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Sample records for progeria syndrome nature

  1. Progeria syndrome: A case report

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    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  2. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Zahoor Hussain Daraz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare genetic disease in which symptoms of aging are manifested at an early age. In the present report, we describe a 9 months old female child presented with a history of progressive coarsening of skin, failure to thrive and irregular bumps over thighs, buttocks and lower limbs for the last 7½ months. In the course of time, she developed alopecia, hyperpigmented spots over the abdomen with thickening and a typical facial profile of HGPS including micrognathia, absent ear lobules, prominent eyes, loss of eyelashes, eyebrows and a bluish hue over the nose.

  3. Progeria

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    Mohamed Riyaz S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare, sporadic, autosomal dominant syndrome that involves premature ageing and death at early age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. A 30-year-old male with clinical and radiologic features highly suggestive of HGPS is presented here with description of differential diagnosis, dental considerations and review of literature.

  4. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

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    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wilson A. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. J Gerontol A ... should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about ...

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Agarwal Uma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  8. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

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    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  9. Progeria

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    Kaur Charandeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of progeria is being reported in a 7-year old boy. He had characteristic facies, short stature, alopecia, high pitched voice, coxa valga and sclerodermatous changes in skin.

  10. Lethal neonatal Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Rodríguez, J I; Pérez-Alonso, P; Funes, R; Pérez-Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-29

    We report on a 35-week gestation female fetus with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP). This patient, who is the first reported with neonatal HGP in the English literature but is the fourth, counting three previous French cases, supports the existence of a more severe prenatal form of progeria. She died 7 hours after birth and presented with intrauterine growth retardation, premature aging, absence of subcutaneous fat, brachydactyly, absent nipples, hypoplastic external genitalia, and abnormal ear lobes. The child's combination of clinical and skeletal manifestations differentiates this form of HGP from other progeroid syndromes with neonatal presentation. We also report previously undescribed autopsy findings including premature loss of hair follicles, premature regression of the renal nephrogenic layer, and premature closure of the growth plates in the distal phalanges that may be related to the aging processes in this condition. We could not find any histological data to support acro-osteolysis, which is the radiographic sign of brachydactyly. The terminal phalanges in HGP seem to be underdeveloped rather than osteolytic.

  11. Progeria

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    Raval Ranjan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old boy presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had senile looks, scanty scalp hair, stunted growth, and wrinkled skin with loss of subcutaneous fat. Sclerodermatous changes were found on both thighs and pelvic region, which was confirmed by histopathology.

  12. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

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    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  13. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: review of the phenotype

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    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare but well known entity characterized by extreme short stature, low body weight, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, and facial features that resemble aged persons. Cardiovascular compromise leads

  14. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  15. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

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    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  16. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

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    Subhash Kashyap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  17. A case of progeria syndrome treated as VIP patient

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    Seema Mahant, Mahant PD, C.M. Reddy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is rare autosomal recessive genetic disease with an incidence of about one in eight million. He was 16 years old boy lying on the couch. He was short stature thin with minimal subcutaneous tissue, skin was thin and fragile with loss of hair over scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes, and his face was dismorphic with prominent eyes, beaked nose, small jaw and large cranium with visible veins over it. His voice was thin and high pitched. Overall, this gives them an extremely aged nearly 70 -80 years old man look. The patient was a known case of progeria syndrome and he was treated as a VIP patient by all faculty members and staff, though he belongs low socioeconomic status, no political issue with them. But still he was a VIP.

  18. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

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    Rajat G. Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest.

  19. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Cleveland, Robert H. [Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Leslie B. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children' s Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Kleinman, Monica E. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Miller, David T. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Genetics, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology and Adolescent Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Snyder, Brian D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Nazarian, Ara [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Giobbie-Hurder, Anita [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Neuberg, Donna [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Kieran, Mark W. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  20. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

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    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  1. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

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    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  2. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma J. H.; Merckx, Diane; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marcelis, Carlo L. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  3. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  4. A lamin A protein isoform overexpressed in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome interferes with mitosis in progeria and normal cells

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    Cao, Kan; Capell, Brian C.; Erdos, Michael R.; Djabali, Karima; Collins, Francis S.

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by dramatic premature aging. Classic HGPS is caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 (residue 1824, C → T) of the LMNA gene, activating a cryptic splice donor and resulting in a mutant lamin A (LA) protein termed “progerin/LAΔ50” that lacks the normal cleavage site to remove a C-terminal farnesyl group. During interphase, irreversibly farnesylated progerin/LAΔ50 anchors to the nuclear membrane and causes characteristic nuclear blebbing. Progerin/LAΔ50's localization and behavior during mitosis, however, are completely unknown. Here, we report that progerin/LAΔ50 mislocalizes into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates and membranes during mitosis and causes abnormal chromosome segregation and binucleation. These phenotypes are largely rescued with either farnesyltransferase inhibitors or a farnesylation-incompetent mutant progerin/LAΔ50. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small amounts of progerin/LAΔ50 exist in normal fibroblasts, and a significant percentage of these progerin/LAΔ50-expressing normal cells are binucleated, implicating progerin/LAΔ50 as causing similar mitotic defects in the normal aging process. Our findings present evidence of mitotic abnormality in HGPS and may shed light on the general phenomenon of aging. PMID:17360355

  5. Progeria syndrome with characteristic deformation of proximal radius observed on CT

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    Sood, S.; Rao, R.C.K.; Ragav, B.; Berry, M. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Radio-Diagnosis)

    1991-01-01

    The progeria syndrome (Hutchinson-Gilford) is an uncommon disease. A peculiar shape of the proximal radial metaphyseal region caused by an infolding of the cortex was observed on CT in 2 brothers suffering from this disorder, a feature not previously reported. A brief review of the radiologic literature was undertaken. This new observation needs to be further evaluated as it may provide a clinching diagnostic feature of this disease. (orig.).

  6. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

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    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  7. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

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    Kalil, Kotb Abbass Metwalley; Fargalley, Hekma Saad

    2012-01-17

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL), low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL), raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL), raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L) and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL) levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  8. Simultaneous Shoulder and Hip Dislocation in a 12-Year-Old Girl with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Shirin Mardookhpour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  9. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

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    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  10. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with severe calcific aortic valve stenosis

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    Natesh B Hanumanthappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging syndrome that results from mutation in the Laminin A gene. This case report of a 12-year-old girl with HGPS is presented for the rarity of the syndrome and the classical clinical features that were observed in the patient. All patients with this condition should undergo early and periodic evaluation for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prognosis is poor and management is mainly conservative. There is no proven therapy available. Mortality in this uniformly fatal condition is primarily due to myocardial infarction, strokes or congestive cardiac failure between ages 7 and 21 years due to the rapidly progressive arteriosclerosis involving the large vessels.

  11. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A 36 years old woman with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report

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    Akrami S M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder with a frequency of 1 in 8 million live births. It is characterised by premature aging phenotype. The median age at death is 13.4 years. It is an autosomal dominat disease due to a de novo point mutation in the Lamin A gene exon 11 in the majority of cases. More than 100 cases have been reported world wide."nCase report: We describe here an exceptionally long-lived patient with HGPS, who is alive at age 36. She was referred by a cardiologist to our endocrinology clinic to be worked up for presence of a metabolic or genetic disorder before a heart surgery."nResults: Having more attention of clinicians about very rare diseases and referring the patients to geneticist are the main goals of this case report as well as describing the disease.

  13. Hip pathology in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a report of two children.

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    Akhbari, Pouya; Jha, Shilpa; James, Kyle D; Hinves, Barry L; Buchanan, Jamie A F

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder. The estimated incidence is one in 4 million births. Orthopaedic manifestations include abnormality of the hips occurring early in the disease process. Severe coxa valga can be apparent by the age of 2 years. We report two cases of HGPS, one in a 7-year-old girl with avascular necrosis of the left hip and the second in a 13-year-old girl with recurrent traumatic hip dislocations. We demonstrate the pathoanatomical changes in the hip with HGPS using a combination of imaging modalities including radiographic, computed tomographic and MRI scans. These include coxa magna, coxa valga and acetabular dysplasia. We also comment on how these would affect the surgical management of this high-risk group of patients. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  14. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

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    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determine...

  15. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

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    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  16. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  17. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determined to be a cerebrovascular accident. Subsequently, she returned almost completely to her pre-surgical neurologic status. Perioperative planning for HGPS patients should include risks typically considered in the planning for geriatric patient care. PMID:19373113

  18. Progeria: a new kind of Laminopathy-- report of the First European Symposium on Progeria and creation of EURO-Progeria, a European Consortium on Progeria and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brune, Thomas; Bonne, Gisele; Denecke, Jonas; Elcioglu, Nursel; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marquardt, Thorsten; Ozgen, Heval; Stamsnijder, Marjet; Steichen, Elisabeth; Steinmann, Beat; Wehnert, Manfred; Levy, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Progeria is a rare, genetically determined condition characterized by accelerated aging in children. Its name is derived from Greek (Geron) and means "prematurely old". The classic type is the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which was first described in England in 1886 by Dr. Jonathan

  19. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A.; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C.; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently,

  20. Using drug treatments to control genome behaviour in normal and Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts, with and without hTERT immortalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Bikkul, Mehmet Ural

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an exceedingly rare genetic condition with striking features reminiscent of marked premature ageing. HGPS is commonly caused by a ‘classic’ mutation in the A-type lamin gene, LMNA (G608G). This leads to the expression of an aberrant truncated lamin A protein, progerin. The nuclear lamina is known to anchor chromosomes, stabilising and re...

  1. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphologi...

  2. Stem cell aging in adult progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is considered an irreversible biological process and also a major risk factor for a spectrum of geriatric diseases. Advanced age-related decline in physiological functions, such as neurodegeneration, development of cardiovascular disease, endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, and neoplastic transformation, has become the focus in aging research. Natural aging is not regarded as a programmed process. However, accelerated aging due to inherited genetic defects in patients of progeria is programmed and resembles many aspects of natural aging. Among several premature aging syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS are two broadly investigated diseases. In this review, we discuss how stem cell aging in WS helps us understand the biology of aging. We also discuss briefly how the altered epigenetic landscape in aged cells can be reversed to a “juvenile” state. Lastly, we explore the potential application of the latest genomic editing technique for stem cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine in the context of aging.

  3. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  4. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  5. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  7. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, bu...

  9. Progeria: A rare genetic premature ageing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs. As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent ′drug of hope′ for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs.

  10. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  11. Labor Market Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  12. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  13. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  14. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  15. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria.

  16. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyue Zhang

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3. In this study, we explore the potential connection(s between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox, double strand breaks (DSBs are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency.

  17. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  18. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  19. The two-faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2014-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces

  20. A homozygous ZMPSTE24 null mutation in combination with a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): insights into the pathophysiology of HGPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Jonas; Brune, Thomas; Feldhaus, Tobias; Robenek, Horst; Kranz, Christian; Auchus, Richard J; Agarwal, Anil K; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2006-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder normally caused by a spontaneous heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that codes for the nuclear lamina protein lamin A. Several enzymes are involved in the processing of its precursor, prelamin A, to the mature lamin A. A functional knockout of one of the enzymes involved in prelamin A processing, the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24, causes an even more severe disorder with early neonatal death described as restrictive dermatopathy (RD). This work describes a HGPS patient with a combined defect of a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene and a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that results in a C-terminal elongation of the final lamin A. Whereas the loss of function mutation of ZMPSTE24 normally results in lethal RD, the truncation of LMNA seems to be a salvage alteration alleviating the clinical picture to the HGPS phenotype. The mutations of our patient indicate that farnesylated prelamin A is the deleterious agent leading to the HGPS phenotype, which gives further insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. [Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. A rare case of neonatal occurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A; Bonfiglioli, G; Masignà Ricciardi, M G

    1986-01-01

    A case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is described in which phenotypic and metabolic symptoms were already evident at birth. Both under a clinical and autopsy point of view an early old age of organs and apparatuses was apparent, posing the problem of the reason why an early old aging occurs. The authors mention literature in favour of a genetic control of cellular aging and make the assumption that the genes controlling old age are various and that a greater or lesser presence and incidence of them could justify the earlier or normal appearance of this status.

  2. Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  3. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientific test to definitively diagnose children with Progeria. What is the Gene for HGPS? The gene responsible for HGPS is called LMNA (pronounced Lamin A). Within this gene there is a change in one element of DNA. This type of gene change is ...

  4. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-06-22

    Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently, to nuclear envelope alterations. In this work, we describe a novel phenotypic feature of the progeria spectrum affecting three unrelated newborns and identify its genetic cause. Patients reported herein present an extremely homogeneous phenotype that somewhat recapitulates those of patients with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. However, pathological signs appear earlier, are more aggressive and present distinctive features including episodes of severe upper airway obstruction. Exome and Sanger sequencing allowed the identification of heterozygous de novo c.163G>A, p.E55K and c.164A>G, p.E55G mutations in LMNA as the alterations responsible for this disorder. Functional analyses demonstrated that fibroblasts from these patients suffer important dysfunctions in nuclear lamina, which generate profound nuclear envelope abnormalities but without progerin accumulation. These nuclear alterations found in patients' dermal fibroblasts were also induced by ectopic expression of the corresponding site-specific LMNA mutants in control human fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate the causal role of p.E55K and p.E55G lamin A mutations in a disorder which manifests novel phenotypic features of the progeria spectrum characterised by neonatal presentation and aggressive clinical evolution, despite being caused by lamin A/C missense mutations with effective prelamin A processing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. The frailty syndrome: definition and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qian-Li

    2011-02-01

    This article reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the epidemiology of frailty by focusing on 6 specific areas: (1) clinical definitions of frailty, (2) evidence of frailty as a medical syndrome, (3) prevalence and incidence of frailty by age, gender, race, and ethnicity, (4) transitions between discrete frailty states, (5) natural history of manifestations of frailty criteria, and (6) behavior modifications as precursors to the development of clinical frailty. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  7. Altered Nuclear Functions in Progeroid Syndromes: a Paradigm for Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndromes of accelerated aging could provide an entry point for identifying and dissecting the cellular pathways that are involved in the development of age-related pathologies in the general population. However, their usefulness for aging research has been controversial, as it has been argued that these diseases do not faithfully reflect the process of natural aging. Here we review recent findings on the molecular basis of two progeroid diseases, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, and highlight functional connections to cellular processes that may contribute to normal aging.

  8. Hyperactivity: Nature of the Syndrome and Its Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    A review of research focuses on the history of the syndrome of hyperactivity (including challenges to the disorder's existence) and describes findings from 16 follow-up studies. It is concluded that no study has been able to convincingly discredit hyperactivity as the syndrome is currently diagnosed. (CL)

  9. Autophagic degradation of farnesylated prelamin A as a therapeutic approach to lamin-linked progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cenni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Farnesylated prelamin A is a processing intermediate produced in the lamin A maturation pathway. Accumulation of a truncated farnesylated prelamin A form, called progerin, is a hallmark of the severe premature ageing syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Progerin elicits toxic effects in cells, leading to chromatin damage and cellular senescence and ultimately causes skin and endothelial defects, bone resorption, lipodystrophy and accelerated ageing. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying prelamin A turnover is critical for the development of clinically effective protein inhibitors that can avoid accumulation to toxic levels without impairing lamin A/C expression, which is essential for normal biological functions. Little is known about specific molecules that may target farnesylated prelamin A to elicit protein degradation. Here, we report the discovery of rapamycin as a novel inhibitor of progerin, which dramatically and selectively decreases protein levels through a mechanism involving autophagic degradation. Rapamycin treatment of progeria cells lowers progerin, as well as wild-type prelamin A levels, and rescues the chromatin phenotype of cultured fibroblasts, including histone methylation status and BAF and LAP2alpha distribution patterns. Importantly, rapamycin treatment does not affect lamin C protein levels, but increases the relative expression of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24. Thus, rapamycin, an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides, previously found to increase longevity in mouse models, can serve as a therapeutic tool, to eliminate progerin, avoid farnesylated prelamin A accumulation, and restore chromatin dynamics in progeroid laminopathies.

  10. Natural history of presumed congenital Brown syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, T J; Smith, K; Orton, R B; Noel, L P; Clarke, W; Cadera, W

    1993-07-01

    To evaluate the stability of the ocular alignment in patients with presumed congenital Brown syndrome. A retrospective review of patients with Brown syndrome with an emphasis on nonsurgical cases. Follow-up of at least 1 year was required for inclusion in the study. Patients were selected for this study from the pediatric ophthalmology services at the Ivey Institute of Ophthalmology, London, Ontario, and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa. A cohort of 71 patients with presumed congenital Brown syndrome. Two cases were bilateral. Eleven cases were excluded because of insufficient length of follow-up, leaving 60 patients with an average follow-up of 46 months. All patients were assessed and followed up by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Of 38 patients who had no hypotropia in primary position at presentation, only two (5%) patients experienced a worsening with the development of a small vertical strabismus during the follow-up period. Six (10%) of the entire group of 60 patients experienced a complete spontaneous resolution of the deficiency in elevation at 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 15 years of age. Among patients with congenital Brown syndrome, those who are orthotropic in the primary position tend to remain stable or improve over time without surgical intervention.

  11. The systemic nature of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marai, I; Zandman-Goddard, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2004-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, Hughes' syndrome) is a systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and recurrent foetal loss, accompanied by mild to moderate thrombocytopaenia and elevated titres of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs): lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and/or anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies. APS was defined originally in 1983 in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, but later it was found that APS can be primary or secondary to other autoimmune diseases or malignancy. During the past 20 years many organs have been reported to be involved in this syndrome and the clinical manifestations are seen in every medical field. Moreover, many aPLs have been found in APS besides aCLs and LACs, which bind to the autoantigen beta-2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI). Treatment for APS, based on antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs, is dependent on various parameters, including whether SLE is also present, classical vs non-classical manifestations of the diseases, women with APS based on pregnancy morbidity, the presence of elevated aCL antibody titres in the absence of clinical manifestations, and catastrophic APS.

