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Sample records for progeroid syndrome previously

  1. An unidentified neonatal progeroid syndrome: follow-up report.

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    Wiedemann, H R

    1979-01-18

    Two male infants with a pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome with natal teeth are compared with two very similar female cases reported in the literature and interpreted as congenital progeria. All these cases may represent a separate entity, a previously unrecognized genetic progeroid syndrome.

  2. Marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome: a newly recognized fibrillinopathy.

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    Passarge, Eberhard; Robinson, Peter N; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M

    2016-08-01

    We review six previous reports between 2000 and 2014 of seven unrelated patients with mutations in the FBN1 gene affecting function. All mutations occurred in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A distinctive phenotype consisting of partial manifestations of Marfan syndrome, a progeroid facial appearance, and clinical features of lipodystrophy was present in all individuals. We suggest that this previously unknown genotype/phenotype relationship constitutes a new fibrillinopathy for which the name marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome would be appropriate.

  3. Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2012-04-20

    Apr 20, 2012 ... Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome;. Premature aging;. Milk teeth;. Nail dystrophy;. Cafe´ au lait skin patches. Abstract A female, 26 months old with features supporting the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome was presented. She had prenatal and postnatal growth failure, generalized lipoatrophy.

  4. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

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    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  5. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

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    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  6. From the rarest to the most common: insights from progeroid syndromes into skin cancer and aging.

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    Capell, Brian C; Tlougan, Brook E; Orlow, Seth J

    2009-10-01

    Despite their rarity, diseases of premature aging, or "progeroid" syndromes, have provided important insights into basic mechanisms that may underlie cancer and normal aging. In this review, we highlight these recent developments in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy, ataxia-telangiectasia, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. Though they are caused by different mutations in various genes and often result in quite disparate phenotypes, deciphering the molecular bases of these conditions has served to highlight their underlying basic similarities. Studies of progeroid syndromes, particularly HGPS, the most dramatic form of premature aging, have contributed to our knowledge of fundamental processes of importance to skin biology, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, genome instability, cellular senescence, and stem-cell differentiation.

  7. Genetics and aging; the Werner syndrome as a segmental progeroid syndrome.

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    Martin, G M

    1985-01-01

    The maximum lifespan potential is a constitutional feature of speciation and must be subject to polygenic controls acting both in the domain of development and in the domain of the maintenance of macromolecular integrity. The enormous genetic heterogeneity that characterizes our own species, the complexities of numerous nature-nurture interactions, and the quantitative and qualitative variations of the senescent phenotype that are observed suggest that precise patterns of aging in each of us may be unique. Patterns of aging may also differ sharply among species (for example, semelparous vs. multiparous mammals). Some potential common denominators, however, allow one to identify progeroid syndromes in man that could lead to the elucidation of important pathways of gene action. (The suffix "-oid" means "like"; it does not mean identity.) Unimodal progeroid syndromes (eg., familial dementia of the Alzheimer type, an autosomal dominant) can help us understand the pathogenesis of a particular aspect of the senescent phenotype of man. Segmental progeroid syndromes (eg. the Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive) may be relevant to multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. Some results of research on the Werner syndrome may be interpreted as support for "peripheral" as opposed to "central" theories of aging; they are consistent with the view that gene action in the domain of development (adolescence, in this instance) can set the stage for patterns of aging in the adult; they point to the importance of mesenchymal cell populations in the pathogenesis of age-related disorders; finally, they underscore the role of chromosomal instability, especially in the pathogenesis of neoplasia.

  8. The neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch): a model for the study of human aging?

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    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Ramírez, Nelson; Arboleda, Humberto

    2007-10-01

    The Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS) characterises a premature aging syndrome in which several features of human aging are apparent at birth therefore allowing their grouping as a neonatal progeroid condition. This differentiates WRS from other progeroid entities such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) in which characteristics of premature aging become apparent some time after birth. The etiology of WRS remains unknown. Some studies have observed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Several studies analysing telomere length and lamin A gene have not revealed any alterations. However, mutations in LMNA have been reported in several other atypical progeroid syndromes. Based on these observations, several hypothesis could be withdrawn concerning the etiology of WRS. The study of genes associated with lamin A metabolism, such as Zmpste24, and the metabolic pathways associated with insulin, such as protein kinase B or AKT, are of particular interest. We believe that WRS characteristics indicate that discovery of the gene and the metabolic pathway associated with this syndrome will most likely lead to new knowledge about the physiopathology of human aging.

  9. Redefining the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: report of the fourth patient with B4GALT7 deficiency and review of the literature.

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    Guo, Michael H; Stoler, Joan; Lui, Julian; Nilsson, Ola; Bianchi, Diana W; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Dauber, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Proteoglycans are a component of the extracellular matrix and are critical for cellular and tissue function. Mutations in proteoglycan components and enzymes involved in proteoglycan synthesis have been implicated in several growth disorders, with common features including short stature and skeletal dysplasia. For example, mutations in B4GALT7, a gene whose protein product catalyzes proteoglycan synthesis, have been associated with the rare progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Here, we conducted exome sequencing in a patient with a previously undiagnosed growth disorder and identified compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7. This patient is just the fourth individual with genetically confirmed progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The mutations include a previously characterized c.808C>T p.Arg270Cys substitution, and a novel c.122T>C p.Leu41Pro substitution. We demonstrate that the novel mutation caused decreased levels of the enzyme, supporting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our report identifies a novel mutation in B4GALT7 causing the progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and contributes an extensive phenotypic characterization of a patient with the syndrome. We also reviewed the previous literature in addition to the present patient, and conclude that the key features associated with B4GALT7 deficiency are short stature, developmental anomalies of the forearm bones and elbow, and bowing of the extremities, in addition to the classic features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. This report helps define the phenotype of the progeroid variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and furthers our understanding of the effect of proteoglycan defects in growth disorders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Altered Nuclear Functions in Progeroid Syndromes: a Paradigm for Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndromes of accelerated aging could provide an entry point for identifying and dissecting the cellular pathways that are involved in the development of age-related pathologies in the general population. However, their usefulness for aging research has been controversial, as it has been argued that these diseases do not faithfully reflect the process of natural aging. Here we review recent findings on the molecular basis of two progeroid diseases, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, and highlight functional connections to cellular processes that may contribute to normal aging.

  11. Neonatal progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome with congenital lipodystrophy results from mutations at the 3' end of FBN1 gene.

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    Jacquinet, Adeline; Verloes, Alain; Callewaert, Bert; Coremans, Christine; Coucke, Paul; de Paepe, Anne; Kornak, Uwe; Lebrun, Frederic; Lombet, Jacques; Piérard, Gérald E; Robinson, Peter N; Symoens, Sofie; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Debray, François-Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    We report a 16-year-old girl with neonatal progeroid features and congenital lipodystrophy who was considered at birth as a possible variant of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome. The emergence of additional clinical signs (marfanoid habitus, severe myopia and dilatation of the aortic bulb) lead to consider the diagnosis of the progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome. A de novo donor splice-site mutation (c.8226+1G>A) was identified in FBN1. We show that this mutation leads to exon 64 skipping and to the production of a stable mRNA that should allow synthesis of a truncated profibrillin-1, in which the C-terminal furin cleavage site is altered. FBN1 mutations associated with a similar phenotype have only been reported in four other patients. We confirm the correlation between marfanoid phenotype with congenital lipodystrophy and neonatal progeroid features (marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome) and frameshift mutations at the 3' end of FBN1. This syndrome should be considered in differential diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

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    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. [Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch). A follow-up study].

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    Rautenstrauch, T; Snigula, F; Wiedemann, H R

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS) are: intrauterine and postnatal growth failure, hydrocephalic appearance, prominent scalp veins, old-looking face, absence of subcutaneous fat and neonatal teeth. Until now altogether nine cases have been reported, which were predominant diagnosed in infant age. The NPS is in general assigned to the autosomal recessive trait. With increasing age the outward appearance stays unchanged. The in 1977 under diagnose progeria presented patient is now 16 years old. With her a considerable atactic movement disturbance developed next to a psychomotoric retardation. The change in metabolism of proteoglycane that was remarkable in infant age is now no longer provable.

  14. Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features and lipodystrophy (MDPL) syndrome in the context of inherited lipodystrophies.

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    Reinier, Frederic; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Hanna, David; Smith, Josh D; Valentini, Maria; Zara, Ilenia; Berutti, Riccardo; Sanna, Serena; Oppo, Manuela; Cusano, Roberto; Satta, Rosanna; Montesu, Maria Antonietta; Jones, Chris; Cerimele, Decio; Nickerson, Deborah A; Angius, Andrea; Cucca, Francesco; Cottoni, Francesca; Crisponi, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Lipodystrophies are a large heterogeneous group of genetic or acquired disorders characterized by generalized or partial fat loss, usually associated with metabolic complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. Many efforts have been made in the last years in identifying the genetic etiologies of several lipodystrophy forms, although some remain to be elucidated. We report here the clinical description of a woman with a rare severe lipodystrophic and progeroid syndrome associated with hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes whose genetic bases have been clarified through whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis. This article reports the 5th MDPL (Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome) patient with the same de novo p.S605del mutation in POLD1. We provided further genetic evidence that this is a disease-causing mutation along with a plausible molecular mechanism responsible for this recurring event. Moreover we overviewed the current classification of the inherited forms of lipodystrophy, along with their underlying molecular basis. Progress in the identification of lipodystrophy genes will help in better understanding the role of the pathways involved in the complex physiology of fat. This will lead to new targets towards develop innovative therapeutic strategies for treating the disorder and its metabolic complications, as well as more common forms of adipose tissue redistribution as observed in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome: new case with normal telomere length in skin fibroblasts.

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    Korniszewski, L; Nowak, R; Oknińska-Hoffmann, E; Skórka, A; Gieruszczak-Białek, D; Sawadro-Rochowska, M

    2001-10-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition with characteristic appearance of premature aging present at birth (aged face, natal teeth, and wrinkled skin). Other features of the syndrome are generalized lipoatrophy with specific fat accumulation in the lateral suprabuttock region, hypotrichosis, macrocephaly (pseudohydrocephalus), and mental retardation. We report on a new case that demonstrates all typical features of the syndrome. The girl is now 16 years and 10 months old and has had follow-up from birth. We measured terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length to evaluate whether the patient's premature aging process is accompanied by shortening of telomere length in her cultured fibroblasts. Mean TRF of 13.5 kb found in our patient's fibroblasts is not shortened as compared to that of normal fibroblasts. Our results differ from those observed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. An Xpb mouse model for combined xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome reveals progeroid features upon further attenuation of DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-O. Andressoo (Jaan-Olle); G. Weeda (Geert); J. de Wit (Jan); J.R. Mitchell (James); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); H. van Steeg (Harry); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPatients carrying mutations in the XPB helicase subunit of the basal transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor TFIIH display the combined cancer and developmental-progeroid disorder xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome (XPCS). Due to the dual transcription repair role

  17. ERCC4 variants identified in a cohort of patients with segmental progeroid syndromes.

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    Mori, Takayasu; Yousefzadeh, Matthew J; Faridounnia, Maryam; Chong, Jessica X; Hisama, Fuki M; Hudgins, Louanne; Mercado, Gabriela; Wade, Erin A; Barghouthy, Amira S; Lee, Lin; Martin, George M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Oshima, Junko

    2018-02-01

    Pathogenic variants in genes, which encode DNA repair and damage response proteins, result in a number of genomic instability syndromes with features of accelerated aging. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a protein that forms a complex with ERCC1 and is required for the 5' incision during nucleotide excision repair. ERCC4 is also FANCQ, illustrating a critical role in interstrand crosslink repair. Pathogenic variants in this gene cause xeroderma pigmentosum, XFE progeroid syndrome, Cockayne syndrome (CS), and Fanconi anemia. We performed massive parallel sequencing for 42 unsolved cases submitted to the International Registry of Werner Syndrome. Two cases, each carrying two novel heterozygous ERCC4 variants, were identified. The first case was a compound heterozygote for: c.2395C > T (p.Arg799Trp) and c.388+1164_792+795del (p.Gly130Aspfs*18). Further molecular and cellular studies indicated that the ERCC4 variants in this patient are responsible for a phenotype consistent with a variant of CS. The second case was heterozygous for two variants in cis: c.[1488A > T; c.2579C > A] (p.[Gln496His; Ala860Asp]). While the second case also had several phenotypic features of accelerated aging, we were unable to provide biological evidence supporting the pathogenic roles of the associated ERCC4 variants. Precise genetic causes and disease mechanism of the second case remains to be determined. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A progeroid syndrome with neonatal presentation and long survival maps to 19p13.3p13.2.

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    Akawi, Nadia; Ali, Bassam; Al Gazali, Lihadh

    2013-07-01

    We report on a Palestinian family with three affected individuals exhibiting progeroid syndrome characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, a progeroid appearance, failure to thrive, short stature, and hypotonia. The progeroid features were evident at birth. All the affected members of this family have survived beyond the neonatal period and one of them is currently a 27-year-old adult. As parental consanguinity suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, we employed homozygosity mapping using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays followed by next generation whole exome sequencing to identify the disease-causing gene. We were able to identify a single block of homozygosity shared between all the affected members of the studied family spanning 2.3 Mb on chromosome 19p13.3p13.2. However, Sanger sequencing of known genes and whole exome sequencing of the three affected sibs did not reveal a convincing causal mutation. These findings are anticipated to open the way for the identification of the molecular causes underlying this syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Progeroid syndrome patients with ZMPSTE24 deficiency could benefit when treated with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide

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    Akinci, Baris; Sankella, Shireesha; Gilpin, Christopher; Ozono, Keiichi; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with progeroid syndromes such as mandibuloacral dysplasia, type B (MADB) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) harbor mutations in zinc metalloproteinase (ZMPSTE24), an enzyme essential for posttranslational proteolysis of prelamin A to form mature lamin A. Dermal fibroblasts from these patients show increased nuclear dysmorphology and reduced proliferation; however, the efficacy of various pharmacological agents in reversing these cellular phenotypes remains unknown. In this study, fibroblasts from MADB patients exhibited marked nuclear abnormalities and reduced proliferation that improved upon treatment with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide but not with other agents, including farnesyl transferase inhibitors. Surprisingly, fibroblasts from an RD patient with a homozygous null mutation in ZMPSTE24, resulting in exclusive accumulation of prelamin A with no lamin A on immunoblotting of cellular lysate, exhibited few nuclear abnormalities and near-normal cellular proliferation. An unbiased proteomic analysis of the cellular lysate from RD fibroblasts revealed a lack of processing of vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein. Interestingly, the assembly of the vimentin microfibrils in MADB fibroblasts improved with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide. We conclude that rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide are beneficial for improving nuclear morphology and cell proliferation of MADB fibroblasts. Data from a single RD patient's fibroblasts also suggest that prelamin A accumulation by itself might not be detrimental and requires additional alterations at the cellular level to manifest the phenotype. PMID:28050601

  20. A novel syndrome of mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, and progeroid features associated with lipodystrophy, undescended testes, and male hypogonadism.

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    Shastry, Savitha; Simha, Vinaya; Godbole, Koumudi; Sbraccia, Paolo; Melancon, Serge; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Novelli, Giuseppe; Kroiss, Matthias; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2010-10-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is an autosomal recessive progeroid disorder associated with type A (partial) or B (generalized) lipodystrophy and is due to mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) or zinc metalloproteinase (ZMPSTE24) genes. The objective of the study was to report a novel syndrome with some overlapping features with MAD. We report seven patients with mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features (MDP), and associated lipodystrophy. These patients have similar features to MAD patients such as hypoplastic mandible, beaked nose, stiff joints, and sclerodermatous skin. However, the patients did not harbor any disease causing variants in LMNA or ZMPSTE24 and showed distinct characteristics such as sensorineural hearing loss and absence of clavicular hypoplasia and acroosteolysis. All males with MDP had undescended testes and were hypogonadal. One adult female showed lack of breast development. Skinfold thickness, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for body fat distribution revealed a lack of lipodystrophy in a prepubertal female but a progressive loss of sc fat presenting with partial lipodystrophy in young adults and generalized lipodystrophy in older patients. Patients with MDP syndrome have a few overlapping but some distinct clinical features as compared with MAD, suggesting that it is a novel syndrome. The molecular basis of MDP syndrome remains to be elucidated.

  1. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

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    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  2. Reversal of mitochondrial defects with CSB-dependent serine protease inhibitors in patient cells of the progeroid Cockayne syndrome.

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    Chatre, Laurent; Biard, Denis S F; Sarasin, Alain; Ricchetti, Miria

    2015-06-02

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are human disorders caused by CSA or CSB gene mutations; both conditions cause defective transcription-coupled repair and photosensitivity. Patients with CS also display neurological and developmental abnormalities and dramatic premature aging, and their cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress. We report CSA/CSB-dependent depletion of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ catalytic subunit (POLG1), due to HTRA3 serine protease accumulation in CS, but not in UV(s)S or control fibroblasts. Inhibition of serine proteases restored physiological POLG1 levels in either CS fibroblasts and in CSB-silenced cells. Moreover, patient-derived CS cells displayed greater nitroso-redox imbalance than UV(S)S cells. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite normalized HTRA3 and POLG1 levels in CS cells, and notably, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was altered in CS cells. These data reveal critical deregulation of proteases potentially linked to progeroid phenotypes in CS, and our results suggest rescue strategies as a therapeutic option.

  3. The cerebro-morphological fingerprint of a progeroid syndrome: white matter changes correlate with neurological symptoms in xeroderma pigmentosum.

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    Jan Kassubek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes, in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy ((1H MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, (1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. CONCLUSIONS: The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients.

  4. The Cerebro-Morphological Fingerprint of a Progeroid Syndrome: White Matter Changes Correlate with Neurological Symptoms in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

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    Kassubek, Jan; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Pinkhardt, Elmar H.; Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Ludolph, Albert C.; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes), in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy (1H MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, 1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. Conclusions The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients. PMID:22363517

  5. Exome sequencing reveals a de novo POLD1 mutation causing phenotypic variability in mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL).

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    Elouej, Sahar; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Caswell, Richard; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian; Desvignes, Jean Pierre; Béroud, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Mohammed, Shehla; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2017-06-01

    Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance and metabolic abnormalities. This syndrome is caused by heterozygous de novo mutations in the POLD1 gene. To date, 19 patients with MDPL have been reported in the literature and among them 14 patients have been characterized at the molecular level. Twelve unrelated patients carried a recurrent in-frame deletion of a single codon (p.Ser605del) and two other patients carried a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 13 (p.Arg507Cys). Additionally and interestingly, germline mutations of the same gene have been involved in familial polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. We describe a male and a female patient with MDPL respectively affected with mild and severe phenotypes. Both of them showed mandibular hypoplasia, a beaked nose with bird-like facies, prominent eyes, a small mouth, growth retardation, muscle and skin atrophy, but the female patient showed such a severe and early phenotype that a first working diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria was made. The exploration was performed by direct sequencing of POLD1 gene exon 15 in the male patient with a classical MDPL phenotype and by whole exome sequencing in the female patient and her unaffected parents. Exome sequencing identified in the latter patient a de novo heterozygous undescribed mutation in the POLD1 gene (NM_002691.3: c.3209T>A), predicted to cause the missense change p.Ile1070Asn in the ZnF2 (Zinc Finger 2) domain of the protein. This mutation was not reported in the 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP and Exome sequencing databases. Furthermore, the Isoleucine1070 residue of POLD1 is highly conserved among various species, suggesting that this substitution may cause a major impairment of POLD1 activity. For the second patient, affected with a typical MDPL phenotype, direct sequencing

  6. Transient progeroid phenotype and lipodystrophy in mosaic polyploidy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karteszi, J.; Kosztolanyi, G.Y.; Czako, M.; Hadzsiev, K.; Morava, E.

    2006-01-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder with a progressive course and early lethality. Severe mental and growth retardation, muscle hypotonia, a progeroid face, wrinkled skin, relative macrocephaly with late closure of the anterior fontanel, arachnodactyly and congenital heart defects

  7. Antenatal diagnosis of Patau syndrome with previous anomalous baby

    OpenAIRE

    Keerthi Kocherla; Vasantha Kocherla

    2014-01-01

    Patau syndrome is the least common and most severe of the viable autosomal trisomies with median survival of fewer than 3 days was first identified as a cytogenetic syndrome in 1960. Patau syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome 13. In this case report, we present antenatal imaging findings and gross foetal specimen correlation of foetus with Patau syndrome confirmed by karyotyping in third gravida who had significant previous obstetric history of gastrochisis in monochorionic and...

  8. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Natural Course of Neonatal Progeroid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: Increased chromosomal breakage and the presence of basal ganglia calcification after early childhood suggest that DNA repair defects are involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. This rare disorder represents a complex of symptoms with unknown cause and pathogenesis, and more than one disease may account for the clinical variability of NPS.

  10. Embryonic expression of the common progeroid lamin A splice mutation arrests postnatal skin development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Tomás; Rosengardten, Ylva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Baek, Jean-Ha; Grochová, Diana; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) are two laminopathies caused by mutations leading to cellular accumulation of prelamin A or one of its truncated forms, progerin. One proposed mechanism for the more severe symptoms in patients with RD compared with HGPS is that higher levels of farnesylated lamin A are produced in RD. Here, we show evidence in support of that hypothesis. Overexpression of the most common progeroid lamin A mutation (LMNA c.1824C>T, p.G608G) during skin development results in a severe phenotype, characterized by dry scaly skin. At postnatal day 5 (PD5), progeroid animals showed a hyperplastic epidermis, disorganized sebaceous glands and an acute inflammatory dermal response, also involving the hypodermal fat layer. PD5 animals also showed an upregulation of multiple inflammatory response genes and an activated NF-kB target pathway. Careful analysis of the interfollicular epidermis showed aberrant expression of the lamin B receptor (LBR) in the suprabasal layer. Prolonged expression of LBR, in 14.06% of the cells, likely contributes to the observed arrest of skin development, clearly evident at PD4 when the skin had developed into single-layer epithelium in the wild-type animals while progeroid animals still had the multilayered appearance typical for skin at PD3. Suprabasal cells expressing LBR showed altered DNA distribution, suggesting the induction of gene expression changes. Despite the formation of a functional epidermal barrier and proven functionality of the gap junctions, progeroid animals displayed a greater rate of water loss as compared with wild-type littermates and died within the first two postnatal weeks. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Serologic Evidence of Previous Campylobacter jejuni Infection in Patients with the Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-15

    Guillain - Barre syndrome . N Engl J Med.1992;326: ular serotype of C. jejuni , Penner type 019, was asso- 1130-6. ciated with...51. with the Guillain -Barrd syndrome who had previous 15. Ropper AN. Campylobacter diarrhea and Guillain - Barre syndrome . C. jejuni infection...with the Guillain - Barre 90PP0820 Syndrome Ban Mishu, M.D.; Amjad A. Ilyas, Ph.D.; Carol L. Koski, M.D.; Francine Vriesendorp, M.D.; Stuart D. Cook,

  12. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg1 38 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Bjoern; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E.; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L.; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D.; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Krueger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E.; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively,

  13. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  14. Small cell carcinoma: arising in Lynch syndrome: a previously undocumented occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Sarah A; Ballinger, Lori; Cerilli, Lisa A

    2009-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is a genetic cancer predisposition syndrome caused by an inherited defect in 1 of 4 DNA mismatch repair genes (mutL homolog 1, mutS homolog 2, mutS homolog 6, and postmeiotic segregation 2). Despite the theoretically increased risk in all tissues, Lynch syndrome exhibits tissue specificity, with a particular tendency among affected individuals to develop colorectal and endometrial cancer at a young age. A number of other malignancies, including those derived from the ovary, stomach, small bowel, and urothelium, have also been linked to this syndrome. A growing body of evidence exists to support an association between mismatch repair mutations and a growing spectrum of hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer-associated neoplasms. In this article, a previously undocumented mismatch repair-related malignancy in a patient with Lynch syndrome is reported.

  15. Down syndrome screening marker levels in women with a previous aneuploidy pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuckle, Howard S; Spencer, K; Nicolaides, K H

    2005-01-01

    In Down syndrome screening programmes, women with a previous affected pregnancy are assumed to have the same marker distribution as those without a family history. This assumption needs to be tested. Information on previous aneuploidy pregnancies was routinely sought on the test request forms in three centres, Leeds, Romford and the Fetal Medicine Centre, London. For each woman with a previous aneuploidy (case), five unaffected pregnancies to women without a history were selected as controls. The markers tested included maternal serum free beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), alpha-fetoprotein, unconjugated estriol and ultrasound nuchal translucency thickness. There were 375 cases: 303 with previous Down syndrome, 63 with Edwards syndrome and 9 with Patau's syndrome. There was a statistically significant difference between cases and controls, in the distribution of free beta-hCG and PAPP-A levels, adjusted for gestation. On average, free beta-hCG was increased by 10% in a subsequent pregnancy after aneuploidy (p pregnancies are available for study, it would be prudent to assume that the same increase as in unaffected pregnancies applies. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and a possible medical syndrome previously linked to chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ardesheer; Ponniah, Kathryn; Strug, Lisa J; Hodge, Susan E; Fyer, Abby J; Weissman, Myrna M

    2008-03-15

    Several studies have identified increased medical problems among individuals with panic disorder (PD). We previously found that specific conditions--interstitial cystitis (IC), mitral valve prolapse (MVP), migraines, and thyroid disorders--aggregated non-randomly among panic families (we called this the "PD syndrome") and that families with and without the syndrome were genetically distinguishable on chromosome 13. We present data from a new case-control study that replicates and extends the syndrome phenotype clinically. Probands with a definite diagnosis and family history of PD (n=219), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=199), or both (n=173) and 102 control subjects with no personal/family history of anxiety were interviewed with the SADS-LA diagnostic instrument. Medical history was obtained via medical checklist and the family history screen; IC symptoms were assessed with criteria developed by the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Subjects and interviewers were unaware of the syndrome hypothesis; final best-estimate diagnoses were blind to syndrome data. Probands with PD or SAD, as compared with control subjects, were five or more times as likely to report IC symptoms and twice as likely to report MVP and migraines (other genitourinary and cardiovascular problems were not elevated). First-degree relatives of probands with PD or SAD were also at increased risk for IC, MVP, thyroid problems, and headaches, regardless of whether the proband reported the same condition. These findings are consistent with previous data supporting a PD syndrome and further suggest that this syndrome might include other anxiety disorders well.

  17. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  18. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. A report of six new cases and a summary of previous reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Narváez, Carla; Mola Gilbert, Montserrat; Batlle de Santiago, Enric; Bigas Farreres, Jordi; Giné Serven, Eloy; Cañete Crespillo, Josep

    2016-03-02

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a medical condition which was identified for the first time in 2004 and affects chronic users of cannabis. It is characterized by cyclic episodes of uncontrollable vomiting as well as compulsive bathing in hot water. The episodes have a duration of two to four days. The vomiting is recognizable by a lack of response to regular antiemetic treatment, and subsides only with cannabis abstinence, reappearing in periods of consumption of this substance. The etiology of this syndrome is unknown. Up until June 2014, 83 cases of CHS were published worldwide, four of them in Spain.The first patient of CHS at Mataró Hospital was diagnosed in 2012. Since then, five new cases have been identified. The average duration between the onset of acute CHS episodes and diagnosis is 6.1 years, similar to that observed in previously published cases, an average of 3.1 years. This "delay" of CHS diagnosis demonstrates a lack of awareness with respect to this medical condition in the healthcare profession.With the objective of providing information concerning CHS and facilitating its timely diagnosis, a series of six new cases of CHS diagnosed in Mataró Hospital is presented along with a summary of cases published between 2004 and June 2014.

  19. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome features in patients previously treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd D Joustra

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patients treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA with suprasellar extension show disturbed sleep characteristics, possibly related to hypothalamic dysfunction. In addition to hypopituitarism, both structural hypothalamic damage and sleep restriction per se are associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with NFMA is not well established. Our objective was to study the prevalence and risk factors for (components of the metabolic syndrome in patients treated for NFMA. DESIGN: The metabolic syndrome (NCEP-ATP III criteria was studied in an unselected cohort of 145 NFMA patients (aged 26-88yr, 44% female in long-term remission after treatment, receiving adequate stable hormone replacement for any pituitary deficiencies. The results were compared to population data of 63,995 Dutch inhabitants by standardization (LifeLines cohort study. RESULTS: NFMA patients showed increased risk for reduced HDL-cholesterol (SMR 1.59, 95% CI 1.13-2.11, increased triglyceride levels (SMR 2.31, 95% CI 1.78-2.90 and the metabolic syndrome (SMR 1.60, 95% CI 1.22-2.02, but not for increased blood pressure, waist circumference or hyperglycemia. Preoperative visual field defects independently affected the risk for increased blood pressure (OR 6.5, 95% CI 1.9-22.2, and hypopituitarism was associated with a body mass index - dependent risk for increased waist circumference (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2 and the metabolic syndrome (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated for NFMA are increased at risk for developing the metabolic syndrome, mainly due to decreased HDL-cholesterol and increased triglycerides. Risk factors included hypopituitarism and preoperative visual field defects. Hypothalamic dysfunction may explain the metabolic abnormalities, in addition to intrinsic imperfections of hormone replacement therapy. Additional research is required to explore the relation between

  20. Standardized multidisciplinary evaluation yields significant previously undiagnosed morbidity in adult women with Turner syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freriks, K.; Timmermans, J.; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Verhaak, C.M.; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Otten, B.J.; Braat, D.D.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Kunst, D.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Besides short stature and gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome (TS) is associated with various abnormalities. Adults with TS have a reduced life expectancy, mainly related to structural abnormalities of the heart and aorta, and an increased risk of atherosclerosis. OBJECTIVE: Our objective

  1. Angiosarcoma in previously irradiated breast in patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oséias Vargas Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and high penetrance that defines a 50% chance of developing cancer before the age of 30 years, including cases of breast sarcoma. Patients with this syndrome who require radiotherapy have an increased risk of developing secondary malignancies including angiosarcomas. CASE REPORT: This was a case report on a female patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. In October 2005, she was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast and underwent sectorectomy. She then received chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Trastuzumab and tamoxifen were also part of the treatment. She recently sought care at our hospital, complaining of hyperemia and nodulation in the right breast, and underwent surgical resection that revealed epithelioid angiosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: When genetic predisposition due to Li-Fraumeni syndrome is documented, the therapy should be adapted so as to minimize the risk. Thus, conservative surgical treatments should be avoided and mastectomy without radiation should be prioritized. In cases in which use of radiotherapy is justified, patients should be followed up intensively.

  2. High prevalence of genetic variants previously associated with LQT syndrome in new exome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Lena; Holst, Anders G; Sadjadieh, Golnaz

    2012-01-01

    To date, hundreds of variants in 13 genes have been associated with long QT syndrome (LQTS). The prevalence of LQTS is estimated to be between 1:2000 and 1:5000. The knowledge of genetic variation in the general population has until recently been limited, but newly published data from NHLBI GO...