  12. Axillary web syndrome: nature and localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, O; Sichere, M; Moreau, A; Rigolet, J; Tinlot, A; Darc, S; Wilputte, F; Strapart, J; Parijs, T; Clément, A; Snoeck, T; Pastouret, F; Leduc, A

    2009-12-01

    Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS) is a complication that can arise in patients following treatment for breast cancer. It is also known variously as syndrome of the axillary cords, syndrome of the axillary adhesion, and cording lymphedema. The exact origin, presentation, course, and treatment of AWS is still largely undefined. Because so little is known about AWS, we undertook a case series study consisting of 15 women who had undergone breast cancer surgery and presented with AWS. All subjects received a clinical examination which included body size determination and detailed measurements of the size and location of the cords. The cords were found to originate from the axilla, continue on the medial aspect of the arm up to the epitrochlea region, then to the anteromedian aspect of the forearm, and finally reaching the base of the thumb. The cords averaged approximately 44% of the limb length. Correlation of the cord location with anatomical studies shows that in fact this path follows the specific course taken by the antero-radial pedicle which arises at the anterior aspect of the elbow from the brachial medial pedicule to anastomose in the axilla at the level of the lateral thoracic chain nodes. Although our series is small, the correspondence between the physical findings and the anatomical studies strongly supports the notion that the cords are lymphatic in origin.

  13. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? ...

  14. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Zhang, Y.S.; Pitrez, P.R.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Miscuglio, M.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, M.R.; Nissan, X.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2017-01-01

    A progeria-on-a-chip model is engineered to recapitulate the biomechanical dynamics of vascular disease and aging. The model shows an exacerbated injury response to strain and is rescued by pharmacological treatments. The progeria-on-a-chip is expected to drive the discovery of new drugs and to

  15. Are There Any Natural Remedies That Reduce Chronic Fatigue Associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... natural remedies that reduce chronic fatigue associated with chronic fatigue syndrome? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Researchers ... a variety of natural products for effectiveness against chronic fatigue syndrome. Most results have been disappointing. A few remedies — ...

  16. Progeria: A desequencer of nature | Chukwuma | Abia State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  17. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Oishi

    Full Text Available In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  18. The Nature of Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Karin; Zimka, Oksana; Stein, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we report the findings of our study on the nature of fatigue in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. Using ethnoscience as a design, we conducted a series of unstructured interviews and card sorts to learn more about how people with chronic fatigue syndrome describe fatigue. Participants (N = 14) described three distinct domains: tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion. Most participants experienced tiredness prior to diagnosis, fatigue during daily life, and exhaustion after overexertion. We also discuss participants' ability to adapt to a variety of stressors and prevent shifts to exhaustion, and relate our findings to stress theory and other current research. Primary strategies that promoted adaptation to stressors included pacing and extended rest periods. These findings can aid health care professionals in detecting impending shifts between tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion and in improving adaptive strategies, thereby improving quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Rett syndrome--natural history in 70 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, S; Murphy, M; Moser, H W; Rett, A

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated, at our institute, 70 females with Rett syndrome between 2 1/2 to 34 1/2 years old. This provided an opportunity of observing the natural history of this condition. The evolution of a subacute encephalopathy of very early onset, maximizing in the second year of life, with slow recovery and devastating sequelae, was recognized. The hyperorality, visual auditory and tactile agnosia with aphasia and seizures resembled symptoms described in human Kluver Bucy syndrome. Over interpretation of behavioral abnormalities as seizures was common. Scoliosis was not a necessary concomitant of age. A consistent biochemical or neurophysiological abnormality was not detectable in understanding the cause and pathogenesis of this disease process. Life span appears to be unaffected though life tables have not yet been established.

  20. The natural history of myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephani, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a short review of the natural history of myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE; Doose syndrome) and the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). In the 1989 classification of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE, 1989), MAE and LGS were initially included in group 2.2: "Cryptogenic or symptomatic generalized epilepsies and syndromes." The subsequent classification of the Proposed Diagnostic Scheme for People with Epileptic Seizures and with Epilepsy (see Ref. 8) placed MAE in axis 3 in the "generalized epilepsy" group and LGS, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI or Dravet syndrome) and atypical benign partial epilepsy/pseudo-Lennox syndrome (ABPE/PLS) in the "epileptic encephalopathy" group. The semiology of MAE and LGS and their differential diagnosis from SMEI and ABPE/PLS are described. Before the onset of SMEI, MAE, and ABPE/PLS, the development of the child is usually normal. In contrast, in LGS, development is frequently retarded at the onset, depending on the etiopathogenesis of the underlying brain disease. The course of MAE is highly variable with regard to seizure outcome (complete remission in some cases, persistent epilepsy in others) and cognitive development (normal or delayed). The course of LGS and SMEI is generally poor, both with regard to the epilepsy and to the cognitive development whereas the course and seizure outcome of ABPE/PLS is favorable; the patients will be seizure-free at puberty. However, the neuropsychological outcome is less favorable; most patients remain mentally retarded.

  1. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie B.; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C.; de Zeeuw, Chris I.; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Mitchell, James R.

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a

  2. The Natural History of Scoliosis in Females With Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jennepher; Torode, Ian; Wong, Kingsley; Ellaway, Carolyn; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Christodoulou, John; Jacoby, Peter; Thomson, Margaret R; Izatt, Maree T; Askin, Geoffrey N; McPhee, Bruce I; Bridge, Corinne; Cundy, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Population-based longitudinal observational study. To describe the prevalence of scoliosis in Rett syndrome, structural characteristics and progression, taking into account the influences of age, genotype, and ambulatory status. Scoliosis is the most common orthopedic comorbidity in Rett syndrome yet very little is known about its natural history and influencing factors such as age, genotype, and ambulatory status. The infrastructure of the Australian Rett Syndrome Database was used to identify all cases with confirmed Rett syndrome in Australia and collect data on genotype and walking status. We identified radiological records and described the Cobb angle of each curve. Time to event analysis was used to estimate the median age of onset of scoliosis and the log-rank test to compare by mutation type. Latent class group analysis was used to identify groups for the trajectory of walking status over time and a multilevel linear model used to assess trajectories of scoliosis development by mutation type and walking status. We used a logistic regression model to estimate the probability of developing a scoliosis with a Cobb angle >60° at 16 years in relation to Cobb angle and walking status at 10 years of age. The median age of scoliosis onset was 11 years with earliest onset in those with a p.Arg255 mutation or large deletion. Scoliosis was progressive for all mutation types except for those with the p.Arg306Cys mutation. Scoliosis progression was reduced when there was capacity to walk independently or with assistance. Cobb angle and walking ability at age 10 can be reliably used to identify those who will develop a very severe scoliosis by age 16. These data on prognosis of scoliosis inform clinical decision making about the likelihood of progression to very severe scoliosis and the need for surgical management. 4.

  3. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dominici

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  4. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lattanzi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  5. Mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in accelerated aging syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Collins, Francis S; Nabel, Elizabeth G

    2007-07-06

    In the past several years, remarkable progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanisms of premature aging. These rare, genetic conditions offer valuable insights into the normal aging process and the complex biology of cardiovascular disease. Many of these advances have been made in the most dramatic of these disorders, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Although characterized by features of normal aging such as alopecia, skin wrinkling, and osteoporosis, patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are affected by accelerated, premature arteriosclerotic disease that leads to heart attacks and strokes at a mean age of 13 years. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the biology of premature aging uncovered in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and other accelerated aging syndromes, advances that provide insight into the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases ranging from atherosclerosis to arrhythmias.

  6. Lynch syndrome: genetics, natural history, genetic counseling, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, H T; Lynch, J

    2000-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common hereditary form of colorectal cancer (CRC). Its natural history has been investigated extensively, so that highly targeted surveillance and management strategies, melded to its natural history, have proven effective in cancer control. Most important is the early age of onset of cancer (approximately 44 years), involving CRC and the several extracolonic cancers that are integral to the syndrome. With respect to CRC, approximately 70% of cases occur proximal to the splenic flexure. Synchronous and metachronous CRCs are extremely common. Full colonoscopy should be initiated when the patient is between the ages of 20 and 25, and because of the accelerated carcinogenesis of CRC, it should be performed every 1 to 2 years. The presence of initial CRC requires subtotal colectomy, given the mentioned increased frequency of metachronous cancer. Options available for germ-line mutation carriers, in addition to cancer screening, include prophylactic colectomy as well as prophylactic total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The discovery of mismatch repair germ-line mutations (most commonly MSH2 or MLH1) has added significantly to the recognition of this disease as well as to the search for high-risk individuals throughout families who, with genetic counseling, may become candidates for germ-line mutation testing. Clearly, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer provides an excellent opportunity for learning about the etio-pathogenesis of cancer at the molecular and clinical levels and how this knowledge might ultimately be exploited for cancer control. A search for chemoprevention agents, such as cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors, as well as for putative environmental effects and how they may interact with the genetic component in CRC etiology should abet this entire cancer control process.

  7. An unidentified neonatal progeroid syndrome: follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, H R

    1979-01-18

    Two male infants with a pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome with natal teeth are compared with two very similar female cases reported in the literature and interpreted as congenital progeria. All these cases may represent a separate entity, a previously unrecognized genetic progeroid syndrome.

  8. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: Natural history and long-term prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Abajirao Jagtap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS is a rare, heterogeneous group of genetically determined, disorder of neuromuscular transmission. They have a varied presentation and progression and very few studies have addressed the natural history. Aim of the present study is to describe the clinical profile and natural history of patients with CMS. Materials and Methods: Study includes patients with CMS who attended comprehensive-neuromuscular-clinic (CNMC during the period January, 2000-2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, with inclusion criteria: (1 Onset in infancy or childhood with fluctuating ocular, bulbar, respiratory or limb muscle weakness (2 Acetylcholine receptor antibody negative (3 normal computed tomography (CT thymus (4 Abnormal repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS testing (5 Exclusion of other autoimmune disorders. Results: Out of 314 patients with myasthenia who attended the CNMC during study period, 15 (4.8% were with CMS (8 boys, 7 girls. Patients were divided as infantile and childhood onset. The mean age of onset and diagnosis in infantile and childhood onset groups were 5.5 months/3.1 years and 3.6 years/6.5 years respectively. Eleven patients had ptosis and 4 had generalized presentation. Most common site of decremental response was over facial nerve in 12 (75% patients. All patients showed good response to treatment with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitor with stable course on follow-up without exacerbations. Mean dose for neostigmine was 28 mg/day and for pyridostigmine was 153 mg/day. Conclusion: Ptosis is most common symptom at onset in CMS, emphasing importance of RNS of the facial nerve, in the absence of molecular diagnosis of CMS. Our CMS cohort had relatively stable course without intermittent exacerbations with fair response to acetyl cholinesterase inhibitor.

  9. Could Metabolic Syndrome, Lipodystrophy, and Aging Be Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exhaustion Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mansilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important and complex diseases of modern society is metabolic syndrome. This syndrome has not been completely understood, and therefore an effective treatment is not available yet. We propose a possible stem cell mechanism involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. This way of thinking lets us consider also other significant pathologies that could have similar etiopathogenic pathways, like lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and aging. All these clinical situations could be the consequence of a progressive and persistent stem cell exhaustion syndrome (SCES. The main outcome of this SCES would be an irreversible loss of the effective regenerative mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs pools. In this way, the normal repairing capacities of the organism could become inefficient. Our point of view could open the possibility for a new strategy of treatment in metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and even aging: stem cell therapies.

  10. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan-Olle Andressoo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of "null" alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals.

  11. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome. Reported to have existed in this population for at least 80 years, Nodding Syndrome is a progressive seizure ...

  12. Are There Any Natural Remedies That Reduce Chronic Fatigue Associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic fatigue. Dealing with a condition such as chronic fatigue syndrome can be challenging. There's a lot of hype about various treatments and "natural" approaches. As with any dietary supplement, ...

  13. Epidemiology and Natural History of the Cardiorenal Syndromes in a Cohort with Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakanas, Thomas A; Khattak, Aisha; Singh, Karandeep; Charytan, David M

    2017-10-06

    It is unknown whether echocardiographic parameters are independently associated with the cardiorenal syndrome. No direct comparison of the natural history of various cardiorenal syndrome types has been conducted. Our retrospective cohort study enrolled adult patients with at least one transthoracic echocardiography between 2004 and 2014 at a single health care system. Information on comorbidities was extracted using condition-specific diagnostic codes. All-cause mortality was the primary outcome among patients with cardiorenal syndrome types 1-4. Myocardial infarction and stroke were the secondary outcomes. In total, 30,681 patients were included, and 2512 (8%) developed at least one of the cardiorenal syndromes: 1707 patients developed an acute form of the syndrome (type 1 or 3), 128 patients developed type 2, and 677 patients developed type 4. In addition, 16% of patients with type 2 and 20% of patients with type 4 also developed an acute cardiorenal syndrome, whereas 14% of patients with acute cardiorenal progressed to CKD or chronic heart failure. Decreasing left ventricular ejection fraction, increasing pulmonary artery pressure, and higher right ventricular diameter were independently associated with higher incidence of a cardiorenal syndrome. Acute cardiorenal syndrome was associated with the highest risk of death compared with patients with CKD without cardiorenal syndrome (hazard ratio, 3.13; 95% confidence interval, 2.72 to 3.61; Pcardiorenal type 4 had better survival than patients with acute cardiorenal syndrome (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.37 to 0.61; Pcardiorenal syndrome and type 4 had increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared with patients with CKD without cardiorenal syndrome. Up to 19% of patients with a chronic form of cardiorenal syndrome will subsequently develop an acute syndrome. Development of acute or type 4 cardiorenal syndrome is independently associated with mortality, the acute form having the worst

  14. Natural history and early diagnosis of LAD-1/variant syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; van Bruggen, Robin; Kamerbeek, Nanne; Tool, Anton T. J.; Hicsonmez, Gonul; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Karow, Axel; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Seeger, Karl; Sanal, Ozden; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Roos, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    The syndrome of leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) combined with a severe Glanzmann-type bleeding disorder has been recognized as a separate disease entity. The variability in clinical and cell biological terms has remained largely unclear. We present data on 9 cases from 7 unrelated families, with

  15. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic...

  16. Use of natural surfactant in an infant with aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglia, M; Verre, M; Tancioni, F; Piccirillo, M; Corapi, U P; Barozzi, E; Vulcano, S

    2007-12-01

    The remarkable effectiveness of surfactant in neonatology suggested its use also in adults as well as in children on the basis of the pulmonary pathophysiology. We describe a case of an 18 month-old child affected by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to asphyxy by gastric juice inhalation, successfully treated with porcine surfactant (Curosurf) associated with ventilatory therapy.

  17. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor prevents both the onset and late progression of cardiovascular disease in a progeria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Cao, Kan; Faddah, Dina A; Tavarez, Urraca L; Conneely, Karen N; Qu, Xuan; San, Hong; Ganesh, Santhi K; Chen, Xiaoyan; Avallone, Hedwig; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2008-10-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is the most dramatic form of human premature aging. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 years, usually from heart attack or stroke. Almost all cases of HGPS are caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene that results in production of a mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. This protein is permanently modified by a lipid farnesyl group, and acts as a dominant negative, disrupting nuclear structure. Treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) has been shown to prevent and even reverse this nuclear abnormality in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We have previously created a mouse model of HGPS that shows progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media of the large arteries, in a pattern that is strikingly similar to the cardiovascular disease seen in patients with HGPS. Here we show that the dose-dependent administration of the FTI tipifarnib (R115777, Zarnestra) to this HGPS mouse model can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease. These observations provide encouraging evidence for the current clinical trial of FTIs for this rare and devastating disease.

  18. Definition and natural history of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Peter R

    2011-08-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a rare epileptic encephalopathy with a peak age of onset of 3-5 years of age. Reported prevalence rates for LGS vary widely from 1-10% of all childhood epilepsies. Incidence rates are much lower. LGS is characterized by intractable, multiple, generalized seizure types and an interictal electroencephalogram showing bursts of slow spike-and-wave, paroxysmal bursts of generalized polyspikes, and a slow background. All patients have tonic seizures during sleep that may be subtle, and nearly all have treatment-resistant, lifelong epilepsy. Cognitive stagnation and behavioral problems are seen in almost all patients and lead to a life of dependency. The differential diagnosis includes other symptomatic generalized epilepsies and pseudo-Lennox syndrome. Misdiagnosis is common. Children and adults with LGS have an enormous impact on their families, and efforts to improve the quality of life for these patients are complex. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. The natural history and clinical syndromes of degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John C

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy.

  20. The Natural History and Clinical Syndromes of Degenerative Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy

  1. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...... dramatically at the time of puberty with complete hyalinization of the seminiferous tubules, although a few tubules with spermatogenesis may be present in adult life. Activation of the pituitary-gonadal axis at 3 months of age is seen in Klinefelter boys similar to healthy boys. However, the level...... of testosterone in Klinefelter boys is significantly lower than in controls. After this 'minipuberty', the hormone levels decline to normal prepubertal levels until puberty. In puberty, an initial rise in testosterone, inhibin B, LH and FSH occurs in Klinefelter boys. However, the rise in testosterone levels off...

  2. Nature and Nurture in the Early-Life Origins of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Astiz, Susana; Ovilo, Cristina; Garcia-Contreras, Consolacion; Vazquez-Gomez, Marta

    The combination of genetic background together with food excess and lack of exercise has become the cornerstone of metabolic disorders associated to lifestyle. The scenario is furthermore reinforced by their interaction with other environmental factors (stress, sleeping patterns, education, culture, rural versus urban locations, and xenobiotics, among others) inducing epigenetic changes in the exposed individuals. The immediate consequence is the development of further alterations like obesity and metabolic syndrome, and other adverse health conditions (type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, reproductive, immune and neurological disorders). Thus, having in mind the impact of the metabolic syndrome on the worldwide public health, the present review affords the relative roles and the interrelationships of nature (genetic predisposition to metabolic syndrome) and nurture (lifestyle and environmental effects causing epigenetic changes), on the establishment of the metabolic disorders in women; disorders that may evolve to metabolic syndrome prior or during pregnancy and may be transmitted to their descendants.

  3. The natural history of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Robert J; Erwin, Kirsten L; Alexander, Guillermo M

    2009-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a severe chronic pain condition characterized by sensory, autonomic, motor, and dystrophic signs and symptoms. This study was undertaken to expand our current knowledge of the evolution of CRPS signs and symptoms with duration of disease. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis using data extracted from a patient questionnaire to evaluate the clinical characteristics of CRPS at different time points of disease progression. Data from the questionnaire included pain characteristics and associated symptoms. It also included autonomic, motor, and dystrophic symptoms and also initiating events, ameliorating and aggravating factors, quality of life, work status, comorbid conditions, pattern of pain spread, family history, and demographics. Comparisons were made of different parameters as they varied with disease duration. A total of 656 patients with CRPS of at least 1-year duration were evaluated. The average age of all participants was 37.5 years, with disease duration varying from 1 to 46 years. The majority of participants were white (96%). A total of 80.3% were females. None of the patients in this study demonstrated spontaneous remission of their symptoms. The pain in these patients was refractory showing only modest improvement with most current therapies. This study shows that although CRPS is a progressive disease, after 1 year, the majority of the signs and symptoms were well developed and although many variables worsen over the course of the illness, the majority demonstrated only moderate increases with disease duration.

  4. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  5. The therapeutic effect of carbogaseous natural mineral waters in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinteza Delia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome is a complex of metabolic disturbances that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Entity includes: dyslipidemia (altered lipid profile, with increasing levels of serum triglycerides and low serum levels of HDL-cholesterol, which promotes the development of atherosclerosis, high blood sugar (diabetes type II or increased insulin resistance, hypertension, abdominal obesity syndrome, proinflammatory, prothrombotic syndrome. In the last 20 years, there was a continuous increase in individuals suffering from this syndrome, the cause remains unknown, but several studies also claim that it is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Of environmental factors, diet low in micronutrients such as calcium, magnesium and potassium seems to be an essential contributor element (Feldsein et al, 2007, Cidalia Pereira et al, 2011. Decreased intake of sodium and increased intake of calcium, magnesium and potassium, proposed by Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension - DASH diet (Van Leer et al 1995, Meigl et al 2008 leads to optimized blood pressure. Even in the absence of increased sodium intake, low levels of magnesium in the blood and cells can induce in some conditions, hypertension, diabetes, insulin resistance or completely metabolic syndrom.Among the methods proposed to correct dietary intake of micronutrients, natural mineral water, often very complex in terms of chemical composition and versatile in terms of the intended effect is one handy, safe and simple.Although used in order to preserve the health from ancient times, scientific studies proving natural mineral water effects on the human body takes place only since the twentieth century. Carbonated mineral waters are the result of deep water filtering through volcanic soils, which contain CO2, carbon dioxide, thus obtained, will help dissolve other elements contained in the soil layers

  6. Progeria caused by a rare LMNA mutation p.S143F associated with mild myopathy and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kmieć, Tomasz; Fidziańska, Anna; Rekawek, Joanna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2008-09-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with premature aging associated with mild myopathy, displaying muscle weakness, joint contractures and hyporeflexia. Genetic analysis revealed rare heterozygous point mutation in lamin A/C gene, g.428C>T. Cardiological evaluation showed atrial fibrillation, but we did not find signs of coronary heart disease, which is life-threatening cardiovascular complication in progeria. Electron microscopy of the muscle revealed abnormalities in nuclear architecture, i.e. blebbing, thick lamina and peripheral distribution of heterochromatin. As some diagnostic criteria characteristic for classic progeria are not fulfilled, this case could be regarded as atypical progeria associated with myopathy and atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the second case of such association described in the literature.

  7. Computational Exploration for Lead Compounds That Can Reverse the Nuclear Morphology in Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailima Rampogu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging that eventually leads to death and is noticed globally. Despite alarming conditions, this disease lacks effective medications; however, the farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs are a hope in the dark. Therefore, the objective of the present article is to identify new compounds from the databases employing pharmacophore based virtual screening. Utilizing nine training set compounds along with lonafarnib, a common feature pharmacophore was constructed consisting of four features. The validated Hypo1 was subsequently allowed to screen Maybridge, Chembridge, and Asinex databases to retrieve the novel lead candidates, which were then subjected to Lipinski’s rule of 5 and ADMET for drug-like assessment. The obtained 3,372 compounds were forwarded to docking simulations and were manually examined for the key interactions with the crucial residues. Two compounds that have demonstrated a higher dock score than the reference compounds and showed interactions with the crucial residues were subjected to MD simulations and binding free energy calculations to assess the stability of docked conformation and to investigate the binding interactions in detail. Furthermore, this study suggests that the Hits may be more effective against progeria and further the DFT studies were executed to understand their orbital energies.

  8. Temsirolimus Partially Rescues the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Cellular Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gabriel

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670, a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. Lamins help maintain the shape and stability of the nuclear envelope in addition to regulating DNA replication, DNA transcription, proliferation and differentiation. The LMNA mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal region of prelamin A, producing the truncated, farnesylated protein progerin. The accumulation of progerin in HGPS nuclei causes numerous morphological and functional changes that lead to premature cellular senescence. Attempts to reverse this HGPS phenotype have identified rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, as a drug that is able to rescue the HGPS cellular phenotype by promoting autophagy and reducing progerin accumulation. Rapamycin is an obvious candidate for the treatment of HGPS disease but is difficult to utilize clinically. To further assess rapamycin's efficacy with regard to proteostasis, mitochondrial function and the degree of DNA damage, we tested temsirolimus, a rapamycin analog with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile than rapamycin. We report that temsirolimus decreases progerin levels, increases proliferation, reduces misshapen nuclei, and partially ameliorates DNA damage, but does not improve proteasome activity or mitochondrial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that future therapeutic strategies should identify new drug combinations and treatment regimens that target all the dysfunctional hallmarks that characterize HGPS cells.

  9. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni: A Natural Alternative for Treating Diseases Associated with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera-Lanestosa, Areli; Moguel-Ordóñez, Yolanda; Segura-Campos, Maira

    2017-10-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (SR) is often used by the food industry due to its steviol glycoside content, which is a suitable calorie-free sweetener. Further, both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that these glycosides and the extracts from SR have pharmacological and therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and anticancer. This work reviews the antiobesity, antihyperglycemic, antihypertensive, and antihyperlipidemic effects of the majority of glycosides and aqueous/alcoholic extracts from the leaves, flowers, and roots of the SR. These compounds can serve as a natural and alternative treatment for diseases that are associated with metabolic syndrome, thus contributing to health promotion.

  10. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  11. Live births, natural losses, and elective terminations with Down syndrome in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Gert; Buckley, Frank; Skotko, Brian G

    2016-05-01

    No studies to date have reported an estimated number of live births, elective terminations, and natural losses (miscarriages and stillbirths) for Down syndrome (DS) in Massachusetts (MA). These numbers would be helpful to estimate how many expectant parents of children with DS need support and the number of live-born children with DS who require services. Combining robust data sets, including the Annual Reports of the MA Birth Defects Monitoring Program, we estimated the number of live births, elective terminations, and natural losses with Down syndrome from 1900 to 2010. The live birth prevalence for DS in MA for the most recent years for which data are available (2006-2010) was estimated at 12.4 per 10,000 live births, with a total of approximately 94 live births annually. During this period, an estimated 126 DS-related elective pregnancy terminations were performed in MA annually. As of 2008, the estimated rate at which live births with DS was reduced as a consequence of DS-related elective pregnancy terminations was 49%. The reduction of live births with DS is significantly higher in MA than in the rest of the United States as a whole. However, ethnic and racial differences in reduction rates were similar-highest for Asians/Pacific Islanders, followed by non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks/Africans, and Hispanics.Genet Med 18 5, 459-466.

  12. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutati...

  13. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  14. [The Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome. Its natural history and levels of prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez y Martínez, R; Martínez-Carboney, R

    1997-01-01

    We attempted here the delineation of the natural history of the disease and corresponding prevention levels (NHD and PL) of the Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome according to the classical model of Leavell and Clark for infectious-contagious diseases. This proposal was based on our own series of 39 patients and our previous reports on the didactics of the NHD and PL model, as well as on the relevant literature; with this approach we obtained an useful model which includes the health-disease status, the analysis of risk factors and the integration of the clinical practice with socio-epidemiological medicine. Furthermore, the NHD and PL model allow the selection of the preventive management depending on the clinical stage, namely health or disease. This approach to a Mendelian condition emphasizes that the Leavell and Clark concepts can be advantageously applied to any genetic disease.

  15. Mechanisms of Anorexia Cancer Cachexia Syndrome and Potential Benefits of Traditional Medicine and Natural Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Hua, Cong; Bao-Hua, Zou; Lei, Yu

    Anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome is prevalent in advanced cancer patients, which is featured by anorexia, decreased dietary intake, body weight loss (skeletal muscle mass loss), and is unable to be reversed by routine nutritional support therapy. Up to now, the main mechanisms involved in cancer cachexia include excessive systemic inflammation, which is represented by increased plasma levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, tumor-induced factors, such as PIF and LMF. These factors eventually act on orexigenic and anorexigenicneurons located in the hypothalamus or protein and lipid metabolism of peripheral tissues, which lead to anorexia, decreased dietary intake, enhanced basic metabolism rate and hypercatabolism. The treatment modality includes early nutritional intervention, physical activity and drug treatment. However, studies about drugs used to treat cachexia are always controversial or merely effective in stimulating appetite and increasing body weight, though not lean body mass. The main target of pharmaceutical treatment is to improve appetite, decrease systemic inflammation and promote anabolic metabolism. Nevertheless, the treatment effectiveness of chemical drugs are not reaching consensus by existing cachexia guidelines. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is recently known as a promising treatment to improve cachaxia status and quality of life of cancer patients. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural herbal medicines have been used in the treatment of cancer for thousands of years worldwide, particularly in China. More and more research show that traditional Hanfang (Chinese medicines) and some natural herbs with less side reactions, have the effects of antagonizing pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancing immune system, inhibiting protein catabolism, boosting the appetite and body weight, which maybe a promising treatment strategy and development tendency for anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome.

  16. The natural history of children with joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type: a longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C.; Nicholson, Lesley L.; Adams, Roger D.; Tofts, Louise; Pacey, Verity

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the manuscript was to describe the natural history of complaints and disability in children diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and to identify the constructs that underlie functional decline. One hundred and one JHS/EDS-HT

  17. Overview of the Enhanced Natural Gestures Instructional Approach and Illustration of Its Use with Three Students with Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calculator, Stephen; Diaz-Caneja Sela, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background: This investigation details procedures used to teach enhanced natural gestures (ENGs) and illustrates its use with three students with Angelman syndrome (AS). Materials and Methods: Themes were extracted, using a process of content analysis, to organize individuals' feedback pertaining to previous versions of the instructional…

  18. The natural history of Cri du Chat Syndrome. A report from the Italian Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Paola Cerruti; Pastore, Guido; Castronovo, Chiara; Godi, Michela; Guala, Andrea; Tamiazzo, Stefania; Provera, Sandro; Pierluigi, Mauro; Bricarelli, Franca Dagna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an update on the natural history of the Cri du Chat Syndrome by means of the Italian Register (I.R.). Two hundred twenty patients were diagnosed by standard cytogenetic methods and 112 of these were also characterised by molecular-cytogenetic investigation (FISH). FISH analysis showed interstitial deletions, short terminal deletions and other rare rearrangements not previously correctly diagnosed by standard cytogenetics. The diagnosis was made in the first month of life in 42% and within first year in 82% of cases. The remaining 18% were diagnosed at an age ranging from 13 months to 47 years. At the last follow-up, patient age ranged from 8 months to 61 years. Mortality, already low, has decreased over time as it is lower between 1984-2002 compared to 1965-1983. Mortality was higher in patients with unbalanced translocations resulting in 5p deletions. Our data confirm that the cat-like cry and peculiar timbre of voice are the most typical signs of the syndrome, not only at birth but also later and these are the only signs which might suggest the diagnosis in patients with small deletions and mild clinical picture. A cytogenetic and clinical variability must be underlined. Cardiac, cerebral, renal and gastrointestinal malformations were more frequent in the patients with unbalanced translocations resulting in 5p deletions. Sucking and feeding difficulties and respiratory infections are frequent in the first months or years of life. Intubation difficulties linked to larynx anomalies must be considered. Psychomotor development is delayed in all patients but there is a variability related to deletion size and type as well as other genetic and environmental factors. However, the results showed an improvement in the acquisition of the development skills and progress in social introduction which should encourage caregivers and parents to work together in carrying out the rehabilitative and educational interventions.

  19. Is sustained natural apophyseal glides combined with conventional physiotherapy effective for patients with facet joint syndrome? – A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Anap, Subhash Khatri, Zambre BR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic back pain has been the nemesis of the human race since the time they evolved and began walking on their two legs; leaving aside the 4 limb locomotion of their predecessors. Varied are the causes of low back ache and facet joint syndrome is one amongst them. Hence this study was undertaken to find out the effectiveness of SNAGS and conventional physiotherapy in patients with lumbar facet joint syndrome. Purpose: To describe the management and outcomes of 4 patients with lumbar facet joint syndrome treated with Sustained Natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs, Therapeutic Ultrasound and lumbar stabilization exercises. Study Design : A case series of consecutive patients with Lumbar facet syndrome Case Description: Four consecutive patients (mean age 52 years who presented with lumbar facet syndrome were treated with two weeks protocol which included Sustained Natural apophyseal glides, Therapeutic Ultrasound (Cont. 1-MHz , 2.0-W/cm2, 10min and lumbar stabilization exercises. Follow up was taken 1 week after the end of active intervention. All patients completed Visual analogue Scale (VAS, Modified Oswestery Disability Questionnaire (MODQ, Sorensen Test hold Timing and spinal Range of motion on initial assessment, immediately at the end of active intervention (2 weeks and at the end of follow up. Outcome: All four patients showed the mean percentage change in score of VAS 49.87 %, MODQ 61.14 %, Sorensen test scores 19.63 %, Flexion range 9.21 % and extend range 17.07 % at the end of follow up. Conclusion: All four patients with Lumbar facet joint syndrome treated with sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGS, Therapeutic Ultrasound and lumbar stabilisation exercises exhibited reduced pain, reduced disability, improved endurance of back muscles and range of motion at the time follow-up.

  20. Impaired genome maintenance suppresses the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in mice with Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid van der Pluijm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a photosensitive, DNA repair disorder associated with progeria that is caused by a defect in the transcription-coupled repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER. Here, complete inactivation of NER in Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mutants causes a phenotype that reliably mimics the human progeroid CS syndrome. Newborn Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mice display attenuated growth, progressive neurological dysfunction, retinal degeneration, cachexia, kyphosis, and die before weaning. Mouse liver transcriptome analysis and several physiological endpoints revealed systemic suppression of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1 somatotroph axis and oxidative metabolism, increased antioxidant responses, and hypoglycemia together with hepatic glycogen and fat accumulation. Broad genome-wide parallels between Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- and naturally aged mouse liver transcriptomes suggested that these changes are intrinsic to natural ageing and the DNA repair-deficient mice. Importantly, wild-type mice exposed to a low dose of chronic genotoxic stress recapitulated this response, thereby pointing to a novel link between genome instability and the age-related decline of the somatotroph axis.

  1. Plant polyphenols as natural drugs for the management of Down syndrome and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Rosa Anna; Valenti, Daniela; Caccamese, Salvatore; Daglia, Maria; Braidy, Nady; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites of plants largely found in fruits, vegetables, cereals and beverages, and therefore represent important constituents of the human diet. Increasing studies have demonstrated the potential beneficial effects of polyphenols on human health. Extensive reviews have discussed the protective effects of polyphenols against a series of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic effects of these natural compounds on neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, such as Down syndrome (DS), for which mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress are hallmarks and contribute to the deleterious symptoms and cognitive decline. This review, starting from the structure, source, bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of relevant polyphenols, highlights recent studies on the effect and potential molecular mechanism(s) of action of the phenolic compounds epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol and hydroxytyrosol in restoring mitochondrial energy deficit and in reversing phenotypical alteration in DS. The clinical implications of plant polyphenol dietary supplements as therapeutic tools in managing DS and other intellectual disability-related diseases, is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hyperandrogenism: the role of a new natural association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, G; Cappelli, V; Di Sabatino, A; Massaro, M G; De Leo, V

    2015-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of women of childbearing age and manifests itself through oligomenorrhea, anovulation, hirsutism, micro-polycystic ovaries. Insulin resistance is a characteristic of PCOS patients and is more pronounced in obese patients. Insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are related to many aspects of the syndrome such as hyperandrogenism, reproductive disorders, acne and hirsutism. In the long-term it may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and negatively affect lipid profile and blood pressure. Changes in lifestyle and diet can partially improve these aspects. The use of insulin-sensitizing drugs such as metformin often normalises the menstrual cycle, improving hyperandrogenism and, subsequently, the response to ovulation induction therapies. New molecules have recently been marketed, that produce the same results, but without the side-effects. One of these is myo-inositol, a new insulin-sensitizing molecule which has been successfully administered to women suffering from PCOS. Associations between inositol and other compounds that can increase the therapeutic effect have been proposed. Of these, we found to be interesting the association with monacolin K, a natural statin that reduces cholesterol levels starting point of the synthesis of steroids, including androgens, and lipoic acid, known for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and insulin-sensitizing activity. We decided to assess the efficacy of the product. We recruited 30 women aged between 24 and 32 years suffering from PCOS with insulin resistance, HOMA index>2.5 and no other endocrine diseases. The following were assessed: Body Mass Index (BMI), characteristics of menstrual cycles, lipid profile (total cholesterol, and HDL), androgens (total testosterone and androstenedione). The patients were also assessed for the degree of hirsutism using the Ferriman-Gallwey Score>8. The subjects were divided into two groups: Group A, treated with an association

  3. Nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic responses in a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, N; Yamamoto, S; Hayasaka, S; Fukuo, Y; Koike, T

    1995-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl complained or poor vision in both eyes. The patient showed progeria, physical and mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, cutaneous photosensitivity, hyperopia, poor pupillary dilation, exotropia, salt-and-pepper fundi, nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic (ERG) responses, cerebral atrophy on computed tomography, and demyelination of periventricular white matter on magnetic resonance imaging. We believe that nondetectable cone and rod ERG responses in Cockayne syndrome, as demonstrated in our patient, may be uncommon.