  3. An infant with large fontanelles, aplasia cutis congenita, tessier facial cleft, polydactyly inversus, and toe syndactyly: a previously undescribed syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jessica; Delk, Paula; Farrow, Emily; Griffith, Christopher; Lah, Melissa; Weaver, David D

    2015-04-01

    We report on a 5-month-old female with large and widely spaced anterior and posterior fontanelles, aplasia cutis congenita, Tessier 3 oblique facial cleft, polydactyly, and syndactyly of toes. The polydactyly is unusual as an accessory finger is attached to the left fifth finger with mirrored, end-to-end fusion. We are naming this anomaly "polydactyly inversus." The infant appears to have a previously unreported syndrome of unknown cause. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Association between serum uric acid, metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria in previously untreated essential hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Enrique; Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco; Costa, José A; González, Carmen; Miralles, Amparo; Moral, Desamparados; Pascual, José María

    2009-01-17

    The aim of the study was to assess the association of serum uric acid levels with microalbuminuria -urinary albumin excretion (UAE)> or = 30mg/24h-. Cross-sectional study in 429 (220 women) hypertensive, non diabetic, never treated patients (mean age: 47 years) with glomerular filtration rate > or =60ml/min/1.73m(2). The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 20.5%; 18% had hyperuricemia and 47% fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome (MS). Baseline UAE correlated in the unvaried analysis to diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and uric acid. In multiple linear regression models, only MS (beta=0.113; p=0.03), and serum uric acid values (beta=0.04; p=0.05) were independently associated with logUAE, after adjustment for age and sex. Hyperuricemia (serum uric acid level > or =7.0mg/dl for men and > or =6.5mg/dl for women; odds ratio=2.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.92; p=0.010), and MS (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.53; p=0.002) were independently associated with a higher risk of microalbuminuria in multiple logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 45.8% in patients with coexistent MS and hyperuricemia, as compared to 13.6% in hypertensive patients without it (p<0.001). In patients with concomitant MS and hyperuricemia the probability of being microalbuminuric was 3.7 times higher than in patients without those factors. Serum uric acid level is associated with microalbuminuria. Coexistence of MS and hyperuricemia in hypertensive patients increases almost 4 times the odds of being microalbuminuric.

  5. Transcriptional profiling reveals progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice as a model system for glomerular aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Schumacher (Björn); V. Bartels (Valerie); P. Frommolt (Peter); B. Habermann (Bianca); F. Braun (Fabian); J.L. Schultze (Joachim); M. Roodbergen (Marianne); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Nürnberg (Peter); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); T. Benzing (Thomas); R.-U. Müller (Roman-Ulrich); C.E. Kurschat (Christine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Aging-related kidney diseases are a major health concern. Currently, models to study renal aging are lacking. Due to a reduced life-span progeroid models hold the promise to facilitate aging studies and allow examination of tissue-specific changes. Defects in genome

  6. Marshall-Smith syndrome: Novel pathogenic variant and previously unreported associations with precocious puberty and aortic root dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anjali; Nguyen, Joanne; Rivera-Davila, Michelle; Rodriguez-Buritica, David

    2017-07-01

    Marshall-Smith Syndrome (MRSHSS) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by failure to thrive and characteristic dysmorphic features associated with accelerated osseous maturation. We present a nine-year-old girl who was diagnosed with MRSHSS based on characteristic clinical features supported by the identification of a novel de novo pathogenic variant in the NFIX gene. The patient also presented with precocious puberty diagnosed at five years of age and had an abnormal GnRH stimulation test indicative of central precocious puberty. Central precocious puberty has not been described in association with MRSHSS previously in the medical literature and broadens our knowledge of the natural history of MRSHSS. The causes of advanced bone age in this syndrome are also reviewed. Additionally, the patient showed progressive dilatation of the aortic root. Although connective tissue abnormalities have been described in association with MRSHSS, aortic root dilatation has not. Understanding the mechanism of comorbidities such as advanced bone age and aortic root dilatation in MRSHSS patients enables future development of anticipatory guidance, preventative care measures, and treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Isochromosome 15q of maternal origin in two Prader-Willi syndrome patients previously diagnosed erroneously as cytogenetic deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinji; Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Mutirangura, A.; Kuwano, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Since a previous report on two Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients with t(15q;15q) was erroneous, the authors report new data and a corrected interpretation. Reexamination of the parental origin of their t(15q;15q) using polymorphic DNA markers that are mapped to various regions of 15q documented no molecular deletions at the 15q11-q13 region in either patient. Both patients were homozygous at all loci examined and their haplotypes on 15q coincided with one of those in their respective mothers. These results indicate that the presumed t(15q;15q) in each patient was actually an isochromosome 15q producing maternal uniparental disomy, consistent with genomic imprinting at the PWS locus. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Somatic Cough Syndrome (Previously Referred to as Psychogenic Cough) and Tic Cough (Previously Referred to as Habit Cough) in Adults and Children: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigan, Anne E; Murad, Mohammad H; Pringsheim, Tamara; Feinstein, Anthony; Chang, Anne B; Newcombe, Peter A; Rubin, Bruce K; McGarvey, Lorcan P; Weir, Kelly; Altman, Kenneth W; Weinberger, Miles; Irwin, Richard S; Adams, Todd M; Altman, Kenneth W; Barker, Alan F; Birring, Surinder S; Blackhall, Fiona; Bolser, Donald C; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Braman, Sidney S; Brightling, Christopher; Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla; Canning, Brendan J; Chang, Anne B; Coeytaux, Remy; Cowley, Terrie; Davenport, Paul; Diekemper, Rebecca L; Ebihara, Satoru; El Solh, Ali A; Escalante, Patricio; Feinstein, Anthony; Field, Stephen K; Fisher, Dina; French, Cynthia T; Gibson, Peter; Gold, Philip; Gould, Michael K; Grant, Cameron; Harding, Susan M; Harnden, Anthony; Hill, Adam T; Irwin, Richard S; Kahrilas, Peter J; Keogh, Karina A; Lane, Andrew P; Lim, Kaiser; Malesker, Mark A; Mazzone, Peter; Mazzone, Stuart; McCrory, Douglas C; McGarvey, Lorcan; Molasiotis, Alex; Murad, M Hassan; Newcombe, Peter; Nguyen, Huong Q; Oppenheimer, John; Prezant, David; Pringsheim, Tamara; Restrepo, Marcos I; Rosen, Mark; Rubin, Bruce; Ryu, Jay H; Smith, Jaclyn; Tarlo, Susan M; Vertigan, Anne E; Wang, Gang; Weinberger, Miles; Weir, Kelly; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review on the management of psychogenic cough, habit cough, and tic cough to update the recommendations and suggestions of the 2006 guideline on this topic. We followed the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) methodologic guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation framework. The Expert Cough Panel based their recommendations on data from the systematic review, patients' values and preferences, and the clinical context. Final grading was reached by consensus according to Delphi methodology. The results of the systematic review revealed only low-quality evidence to support how to define or diagnose psychogenic or habit cough with no validated diagnostic criteria. With respect to treatment, low-quality evidence allowed the committee to only suggest therapy for children believed to have psychogenic cough. Such therapy might consist of nonpharmacologic trials of hypnosis or suggestion therapy, or combinations of reassurance, counseling, and referral to a psychologist, psychotherapy, and appropriate psychotropic medications. Based on multiple resources and contemporary psychologic, psychiatric, and neurologic criteria (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition and tic disorder guidelines), the committee suggests that the terms psychogenic and habit cough are out of date and inaccurate. Compared with the 2006 CHEST Cough Guidelines, the major change in suggestions is that the terms psychogenic and habit cough be abandoned in favor of somatic cough syndrome and tic cough, respectively, even though the evidence to do so at this time is of low quality.

  9. Progesterone after previous preterm birth for prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (PROGRESS): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Crowther, Caroline A; McPhee, Andrew J; Flenady, Vicki; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-24

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, as a consequence of preterm birth, is a major cause of early mortality and morbidity during infancy and childhood. Survivors of preterm birth continue to remain at considerable risk of both chronic lung disease and long-term neurological handicap. Progesterone is involved in the maintenance of uterine quiescence through modulation of the calcium-calmodulin-myosin-light-chain-kinase system in smooth muscle cells. The withdrawal of progesterone, either actual or functional is thought to be an antecedent to the onset of labour. While there have been recent reports of progesterone supplementation for women at risk of preterm birth which show promise in this intervention, there is currently insufficient data on clinically important outcomes for both women and infants to enable informed clinical decision-making. The aims of this randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial are to assess whether the use of vaginal progesterone pessaries in women with a history of previous spontaneous preterm birth will reduce the risk and severity of respiratory distress syndrome, so improving their infant's health, without increasing maternal risks. Multicentered randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. pregnant women with a live fetus, and a history of prior preterm birth at less than 37 weeks gestation and greater than 20 weeks gestation in the immediately preceding pregnancy, where onset of labour occurred spontaneously, or in association with cervical incompetence, or following preterm prelabour ruptured membranes. Trial Entry & Randomisation: After obtaining written informed consent, eligible women will be randomised between 18 and 23+6 weeks gestation using a central telephone randomisation service. The randomisation schedule prepared by non clinical research staff will use balanced variable blocks, with stratification according to plurality of the pregnancy and centre where planned to give birth. Eligible women will be

  10. Progesterone after previous preterm birth for prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (PROGRESS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flenady Vicki

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, as a consequence of preterm birth, is a major cause of early mortality and morbidity during infancy and childhood. Survivors of preterm birth continue to remain at considerable risk of both chronic lung disease and long-term neurological handicap. Progesterone is involved in the maintenance of uterine quiescence through modulation of the calcium-calmodulin-myosin-light-chain-kinase system in smooth muscle cells. The withdrawal of progesterone, either actual or functional is thought to be an antecedent to the onset of labour. While there have been recent reports of progesterone supplementation for women at risk of preterm birth which show promise in this intervention, there is currently insufficient data on clinically important outcomes for both women and infants to enable informed clinical decision-making. The aims of this randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial are to assess whether the use of vaginal progesterone pessaries in women with a history of previous spontaneous preterm birth will reduce the risk and severity of respiratory distress syndrome, so improving their infant's health, without increasing maternal risks. Methods Design: Multicentred randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Inclusion Criteria: pregnant women with a live fetus, and a history of prior preterm birth at less than 37 weeks gestation and greater than 20 weeks gestation in the immediately preceding pregnancy, where onset of labour occurred spontaneously, or in association with cervical incompetence, or following preterm prelabour ruptured membranes. Trial Entry & Randomisation: After obtaining written informed consent, eligible women will be randomised between 18 and 23+6 weeks gestation using a central telephone randomisation service. The randomisation schedule prepared by non clinical research staff will use balanced variable blocks, with stratification according to plurality of the

  11. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  12. DNA Damage Accumulation and TRF2 Degradation in Atypical Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidisha eSaha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome (AWS, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, -H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Strain #22 Isolated from a Patient with Short Bowel Syndrome and Previous d-Lactic Acidosis and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domann, Eugen; Fischer, Florence; Glowatzki, Fabian; Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Hain, Torsten; Zechel-Gran, Silke; Giffhorn-Katz, Susanne; Neubauer, Bernd A

    2016-07-28

    d-Lactic acidosis with associated encephalopathy caused by overgrowth of intestinal lactic acid bacteria is a rarely diagnosed neurological complication of patients with short bowel syndrome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii strain #22 isolated from a patient with short bowel syndrome and previous d-lactic acidosis/encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 Domann et al.

  14. The previous use of digoxin does not worsen early outcome of acute coronary syndromes: an analysis of the ARIAM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rubira, Juan Carlos; Calvo-Taracido, Manuel; Francisco-Aparicio, Francisca; Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Reina Toral, Antonio; Aramburu-Bodas, Oscar; Gallego García de Vinuesa, Pastora; Cruz Fernández, José Maria; Alcántara, Angel Garcia; Hidalgo-Urbano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the previous use of digoxin on the hospital mortality and complications of patients admitted because of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We analyzed the data of patients included in the ARIAM-Andalucia Registry, which involves 49 hospitals in Andalucia, Spain, from 2007 to 2012. Patients on digoxin treatment prior to their admission because of ACS constituted the digoxin group (DG), and were compared with the group of patients not on digoxin. Logistic regression and propensity score matching were used to analyze the differences. We included 20,331 patients, of whom 244 (1.2%) were on digoxin. DG patients were older (73.1 vs 63.7 years old), more often women, and had more diabetes, hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, obstructive pulmonary disease or kidney disease. On univariate analysis, DG patients had significantly higher hospital mortality (13.5 vs 5.3% P digoxin was not associated with an increase in dysrhythmic complications nor was an independent predictor of mortality during hospitalization.

  15. Analgesic Effect of Botulinum Toxin A in Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients Previously Treated with Local Infiltration of Anesthetic and Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sevilla, Joaquín; García-Fernández, María R; Vicente-Villena, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) who were previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids (LIAS). The study included a retrospective phase and a longitudinal open-label prospective phase, which were conducted on consecutive patients with MPS previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic (levobupivacaíne 0.25%) and steroids (triamcinolone 40 mg). Eligible patients were treated with a single intramuscular injection of BoNTA (Botox; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA). The treatment efficacy was determined according to the degree of pain relief obtained. Eighty-two patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the study. Successful results were obtained for 32 (39.0%) and 30 (36.6%) patients, during treatment with BoNTA and LIAS, respectively. The mean (standard deviation) length of the analgesic effect was significantly longer with BoNTA (29.6 [SD = 17.7] weeks) than with LIAS (8.5 [SD = 6.4] weeks), P pain for a relatively long time.

  16. Characterization of a New Disease Syndrome Associated with Porcine Circovirus Type 2 in Previously Vaccinated Herds▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino-Ozuna, Ada G.; Henry, Steven; Hesse, Richard; Nietfeld, Jerome C.; Bai, Jianfa; Scott, H. Morgan; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD) encompasses a group of wasting syndromes linked to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). This paper describes a new PCV2 disease syndrome, called acute pulmonary edema (APE), which, unlike other PCVAD syndromes, has a peracute onset and is associated with herds vaccinated for PCV2. PMID:21346043

  17. Longitudinal determination of antiphospholipid antibodies in lupus patients without previous manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bandt, M; Benali, K; Guillevin, L; Hachulla, E; Job, C; Fautrel, B; Fournié, G; Bonnet, C; Fournié, B; Le Goff, P; Jorgensen, C; Meyer, O

    1999-01-01

    To investigate whether serial anticardiolipin determination contributes to the clinical management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with no previous sign of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). In 90 patients with SLE with no previous clinical manifestations of the APS, repeated clinical evaluations were performed, and serial blood samples (obtained over a 30 month period, range 13-53 mo) were screened for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were detected using an ELISA and considered positive if the result was >25 GPL on 2 separate occasions. Patients were not required to be on a specific treatment regimen during the study. Thirty-four patients (37%) had at least one positive ELISA and 11 (11/90, 12%) 2 positive ELISA for IgG aCL during the study. Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) was found in 16 patients, and a false positive VDRL in 5. At study completion, the total number of clinical or laboratory events associated with APS was 30. In univariate analysis, aCL was significantly associated only with LAC (paCL also correlated with hemoglobin level, anti-DNA antibody, leukocyte count, and the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). LAC and aCL were significantly associated with each other (OR 5.17; 95% CI 1.5-17.7), but LAC had a better positive predictive value than aCL for arterial thrombosis and neurological events. Among our patients with SLE without previous clinical manifestations of APS, positive aCL did not predict the occurrence of APS within the next 3 years, but was statistically related to the clinical disease activity (SLEDAI).

  18. Is a previous diagnosis of asthma a reliable criterion for asthma–COPD overlap syndrome in a patient with COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrecheguren, Miriam; Román-Rodríguez, Miguel; Miravitlles, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients share characteristics of both COPD and asthma. As yet, there is no gold standard to identify patients with the so-called asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Objective To describe the differences between ACOS patients and the remaining COPD patients, and to compare the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with ACOS by two different criteria: previous diagnosis of asthma before the age of 40 years; and the diagnostic criteria of the Spanish guidelines of COPD. Methods Multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study performed in 3,125 COPD patients recruited in primary care and specialized outpatient clinics. Patients with COPD and a history of asthma before the age of 40 years were diagnosed with ACOS and compared to the remaining COPD patients. Subsequently, ACOS patients were subdivided based on whether they fulfilled the Spanish guidelines of the COPD diagnostic criteria or not, and they were compared. Results ACOS was diagnosed in 15.9% of the patients. These patients had different basal characteristics compared to the remaining COPD patients, including a higher frequency of women and more exacerbations despite lower tobacco exposure and better lung function. They were more likely to have features of asthma, such as a positive bronchodilator test, higher peripheral eosinophilia, and higher total immunoglobulin E. Within the ACOS group, only one-third fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of the Spanish guidelines of COPD; these individuals were not significantly different from the remaining ACOS patients, except for having more exacerbations and poorer lung function. Conclusion ACOS patients diagnosed on the basis of a previous diagnosis of asthma differed from the remaining COPD patients, but they were similar to ACOS patients diagnosed according to more restrictive criteria, suggesting that a history of asthma before the age of 40 years could be a useful criterion to suspect ACOS in a patient with COPD. PMID:26366067

  19. The risk of pain syndrome affecting a previously non-painful limb following trauma or surgery in patients with a history of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satteson, Ellen S; Harbour, Patrick W; Koman, L Andrew; Smith, Beth P; Li, Zhongyu

    2017-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a challenging complication after surgery or trauma. This study sought to determine the incidence of CRPS after a second inciting event in a previously unaffected extremity in patients with a history of an ongoing CRPS diagnosis in another extremity. A retrospective review identified patients with CRPS seen in clinic over a 20-month period. The incidence of CRPS after subsequent surgery or injury in a previous unaffected extremity was determined and compared to an average incidence reported in the literature. Ninety-three patients had a diagnosis of primary CRPS. Nineteen (20.4%) developed CRPS in one or more additional extremity compared to the incidence of 23.4 per 100,000 (0.0234%) in the literature (odds ratio 1069.6, pCRPS compared to a CRPS incidence rate of 6.4% following distal radius fracture, as determined by literature review (odds ratio 11.7, phistory of CRPS are more likely to develop secondary CRPS compared to the rates reported in the literature among the general population. Patients with a history of CRPS should be counselled that they may be at risk for developing secondary CRPS if they undergo surgery or sustain trauma to another extremity. Copyright © 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeedi, Rafid Fayadh; Abdullatef, Waleed Khalid; Dabdoob, Wafer; Bener, Abdulbari; Albinali, Hajar A; Gehani, Abdurrazzak

    2013-03-19

    Mortality from cardiovascular disease in the Middle East is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) continues to raise interest, but data from the Middle East is limited, especially in non-diabetic patients. This study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of MS and frequency of its components, individually and in combination, in a male population presenting with ACS, but without a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). This is a prospective study of 467 consecutive male patients hospitalized for ACS. They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. The mean age was (49.7±10.7 years). Of the 467 patients, 324 (69.4%) fulfilled the criteria for MS. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) was identified in 178 patients (54.9%), and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) in 146 patients (45.1%). These proportions were not significantly different from those without MS (STEMI 51.7% vs. NSTE-ACS 48.3%, respectively). However, patients with MS were older (50.6±10 vs. 47.9±11 years; p=0.012), and more than half of those with MS were above 50 years. The most common abnormal metabolic components were reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c; 94.1%), elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG; 89.8%), and elevated triglycerides (81.8%), followed by increased waist circumference (61.7%) and raised blood pressure (40.4%). The majority of patients with MS had three or more metabolic components (326 patients, 69.4%), and 102 (21.8%) had two components, but only 37 (8.4%) had a single component. In ACS patients, without previous history of DM, MS is highly prevalent. Reduced HDL, elevated FBG and triglycerides were the most frequent metabolic components. The majority had multiple components. These findings raise alarm and show that drug therapy alone may not be fully effective, unless the

  1. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrazzak Gehani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality from cardiovascular disease in the Middle East is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in acute coronary syndrome (ACS continues to raise interest, but data from the Middle East is limited, especially in non-diabetic patients. This study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of MS and frequency of its components, individually and in combination, in a male population presenting with ACS, but without a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods: This is a prospective study of 467 consecutive male patients hospitalized for ACS. They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: The mean age was (49.7±10.7 years. Of the 467 patients, 324 (69.4% fulfilled the criteria for MS. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI was identified in 178 patients (54.9%, and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS in 146 patients (45.1%. These proportions were not significantly different from those without MS (STEMI 51.7% vs. NSTE-ACS 48.3%, respectively. However, patients with MS were older (50.6±10 vs. 47.9±11 years; p=0.012, and more than half of those with MS were above 50 years. The most common abnormal metabolic components were reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c; 94.1%, elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG; 89.8%, and elevated triglycerides (81.8%, followed by increased waist circumference (61.7% and raised blood pressure (40.4%. The majority of patients with MS had three or more metabolic components (326 patients, 69.4%, and 102 (21.8% had two components, but only 37 (8.4% had a single component. Conclusions: In ACS patients, without previous history of DM, MS is highly prevalent. Reduced HDL, elevated FBG and triglycerides were the most frequent metabolic components. The majority had multiple components. These findings raise alarm and show that drug therapy alone may

  2. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorawit Ananphongmanee

    Full Text Available Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7 and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1 promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7 and partial VP28 (pVP28 were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against

  3. Rare genetic variants previously associated with congenital forms of long QT syndrome have little or no effect on the QT interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghouse, Jonas; Have, Christian Theil; Weeke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: We studied whether variants previously associated with congenital long QT syndrome (cLQTS) have an effect on the QTc interval in a Danish population sample. Furthermore, we assessed whether carriers of variants in cLQTS-associated genes are more prone to experience syncope compared with non...

  4. The urge to move and breathe - the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treatment in patients with previously diagnosed, clinically significant restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiana; Peralta, Ana Rita; Bentes, Carla

    2017-10-01

    The association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has seldom been reported. There is one study reporting improvement of RLS symptoms severity in patients naive of treatment after initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for OSAS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the OSAS treatment in patients with previously diagnosed, clinically significant RLS in a usual clinical setting. This was a retrospective study of RLS patients from a sleep clinic with a concomitant or subsequent diagnosis of OSAS. All patients who started treatment for OSAS and had a follow-up of ≥3 months were selected. Exclusion criteria included noncompliance, absence of sufficient information on clinical records, and RLS improvement following treatment of secondary causes. The primary outcome variable was clinical status of RLS symptoms following OSA treatment. Other variables included demographics, RLS treatment and outcome, OSA diagnosis, treatment, compliance, outcome, and PSG characteristics. From a database of 97 RLS patients, 56 patients had both OSA and RLS. Of these patients, 28 met the criteria for the study. In all, 17 patients (60.9%) were female, with a mean age 60 years. A total of 16 patients (57.1%) were diagnosed with idiopathic RLS. OSAS was diagnosed, on average, 21 months after the RLS diagnosis. A total of 19 (70.4%) patients were overweight or obese, 26 (92.9%) reported snoring, and 10 (35.7%) witnessed apneas. A total of 16 patients (57.1%) had excessive daytime sleepiness and 23 (84.1%) had insomnia. The mean apnea-hypopnea index was 19. Patients were mostly treated with dopamine agonists (19 patients, 67.9%) for the RLS, and nine patients were treated with more than two drugs for RLS. A total of 20 patients (71.4%) had improvement of symptoms of RLS after therapy for OSAS, of whom nine stopped drug therapy and eight reduced the dose. In patients with clinically significant RLS, treatment of

  5. Increased rates of complications in singleton pregnancies of women previously diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome predominantly in the hyperandrogenic phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, Marlieke A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413993809; Lamain-de Ruiter, Marije; Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M.; Kwee, Anneke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290465648; Laven, Joop S.; Lambalk, Cornelis B.; Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156353253; Franx, Arie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157009939; Fauser, Bart C.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071281932; Koster, Maria P.H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To study the presence of several maternal and neonatal complications in a cohort of women with hyperandrogenic as well as normoandrogenic polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and women with PCOS who received different fertility treatments. Design Prospective multicenter cohort study. Setting

  6. ATLANTIC-DIP: prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus by International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Eoin; Crowe, Catherine; Carmody, Louise A; Kirwan, Breda; O'Dea, Angela; Glynn, Liam G; McGuire, Brian E; O'Shea, Paula M; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-02-01

    Women with previous gestational diabetes (GDM) are a high-risk group for future development of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. The new International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria significantly increase the number of women diagnosed with GDM. The long-term metabolic outcome in these women is unknown. We set out to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, using adult treatment panel-III criteria; and insulin resistance, using HOMA2-IR, in white European women with previous GDM. Using a cohort design, we invited women meeting IADPSG GDM criteria across four Irish antenatal centres between 2007 and 2010 to participate. Two hundred and sixty-five women with previous values meeting IADPSG criteria for GDM participated (44 % of the population eligible for participation). Mean age was 36.7 years (SD 5.0). These women were compared with a randomly selected control group of 378 women (mean age 37.6 years, SD 5.1) known to have normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in pregnancy during the same period. A total of 25.3 % of women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM met metabolic syndrome criteria, compared to 6.6 % of women with NGT [at 2.6 (SD 1.0) vs. 3.3 years (SD 0.7) post-partum]. The prevalence of HOMA2-IR >1.8 was higher in women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM (33.6 vs. 9.1 % with NGT, p criteria demonstrate a greater than threefold prevalence of metabolic syndrome compared to women with NGT in pregnancy. Efforts to prevent projected long-term consequences of this should focus on interventions both in the preconception and post-partum periods.

  7. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  8. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma J. H.; Merckx, Diane; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marcelis, Carlo L. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  9. Heterologous challenge with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine virus: no evidence of reactivation of previous European-type PRRS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens; Oleksiewicz, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    In Denmark, a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) control programme, comprising vaccination of seropositive herds with a live American type PRRSV vaccine, was started in 1996. In several of these herds, spread of vaccine virus from vaccinated 3-18 week old pigs to non...... in previously European PRRSV infected pigs after challenge with the vaccine strain seems to be the result of a boosting effect on the immune system, induced by the heterologous vaccine PRRSV strain....

  10. Cri du chat syndrome and congenital heart disease: a review of previously reported cases and presentation of an additional 21 cases from the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Christine; Moller, James H; Finkelstein, Marsha; Lohr, Jamie; Schimmenti, Lisa

    2006-05-01

    To analyze the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) database from 1982 to 2002 to determine the frequency and distribution of congenital heart disease (CHD) found in this population, to review the literature for previously published accounts of CHD in this population, and to review current genotype-phenotype associations for cri du chat (CDC) syndrome with CHD. We performed a retrospective review of the 98422 CHD cases submitted to the PCCC between 1982 and 2002, to find patients who had a noncardiac diagnosis of CDC syndrome. A total of 21 patients (15 female and 6 male patients) were identified. Although some patients had multiple cardiac anomalies, they were categorized according to primary diagnoses on the basis of the most hemodynamically significant component. The patient groups were ventricular septal defect (n = 6), patent ductus arteriosus (n = 6), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 5), pulmonary valve atresia with ventricular septal defect (n = 2), pulmonary valve stenosis (n = 1), and double-outlet right ventricle (n = 1). Eighteen of the 21 patients underwent surgical repair of their defects. There was 1 late operative death. To determine whether the observed frequency of these cardiac defects among patients with CDC syndrome was comparable to that of the general population of patients with CHD, data for all cases submitted to the PCCC from 1982 to 2002 were used. Use of these numbers to determine expected frequencies for these defects showed significantly greater proportions of patients with these specific lesions among the patients with CDC syndrome. Currently there is no clear understanding of the genomic cause of the prevalence of these defects in the population with CDC syndrome, although CHD has been noted among patients with other deletion syndromes.

  11. Embryonic senescence and laminopathies in a progeroid zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Eriko; Imamura, Shintaro; Qi, Jie; Toure, Jamal; Valdez, Delgado M; Carr, Christopher E; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Kishi, Shuji

    2011-03-30

    Mutations that disrupt the conversion of prelamin A to mature lamin A cause the rare genetic disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a group of laminopathies. Our understanding of how A-type lamins function in vivo during early vertebrate development through aging remains limited, and would benefit from a suitable experimental model. The zebrafish has proven to be a tractable model organism for studying both development and aging at the molecular genetic level. Zebrafish show an array of senescence symptoms resembling those in humans, which can be targeted to specific aging pathways conserved in vertebrates. However, no zebrafish models bearing human premature senescence currently exist. We describe the induction of embryonic senescence and laminopathies in zebrafish harboring disturbed expressions of the lamin A gene (LMNA). Impairments in these fish arise in the skin, muscle and adipose tissue, and sometimes in the cartilage. Reduced function of lamin A/C by translational blocking of the LMNA gene induced apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and craniofacial abnormalities/cartilage defects. By contrast, induced cryptic splicing of LMNA, which generates the deletion of 8 amino acid residues lamin A (zlamin A-Δ8), showed embryonic senescence and S-phase accumulation/arrest. Interestingly, the abnormal muscle and lipodystrophic phenotypes were common in both cases. Hence, both decrease-of-function of lamin A/C and gain-of-function of aberrant lamin A protein induced laminopathies that are associated with mesenchymal cell lineages during zebrafish early development. Visualization of individual cells expressing zebrafish progerin (zProgerin/zlamin A-Δ37) fused to green fluorescent protein further revealed misshapen nuclear membrane. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor reduced these nuclear abnormalities and significantly prevented embryonic senescence and muscle fiber damage induced by zProgerin. Importantly, the adult Progerin fish survived and remained fertile with

  12. Embryonic senescence and laminopathies in a progeroid zebrafish model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Koshimizu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations that disrupt the conversion of prelamin A to mature lamin A cause the rare genetic disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a group of laminopathies. Our understanding of how A-type lamins function in vivo during early vertebrate development through aging remains limited, and would benefit from a suitable experimental model. The zebrafish has proven to be a tractable model organism for studying both development and aging at the molecular genetic level. Zebrafish show an array of senescence symptoms resembling those in humans, which can be targeted to specific aging pathways conserved in vertebrates. However, no zebrafish models bearing human premature senescence currently exist. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the induction of embryonic senescence and laminopathies in zebrafish harboring disturbed expressions of the lamin A gene (LMNA. Impairments in these fish arise in the skin, muscle and adipose tissue, and sometimes in the cartilage. Reduced function of lamin A/C by translational blocking of the LMNA gene induced apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and craniofacial abnormalities/cartilage defects. By contrast, induced cryptic splicing of LMNA, which generates the deletion of 8 amino acid residues lamin A (zlamin A-Δ8, showed embryonic senescence and S-phase accumulation/arrest. Interestingly, the abnormal muscle and lipodystrophic phenotypes were common in both cases. Hence, both decrease-of-function of lamin A/C and gain-of-function of aberrant lamin A protein induced laminopathies that are associated with mesenchymal cell lineages during zebrafish early development. Visualization of individual cells expressing zebrafish progerin (zProgerin/zlamin A-Δ37 fused to green fluorescent protein further revealed misshapen nuclear membrane. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor reduced these nuclear abnormalities and significantly prevented embryonic senescence and muscle fiber damage induced by zProgerin. Importantly, the adult

  13. Sudden onset of cauda equina syndrome resulting from posterior migration of lumbar herniated disc without significant previous neurological signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jeong-Hyuk; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Chul-Ku; Ha, Ho-Gyun

    2012-09-01

    While extruded disc fragments are known to migrate anteriorly, posteriorly, or laterally to the theca sac, posterior migration of the fragments is relatively rare and sudden onset of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by the migration is extremely rare. The authors experienced a case of CES that was manifested abruptly with sudden paraplegia caused by posterior migration of the lumbar intervertebral disc. A 74-year old man, who had no prior significant neurologic signs or trauma history, visited our emergency center with paraplegia of both lower extremities occurring suddenly when awakened. On magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings, we could detect ruptured disc herniation with severe lumbar stenosis at the L2-3 level. We performed an emergent decompression, and the right posterior migrated disc fragments at L2-3 were intraoperatively observed. The patient was fully recovered himself on the follow up after 3 months of the operation. In conclusion, early operation can result in better outcome in acute paraplegia caused by the posterior migrated disc fragments.