  4. Overexpression of p53 but not Rb in the cytoplasm of neurons and small vessels in an autopsy of a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Hiroaki; Itonaga, Tomoyo; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro; Ihara, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Cockayne syndrome presents senescence-like changes starting in early infancy; however, the mechanism of premature aging remains unclear. In an autopsy of a 23-year-old woman with Cockayne syndrome, we evaluated the correlation between Cockayne pathology and the expression patterns of the senescence-associated proteins p53 and Rb. Neuropathological findings in this case revealed basal ganglia calcification, tigroid leukodystrophy, bizarre reactive astrocytes, severe cerebellar atrophy with loss of Purkinje cells, and arteriolar/neuronal calcifications in the hypothalamus. Multiple arteriolar calcifications and sclerotic changes were seen in the central nervous system and kidney, but the endothelium of the aorta and coronary arteries remained intact appropriately for the individual's age without any finding of arteriosclerosis. Overexpression of p53 protein was confirmed in the cytoplasm of neurons in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum, of arteriolar endothelial cells of the cerebrum and renal glomerular capillaries, and of cutaneous epithelial cells. The distribution of p53 overexpression was coincident with that of pathological alteration, such as neuronal loss, calcification and atrophy. High expression of p53 was localized in the cytoplasm, not in the nucleus. In contrast to p53, Rb was not expressed in any senescence lesion. In terms of senescence, distinct differences are found among organs in a patient with Cockayne syndrome. This segmental progeria differs from natural aging, and implicates p53 overexpression in the etiology of CS. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van de Ven

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age, including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPD(G602D/R722W/XPA(-/- that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80(-/- mouse. Specific (but not all types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage.

  6. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyer, Carol U.; Barber, Daniel; Mandl, Judith N.

    2012-01-01

    White nose syndrome, caused by Geomyces destructans, has killed more than 5 million cave hibernating bats in eastern North America. During hibernation, the lack of inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of fungal infection and erosion is consistent with a temperature-induced inhibition of immune cell trafficking. This immune suppression allows G. destructans to colonize and erode the skin of wings, ears and muzzle of bat hosts unchecked. Yet, paradoxically, within weeks of emergence from hibernation an intense neutrophilic inflammatory response to G. destructans is generated, causing severe pathology that can contribute to death. We hypothesize that the sudden reversal of immune suppression in bats upon the return to euthermia leads to a form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), which was first described in HIV-infected humans with low helper T lymphocyte counts and bacterial or fungal opportunistic infections. IRIS is a paradoxical and rapid worsening of symptoms in immune compromised humans upon restoration of immunity in the face of an ongoing infectious process. In humans with HIV, the restoration of adaptive immunity following suppression of HIV replication with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can trigger severe immune-mediated tissue damage that can result in death. We propose that the sudden restoration of immune responses in bats infected with G. destructans results in an IRIS-like dysregulated immune response that causes the post-emergent pathology.

  8. Evaluation of natural language processing from emergency department computerized medical records for intra-hospital syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagliaroli Véronique

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of patients who pose an epidemic hazard when they are admitted to a health facility plays a role in preventing the risk of hospital acquired infection. An automated clinical decision support system to detect suspected cases, based on the principle of syndromic surveillance, is being developed at the University of Lyon's Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse. This tool will analyse structured data and narrative reports from computerized emergency department (ED medical records. The first step consists of developing an application (UrgIndex which automatically extracts and encodes information found in narrative reports. The purpose of the present article is to describe and evaluate this natural language processing system. Methods Narrative reports have to be pre-processed before utilizing the French-language medical multi-terminology indexer (ECMT for standardized encoding. UrgIndex identifies and excludes syntagmas containing a negation and replaces non-standard terms (abbreviations, acronyms, spelling errors.... Then, the phrases are sent to the ECMT through an Internet connection. The indexer's reply, based on Extensible Markup Language, returns codes and literals corresponding to the concepts found in phrases. UrgIndex filters codes corresponding to suspected infections. Recall is defined as the number of relevant processed medical concepts divided by the number of concepts evaluated (coded manually by the medical epidemiologist. Precision is defined as the number of relevant processed concepts divided by the number of concepts proposed by UrgIndex. Recall and precision were assessed for respiratory and cutaneous syndromes. Results Evaluation of 1,674 processed medical concepts contained in 100 ED medical records (50 for respiratory syndromes and 50 for cutaneous syndromes showed an overall recall of 85.8% (95% CI: 84.1-87.3. Recall varied from 84.5% for respiratory syndromes to 87.0% for cutaneous syndromes. The

  9. Natural course of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Tom; Collin, Simon M; Tilling, Kate; Nuevo, Roberto; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Heron, Jon; Crawley, Esther

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about persistence of or recovery from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in adolescents. Previous studies have small sample sizes, short follow-up or have focused on fatigue rather than CFS/ME or, equivalently, chronic fatigue, which is disabling. This work aimed to describe the epidemiology and natural course of CFS/ME in adolescents aged 13-18 years. Longitudinal follow-up of adolescents enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Avon, UK. We identified adolescents who had disabling fatigue of >6 months duration without a known cause at ages 13, 16 and 18 years. We use the term 'chronic disabling fatigue' (CDF) because CFS/ME was not verified by clinical diagnosis. We used multiple imputation to obtain unbiased estimates of prevalence and persistence. The estimated prevalence of CDF was 1.47% (95% CI 1.05% to 1.89%) at age 13, 2.22% (1.67% to 2.78%) at age 16 and 2.99% (2.24% to 3.75%) at age 18. Among adolescents with CDF of 6 months duration at 13 years 75.3% (64.0% to 86.6%) were not classified as such at age 16. Similar change was observed between 16 and 18 years (75.0% (62.8% to 87.2%)). Of those with CDF at age 13, 8.02% (0.61% to 15.4%) presented with CDF throughout the duration of adolescence. The prevalence of CDF lasting 6 months or longer (a proxy for clinically diagnosed CFS/ME) increases from 13 to 18 years. However, persistent CDF is rare in adolescents, with approximately 75% recovering after 2-3 years. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Saffron: a promising natural medicine in the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder which encompasses obesity, high blood glucose, high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. Moreover, metabolic syndrome is considered as the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is the leading cause of mortality in the world for both men and women. Several chemical drugs are available to treat metabolic risk factors, but because of the safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects, nowadays herbal therapy has a critical role in the treatment of these CVD risk factors. Crocus sativus L. (saffron) is a perennial herb that belongs to the Iridaceae family. Saffron is an extensively used food additive for its colour and taste and has been widely used in traditional as well as modern medicine to treat several illnesses including cardiovascular diseases. Most of the unique properties of this plant are attributed to the presence of three major components, including crocin, safranal and crocetin. It has been proved that saffron has an important role in the management of metabolic syndrome because of its marvelous activities including anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, hypotensive and hypolipidaemic properties. In this review article, we discuss the beneficial properties of saffron and its active components to treat different components of metabolic syndrome and most relevant animal and human studies regarding the use of this plant in cardiovascular disease, with focus on the metabolic risk factors. This review also suggests that after randomised clinical trials, saffron may be implicated as a preventive or therapeutic agent against metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The progressive nature of concentration camp syndrome in former prisoners of Nazi concentration camps--Not just history, but the important issue of contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Robert; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Leszek, Jerzy; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Panaszek, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Constant stress, slave labor, tortures, and starvation all affected the health of concentration camp prisoners, contributing to multimorbidities, increased mortality and accelerated development of chronic illnesses, what we have shown in an earlier publication. The interrelated somatic and psychological symptoms gave rise to concentration camp syndrome (KZ-syndrome), which has many features of PTSD, occurring frequently nowadays. The paper attempts at assessing the influence of concentration camp conditions on functional disorders in each system of the human body, occurring in KZ-syndrome, and at demonstrating the progressive nature of the syndrome. A retrospective assessment of the former prisoners' health after 5 and 30 years following their leaving camps was performed based on medical records and surveys. The materials included 250 former prisoners who underwent medical examination in 1950, i.e. 5 years after leaving the camp, of whom 120 former prisoners survived and were examined and surveyed in 1975, i.e. 30 years after leaving the camp. KZ-syndrome was shown to occur in 58.8% of former prisoners 5 years after leaving the camp, and in 77.5% after 30 years (p concentration camps, in the form of KZ-syndrome, were observed in most former prisoners. Over time, the number of morbidities and the intensity of symptoms increased, which indicates that the syndrome has a chronic and progressive nature. KZ-syndrome is a multi-organ disorder, with numerous chronic comorbidities exacerbating the progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere and Fazio Londe syndrome revisited: natural history, genetics, treatment and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Annet M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare neurological disorder which may present at all ages with sensorineural deafness, bulbar palsy and respiratory compromise. Fazio-Londe syndrome is considered to be the same disease entity. Recently it was demonstrated that in some patients the disease is caused by mutations in the SLC52A3 gene which encodes the intestinal (hRFT2 riboflavin transporter. In these patients riboflavin deficiency is the cause of the BVVL/FL syndrome and supplementation of riboflavin proved a life saving treatment. Mutations in the SLC52A2 gene and the SLC52A1 (GPR172B gene, coding for human riboflavin transporters hRFT3 and hRFT1 have been associated with the BVVL syndrome as well. We performed a review of the literature, with emphasis on the natural history and the effects of treatment in these patients. A total of 35 publications were traced reporting on the clinical presentation of 74 patients who presented before age 18. The most prevalent symptoms were bulbar palsy, hearing loss, facial weakness and respiratory compromise. Death was reported in 28 of the 61 untreated patients, with a very low survival in patients presenting before age 4. All 13 patients who were treated with riboflavin survived, with a strong clinical improvement after days to months of treatment in eight patients. Three patients demonstrated a stable clinical course and treatment was stopped early in two patients. Abnormalities in plasma flavin levels and/or plasma acylcarnitine profiles were observed in some but not in all patients, and also patients with normal plasma flavin levels and acylcarnitine profiles demonstrated a striking clinical improvement on riboflavin supplementation. It is now clear that proper diagnosis requires mutation analysis of all three transporter genes and treatment should be started immediately without first awaiting results of molecular analysis. Clinical improvement may be rapid or gradual over a period of

  13. Blood antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPX), biochemical and haematological parameters in pigs naturally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukelj, M; Toplak, I; Svete, A Nemec

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become one of the most economically important diseases for the swine industry worldwide. The objective of the study was to determine selected blood antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD)), biochemical and haematological parameters in PRRS positive and negative pigs of three different categories, mainly to test oxidative stress hypothesis in pigs naturally infected with PRRS virus. Ninety PRRS positive and 90 PRRS negative pigs were included in the study. The presence of PRRS was confirmed by serological detection of antibodies against PRRS virus (PRRSV) and detection of PRRS viral RNA by RT-PCR. Pigs were further divided into three groups of 30: piglets just before weaning (weaners), fatteners and finishers. Blood samples for determining selected blood parameters were collected from the vena cava cranialis. Significantly (P stress might be increased in PRRSV naturally infected pigs, especially in weaners.

  14. The epidemiology of premature aging and associated comorbidities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Werner syndrome, also known as childhood- and adulthood-progeria, respectively, represent two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases with clinical...

  15. From the rarest to the most common: insights from progeroid syndromes into skin cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Tlougan, Brook E; Orlow, Seth J

    2009-10-01

    Despite their rarity, diseases of premature aging, or "progeroid" syndromes, have provided important insights into basic mechanisms that may underlie cancer and normal aging. In this review, we highlight these recent developments in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy, ataxia-telangiectasia, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. Though they are caused by different mutations in various genes and often result in quite disparate phenotypes, deciphering the molecular bases of these conditions has served to highlight their underlying basic similarities. Studies of progeroid syndromes, particularly HGPS, the most dramatic form of premature aging, have contributed to our knowledge of fundamental processes of importance to skin biology, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, genome instability, cellular senescence, and stem-cell differentiation.

  16. Experimental and Natural Infections of Goats with Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus: Evidence for Ticks as Viral Vector.

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    Yongjun Jiao

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, the causative agent for the fatal life-threatening infectious disease, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS, was first identified in the central and eastern regions of China. Although the viral RNA was detected in free-living and parasitic ticks, the vector for SFTSV remains unsettled.Firstly, an experimental infection study in goats was conducted in a bio-safety level-2 (BSL-2 facility to investigate virus transmission between animals. The results showed that infected animals did not shed virus to the outside through respiratory or digestive tract route, and the control animals did not get infected. Then, a natural infection study was carried out in the SFTSV endemic region. A cohort of naïve goats was used as sentinel animals in the study site. A variety of daily samples including goat sera, ticks and mosquitoes were collected for viral RNA and antibody (from serum only detection, and virus isolation. We detected viral RNA from free-living and parasitic ticks rather than mosquitoes, and from goats after ticks' infestation. We also observed sero-conversion in all members of the animal cohort subsequently. The S segment sequences of the two recovered viral isolates from one infected goat and its parasitic ticks showed a 100% homology at the nucleic acid level.In our natural infection study, close contact between goats does not appear to transmit SFTSV, however, the naïve animals were infected after ticks' infestation and two viral isolates derived from an infected goat and its parasitic ticks shared 100% of sequence identity. These data demonstrate that the etiologic agent for goat cohort's natural infection comes from environmental factors. Of these, ticks, especially the predominant species Haemaphysalis longicornis, probably act as vector for this pathogen. The findings in this study may help local health authorities formulate and focus preventive measures to contain

  17. An adult case of Cockayne syndrome without sclerotic angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Sano, N; Ito, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Okauchi, Y; Kondo, H; Horiuchi, N; Nakao, K; Iwata, M

    1997-08-01

    We report an autopsy case of Cockayne syndrome (CS). A 40-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital for cachexia. She had displayed the striking features of CS, including dwarfism, mental retardation, neural deafness, ataxia, intracranial calcifications, and progeria since her childhood. Endocrinological examinations suggested normal pituitary function and a disorder of the hypothalamus or the cerebrum. She died of acute pneumonia at the age of 42. Autopsy findings showed typical abnormalities in the central nervous system compatible with CS; however, no atherosclerotic change was observed in the systemic arteries.

  18. Klinefelter's syndrome and psychopathology: a case study of the combined effects of nature and nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastowny, T R; Lehman, A F; Dickerson, F

    1987-01-01

    A patient with Klinefelter's syndrome and genotype 47 XXY was abused and ostracized by his family during childhood. Later, this pattern was repeated by a series of homosexual lovers. The separate and interactive effects between genetic and psychosocial risk factors may account for this patient's subsequent psychosexual and personality disorders and reminds scholars of psychopathology of the importance of early detection and intervention. This single case study is presented for heuristic value, illustrative purposes, and serves as a link between mental health clinicians and sexologists.

  19. Natural history and clinical outcome of "uncorrected" scimitar syndrome patients: a multicenter study of the italian society of pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Padrini, Maddalena; Boccuzzo, Giovanna; Agnoletti, Gabriella; Bondanza, Sara; Butera, Gianfranco; Chiappa, Enrico; Marasini, Maurizio; Pilati, Mara; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Prandstraller, Daniela; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Castaldi, Biagio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Spadoni, Isabella; Stellin, Giovanni; Milanesi, Ornella

    2013-07-01

    To analyze the clinical status of patients with "uncorrected" scimitar syndrome in a multicenter Italian study. The natural history of scimitar syndrome was analyzed in 44 affected individuals (from 9 Italian centers). The median age at diagnosis was 1.05 years (range, 1 day-41 years). Thirty-three patients (75%) had an isolated form; 11 patients (25%) had associated congenital heart diseases. Twenty-two patients (50%) were symptomatic at diagnosis, including respiratory symptoms (n=20) and congestive heart failure (n=6). Patients with associated congenital heart defects had a higher prevalence of congestive heart failure (4 of 11 [36.4%] vs 2 of 33 [6.1%]; P=.027), pulmonary arterial hypertension (7 of 11 [63.6%] vs 2 of 33 [6.1%]; P=.027) than patients with isolated forms. Ten patients (22.7%) underwent correction of associated cardiac defects, leaving the anomalous pulmonary venous drainage intact. The median length of follow-up after diagnosis was 6.4 years (range, 0.2-27.5 years). Two patients died, both with associated cardiac defects and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Of 42 survivors, 39 (92.8%) were asymptomatic at the last follow-up visit; 3 patients still complained respiratory symptoms. There was no difference between isolated and associated forms of the disease. In most patients, scimitar syndrome presented as an isolated lesion with a benign outcome. Nonetheless, when associated with other cardiac defects and pulmonary arterial hypertension, there was an increased risk of congestive heart failure and mortality. Correction of associated cardiac defects (transforming "associated" into "isolated" forms), together with the therapeutic occlusion of anomalous arterial supply to the lung, led to a benign outcome comparable to that in primarily isolated forms. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy in Angelman syndrome: a questionnaire-based assessment of the natural history and current treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Ronald L; Conant, Kerry D; Braun, Eileen K; Bruno, Patricia; Said, Rana R; Nespeca, Mark P; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2009-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) commonly presents with epilepsy (>80%). The goal of this study was to examine the natural history and various treatments of epilepsy in AS in a large population. A detailed electronic survey containing comprehensive questions regarding epilepsy in AS was conducted through the Angelman Syndrome Foundation. There were responses from 461 family members of individuals with AS, of whom 86% had epilepsy (60% with multiple seizure types), the most common being atonic, generalized tonic-clonic, absence, and complex partial. Partial-onset seizures only were reported in 11% of those with epilepsy. Epilepsy was most common among those with maternal deletions and unknown subtypes, with catastrophic epilepsies present in only these two subtypes. These epilepsies were refractory to medication, with only 15% responding to the first antiepileptic drug (AED). The most commonly prescribed AED were valproic acid and clonazepam, but lamotrigine and levetiracetam appeared to have similar efficacy and tolerability. This is the largest study to date assessing epilepsy in AS. Although epilepsy in AS is considered a generalized epilepsy, there was a high prevalence of partial seizures. There are few previous data regarding the use of newer AED in AS, and the results of this study suggest that these newer agents, specifically levetiracetam and lamotrigine, may have efficacy similar to that of valproic acid and clonazepam, and that they appear to have similar or better side-effect profiles. Nonpharmacologic therapies such as dietary therapy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) also suggest favorable efficacy and tolerability, although further studies are needed.