  14. Mutations in Genes Encoding Cardiac Ion Channels Previously Associated With Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Are Present With High Frequency in New Exome Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Refsgaard, Lena; Nielsen, Jonas B

    2013-01-01

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Grand Opportunity (NHLBI GO) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) provided important knowledge on genetic variation in the background population. Our aim was to identify all variants previously associated with SIDS in ESP to improve the discrimination between plausible......Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. The genetic contribution to SIDS has been investigated intensively and to date, 14 cardiac channelopathy genes have been associated with SIDS. Newly published data from...... disease-causing mutations and variants most likely to be false-positive....

  15. Examination of virus shedding in semen from vaccinated and from previously infected boars after experimental challenge with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas L.; Nielsen, Jens; Have, Per

    1997-01-01

    Danish artificial insemination (AI) centres house several boars antibody positive to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus as well as PRRSV-naive boars which may become acutely infected, The risk of transmission of PRRSV by semen may therefore constitute a serious problem...... vaccine compared to the non-vaccinated control animals. In contrast, no changes in onset, level and duration of viremia and shedding of virus in semen were observed using the inactivated vaccine, Neither viremia nor seminal shedding of virus was detected in previously PRRSV-infected, PRRSV...

  16. Vaginal progesterone pessaries for pregnant women with a previous preterm birth to prevent neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (the PROGRESS Study): A multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Caroline A; Ashwood, Pat; McPhee, Andrew J; Flenady, Vicki; Tran, Thach; Dodd, Jodie M; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, as a consequence of preterm birth, is a major cause of early mortality and morbidity. The withdrawal of progesterone, either actual or functional, is thought to be an antecedent to the onset of labour. There remains limited information on clinically relevant health outcomes as to whether vaginal progesterone may be of benefit for pregnant women with a history of a previous preterm birth, who are at high risk of a recurrence. Our primary aim was to assess whether the use of vaginal progesterone pessaries in women with a history of previous spontaneous preterm birth reduced the risk and severity of respiratory distress syndrome in their infants, with secondary aims of examining the effects on other neonatal morbidities and maternal health and assessing the adverse effects of treatment. Women with a live singleton or twin pregnancy between 18 to placebo (n = 389). Participants and investigators were masked to the treatment allocation. The primary outcome was respiratory distress syndrome and severity. Secondary outcomes were other respiratory morbidities; other adverse neonatal outcomes; adverse outcomes for the woman, especially related to preterm birth; and side effects of progesterone treatment. Data were analysed for all the 787 women (100%) randomised and their 799 infants. Most women used their allocated study treatment (740 women, 94.0%), with median use similar for both study groups (51.0 days, interquartile range [IQR] 28.0-69.0, in the progesterone group versus 52.0 days, IQR 27.0-76.0, in the placebo group). The incidence of respiratory distress syndrome was similar in both study groups-10.5% (42/402) in the progesterone group and 10.6% (41/388) in the placebo group (adjusted relative risk [RR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-1.49, p = 0.912)-as was the severity of any neonatal respiratory disease (adjusted treatment effect 1.02, 95% CI 0.69-1.53, p = 0.905). No differences were seen between study groups for

  17. Previously Unreported Biallelic Mutation in DNAJC19: Are Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Basal Ganglia Lesions Additional Features of Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Ataxia (DCMA) Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Mayr, Johannes A; Feichtinger, René G; Canda, Ebru; Çoker, Mahmut; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), non-progressive cerebellar ataxia (A), testicular dysgenesis, growth failure, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria are the hallmarks of DNAJC19 defect (or DCMA syndrome) due to biallelic mutations in DNAJC19. To date DCMA syndrome has been reported in 19 patients from Canada and in two Finnish siblings. The underlying pathomechanism is unknown; however, DNAJC19 is presumed to be involved in mitochondrial membrane related processes (e.g., protein import and cardiolipin remodeling). Here, we report an additional patient with progressive cerebellar atrophy and white matter changes. A Turkish boy presented at age 2 months with dilated cardiomyopathy (initially worsening then stabilizing in the second year of life), growth failure, bilateral cryptorchidism, and facial dysmorphism. Mental and motor developmental were, respectively, moderately and severely delayed. Profound intentional tremor and dyskinesia, spasticity (particularly at the lower extremities), and dystonia were observed. Sensorineural hearing loss was also diagnosed. MRI showed bilateral basal ganglia signal alterations. Plasma lactate levels were increased, as was urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid. He deceased aged 3 years. Sanger Sequencing of DNAJC19 confirmed the clinical diagnosis of DNAJC19 defect by revealing the previously unreported homozygous stop mutation c.63delC (p.Tyr21*). Investigation of enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism revealed decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase in muscle tissue. Sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral basal ganglia lesions are common symptoms of mitochondrial disorders. This is the first report of an association with DNAJC19 defect.

  18. EGFR mutations cause a lethal syndrome of epithelial dysfunction with progeroid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganetzky, Rebecca; Finn, Erin; Bagchi, Atrish; Zollo, Ornella; Conlin, Laura; Deardorff, Matthew; Harr, Margaret; Simpson, Michael A; McGrath, John A; Zackai, Elaine; Lemmon, Mark A; Sondheimer, Neal

    2015-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is part of a large family of receptors required for communicating extracellular signals through internal tyrosine kinases. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling is required for tissue development, whereas constitutive activation of this signaling pathway is associated with oncogenic transformation. We identified homozygous c.1283G>A (p.Gly428Asp) mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in two siblings. The children were born prematurely, had abnormalities in skin and hair, suffered multisystem organ failure, and died in the neonatal period from intestinal perforation. EGF failed to induce mutated receptor phosphorylation in patient-derived fibroblasts and activation of downstream targets was suppressed. The heterologously expressed extracellular domain was impaired in stability and the binding of EGF. Cells from the affected patient undergo early senescence with accelerated expression of β-galactosidase and shortened telomeres at all passages when compared to controls. A comparison of homozygous inherited regions from a separate report of a patient from the same ethnic background and EGFR genotype confirms the pathogenicity of EGFR mutations in congenital disease.

  19. Drug-Induced QT Prolongation as a Result of an Escitalopram Overdose in a Patient with Previously Undiagnosed Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of drug-induced QT prolongation caused by an escitalopram overdose in a patient with previously undiagnosed congenital LQTS. A 15-year-old Caucasian female presented following a suicide attempt via an escitalopram overdose. The patient was found to have a prolonged QT interval with episodes of torsades de pointes. The patient was admitted to the telemetry unit and treated. Despite the resolution of the torsades de pointes, she continued to demonstrate a persistently prolonged QT interval. She was seen by the cardiology service and diagnosed with congenital long QT syndrome. This case illustrates the potential for an escitalopram overdose to cause an acute QT prolongation in a patient with congenital LQTS and suggests the importance of a screening electrocardiogram prior to the initiation of SSRIs, especially in patients at high risk for QT prolongation.

  20. Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire Claudia Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS and to healthy controls (CG to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc, and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity. Results cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P  0.05 and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P  Conclusions Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with MS and regardless the presence of established cardiovascular risk factors.

  1. Incidence of and survival after subsequent cancers in carriers of pathogenic MMR variants with previous cancer: a report from the prospective Lynch syndrome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Evans, D Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Jenkins, Mark; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Frayling, Ian M; Plazzer, John-Paul; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Genuardi, Maurizio; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Möslein, Gabriela; Sampson, Julian R; Capella, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    Today most patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) survive their first cancer. There is limited information on the incidences and outcome of subsequent cancers. The present study addresses three questions: (i) what is the cumulative incidence of a subsequent cancer; (ii) in which organs do subsequent cancers occur; and (iii) what is the survival following these cancers? Information was collated on prospectively organised surveillance and prospectively observed outcomes in patients with LS who had cancer prior to inclusion and analysed by age, gender and genetic variants. 1273 patients with LS from 10 countries were followed up for 7753 observation years. 318 patients (25.7%) developed 341 first subsequent cancers, including colorectal (n=147, 43%), upper GI, pancreas or bile duct (n=37, 11%) and urinary tract (n=32, 10%). The cumulative incidences for any subsequent cancer from age 40 to age 70 years were 73% for pathogenic MLH1 ( path_MLH1 ), 76% for path_MSH2 carriers and 52% for path_MSH6 carriers, and for colorectal cancer (CRC) the cumulative incidences were 46%, 48% and 23%, respectively. Crude survival after any subsequent cancer was 82% (95% CI 76% to 87%) and 10-year crude survival after CRC was 91% (95% CI 83% to 95%). Relative incidence of subsequent cancer compared with incidence of first cancer was slightly but insignificantly higher than cancer incidence in patients with LS without previous cancer (range 0.94-1.49). The favourable survival after subsequent cancers validated continued follow-up to prevent death from cancer. The interactive website http://lscarisk.org was expanded to calculate the risks by gender, genetic variant and age for subsequent cancer for any patient with LS with previous cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Brosset Ugas MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics.

  3. Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Brosset Ugas MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics.

  4. Fatal Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Induced by Carbamazepine Treatment in a Patient Who Previously had Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yen Huang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a rare but life-threatening skin disease that is most commonly drug-induced. It has recently been suggested that Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS belongs to the same group of skin disorders, although it has a lower mortality rate than TEN. We report the case of a 26-year-old male schizophrenic patient with a history of carbamazepine-induced SJS 5 years earlier. At the time of his current admission, he was admitted to our psychiatry department with acute agitation due to schizophrenia. However, the patient and his family denied history of drug allergy. After 3 days of carbamazepine treatment, the patient developed TEN (body surface area > 90%. He was transferred to the burn center, but despite appropriate treatment, including intravenous hydrocortisone 200 mg q6h and being covered with sterile biological material, he died. It is important to note that re-administration of a drug that previously caused SJS may lead to TEN, which has a very high mortality rate.

  5. Lethal neonatal Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J I; Pérez-Alonso, P; Funes, R; Pérez-Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-29

    We report on a 35-week gestation female fetus with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP). This patient, who is the first reported with neonatal HGP in the English literature but is the fourth, counting three previous French cases, supports the existence of a more severe prenatal form of progeria. She died 7 hours after birth and presented with intrauterine growth retardation, premature aging, absence of subcutaneous fat, brachydactyly, absent nipples, hypoplastic external genitalia, and abnormal ear lobes. The child's combination of clinical and skeletal manifestations differentiates this form of HGP from other progeroid syndromes with neonatal presentation. We also report previously undescribed autopsy findings including premature loss of hair follicles, premature regression of the renal nephrogenic layer, and premature closure of the growth plates in the distal phalanges that may be related to the aging processes in this condition. We could not find any histological data to support acro-osteolysis, which is the radiographic sign of brachydactyly. The terminal phalanges in HGP seem to be underdeveloped rather than osteolytic.

  6. A pilot study on the effect of a symbiotic mixture in irritable bowel syndrome: an open-label, partially controlled, 6-month extension of a previously published trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, C; Tremolaterra, F; Gallotta, S; Fortunato, A; Cappello, C; Ciacci, C; Iovino, P

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the efficacy of probiotics has received considerable attention in the treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this regard, a symbiotic mixture (Probinul(®)) has shown beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to extend the previously published 4-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of this symbiotic mixture. This is an open-label prospective, partially controlled, 6-month extension period pilot study in which patients continued to receive the symbiotic mixture (Group 1) or were switched from placebo to symbiotic mixture (Group 2) using cyclic administration (last 2 weeks/month). The primary endpoints were the overall satisfactory relief of bloating and flatulence (assessed as proportions of responders). The secondary endpoints were evaluation of the symptom severity scores (bloating, flatulence, pain and urgency) and bowel function scores (frequency, consistency and incomplete evacuation). Twenty-six IBS patients completed the 6-month extension period (13 patients in Group 1 and 13 patients in Group 2). In the per-protocol analysis, the proportions of responders across time were not significantly different in the groups but in Group 2, there was an increased percentage of responders for flatulence (p = 0.07). In addition, the score of flatulence was reduced significantly during the 6-month treatment period in Group 2 (p symbiotic mixture was associated with persistence of relief from flatulence or new reduction in flatulence in the present 6-month long extension study. These results need to be more comprehensively assessed in large, long-term, randomized, placebo-controlled studies.

  7. Short-term combined treatment with liraglutide and metformin leads to significant weight loss in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome and previous poor response to metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensterle Sever, Mojca; Kocjan, Tomaz; Pfeifer, Marija; Kravos, Nika Aleksandra; Janez, Andrej

    2014-03-01

    The effect of metformin on weight reduction in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is often unsatisfactory. In this study, we investigated the potential add-on effect of treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide on weight loss in obese nondiabetic women with PCOS who had lost weight during pretreatment with metformin. A total of 40 obese women with PCOS, who had been pretreated with metformin for at least 6 months, participated in a 12-week open-label, prospective study. They were randomized to one of three treatment arms: metformin (MET) arm 1000 mg BID, liraglutide (LIRA) arm 1.2 mg QD s.c., or combined MET 1000 mg BID and LIRA (COMBI) 1.2 mg QD s.c. Lifestyle intervention was not actively promoted. The primary outcome was change in body weight. Thirty six patients (aged 31.3 ± 7.1 years, BMI 37.1 ± 4.6 kg/m²) completed the study: 14 on MET, 11 on LIRA, and 11 on combined treatment. COMBI therapy was superior to LIRA and MET monotherapy in reducing weight, BMI, and waist circumference. Subjects treated with COMBI lost on average 6.5 ± 2.8 kg compared with a 3.8 ± 3.7 kg loss in the LIRA group and a 1.2 ± 1.4 kg loss in the MET group (Pweight loss was stratified: a total of 38% of subjects were high responders who lost ≥5% body weight, 22% of them in the COMBI arm compared with 16 and 0% in the LIRA and MET arm respectively. BMI decreased by 2.4 ± 1.0 in the COMBI arm compared with 1.3 ± 1.3 in LIRA and 0.5 ± 0.5 in the MET arm (Pweight loss. Short-term combined treatment with liraglutide and metformin was associated with significant weight loss and decrease in waist circumference in obese women with PCOS who had previously been poor responders regarding weight reduction on metformin monotherapy.

  8. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutati...

  9. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  10. Changes in heparan sulfate are associated with delayed wound repair, altered cell migration, adhesion and contractility in the galactosyltransferase I (beta4GalT-7) deficient form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotte, M.; Spillmann, D.; Yip, G.W.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Echtermeyer, F.G.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Kiesel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced activity of beta4-galactosyltransferase 7 (beta4GalT-7), an enzyme involved in synthesizing the glycosaminoglycan linkage region of proteoglycans, is associated with the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). In the invertebrates Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans,

  11. The first PTPN1 1 mutations in hotspot exons reported in Moroccan children with Noonan syndrome and comparison of mutation rate to previous studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouchikhi, Ihssane; Samri, Imane; Iraqui Houssaini, Mohammed; Trhanint, Saaid; Bouguenouch, Laila; Sayel, Hanane; Hida, Moustapha; Atmani, Samir; Ouldim, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of 1/1000-2500. It results from protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) mutations in roughly 50% of cases. Mutational screening of PTPN11 has been carried out in different populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to screen, for the first time, PTPN11 mutations in a series of Moroccan Noonan syndrome patients. We used bidirectional sequencing of exons 3 and 8, considered as PTPN11 mutation hot spots, and then compared the rate of mutational events of these exons between different populations using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. We detected 3 heterozygous mutations (Asp6lGly, Tyr63Cys, and Asn308Ser) in 4 individuals of 16 sporadic patients (25%). The rate of mutation in our cohort did not differ from that of other populations. However, we found significant differences in the mutation rate of exon 8 between one Japanese cohort and some populations, which requires more investigations to be explained. The present study allowed identification of mutations clustered in exons 3 and 8 of the PTPN11 gene in a Moroccan Noonan syndrome cohort and enabled us to give appropriate genetic counseling to the mutation-positive patients.

  12. A 5-year journey with cutis laxa in an Indian child: The de barsy syndrome revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available De Barsy syndrome (DBS, synonymously known as autosomal recessive cutis laxa type III, is an extremely rare condition clinically characterized by cutis laxa, a progeroid appearance, and ophthalmologic abnormalities. We present here an account of 5-year follow-up since the birth of an Indian boy with DBS, who had a few rare and unusual manifestations. In addition, our case probably represents the first reported case of DBS from India.

  13. Is lactose intolerance implicated in the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome or functional diarrhoea in previously asymptomatic people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Sally D; Barton, J Roger; Welfare, Mark R

    2002-11-01

    The relationship between lactose intolerance and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults is uncertain. Bowel symptoms may persist after bacterial gastroenteritis and as post-infectious IBS. Acquired lactose intolerance may follow viral enteric infections in children. We compared the frequency of lactose intolerance after bacterial gastroenteritis in adults with and without symptoms of IBS or functional diarrhoea at 3-6-months' follow-up. A prospective cohort study was conducted. All subjects with bacterial gastroenteritis confirmed by stool culture from the microbiology laboratory and without prior IBS or functional diarrhoea were eligible to participate. IBS and functional diarrhoea were diagnosed via self-completed Rome II modular questionnaires. Lactose intolerance was determined from a rise in breath hydrogen and plasma glucose and symptoms. One hundred and twenty-eight subjects with bacterial gastroenteritis were followed prospectively, from which a smaller cohort of 42 subjects took part in this study. The cohort was comprised of 24/25 subjects who developed post-infectious IBS (n = 16) or functional diarrhoea (n = 8) (9 male, 15 female) and 18 random controls (8 male, 10 female) chosen from the group without IBS or functional diarrhoea. The mean age of the subjects was 44.4 years (range 25-76 years). In the group with functional diarrhoea or IBS, four subjects had failure of the plasma glucose to rise but none had abnormal glucose hydrogen breath tests. In the control subjects, one had a positive combined test and six had failure of plasma glucose to rise alone. No subject developed symptoms during the test. Bacterial gastroenteritis did not cause persistent lactose intolerance in our study population. Lactose intolerance does not appear to be implicated in the aetiology of post-infectious bowel symptoms, including IBS. Advice to avoid dairy products in patients presenting with post-infectious IBS on the basis that they may have lactose

  14. [Peripheral neuropathy as a presenting form of Cockayne syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campistol Plana, J; Riverola de Veciana, A; Poo Argüelles, P; Colomer Oferil, J; Moreno Hernández, J

    1991-01-01

    We report a clinical observation of an infant aged 5 months with Cockayne syndrome whose symptomatology included failure to thrive, microcephaly, peripheral neuropathy and elevated level of protein in CSF. More typical signs of this syndrome appeared lately with progeroid facies, photosensitivity and intracranial calcifications that computed tomography revealed at 13 months of age. The early onset of clinical manifestations, the association with peripheral neuropathy, and the high level of protein in CSF are unusual facts that led us to do the differential diagnosis with other demyelinating disorders.

  15. New ZMPSTE24 (FACE1) mutations in patients affected with restrictive dermopathy or related progeroid syndromes and mutation update

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navarro, Claire Laure; Esteves-Vieira, Vera; Courrier, Sebastien; Boyer, Amandine; Thuy Duong Nguyen, [No Value; Le Thi Thanh Huong, [No Value; Meinke, Peter; Schroeder, Winnie; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Sznajer, Yves; Amor, David J; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Biervliet, Martine; van den Akker, Peter C; Cau, Pierre; Roll, Patrice; Levy, Nicolas; Badens, Catherine; Wehnert, Manfred; De Sane-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2014-01-01

    Restrictive dermopathy (RD) is a rare and extremely severe congenital genodermatosis, characterized by a tight rigid skin with erosions at flexure sites, multiple joint contractures, low bone density and pulmonary insufficiency...

  16. Molecular spectrum of excision repair cross-complementation group 8 gene defects in Chinese patients with Cockayne syndrome type A

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Huang, Yu; Yan, Ming; Li, Jiuwei; Ding, Changhong; Jin, Hong; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yanling; Wu, Baiyan; Chen, Dafang

    2017-01-01

    There are two genetics complementary groups Cockayne syndrome type A and B (CS-A and CS-B OMIM 216400, 133540), which is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the excision repair cross-complementation group 8 gene (ERCC8) result in CS-A, and mutations in ERCC6 result in CS-B. Homozygous ERCC6/ERCC8 mutations also result in UV-sensitive syndrome. In this study, twenty-one Han Chinese patients with CS were investigated to ident...

  17. COCKAYNE SYNDROME: REPORT OF TWO CASES WITHIN A FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadi

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and phenotypic features of two siblings (a 12 years old girl and her 7 year old brother with Cockayne syndrome are described. The main problems were mild to moderate mental retardation, dwarfism, clumsy gait, photosensitive skin lesions and progeroid (senile like appearance. Brain CT - scans revealed symmetrical, well defined areas of calcification mainly located at lenticular nuclei, in both patients. Vie brainstem auditory responses also showed increased hearing thresholds and absolute wave latencies, that were more prominent in the older sister. The older patient had a healthy twin sister with normal mental function and phenotypic appearance.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies de novo heterozygous CAV1 mutations associated with a novel neonatal onset lipodystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Kircher, Martin; Del Campo, Miguel; Amato, R Stephen; Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-08-01

    Despite remarkable progress in identifying causal genes for many types of genetic lipodystrophies in the last decade, the molecular basis of many extremely rare lipodystrophy patients with distinctive phenotypes remains unclear. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the parents and probands from six pedigrees with neonatal onset of generalized loss of subcutaneous fat with additional distinctive phenotypic features and report de novo heterozygous null mutations, c.424C>T (p.Q142*) and c.479_480delTT (p.F160*), in CAV1 in a 7-year-old male and a 3-year-old female of European origin, respectively. Both the patients had generalized fat loss, thin mottled skin and progeroid features at birth. The male patient had cataracts requiring extraction at age 30 months and the female patient had pulmonary arterial hypertension. Dermal fibroblasts of the female patient revealed negligible CAV1 immunofluorescence staining compared to control but there were no differences in the number and morphology of caveolae upon electron microscopy examination. Based upon the similarities in the clinical features of these two patients, previous reports of CAV1 mutations in patients with lipodystrophies and pulmonary hypertension, and similar features seen in CAV1 null mice, we conclude that these variants are the most likely cause of one subtype of neonatal onset generalized lipodystrophy syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Which surgery should be offered for carpal tunnel syndrome in a patient who was previously treated for recurrence on the contralateral side? Preliminary study of 13 patients with the Canaletto(®) implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, I; Seigle-Murandi, F; Gouzou, S; Fabacher, T; Facca, S; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Liverneaux, P

    2017-10-16

    There are no published studies on the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients who have already been operated for recurrent CTS on the contralateral side. The aim of this study was to evaluate 13 patients with CTS who underwent primary release using a Canaletto(®) implant. The 13 patients had all been operated for recurrent CTS previously. On the contralateral side, they all had subjective signs, and two of them already had complications. All were operated with the Canaletto(®) implant according to Duché's technique, in a mean of 20minutes. After a mean 19.3-month follow-up, paresthesia, pain, and QuickDASH scores were significantly improved, even in one patient who underwent revision at another facility. This preliminary study suggests that use of a Canaletto(®) implant as first-line treatment for CTS in patients who already underwent revision surgery on the other side is a simple and safe technique, without worsening of symptoms. These findings should be assessed with a prospective randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Eccrine sweat gland anatomy in cockayne syndrome: a possible diagnostic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landing, B H; Sugarman, G; Dixon, L G

    1983-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease, which includes as major features motor and mental retardation (beginning in the second year), microcephaly, ataxia, retinal degeneration and pigmentation, cataracts, progeroid features, intracranial calcification, hypogonadism, and growth retardation. Many other diseases have some of these features, so that diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome can be difficult, especially in younger children. Eccrine sweat glands were microdissected from autopsy or biopsy specimens from patients with Cockayne syndrome, and mean values for duct length, secretory coil volume, ratio of coil volume to duct length, and axis ratio of the secretory coil were determined. In comparison with values for eccrine glands of patients with no known genetic or chromosomal disease, eccrine glands in Cockayne syndrome are abnormally small for age. Whether other diseases with various similarities to Cockayne syndrome produce similar growth abnormality of eccrine sweat glands is not known, but determination of sweat gland size may provide data suggesting or supporting the diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome.

  1. How to diagnose a lipodystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Douillard, Claire; Defrance, Frédérique; Dieudonne, Lucile; Mouton, Fanny; Lemaire, Christine; Bertrand-Escouflaire, Nicole; Bourdelle-Hego, Marie-Françoise; Devemy, Fabrice; Evrard, Anne; Gheerbrand, Dominique; Girardot, Caroline; Gumuche, Sophie; Hober, Christine; Topolinski, Hélène; Lamblin, Blandine; Mycinski, Bénédicte; Ryndak, Amélie; Karrouz, Wassila; Duvivier, Etienne; Merlen, Emilie; Cortet, Christine; Weill, Jacques; Lacroix, Dominique; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of adipose tissue diseases ranges from obesity to lipodystrophy, and is accompanied by insulin resistance syndrome, which promotes the occurrence of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications. Lipodystrophy refers to a group of rare diseases characterized by the generalized or partial absence of adipose tissue, and occurs with or without hypertrophy of adipose tissue in other sites. They are classified as being familial or acquired, and generalized or partial. The genetically determined partial forms usually occur as Dunnigan syndrome, which is a type of laminopathy that can also manifest as muscle, cardiac, neuropathic or progeroid involvement. Gene mutations encoding for PPAR-gamma, Akt2, CIDEC, perilipin and the ZMPSTE 24 enzyme are much more rare. The genetically determined generalized forms are also very rare and are linked to mutations of seipin AGPAT2, FBN1, which is accompanied by Marfan syndrome, or of BANF1, which is characterized by a progeroid syndrome without insulin resistance and with early bone complications. Glycosylation disorders are sometimes involved. Some genetically determined forms have recently been found to be due to autoinflammatory syndromes linked to a proteasome anomaly (PSMB8). They result in a lipodystrophy syndrome that occurs secondarily with fever, dermatosis and panniculitis. Then there are forms that are considered to be acquired. They may be iatrogenic (protease inhibitors in HIV patients, glucocorticosteroids, insulin, graft-versus-host disease, etc.), related to an immune system disease (sequelae of dermatopolymyositis, autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes, particularly associated with type 1 diabetes, Barraquer-Simons and Lawrence syndromes), which are promoted by anomalies of the complement system. Finally, lipomatosis is currently classified as a painful form (adiposis dolorosa or Dercum's disease) or benign symmetric multiple form, also known as Launois-Bensaude syndrome or Madelung

  2. Spectrum and risk of neoplasia in Werner syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauper, Julia M; Krause, Alison; Vaughan, Thomas L; Monnat, Raymond J

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive genetic instability and progeroid ('premature aging') syndrome which is associated with an elevated risk of cancer. Our study objectives were to characterize the spectrum of neoplasia in WS using a well-documented study population, and to estimate the type-specific risk of neoplasia in WS relative to the general population. We obtained case reports of neoplasms in WS patients through examining previous case series and reviews of WS, as well as through database searching in PubMed, Google Scholar, and J-EAST, a search engine for articles from Japan. We defined the spectrum (types and sites) of neoplasia in WS using all case reports, and were able to determine neoplasm type-specific risk in Japan WS patients by calculating standardized incidence and proportionate incidence ratios (SIR and SPIR, respectively) relative to Osaka Japan prefecture incidence rates. We used a newly assembled study population of 189 WS patients with 248 neoplasms to define the spectrum of neoplasia in WS. The most frequent neoplasms in WS patients, representing 2/3 of all reports, were thyroid neoplasms, malignant melanoma, meningioma, soft tissue sarcomas, leukemia and pre-leukemic conditions of the bone marrow, and primary bone neoplasms. Cancer risk defined by SIRs was significantly elevated in Japan-resident WS patients for the six most frequent neoplasms except leukemia, ranging from 53.5-fold for melanoma of the skin (95% CI: 24.5, 101.6) to 8.9 (95% CI: 4.9, 15.0) for thyroid neoplasms. Cancer risk as defined by SPIR was also significantly elevated for the most common malignancies except leukemia. WS confers a strong predisposition to several specific types of neoplasia. These results serve as a guide for WS clinical care, and for additional analyses to define the mechanistic basis for cancer in WS and the general population.

  3. Spectrum and risk of neoplasia in Werner syndrome: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Lauper

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive genetic instability and progeroid ('premature aging' syndrome which is associated with an elevated risk of cancer.Our study objectives were to characterize the spectrum of neoplasia in WS using a well-documented study population, and to estimate the type-specific risk of neoplasia in WS relative to the general population.We obtained case reports of neoplasms in WS patients through examining previous case series and reviews of WS, as well as through database searching in PubMed, Google Scholar, and J-EAST, a search engine for articles from Japan. We defined the spectrum (types and sites of neoplasia in WS using all case reports, and were able to determine neoplasm type-specific risk in Japan WS patients by calculating standardized incidence and proportionate incidence ratios (SIR and SPIR, respectively relative to Osaka Japan prefecture incidence rates.We used a newly assembled study population of 189 WS patients with 248 neoplasms to define the spectrum of neoplasia in WS. The most frequent neoplasms in WS patients, representing 2/3 of all reports, were thyroid neoplasms, malignant melanoma, meningioma, soft tissue sarcomas, leukemia and pre-leukemic conditions of the bone marrow, and primary bone neoplasms. Cancer risk defined by SIRs was significantly elevated in Japan-resident WS patients for the six most frequent neoplasms except leukemia, ranging from 53.5-fold for melanoma of the skin (95% CI: 24.5, 101.6 to 8.9 (95% CI: 4.9, 15.0 for thyroid neoplasms. Cancer risk as defined by SPIR was also significantly elevated for the most common malignancies except leukemia.WS confers a strong predisposition to several specific types of neoplasia. These results serve as a guide for WS clinical care, and for additional analyses to define the mechanistic basis for cancer in WS and the general population.

  4. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  5. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB) Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Serena; Filippi, Silvia; Caputo, Manuela; Cipak, Lubos; Gregan, Juraj; Ammerer, Gustav; Frontini, Mattia; Willems, Daniela; Prantera, Giorgio; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) known as transcription coupled repair (TCR). CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP) technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  6. Comparação entre as manifestações epilepticas ocorridas na Sindrome de Lennox-Gastaut, com e sem Sindrome de West pregressa Comparison of epileptic manifestations in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with and without previous West syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Speciali

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o quadro epiléptico de 27 pacientes com síndrome de Lennox-Gastaut (20 sem antecedente de síndrome de West e 7 com esse antecedente. A caracterização das crises foi realizada através das informações prestadas pelos familiares em maior contato com as crianças além da observação pessoal das manifestações, possibilitadas pela sua elevada frequência. Observam-se diferenças nas manifestações epilépticas dos pacientes com e sem antecedente de síndrome de West. Tais diferenças foram minudenciadas e permitiram a individualização de dois grupos de pacientes com ponta-onda lenta. As peculiaridades clínicas de cada grupo foram interpretadas em função do estadio de maturação cerebral durante o qual incidiu a encefalopatia epiléptica difusa.Clinical and electroencephalographic aspects of twenty seven (27 patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome were studied (20 without previous West syndrome, group A, and 7 with this antecedent, group B. The epileptic seizures were characterized through descriptions made by relatives who were in close contact with the patients, and also by direct observation by the author in the clinic. The direct observation was possible due to high frequency rates of the seizures. Different clinical patterns were observed in patients who had and who had not previous history of West syndrome. The analysis of these differences permitted the identification of two groups of patients, although both of them had sharp and slow waves in the EEG. The clinical picture of each group was interpreted as the result of the stage of cerebral maturation at the time the diffuse epileptic encephalopathy occurred.