  1. Psychosexual outcomes in three siblings with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome: impact of nature versus nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Angela Ann; Shabir, Iram; Marumadi, Eunice; Dada, Reema; Ammini, Ariachery C; Mehta, Manju

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports of adults with disorders of sexual development (DSD). Here we describe the clinical profile and results of psychological assessment of three siblings with 46, XY DSD caused by partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS). The elder sibling (aged 22 years) was reared as female, while the middle and youngest siblings (17 and 18 years of age), were reared as males. The gender identity was concordant with the sex of rearing. There was no gender dysphoria. The psychological distress that our patients experienced was due to the limitations placed on them by their medical condition. It did not permit them to experience various facets of being either male or female completely. The younger siblings reared as males had additional problems of gynecomastia and lack of male secondary sexual development.

  2. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  3. Occurrence of nodular lymphocyte-predominant hodgkin lymphoma in hermansky-pudlak type 2 syndrome is associated to natural killer and natural killer T cell defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lorenzi

    Full Text Available Hermansky Pudlak type 2 syndrome (HPS2 is a rare autosomal recessive primary immune deficiency caused by mutations on β3A gene (AP3B1 gene. The defect results in the impairment of the adaptor protein 3 (AP-3 complex, responsible for protein sorting to secretory lysosomes leading to oculo-cutaneous albinism, bleeding disorders and immunodeficiency. We have studied peripheral blood and lymph node biopsies from two siblings affected by HPS2. Lymph node histology showed a nodular lymphocyte predominance type Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL in both HPS2 siblings. By immunohistochemistry, CD8 T-cells from HPS2 NLPHL contained an increased amount of perforin (Prf + suggesting a defect in the release of this granules-associated protein. By analyzing peripheral blood immune cells we found a significant reduction of circulating NKT cells and of CD56(brightCD16(- Natural Killer (NK cells subset. Functionally, NK cells were defective in their cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines including Hodgkin Lymphoma as well as in IFN-γ production. This defect was associated with increased baseline level of CD107a and CD63 at the surface level of unstimulated and IL-2-activated NK cells. In summary, these results suggest that a combined and profound defect of innate and adaptive effector cells might explain the susceptibility to infections and lymphoma in these HPS2 patients.

  4. Using a Parent Survey to Advance Knowledge about the Nature and Consequences of Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Raspa, Melissa; Olmsted, Murrey G.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature and consequences of intellectual and developmental disabilities is challenging, especially when the condition is rare, affected individuals are geographically dispersed, and/or resource constraints limit large-scale studies involving direct assessment. Surveys provide an alternative methodology for gathering information…

  5. Case report on spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome following natural conception associated with primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smisha Sridev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous OHSS is a rare event in pregnancy following natural conception and only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. This report is a case of spontaneously conceived pregnancy with Spontaneous OHSS and Primary hypothyroidism

  6. A natural history of a child with monosomy 5p syndrome (Cat-cry/Cri-du-chat syndrome) during the 18 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmyk, R; Panasiuk, B; Yatsenko, S A; Stankiewicz, P; Midro, A T

    2005-01-01

    A record of a natural history of a long-term case study devoted to monosomy 5p (Cat-cry/Cri-du-chat) syndrome has been described rarely. Knowledge on the range of the changes in phenotype attributable to advancing age can be useful in clinical diagnosis of monosomy 5p at the different developmental stages, including adolescence, as well in prognosis for genetic counseling. In this case a detailed analysis of the morphologic phenotype in a girl with del(5)(p13.3) observed from 4 months to 18 years of age is reported. The comparative analysis of the girl's phenotype in different developmental stages has revealed that microcephaly, flat occipital region, face asymmetry, wide spaced palpebral fissures, epicanthic folds, small mouth fissure, thin mucous lip, small and low set ears and short IV metacarpals has not changed with advancing age. However, facial asymmetry was more evident, frontal tubers were less prominent, nasal root and back became prominent nasal back became elongated, the subnasal region was shorter and marked malocclusion appeared.

  7. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  8. Diagnosis, natural history, and management in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Peter H; Belmont, John; Black, James; De Backer, Julie; Frank, Michael; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Johnson, Diana; Pepin, Melanie; Robert, Leema; Sanders, Lynn; Wheeldon, Nigel

    2017-03-01

    Vascular Ehlers Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon genetic disorders characterized by arterial aneurysm, dissection and rupture, bowel rupture, and rupture of the gravid uterus. The frequency is estimated as 1/50,000-1/200,000 and results from pathogenic variants in COL3A1, which encodes the chains of type III procollagen, a major protein in vessel walls and hollow organs. Initial diagnosis depends on the recognitions of clinical features, including family history. Management is complex and requires multiple specialists who can respond to and manage the major complications. A summary of recommendations for management include: Identify causative variants in COL3A1 prior to application of diagnosis, modulate life style to minimize injury, risk of vessel/organ rupture, identify and create care team, provide individual plans for emergency care ("vascular EDS passport") with diagnosis and management plan for use when traveling, centralize management at centers of excellence (experience) when feasible, maintain blood pressure in the normal range and treat hypertension aggressively, surveillance of vascular tree by doppler ultrasound, CTA (low radiation alternatives) or MRA if feasible on an annual basis. These recommendations represent a consensus of an international group of specialists with a broad aggregate experience in the care of individuals with vascular EDS that will need to be assessed on a regular basis as new information develops. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated.

  10. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Soulières

    Full Text Available A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM, an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated.

  11. Turning Crisis into Opportunity: Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry as Illustrated in the Scientific Research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Ling; Kwan, Jenny; Hodson, Derek; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2009-01-01

    Interviews with key scientists who had conducted research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), together with analysis of media reports, documentaries and other literature published during and after the SARS epidemic, revealed many interesting aspects of the nature of science (NOS) and scientific inquiry in contemporary scientific research…

  12. Elucidating the Nature and Mechanism of Tic Improvement in Tourette Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shprecher

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: For unclear reasons, many Tourette syndrome (TS children report near‐complete tic remission by young adulthood. Immature maturation of brain networks, observed with resting‐state functional MRI (rs‐fc‐MRI in adolescents and adults with TS, might evolve to a mature pattern in adults who experience tic improvement or remission. We explored the feasibility of testing this hypothesis in our population of young adult TS males, each with prior clinical assessments completed during childhood as part of a separate TS Association Genetics Consortium study. Methods: A total of 10 TS males (off tic suppressing drugs for at least 6 months aged 19–32 years, mean follow‐up interval 7.5 (2 to 13 years, and 11 neurologically normal controls were enrolled and underwent 3‐Tesla structural and rs‐fc‐MRI sequences. Results: The mean change in Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS was −31.5% (total and −26.6% (YGTSS motor+vocal. Two subjects reported resolution of tic‐related disability, with drops from mean 45 to 16.5 (YGTSS‐total and 25 to 11.5 (YGTSS motor+vocal.. Rs‐fc‐MRI revealed significantly increased connectivity between the ipsilateral anterior and mid cingulate cortex and striatum, increased connectivity between local connections, and decreased connectivity between more distant connections; representing an immature connectivity pattern.Discussion: Similar to previous reports, we found immature patterns of functional connectivity in adult TS subjects. Despite a lack of complete tic remission, two subjects exhibited dramatic drops in tic severity that correlated with tic‐related disability improvement. More work is needed to elucidate the mechanism of such dramatic improvement in TS.

  13. Nature and extent of person recognition impairments associated with Capgras syndrome in Lewy body dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Chris M; Barkley, Victoria; Finger, Elizabeth C; Carson, Nicole; Duke, Devin; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Gilboa, Asaf; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Capgras syndrome (CS) adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the "mirror-image" of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) atrophy that appeared to be uniquely associated with the presence CS. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic

  14. Nature and Extent of Person Recognition Impairments Associated with Capgras Syndrome in Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M. Fiacconi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Capgras Syndrome (CS adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the ‘mirror image’ of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Lewy Body Dementia (DLB who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic responding, to the extent that the potential role of interoceptive awareness in overt judgments is taken into account.

  15. Prevalence, Nature, and Correlates of Sleep Problems Among Children with Fragile X Syndrome Based on a Large Scale Parent Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronk, Rebecca; Bishop, Ellen E.; Raspa, Melissa; Bickel, Julie O.; Mandel, Daniel A.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study reports on current child sleep difficulties reported by parents of children with Fragile X syndrome (FXS). We address prevalence and type of sleep problems (e.g., difficulty falling asleep, frequent awakenings); type and effectiveness of medical and behavioral treatments (e.g., medication, surgery, environmental changes); and explore specific child and family characteristics (e.g., child age, child gender, co-occurring conditions) as possible predictors of child sleep difficulties. Design/Participants: This study is part of a larger survey addressing needs of families with children with FXS. This article focuses on the families who responded to the survey sleep questions, had one or more children with the full mutation FXS, and who reside in the United States. The mean age for male and female children in this group was 15 years and 16 years respectively (N = 1,295). Results: Parents reported that 32% of the children with FXS currently experience sleep difficulties; 84% of those children are reported to have ≥ 2 current sleep problems. Problems falling asleep and frequent night awakenings were the most frequently reported difficulties; 47% of males and 40% of females received ≥1 medication to help with sleep. Children with more problematic health or behavioral characteristics had a higher likelihood of having current sleep problems. Conclusions: Our survey provides the most representative sample to date of sleep problems in children with FXS or any other neurodevelopmental disability. This large scale survey establishes a foundation for the prevalence of sleep disorders in children with FXS. Citation: Kronk R; Bishop EE; Raspa M; Bickel JO; Mandel DA; Bailey DB. Prevalence, nature, and correlates of sleep problems among children with fragile x syndrome based on a large scale parent survey. SLEEP 2010;33(5):679-687. PMID:20469810

  16. Prader-Willi syndrome and early-onset morbid obesity NIH rare disease consortium: A review of natural history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; Kimonis, Virginia; Dykens, Elisabeth; Gold, June A; Miller, Jennifer; Tamura, Roy; Driscoll, Daniel J

    2017-12-22

    We describe the National Institutes of Health rare disease consortium for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) developed to address concerns regarding medical care, diagnosis, growth and development, awareness, and natural history. PWS results from errors in genomic imprinting leading to loss of paternally expressed genes due to 15q11-q13 deletion, maternal disomy 15 or imprinting defects. The 8 year study was conducted at four national sites on individuals with genetically confirmed PWS and early-onset morbid obesity (EMO) with data accumulated to gain a better understanding of the natural history, cause and treatment of PWS. Enrollment of 355 subjects with PWS and 36 subjects with EMO began in September 2006 with study completion in July 2014. Clinical, genetic, cognitive, behavior, and natural history data were systematically collected along with PWS genetic subtypes, pregnancy and birth history, mortality, obesity, and cognitive status with study details as important endpoints in both subject groups. Of the 355 individuals with PWS, 217 (61%) had the 15q11-q13 deletion, 127 (36%) had maternal disomy 15, and 11 (3%) had imprinting defects. Six deaths were reported in our PWS cohort with 598 cumulative years of study exposure and one death in the EMO group with 42 years of exposure. To our knowledge, this description of a longitudinal study in PWS represents the largest and most comprehensive cohort useful for investigators in planning comparable studies in other rare disorders. Ongoing studies utilizing this database should have a direct impact on care and services, diagnosis, treatment, genotype-phenotype correlations, and clinical outcomes in PWS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Natural killer cell biology illuminated by primary immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Matthias; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cytotoxic effector cells well known for their role in antiviral immunity and tumor immunosurveillance. In parts, this knowledge stems from rare inherited immunodeficiency disorders in humans that abrogate NK cell function leading to immune impairments, most notably associated with a high susceptibility to viral infections. Phenotypically, these disorders range from deficiencies selectively affecting NK cells to complex general immune defects that affect NK cells but also other immune cell subsets. Moreover, deficiencies may be associated with reduced NK cell numbers or rather impair specific NK cell effector functions. In recent years, genetic defects underlying the various NK cell deficiencies have been uncovered and have triggered investigative efforts to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we review the associations between inherited human diseases and NK cell development as well as function, with a particular focus on defects in NK cell exocytosis and cytotoxicity. Furthermore we outline how reports of diverse genetic defects have shaped our understanding of NK cell biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Natural history of aortic root dilation through young adulthood in a hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alyssa; Atzinger, Carrie; Hays, Brandon; James, Jeanne; Shikany, Amy; Neilson, Derek; Martin, Lisa; Weaver, Kathryn Nicole

    2017-06-01

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is a common inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by joint hypermobility. The natural history of aortic root dilation (AoD), a potential complication of EDS, has not been well characterized in this population. We describe the natural history of aortic root size in a large cohort of patients with hEDS. A cohort of 325 patients with HEDS was identified at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), including 163 patients from a previous study. Medical records were reviewed and each participant's height, weight, and aortic dimensions from up to four echocardiograms were documented. Aortic root z-scores were calculated using two established formulas based on age (Boston or Devereux). Overall prevalence of AoD and prevalence by age were calculated and longitudinal regression was performed. The prevalence of AoD with a z-score ≥ 2.0 was 14.2% (46/325) and with a z-score of ≥3.0 was 5.5% (18/325). No significant increases in z-score were seen over time for patients with multiple echocardiograms. Participants under the age of 15 years had an average decline of 0.1 standard deviations (SDs)/year. No significant change was found after 15 of age. Between the ages of 15 and 21 years, Boston z-scores were 0.96 higher than Devereux z-scores. The nearly 1 z-score unit difference between formulas indicates caution prior to diagnosing AoD in patients with hEDS. In light of the low prevalence and lack of progression of AoD, routine echocardiograms may not be warranted for pediatric patients with hEDS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Dynamics of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and natural killer cells in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing-Ming; He, Zhong-Ping; Zhuang, Hui; Song, Shu-Jing; Dai, Wang-Su; Zhang, Si-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Jing-Yuan

    2004-08-01

    To study the dynamics of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells in 602 serial samples from 240 patients with SARS were counted, using flow cytometry, and compared with that of normal population. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells in SARS patients were significantly lower than that of the normal population (P < 0.001) and were much lower in SARS patients with severe or extremely severe types, as compared with that of moderate or mild type cases (P < 0.001). The amount of B lymphocytes in recovery SARS patients increased at the 2nd week after onset, and gradually becoming normal at the 5th week of the disease onset. The number of NK cells was in the low level at onset, and keep decreasing at the 2nd week. However, it was increasing with the recovery of the disease, but did not reach to normal level at the 5th week after onset. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells were associated with the severity of the disease, and detection of these two kinds of cells was useful for predicting the prognosis of SARS.

  20. Effect of a Natural Supplement Containing Curcuma Longa, Guggul, and Chlorogenic Acid in Patients With Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Angelo Maria; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Katsiki, Niki; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Nikolic, Dragana; Vanella, Luca; Giglio, Rosaria Vincenza; Giannone, Valeria Ausilia; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Manfredi

    2015-10-01

    The impact of a natural supplement (Kepar; Rikrea, Italy), containing several plant extracts such as curcuma longa, silymarin, guggul, chlorogenic acid, and inulin, was evaluated in 78 patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS; 45 men; age: 62 ± 9 years). Kepar at a dose of 2 pills/d was given for 4 months as add-on therapy to the ongoing treatment, maintained at fixed doses for the entire study. Anthropometric variables, plasma lipids, glucose parameters, and oxidative stress were measured at baseline and after 4 months. We found significant reductions in body weight (from 81.1 ± 13.5 to 79.4 ± 12.5 kg, P < .0001), body mass index (from 29.6 [23.7] to 29.3 [21.9] kg/m(2), P = .001), and waist circumference (from 105 ± 11 to 102 ± 10 cm, P = .0004) as well as in fasting glucose (from 6.5 [11.7] to 6.4 [7.6] mmol/L, P = .014) and total cholesterol (from 4.8 ± 1.4 to 4.5 ± 1.0 mmol/L, P = .03). No significant changes were found in the other appraised parameters, including oxidative stress. In conclusion, after few months of treatment Kepar seems to exert beneficial effects in patients with MetS. Larger studies with a longer follow-up period are needed to confirm these preliminary findings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [Cockayne syndrome and epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (Hallopeau-Siemens). Simultaneous occurrence in a family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubach, D; Riechers, U

    1982-09-01

    A Turkish family with four children is described, two boys suffering from Cockayne's syndrome and a girl from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (Hallopeau-Siemens). The outstanding features in the brothers are a pronounced delay in growth which began in both children at the age of about 1.5 years, progeria-like facial features, and a high degree of light sensitivity noticed very soon after birth. The daughter died of septicemia at the age of 4 years. Both diseases are rare and probably the consequence of extremely high consanguinity.

  2. [Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch). A follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenstrauch, T; Snigula, F; Wiedemann, H R

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS) are: intrauterine and postnatal growth failure, hydrocephalic appearance, prominent scalp veins, old-looking face, absence of subcutaneous fat and neonatal teeth. Until now altogether nine cases have been reported, which were predominant diagnosed in infant age. The NPS is in general assigned to the autosomal recessive trait. With increasing age the outward appearance stays unchanged. The in 1977 under diagnose progeria presented patient is now 16 years old. With her a considerable atactic movement disturbance developed next to a psychomotoric retardation. The change in metabolism of proteoglycane that was remarkable in infant age is now no longer provable.

  3. The natural history of children with joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; Nicholson, Lesley L; Adams, Roger D; Tofts, Louise; Pacey, Verity

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the manuscript was to describe the natural history of complaints and disability in children diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and to identify the constructs that underlie functional decline. One hundred and one JHS/EDS-HT children were observed over 3 years and assessed at three time points on the following: functional impairments, quality of life, connective tissue laxity, muscle function, postural control and musculoskeletal and multi-systemic complaints. Cluster analysis was performed to identify subgroups in severity. Clinical profiles were determined for these subgroups, and differences were assessed by multivariate analysis of covariance. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine the subsequent trajectories. Finally, an exploratory factor analysis was used to uncover the underlying constructs of functional impairment. Three clusters of children were identified in terms of functional impairment: mild, moderately and severely affected. Functional impairment at baseline was predictive of worsening trajectories in terms of reduced walking distance and decreased quality of life (P ⩽ 0.05) over 3 years. Multiple interactions between the secondary outcomes were observed, with four underlying constructs identified. All four constructs (multi-systemic effects, pain, fatigue and loss of postural control) contributed significantly to disability (P ⩽ 0.046). Children diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT who have a high incidence of multi-systemic complaints (particularly, orthostatic intolerance, urinary incontinence and diarrhoea) and poor postural control in addition to high levels of pain and fatigue at baseline are most likely to have a deteriorating trajectory of functional impairment and, accordingly, warrant clinical prioritization.

  4. Hemolytic anemia due to passenger lymphocyte syndrome in solid malignancy patients treated with allogeneic natural killer cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Robert; Singh, Charanjeet; Cooley, Sarah; Geller, Melissa; Northouse, Joan; Welbig, Julie; Slungaard, Arne; Miller, Jeff; McKenna, David

    2013-02-01

    Allogeneic natural killer (NK) cell products for treatment of solid organ malignancies were prepared by performing T (CD3+)-cell depletion on nonmobilized apheresis mononuclear cell collections. The products were not B-cell depleted. This report details two cases of passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) after NK-cell infusion. Patient 1 is a blood group A+ 56-year-old female with Stage IV ovarian carcinoma who received NK cells from an O+ donor. On day +7 she developed new hemolytic anemia. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT) was positive for immunoglobulin G and C3, and the eluate contained anti-A. Subsequently, anti-A was identified on reverse typing. She was transfused with group O red blood cells (RBCs). By day +12 she forward typed as O with anti-A and B on reverse typing. By day +42, DAT was negative with only weak anti-A on reverse typing. Patient 2 is a blood group B+ 51-year-old female with metastatic lobular breast carcinoma who received NK cells from an O+ donor. On day +7 she developed new hemolytic anemia. DAT was positive, and the eluate contained anti-A and -B. Anti-A reactivity was due to anti-A,B. The next day she developed new anti-B on reverse typing. She was transfused with O RBCs. Anti-B titer increased to a maximum of 512 on day +12. At discharge on Day +29 her anti-B titer was still 32. These patients developed PLS after infusion of NK cells. Because of these cases NK-cell products are now B (CD19+)-cell depleted at our institution, and this approach is recommended for other centers. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. The natural history of Dandy-Walker syndrome in the United States: A population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Ukwuoma, Onyinyechi I; Lunos, Scott; Okuyemi, Kolawole S

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a congenital disorder typically manifesting with hydrocephalus. The classic anatomic hallmarks of DWS are hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, anterior-posterior enlargement of the posterior fossa, upward displacement of the torcula and transverse sinuses, and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Although optimal treatment of DWS typically requires neurosurgical intervention to prevent intracranial pressure increases incompatible with life, the natural history of this disorder has yet to be evaluated on a nationwide level. The Kids' Inpatient Database covering 1997-2003 was used for analysis. Children younger than age 18 admitted for DWS (ICD-9-CM = 742.3) were analyzed with a matched control group. The primary procedure codes for operative CSF drainage were coded into the analysis. The incidence of DWS was 0.136%; 14,599 DWS patients were included. Multiple logistic regression models were used. Odds ratios (OR) were reported with 95% confidence intervals. Mortality (OR = 10.02; P < 0.0001) and adverse discharge disposition (OR = 4.59; P < 0.0001) were significantly greater in DWS patients compared with controls. 20.4% of DWS patients received operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, 81-times more than controls (P < 0.0001). CSF drainage reduced mortality by 44% among DWS patients (P < 0.0001). Although DWS is associated with a 10-fold increase in mortality, operative CSF drainage nearly halves the mortality rate. Based on these findings (Class IIB evidence), it is likely that the increased mortality associated with DWS is directly attributable to the nearly 80% of DWS patients who did not receive operative CSF drainage for hydrocephalus. Consequently, increased access to neurosurgical intervention could reduce the mortality rate of DWS towards that of the general population.

  6. The natural history of Dandy-Walker syndrome in the United States: A population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a congenital disorder typically manifesting with hydrocephalus. The classic anatomic hallmarks of DWS are hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, anterior-posterior enlargement of the posterior fossa, upward displacement of the torcula and transverse sinuses, and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Aims: Although optimal treatment of DWS typically requires neurosurgical intervention to prevent intracranial pressure increases incompatible with life, the natural history of this disorder has yet to be evaluated on a nationwide level. Settings and Design/Materials and Methods: The Kids′ Inpatient Database covering 1997-2003 was used for analysis. Children younger than age 18 admitted for DWS (ICD-9-CM = 742.3 were analyzed with a matched control group. The primary procedure codes for operative CSF drainage were coded into the analysis. The incidence of DWS was 0.136%; 14,599 DWS patients were included. Statistical Analysis Used: Multiple logistic regression models were used. Odds ratios (OR were reported with 95% confidence intervals. Results and Conclusions: Mortality (OR = 10.02; P < 0.0001 and adverse discharge disposition (OR = 4.59; P < 0.0001 were significantly greater in DWS patients compared with controls. 20.4% of DWS patients received operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF drainage, 81-times more than controls (P < 0.0001. CSF drainage reduced mortality by 44% among DWS patients (P < 0.0001. Although DWS is associated with a 10-fold increase in mortality, operative CSF drainage nearly halves the mortality rate. Based on these findings (Class IIB evidence, it is likely that the increased mortality associated with DWS is directly attributable to the nearly 80% of DWS patients who did not receive operative CSF drainage for hydrocephalus. Consequently, increased access to neurosurgical intervention could reduce the mortality rate of DWS towards that of the general population.

  7. The natural history and surgical outcome of patients with scimitar syndrome: a multi-centre European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Guariento, Alvise; Milanesi, Ornella; Gregori, Dario; Stellin, Giovanni

    2017-10-03

    Treatment decisions in patients with scimitar syndrome (SS) are often challenging, especially in patients with isolated SS who are often asymptomatic and who might be diagnosed accidentally. We queried a large multi-institutional registry of SS patients to evaluate the natural history of this condition and to determine the efficacy of surgical treatment in terms of survival and clinical status. We collected data on 485 SS patients from 51 institutions; 279 (57%) patients were treated surgically (STPs) and 206 (43%) were clinically monitored (CMPs). Median age at last follow-up was 11.6 years (interquartile range 4-22 years). Overall survival probability at 30 years of age was 88% [85-92% confidence intervals (CI)] and was lower in patients with associated congenital heart disease (CHD) (P < 0.001) and pulmonary hypertension (P < 0.001). Most patients were asymptomatic at last follow-up (279/451, 62%); STPs were more frequently asymptomatic than CMPs (73% vs. 47%, P < 0.001), with fewer cardiac [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, 95% CI 0.22-0.82] and respiratory symptoms (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.28). Many STPs (63/254, 25%) had stenosis/occlusion of the scimitar drainage, and this was associated with a younger age at surgery (OR 0.4, CI 0.21-0.78). Patients with SS have a high overall survival. Survival probability was lower in patients with associated CHDs and in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Surgical treatment of SS is beneficial in reducing symptoms, however, given the significant risk of post-operative scimitar drainage stenosis/occlusion, it should be tailored to a comprehensive haemodynamic evaluation and to the patient's age.

  8. Discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics in a patient with Cockayne syndrome during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Hitosugi, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a kind of progeria with autosomal chromosome recessiveness described first by Cockayne in 1936. Patients with this syndrome were characterized by retarded growth, cerebral atrophy, and mental retardation. We experienced an anesthetic management of a patient with Cockayne syndrome, who underwent dental treatment twice. The primary concern was discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics. The values of bispectral index showed a sharp fall to 1 digit and suppression ratio more than 40, while hemodynamics was stable during induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane 8%. We should pay attention to anesthetic depth in the central nervous system in patients with Cockayne syndrome. Titration of anesthetics should be performed by the information from electroencephalography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear matrix, nuclear envelope and premature aging syndromes in a translational research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Pierre; Navarro, Claire; Harhouri, Karim; Roll, Patrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; Kaspi, Elise; Perrin, Sophie; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lévy, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Lamin A-related progeroid syndromes are genetically determined, extremely rare and severe. In the past ten years, our knowledge and perspectives for these diseases has widely progressed, through the progressive dissection of their pathophysiological mechanisms leading to precocious and accelerated aging, from the genes mutations discovery until therapeutic trials in affected children. A-type lamins are major actors in several structural and functional activities at the nuclear periphery, as they are major components of the nuclear lamina. However, while this is usually poorly considered, they also play a key role within the rest of the nucleoplasm, whose defects are related to cell senescence. Although nuclear shape and nuclear envelope deformities are obvious and visible events, nuclear matrix disorganization and abnormal composition certainly represent the most important causes of cell defects with dramatic pathological consequences. Therefore, lamin-associated diseases should be better referred as laminopathies instead of envelopathies, this later being too restrictive, considering neither the key structural and functional roles of soluble lamins in the entire nucleoplasm, nor the nuclear matrix contribution to the pathophysiology of lamin-associated disorders and in particular in defective lamin A processing-associated aging diseases. Based on both our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and the biological and clinical consequences of progeria and related diseases, therapeutic trials have been conducted in patients and were terminated less than 10 years after the gene discovery, a quite fast issue for a genetic disease. Pharmacological drugs have been repurposed and used to decrease the toxicity of the accumulated, unprocessed and truncated prelaminA in progeria. To date, none of them may be considered as a cure for progeria and these clinical strategies were essentially designed toward reducing a subset of the most dramatic and morbid features

  10. Description and Evaluation of a Home-Based, Parent-Administered Program for Teaching Enhanced Natural Gestures to Individuals With Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calculator, Stephen N

    2016-02-01

    This article describes and presents outcomes of a home-based, self-administered version of the Enhanced Natural Gestures (ENG) program for individuals with Angelman syndrome. Parents of 18 individuals (11 boys and 7 girls) with Angelman syndrome, in consultation with their speech-language pathologists, participated in a quasi-experimental "B" design in which they self-administered an instructional program to teach their children to use enhanced natural gestures at home and/or in the community. Parents integrated 2 teaching methods, Mand-Model with time delay and Molding-Shaping, into their everyday interactions with their children. Parents reported outcomes of the program through goal attainment scaling and completion of the ENG Acceptability Rating Form. Children's overall achievements acquiring ENGs generally met or exceeded program (and parent) expectations. Most parents reported little difficulty self-administering the ENG program with their children and regarded the program positively across multiple dimensions. ENGs may, in conjunction with other forms of augmentative and alternative communication, represent a viable method of communication for many individuals with Angelman syndrome. Further research is warranted to explore the feasibility of ENGs with other populations of individuals with severe disabilities and complex communication challenges.

  11. Cardiorenal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schetz, Miet

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials.

  12. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of survived sudden cardiac arrest Because of the nature of the heart rhythm abnormality, medications usually aren’t used to treat Brugada syndrome. A medical device called an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is the ...

  13. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yin Lo

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90 iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM, and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM, abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in HGPS

  14. The Basic Nature of Ethical Problems Experienced by Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Implications for Nursing Ethics Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Miriam E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) described and validated 100 ethical problems that are experienced by people with AIDS from 3 levels of ethical inquiry: descriptive ethics, normative ethics, and metaethics. Findings suggest strategies for improving nursing ethics education. (JOW)

  15. Adenosine deaminase acts as a natural antagonist for dipeptidyl peptidase 4-mediated entry of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, V Stalin; Smits, Saskia L; Provacia, Lisette B; van den Brand, Judith M A; Wiersma, Lidewij; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Bestebroer, Theo M; Spronken, Monique I; van Amerongen, Geert; Rottier, Peter J M; Fouchier, Ron A M; Bosch, Berend Jan; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Haagmans, Bart L

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replicates in cells of different species using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) as a functional receptor. Here we show the resistance of ferrets to MERS-CoV infection and inability of ferret DDP4 to bind MERS-CoV. Site-directed mutagenesis of

  16. Adenosine deaminase acts as a natural antagonist for dipeptidyl peptidase 4-mediated entry of the middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.S. Stalin Raj; S.L. Smits (Saskia); L.B.V. Provacia (Lisette); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); L.C.M. Wiersma (Lidewij); W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner ); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); M.I. Spronken (Monique); G. van Amerongen (Geert); P.J.M. Rottier (Peter); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replicates in cells of different species using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) as a functional receptor. Here we show the resistance of ferrets to MERS-CoV infection and inability of ferret DDP4 to bind MERS-CoV. Site-directed

  17. Natural history and Predictors of Progression to Sjögren's Syndrome Among Participants of the SICCA registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiboski, Caroline H; Baer, Alan N; Shiboski, Stephen C

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To explore changes in the phenotypic features of Sjoögren's syndrome (SS), and in SS status among participants in the Sjoögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) registry over a 2 to 3-year interval. METHODS: All participants in the SICCA registry who were...

  18. Phenotype and natural history in 101 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome through an internet questionnaire system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Channa F.; Baas, Melanie; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; van Heukelingen, John; Routledge, Sue; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS; MIM# 610954) is a genetically determined entity mainly caused by mutations in TransCription Factor 4 (TCF4). We have developed a new way to collect information on (ultra-)rare disorders through a web-based database which we call 'waihonapedia' (waihona [meaning treasure

  19. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome: new case with normal telomere length in skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniszewski, L; Nowak, R; Oknińska-Hoffmann, E; Skórka, A; Gieruszczak-Białek, D; Sawadro-Rochowska, M

    2001-10-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition with characteristic appearance of premature aging present at birth (aged face, natal teeth, and wrinkled skin). Other features of the syndrome are generalized lipoatrophy with specific fat accumulation in the lateral suprabuttock region, hypotrichosis, macrocephaly (pseudohydrocephalus), and mental retardation. We report on a new case that demonstrates all typical features of the syndrome. The girl is now 16 years and 10 months old and has had follow-up from birth. We measured terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length to evaluate whether the patient's premature aging process is accompanied by shortening of telomere length in her cultured fibroblasts. Mean TRF of 13.5 kb found in our patient's fibroblasts is not shortened as compared to that of normal fibroblasts. Our results differ from those observed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Is the Control of Applied Digital Forces During Natural Five-digit Grasping Affected by Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Tsun; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Chien-Ju; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin

    2015-07-01

    The impaired sensory function of the hand induced by carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is known to disturb dexterous manipulations. However, force control during daily grasping configuration among the five digits has not been a prominent focus of study. Because grasping is so important to normal function and use of a hand, it is important to understand how sensory changes in CTS affect the digit force of natural grasp. We therefore examined the altered patterns of digit forces applied during natural five-digit grasping in patients with CTS and compared them with those seen in control subjects without CTS. We hypothesized that the patients with CTS will grasp by applying larger forces with lowered pair correlations and more force variability of the involved digits than the control subjects. Specifically, we asked: (1) Is there a difference between patients with CTS and control subjects in applied force by digits during lift-hold-lower task? (2) Is there a difference in force correlation coefficient of the digit pairs? (3) Are there force variability differences during the holding phase? We evaluated 15 female patients with CTS and 15 control subjects matched for age, gender, and hand dominance. The applied radial forces (Fr) of the five digits were recorded by respective force transducers on a cylinder simulator during the lift-hold-lower task with natural grasping. The movement phases of the task were determined by a video-based motion capture system. The applied forces of the thumb in patients with CTS (7 ± 0.8 N; 95% CI, 7.2-7.4 N) versus control subjects (5 ± 0.8 N; 95% CI, 5.1-5.3 N) and the index finger in patients with CTS (3 ± 0.3 N; 95% CI, 3.2-3.3 N) versus control subjects (2 ± 0.3 N; 95% CI, 2.2-2.3 N) observed throughout most of the task were larger in the CTS group (p ranges 0.035-0.050 for thumb and 0.016-0.050 for index finger). In addition, the applied force of the middle finger in patients with CTS (1 ± 0.1 N; 95% CI, 1.3-1.4

  1. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie da Costa Eiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Huntchinson-Gilford (Progeria é uma rara doença autossômica dominante, caracterizada pelo envelhecimento precoce. Relata-se caso de uma criança, que aos 6 meses iniciou alopecia na região occipital e placas esclerodermiformes no abdome. Esta síndrome apresenta alterações em vários órgãos e sistemas como a pele, esquelético e sistema cardiovascular. O diagnóstico é clínico e não possui tratamento, porém seu reconhecimento é necessário para minimizar a aterosclerose precoce através do controle da dislipidemia.Huntchinson-Gilford Syndrome (Progeria is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by premature aging. It is reported the case of child whose alopecia started at the age of 6 months on the occipital region. The child also presented scleroderma plaques on the abdomen. This syndrome presents alterations in many organs and systems such as the skin and the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. The diagnosis is clinical and there is no treatment for it but recognition is necessary to minimize early atherosclerosis through the control of dyslipidemia.