  7. Decreased cell proliferation and higher oxidative stress in fibroblasts from Down Syndrome fetuses. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Amparo; García-Giménez, José Luis; Audí, Laura; Toran, Nuria; Andaluz, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease and is also known for its decreased incidence of solid tumors and its progeroid phenotype. Cellular and systemic oxidative stress has been considered as one of the Down Syndrome phenotype causes. We correlated, in a preliminary study, the fibroblast proliferation rate and different cell proliferation key regulators, like Rcan1 and the telomere length from Down Syndrome fetuses, with their oxidative stress profile and the Ribonucleic acid and protein expression of the main antioxidant enzymes together with their activity. Increased oxidized glutathione/glutathione ratio and high peroxide production were found in our cell model. These results correlated with a distorted antioxidant shield. The messenger RNA (SOD1) and protein levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase were increased together with a decreased mRNA expression and protein levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). As a consequence the [Cu/ZnSOD/(catalase+GPx)] activity ratio increases which explains the oxidative stress generated in the cell model. In addition, the expression of thioredoxin 1 and glutaredoxin 1 is decreased. The results obtained show a decreased antioxidant phenotype that correlates with increased levels of Regulator of calcineurin 1 and attrition of telomeres, both related to oxidative stress and cell cycle impairment. Our preliminary results may explain the proneness to a progeroid phenotype. © 2013.

  8. [The metabolic and molecular bases of Cockayne syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Núñez-Reveles, Nelly Yazmine

    2010-01-01

    Cockayne is a segmental progeroid syndrome that has autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. It is mainly characterized by Intrauterine growth retardation, severe postnatal growth deficiency, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, wizened face, sensorineural hearing loss, cataracts, dental caries, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, atherosclerosis, proteinuria, micropenis, renal failure, skeletal abnormalities, skin photosensitivity, decreased subcutaneous adipose tissue, cerebral atrophy, dementia, basal ganglia calcifications, ataxia and apraxia. It has a complex phenotype given by genetic heterogeneity. There are five gene responsible for this syndrome: CSA, CSB, XPB, XPD and XPG, in which various mutations have been found. The biochemical effect of these mutations includes dysfunctional protein of the repair system for oxidative damage to DNA, the complex coupled to transcription and the nucleotide excision repair system. Considering the role played for these proteins and its effects on clinical phenotype when they are deficient, we suggest that these genes might be candidates for analyzing susceptibility to common chronic degenerative diseases related to oxidative stress and aging.

  9. Clinical implications of de Barsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lindsay L; Olsen, David A; Smith, Hugh M

    2017-11-17

    De Barsy syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by cutis laxa, progeroid appearance, ophthalmic opacification, skeletal malformations, growth delays, and intellectual disability. The aim of this case series is to identify the anesthetic considerations in the clinical management of patients with de Barsy syndrome. A retrospective case review from 1968 to 2016 was performed at a single tertiary medical center to identify patients with de Barsy syndrome who underwent anesthesia for diagnostic and surgical procedures. We collected and analyzed the perioperative records and following data: age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, relevant comorbidities, surgical procedures, anesthesia management, and observed complications. Three patients underwent 64 unique anesthetics for a diverse collection of diagnostic and surgical procedures. An array of anesthetics and techniques were successfully used. Observations of the perioperative period found 7 episodes of intraoperative hyperthermia (>38.3°), a single difficult airway requiring fiberoptic bronchoscopic-guided intubation, and repeatedly difficult intravenous access. This expanded case series suggests that providers caring for patients with de Barsy syndrome should be aware of potential challenges with airway management, vascular access, and temperature monitoring. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding Werner Syndrome [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra A. Shamanna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging, the universal phenomenon, affects human health and is the primary risk factor for major disease pathologies. Progeroid diseases, which mimic aging at an accelerated rate, have provided cues in understanding the hallmarks of aging. Mutations in DNA repair genes as well as in telomerase subunits are known to cause progeroid syndromes. Werner syndrome (WS, which is characterized by accelerated aging, is an autosomal-recessive genetic disorder. Hallmarks that define the aging process include genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulation of nutrient sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. WS recapitulates these hallmarks of aging and shows increased incidence and early onset of specific cancers. Genome integrity and stability ensure the normal functioning of the cell and are mainly guarded by the DNA repair machinery and telomeres. WRN, being a RecQ helicase, protects genome stability by regulating DNA repair pathways and telomeres. Recent advances in WS research have elucidated WRN’s role in DNA repair pathway choice regulation, telomere maintenance, resolution of complex DNA structures, epigenetic regulation, and stem cell maintenance.

  11. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Makwana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Moyamoya disease is a disorder of blood vessels in the brain, specifically the internal carotid arteries and the arteries that branch from them. The primary idiopathic form “moyamoya disease” has been distinguished from an associated form of “moyamoya syndrome,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease, fibromuscular dysplasia, activated protein C resistance, or head trauma. There have been only 47 previous cases of moyamoya syndrome in association with Down syndrome reported in the world literature. Recently, we have come across a Case of Downs’ Syndrome with Moyamoya Syndrome. Because of its rarity we want to report our case.

  12. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1.

  13. Early Onset Werner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna İmge Aydoğan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a rare autosomal recessive adult-onset progeroid disorder characterized by the early onset of aged-appearance and age-related metabolic disorders. Symptoms of premature aging usually first develop in the second-third decades of life. We report a 27-year-old female who was admitted to our clinic at the age of eighteen with hyperglycemia. She was diagnosed with diabetes and type 4 dyslipidemia at the age of seven. In her family history, her parents were first cousins and she had three healthy brothers. On her first physical examination; she had bird-like face appearance, global hair loss, beaked nose, short stature and she was overweight. She had global hair loss with gray and thin hair. Hoarseness of voice and hyperkeratosis of skin were observed. She had bilateral cataracts and moderate sensorineural hearing loss. On psychiatric examination, borderline mental retardation was detected. She had severe insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia despite levothyroxine, gemfibrozil, omega-3 and intensive insulin treatment. Routine lipid apheresis was performed to lower the triglyceride levels reaching 5256 mg/dL. She also had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, hepatosteatosis, osteoporosis and epilepsy. Disease was accompanied by several congenital deformities, such as Rathke’s cleft cyst, angiomyolipoma and femoral neck hypoplasia. WS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple endocrine manifestations as well as soft tissue changes. We present a case of early disturbances that were diagnosed before typical clinical signs and symptoms. We propose that WS should be kept in mind when type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia are diagnosed early in childhood. Turk Jem 2015; 19: 99-104

  14. Cockayne syndrome: review of 25 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdirim, E; Topçu, M; Ozön, A; Cila, A

    1996-11-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings of 25 patients with classical Cockayne syndrome (CS) are reviewed. A history of consanguinity was present in 21 patients, and 15 patients had at least 1 affected sibling. Apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism, microcephaly, and mental retardation, the most consistent clinical features included photosensitivity (84%), gait disturbances (84%), progeroid appearance (84%), and ocular abnormalities (88%). The most consistent laboratory findings comprised abnormal nerve conduction (slowed conduction in 13 of the 16 cases with an ENMG), and an abnormal brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) and/or audiometry (abnormal in 13 of the 17 cases in whom either one of them were available). Cerebral atrophy and calcification of the basal ganglia were the next more common laboratory findings. Clinical criteria are useful in most instances in the diagnosis of CS. In patients in whom the clinical features are controversial for a diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome, studies directed to disorders of myelination involving both peripheral and central nervous systems in conjunction with audiometry may aid in the diagnosis.

  15. Interstitial Lung Disease in Werner Syndrome: A Case Report of a 55-Year-Old Male Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphaine Goletto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a progeroid or premature aging syndrome characterized by early onset of age-related pathologies and cancer. The average life expectancy of affected people is 52.8 years and tends to increase. The major causes of death are malignancy and myocardial infarction. Increased telomere attrition and decay are thought to play a causative role in the clinical and pathological manifestations of the disease. Although telomere length, with or without germline mutation, is known to be associated with interstitial lung disease, the latter is not associated with WS. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case describing a WS patient with fatal ILD. This case suggests that older patients with WS could develop ILD. Clinical outcome of WS patients may thus be improved by counselling them regarding smoking cessation or other exposure and by proposing antifibrotic therapy.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...... a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  17. Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events: reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michos, Erin D; Sibley, Christopher T; Baer, Jefferson T; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2012-06-05

    Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values <70 mg/dl, but this study had some limitations. Previously, small randomized, clinical trials of niacin plus statins showed that modest regression of carotid atherosclerosis is possible in individuals with CVD, CVD risk equivalents, or atherosclerosis. This viewpoint summarizes these imaging trials studying niacin and places them in the context of the failure of AIM-HIGH to support the HDL-C-increasing hypothesis. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Familial Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome is an acute inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy that is generally considered a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome and is characterized by the clinical triad of ataxia, areflexia, and ophthalmoplegia. Several reports of familial Guillain-Barré syndrome have been reported, indicating a possible underlying genetic and/or environmental predisposition to the development of Guillain-Barré syndrome. A familial association in Miller Fisher syndrome has not previously been described in the literature. We report 2 cases of Miller Fisher syndrome presenting simultaneously in siblings, with a review of recent relevant literature.

  19. Is There a Cure for Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print Is there a cure for Cushing syndrome? Untreated Cushing syndrome can be life-threatening—fortunately, most people ... their previous strength. People who no longer have Cushing syndrome might be more likely to develop diabetes, ...

  20. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  2. Caracterización de cultivos celulares derivados de pacientes con síndrome progeroide neonatal, un nuevo modelo para el estudio de procesos relacionados con el envejecimiento humano / Progeroid neonatal syndrome fibroblast characterization, a new model for studying aging human related processes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Suárez, Nelson Javier

    2009-01-01

    El síndrome de Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (SWR) es un desorden genético raro caracterizado por un envejecimiento prematuro neonatal, deficiencia de la capa de grasa subcutánea; piel delgada, frágil y arrugada y en la mayoría de los casos el deceso sucede durante los primeros meses de vida. La etiología del SWR es desconocida, aunque diferentes autores están de acuerdo en un patrón de herencia autosómico recesivo de la anomalía genética responsable. Estudios de ligamiento recientes en otro síndro...

  3. Coexistence of Reverse Capgras Syndrome, Subjective Double and Cotard Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Mashayekhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Misidentification syndrome is a condition in which the person thinks that familiar persons have been replaced with other one. Coexistence of some types of this syndrome has been reported with other psychiatric syndromes. In this report, we present a 47-year-old married man with coexistence of reverse Capgras and subjective double syndromes with Cotard syndrome. There is no previous report of coexistence of these three forms of delusions in a single case.

  4. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S C

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  5. The epidemiology of premature aging and associated comorbidities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Werner syndrome, also known as childhood- and adulthood-progeria, respectively, represent two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases with clinical...

  6. Exophthalmos in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W

    1996-08-01

    Exophthalmos was noted in 4 of the 12 patients reported by Harvey Cushing in 1932. Although exophthalmos has often been included in clinical descriptions, no previous study has reported actual measurements in patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome, and in control patients. The aim of this study was to obtain these measurements. Thirty-one patients with active Cushing's syndrome (19 iatrogenic), 15 with treated Cushing's syndrome, 18 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 59 control patients, and 3 patients with active Cushing's syndrome plus a family or personal history of thyroid disease. A consecutive series of patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome were assessed. They were compared with patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, and with control patients. Exophthalmos was assessed by the author using a Hertel meter. Urinary free cortisol was measured on patients with Cushing's syndrome, and serum thyroxine was estimated for them, and for the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Exophthalmos exceeding 16 mm (> 2 SD above normal mean) was found in 45% of active Cushing's syndrome, 21% of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 20% of treated Cushing's syndrome, 2% of normal controls, and 77% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. No patient with Cushing's syndrome had significant symptoms due to exophthalmos. Patients with active Cushing's syndrome have statistically significant exophthalmos. This rarely causes symptoms, and diminishes when cortisol concentrations become normal. Cushing's syndrome and autoimmune thyroid disease may coexist in patients with exophthalmos.

  7. Late Onset of Multiple Basal Cell Carcinomas in a Patient with Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome Previously Treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma/ Kasna pojava multiplog bazocelularnog karcinoma kod pacijenta sa Gorlin-Golcovim sindromom prethodno lečenog od Hočkinovog limfoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankova Rumyana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of multiple basal cell carcinomas is commonly associated with immunosuppression or genetic disorders. The latter include congenital diseases such as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas at an early age and a variable combination of other phenotypic abnormalities that result in multiple organ involvement. The susceptibility gene was mapped to chromosome 9q22.3-3.1. Like other tumor suppressor genes, PTCH1 gene shows frequent deletion and a whole variety of other mutations. A high rate of new mutations and the variable expressivity of the condition make full diagnostic assessment difficult, especially in mildly affected individuals with no family history of the condition. It has been postulated that the presence of two major features or one major feature with two minor features classify a condition as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  8. The quadrilateral space syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, S; Miyaji, H; Matoba, M

    1995-05-01

    We describe a 21-year-old woman with left shoulder pain increased by desk work. Left subclavian angiography disclosed occlusion of the posterior circumflex humeral artery on abduction and external rotation of the arm, compatible with the previous reports of the quadrilateral space syndrome. This syndrome should be considered in patients with shoulder pain of unknown aetiology.

  9. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients...

  10. SHORT RIB POLYDACTYLY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Moinfar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRPS is a very rare congenital anomaly that is classified into four subtypes. It is an autosomal recessive inherited disease. We report a case of this syndrome without a previous family history of congenital defects.

  11. 77 FR 70176 - Previous Participation Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Previous Participation Certification AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer... digital submission of all data and certifications is available via HUD's secure Internet systems. However...: Previous Participation Certification. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0118. Form Numbers: HUD-2530 . Description...

  12. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, ...

  13. Retinal folds in Terson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keithahn, M A; Bennett, S R; Cameron, D; Mieler, W F

    1993-08-01

    Perimacular retinal folds have been reported in the shaken baby syndrome, but have not been described in adults with Terson syndrome. The authors present two patients with perimacular retinal folds in adults with Terson syndrome. In one patient, electron microscopy was used to examine the membrane spanning the fold. The membrane spanning the perimacular fold was found to be internal limiting membrane. The pathogenesis of these perimacular folds found in adults sustaining direct head trauma is probably different from that previously described for folds seen in infant eyes with shaken baby syndrome. Retinal folds occurring in Terson syndrome are clinically similar to those seen in the shaken baby syndrome.

  14. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  15. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  16. Nuclear matrix, nuclear envelope and premature aging syndromes in a translational research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Pierre; Navarro, Claire; Harhouri, Karim; Roll, Patrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; Kaspi, Elise; Perrin, Sophie; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lévy, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Lamin A-related progeroid syndromes are genetically determined, extremely rare and severe. In the past ten years, our knowledge and perspectives for these diseases has widely progressed, through the progressive dissection of their pathophysiological mechanisms leading to precocious and accelerated aging, from the genes mutations discovery until therapeutic trials in affected children. A-type lamins are major actors in several structural and functional activities at the nuclear periphery, as they are major components of the nuclear lamina. However, while this is usually poorly considered, they also play a key role within the rest of the nucleoplasm, whose defects are related to cell senescence. Although nuclear shape and nuclear envelope deformities are obvious and visible events, nuclear matrix disorganization and abnormal composition certainly represent the most important causes of cell defects with dramatic pathological consequences. Therefore, lamin-associated diseases should be better referred as laminopathies instead of envelopathies, this later being too restrictive, considering neither the key structural and functional roles of soluble lamins in the entire nucleoplasm, nor the nuclear matrix contribution to the pathophysiology of lamin-associated disorders and in particular in defective lamin A processing-associated aging diseases. Based on both our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and the biological and clinical consequences of progeria and related diseases, therapeutic trials have been conducted in patients and were terminated less than 10 years after the gene discovery, a quite fast issue for a genetic disease. Pharmacological drugs have been repurposed and used to decrease the toxicity of the accumulated, unprocessed and truncated prelaminA in progeria. To date, none of them may be considered as a cure for progeria and these clinical strategies were essentially designed toward reducing a subset of the most dramatic and morbid features

  17. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  18. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ...

  19. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  20. Knowledge and Previous Contraceptive Use by Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information obtained included demographic characteristics, knowledge of and previous use of contraception. Results: Respondents displayed a high level of contraceptive knowledge, as 277 (91.7%) were aware of it. The condom and the combined oral pill were the two contraceptive methods most commonly known, by 254 ...

  1. Subsequent pregnancy outcome after previous foetal death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, J. W.; Korteweg, F. J.; Holm, J. P.; Timmer, A.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; van Pampus, M. G.

    Objective: A history of foetal death is a risk factor for complications and foetal death in subsequent pregnancies as most previous risk factors remain present and an underlying cause of death may recur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate subsequent pregnancy outcome after foetal death and to

  2. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  3. Genetics Home Reference: FOXG1 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contact and a near absence of speech and language skills. Because of these social impairments, FOXG1 syndrome is classified as an autism spectrum disorder. FOXG1 syndrome was previously described as ...

  4. A neuropathological study of early onset Cockayne syndrome with chromosomal anomaly 47XXX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M; Hayakawa, K; Suzuki, F; Sugita, K; Satoh, J; Morimatsu, Y

    1992-01-01

    We present the clinical and neuropathological findings in a female patient with early onset Cockayne syndrome and a chromosomal anomaly (47XXX). The girl was the only child of healthy, unrelated parents. She was born with a birth weight of 1,930 gm. She had progeroid facial features with bilateral cataracts. A diagnosis of 47XXX was made on the basis of a chromosomal study. Physical shortness became increasingly prominent while her weight remained stationary. Psychomotor retardation was noted, and she could never sit alone. A brain CT scan showed cerebral atrophy and calcification of the basal ganglia. Cultured skin fibroblast exhibited significant sensitivity to the ultraviolet light. She died from a chest infection at the age of 7 years and 4 months. Microscopically, the renal glomeruli showed diffuse sclerotic changes with thick capillary basement membranes. A neuropathological examination revealed a very small brain (295 gm), extensive myelin deficiency, gliosis in the white matter, and calcifications in the basal ganglia, and cerebral and cerebellar cortices. The loss of both Purkinje and granular cells was noticed in the cerebellar cortex. This is the first report of a case with the Cockayne syndrome and 47XXX, and the 47XXX in this patient seems to be coincidental.

  5. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Kariminejad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis laxa IIA (ARCL2A, cutis laxa IIB (ARCL2B, and geroderma osteodysplastica (GO, have very similar clinical features, complicating accurate diagnosis. Individuals with these conditions often present with cutis laxa, progeroid features, and hyperextensible joints. These conditions also share additional features, such as short stature, hypotonia, and congenital hip dislocation, but the severity and frequency of these findings are variable in each of these cutis laxa syndromes. The characteristic features for ARCL2A are abnormal isoelectric focusing and facial features, including downslanting palpebral fissures and a long philtrum. Rather, the clinical phenotype of ARCL2B includes severe wrinkling of the dorsum of the hands and feet, wormian bones, athetoid movements, lipodystrophy, cataract and corneal clouding, a thin triangular face, and a pinched nose. Normal cognition and osteopenia leading to pathological fractures, maxillary hypoplasia, and oblique furrowing from the outer canthus to the lateral border of the supraorbital ridge are discriminative features for GO. Here we present 10 Iranian patients who were initially diagnosed clinically using the respective features of each cutis laxa syndrome. Each patient’s clinical diagnosis was then confirmed with molecular investigation of the responsible gene. Review of the clinical features from the cases reported from the literature also supports our conclusions.

  6. Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yu-Seon; Kim, Gun-Ha; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, So-Hee; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome has been previously reported as either otodental syndrome or oculo-oto-dental syndrome. The otodental syndrome is characterized by dental abnormalities and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and by ocular coloboma in some cases. The underlying genetic defect causing otodental syndrome is a hemizygous microdeletion involving the FGF3 gene on chromosome 11q13.3. Recently, a new form of severe deafness, microtia (small ear) and small teeth, without the ...

  7. Expanding the clinical spectrum of B4GALT7 deficiency: homozygous p.R270C mutation with founder effect causes Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartault, François; Munier, Patrick; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Vellayoudom, Jeannine; Doray, Bérénice; Payet, Christine; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Laville, Jean-Marc; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    First described as a variant of Larsen syndrome in Reunion Island (LRS) in the southern Indian Ocean, ‘Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome' is characterized by dwarfism, hyperlaxity, multiple dislocations and distinctive facial features. It overlaps with Desbuquois dysplasia, Larsen syndrome and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with dislocations ascribed to CANT1, FLNB and CHST3 mutations, respectively. We collected the samples of 22 LRS cases. After exclusion of CANT1, FLNB and CHST3 genes, an exome sequencing was performed in two affected second cousins and one unaffected sister. We identified a homozygous missense mutation in B4GALT7, NM_007255.2: c.808C>T p.(Arg270Cys) named p.R270C, in the two affected cases, not present in the unaffected sister. The same homozygous mutation was subsequently identified in the remaining 20 LRS cases. Our findings demonstrate that B4GALT7 is the causative gene for LRS. The identification of a unique homozygous mutation argues in favor of a founder effect. B4GALT7 encodes a galactosyltransferase, required for the initiation of glycoaminoglycan side chain synthesis of proteoglycans. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum of B4GALT7 mutations, initially described as responsible for the progeroid variant of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. It further supports a common physiopathological basis involving proteoglycan synthesis in skeletal disorders with dislocations. PMID:24755949

  8. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  9. Postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Chapman, Kristine; Traboulsee, Anthony

    2011-10-01

    Although postvaccination Guillain-Barré syndrome is commonly reported, there have only been 2 previously reported cases of postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome, and none in association with the novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine. To describe a case of Miller Fisher syndrome following receipt of the seasonal influenza and novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine. Case report and literature review. Vancouver General Hospital. A 77-year-old Chinese woman. The patient presented with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, areflexia, and a sensory neuropathy within 2 weeks of immunization. Findings of parainfectious evaluation were unremarkable. Treatment with 2 courses of intravenous immunoglobulin led to clinical improvement. Her presentation and natural history of disease were similar to the 2 previously published cases. We present the third case of postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome in the literature and the first associated with the novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine.

  10. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A support group can be helpful for emotional support and for giving and receiving practical advice. The following organization provides additional information about Williams Syndrome: Williams Syndrome Association -- www.williams-syndrome.org

  11. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  12. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  13. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  14. Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Asperger Syndrome Information Page Asperger Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder. It is ...

  15. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  16. Surgery of intracranial aneurysms previously treated endovascularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirakotai, Wuttipong; Sure, Ulrich; Yin, Yuhua; Benes, Ludwig; Schulte, Dirk Michael; Bien, Siegfried; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2007-11-01

    To perform a retrospective study on the patients who underwent aneurysmal surgery following endovascular treatment. We performed a retrospective study on eight patients who underwent aneurysmal surgery following endovascular treatment (-attempts) with gugliemi detachable coils (GDCs). The indications for surgery, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes were analyzed. The indications for surgical treatment after GDC coiling of aneurysm were classified into three groups. First group: surgery of incompletely coiled aneurysms (n=4). Second group: surgery of mass effect on the neural structures due to coil compaction or rebleeding (n=2). Third group: surgery of vascular complications after endovascular procedure due to parent artery occlusion or thrombus propagation from aneurysm (n=2). Aneurysm obliterations could be performed in all cases confirmed by postoperative angiography. Six patients had an excellent outcome and returned to their profession. Patient's visual acuity was improved. One individual experienced right hemiparesis (grade IV/V) and hemihypesthesia. Microsurgical clipping is rarely necessary for previously coiled aneurysms. Surgical treatment is uncommonly required when an acute complication arises during endovascular treatment, or when there is a dynamic change of a residual aneurysm configuration over time that is considered to be insecure.

  17. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  18. Capgras syndrome in postictal delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Devavrat; Koirala, Sharad; Lamichhane, Sachin; Paladugu, Anubha; Johal, Rupinder; Lippmann, Steven

    2010-03-01

    A 34-year-old man with a seizure disorder had not been taking anticonvulsant medications regularly. A previous pattern of recurrent seizures resolved after restarting anticonvulsant drugs. Recent seizure episodes were followed by delirium and presentation of Capgras syndrome. A variety of functional and organic etiologies for Capgras syndrome are known. This syndrome has been documented in cases of postictal delirium. These symptoms along with delirium ended with seizure control once back on anticonvulsant medicines.

  19. Capgras Syndrome in Postictal Delirium

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Devavrat; Koirala, Sharad; Lamichhane, Sachin; Paladugu, Anubha; Johal, Rupinder; Lippmann, Steven

    2010-01-01

    A 34-year-old man with a seizure disorder had not been taking anticonvulsant medications regularly. A previous pattern of recurrent seizures resolved after restarting anticonvulsant drugs. Recent seizure episodes were followed by delirium and presentation of Capgras syndrome. A variety of functional and organic etiologies for Capgras syndrome are known. This syndrome has been documented in cases of postictal delirium. These symptoms along with delirium ended with seizure control once back on ...

  20. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  1. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  2. Impaired genome maintenance suppresses the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in mice with Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid van der Pluijm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a photosensitive, DNA repair disorder associated with progeria that is caused by a defect in the transcription-coupled repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER. Here, complete inactivation of NER in Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mutants causes a phenotype that reliably mimics the human progeroid CS syndrome. Newborn Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mice display attenuated growth, progressive neurological dysfunction, retinal degeneration, cachexia, kyphosis, and die before weaning. Mouse liver transcriptome analysis and several physiological endpoints revealed systemic suppression of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1 somatotroph axis and oxidative metabolism, increased antioxidant responses, and hypoglycemia together with hepatic glycogen and fat accumulation. Broad genome-wide parallels between Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- and naturally aged mouse liver transcriptomes suggested that these changes are intrinsic to natural ageing and the DNA repair-deficient mice. Importantly, wild-type mice exposed to a low dose of chronic genotoxic stress recapitulated this response, thereby pointing to a novel link between genome instability and the age-related decline of the somatotroph axis.

  3. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Frailty syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Potpara, Tatjana S; Bjerregaard Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The age of patients presenting with complex arrhythmias is increasing. Frailty is a multifaceted syndrome characterized by an increased vulnerability to stressors and a decreased ability to maintain homeostasis. The prevalence of frailty is associated with age. The aims of this European Heart...... Rhythm Association (EHRA) EP Wire survey were to evaluate the proportion of patients with frailty and its influence on the clinical management of arrhythmias. A total of 41 centres-members of the EHRA Electrophysiology Research Network-in 14 European countries completed the web-based questionnaire...... in June 2017. Patients over 70 years represented 53% of the total treated population, with the proportion of frail elderly individuals reaching approximately 10%; 91.7% of the responding centres reported treating frail subjects in the previous year. The respondents usually recognized frailty based...

  5. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  6. Lynch Syndrome: A Pediatric Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Sherry C; Durno, Carol A; Erdman, Steven H

    .... The most common hereditary colon cancer susceptibility condition, Lynch syndrome (LS), previously known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, is an autosomal dominant condition caused by a germline mutation in 1 of 4 DNA mismatch repair (MMR...

  7. Rates of induced abortion in Denmark according to age, previous births and previous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise H. Hansen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the effects of various socio-demographic determinants on a woman's risk of having an abortion are relatively well-documented, less attention has been given to the effect of previous abortions and births. Objective: To study the effect of previous abortions and births on Danish women's risk of an abortion, in addition to a number of demographic and personal characteristics. Data and methods: From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtained data on the number of live births and induced abortions by year (1981-2001, age (16-39, county of residence and marital status. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of the explanatory variables on the probability of having an abortion in a relevant year. Main findings and conclusion: A woman's risk of having an abortion increases with the number of previous births and previous abortions. Some interactions were was found in the way a woman's risk of abortion varies with calendar year, age and parity. The risk of an abortion for women with no children decreases while the risk of an abortion for women with children increases over time. Furthermore, the risk of an abortion decreases with age, but relatively more so for women with children compared to childless women. Trends for teenagers are discussed in a separate section.

  8. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-09-21

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Children with Usher syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......, 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...

  10. Melatonin alterations and brain acetylcholine lesions in sleep disorders in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Yumi; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Miyata, Rie; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2014-11-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficient nucleotide excision repair. Patients with CS exhibit progeroid features, developmental delay, and various neurological disorders; they are also known to suffer from sleep problems, which have never been investigated in detail. The aim of this study is to investigate the pathogenesis of sleep disorders in patients with CS. We performed a questionnaire survey of the families of patients with CS, enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses of the melatonin metabolite, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SM), in the patients' urine, and immunohistochemistry in the hypothalamus, the basal nucleus of Meynert (NbM), and the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) in four autopsy cases. Sleep-wakefulness rhythms were disturbed in patients with CS, and these disturbances seemed to be related to a reduced urinary excretion of 6-SM. In addition, although the hypothalamic nuclei were comparatively preserved, acetylcholine neurons (AchNs) were severely decreased in the NbM and PPN. AchNs modulate both arousal and rapid eye movement sleep, and selective lesions of AchNs in the PPN and/or NbM in combination with disturbed melatonin metabolism might be involved in the sleep disorders in CS. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Clinical and cellular biologic diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C H; Ko, Y M; Chien, C H; Yang, R C; Hung, K L; Hsiao, T J; Lee, C I

    1991-12-01

    We report a case of Cockayne syndrome. A 6-year-old boy presented with a progeroid face, dwarfism, psychomotor retardation, skin photosensitivity and retinal pigmented degeneration. Neurological study disclosed slowed nerve conduction velocities and a brain CT showed calcification in the basal ganglia. Auditory brain stem evoked potential showed prolonged interpeak latency of wave I to wave V. Laboratory evaluation revealed mild liver dysfunction and peripheral eosinophilia. Fibroblast cultures from the patient and his family were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light of 254 nm, ranging from 1 to 10 J/m2. Under 1 J/m2 irradiation, the surviving fraction of the fibroblasts from the patient, his mother, and a control subject were 40%, 50%, 90% respectively. If the fibroblasts of these subjects were exposed to 2 J/m2 and 3 J/m2 irradiation, the surviving fraction changed to 10%, 22%, 80% and 1.5%, 9%, 68%, respectively. However, fibroblasts from his sister and father showed the same surviving fraction as the control. The study showed that fibroblasts from the patient and his mother were extremely sensitive to UV light irradiation. We also study the concentration of the pyrimidine dimer of DNA in the patient and the control subject. Pyrimidine dimer showed no difference between the patient and the normal subject before and after 24-hour UV irradiation. These results suggest that the sensitivity to UV of Cockayne fibroblasts may be due to a ligase deficiency or to a replicon initiation disturbance in Cockayne cells.

  12. Cockayne syndrome with early onset of manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, D B; Marquis, P; Shertzer, M E; Burton, B K

    1982-10-01

    The Cockayne syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome of growth failure and characteristic physical and pathological changes. Typically the disorder becomes manifest in the second year of life; growth and development are normal during the first year. We report presumably monozygotic twins with otherwise classic Cockayne syndrome but with a prenatal onset. Several previously described cases seem to represent a similar form of Cockayne syndrome with early onset of growth failure and development delay.

  13. A new mutation in blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Gul, Davut; Demirkaya, Erkan; Gok, Faysal

    2015-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2-13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  14. Prolonged QT interval in Rett syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ellaway, C; Sholler, G; Leonard, H; Christodoulou, J

    1999-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown aetiology. A prolonged QT interval has been described previously in patients with Rett syndrome. To investigate QT prolongation and the presence of cardiac tachyarrhythmias in Rett syndrome electrocardiography and 24 hour Holter monitoring were performed prospectively in a cohort of 34 girls with Rett syndrome. The corrected QT value was prolonged in nine patients. Compared with a group of healthy controls of a...

  15. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ...

  16. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  17. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  18. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  19. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ...

  20. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criton S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a hamartomatous disorder characterised by focal overgrowths that can involve any structure of the body. An eleven-year-old girl with Proteus syndrome has been described with clitoromegaly.

  1. Overlap syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Rust, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In hepatology, the term overlap syndrome describes variant forms of the major hepatobiliary autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  3. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  4. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  5. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  6. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  7. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  8. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Many people with Alport syndrome also have hearing problems and abnormalities with their eyes. Other signs and ... and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, hearing and vision problems tend to be more common in males than ...