  2. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Endourologic Intervention for Management of Infertility in a Man with Zinner Syndrome Resulting in a Natural Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaways, Ismaeel; Ahmed, Shyaw M

    2016-01-01

    Ipsilateral renal agenesis associated with seminal vesicular cysts is an uncommon finding. Zinner syndrome is a rare variant of wolffian duct anomalies with a triad of seminal vesicle cyst, ipsilateral renal agenesis, and male fertility problems due to ejaculatory duct obstruction (EDO). A 28-year-old man with 6 years history of primary infertility presented with left-side lower abdominal pain. A palpable cystic mass was found on digital rectal examination. Semen analysis revealed low volume ejaculate azoospermia. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a single right kidney and transrectal ultrasonography showed an evidence of left EDO. Transurethral resection of the ejaculatory duct was performed. Semen analysis after 2 weeks showed normal sperm count (23M) and acceptable progressive motility (24%). Eight weeks later, his wife was pregnant with a 7-week viable fetus. Although not a common disease, a careful physical examination and thorough semen analysis interpretation should guide clinicians to diagnose a surgically treatable syndromic cause of male infertility.

  4. Radiologic observations in severe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome treated with the isolated phospholipid fraction of natural surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensson, W.; Noack, G.; Curstedt, T.; Herin, P.; Robertson, B.

    Ten newborn babies with severe respiratory distress syndrome, all dependent on artificial ventilation, were treated via the airways with the isolated phospholipid fraction of bovine or porcine surfactant. After treatment with surfactant at a median age of 10.5 h, there was in all patients a striking improvement of lung aeration in chest films, with a decrease in parenchymal fluid retention and in distension of bronchioli. These radiologic findings were associated with a dramatic improvement of oxygenation and a significant reduction of the right-to-left shunt. In spite of the rapid therapeutic response, four patients died from cerebral hemorrhage. One of the surviving patients developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Our findings document efficacy of this new surfactant preparation in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, but the long-term effects need to be further tested in randomized clinical trials.

  5. Phenotype and natural history in 101 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome through an internet questionnaire system

    OpenAIRE

    de Winter, Channa F.; Baas, Melanie; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; van Heukelingen, John; Routledge, Sue; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2016-01-01

    Background Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS; MIM# 610954) is a genetically determined entity mainly caused by mutations in TransCription Factor 4 (TCF4). We have developed a new way to collect information on (ultra-)rare disorders through a web-based database which we call ?waihonapedia? (waihona [meaning treasure in Hawaiian] encyclopaedia). Methods We have built a waihonapedia system in a collaboration between physicians, social scientists, and parent support groups. The system consists of an in...

  6. Endourologic Intervention for Management of Infertility in a Man with Zinner Syndrome Resulting in a Natural Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Aghaways, Ismaeel; Ahmed, Shyaw M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Ipsilateral renal agenesis associated with seminal vesicular cysts is an uncommon finding. Zinner syndrome is a rare variant of wolffian duct anomalies with a triad of seminal vesicle cyst, ipsilateral renal agenesis, and male fertility problems due to ejaculatory duct obstruction (EDO). Case Presentation: A 28-year-old man with 6 years history of primary infertility presented with left-side lower abdominal pain. A palpable cystic mass was found on digital rectal examinat...

  7. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find The Other 150 Kids Video Gallery In Memory Of Life According To Sam Awards & Reviews Buy & ... 2018 in Boston MA: Night of Wonder 2018: Music to your ears! Learn More College Diabetes Network ...

  8. Progeria 101/FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth failure, loss of body fat and hair, aged-looking skin and stiffness of joints. As children get older, they suffer from osteoporosis, generalized atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (heart) disease and stroke. The ...

  9. Learning about Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Projects Grant Information NIH Common Fund NIH RePORTER Research at NHGRI An Overview Branches Clinical Research ... use of high-throughput screening technology to identify chemical compounds that might reverse nuclear membrane abnormalities of ...

  10. The Cockayne Syndrome Natural History (CoSyNH) study: clinical findings in 102 individuals and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian T; Stark, Zornitza; Sutton, Ruth E; Danda, Sumita; Ekbote, Alka V; Elsayed, Solaf M; Gibson, Louise; Goodship, Judith A; Jackson, Andrew P; Keng, Wee Teik; King, Mary D; McCann, Emma; Motojima, Toshino; Murray, Jennifer E; Omata, Taku; Pilz, Daniela; Pope, Kate; Sugita, Katsuo; White, Susan M; Wilson, Ian J

    2016-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare, autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly, impaired postnatal growth, and premature pathological aging. It has historically been considered a DNA repair disorder; fibroblasts from classic patients often exhibit impaired transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Previous studies have largely been restricted to case reports and small series, and no guidelines for care have been established. One hundred two study participants were identified through a network of collaborating clinicians and the Amy and Friends CS support groups. Families with a diagnosis of CS could also self-recruit. Comprehensive clinical information for analysis was obtained directly from families and their clinicians. We present the most complete evaluation of Cockayne syndrome to date, including detailed information on the prevalence and onset of clinical features, achievement of neurodevelopmental milestones, and patient management. We confirm that the most valuable prognostic factor in CS is the presence of early cataracts. Using this evidence, we have created simple guidelines for the care of individuals with CS. We aim to assist clinicians in the recognition, diagnosis, and management of this condition and to enable families to understand what problems they may encounter as CS progresses.Genet Med 18 5, 483-493.

  11. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1.

  12. Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection associated with hemophagocytic syndrome and extra-nodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in an 18-year-old girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yawei; Yang, Junwen; Lian, Guanghui; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Li, Fujun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection (CAEBV) associated with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and extra-nodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL) is a rare life-threatening disorder. This disease is easily misdiagnosed because of its varied presentations. Patient concerns: An 18-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with a history of edema in the lower limbs and intermittent fever lasting for more than 1 month. At admission, she had severe liver injury of unknown etiology. Laboratory test results revealed pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Results of serologic tests for EBV were positive. Results of a skin biopsy indicated EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and bone marrow aspiration revealed focal hemophagocytosis and atypical lymphoid cells. Diagnosis: On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the case as extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma-associated HPS (natural killer/T-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome), which is commonly induced by CAEBV. Interventions: Treatment consisted of general management of hepatitis, supplemented with albumin and empirical antibiotic therapy. Outcomes: The patient died from massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage a week after she was discharged from the hospital. Lessons: ENKL and HPS present with varied features and are generally fatal; therefore, clinicians should proceed with caution in suspected cases. HPS should be considered when the patient presents with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and liver failure. When HPS is suspected, clinicians should determine the underlying cause, such as severe infection, including infection with viruses such as EBV; genetic predisposition; or underlying malignancies, especially lymphoma because of its strong association with HPS. PMID:28489771

  13. Effects of natural S-equol supplements on overweight or obesity and metabolic syndrome in the Japanese, based on sex and equol status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Takeshi; Tochiya, Mayu; Sasaki, Yousuke; Muranaka, Kazuya; Yamakage, Hajime; Himeno, Akihiro; Shimatsu, Akira; Inaguma, Asami; Ueno, Tomomi; Uchiyama, Shigeto; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that soy intake has an important role in the prevention of age-related health problems. Daidzein, the principal isoflavone contained in soy, is converted to S-equol by the intestinal bacteria. Not all individuals, however, can produce S-equol, which is considered the most biologically active metabolite. We studied the effects of a natural S-equol supplement on metabolic parameters associated with overweight or obesity and metabolic syndrome. The study was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design with no washout period. All subjects were considered overweight or obese if they had a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2) . Placebo or natural S-equol tablets containing 10 mg S-equol were orally ingested each day for 12 weeks. A total of 54 Japanese overweight or obese outpatients were enrolled. The equol phenotype was determined, and various metabolic parameters, including cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), were measured. Equol non-producers comprised 67.9% of the overweight or obese subjects. The ratio of equol non-producers in this overweight or obese subject group was higher than the previously reported ratio of equol non-producers (approximately 50%) in the general population. Compared with the placebo group, intervention with natural S-equol led to a significant decrease in HbA1c, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and CAVI score. Furthermore, the effect was more prominent in the subgroup of female equol non-producers. The ratio of equol non-producers in overweight or obese populations might be higher than generally reported. Natural S-equol might have a role in glycaemic control and in the prevention of cardiovascular disease by its effects to lower LDL-C levels and CAVI scores in overweight or obese individuals. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. McCune-Albright syndrome, natural history and multidisciplinary management in a series of 14 pediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopiantz, Mikael; Journeau, Pierre; Lebon-Labich, Béatrice; Sorlin, Arthur; Cuny, Thomas; Weryha, Georges; Leheup, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by endocrine disorders, café-au-lait spots and fibrous dysplasia of bone that occurs early in life. A series of 14 pediatric cases were followed between 1994 and 2013 by the competence center for rare endocrine diseases and constitutional bone diseases at CHU de Nancy (France). The diagnosis is based on the presence of at least two symptoms. The mean follow-up was 6 years (1-17 years). The sex ratio was six girls per boy. The incidence was 0.28 cases/million population/year. Mean age at diagnosis was 6 years. A mutation in the GNAS gene was found in 33% of patients tested. Gonadal involvement (13/14 cases), including early peripheral puberty and ovarian cysts in girls (82%) occurred on average at 4 years of age. Bone involvement (10/14 cases) appeared on average at 5 years of age and was most often multiple (80%) with fracture risk, and the skull, with a neurosensory risk. Clinical definition and methods of screening and monitoring can be improved to allow for an earlier intervention. It must be multidisciplinary and take into account the disability and quality of life of the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Nature and role of high sister chromatid exchanges in Bloom syndrome cells. Some cytogenetic and immunological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y

    1990-12-01

    The phenomenon of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is an interesting genetic event in metaphase chromosomes, even though its exact mechanism remains unknown. The fact that SCE can take place, whether "spontaneously" or induced by various agents, is in itself important, for such an event, involving damage and possible repair of bilateral loci in chromosomes, presents opportunities for modification of the chromosomal structure and/or function (e.g., oncogene activation). It has been assumed that under "normal" circumstances, SCE does not lead to any change in the functional genome, although this may not apply to abnormal conditions. The latter may be produced by a number of chemical agents (including various carcinogens) that lead to a significantly increased incidence of SCE in normal and malignant cells either in vitro or in vivo. In fact, SCE has been recognized and advocated as a most sensitive test for potentially mutagenic and/or carcinogenic agents. Thus, the broad field of SCE studies becomes of direct interest for and subject to exploration by those involved with cancer causation and biology. In this review, a synopsis of our experiences with high SCE mechanisms in Bloom syndrome cell lines will be presented, in connection with high SCE mutant cell line derived from ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and/or malignant transformation.

  16. Properties of modified natural surfactant after exposure to fibrinogen in vitro and in an animal model of respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkovska, Andrea; Linderholm, Bim; Haegerstrand-Björkman, Marie; Curstedt, Tore

    2012-09-01

    Plasma proteins are known to interfere with pulmonary surfactant. Studies have proven the hypothesis that fibrinogen preserves exogenous surfactant subjected to long-term surface area cycling. The exogenous surfactant Curosurf was subjected to long-term surface area cycling without or with fibrinogen (ratio 2:1 w/w) and was tested by captive bubble surfactometer and on newborn premature rabbits. Surface tension increased in Curosurf (80 mg/ml) samples without fibrinogen after 6-12 d of cycling. In samples with fibrinogen the cycling time had no effect on surface tension. Addition of fibrinogen to surfactant prevented lipid peroxidation. Lung gas volumes of animals with noncycled Curosurf or Curosurf cycled with fibrinogen for 6 d were comparable and higher than in rabbits with Curosurf cycled without fibrinogen. Alveolar volume density was higher in groups with noncycled Curosurf or Curosurf cycled with fibrinogen than in Curosurf cycled without fibrinogen (both P surfactant cycled at 37 °C depends both on surfactant concentration and cycling time. At high phospholipid concentration used in clinical practice fibrinogen has a protective effect on biophysical and physiological properties of natural modified surfactant subjected to surface area cycling. This effect is partially mediated by reduction in lipid peroxidation.

  17. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  18. Turning Crisis into Opportunity: Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry as Illustrated in the Scientific Research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Ling; Kwan, Jenny; Hodson, Derek; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2009-01-01

    Interviews with key scientists who had conducted research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), together with analysis of media reports, documentaries and other literature published during and after the SARS epidemic, revealed many interesting aspects of the nature of science (NOS) and scientific inquiry in contemporary scientific research in the rapidly growing field of molecular biology. The story of SARS illustrates vividly some NOS features advocated in the school science curriculum, including the tentative nature of scientific knowledge, theory-laden observation and interpretation, multiplicity of approaches adopted in scientific inquiry, the inter-relationship between science and technology, and the nexus of science, politics, social and cultural practices. The story also provided some insights into a number of NOS features less emphasised in the school curriculum—for example, the need to combine and coordinate expertise in a number of scientific fields, the intense competition between research groups (suspended during the SARS crisis), the significance of affective issues relating to intellectual honesty and the courage to challenge authority, the pressure of funding issues on the conduct of research and the ‘peace of mind’ of researchers, These less emphasised elements provided empirical evidence that NOS knowledge, like scientific knowledge itself, changes over time. They reflected the need for teachers and curriculum planners to revisit and reconsider whether the features of NOS currently included in the school science curriculum are fully reflective of the practice of science in the 21st century. In this paper, we also report on how we made use of extracts from the news reports and documentaries on SARS, together with episodes from the scientists’ interviews, to develop a multimedia instructional package for explicitly teaching the prominent features of NOS and scientific inquiry identified in the SARS research.

  19. FITNET's Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Is Ineffective and May Impede Natural Recovery in Adolescents with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatineh, Simin; Vink, Mark

    2017-08-11

    The Dutch Fatigue In Teenagers on the interNET (FITNET) study claimed that after 6 months, internet based cognitive behaviour therapy in adolescents with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), led to a 63% recovery rate compared to 8% after usual care, and that this was maintained at long term follow up (LTFU). Our reanalysis shows that their post-hoc definition of recovery included the severely ill, the unblinded trial had no adequate control group and it used lax selection criteria as well as outcomes assessed via questionnaires rather than objective outcomes, further contributing to exaggerated recovery figures. Their decision not to publish the actometer results might suggest that these did not back their recovery claims. Despite these bias creating methodological faults, the trial still found no significant difference in recovery rates ("~60%") at LTFU, the trial's primary goal. This is similar to or worse than the documented 54-94% spontaneous recovery rates within 3-4 years, suggesting that both FITNET and usual care (consisting of cognitive behaviour and graded exercise therapies) are ineffective and might even impede natural recovery in adolescents with ME/CFS. This has implications for the upcoming costly NHS FITNET trial which is a blueprint of the Dutch study, exposing it to similar biases.

  20. Chronic exposure to air pollution particles increases the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome: findings from a natural experiment in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongjie; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Li, Zhigang; Gow, Andrew; Chung, Kian Fan; Hu, Min; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zeng, Limin; Zhu, Tong; Jia, Guang; Li, Xiaoqian; Duarte, Marlyn; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that air pollution is a risk factor for childhood obesity. Limited experimental data have shown that early-life exposure to ambient particles either increases susceptibility to diet-induced weight gain in adulthood or increases insulin resistance, adiposity, and inflammation. However, no data have directly supported a link between air pollution and non-diet-induced weight increases. In a rodent model, we found that breathing Beijing's highly polluted air resulted in weight gain and cardiorespiratory and metabolic dysfunction. Compared to those exposed to filtered air, pregnant rats exposed to unfiltered Beijing air were significantly heavier at the end of pregnancy. At 8 wk old, the offspring prenatally and postnatally exposed to unfiltered air were significantly heavier than those exposed to filtered air. In both rat dams and their offspring, after continuous exposure to unfiltered air we observed pronounced histologic evidence for both perivascular and peribronchial inflammation in the lungs, increased tissue and systemic oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, and an enhanced proinflammatory status of epididymal fat. Results suggest that TLR2/4-dependent inflammatory activation and lipid oxidation in the lung can spill over systemically, leading to metabolic dysfunction and weight gain.-Wei, Y., Zhang, J., Li, Z., Gow, A., Chung, K. F., Hu, M., Sun, Z., Zeng, L., Zhu, T., Jia, G., Li, X., Duarte, M., Tang, X. Chronic exposure to air pollution particles increases the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome: findings from a natural experiment in Beijing. © FASEB.