  9. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ...

  10. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  11. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  12. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  13. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Preferred Language Guide Down Syndrome Facts Down ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Facts Preferred Language Guide Publications ...

  14. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Usher Syndrome > Facts About Usher Syndrome Facts About Usher Syndrome This information was developed by the National Eye ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Usher Syndrome Defined What is Usher syndrome? Usher syndrome is ...

  15. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  16. The developmental trajectory of disruptive behavior in Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Lauren J; Gray, Kylie M; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome. Changes in behaviors were measured using validated items from the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). The results indicate that, while verbal aggression shows no evidence of diminishing with age, physical aggression, and temper tantrums decline with age before 19 years for people with Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and William syndrome; and after 19 years for people with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings offer a somewhat more optimistic outlook for people with an intellectual disability than has previously been suggested. Research is needed to investigate the mechanisms predisposing people with PWS to persistence of temper tantrums and physical aggression into adulthood. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much saturated fat, and does not get enough physical activity may develop metabolic syndrome. Other causes include insulin resistance and a family ... you’re overweight. It also includes getting more physical activity and eating a ... syndrome treatment If you already have metabolic syndrome, making ...

  19. Goodpasture Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessary. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition Eating, diet, and nutrition have not been shown to play a role in causing or preventing Goodpasture syndrome. Points to Remember Goodpasture syndrome is a pulmonary-renal syndrome, which is a group of acute illnesses ...

  20. [Reye's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, I

    2000-11-01

    A nationwide survey on Reye's syndrome(RS) was described. And problems between RS and influenza virus such as etiology, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and epidemiology were reviewed. So-called aspirin issue on RS was re-evaluated according to recent advance of RS research. Finally future aspect of Reye's syndrome was also discussed.

  1. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Reye's Syndrome Information Page Reye's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? Much ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Reye's Syndrome × What research is being done? Much of the ...

  2. [Cardiorenal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleck, D; John, S

    2017-09-13

    Patients in the intensive care unit often suffer from cardiorenal syndrome, which can have an important influence on the patient's outcome. The heart and kidney influence each other via organ crosstalk. We screened and evaluated current publications on cardiorenal syndromes and their therapy. A key role in the management of cardiorenal syndromes is renal decongestion via loop diuretics.

  3. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome features in patients previously treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Sjoerd D.; Claessen, Kim M. J. A.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; van Beek, Andre P.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Pereira, Alberto M.; Biermasz, Nienke R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patients treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA) with suprasellar extension show disturbed sleep characteristics, possibly related to hypothalamic dysfunction. In addition to hypopituitarism, both structural hypothalamic damage and sleep restriction per se are associated

  4. Lemierre's Syndrome Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is an anaerobic suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein secondary to oropharyngeal infection. There is only one previous case report in pregnancy which was complicated by premature delivery of an infant that suffered significant neurological damage. We present an atypical case diagnosed in the second trimester with a live birth at term. By reporting this case, we hope to increase the awareness of obstetricians to the possibility of Lemierre's syndrome when patients present with signs of unabating oropharyngeal infection and pulmonary symptoms.

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N. Hein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS developing as a result of Lemierre’s syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre’s syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre’s syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care.

  6. Culture-bound syndromes: the story of dhat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathipala, A; Siribaddana, S H; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2004-03-01

    Culture-bound syndrome is a term used to describe the uniqueness of some syndromes in specific cultures. Dhat (semen-loss anxiety) has been considered to be an exotic 'neurosis of the Orient'. To ascertain the presence of similar symptoms and syndromes in different cultures and historical settings. Electronic and manual literature searches were used to gather information on the existence and description of semen-loss anxiety in different cultures and settings. Most of the empirical studies on dhat syndrome have emerged from Asia, whereas its concepts have been described historically in other cultures, including Britain, the USA and Australia. The different sources indicate the universality of symptoms and global prevalence of this condition, despite its image as a 'neurosis of the Orient'. It appears that dhat (semen-loss anxiety) is not as culture-bound as previously thought. We propose that the concept of culture-bound syndromes should be modified in line with DSM-IV recommendations.

  7. Poland syndrome with dextrocardia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiwango, G W; Swan, M C; Nyende, R; Hodges, A M

    2010-11-01

    Poland syndrome is a rare congenital condition presentingwith typical features including an absent costosternal head of pectoralis major andipsilateral brachysyndactyly. There are many clinical variations of the syndrome including rib defects, absence of shoulder girdle muscle and breast hypoplasia or agenesis. Dextrocardia is rarely associated with Poland Syndrome with only 22 cases being previously reported in the worldwide literature. Whereas 'classical' Poland syndrome is predominantly right sided, all cases associated with dextrocardia have been left sided. We report a further case of left sided Poland syndrome with dextrocardia which might have important implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of this unusual condition.

  8. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  9. Overexpression of parkin rescues the defective mitochondrial phenotype and the increased apoptosis of Cockayne Syndrome A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Barbara; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Romagnoli, Alessandra; De Nuccio, Chiara; Savino, Miriam; Pietraforte, Donatella; Lanzafame, Manuela; Calcagnile, Angelo Salvatore; Fortini, Paola; Baccarini, Sara; Orioli, Donata; Degan, Paolo; Visentin, Sergio; Stefanini, Miria; Isidoro, Ciro; Fimia, Gian Maria; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2017-11-28

    The ERCC8/CSA gene encodes a WD-40 repeat protein (CSA) that is part of a E3-ubiquitin ligase/COP9 signalosome complex. When mutated, CSA causes the Cockayne Syndrome group A (CS-A), a rare recessive progeroid disorder characterized by sun sensitivity and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CS-A cells features include ROS hyperproduction, accumulation of oxidative genome damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased apoptosis that may contribute to the neurodegenerative process. In this study, we show that CSA localizes to mitochondria and specifically interacts with the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein (DRP1) that is hyperactivated when CSA is defective. Increased fission is not counterbalanced by increased mitophagy in CS-A cells thus leading to accumulation of fragmented mitochondria. However, when mitochondria are challenged with the mitochondrial toxin carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenyl hydrazine, CS-A fibroblasts undergo mitophagy as efficiently as normal fibroblasts, suggesting that this process remains targetable to get rid of damaged mitochondria. Indeed, when basal mitophagy was potentiated by overexpressing Parkin in CSA deficient cells, a significant rescue of the dysfunctional mitochondrial phenotype was observed. Importantly, Parkin overexpression not only reactivates basal mitophagy, but plays also an anti-apoptotic role by significantly reducing the translocation of Bax at mitochondria in CS-A cells. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the role of CSA in mitochondrial maintenance and might open new perspectives for therapeutic approaches.

  10. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Ege

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI syndrome is a recently understood hip condition that describes the pathologic contact between the femoral neck and the acetabular rim. Previously, it was also called and ldquo;acetabular rim syndrome and rdquo; or and ldquo;cervicoacetabular impingement syndrome and rdquo;. It is characterized by a developmental disorder affecting the femoral neck, acetabular rim and labrum. The chronic irritation on the hip joint causes chondral damage and mechanical changes, and these degenerative changes eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Two types of FAI have been described: Cam type and pincer type. Treatment options for FAI are conservative, open, mini open and arthroscopic surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 42-47

  11. METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dikanović, Marinko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders that include hyperlipidemia, inadequate insulin resistance, hypertension, and abdominal type obesity. Patients who suffer from this syndrome have an increased risk for heart disease and blood vessel disease, stroke and type II diabetes. The world's leading healthcare institutions also disagree on the exact definition of this organization poremećaja. NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program) defines metabolic syndrome as a situation in which the...

  12. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  13. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  14. [Caroli's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Qiu, Zheng-Qing; Wei, Min

    2009-01-01

    Caroli's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease. Here a case of Caroli's syndrome associated with medullary sponge kidney was reported. The patient was a 2-years and 10 months-old boy. He presented with hepatosplenomegaly. Fever, abdominal pain or jaundice was not found. The imaging examination showed intrahepatic bile duct dilation, splenomegaly, medullary sponge kidney and nephrocalcinosis. After introduction of the case, this paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of Caroli's syndrome.

  15. Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS Myotonia Congenita Information Page NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Congenital ...

  16. [Cardiorenal syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Késöi, István; Sági, Balázs; Vas, Tibor; Pintér, Tünde; Kovács, Tibor; Wittmann, István; Nagy, Judit

    2011-09-18

    Cardiac and kidney diseases are very common, and increasingly coexist. Classification for cardiorenal syndrome and for its specific subtypes has been developed and published recently by a consensus group of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative. Cardiorenal syndromes have been classified according to whether the impairment of each organ is primary, secondary or whether heart and kidney dysfunction occurs simultaneously as a systemic disease. The different syndromes were classified into five subtypes. Type-1: acute cardiorenal syndrome: an abrupt worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-2: chronic cardiorenal syndrome: chronic abnormalities in cardiac function causing kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-3: acute renocardiac syndrome: abrupt worsening of kidney function leading to heart injury and/or dysfunction. Type-4: chronic renocardiac syndrome: chronic kidney diseases leading to heart injury, disease and/or dysfunction. Type-5: secondary cardiorenal syndrome: acute or chronic systemic diseases leading to simultaneous injury and/or dysfunction of heart and kidney. The identification of patients and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying each syndrome subtype will help cardiologists, nephrologists and physicians working on intensive care units to characterize groups of their patients with cardiac and renal impairment and to provide a more accurate treatment for them.

  17. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  18. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  19. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  20. Progestogens and Cushing's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harte, C

    2012-02-03

    We report 3 patients where Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA = Provera) and Megestrol Acetate (Megace) in doses used for therapy of breast cancer, caused clinical hypercortisolism and Cushing\\'s syndrome. Studies of the toxicity of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate list the commonest adverse events at 500 mg\\/day as weight gain, water retention, increased blood pressure, tremor, moon face, sweating, muscle cramps, vaginal bleeding and increased appetite. Glucocorticoid-like effects are seen in up to 30% of patients treated for longer than 6 weeks with mostly large doses of the order of 1500 mg\\/day but Cushing\\'s syndrome has been reported in patients taking 400 mg\\/day. Neither the glucocorticoid-like effects or Cushing\\'s syndrome have been previously observed with Megestrol Acetate. In the elderly female population receiving progestogens for neoplastic disease the progestogen itself could be an appreciable cause of morbidity both by causing glucocorticoid-like effects and Cushing\\'s syndrome but also by lack of awareness of the danger of sudden withdrawal of these compounds when the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is suppressed. The signs and symptoms could be easily overlooked unless appropriate testing for Cushing\\'s syndrome is carried out. While the progestogen may have to be continued indefinitely a dose decrease may be feasible with reduction of morbidity.

  1. [Cockayne syndrome in two brothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, J S; da Silva, E O; de Mello, R J; Fittipaldi, H; de Carvalho, M W

    1995-01-01

    We report the clinical history of two brothers with the classical Cockayne syndrome. The main manifestations consisted of cachectic dwarfism, mental retardation, intracranial calcifications, microcephaly, enophthalmos, senile appearance, joint hypomotility and skin photosensitivity. In one of these children, who died at 10 years of age of bronchopneumonia, necropsy studies revealed a variety of anomalies, mainly encephalic,which included an arachnoidal cyst at the base of the cerebellum, a defect apparently previously undescribed inpatients with this syndrome.

  2. The Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, F; Lenard, H G

    1991-02-01

    We describe the seventh patient with the Floating-Harbor syndrome. Similar to previous cases in the literature this girl presented with proportionate intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, normocephaly, triangular face with bulbous nose, long eyelashes, short upper lip, small vermilion border of upper lip, dorsally rotated ears, deep nuchal hair line, hirsutism, and clinodactyly of little fingers. She exhibited mental retardation and retarded speech development. Clinical symptoms and differential diagnosis of this rare syndrome are briefly discussed.

  3. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  4. Molecular spectrum of excision repair cross-complementation group 8 gene defects in Chinese patients with Cockayne syndrome type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Huang, Yu; Yan, Ming; Li, Jiuwei; Ding, Changhong; Jin, Hong; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yanling; Wu, Baiyan; Chen, Dafang

    2017-10-20

    There are two genetics complementary groups Cockayne syndrome type A and B (CS-A and CS-B OMIM 216400, 133540), which is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the excision repair cross-complementation group 8 gene (ERCC8) result in CS-A, and mutations in ERCC6 result in CS-B. Homozygous ERCC6/ERCC8 mutations also result in UV-sensitive syndrome. In this study, twenty-one Han Chinese patients with CS were investigated to identify mutations in ERCC8/ERCC6, of which thirteen cases with CS-A were identified with the mutations of ERCC8. There are five types mutations of ERCC8 in our study, such as exon 4 rearrangement, c.394_398delTTACA, c.299insA, c.843 + 2 T > C, and c.2 T > A. An estimated frequency of exon 4 rearrangement accounts for 69.23% and c.394_398delTTACA accounts for 11.53% in our cohort. Haplotype analysis revealed that the exon 4 rearrangement and c.394_398delTTACA mutations originated from a common founder in the Chinese population respectively. With the identification of three novel ERCC8 mutations, this study expanded the molecular spectrum of known ERCC8 defects, and furthermore, suggests that the exon 4 rearrangement and c.394_398delTTACA mutations may be a common underlying cause of CS-A in the Chinese population, which is different from that in other populations.

  5. Crisponi/CISS1 syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    AlHashem, Amal M; Majeed-Saidan, Muhammad Ali; Ammari, Amer N

    2016-01-01

    Crisponi/CISS1 syndrome (MIM#272430) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by major feeding difficulties, camptodactyly, and anhidrosis in early childhood; and the subsequent development of paradoxical cold-induced sweating and scoliosis later in life. The syndrome is caused...... unpublished, that the homogeneity of the recently described c.983dupG (p.Ser328Argfs∗2) mutation in CRLF1 was associated with a highly variable degree of severity, and that the phenotype significantly overlaps with the recently described COG6-related anhidrosis syndrome (MIM#615328). Another fifth previously...

  6. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner; Özge Keleş; Nevzat Uzuner

    2016-01-01

    Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual fie...

  7. Previous Second Trimester Abortion: A risk factor for third trimester ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature on spontaneous rupture of the uterus is scanty but cases occurring after hysteroscopic metroplasty, resectroscopy for Asherman´s syndrome, hysteroscopic fundal perforation, and voluntary termination of pregnancy and in a primiparous woman are reported. Spontaneous uterine rupture though rare should always ...

  8. Investigation of previously implicated genetic variants in chronic tic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Londono, Douglas; Gordon, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Genetic studies in Tourette syndrome (TS) are characterized by scattered and poorly replicated findings. We aimed to replicate findings from candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Our cohort included 465 probands with chronic tic disorder (93% TS) and both parents from 412 fam...

  9. Melting graft wound syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiou-Mei Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melting graft wound syndrome is characterized by progressive epidermal loss from a previously well-taken skin graft, healed burn, or donor site. It may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. We report a 23-year-old flame-burned patient with second- to third-degree burns involving more than 70% of the total body surface area, whose condition was complicated with septic shock. The patient presented with erosions and ulcers occurring on previously well-taken skin graft recipient sites over both legs and progressive epidermal loss on donor sites over the back. The patient's presentation was compatible with the diagnosis of melting graft wound syndrome, and we successfully treated the patient with debridement and supportive treatment.

  10. Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, E D; Zimmerman, A W; Grunnet, M L; Lewis, R A; Spackman, T J

    1982-12-01

    The diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome was established with the aid of cranial computed tomography (CT) in a child with growth deficiency, mental retardation, and neurologic findings which are typical for this rare childhood disorder. Calcification of basal ganglia and hydrocephalus ex vacuo are neuropathologic characteristics of Cockayne syndrome which may be present on CT as early as 3 years of age.

  11. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  12. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  13. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  14. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or nonvasospastic angina secondary ... to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral ... a likely diagnosis and blood was sent for.

  15. Cardiorenal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schetz, Miet

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials.

  16. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  17. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  18. Marshall's syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Elisa; de Almeida, Ana Paula Moura; Souza, Gabriela Maria Assis de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Marshall´s syndrome is a form of acquired cutis laxa without systemic involvement, which is preceded by an inflammatory dermatitis with a neutrophilic component. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy with clinical and histopathological features of this syndrome. The etiology remains unknown and there is no definitive treatment. PMID:23739715

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Koryachkin

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent mo...

  20. Netherton′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M L Khatri

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6 year old Libyan boy had diffuse erythema at birth and later developed pruritic, maculo-papular, papular, circinat c, double-edge, scaly lesions, suggestive of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa (ILC.Hisscalp hair were brittle and sparse with partial patchy alopecia, showing change of trichorrhexis invaginata, these -associations being characteristic of Netherton′s syndrome. The boy had slightly stunted growth; a feature which has not been recorded in previously reported cases.

  1. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Olivier

    2002-05-01

    CREST syndrome has been described as a form of progressive systemic sclerosis in which there is relatively limited involvement of the skin, prominence of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction and telangiectasia. The acronym CREST was coined in 1964 by Winterbauer in the USA but the very first case report was by French physicians Thibierge and Weissenbach in 1910. Antinuclear antibodies recognizing chromosomal centromere proteins are characteristic of CREST syndrome and are present in more than 50% of the cases. The prognosis of CREST syndrome is relatively good with a long lasting disease duration (>10 years). Two complications are seldom associated with CREST syndrome: digital gangrene with finger losses and pulmonary hypertension (3 to 14% of CREST syndrome). Pulmonary hypertension is a very late event and the prognosis is very severe (mortality rate of 50% after 2 years).

  3. Cowden Syndrome and Concomitant Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Seppo W; Ringholm, Lene; Dali, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    Cowden Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. Patients with Cowden Syndrome are at increased risk of various benign and malignant neoplasms in breast, endometrium, thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are ubiquitous neoplasms that may...... occur anywhere in the human body. Bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors include four different histological subtypes, among these, typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoids. No association between Cowden Syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors has previously been described. We present two cases of Cowden...

  4. Generaliserede kramper som debutsymptom ved Gitelmans syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Carolina; Jeppesen, Eva Mosfeldt; Mortensen, Henrik B

    2009-01-01

    Gitelman's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome presenting with hypocalciuria, hypomagnesiemia and hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis. This case reports a patient admitted with generalized seizures with the above-mentioned biochemical abnormalities, thus representing a rare onset...... of Gitelman's syndrome which - to our knowledge - has not been described previously. The patient had a homozygote deletion of the CLC-KB gene, CLCNKB. The case was successfully treated by correcting hypokalemia and hypomagnesiemia with supplemental potassium and magnesium. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Mar-2...

  5. 22 CFR 40.91 - Certain aliens previously removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens previously removed. 40.91... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Aliens Previously Removed § 40.91 Certain aliens previously removed. (a) 5-year bar. An alien who has been found inadmissible, whether as a result...

  6. Bilateral orbital infarction and retinal detachment in a previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone infarction involving the orbit in sickle cell disease is not common. Bilateral orbital infarction in a previously undiagnosed sickle cell hemoglobinopathy has not been previously reported. In this report, we present a case of an 11‑year‑old previously undiagnosed sickle cell disease Nigerian girl with severe acute bilateral ...

  7. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabham, William W; Lewis, Geoffrey F; Bonnema, David D; Nielsen, Christopher D; O'Brien, Terrence X

    2011-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is usually characterized by left ventricular anteroapical dysfunction in the absence of significant coronary disease commonly precipitated by an emotional or stressful trigger. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually diagnosed on the basis of symptoms, family history, echocardiography, or by the presence of a characteristic murmur. We report a unique case of TCM occurring in a patient with previously undiagnosed HCM with left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction who presented with an acute coronary syndrome and ultimately underwent successful alcohol septal ablation. The potential pathophysiologic correlations are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T W

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and recently nodular hyperplasia of the liver has been reported in patients with early stage PBC. We present a case of NRHL with CREST syndrome and serological and biochemical features of PBC, a newly recognised overlap syndrome. Images Figure PMID:2583572

  9. [Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-15

    In this study we report on the different genetic syndromes in which autism has been described as one of the possible manifestations. Certain genetic syndromes are providing us with extremely valuable information about the role played by genetics in autism. This is the case of the following syndromes: Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, 15q11-q13 duplication, fragile X syndrome, fragile X premutation, deletion of chromosome 2q, XYY syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Apert syndrome, mutations in the ARX gene, De Lange syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome, Williams syndrome, Rett syndrome, Noonan syndrome, Down syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Steinert disease, tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Lujan-Fryns syndrome, Moebius syndrome, hypomelanosis of Ito, neurofibromatosis type 1, CHARGE syndrome and HEADD syndrome.

  10. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  11. Bloom syndrome in an Indian child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2005-01-01

    A girl presented with severely stunted growth, photosensitivity, and a characteristic facies. Cytogenetic studies were suggestive of Bloom syndrome. This disorder has not been previously documented in the literature in an Indian child. Minor variations in characteristics in this patient have been highlighted. Cytogenetically, she was found to be a low sister chromatid exchange mosaicism of Bloom syndrome.

  12. Extensive thoracolumbosacral vertebral osteomyelitis after Lemierre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, D. H R; van Dijk, M.; Hoepelman, A. I M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074382160; Oner, F. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188615326; Verlaan, J. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269057285

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a unique case of multilevel vertebral osteomyelitis after Lemierre syndrome. Methods: A previously healthy 27-year-old man presented in the Emergency Department in septic shock because of Lemierre syndrome for which he was subsequently treated with intravenous benzylpenicillin

  13. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. ... They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: ...

  14. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  15. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  16. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism experiencing mental health problems

    OpenAIRE

    H. Heathcote

    1999-01-01

    No research has previously been done regarding the phenomenon of adolescents who have previously been involved in Satanism and who experience obstacles in their strive for mental health. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism present behavioral problems like aggressive outbursts, depression, “ psychosis” or suicide attempts, that could lead to suicide. In the phenomenonanalysis semi-structured, phenomenological interviews were performed with the respondents and their parents. The respond...

  17. Malpuech syndrome: three patients and a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S.; Brunner, H.G.; Dael, C.M. van; Essen, A.J. van

    2005-01-01

    We describe three patients with Malpuech syndrome from two families. Previously, 10 patients from 6 families have been reported. Consanguinity in two families suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Growth retardation, mental retardation, cleft lip, and/or palate, hypertelorism, urogenital

  18. Malpuech syndrome : Three patients and a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstjens-Frederikse, WS; Brunner, HG; van Dael, CML; van Essen, AJ

    2005-01-01

    We describe three patients with Malpucch syndrome from two families. Previously, 10 patients from 6 families have been reported. Consanguinity in two families suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Growth retardation, mental retardation, cleft lip, and/or palate, hypertelorism, urogenital

  19. Poly-epiphyseal overgrowth: description of a previously unreported skeletal dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazzaglia, Ugo E.; Bonaspetti, Giovanni [University of Brescia, Orthopaedic Clinic, Brescia (Italy); Beluffi, Giampiero [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Marchi, Antonietta; Bozzola, Mauro; Savasta, Salvatore [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Paediatric Clinic, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A skeletal dysplasia with previously unreported features is presented. Its evolution was characterized by growth abnormalities of bones without involvement of other organs. Advanced bone age, increased stature and irregular epiphyseal ossification with stippling of the main long bones were documented. Physeal overgrowth was massive in the left proximal humerus and femur. Furthermore, the hip joint appeared fused with an abundant mass of pathological calcific tissue extending from the femur to the ilium. Pathological epiphyses were characterized by anarchic cartilaginous proliferation with multiple ossification centres, while lamellar bone apposition and remodelling were normal. The observed bone changes were different from those in any previously reported syndrome, metabolic defect or bone dysplasia. However, they clearly indicated a defect of endochondral ossification with some resemblance to phenotypes observed in dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica. (orig.)

  20. Moebius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1990-01-01

    Brain stem calcification on CT scan, suggesting prenatal brain stem ischemia, is reported in an infant with Moebius syndrome examined in the Department of Pediatrics and Neonatal Medicine, State University of Gent, Gent, Belgium.

  1. Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the set located behind your jaw and in front of your ears Skin rashes or dry skin Vaginal dryness Persistent dry cough Prolonged fatigue Causes Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder. Your immune system mistakenly ...

  2. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Genetic Brain Disorders Show More Show Less ... Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of ...

  3. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  4. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a ... medicine to treat an inflammatory disease leads to Cushing's. Some kinds of tumors produce a hormone that ...

  6. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drawings. Frequently, there is also an impairment in reading. Children with a high level of intellectual functioning as well as those with brain damage may be affected with the disorder. × Definition Gerstmann's syndrome is a cognitive impairment that results ...

  7. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Paraneoplastic Syndromes Information ...

  8. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information ...

  9. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormone. People suffering from depression, alcoholism, malnutrition, or panic disorders also have increased cortisol levels. When the ... five times more often than men. Ectopic ACTH Syndrome Some benign or, more often, cancerous tumors that ...

  10. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Diarrhea Reye's syndrome Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  11. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a focal brain lesion (damage contained to one area of the brain) surgery may be beneficial. Other therapies are ... Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page ...

  12. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  13. Klinefelter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility is the most common symptom of Klinefelter syndrome. Symptoms may include any of the following: Abnormal body proportions (long legs, short trunk, shoulder equal to hip size) Abnormally large breasts ( gynecomastia ) ...

  14. Angelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the gene Other tests may include: Brain MRI EEG Treatment There is no cure for Angelman syndrome. ... nih.gov/pubmed/20301323 . Accessed August 1, 2015. Review Date 8/1/2015 Updated by: Chad Haldeman- ...

  15. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  16. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programs can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  17. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of survived sudden cardiac arrest Because of the nature of the heart rhythm abnormality, medications usually aren’t used to treat Brugada syndrome. A medical device called an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is the ...

  18. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether you have Marfan syndrome. Medical and Family Histories Your doctor will ask about your medical history ... and football. You also may need to avoid sports that involve physical contact with other players or ...

  19. Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may cause problems with chewing Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Exams and Tests A doctor can often make ... those with Down syndrome to: Be taught about pregnancy and taking the proper precautions Learn to advocate ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an increased risk of an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) due to the autoimmune disorder Hashimoto's thyroiditis. They also have an increased risk of diabetes. Some women with Turner syndrome have gluten intolerance (celiac disease) or inflammatory bowel disease. Skeletal ...

  1. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  2. Horner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether treatment of the cause is successful. Possible Complications There are no direct complications of Horner syndrome ... Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  3. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord ... basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects ...

  4. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barré Syndrome Information Page Headache Information Page Hemicrania Continua Information Page Hemifacial Spasm Information Page Hereditary Spastic ... the Spotlight Find NINDS Clinical Trials Patient & Caregiver Education Fact Sheets Hope Through Research Know Your Brain ...

  5. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  6. Goldenhar Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fariba Tarhani

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Goldenhar Syndrome is a congenital abnormally which manly affects face, but another organs involvement should be considered .Cardiac problems are the main causes of death in these patients.

  7. Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nand Lal

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease of complex clinical phenotype that usually presents in early childhood. Characteristically the child presents with delayed milestones, growth and mental retardation associated with typical facies, photosensitivity, retinitis pigmentosa, deafness and ataxia. The various features are attributed to abnormal transcription rather than abnormal repair of photodamaged DNA. Based on clinical criteria a classical case of Cockayne syndrome in a 7 year old girl is described.

  8. Reye's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolmson, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses Reye's syndrome and the hypotheses relating to its causes and associating its incidence with that of chickenpox and influenza A and B. The recent decline in the incidence of Reye's syndrome appears to be related to the reduced use of Aspirin in children and adolescents. Although evidence so far is circumstantial, North American P(a)ediatric Associations have indicated that Aspirin should not be used to control fever in children who have viral infections but es...

  9. [Clinical and cellular studies in a patient with Cockayne syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C; Petecca, M C; Baricci, D; Lagomarsini, P; Stefanini, M

    1992-12-01

    Hypersensitivity to the lethal effect of ultraviolet light (UV) and other DNA-damaging agents has been observed in cells from patients affected by Cockayne syndrome, suggesting that this syndrome is deficient in the capability to repair damage in cellular DNA. We report a case showing the main clinical features of Cockayne syndrome in which the clinical and cellular photosensitivity described as typical for Cockayne syndrome is not present. These cytological results suggest that there is considerable clinical and cellular heterogeneity in Cockayne syndrome and that cellular sensitivity to UV might not be as essential for the diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome as previously thought.

  10. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A.; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C.; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently,

  11. [Jerusalem syndrome - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczyk, Anna; Swiecicki, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to present the case of a patient who developed acute psychotic symptoms on her visit to Jerusalem. The analysis of the clinical case and medical history. The presented 62-year-old women with a history of previous psychiatric disorder arrived with her husband to Jerusalem as a part of organised touristic group. She developed acute psychotic reaction through some stages characteristic for the third type of Jerusalem syndrome. Symptoms resolved completely soon after returning to Poland and admission to the hospital where an antipsychotic treatment was performed. Despite the rare occurrence of this phenomenon, it is worth noting that we can divide Jerusalem syndrome into three types depending on its clinical course, patient's history of previous psychiatric disorders and this division has some clinical implications. This syndrome can be also considered in the context of some factors connected with travelling in general which may be responsible for psychiatric disturbances occurring among travelers. The course of psychiatric disturbances in the presented patient resembled the third type of Jerusalem syndrome despite her past psychiatric history and probably travelling caused her decompensations. In clinical practice we have to remember that in case of the patients with a known psychiatric history, clinical evaluation may be useful before travelling. In previously healthy patients developing the third type of the Jerusalem syndrome early intervention and separation from Jerusalem and its holy places and their contact with family are crucial for soon recovery.

  12. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepe G

    2016-05-01

    losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential biomarkers of clinical severity. Keywords: Marfan syndrome, thoracic aortic aneurysm, fibrillin 1, cardiovascular manifestations, diagnosis, therapy

  13. Binder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chummun, Shaheel; McLean, N R; Nugent, M; Anderson, P J; David, David J

    2012-07-01

    Patients with chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) usually present with Binder-type features, and often CDP is misdiagnosed as Binder syndrome. This study reviewed the management and outcome of patients with Binder syndrome and CDP in a multidisciplinary setting. The notes and radiographs of the patients managed at the Australian Craniofacial Unit with a multidisciplinary setting since 1976 were reviewed, and data were collected on patient demographics, associated medical and surgical problems, subsequent management, and complications. Seventy-seven patients were treated over the 30-year period (5 patients were lost to follow-up); of the remaining 72 patients, 60 (83%) had Binder syndrome, and 12 (17%) were patients with CDP. Forty were males, and 32 were females, with an age range of 6 months to 47 years. Thirteen patients (18%) had a strong family history, and 65 patients (90%) have so far undergone surgical correction, and of those, 35 (54%) have completed their treatment, the longest follow-up time being 18 years. The mean number of surgical procedures was 2.4, and 18 patients (28%) had postoperative complications, which included partial necrosis of the maxilla, osteomyelitis of the mandible, facial nerve and inferior alveolar nerve neuropraxia, nasal bone graft exposure, and cellulitis. Because of the phenotypic characteristics shared by both Binder syndrome and CDP, it is most likely that Binder syndrome is not a syndrome, nor is it an entity, but most likely to be an "association." We would advocate that these patients should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting.

  14. A New Mutation in Blau Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Zeybek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2–13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  15. Antley-Bixler syndrome with radioulnar synostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, Maja E.; Kelleher, Jerry [Department of Radiology, Our Lady' s Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin, Dublin 12 (Ireland); White, Martin J. [Department of Neonatology, Our Lady' s Hospital for Sick Children, Dublin 12 (Ireland); Green, Andrew J. [National Centre for Medical Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin 12 (Ireland)

    2004-02-01

    This report describes a newborn boy with Antley-Bixler (AB) syndrome. AB syndrome is a rare disorder characterized mainly by craniosynostosis and multiple joint contractures including radiohumeral synostosis. Our patient differs from the usual presentation by the presence of radioulnar rather than a radiohumeral synostosis. In addition, the child had a FGFR1 1300T mutation, which has not previously been associated with AB syndrome. Thus, our patient presents unique features and represents another argument in favour of an AB-like spectrum rather than a single syndrome. (orig.)

  16. Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, A; Peker, E; Dogan, M; Tuncer, O; Kirimi, E

    2011-01-01

    Baller-Gerold Syndrome (BGS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is apparent at birth. The disorder is characterized by distinctive malformations of the skull and facial area and bones of the forearms and hands. We report a 4 year old boy in whom the clinical features of craniosynostosis and bilateral absent thumbs and radii led to a diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome. Physical examination revealed that the heart was localized to the right side. Echocardiography confirmed dextrocardia. Dextrocardia has not previously been reported with Baller-Gerold syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with dextrocardia.

  17. 14 CFR 47.33 - Aircraft not previously registered anywhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft not previously registered anywhere... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION Certificates of Aircraft Registration § 47.33 Aircraft not previously registered anywhere. (a) A person who is the owner of an aircraft that has not been registered...

  18. 2 CFR 220.40 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 220.40 Section 220.40 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-21) § 220.40 Relationship to previous issuance. (a...

  19. 2 CFR 230.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 230.45 Section 230.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) § 230.45 Relationship to previous issuance. (a...

  20. 2 CFR 1.215 - Relationship to previous issuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuances. 1.215 Section 1.215 Grants and Agreements ABOUT TITLE 2 OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND SUBTITLE A Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.215 Relationship to previous issuances. Although some of the guidance was...

  1. Large Bowel Obstruction Caused by Adhesions without Previous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Large bowel obstruction is rarely caused by adhesions. To our knowledge, the few cases reported in literature are secondary to previous abdomino-pelvic surgery, and are in female patients. Case Reports: We report two cases of large bowel obstruction due to adhesions in males with no previous abdominal ...

  2. 75 FR 76056 - FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: STATUS: Closed meeting. PLACE: 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC. DATE AND TIME OF PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED MEETING: Thursday...

  3. Hepatorenal syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tércio Genzini

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the development of renal failure in patients with chronic previous liver disease, without clinical or laboratory evidence of previous kidney disease. It affects up to 18% of cirrhotic patients with ascites during the first year of follow-up, reaching 39% in five years and presenting a survival of about two weeks after its establishment. HRS diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data. The occurrence of this syndrome is related to the mechanism for ascites development, involving vasoconstriction, low renal perfusion, water and sodium retention, increased plasma volume, and consequent overflow at the splanchnic level. Renal vasoactive mediators like endothelin 1, thromboxane A2, and leukotrienes are also involved in the genesis of this syndrome, which culminates in functional renal insufficiency. The treatment of choice can be pharmacological or surgical, although liver transplantation is the only permanent and effective treatment, with a four-year survival rate of up to 60%. Liver function recovery is usually followed by renal failure reversion. Early diagnosis and timely therapeutics can increase life expectancy for these patients while they are waiting for liver transplantation as a definitive treatment.

  4. Auriculotemporal nerve syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Morillas, L; Reaño Martos, M; Rodríguez Mosquera, M; Iglesias Cadarso, A; Pérez Pimiento, A; Domínguez Lázaro, A R

    2003-01-01

    Auriculotemporal nerve syndrome is characterized by erythema, perspiration, heat and pain localized in the area supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve in response to gustatory stimuli after the ingestion of different types of food. This syndrome may be confused with food allergy. A 21-year-old woman complained of erythema, sweat and heat in the right cheek after intake of several foods such as chocolate, fruits, and nuts for the previous 8 months. She had fractured her jaw two years previously. Skin prick tests were performed with a standard battery of common inhalant allergens and with an extensive panel of food allergens. Prick-by-prick tests were also performed with fruits, nuts, and cacao. Total and specific IgE were measured. Open oral food challenge test was performed. Skin prick tests were positive for grass and olive pollen. Prick-by-prick tests and specific IgE antibodies to the different foods were all negative. Open oral challenge test with apple reproduced the symptoms. This benign syndrome is often misdiagnosed as a food allergy.

  5. Leg ulcers: a new symptom of Blau syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, Veerle; Hofman, Sarah; Dahan, Karin; Beele, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, typically defined by granulomatous polyarthritis, uveitis and skin eruption. Biopsy specimens demonstrate non-caseating granulomas in all lesions. We present a case of Blau syndrome associated with large recalcitrant leg ulcers. Biopsies taken in the leg ulcers of our patient systematically showed granulomas. Although leg ulcers have not previously been described as a part of Blau syndrome, we assume that the ulcerations in this case form part of Blau syndrome.

  6. Metabolic syndrome in migraine headache: A case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrzad Salmasi; Laya Amini; Shaghayegh Haghjooy Javanmard; Mohammad Saadatnia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The correlation of metabolic syndrome and migraine headache was evaluated in some previous studies. However there is no study that compared the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the patients with and without migraine. Control of coincidental factors such as metabolic syndrome reduces therapeutic resistance in migrainous patients. The aim of this study was to compare prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with and without migraine headache. Materials and Methods: 200 migrai...

  7. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Likelihood of Having a Child with Down Syndrome? Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and ... care and treatment of babies born with Down syndrome. Does Down Syndrome Run in Families? All 3 types of ...

  8. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation CLICK HERE to watch Dr. Leslie ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  9. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  10. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  11. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  12. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  13. Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can I get more information? What is Rett syndrome? Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmenal disorder that affects girls ... as “asymptomatic female carriers.” top Who gets Rett syndrome? Rett syndrome is estimated to affect one in every ...

  14. Rett Syndrome: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Rett Syndrome Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder ... ultimately reverse the disorder's effects. Common Names Rett syndrome Rett disorder RTT Medical or Scientific Names Autism-dementia- ...

  15. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skating Living With Stepparents Be a Green Kid Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  16. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual field rather than blindness in neurologic examination of the patient. He had simultanagnosia, optic ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. There are multiple infarcts in bilaterally occipital and parietal regions in the patient’s cerebral MRI. In this case, we have present a rare disorder of the Balint’s syndrome.

  17. [Intravenous immunoglobulin in postpolio syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbu, Elisabeth; Rekand, Tiina; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Strøm, Vegard; Opheim, Arve; Stanghelle, Johan Kvalvik; Aarli, Johan A

    2004-09-23

    Postpolio syndrome is characterised by new muscular weakness, pain, and fatigue several decades after the acute polio, and affects approximately 1/4 of patients with previous paralytic polio. A 47-year-old woman with a previous history of acute poliomyelitis developed progressive muscular weakness in her left arm and right leg with muscular pain and fatigue. Clinical examination, MRI, and electromyography gave no other explanation to her progressive muscular weakness and fatigue than postpolio syndrome. She was treated with 400 mg/kg immunoglobulin intravenously for five consecutive days. At follow-up two and three months later, she had a considerable increase in isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension and flexion on the right side, and experienced less fatigue. This case suggests that stabilisation of an autoimmune dysfunction may be a therapeutic option in postpolio syndrome.

  18. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Sheetal; Panigrahi, Inusha; Marwaha, Ram Kumar

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  19. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Sharda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  20. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome followed by Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roux Serratrice, C; Serratrice, J; Granel, B; Weiller-Merli, C; Rey, J; Lepidi, H; Disdier, P; Weiller, P J

    2001-03-24

    Sicca syndrome after Stevens-Johnson syndrome is classically described. However, to our knowledge, authentic Sjögren's syndrome following epidermal necrolysis has not been described previously. A 36-year-old woman with Steven-Johnson syndrome developed transient hepatitis and a persistent sicca syndrome. Fourteen years later an authentic Sjögren's syndrome was identified with presence of antinuclear and anti-SSA antibodies and lymphocytes infiltration of the accessory salivary glands, i.e. grade IV disease in the Chisholm classification. The initial mucosal destruction observed in our patients may have laid the ground for Sjögren's syndrome via abnormal antigen presentation in a predisposed dysimmune context.

  1. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary ci...

  2. Is It Antiphospholipid Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Ditto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis remains a challenge, as nearly half of cases develop in the absence of preexistent heart disease and known risk factors. Not infrequently, a blunted clinical course at onset can lead to erroneous diagnoses. We present the case of a 47-year-old previously healthy man in which a presumptive diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome was made based on the absence of echocardiographically detected heart involvement, a negative blood culture, normal C-reactive protein (CRP levels, a positive lupus anticoagulant (LAC test, and evidence of splenic infarcts. The patient eventually developed massive aortic endocarditic involvement, with blood cultures positive for Streptococcus bovis, and was referred for valvular replacement. This case not only reminds us of the diagnostic challenges of bacterial endocarditis, but also underlines the need for a critical application of antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria.

  3. Johanson—Blizzard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Baleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the data available in the literature and their clinical observation of a child with Johanson—Blizzard syndrome, a rare genetic disorder. Particular emphasis is laid on the clinical manifestations of the disease, characterized by multiple malformations, such as congenital exocrine insufficiency and abnormalities of the maxillofacial region and the organs of hearing and vision. A molecular genetic study detected previously undescribed UBR1 gene mutation. The paper describes the differential diagnosis of this syndrome and multicomponent therapy involving clinical nutrition and enzyme therapy during life. A seven-year follow-up revealed positive changes in the child’s general condition. 

  4. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients...... and murine models. To date, no data on oxidative stress have been reported for the MECP2 gain-of-function mutations in patients with MDS. In the present work, the pro-oxidant status and oxidative fatty acid damage in MDS was investigated (subjects n = 6) and compared to RTT (subjects n = 24) and healthy...... condition (subjects n = 12). Patients with MECP2 gain-of-function mutations showed increased oxidative stress marker levels (plasma non-protein bound iron, intraerythrocyte non-protein bound iron, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes), as compared to healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). Such increases were...

  5. Induction of labour in women with one previous caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P; Elmardi, A; Bathula, U; Chandru, S; Charlesworth, D

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a postal survey of NHS obstetric consultants working in England regarding their own practice and views on induction of labour in women with one previous caesarean section. Out of 480 consultant obstetricians across England, 322 replied, giving a response rate of 67%. Our survey has revealed a wide variation in practice of consultants across England, regarding induction of labour at term or post-term in women with one previous caesarean section. Hence, we feel that there is a need for a national audit of induction of labour in women with one previous caesarean section, with uterine rupture following induction of labour in such women as an auditable standard.

  6. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism experiencing mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Heathcote

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available No research has previously been done regarding the phenomenon of adolescents who have previously been involved in Satanism and who experience obstacles in their strive for mental health. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism present behavioral problems like aggressive outbursts, depression, “ psychosis” or suicide attempts, that could lead to suicide. In the phenomenonanalysis semi-structured, phenomenological interviews were performed with the respondents and their parents. The respondents were requested to write a naïve sketch about their life. After completion of the data-control, guidelines for nursing staff were set.

  7. [Jerusalem syndrome. Symptoms, course and cultural context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Sobczyk, Artur

    2011-01-01

    The Jerusalem syndrome is an acute psychotic state observed in tourists and pilgrims who visit Jerusalem. The main symptom of this disorder is identification with a character from the Bible and exhibiting behaviours which seems to be typical for this character. The article presents an overview of cultural and demographic factors associated with the appearance of the Jerusalem syndrome. Three main categories of the syndrome were identified with special focus on the category unconjoined to previous psychopathology which can be described as the 'pure' form of the Jerusalem syndrome. The main diagnostic criteria for the 'pure' type and the sequence of seven clinical stages of the Jerusalem syndrome were described. The article contains a review of the hypothesis about the causes of Jerusalem syndrome with special attention given to the role of places of particular meaning for religious tradition.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms...

  9. Ulcerative colitis may not necessarily be rare as previously thought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ulcerative colitis may not necessarily be rare as previously thought in tropical and subtropical Africa. With increasing westernized life style, greater utilization and accessibility to modern medical practice,availability of tertiary level health care di.

  10. Influence of previous participation in physical activity on its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... participation can influence perceptions of PA among the students. Physical activity promotion programmes should consider the role of these factors which should be emphasised from childhood. Keywords: physical activity, students, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, previous participation, sedentary lifestyle, Rwanda

  11. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Olsson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema,

  12. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  13. Hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy in patients with previous gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droeser, Raoul A; Ottosson, Johan; Muth, Andreas; Hultin, Hella; Lindwall-Åhlander, Karin; Bergenfelz, Anders; Almquist, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Case reports suggest that patients with previous gastric bypass have an increased risk of severe hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy, but there are no population-based studies. The prevalence of gastric bypass before thyroidectomy and the risk of hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy in patients with previous gastric bypass were investigated. By cross-linking The Scandinavian Quality Registry for Thyroid, Parathyroid and Adrenal Surgery with the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry patients operated with total thyroidectomy without concurrent or previous surgery for hyperparathyroidism were identified and grouped according to previous gastric bypass. The risk of treatment with intravenous calcium during hospital stay, and with oral calcium and vitamin D at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively was calculated by using multiple logistic regression in the overall cohort and in a 1:1 nested case-control analysis. We identified 6115 patients treated with total thyroidectomy. Out of these, 25 (0.4 %) had undergone previous gastric bypass surgery. In logistic regression, previous gastric bypass was not associated with treatment with i.v. calcium (OR 2.05, 95 % CI 0.48-8.74), or calcium and/or vitamin D at 6 weeks (1.14 (0.39-3.35), 1.31 (0.39-4.42)) or 6 months after total thyroidectomy (1.71 (0.40-7.32), 2.28 (0.53-9.75)). In the nested case-control analysis, rates of treatment for hypocalcemia were similar in patients with and without previous gastric bypass. Previous gastric bypass surgery was infrequent in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy and was not associated with an increased risk of postoperative hypocalcemia.

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  15. [Surgery for bronchial carcinoma after treatment of a previous cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordant, P; Pages, P-B; Foucault, C; Badia, A; Fabre, E; Dujon, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2013-05-01

    The increase in the number of cancer survivors, together with the improvement of their follow-up, lead to the frequent diagnosis of resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with history of previous malignancy. We sought to analyse the outcomes of these patients. Patients undergoing surgical resection for NSCLC between January 1980 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. For each patient, the presence of previous malignancy was noted, and classified into five groups: oro-pharyngeal cancer, lung cancer, haematopoietic malignancy, other organ malignancy, and more than two cancers. The overall population included 5846 patients. Among them, 1243 (21%) had a history of previous malignancy, of whom 383 (31%) presented with synchronous cancer. Patients with history of previous malignancy were more often female, older, with more adenocarcinomas, more limited disease, less pneumonectomies, but higher postoperative morbidity and mortality. Overall survival was worse in patients with a history of previous malignancy than in patients without (median, 5 and 10 year: 33 months, 34.3%, 17.8% versus 47 months, 44.6%, 28.8%). A history of previous malignancy impacted significantly the prognosis of patients operated on for limited NSCLC. However, only surgical resection led to improved long-term survival at 5 years. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  18. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  19. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  20. Cardiorenal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) have been subclassified as five defined entities which represent clinical circumstances in which both the heart and the kidney are involved in a bidirectional injury and dysfunction via a final common pathway of cell-to-cell death and accelerated apoptosis mediated by oxidative stress. Types 1 and 2 involve acute and chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) scenarios leading to acute kidney injury or accelerated chronic kidney disease. Types 2 and 3 describe acute and chronic kidney disease leading primarily to heart failure, although it is possible that acute coronary syndromes, stroke, and arrhythmias could be CVD outcomes in these forms of CRS. Finally, CRS type 5 describes a simultaneous insult to both heart and kidneys, such as sepsis, where both organs are injured simultaneously. Both blood and urine biomarkers are reviewed in this paper and offer a considerable opportunity to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiology and known epidemiology of these recently defined syndromes. PMID:21286212

  1. Dressler Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dressler Syndrome (DS is a febrile illness secondary to an inflammatory reaction involving the pleura and pericardium. It is more common in patients who have undergone surgery that involves opening the pericardium. However, DS has also been described following myocardial infarction and as an unusual complication after percutaneous procedures such as coronary stent implantation, after implantation of epicardial pacemaker leads and transvenous pacemaker leads, and following blunt trauma, stab wounds, and heart puncture. Pericardial effusions often accompany the syndrome and may develop into early or late postoperative cardiac tamponade and even recurrent cardiac tamponade. The syndrome is also characterized by pericardial or pleuritic pain, pleural effusions, pneumonitis, and abnormal ECG and radiography findings.

  2. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  3. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2012-01-31

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  4. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2011-01-01

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  5. Uso de olanzapina e eletroconvulsoterapia em um paciente com esquizofrenia catatônica refratária e antecedentes de síndrome neuroléptica maligna Olanzapina y ECT en un enfermo con esquizofrenia catatónica refractaria y alto riesgo de síndrome neuroléptico maligno Olanzapine and ECT combined therapy in a refractory catatonic subtype schizophrenia patient with previous neuroleptic malignant syndrome episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gomes de Alvarenga

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve a história clínica e o manejo de um paciente masculino adulto com esquizofrenia catatônica refratária a dois neurolépticos típicos (haloperidol e clorpromazina e a outro agente atípico (risperidona, e com antecedente de dois episódios de síndrome neuroléptica maligna em vigência de neurolépticos típicos. Os autores optaram pela associação de eletroconvulsoterapia (ECT e olanzapina (7,5 mg. Foram obtidos consideráveis benefícios para o paciente.Presentamos un relato clínico referente a la historia precedente y al desarrollo de un enfermo varón con esquizofrenia catatónica refractaria a los neurolépticos convencionales (clorpromazina y haloperidol y a otro agente de nueva generación (risperidona. El enfermo presentó, en dos ocasiones, síndrome neuroléptico maligno, provocado por el uso de los neurolépticos convencionales. Los autores emplearon ECT y olanzapina (7,5 mg obteniendo considerable éxito clínico.This article describes the clinical history and management of an adult male patient with refractory catatonic schizophrenia to two typically used neurolpetic medications (haloperidol and chlorpromazine and to another atypical agent (risperidone.The patient had also presented two neuroleptic malignant syndrome episodes due to typical neuroleptic agents. The authors combined ECT and olanzapine (7.5 mg as treatment, and a considerable clinical improvement was obtained.

  6. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  7. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  8. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  9. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  10. [Terson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielska, Agnieszka; Czarnecki, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The syndrome of intra-vitreous bleeding in association with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was first describe by French ophthalmologist Albert Terson in 1900. In last 10 years only a few cases were recorded. Early recognition of TS is of high importance, since diminution of visual acuity even to functional blindness, can hamper the rehabilitative process. The treatment methods are various, based on clinical manifestation. The surgical procedure of choice is the pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The importance of being aware of the syndrome is very crucial, both in order to provide the adequate nursing care and to be able to perform early vitrectomy, to restore the visual function.

  11. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  12. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  13. Preliminary findings of a previously unrecognized porcine primary immunodeficiency disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, A G Cino; Rowland, R R R; Nietfeld, J C; Kerrigan, M A; Dekkers, J C M; Wyatt, C R

    2013-01-01

    Weaned pigs from a line bred for increased feed efficiency were enrolled in a study of the role of host genes in the response to infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV). Four of the pigs were euthanatized early in the study due to weight loss with illness and poor body condition; 2 pigs before PRRSV infection and the other 2 pigs approximately 2 weeks after virus inoculation. The 2 inoculated pigs failed to produce PRRSV-specific antibodies. Gross findings included pneumonia, absence of a detectable thymus, and small secondary lymphoid tissues. Histologically, lymph nodes, spleen, tonsils, and Peyer's patches were sparsely cellular with decreased to absent T and B lymphocytes.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... older adults. The signs and symptoms of Costello syndrome overlap significantly with those of two other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, ...

  15. Endocrine manifestations of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whooten, Rachel; Schmitt, Jessica; Schwartz, Alison

    2018-02-01

    To summarize the recent developments in endocrine disorders associated with Down syndrome. Current research regarding bone health and Down syndrome continues to show an increased prevalence of low bone mass and highlights the importance of considering short stature when interpreting dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The underlying cause of low bone density is an area of active research and will shape treatment and preventive measures. Risk of thyroid disease is present throughout the life course in individuals with Down syndrome. New approaches and understanding of the pathophysiology and management of subclinical hypothyroidism continue to be explored. Individuals with Down syndrome are also at risk for other autoimmune conditions, with recent research revealing the role of the increased expression of the Autoimmune Regulatory gene on 21st chromosome. Lastly, Down-syndrome-specific growth charts were recently published and provide a better assessment of growth. Recent research confirms and expands on the previously known endocrinopathies in Down syndrome and provides more insight into potential underlying mechanisms.

  16. Corneal biomechanical properties in eyes with no previous surgery, with previous penetrating keratoplasty and with deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Banu Torun; Akdemir, Mehmet Orcun; Acar, Suphi

    2013-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of the cornea in eyes with no previous surgery, with keratoconus with previous penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and with keratoconus with previous deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using the Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA). One hundred twenty eyes of 120 patients were included in this prospective comparative study. Forty eyes were with no previous ocular surgery (group 1), 40 eyes were with previous PK for keratoconus (group 2), and 40 eyes were with previous DALK for keratoconus (group 3). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured with ORA. The CH and CRF values in group 2 were significantly lower than in group 1 and group 3 (p = 0.001). The CH and CRF values were similar in group 1 and group 3. There was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and 3. Although the post-PK keratoconus cornea has weaker biomechanical properties, post-DALK keratoconus cornea is similar to normal cornea. A cornea weakened by keratoconus can be strengthened with lamellar keratoplasty.

  17. Mutations in Cockayne Syndrome-Associated Genes (Csa and Csb) Predispose to Cisplatin-Induced Hearing Loss in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Robert N; Ng, Sum-Yan; Llamas, Juan; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Segil, Neil

    2016-04-27

    models of Cockayne syndrome, a progeroid disorder resulting from a defect in the transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) branch of nucleotide excision repair, are hypersensitive to cisplatin-induced hearing loss and sensory hair cell death in the organ of Corti, the mammalian auditory sensory epithelium. Our work indicates that Csa and Csb, two genes involved in TCR, are preferentially required to protect against cisplatin ototoxicity, relative to global genome repair-specific elements of nucleotide excision repair, and suggests that TCR is a major force maintaining DNA integrity in the cochlea. The Cockayne syndrome mice thus represent a model for testing the contribution of DNA repair mechanisms to cisplatin ototoxicity. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364758-13$15.00/0.

  18. Anisometropia magnitude and visual deficits in previously untreated anisometropic amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Bin Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To assess the quantitative association between anisometropia magnitude and the losses of resolution and contrast sensitivity; and to exemplify how the function of fusion and stereopsis vary with anisometropia magnitude (AM in previously untreated anisometropic amblyopes.METHODS:A total of 57 patients with previously untreated anisometropic amblyopia without strabismus (range:8-35 years, were measured refractive error, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, fusion and stereopsis, and 48 patients have completed contrast sensitivity function test. AM was determined by dioptric vector addition model, and the amblyopia depth was determined by the difference of BCVA in logMAR units between the amblyopic and fellow eyes.RESULTS: AM was significantly correlated with both amblyopia depth (Pearson R=0.728, PPPCONCLUSION: In the patients with previously untreated anisometropia amblyopia, higher degree of anisometropia is significantly associated with deeper amblyopia, worse contrast sensitivity, fusion and stereopsis functions.

  19. Intravitreal ranibizumab for diabetic macular oedema in previously vitrectomized eyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Ostri, Christoffer; Brynskov, Troels

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is little information about the efficacy of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition in vitrectomized eyes. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of anti-VEGF (ranibizumab) on diabetic macular oedema in previously vitrectomized eyes. METHODS: A nationwide...... retrospective review of medical records from 2010 to 2013. RESULTS: We identified 33 previously vitrectomized eyes in 28 patients treated with ranibizumab injections for diabetic macular oedema. Median follow-up was 323 days (interquartile range 72-1404 days). Baseline mean visual acuity was 0.57 logMAR (95% CI......). The mean reduction in CFT was 14% (95% CI 4-24%, p = 0.01). Sixteen eyes (48.5%) became devoid of oedema on the last OCT scan. Despite the significant reduction in CFT, the visual acuity remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Intravitreal ranibizumab can be effective in previously vitrectomized eyes with diabetic...

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep J Sebastin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature.

  1. YOUSSEF SYNDROME REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Menon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Youssef’s syndrome, a rare entity, consists of cyclical haematuria or menouria, amenorrhea associated with vaginal leakage of urine. This was first described by M Youssef, an Egyptian Surgeon in 1957.1 Since then, reports of this rare urogenital fistula have appeared off and on in literature. We present a case subsequent to a ruptured uterus during a trial of labour after a previous Caesarean section. A 26-year-old lady, para 2, presented to the OPD with complaints of intermittent haematuria, increased frequency of micturition and lactational amenorrhea. She also gave history of occasional watery discharge per vaginum, which had subsided by the time of presentation.

  2. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J. C.; van Engelen, K.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B. C.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  3. Sotos syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    A Juneja; Sultan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications...

  4. Cowden syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Chermi, Zied Mohamed; Marrekchi, Slaheddine; Raida, Ben Salah; Boudaya, Sonia; Mseddi, Madiha; Jalel, Meziou Taha; Turki, Hamida

    2011-03-26

    Cowden syndrome is a rare genodermatosis charactarized by presence of multiple hamartomas. The aim of the study was to specify the clinical, therapeutic and prognostic aspects of Cowden syndrome. Our study included 4 patients with Cowden syndrome, 2 males and 2 females between 14 and 46 years old. Clinical examination of the skin revealed facials papules (4 cases), acral keratosis (1 case), translucent keratotic papules (2 cases). Oral examination revealed papules (4 cases), papillomatosis (4 cases), gingival hypertrophy (4 cases) and scrotal tongue (2 cases). Investigations revealed thyroid lesions (2 cases), fibrocystic disease and lipoma of the breast in 1 case, "glycogenic acanthosis" (1 case), macrocephaly (2 cases), dysmorphic face (1 case) and lichen nitidus (1 case). Oral etretinate and acitretine were temporary efficient in 2 patients. Topical treatment with tretinoin lotion resulted in some improvement in cutaneous, but not mucosal lesions in one patient. No cancer was revealed. The pathognomonic mucocutaneous lesions were found in all patients. However, no degenerative lesions have been revealed. A new association of Cowden syndrome with lichen nitidus was found. Treatment with oral retinoids was efficient on cutaneous lesions.

  5. kartagener's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    upper and lower respiratory tract infections such as sinusitis, otitis media and bronchiectasis (6). Males are generally infertile because of immotile sperms (8). In rare cases, no structural cilliary abnormalities are detectable even though cilliary function is abnormal and the clinical syndrome is typical (9). Some males have ...

  6. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe cardiovascular complications exemplifies the challenges faced in resource-limited countries towards making diagnosis and treatment of rare conditions. Elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans levels or a ...

  7. Ortner syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-02

    Feb 2, 2009 ... Division of Otolaryngology, University of Cape Town. L J Zühlke, MB ChB, DCH, FCPaed, Cert in Paed Card. Department of Paediatric Cardiology, University of Cape Town and Red Cross Children's Hospital, Cape Town. 170 SAJCH DECEMBER 2008 VOL. 2 NO. 4. CASE REPORT. Ortner syndrome, or ...

  8. Kostmann Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has shown promise in the treatment of non-responders. About 60-80% of. SCN cases are associated with constitutive mutations in one copy of the gene encoding neutrophil elastase ELA2. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. (MDS/AML) have been ...

  9. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Gorlin syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these patients are hypersensitive to radiation and prone to develop multiple malignancies. Patients can ... maxillofacial surgeons, radiation oncologists and dermatologists, and it will be to the benefit of the patient with this syndrome for these specialists ... grandmother had been diagnosed with breast cancer, and there was.

  11. Hunter syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dermatan et sulfate d'heparin. L'accumulation de l'intra et extracellulaire de ce matieres provoquent un organe multisystémique anormal. Nous présentons un patient atteint du syndrome de chasseur impliquant 1a peau systeme cardiovasculaire, des yeux et systeme musculosquelettique. Nous avons aussi écrit le compte ...

  12. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an audiologist , an endocrinologist , a clinical geneticist , a genetic counselor , an otolaryngologist , and a speech-language pathologist . To reduce the likelihood of hearing loss progression, children and adults with Pendred syndrome should avoid contact sports that might lead to head injury; wear head ...

  13. Goldenhar syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operational on the derivatives of the first and second bran- chial arches and clefts before the end of the organogenetic period (7'h or 8'h week of embryonic life)? ..... Marshman WE, Schalit G, Jones RB, Lee JP, Mathews TD and McCabe S: Congenital anomalies in patients with Duane retraction syndrome and their relatives.

  14. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    the two enzymes required to break down the sugar chains into proteins and ... Clinical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's syndrome). He was born of ... He is the only child in a separated family and is currently staying with ...

  15. Ortner syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-02

    Feb 2, 2009 ... A 3-month-old baby girl was brought to the Ear, Nose and ... had died of cardiac failure at a very young age. ... on adduction, allowing for her good voice. Further follow- up and a cardiac ultrasound scan showed improved cardiac function. Discussion. Ortner first described this syndrome in 1897 after seeing ...

  16. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives. continue How Do Kids Get It? Marfan syndrome affects 1 in every 5,000 people all over the world. That makes it pretty rare. It's a genetic (say: juh-NEH-tik) disease, which means it is caused by a problem with a ...

  17. Postthrombotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. 2,12 Additional Resources Here are some Internet links that will give you more information about ... CrossRef PubMed ↵ Kahn SR, Ginsberg JS. Relationship between deep venous thrombosis and the postthrombotic syndrome. Arch Intern ...

  18. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    disorder due to deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase with patients rarely living till adulthood. Failure to identify ... case report. CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe .... mitral valve prolapse with severe regurgitation, moderate ...

  19. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine: Clinical Essentials. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 27, 2015. Imazio M, et al. Postpericardiotomy syndrome: A proposal for diagnostic criteria. Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine. 2013:14:351. Alraies MC, ...

  20. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2009-01-01

    -to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  1. Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, I. van der

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set

  2. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  3. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  4. Kosenow syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spina bifida was also noted. MRI was performed and showed absence of osseous or cartilaginous tissue in the normal location of the ilium. Instead there was a soft-tissue structure, hypo-intense in all sequences, suggestive of fibrous tissue. Imaging features of a rare case of scapuloiliac dysostosis (Kosenow syndrome) in ...

  5. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  6. Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Once hearing problems are corrected, most people with this syndrome should be able to lead a normal life. Those with ... require part of large bowel to be removed Hearing loss Self-esteem problems, or other problems related to appearance Slight decreased ...

  7. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  8. Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the case of Beryx splendens from the Sierra Leone Rise (Gulf of Guinea). F Salmerón, J.C. Báez, D Macías, L Fernandez-Peralta, A Ramos ...

  9. Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Effective contraceptive use is important after a caesarean or operative delivery because of the possible risks a woman may face in subsequent pregnancies. Objectives: The objective of the present study was to determine the uptake and choices of contraception among women with previous operative delivery.

  10. 2 CFR 225.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 225.45 Section 225.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR STATE, LOCAL, AND INDIAN TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS (OMB CIRCULAR A-87) § 225.45 Relationship to...

  11. Recovery of Previously Uncultured Bacterial Genera from Three Mediterranean Sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis; McPherson, Kyle; Passel, van Mark W.J.; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2017-01-01

    Sponges often harbour a dense and diverse microbial community. Presently, a large discrepancy exists between the cultivable bacterial fraction from sponges and the community in its natural environment. Here, we aimed to acquire additional insights into cultivability of (previously uncultured)

  12. Snowfall in coastal West Antarctica much greater than previously assumed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; van Meijgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    A new Antarctic accumulation distribution, based on regional model output calibrated with 1900 in-situ observations, is used to re-assess accumulation in 24 Antarctic ice drainage basins. When compared to the previous compilation, good agreement is found for 19 of the 24 basins, representing 93% of

  13. 5 CFR 9701.352 - Use of highest previous rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Pay Administration § 9701.352 Use of... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of highest previous rate. 9701.352 Section 9701.352 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT...

  14. Suburethral sling procedures after previous surgery for urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare the outcome of suburethral sling procedures (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT), obturator tape (Ob-tape)) for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women with previous surgery for SUI or pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods. A comparative, descriptive, retrospective study was done using information ...

  15. The effect of previous traumatic injury on homicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Russell L; Davis, Gregory G; Levitan, Emily B; MacLennan, Paul A; Redden, David T; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Research has reported that a strong risk factor for traumatic injury is having a previous injury (i.e., recidivism). To date, the only study examining the relationship between recidivism and homicide reported strong associations, but was limited by possible selection bias. The current matched case-control study utilized coroner's data from 2004 to 2008. Subjects were linked to trauma registry data to determine whether the person had a previous traumatic injury. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between homicide and recidivism. Homicide risk was increased for those having a previous traumatic injury (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.09-2.99) or a previous intentional injury (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.24-5.17). These results suggest an association between homicide and injury recidivism, and that trauma centers may be an effective setting for screening individuals for secondary prevention efforts of homicide through violence prevention programs. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. 24 CFR 1710.552 - Previously accepted state filings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION Certification... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Previously accepted state filings. 1710.552 Section 1710.552 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  17. Cryptococcal meningitis in a previously healthy child | Chimowa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An 8-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 3 weeks history of headache, neck stiffness, deafness, fever and vomiting and was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis. She had documented hearing loss and was referred to tertiary-level care after treatment with fluconazole did not improve her neurological ...

  18. Haemophilus influenzae type f meningitis in a previously healthy boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Berg, Ronan M G; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Non-serotype b strains of Haemophilus influenzae are extremely rare causes of acute bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 14-year-old boy, who was previously healthy and had been immunised against H influenzae serotype b (Hib...

  19. The impact of previous knowledge and experience on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of previous knowledge and experience on the entrepreneurial attitudes of Grade 12 learners. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, ...

  20. Abiraterone in metastatic prostate cancer without previous chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, C.J.; Smith, M.R.; Bono, J. De; Molina, A.; Logothetis, C.J.; Souza, P. de; Fizazi, K.; Mainwaring, P.; Piulats, J.M.; Ng, S.; Carles, J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Basch, E.; Small, E.J.; Saad, F.; Schrijvers, D.; Poppel, H. van; Mukherjee, S.D.; Suttmann, H.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Flaig, T.W.; George, D.J.; Yu, E.Y.; Efstathiou, E.; Pantuck, A.; Winquist, E.; Higano, C.S.; Taplin, M.E.; Park, Y.; Kheoh, T.; Griffin, T.; Scher, H.I.; Rathkopf, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy. We evaluated this agent in patients who had not received previous chemotherapy. METHODS: In this double-blind study, we

  1. Outcome Of Pregnancy Following A Previous Lower Segment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A previous ceasarean section is an important variable that influences patient management in subsequent pregnancies. A trial of vaginal delivery in such patients is a feasible alternative to a secondary section, thus aiding to reduce the ceasarean section rate and its associated co-morbidities. Objective: To ...

  2. A previously undescribed coronavirus associated with respiratory disease in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); B. Niemeyer (Berend); J.H. Simon (James); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of acute respiratory tract illnesses is sometimes unclear due to limitations of diagnostic tests or the existence of as-yet-unidentified pathogens. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a not previously recognized coronavirus obtained from an 8-mo-old

  3. 31 CFR 202.5 - Previously designated depositaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Previously designated depositaries. 202.5 Section 202.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE DEPOSITARIES AND FINANCIAL AGENTS...

  4. The job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to identify influences on the job satisfaction of previously disadvantaged school principals in North-West Province. Evans's theory of job satis- faction, morale and motivation was useful as a conceptual framework. A mixed- methods explanatory research design was important in discovering issues ...

  5. The job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to identify influences on the job satisfaction of previously disadvantaged school principals in North-West Province. Evans's theory of job satisfaction, morale and motivation was useful as a conceptual framework. A mixedmethods explanatory research design was important in discovering issues with ...

  6. Compartment syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss. Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes. Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma. As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within this compartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume. Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms. Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods. While the direct methods are quite accurate, they are impractical and not feasible for routine practice. Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder. Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement. The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  7. Pendred syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Kopp, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that is classically defined by the combination of sensorineural deafness/hearing impairment, goiter, and an abnormal organification of iodide with or without hypothyroidism. The hallmark of the syndrome is the impaired hearing, which is associated with inner ear malformations such as an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). The thyroid phenotype is variable and may be modified by the nutritional iodine intake. Pendred syndrome is caused by biallelic mutations in the SLC26A4/PDS gene, which encodes the multifunctional anion exchanger pendrin. Pendrin has affinity for chloride, iodide, and bicarbonate, among other anions. In the inner ear, pendrin functions as a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger that is essential for maintaining the composition and the potential of the endolymph. In the thyroid, pendrin is expressed at the apical membrane of thyroid cells facing the follicular lumen. Functional studies have demonstrated that pendrin can mediate iodide efflux in heterologous cells. This, together with the thyroid phenotype observed in humans (goiter, impaired iodine organification) suggests that pendrin could be involved in iodide efflux into the lumen, one of the steps required for thyroid hormone synthesis. Iodide efflux can, however, also occur in the absence of pendrin suggesting that other exchangers or channels are involved. It has been suggested that Anoctamin 1 (ANO1/TMEM16A), a calcium-activated anion channel, which is also expressed at the apical membrane of thyrocytes, could participate in mediating apical efflux. In the kidney, pendrin is involved in bicarbonate secretion and chloride reabsorption. While there is no renal phenotype under basal conditions, severe metabolic alkalosis has been reported in Pendred syndrome patients exposed to an increased alkali load. This review provides an overview on the clinical spectrum of Pendred syndrome, the functional data on pendrin with a focus on its potential role in

  8. [Evans syndrome in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Montes, Olivia Alejandra; Escobar-Orduño, Martha Cecilia; Lozano-Garcidueñas, Mónica; Valle-Leal, Jaime Guadalupe

    Evans syndrome is characterized by the reduction of at least two blood cell lineages in the absence of other diagnoses; it was previously described as the simultaneous or sequential development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia with unknown etiology. An incidence of 37% and mortality rate of 10% were reported for Evans syndrome. We report the clinical presentation and evolution of Evans syndrome in two infants who were initially diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia. The clinical diagnosis was supported on complementary studies, where hematological disorders were corroborated. Both cases received treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. For the management of children with thrombocytopenia, the pediatrician must analyze for other cell lineage disorders. In the cases that we report here, we found the presence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and monocytosis. Therefore, infectious and immunological studies must be included. The first-line treatment of choice are steroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin can be considered if severe immune thrombocytopenia is associated, as observed in these cases. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Resources » Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  10. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  11. A theoretical explanation for previously infertile mothers' vulnerability to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    To present a theoretical approach to understanding the potential vulnerability to depression in previously infertile new mothers. This approach was developed by synthesizing results of a series of grounded theory studies of experiences of infertility and pregnancy and of parenting after infertility. These results were further synthesized with the relational cultural theory (RCT). Previously infertile new mothers have experienced repeated and sustained interferences with significant relationships over the course of their infertility, which could lead to depression. Implications of this theoretical perspective include: (a) it is a new approach to understanding a significant and sometimes minimized issue in women's health; (b) it is a basis for designing an intervention for women coping with infertility and its aftermath; and (c) it might be applied to other women's health issues.

  12. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Performed after Previous Suprapubic Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Johnson F; Feuerstein, Michael; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Samadi, David B

    2016-01-01

    Operative management of prostate cancer in a patient who has undergone previous open suprapubic simple prostatectomy poses a unique surgical challenge. Herein, we describe a case of intermediate risk prostate cancer in a man who had undergone simple prostatectomy ten years prior to presentation. The patient was found to have Gleason 7 prostate cancer on MRI fusion biopsy of the prostate for elevated PSA and underwent an uncomplicated robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

  13. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Performed after Previous Suprapubic Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson F. Tsui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Operative management of prostate cancer in a patient who has undergone previous open suprapubic simple prostatectomy poses a unique surgical challenge. Herein, we describe a case of intermediate risk prostate cancer in a man who had undergone simple prostatectomy ten years prior to presentation. The patient was found to have Gleason 7 prostate cancer on MRI fusion biopsy of the prostate for elevated PSA and underwent an uncomplicated robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

  14. A previously unidentified host protein protects retroviral DNA from autointegration

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myung Soo; Craigie, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Integration of a DNA copy of the viral genome into a host chromosome is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle. The machinery that carries out the integration reaction is a nucleoprotein complex derived from the core of the infecting virion. To successfully integrate into host DNA, the viral DNA within this complex must avoid self-destructive integration into itself, a reaction termed autointegration. We have previously shown [Lee, M. S. and Craigie, R. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U...

  15. Previous Violent Events and Mental Health Outcomes in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac-Polanco, Victor D.; Lopez-Soto, Victor A.; Kohn, Robert; Xie, Dawei; Richmond, Therese S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed a probability sample of Guatemalans to determine if a relationship exists between previous violent events and development of mental health outcomes in various sociodemographic groups, as well as during and after the Guatemalan Civil War. Methods. We used regression modeling, an interaction test, and complex survey design adjustments to estimate prevalences and test potential relationships between previous violent events and mental health. Results. Many (20.6%) participants experienced at least 1 previous serious violent event. Witnessing someone severely injured or killed was the most common event. Depression was experienced by 4.2% of participants, with 6.5% experiencing anxiety, 6.4% an alcohol-related disorder, and 1.9% posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Persons who experienced violence during the war had 4.3 times the adjusted odds of alcohol-related disorders (P < .05) and 4.0 times the adjusted odds of PTSD (P < .05) compared with the postwar period. Women, indigenous Maya, and urban dwellers had greater odds of experiencing postviolence mental health outcomes. Conclusions. Violence that began during the civil war and continues today has had a significant effect on the mental health of Guatemalans. However, mental health outcomes resulting from violent events decreased in the postwar period, suggesting a nation in recovery. PMID:25713973

  16. Evaluation of cleansing methods for previously worn prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, R Thomas; Conrad, Robert S; Bullard, James W; Goodson, Leigh B; Mehta, Naresh; Lech, Stanley J; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-04-01

    Although there are many product claims that address the issue of denture sanitization, controlled scientific studies on previously worn dentures have not been performed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate procedures directed at sanitizing previously worn contaminated dentures from two regions of the United States. This study examined 51 previously worn dentures from two regions. An established method of denture retrieval, sectioning, and culturing was used, including isolation of anaerobes. Evaluation of microbial contamination posttreatment was used to determine the effects of soaking dentures in Polident (US and European formulations) for varying periods of times/temperatures, microwaving dentures with varying temperatures, sonicating dentures, and immersing the dentures while using a vacuum. A combination of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and general linear model (GLM) of the SPSS was used to analyze the data with P sanitization rather than sterilization. Denture-borne microorganisms can be significantly reduced by using a Polident solution for 8 hours at room temperature or for 5 minutes at 65 degrees C. Microwaving, sonication, and use of a vacuum were less effective. ClLINICAL IMPLICATIONS The importance of daily use of Polident solution for 8 hours or for 5 minutes at 65 degrees C to sanitize worn prostheses must be stressed.

  17. Subsequent pregnancy outcomes in women previously diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David B; Casey, Brian M; McIntire, Donald D; Cunningham, F Gary

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate subsequent pregnancy outcomes in women previously identified during an index pregnancy to have subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). From 2000 to 2003, thyroid analytes were measured in 17,298 women. Using their index pregnancy thyroid-analyte classification, pregnancy outcomes were compared between the returning cohorts. There were 6,985 women previously screened and subsequently delivered at our hospital though 2011 with 230 (3.3%) designated to have SCH and 6,645 (95.1%) euthyroid. Significant differences between the two cohorts included risk for diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 2.7, p = 0.005), gestational diabetes (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.69, p = 0.015), and stillbirth (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.05 to 11.68, p = 0.042). After adjustment, the increased likelihood of diabetes (adjusted OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.40, p = 0.032) and stillbirth (adjusted OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.01 to 11.49, p = 0.048) persisted. Women identified during a previous pregnancy with SCH are at increased risk for some adverse perinatal outcomes during a subsequent pregnancy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. New Concepts in Pacemaker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Michael Farmer

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available After implantation of a permanent pacemaker, patients may experience severe symptoms of dyspnea, palpitations, malaise, and syncope resulting from pacemaker syndrome. Although pacemaker syndrome is most often ascribed to the loss of atrioventricular (A-V synchrony, more recent data may also implicate left ventricular dysynchrony caused by right ventricular pacing. Previous studies have not shown reductions in mortality or stroke with rate-modulated dual-chamber (DDDR pacing as compared to ventricular-based (VVI pacing. The benefits in A-V sequential pacing with the DDDR mode are likely mitigated by the interventricular (V-V dysynchrony imposed by the high percentage of ventricular pacing commonly seen in the DDDR mode. Programming DDDR pacemakers to encourage intrinsic A-V conduction and reduce right ventricular pacing will likely decrease heart failure and pacemaker syndrome. Studies are currently ongoing to address these questions.

  19. Medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshef, Noam; Guelich, David R

    2012-04-01

    MTSS is a benign, though painful, condition, and a common problem in the running athlete. It is prevalent among military personnel, runners, and dancers, showing an incidence of 4% to 35%. Common names for this problem include shin splints, soleus syndrome, tibial stress syndrome, and periostitis. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Previous theories included an inflammatory response of the periosteum or periosteal traction reaction. More recent evidence suggests a painful stress reaction of bone. The most proven risk factors are hyperpronation of the foot, female sex, and history of previous MTSS. Patient evaluation is based on meticulous history taking and physical examination. Even though the diagnosis remains clinical, imaging studies, such as plain radiographs and bone scans are usually sufficient, although MRI is useful in borderline cases to rule out more significant pathology. Conservative treatment is almost always successful and includes several options; though none has proven more superior to rest. Prevention programs do not seem to influence the rate of MTSS, though shock-absorbing insoles have reduced MTSS rates in military personnel, and ESWT has shortened the duration of symptoms. Surgery is rarely indicated but has shown some promising results in patients who have not responded to all conservative options.

  20. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  1. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...... strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been...

  2. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  3. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  4. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  5. Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlander, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  6. [Cockayne syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Mei; Cui, Yun-Pu; Liu, Yun-Feng; Wei, Ling; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin-Li; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease. This paper reports a case of Cockayne syndrome confirmed by gene analysis. The baby (male, 7 years old) was referred to Peking University Third Hospital with recurrent desquamation, pigmentation and growth and development failure for 6 years, and recurrent dental caries and tooth loss for 2 years. Physical examination showed very low body weight, body length and head circumference, yellow hair, a lot of fawn spots on the face, skin dry and less elastic, and subcutaneous lipopenia. He had an unusual appearance with sunken eyes, sharp nose, sharp mandible, big auricle and dental caries and tooth loss. Crura spasticity and ataxia with excessive tendon reflexion, and ankle movement limitation while bending back were observed. He had slured speech. The level of serum insulin like growth factor I was low, and the results of blood and urinary amino acid analysis suggested malnutrition. The results of blood growth hormone, thyroxin, parathyroxin, liver function, renal function, lipoprotein profile and blood glucose and electrolytes were all within normal limit. An electronic hearing examination showed moderate neural hearing loss. The sonogram of eyes revealed small eye axis and vitreous body opacity of right side. MRI of brain revealed bilateral calcification of basal ganglia and generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, and brainstem and callus were also atrophic. Genetic analysis confirmed with CSA gene mutation. So the boy was definitely diagnosed with Cockayne syndrome. He was discharged because of no effective treatment.

  7. SUSAC SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kevin H; Haug, Sara J; Imes, Richard K; Cunningham, Emmett T; McDonald, H Richard

    2015-01-01

    To describe an atypical presentation of Susac syndrome. Observational case report. A 44-year-old man with no significant medical history presented with inferonasal visual field loss in his left eye of several months of duration. He was found to have bilateral migratory arteritis with focal areas of arteriolar occlusion in both eyes and peripheral ischemia superotemporally in his left eye. An extensive hematologic workup was negative for autoimmune disease or coagulopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast of his brain revealed a hyperintense lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Auditory testing was significant for nonspecific high-frequency hearing loss in the right ear. Given the full clinical picture, a diagnosis of Susac syndrome was made. Susac syndrome is a multisystemic, immune-mediated occlusive endotheliopathy characterized by the clinical triad of encephalopathy, branch retinal artery occlusions, and hearing loss. However, patients may present with varying degrees of this triad; thus, there should be a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with multiple artery occlusions or multifocal arteritis. (C) 2015 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.

  8. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  9. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome.

  10. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  11. Investigating the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinases in the proliferation of Werner syndrome fibroblasts using diaminopyridine inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Terence

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome show reduced replicative lifespan and a "stressed" morphology, both alleviated using the MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. However, interpretation of these data is problematical because although SB203580 has the stress-activated kinases p38 and JNK1/2 as its preferred targets, it does show relatively low overall kinase selectivity. Several lines of data support a role for both p38 and JNK1/2 activation in the control of cellular proliferation and also the pathology of diseases of ageing, including type II diabetes, diseases to which Werner Syndrome individuals are prone, thus making the use of JNK inhibitors attractive as possible therapeutics. We have thus tested the effects of the widely used JNK inhibitor SP600125 on the proliferation and morphology of WS cells. In addition we synthesised and tested two recently described aminopyridine based inhibitors. SP600125 treatment resulted in the cessation of proliferation of WS cells and resulted in a senescent-like cellular phenotype that does not appear to be related to the inhibition of JNK1/2. In contrast, use of the more selective aminopyridine CMPD 6o at concentrations that fully inhibit JNK1/2 had a positive effect on cellular proliferation of immortalised WS cells, but no effect on the replicative lifespan of primary WS fibroblasts. In addition, CMPD 6o corrected the stressed WS cellular morphology. The aminopyridine CMPD 6r, however, had little effect on WS cells. CMDP 6o was also found to be a weak inhibitor of MK2, which may partially explain its effects on WS cells, since MK2 is known to be involved in regulating cellular morphology via HSP27 phosphorylation, and is thought to play a role in cell cycle arrest. These data suggest that total JNK1/2 activity does not play a substantial role in the proliferation control in WS cells.

  12. Lambert-Eaton syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasthenic syndrome; Eaton-Lambert syndrome; Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome; LEMS; LES ... get up from a sitting or lying position Problems talking Problems chewing or swallowing, which may include ...

  13. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain ...

  14. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Tourette Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Tourette Syndrome Print A ... have their tics continue into adulthood. Dealing With Tourette Syndrome Many people don't understand what Tourette ...

  15. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... reduce the risk of fractures if you develop osteoporosis. Taking medicine to decrease the amount of glucocorticoid ...

  16. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de Guillain-Barré Guillain-Barré Syndrome Information Page Guillain-Barre Syndrome information sheet compiled by NINDS. See all related publications Order NINDS Publications Definition Miller Fisher syndrome is a rare, acquired nerve ...

  17. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  18. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  19. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Central Cord Syndrome Information Page Central Cord Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? Our understanding of central cord syndrome has increased greatly in recent decades as ...

  20. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are caused by ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  1. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. Your browser does not support the video tag. ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. Help us fix the law and end #LawSyndrome. ...

  2. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  3. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microindentation in patients with stress fractures and in controls. Patients and methods - We measured bone material strength index (BMSi) by microindentation in 30 women with previous stress fractures and in 30 normal controls. Bone mineral density by DXA and levels of the bone markers C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTX) and N-terminal propeptide of type-1 procollagen (P1NP) were also determined. Results - Mean BMSi in stress fracture patients was significantly lower than in the controls (SD 72 (8.7) vs. 77 (7.2); p = 0.02). The fracture subjects also had a significantly lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than the controls (0.9 (0.02) vs. 1.0 (0.06); p = 0.03). Bone turnover-as reflected in serum levels of the bone marker CTX-was similar in both groups, while P1NP levels were significantly higher in the women with stress fractures (55 μg/L vs. 42 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was no correlation between BMSi and BMD or bone turnover. Interpretation - BMSi was inferior in patients with previous stress fracture, but was unrelated to BMD and bone turnover. The lower values of BMSi in patients with previous stress fracture combined with a lower BMD may contribute to the increased propensity to develop stress fractures in these patients.

  4. Sofosbuvir, Velpatasvir, and Voxilaprevir for Previously Treated HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlière, Marc; Gordon, Stuart C; Flamm, Steven L; Cooper, Curtis L; Ramji, Alnoor; Tong, Myron; Ravendhran, Natarajan; Vierling, John M; Tran, Tram T; Pianko, Stephen; Bansal, Meena B; de Lédinghen, Victor; Hyland, Robert H; Stamm, Luisa M; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Zhang, Jie; Huang, K C; Subramanian, G Mani; Brainard, Diana M; McHutchison, John G; Verna, Elizabeth C; Buggisch, Peter; Landis, Charles S; Younes, Ziad H; Curry, Michael P; Strasser, Simone I; Schiff, Eugene R; Reddy, K Rajender; Manns, Michael P; Kowdley, Kris V; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Patients who are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and who do not have a sustained virologic response after treatment with regimens containing direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have limited retreatment options. We conducted two phase 3 trials involving patients who had been previously treated with a DAA-containing regimen. In POLARIS-1, patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who had previously received a regimen containing an NS5A inhibitor were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir, the NS5A inhibitor velpatasvir, and the protease inhibitor voxilaprevir (150 patients) or matching placebo (150 patients) once daily for 12 weeks. Patients who were infected with HCV of other genotypes (114 patients) were enrolled in the sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir group. In POLARIS-4, patients with HCV genotype 1, 2, or 3 infection who had previously received a DAA regimen but not an NS5A inhibitor were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir (163 patients) or sofosbuvir-velpatasvir (151 patients) for 12 weeks. An additional 19 patients with HCV genotype 4 infection were enrolled in the sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir group. In the three active-treatment groups, 46% of the patients had compensated cirrhosis. In POLARIS-1, the rate of sustained virologic response was 96% with sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir, as compared with 0% with placebo. In POLARIS-4, the rate of response was 98% with sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir and 90% with sofosbuvir-velpatasvir. The most common adverse events were headache, fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea. In the active-treatment groups in both trials, the percentage of patients who discontinued treatment owing to adverse events was 1% or lower. Sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir taken for 12 weeks provided high rates of sustained virologic response among patients across HCV genotypes in whom treatment with a DAA regimen

  5. Cutaneous protothecosis in a patient with previously undiagnosed HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kenneth; Tee, Shang-Ian; Ho, Madeline S L; Pan, Jiun Yit

    2015-08-01

    Protothecosis is an uncommon condition resulting from infection by achlorophyllous algae of the Prototheca species. Immunocompromised individuals are generally most susceptible to protothecal infection and tend to develop severe and disseminated disease. However, the association between protothecosis and HIV-induced immunosuppression is not clear, with only a handful of cases having been described to date. Here we report a case of cutaneous protothecosis in a Chinese man with previously undiagnosed HIV infection that responded well to oral itraconazole. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Atrial fibrillation after taser exposure in a previously healthy adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multerer, Sara; Berkenbosch, John W; Das, Bibhuti; Johnsrude, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    We are reporting a previously healthy adolescent who developed atrial fibrillation after being tased. He has a structurally normal heart on echocardiogram, normal electrolyte level and thyroid function test results, and a urine toxicology screen positive for marijuana. The patient ultimately required external defibrillation to convert his cardiac rhythm to normal sinus rhythm and has had no recurrent arrhythmias since hospital discharge (approximately 1 year). This is the first reported case of atrial fibrillation developing after a Taser shot, occurring in an adolescent without other risk factors. This case illustrates the arrhythmogenic potential of a Taser in otherwise healthy young individuals, and further study of occurrence of Taser-induced arrhythmias is warranted.

  7. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  8. Moyamoya disease in a child with previous acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taik-Kun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Kim, Baek Hyun; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, 516 Kojan-Dong, Ansan City, Kyungki-Do 425-020 (Korea); Eun, Baik-Lin [Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-09-01

    A previously healthy 24-day-old boy presented with a 2-day history of fever and had a convulsion on the day of admission. MRI showed abnormal signal in the thalami, caudate nuclei and central white matter. Acute necrotising encephalopathy was diagnosed, other causes having been excluded after biochemical and haematological analysis of blood, urine and CSF. He recovered, but with spastic quadriparesis. At the age of 28 months, he suffered sudden deterioration of consciousness and motor weakness of his right limbs. MRI was consistent with an acute cerebrovascular accident. Angiography showed bilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis or frank occlusion with numerous lenticulostriate collateral vessels consistent with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  9. Fulminant Pneumococcal Pericarditis in a Previously Healthy Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Cvetan; Nath, Ermin; Moon, Michael; Windram, Jonathan; Graham, Michelle M

    2017-04-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare acutely life-threatening condition. Initial symptoms, signs, and investigations can be nonspecific. Echocardiography is invaluable for establishing the diagnosis and initial management. We present a case of a previously healthy patient with purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the absence of a primary focus of infection. The patient deteriorated rapidly with cardiac tamponade and septic shock and was managed successfully by a combined medical and surgical approach. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gender dysphoria in Klinefelter's syndrome: three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gordon W; Parkinson, John

    2017-07-01

    Previous reports have found the incidence of gender dysphoria in Klinefelter's patients greater than in the general male population. A cohort of patients with gender dysphoria was reviewed. Of the 220 patients with gender dysphoria, three had Klinefelter's syndrome. These three reports are further examples of gender dysphoria in Klinefelter's syndrome. The role of biological factors in gender identity is affirmed. Caution is urged in prescribing testosterone.

  11. Melanoma diagnosed in lesions previously treated by laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Sarah; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Schimming, Tobias; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G

    2017-01-01

    Laser therapy has become a routine procedure in dermatological practice and is frequently also used for pigmented lesions. Few reports exist of melanomas diagnosed in lesions previously treated by laser therapy. Between 2007 and 2014, we identified 11 patients who presented to our department with a melanoma diagnosed in a region previously treated by laser therapy. The course of events until the diagnosis of melanoma was assessed as well as patient outcome including treatment for disease progression. No histological assessment had been performed prior to laser therapy in nine of 11 (82%) cases. Benign melanocytic lesions had been diagnosed by biopsy prior to laser therapy in the other two cases. Time from laser therapy to diagnosis of melanoma ranged from less than 1 to 10 years. Stage of disease at diagnosis varied from stage IA to IIIC. Four patients progressed to stage IV disease, of whom at least one died of melanoma. We conclude that laser treatment of pigmented lesions can complicate the diagnosis of melanoma and lead to diagnosis delay with potentially fatal consequences. Considering this risk, we believe laser therapy for pigmented lesions should either be avoided entirely or at a minimum performed only after prior histological assessment. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Does previous healthcare experience increase success in physician assistant training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmann, Theresa; Iverson, Katie

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare experience is used by many physician assistant (PA) programs to rank applicants. Despite a large healthcare literature base evaluating admissions factors, little information is available on the relationship of healthcare experience and educational outcomes. We aimed to test whether previous healthcare experience is associated with increased success during the clinical portion of the PA educational process. Hours of direct healthcare experience reported on Central Application Service for Physician Assistants applications for 124 students in the classes of 2009 through 2013 were associated with a calculated average preceptor evaluation score for each student and with average standardized-patient examination scores for a subset of students. Average student age was 28.7 years and median healthcare experience was 2,257 hours (range 390-16,400). Previous healthcare experience was not significantly correlated with preceptor evaluations or standardized-patient examination scores. This 5-year single institution pilot study did not support the hypothesis that healthcare experience is associated with improved clinical year outcomes.

  13. Kidnapping Detection and Recognition in Previous Unknown Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An unaware event referred to as kidnapping makes the estimation result of localization incorrect. In a previous unknown environment, incorrect localization result causes incorrect mapping result in Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM by kidnapping. In this situation, the explored area and unexplored area are divided to make the kidnapping recovery difficult. To provide sufficient information on kidnapping, a framework to judge whether kidnapping has occurred and to identify the type of kidnapping with filter-based SLAM is proposed. The framework is called double kidnapping detection and recognition (DKDR by performing two checks before and after the “update” process with different metrics in real time. To explain one of the principles of DKDR, we describe a property of filter-based SLAM that corrects the mapping result of the environment using the current observations after the “update” process. Two classical filter-based SLAM algorithms, Extend Kalman Filter (EKF SLAM and Particle Filter (PF SLAM, are modified to show that DKDR can be simply and widely applied in existing filter-based SLAM algorithms. Furthermore, a technique to determine the adapted thresholds of metrics in real time without previous data is presented. Both simulated and experimental results demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the proposed method.

  14. Suicidal imagery in a previously depressed community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Catherine; Shah, Dhruvi; Barnhofer, Thorsten; Holmes, Emily A

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to replicate previous findings of vivid suicide-related imagery in previously suicidal patients in a community sample of adults with a history of depression. Twenty-seven participants were interviewed regarding suicidal imagery. Seventeen participants reported prior suicidal ideation or behaviour in the clinical assessment, and the vast majority of these also reported experiencing suicide-related imagery when at their most depressed and despairing, in many cases in the form of flash-forwards to imagined future suicidal acts. Interestingly, five of the 10 participants who did not report suicidal ideation or behaviour in the clinical interview also described prominent imagery related to themes of death and suicide, but in several cases, these images were associated with meanings that seemed to act to reduce the likelihood of subsequent suicidal acts. Severity of prior suicidality was associated with lower levels of imagery-related distress and higher levels of imagery-related comfort. These findings support the idea that suicide-related imagery is an important component in the phenomenology of depression and despair and hint at potentially important differences in the meaning associated with such imagery between those individuals who report experiencing suicidal ideation or behaviour when depressed and those who do not. The findings are consistent with Joiner's model of acquired capability for suicide through habituation to pain and fear of suicide and suggest that it may be useful to tackle such imagery directly in the treatment of suicidal patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Are previous suicide attempts a risk factor for completed suicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-Sarriés, Adriana; Blanco, Miriam; Azcárate, Leire; Peinado, Rubén; López-Goñi, José J

    2018-02-01

    A previous suicide attempt is a clinically relevant factor for completed suicide. In this paper people who committed suicide on their first attempt are compared with those who did so after previous attempts. A review of the Computerised Clinical Histories in the Navarro Health Service-Osasunbidea (2010-2013) in Spain. Of the 166 cases, 31.9% (n = 53) presented at least one prior attempt. Of these 53, 65.3% modified the method of suicide. Women presented significantly more attempts (χ2 = 14.3; df = 3; p = .002). Three sub-samples were identified according to the attempts and diagnoses. The diagnoses of personality disorders (90.9%; n = 10) and women under 51 years of age with a diagnosis of affective, anxiety, or substance abuse disorders (82.4%; n = 14) presented the highest numbers of attempts. People without a psychiatric diagnosis and with psychotic or organic mental disorders presented the smallest proportion of attempts (13.2%; n = 10) together with people over 51 years of age diagnosed with affective, anxiety, or substance abuse disorders (22.5%; n = 9). Prior attempts are suicide risk factors only in specific clinical sub-samples. Prevention and intervention programs should consider these results.

  16. Incidence of Acneform Lesions in Previously Chemically Damaged Persons-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dabiri

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Chemical gas weapons especially nitrogen mustard which was used in Iraq-Iran war against Iranian troops have several harmful effects on skin. Some other chemical agents also can cause acne form lesions on skin. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of acneform in previously chemically damaged soldiers and non chemically damaged persons. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, 180 chemically damaged soldiers, who have been referred to dermatology clinic between 2000 – 2004, and forty non-chemically damaged people, were chosen randomly and examined for acneform lesions. SPSS software was used for statistic analysis of the data. Results: The mean age of the experimental group was 37.5 ± 5.2 and that of the control group was 38.7 ± 5.9 years. The mean percentage of chemical damage in cases was 31 percent and the time after the chemical damage was 15.2 ± 1.1 years. Ninety seven cases (53.9 percent of the subjects and 19 people (47.5 percent of the control group had some degree of acne. No significant correlation was found in incidence, degree of lesions, site of lesions and age of subjects between two groups. No significant correlation was noted between percentage of chemical damage and incidence and degree of lesions in case group. Conclusion: Incidence of acneform lesions among previously chemically injured peoples was not higher than the normal cases.

  17. Ocular findings in Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William B; O'Halloran, Henry S; Grossfeld, Paul D; Scher, Colin; Jockin, Yvette M; Jones, Christopher

    2004-04-01

    To discuss the ophthalmic findings and their clinical significance in 10 new cases of Jacobsen syndrome (mental retardation, craniofacial anomalies, congenital heart defects, and blood dyscrasias) and to review the ophthalmic findings in all previously reported cases in the literature. Ten new cases of Jacobsen syndrome were collected and studied prospectively for detection of abnormal ophthalmologic examination findings. A total of 63 previously reported cases were identified from Medline and analyzed for ophthalmologic abnormalities. The most common ophthalmologic findings in the new cases of Jacobsen syndrome included strabismus (90.0%), refractive error (90.0%), and ptosis (70.0%). Facial dysmorphism was also common and included hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, and down-slanting palpebral fissures. Uncommon ophthalmic findings included 5 patients with retinal vascular tortuosity, 1 with glaucoma, and 3 with amblyopia. In 63 cases reviewed, 36 reported ophthalmologic abnormalities. The most common findings included facial anomalies and ptosis. Only 5 of the 63 patients had evidence of strabismus, and none were reported to have retinal vascular tortuosity. To prevent unnecessary vision loss in children with Jacobsen syndrome, proper screening for amblyogenic factors is imperative. We recommend a baseline complete ophthalmologic examination with subsequent follow-up examinations depending on the particular findings noted during the initial screening visit.

  18. Spinal Arachnoiditis as a Complication of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in Non-HIV Previously Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panackal, Anil A; Komori, Mika; Kosa, Peter; Khan, Omar; Hammoud, Dima A; Rosen, Lindsey B; Browne, Sarah K; Lin, Yen-Chih; Romm, Elena; Ramaprasad, Charu; Fries, Bettina C; Bennett, John E; Bielekova, Bibiana; Williamson, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcus can cause meningoencephalitis (CM) among previously healthy non-HIV adults. Spinal arachnoiditis is under-recognized, since diagnosis is difficult with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) pathology. We describe 6 cases of spinal arachnoiditis among 26 consecutively recruited CM patients with normal CD4 counts who achieved microbiologic control. We performed detailed neurological exams, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping and biomarker analysis before and after adjunctive immunomodulatory intervention with high dose pulse corticosteroids, affording causal inference into pathophysiology. All 6 exhibited severe lower motor neuron involvement in addition to cognitive changes and gait disturbances from meningoencephalitis. Spinal involvement was associated with asymmetric weakness and urinary retention. Diagnostic specificity was improved by MRI imaging which demonstrated lumbar spinal nerve root enhancement and clumping or lesions. Despite negative fungal cultures, CSF inflammatory biomarkers, sCD27 and sCD21, as well as the neuronal damage biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NFL), were elevated compared to healthy donor (HD) controls. Elevations in these biomarkers were associated with clinical symptoms and showed improvement with adjunctive high dose pulse corticosteroids. These data suggest that a post-infectious spinal arachnoiditis is an important complication of CM in previously healthy individuals, requiring heightened clinician awareness. Despite microbiological control, this syndrome causes significant pathology likely due to increased inflammation and may be amenable to suppressive therapeutics. Published by Oxford University Press for the Clinical Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Cushing Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Cushing Syndrome: Other FAQs Are there disorders or conditions associated with Cushing syndrome? Very rarely, a surgeon cannot remove all ...

  20. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skeletal Syndrome (COFS) Information Page Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Information Page Chorea Information Page Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Coffin Lowry Syndrome Information ...

  1. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially during infancy and childhood. Seizure disorder (epilepsy). Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Top of page How is WAGR syndrome diagnosed? Symptoms that suggest WAGR syndrome, like aniridia, ...

  2. Nivolumab in previously untreated melanoma without BRAF mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Caroline; Long, Georgina V; Brady, Benjamin; Dutriaux, Caroline; Maio, Michele; Mortier, Laurent; Hassel, Jessica C; Rutkowski, Piotr; McNeil, Catriona; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Savage, Kerry J; Hernberg, Micaela M; Lebbé, Celeste; Charles, Julie; Mihalcioiu, Catalin; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Mauch, Cornelia; Cognetti, Francesco; Arance, Ana; Schmidt, Henrik; Schadendorf, Dirk; Gogas, Helen; Lundgren-Eriksson, Lotta; Horak, Christine; Sharkey, Brian; Waxman, Ian M; Atkinson, Victoria; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2015-01-22

    Nivolumab was associated with higher rates of objective response than chemotherapy in a phase 3 study involving patients with ipilimumab-refractory metastatic melanoma. The use of nivolumab in previously untreated patients with advanced melanoma has not been tested in a phase 3 controlled study. We randomly assigned 418 previously untreated patients who had metastatic melanoma without a BRAF mutation to receive nivolumab (at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks and dacarbazine-matched placebo every 3 weeks) or dacarbazine (at a dose of 1000 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks and nivolumab-matched placebo every 2 weeks). The primary end point was overall survival. At 1 year, the overall rate of survival was 72.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65.5 to 78.9) in the nivolumab group, as compared with 42.1% (95% CI, 33.0 to 50.9) in the dacarbazine group (hazard ratio for death, 0.42; 99.79% CI, 0.25 to 0.73; Psurvival was 5.1 months in the nivolumab group versus 2.2 months in the dacarbazine group (hazard ratio for death or progression of disease, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.56; Psurvival benefit with nivolumab versus dacarbazine was observed across prespecified subgroups, including subgroups defined by status regarding the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Common adverse events associated with nivolumab included fatigue, pruritus, and nausea. Drug-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 11.7% of the patients treated with nivolumab and 17.6% of those treated with dacarbazine. Nivolumab was associated with significant improvements in overall survival and progression-free survival, as compared with dacarbazine, among previously untreated patients who had metastatic melanoma without a BRAF mutation. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; CheckMate 066 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01721772.).

  3. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cereda Anna

    2012-10-01

    obstruction is likely more common than previously realized and should be investigated when full care is opted by the family and medical team. The complexity and the severity of the clinical presentation at birth and the high neonatal and infant mortality make the perinatal and neonatal management of babies with trisomy 18 particularly challenging, controversial, and unique among multiple congenital anomaly syndromes. Health supervision should be diligent, especially in the first 12 months of life, and can require multiple pediatric and specialist evaluations.

  4. The long-term consequences of previous hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans

    2015-01-01

    vascular state. While it is biologically plausible that these changes may induce long-term consequences, the insight into morbidity as well as mortality in patients with previous hyperthyroidism is limited. The reasons for this are a combination of inadequately powered studies, varying definitions......,400 non-hyperthyroid control individuals (matched for age and sex), all identified from a random 5% sample of the Danish background population (n=339,481). In the second study population, 625 same-sex twin pairs, discordant for hyperthyroidism, were included. For each individual, the degree of co......-up (>10 years) as well as control for co-morbidity and genetic confounding. The results provide a number of interesting insights into the long-term consequences of hyperthyroidism. Firstly, hyperthyroidism is associated with an approximately 30% increased all-cause mortality. The all-cause mortality does...

  5. Malignant tumor formation in dogs previously irradiated for acanthomatous epulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Margaret C; Page, Rodney L; Théon, Alain; Erb, Hollis N; Thrall, Donald E

    2004-01-01

    In this retrospective study of 57 dogs irradiated for oral acanthomatous epulis, 2 (3.5%) dogs developed a second tumor (sarcoma, osteosarcoma) in the radiation treatment field at 5.2 and 8.7 years after the end of radiation therapy. As opposed to previous reports, no second epithelial tumors developed in the radiation treatment field. There is a risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, but it appears that it is a relatively low risk and an event that occurs years after radiation therapy. Radiation-induced tumors are of more concern in younger dogs that undergo radiation therapy for tumors that are radioresponsive, such as acanthomatous epulis, where long-term survival is expected. The only statistically significant variable in the survival analysis was age, with dogs less than 8.3 years old having a significantly longer median overall survival (2322 days) than dogs older than 8.3 years (1106 days; P<0.0001).

  6. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  7. Lessons from Previous Expeditions for the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuster, J.

    Anecdotal comparisons frequently are made between expeditions of the past and future space missions. From an engineering perspective, the differences between future and past expeditions are considerable. Spacecraft are far more complex than sailing ships, and one of the factors that drives the complexity is the requirement to support the crew in the hostile environment of space. The technological differences are significant, but from a behavioral perspective, are the differences really that great between confinement in a small wooden ship locked in the polar ice cap and confinement in a small high-technology ship hurtling through interplanetary space? The psychological differences probably are few. This paper discusses some of the most salient behavioral and technical lessons from previous expeditions that can be applied to facilitate the human explora- tion of Mars.

  8. Effect of previous induced abortions on postabortion contraception selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Melissa; Roston, Alicia; Keith, Louis; Patel, Ashlesha

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to compare contraceptive method selection in women undergoing their first pregnancy termination versus women undergoing repeat pregnancy termination in an urban abortion clinic. We hypothesized that women undergoing repeat abortions will select highly effective contraceptives (intrauterine device, subdermal implant, tubal ligation) more often than patients undergoing their first abortion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all women undergoing first-trimester surgical abortion at John H. Stroger, Jr., Hospital of Cook County from October 1, 2009, to October 31, 2011. We compared contraceptive method selection in the postabortion period after receipt of contraceptive counseling for 7466 women, stratifying women by history of no prior abortion versus one or more abortions. Of the 7466 women, 48.6% (3625) had no history of previous abortion. After controlling for age, race and number of living children, women with a history of abortion were more likely to select a highly effective method [odds ratio (OR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.33]. Most significantly, having living children was the strongest predictor of a highly effective method with an OR of 3.17 (95% CI 2.69-3.75). In women having a first-trimester abortion, the factors most predictive of selecting a highly effective method for postabortion contraception include history of previous abortion and having living children. The latter holds true independent of abortion history. This paper is unique in its ability to demonstrate the high interest in highly effective contraceptive selection in high-risk, low-income women with prior abortion history. Efforts to integrate provision of highly effective methods of contraception for postabortion care are essential for the reduction of future unintended pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Typing DNA profiles from previously enhanced fingerprints using direct PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Taylor, Duncan; Handt, Oliva; Linacre, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    Fingermarks are a source of human identification both through the ridge patterns and DNA profiling. Typing nuclear STR DNA markers from previously enhanced fingermarks provides an alternative method of utilising the limited fingermark deposit that can be left behind during a criminal act. Dusting with fingerprint powders is a standard method used in classical fingermark enhancement and can affect DNA data. The ability to generate informative DNA profiles from powdered fingerprints using direct PCR swabs was investigated. Direct PCR was used as the opportunity to generate usable DNA profiles after performing any of the standard DNA extraction processes is minimal. Omitting the extraction step will, for many samples, be the key to success if there is limited sample DNA. DNA profiles were generated by direct PCR from 160 fingermarks after treatment with one of the following dactyloscopic fingerprint powders: white hadonite; silver aluminium; HiFi Volcano silk black; or black magnetic fingerprint powder. This was achieved by a combination of an optimised double-swabbing technique and swab media, omission of the extraction step to minimise loss of critical low-template DNA, and additional AmpliTaq Gold(®) DNA polymerase to boost the PCR. Ninety eight out of 160 samples (61%) were considered 'up-loadable' to the Australian National Criminal Investigation DNA Database (NCIDD). The method described required a minimum of working steps, equipment and reagents, and was completed within 4h. Direct PCR allows the generation of DNA profiles from enhanced prints without the need to increase PCR cycle numbers beyond manufacturer's recommendations. Particular emphasis was placed on preventing contamination by applying strict protocols and avoiding the use of previously used fingerprint brushes. Based on this extensive survey, the data provided indicate minimal effects of any of these four powders on the chance of obtaining DNA profiles from enhanced fingermarks. Copyright © 2017

  10. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  11. Surgical treatment of breast cancer in previously augmented patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanas, Yvonne L; Leong, Darren S; Da Lio, Andrew; Waldron, Kathleen; Watson, James P; Chang, Helena; Shaw, William W

    2003-03-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing each year. Concomitantly, cosmetic breast augmentation has become the second most often performed cosmetic surgical procedure. As the augmented patient population ages, an increasing number of breast cancer cases among previously augmented women can be anticipated. The surgical treatment of these patients is controversial, with several questions remaining unanswered. Is breast conservation therapy feasible in this patient population and can these patients retain their implants? A retrospective review of all breast cancer patients with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty who were treated at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between 1991 and 2001 was performed. During the study period, 58 patients were treated. Thirty patients (52 percent) were treated with a modified radical mastectomy with implant removal. Twenty-eight patients (48 percent) underwent breast conservation therapy, which consisted of lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and radiotherapy. Twenty-two of the patients who underwent breast conservation therapy initially retained their implants. Eleven of those 22 patients (50 percent) ultimately required completion mastectomies with implant removal because of implant complications (two patients), local recurrences (five patients), or the inability to obtain negative margins (four patients). Nine additional patients experienced complications resulting from their implants, including contracture, erosion, pain, and rupture. The data illustrate that breast conservation therapy with maintenance of the implant is not ideal for the majority of augmented patients. Breast conservation therapy with explantation and mastopexy might be appropriate for rare patients with large volumes of native breast tissue. Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction might be a more suitable choice for these patients.

  12. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  13. Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sivasankari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is the autosomal dominant-inherited multisystem connective-tissue disorder, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 individuals and equal distribution in both genders. The main clinical manifestation of this disorder consists of an exaggerated length of the upper and lower limbs, hyperlaxity, scoliosis, alterations in the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, and atypical bone overgrowth. Orofacial manifestations such as high-arched palate, hypodontia, long narrow teeth, bifid uvula, mandibular prognathism, and temporomandibular disorders are also common. Early diagnosis of MFS is essential to prevent the cardiovascular complications and treatment of orofacial manifestations, thus to increase the quality of life of the patient.

  14. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  15. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  16. [Dependency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorisalo, Sailaritta

    2013-01-01

    The most common causes of lower limb edema include cardiac insufficiency, venous insufficiency, insufficiency of lymph flow, and side effects of drugs. It can also be due to dependency syndrome, in which the edema and skin changes can only be explained by a passive calf muscle pump and the resulting venous hypertension. Underlying the drop foot is always immobilization for one reason or other. The patient must be given an explanation about the situation, activated to move if possible, and in any case guided to the use of support stockings and postural therapy.

  17. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  18. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  19. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  20. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  1. Wells′ syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Ajay

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic cellulitis/Wells′ syndrome is a rare dermatosis with erythematous, urticarial plaques that become more indurated and eventually have grey blue discoloration. The histopathology is distinctive, with a diffuse infiltrate composed predominantly of eosinophils but admixed with lymphocytes, histicytes and occasionally multinucleated histiocytes. There is dermal edema with so called "flame figures" that is composed of collagen focally enveloped with aggregates of eosinophilic granules. These collagen fibres may be surrounded by palisading histiocyes. The course is variable with waxing and waning and eventual spontaneous resolution.

  2. Cardiorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Di Lullo, Luca

    2014-04-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) includes a broad spectrum of diseases within which both the heart and kidneys are involved, acutely or chronically. An effective classification of CRS in 2008 essentially divides CRS in two main groups, cardiorenal and renocardiac CRS, based on primum movens of disease (cardiac or renal); both cardiorenal and renocardiac CRS are then divided into acute and chronic, according to onset of disease. The fifth type of CRS integrates all cardiorenal involvement induced by systemic disease. This article addresses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of the 5 distinct types of CRS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unusual presentation of prune belly syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Demisse, Abayneh Girma; Berhanu, Ashenafi; Tadesse, Temesgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown etiology, with the following triad of findings: abdominal muscle wall weakness, undescended testes, and urinary tract abnormalities. In most cases, detection of prune belly syndrome occurs during neonatal or infancy period. In this case report, we describe a 12-year-old boy from Ethiopia with the triad of findings of prune belly syndrome along with skeletal malformations. We are unaware of any previous report of prun...

  4. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity in west syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Montelli, Terezinha C. B.; Iwasso, Maria Tereza R.; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha S.; Mota, Norma Gerusa S.

    1981-01-01

    The immunological status of five children with West syndrome consequent to previous cerebral lesions was investigated. Three children had West syndrome and two were in transition from West to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. All of them showed cellular immunological deficiencies in the following tests: sensitization to DNCB, intracutaneous reaction to PHA, inhibition of leucocyte migration, blastic transformation of lymphocytes, T and B lymphocytes in peripheric blood and levels of serum immunoglobul...

  5. Capgras syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect in nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtzo, L Christine; Kleinman, Jonathan T; Llinas, Rafael H

    2008-01-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus can manifest as personality changes and psychosis. We report an 87-year-old right-handed male presenting with both Capgras syndrome and severe unilateral spatial neglect during nonconvulsive status epilepticus. After treatment of his seizures, his Capgras syndrome and hemispatial neglect resolved. This case illustrates a report of the confluence of Capgras syndrome and documented hemispatial neglect in nonconvulsive status epilepticus only reported once previously [1].

  6. Capgras Syndrome and Unilateral Spatial Neglect in Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Christine Turtzo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonconvulsive status epilepticus can manifest as personality changes and psychosis. We report an 87-year-old right-handed male presenting with both Capgras syndrome and severe unilateral spatial neglect during nonconvulsive status epilepticus. After treatment of his seizures, his Capgras syndrome and hemispatial neglect resolved. This case illustrates a report of the confluence of Capgras syndrome and documented hemispatial neglect in nonconvulsive status epilepticus only reported once previously [1].

  7. [Miller Fisher syndrome, internal and external ophthalmoplegia after flu vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Marchite, C I; Buznego-Suárez, L; Fagúndez-Vargas, M A; Méndez-Llatas, M; Pozo-Martos, P

    2008-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is the most frequent variant of the Guillain-Barré Syndrome. It is characterised by the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. We present a case of a patient who developed these clinical findings 5 days after flu vaccination. Miller Fisher Syndrome is an unusual condition seen in ophthalmologic clinical practice. Although respiratory and digestive infections have been reported as antecedent infectious agents in MFS, it has not previously been described in relation to the flu vaccine.

  8. Determination of periodontopathogens in patients with Cri du chat syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesta-Mudarra, Sof?a; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Rodr?guez-Caballero, ?ngela; Y??ez-Vico, Rosa M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Perea-P?rez, Evelio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cri du chat syndrome is a genetic alteration associated with some oral pathologies. However, it has not been described previously any clinical relationship between the periodontal disease and the syndrome. The purpose of this comparative study was to compare periodontopathogenic flora in a group with Cri du chat syndrome and another without the síndrome, to assess a potential microbiological predisposition to suffer a periodontitis. Study Design: The study compared nineteen subjec...

  9. Extensive comedonal and cystic acne in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelo, Antonio; Fernandez-Crehuet, Pablo; Del Prado, Elena; Martes, Pilar; Hernández-Martín, Angela; De Diego, Verónica; Carapeto, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Patau syndrome is a chromosomal disorder associated with multiple malformations caused by inheritance of an extra chromosome (trisomy 13). Some skin defects have been reported in patients with Patau syndrome, such as scalp defects, glabellar stains, deep palmar creases, rocker-bottom feet, convex soles, hyperconvextity of the nails, and multiple hemangiomas. To our knowledge, widespread comedonal and cystic acne have not been previously reported in Patau syndrome.

  10. The diagnostic quandary of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia vs. CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Ben-Aviv, D; Covello, S P

    2001-10-01

    The distribution and clinical appearance of the telangiectasia in the CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are very similar. Several previously reported cases of the CREST syndrome simulating HHT illustrate this diagnostic quandary. We report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for both the CREST syndrome and HHT, and discuss the distinguishing features of the two diseases, including the distinctive histopathological findings of telangiectasia in HHT.

  11. Capgras Syndrome and Other Delusional Misidentification Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrelle, Alain; Luauté, J-P

    2018-01-01

    The delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS) are a group of disorders, characterized by patients mistaking the identity of people they know, although they recognize them physically. The term DMS is an umbrella term which may cover disorders whose definition extends to objects other than people, such as animals, places, or familiar material objects. The most common and best known DMS is Capgras syndrome. In this disorder, the misidentification leads to the delusional conviction that a close friend or relative has been replaced by an identical - or almost identical - "double," whose original has disappeared. This double is an imposter without name or identity. Most often considered as a persecutor, the double may be subjected to aggression, which may be very violent. Neuropsychological hypotheses based on cerebral dysfunctions are now commonly considered to be at the origin of the disorder. They have been elaborated from achievements in the neurosciences, particularly the facial recognition models. In return, knowledge about the normal cognitive processes involved in recognition and familiarity has benefited from the work that cognitive neuropsychiatry has invested in these disorders. The DMS are observed in various contexts of morbidity: primary psychiatric diagnosis, or secondary to various organic disorders, particularly in neurodegenerative disease; they are rarely met in isolated form. Most often, they develop in line with the associated pathology. In the absence of consensual clinical description, the epidemiology of DMS is uncertain; they may be more frequent than previously supposed. There is no specific treatment for these disorders; neuroleptics are generally used in association with treatment of the concomitant disorder. The frequent association of DMS with organic disorders which may be curable and the particularly dangerous profile of these patients are factors that underline the need for better screening. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab or Monotherapy in Previously Untreated Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, James; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Gonzalez, Rene; Grob, Jean Jacques; Cowey, C. Lance; Lao, Christopher D.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Dummer, Reinhard; Smylie, Michael; Rutkowski, Piotr; Ferrucci, Pier Francesco; Hill, Andrew; Wagstaff, John; Carlino, Matteo S.; Haanen, John B.; Maio, Michele; Marquez-Rodas, Ivan; McArthur, Grant A.; Ascierto, Paolo A.; Long, Georgina V.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Postow, Michael A.; Grossmann, Kenneth; Sznol, Mario; Dreno, Brigitte; Bastholt, Lars; Yang, Arvin; Rollin, Linda M.; Horak, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2017-01-01

    Background The results of phase 1 and phase 2 studies suggest that nivolumab (a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor) and ipilimumab (a CTLA-4 checkpoint inhibitor) have complementary activity in metastatic melanoma. In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, nivolumab alone or nivolumab combined with ipilimumab versus ipilimumab alone were evaluated in patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods We randomly assigned 945 previously untreated patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, in 1:1:1 ratio, to nivolumab alone (3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks), or to nivolumab (at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram) plus ipilimumab (at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram) every 3 weeks for 4 doses followed by nivolumab (3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks), or to ipilimumab alone (3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for 4 doses). Progression-free and overall survival were co-primary end points. Patients continue to be followed for overall survival. Results Median progression-free survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.9 to 16.7) for nivolumab plus ipilimumab as compared with 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.8 to 3.4) for ipilimumab alone (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.57; Pnivolumab alone (hazard ratio in the comparison with ipilimumab alone, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.76; Pnivolumab plus ipilimumab and nivolumab alone groups, but in PD-L1-negative patients, progression-free survival was longer with the combination as compared with nivolumab alone (11.2 months [95% CI, 8.0 to not reached] versus 5.3 months [95% CI, 2.8 to 7.1]). Grade 3–4 drug-related adverse events occurred in 16.3%, 55.0%, and 27.3% of patients in the nivolumab, nivolumab plus ipilimumab, and ipilimumab alone groups, with 1, 0, and 1 drug-related deaths, respectively. Conclusions Nivolumab alone or combined with ipilimumab significantly improved progression-free survival, as compared with ipilimumab, among previously untreated patients with metastatic melanoma. Results with the combination

  13. Spartan deficiency causes genomic instability and progeroid phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maskey, R.S.; Kim, M.S.; Baker, D.J.; Childs, B.; Malureanu, L.A.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Machida, Y.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Machida, Y.J.

    2014-01-01

    Spartan (also known as DVC1 and C1orf124) is a PCNA-interacting protein implicated in translesion synthesis, a DNA damage tolerance process that allows the DNA replication machinery to replicate past nucleotide lesions. However, the physiological relevance of Spartan has not been established. Here

  14. 76 FR 6525 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company (Type Certificate Previously Held by Columbia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... Company (Type Certificate Previously Held by Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing (Previously the Lancair... Aircraft Company (Type Certificate Previously Held by Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing (Previously The... Aircraft Company (type certificate previously held by Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing (previously The...

  15. Multispecies Coevolution Particle Swarm Optimization Based on Previous Search History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid coevolution particle swarm optimization algorithm with dynamic multispecies strategy based on K-means clustering and nonrevisit strategy based on Binary Space Partitioning fitness tree (called MCPSO-PSH is proposed. Previous search history memorized into the Binary Space Partitioning fitness tree can effectively restrain the individuals’ revisit phenomenon. The whole population is partitioned into several subspecies and cooperative coevolution is realized by an information communication mechanism between subspecies, which can enhance the global search ability of particles and avoid premature convergence to local optimum. To demonstrate the power of the method, comparisons between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms are grouped into two categories: 10 basic benchmark functions (10-dimensional and 30-dimensional, 10 CEC2005 benchmark functions (30-dimensional, and a real-world problem (multilevel image segmentation problems. Experimental results show that MCPSO-PSH displays a competitive performance compared to the other swarm-based or evolutionary algorithms in terms of solution accuracy and statistical tests.

  16. Optimal temperature for malaria transmission is dramaticallylower than previously predicted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordecai, Eerin A.; Paaijmans, Krijin P.; Johnson, Leah R.; Balzer, Christian; Ben-Horin, Tal; de Moor, Emily; McNally, Amy; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.; Smith, Thomas C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of mosquito vectors and malaria parasites affect the incidence, seasonal transmission and geographical range of malaria. Most malaria models to date assume constant or linear responses of mosquito and parasite life-history traits to temperature, predicting optimal transmission at 31 °C. These models are at odds with field observations of transmission dating back nearly a century. We build a model with more realistic ecological assumptions about the thermal physiology of insects. Our model, which includes empirically derived nonlinear thermal responses, predicts optimal malaria transmission at 25 °C (6 °C lower than previous models). Moreover, the model predicts that transmission decreases dramatically at temperatures > 28 °C, altering predictions about how climate change will affect malaria. A large data set on malaria transmission risk in Africa validates both the 25 °C optimum and the decline above 28 °C. Using these more accurate nonlinear thermal-response models will aid in understanding the effects of current and future temperature regimes on disease transmission.

  17. Use of robotic colonoscopy in patients with previous incomplete colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, E; Parisi, G; Bertoni, M; Bertini, M; Metrangolo, S; Ierardi, E; Cervelli, R; Bresci, G; Sacco, R

    2017-02-01

    Conventional colonoscopy (CC) is the gold standard to diagnostic and therapeutic approach to colon. However, in few cases, cecal intubation could fail due to colon anatomy, patient compliance and physician expertise. Endotics robotic colonoscopy is a novel, safe, mini-invasive modality to explore the entire colon. Our aim was to assess, in a retrospective study, Endotics ability of cecal intubation in all cases in which CC failed. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 276 Endotics robotic colonscopy examinations were performed at the Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Unit of Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy, in a series of consecutive patients who had undergone CC and failed cecal intubation. We assessed the cecal intubation rate in 102 patients addressed to Endotics after previous incomplete CC. Overall, endotics system was successful in 93.1% of the incomplete conventional colonoscopy cases (95% performance). Whenever the intended exploration of the entire colon with CC failed, the endotics robotic endoscopy represented a useful tool as it helped examine the entire colon in almost all cases.

  18. Pleomorphic dermal sarcoma: a more aggressive neoplasm than previously estimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardío, Juan C; Pinedo, Fernando; Aramburu, José A; Suárez-Massa, Dolores; Pampín, Ana; Requena, Luis; Santonja, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Pleomorphic dermal sarcoma (PDS) is a rare neoplasm sharing pathological features with atypical fibroxanthoma, but adding tumor necrosis, invasion beyond superficial subcutis or vascular or perineural infiltration. Although its metastatic risk has been estimated to be less than 5%, its real outcome is presently uncertain because of its rarity and to the lack of homogeneous criteria used in reported cases. Retrospective clinicopathological study of 18 cases of PDS. The lesions presented as tumors or plaques (size: 7-70 mm) on the head of elderly patients (median: 81 years), without a gender predominance. Histopathologically, they consisted of spindle cells arranged in a fascicular pattern, containing pleomorphic epithelioid and giant multinucleated cells in varying proportions, and usually exhibiting numerous mitotic figures and infiltrative tumor margins. No immunoexpression for cytokeratins, S100 protein, desmin or CD34 was observed. Necrosis and venous invasion were found in three tumors each (17%). Follow-up was available in 15 cases (median: 33 months). Three patients (20%) had local recurrences, all with incomplete primary surgical resections. Three patients (20%) developed distant metastases in the skin, regional lymph nodes and/or lungs and died from the disease. Our data suggest that PDS may be a more aggressive neoplasm than previously estimated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Global functional atlas of Escherichia coli encompassing previously uncharacterized proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingzhao Hu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One-third of the 4,225 protein-coding genes of Escherichia coli K-12 remain functionally unannotated (orphans. Many map to distant clades such as Archaea, suggesting involvement in basic prokaryotic traits, whereas others appear restricted to E. coli, including pathogenic strains. To elucidate the orphans' biological roles, we performed an extensive proteomic survey using affinity-tagged E. coli strains and generated comprehensive genomic context inferences to derive a high-confidence compendium for virtually the entire proteome consisting of 5,993 putative physical interactions and 74,776 putative functional associations, most of which are novel. Clustering of the respective probabilistic networks revealed putative orphan membership in discrete multiprotein complexes and functional modules together with annotated gene products, whereas a machine-learning strategy based on network integration implicated the orphans in specific biological processes. We provide additional experimental evidence supporting orphan participation in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and assembly of the bacterial cell envelope. This resource provides a "systems-wide" functional blueprint of a model microbe, with insights into the biological and evolutionary significance of previously uncharacterized proteins.

  20. Motivational activities based on previous knowledge of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. A.; Gómez-Robledo, L.; Huertas, R.; Perales, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Academic results depend strongly on the individual circumstances of students: background, motivation and aptitude. We think that academic activities conducted to increase motivation must be tuned to the special situation of the students. Main goal of this work is analyze the students in the first year of the Degree in Optics and Optometry in the University of Granada and the suitability of an activity designed for those students. Initial data were obtained from a survey inquiring about the reasons to choose this degree, their knowledge of it, and previous academic backgrounds. Results show that: 1) the group is quite heterogeneous, since students have very different background. 2) Reasons to choose the Degree in Optics and Optometry are also very different, and in many cases were selected as a second option. 3) Knowledge and motivations about the Degree are in general quite low. Trying to increase the motivation of the students we designed an academic activity in which we show different topics studied in the Degree. Results show that students that have been involved in this activity are the most motivated and most satisfied with their election of the degree.