  1. Natural history of transient myeloproliferative disorder clinically diagnosed in Down syndrome neonates: a report from the Children's Oncology Group Study A2971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamis, Alan S; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Hilden, Joanne M; Sorrell, April D; Sharma, Mukta; Loew, Thomas W; Arceci, Robert J; Barnard, Dorothy; Doyle, John; Massey, Gita; Perentesis, John; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Taub, Jeffrey; Smith, Franklin O

    2011-12-22

    Transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD), restricted to newborns with trisomy 21, is a megakaryocytic leukemia that although lethal in some is distinguished by its spontaneous resolution. Later development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs in some. Prospective enrollment (n = 135) elucidated the natural history in Down syndrome (DS) patients diagnosed with TMD via the use of uniform monitoring and intervention guidelines. Prevalent at diagnosis were leukocytosis, peripheral blast exceeding marrow blast percentage, and hepatomegaly. Among those with life-threatening symptoms, most (n = 29/38; 76%) received intervention therapy until symptoms abated and then were monitored similarly. Organomegaly with cardiopulmonary compromise most frequently led to intervention (43%). Death occurred in 21% but only 10% were attributable to TMD (intervention vs observation patients: 13/14 vs 1/15 because of TMD). Among those solely observed, peripheral blasts and all other TMD symptoms cleared at a median of 36 and 49 days from diagnosis, respectively. On the basis of the diagnostic clinical findings of hepatomegaly with or without life-threatening symptoms, 3 groups were identified with differing survival: low risk with neither finding (38%), intermediate risk with hepatomegaly alone (40%), and high risk with both (21%; overall survival: 92% ± 8%, 77% ± 12%, and 51% ± 19%, respectively; P ≤ .001). Among all, AML subsequently occurred in 16% at a median of 441 days (range, 118-1085 days). The trial is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00003593.

  2. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results.

  3. FITNET’s Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Is Ineffective and May Impede Natural Recovery in Adolescents with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatineh, Simin

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch Fatigue In Teenagers on the interNET (FITNET) study claimed that after 6 months, internet based cognitive behaviour therapy in adolescents with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), led to a 63% recovery rate compared to 8% after usual care, and that this was maintained at long term follow up (LTFU). Our reanalysis shows that their post-hoc definition of recovery included the severely ill, the unblinded trial had no adequate control group and it used lax selection criteria as well as outcomes assessed via questionnaires rather than objective outcomes, further contributing to exaggerated recovery figures. Their decision not to publish the actometer results might suggest that these did not back their recovery claims. Despite these bias creating methodological faults, the trial still found no significant difference in recovery rates (“~60%”) at LTFU, the trial’s primary goal. This is similar to or worse than the documented 54–94% spontaneous recovery rates within 3–4 years, suggesting that both FITNET and usual care (consisting of cognitive behaviour and graded exercise therapies) are ineffective and might even impede natural recovery in adolescents with ME/CFS. This has implications for the upcoming costly NHS FITNET trial which is a blueprint of the Dutch study, exposing it to similar biases. PMID:28800089

  4. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  5. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: Lysosomal trafficking regulator domains regulate exocytosis of lytic granules but not cytokine secretion by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Krzewska, Aleksandra; Wood, Stephanie M; Murakami, Yousuke; Nguyen, Victoria; Chiang, Samuel C C; Cullinane, Andrew R; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Gahl, William A; Coligan, John E; Introne, Wendy J; Bryceson, Yenan T; Krzewski, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare immunodeficiency with impaired cytotoxic lymphocyte function, mainly that of natural killer (NK) cells. Our understanding of NK cell function deficiency in patients with CHS and how LYST regulates lytic granule exocytosis is very limited. We sought to delineate cellular defects associated with LYST mutations responsible for the impaired NK cell function seen in patients with CHS. We analyzed NK cells from patients with CHS with missense mutations in the LYST ARM/HEAT (armadillo/huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and the yeast kinase TOR1) or BEACH (beige and Chediak-Higashi) domains. NK cells from patients with CHS displayed severely reduced cytotoxicity. Mutations in the ARM/HEAT domain led to a reduced number of perforin-containing granules, which were significantly increased in size but able to polarize to the immunologic synapse; however, they were unable to properly fuse with the plasma membrane. Mutations in the BEACH domain resulted in formation of normal or slightly enlarged granules that had markedly impaired polarization to the IS but could be exocytosed on reaching the immunologic synapse. Perforin-containing granules in NK cells from patients with CHS did not acquire certain lysosomal markers (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1/2) but were positive for markers of transport vesicles (cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor), late endosomes (Ras-associated binding protein 27a), and, to some extent, early endosomes (early endosome antigen 1), indicating a lack of integrity in the endolysosomal compartments. NK cells from patients with CHS had normal cytokine compartments and cytokine secretion. LYST is involved in regulation of multiple aspects of NK cell lytic activity, ranging from governance of lytic granule size to control of their polarization and exocytosis, as well as regulation of endolysosomal compartment identity

  6. Brain vascular changes in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Miwa-Saito, Naho; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Kubota, Masaya

    2012-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are caused by deficient nucleotide excision repair. CS is characterized by cachectic dwarfism, mental disability, microcephaly and progeria features. Neuropathological examination of CS patients reveals dysmyelination and basal ganglia calcification. In addition, arteriosclerosis in the brain and subdural hemorrhage have been reported in a few CS cases. Herein, we performed elastica van Gieson (EVG) staining and immunohistochemistry for collagen type IV, CD34 and aquaporin 4 to evaluate the brain vessels in autopsy cases of CS, XP group A (XP-A) and controls. Small arteries without arteriosclerosis in the subarachnoid space had increased in CS cases but not in either XP-A cases or controls. In addition, string vessels (twisted capillaries) in the cerebral white matter and increased density of CD34-immunoreactive vessels were observed in CS cases. Immunohistochemistry findings for aquaporin 4 indicated no pathological changes in either CS or XP-A cases. Hence, the increased subarachnoid artery space may have caused subdural hemorrhage. Since such vascular changes were not observed in XP-A cases, the increased density of vessels in CS cases was not caused by brain atrophy. Hence, brain vascular changes may be involved in neurological disturbances in CS. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  7. The neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch): a model for the study of human aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Ramírez, Nelson; Arboleda, Humberto

    2007-10-01

    The Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS) characterises a premature aging syndrome in which several features of human aging are apparent at birth therefore allowing their grouping as a neonatal progeroid condition. This differentiates WRS from other progeroid entities such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) in which characteristics of premature aging become apparent some time after birth. The etiology of WRS remains unknown. Some studies have observed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Several studies analysing telomere length and lamin A gene have not revealed any alterations. However, mutations in LMNA have been reported in several other atypical progeroid syndromes. Based on these observations, several hypothesis could be withdrawn concerning the etiology of WRS. The study of genes associated with lamin A metabolism, such as Zmpste24, and the metabolic pathways associated with insulin, such as protein kinase B or AKT, are of particular interest. We believe that WRS characteristics indicate that discovery of the gene and the metabolic pathway associated with this syndrome will most likely lead to new knowledge about the physiopathology of human aging.

  8. Relevance of a Hypersaline Sodium-Rich Naturally Sparkling Mineral Water to the Protection against Metabolic Syndrome Induction in Fructose-Fed Sprague-Dawley Rats: A Biochemical, Metabolic, and Redox Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidália Dionísio Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic Syndrome increases the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Increased fructose consumption and/or mineral deficiency have been associated with Metabolic Syndrome development. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 8 weeks consumption of a hypersaline sodium-rich naturally sparkling mineral water on 10% fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (Metabolic Syndrome animal model. The ingestion of the mineral water (rich in sodium bicarbonate and with higher potassium, calcium, and magnesium content than the tap water used as control reduced/prevented not only the fructose-induced increase of heart rate, plasma triacylglycerols, insulin and leptin levels, hepatic catalase activity, and organ weight to body weight ratios (for liver and both kidneys but also the decrease of hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity and oxidized glutathione content. This mineral-rich water seems to have potential to prevent Metabolic Syndrome induction by fructose. We hypothesize that its regular intake in the context of modern diets, which have a general acidic character interfering with mineral homeostasis and are poor in micronutrients, namely potassium, calcium, and magnesium, could add surplus value and attenuate imbalances, thus contributing to metabolic and redox health and, consequently, decreasing the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  9. Impaired calcium mobilization in natural killer cells from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients is associated with transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T; Johnston, S; Clarke, L; Smith, P; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S

    2017-02-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily 3 (TRPM3) ion channels play a role in calcium (Ca(2+) ) cell signalling. Reduced TRPM3 protein expression has been identified in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients. However, the significance of TRPM3 and association with intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization has yet to be determined. Fifteen CFS/ME patients (mean age 48·82 ± 9·83 years) and 25 healthy controls (mean age 39·2 ± 12·12 years) were examined. Isolated natural killer (NK) cells were labelled with fluorescent antibodies to determine TRPM3, CD107a and CD69 receptors on CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells and CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells. Ca(2+) flux and NK cytotoxicity activity was measured under various stimulants, including pregnenolone sulphate (PregS), thapsigargin (TG), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB) and ionomycin. Unstimulated CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells showed significantly reduced TRPM3 receptors in CFS/ME compared with healthy controls (HC). Ca(2+) flux showed no significant difference between groups. Moreover, PregS-stimulated CD56(bright) CD16(dim/-) NK cells showed a significant increase in Ca(2+) flux in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. By comparison, unstimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells showed no significant difference in both Ca(2+) flux and TRPM3 expression. PregS-stimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells increased TRPM3 expression significantly in CFS/ME, but this was not associated with a significant increase in Ca(2+) flux. Furthermore, TG-stimulated CD56(dim) CD16(+) NK cells increased K562 cell lysis prior to PregS stimulation in CFS/ME patients compared with HC. Differential expression of TRPM3 and Ca(2+) flux between NK cell subtypes may provide evidence for their role in the pathomechanism involving NK cell cytotoxicity activity in CFS/ME. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  10. Natural killer cells and single nucleotide polymorphisms of specific ion channels and receptor genes in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Huth, Teilah; Chacko, Anu; Johnston, Samantha; Smith, Pete; Staines, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine natural killer (NK) cytotoxic activity and if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotypes in transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels and acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) were present in isolated NK cells from previously identified myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients. A total of 39 ME/CFS patients (51.69±2 years old) and 30 unfatigued controls (47.60±2.39 years old) were included in this study. Patients were defined according to the 1994 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Flow cytometry protocols were used to examine NK cytotoxic activity. A total of 678 SNPs from isolated NK cells were examined for 21 mammalian TRP ion channel genes and for nine mammalian AChR genes via the Agena Bioscience iPlex Gold assay. SNP association and genotype was determined using analysis of variance and Plink software. ME/CFS patients had a significant reduction in NK percentage lysis of target cells (17%±4.68%) compared with the unfatigued control group (31%±6.78%). Of the 678 SNPs examined, eleven SNPs for TRP ion channel genes (TRPC4, TRPC2, TRPM3, and TRPM8) were identified in the ME/CFS group. Five of these SNPs were associated with TRPM3, while the remainder were associated with TRPM8, TRPC2, and TRPC4 (Pgenes: six with CHRNA3, while the remainder were associated with CHRNA2, CHRNB4, CHRNA5, and CHRNE (P<0.05). There were sixteen genotypes identified from SNPs in TRP ion channels and AChRs for TRPM3 (n=5), TRPM8 (n=2), TRPC4 (n=3), TRPC2 (n=1), CHRNE (n=1), CHRNA2 (n=2), CHRNA3 (n=1), and CHRNB4 (n=1) (P<0.05). We identified a number of SNPs and genotypes for TRP ion channels and AChRs from isolated NK cells in patients with ME/CFS, suggesting these SNPs and genotypes may be involved in changes in NK cell function and the development of ME/CFS pathology. These anomalies suggest a role for dysregulation of Ca(2+) in AChR and TRP ion channel signaling in the pathomechanism

  11. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, ...

  12. Moyamoya Syndrome: A Window of Moyamoya Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya-like vasculopathy develops in association with various systemic diseases and conditions, which is termed moyamoya syndrome. Relatively common diseases and conditions are related to moyamoya syndrome, including neurofibromatosis type 1, Down syndrome, thyroid disease, and cranial irradiation. Moyamoya syndrome shares phenotypical characteristics with idiopathic moyamoya disease. However, they differ in other details, including clinical presentations, natural history, and treatment con...

  13. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  14. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  15. Treatment in Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occur after mild traumatic brain injury. These symptoms usually recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Persistent post-concussion symptoms could occur in 10% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints and the treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. The patient should be educated about the nature and outcome of the syndrome and reassured that almost all symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months. Multifaceted rehabilitation programs and cognitive behavioral therapy could be beneficial. Pharmacotherapy and somatic therapy are other options for persistent symptoms.

  16. Spectrum of Idiopathic Rolandic Epilepsy Syndromes and Behavioral Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), BCECTS Plus syndromes, Rolandic epilepsy-related syndromes, and idiopathic benign childhood epilepsy with occipital spikes (Panayiotopoulos syndrome) is reviewed by researchers at Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy.

  17. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ...

  18. Clinical, haematological and biochemical alterations in heat intolerance (panting) syndrome in Egyptian cattle following natural foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mohamed M; Abdel-Hamid, Omnia M

    2010-08-01

    Clinical signs of heat intolerance (panting) syndrome were observed in Holstein cows in a private farm in Egypt. There were heat intolerance (fever), panting, profuse salivation, hirsutism, lameness and reduced milk production. Blood and serum samples were collected from ten diseased cows and five apparently healthy cows as control. Serological tests confirmed the presence of non-structural protein of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) infection. There were significant reductions in the total red blood cell count with increased leucocytic and lymphocytic counts in diseased group compared to control. The serum Na, Cl, Ca, Mg, Zn and Fe were significantly reduced but P was increased in diseased animals compared to control. The total protein, albumin, cholesterol and cortisol were significantly reduced but the glucose and malonaldehyde were significantly increased in diseased cows. This was the first report in Egypt to describe the clinical and haemato-biochemical changes in panting syndrome following FMD.

  19. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Galant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD, Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD. We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  20. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-04-25

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  1. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A support group can be helpful for emotional support and for giving and receiving practical advice. The following organization provides additional information about Williams Syndrome: Williams Syndrome Association -- www.williams-syndrome.org

  2. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  3. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  4. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  5. Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Asperger Syndrome Information Page Asperger Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder. It is ...

  6. Cockayne syndrome: Clinical features, model systems and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties, leading to death by 12 years of age on average. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, with a prevalence of approximately 2.5 per million. There are several phenotypes (1-3) and two complementation groups (CSA and CSB), and CS overlaps with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). It has been considered a progeria, and many of the clinical features resemble accelerated aging. As such, the study of CS affords an opportunity to better understand the underlying mechanisms of aging. The molecular basis of CS has traditionally been ascribed to defects in transcription and transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER). However, recent work suggests that defects in base excision DNA repair and mitochondrial functions may also play key roles. This opens up the possibility for molecular interventions in CS, and by extrapolation, possibly in aging. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  8. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection associated with hemophagocytic syndrome and extra-nodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in an 18-year-old girl: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yawei; Yang, Junwen; Lian, Guanghui; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Li, Fujun

    2017-05-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) associated with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and extra-nodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL) is a rare life-threatening disorder. This disease is easily misdiagnosed because of its varied presentations. An 18-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with a history of edema in the lower limbs and intermittent fever lasting for more than 1 month. At admission, she had severe liver injury of unknown etiology. Laboratory test results revealed pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Results of serologic tests for EBV were positive. Results of a skin biopsy indicated EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and bone marrow aspiration revealed focal hemophagocytosis and atypical lymphoid cells. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the case as extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma-associated HPS (natural killer/T-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome), which is commonly induced by CAEBV. Treatment consisted of general management of hepatitis, supplemented with albumin and empirical antibiotic therapy. The patient died from massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage a week after she was discharged from the hospital. ENKL and HPS present with varied features and are generally fatal; therefore, clinicians should proceed with caution in suspected cases. HPS should be considered when the patient presents with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and liver failure. When HPS is suspected, clinicians should determine the underlying cause, such as severe infection, including infection with viruses such as EBV; genetic predisposition; or underlying malignancies, especially lymphoma because of its strong association with HPS.

  9. Seminar on Usher's Syndrome: Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester School for the Deaf, NY.

    Summarized are the presentation of M. Vernon and the Comments of primary panelists from a seminar on Usher's Syndrome, a genetic disease involving congenital deafness and progressive loss of vision due to retinitis pigmentosa. The following topics are addressed: genetics today, nature of Usher's Syndrome, symptoms, prevalence, lay diagnosis for…

  10. Biochemical Assessment of Bone Health in Working Obese Egyptian Females with Metabolic Syndrome; the Effect of Weight Loss by Natural Dietary Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha I.A. Moaty

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSION: These results confirm the benefit of doum in improving bone health parameter [25 (OH D/PTH axis] in the MetS patients, beside the MetS criteria. So, we can conclude that natural effective supplements lead towards the optimization of biochemical parameters in favor of a healthy outcome.

  11. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  12. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  13. Sensitization to Ficus benjamina: relationship to natural rubber latex allergy and identification of foods implicated in the Ficus-fruit syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, W; Focke, M; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    2004-08-01

    Ornamental Ficus benjamina (FB) has been recognized as a new indoor allergen. Little is known about the prevalence in moderately exposed subjects and the proposed association with fruit and Hevea latex hypersensitivity. To study the prevalence of FB sensitization and the relationship with Hevea latex allergy, to identify cross-reacting fruits, and to characterize the responsible allergens. A skin prick test solution prepared from FB latex (200 microg/mL) was included in our routine screening programme for suspect inhalant allergy. Patients reacting with the FB extract were further skin tested with exotic fruits by the prick-to-prick method. Inhibition of fig and FB CAP by FB latex, fig (Ficus carica), kiwi, the thiolproteases ficin and papain, Hevea latex and rHev b 6.02 (hevein) was performed in selected patients. Of 2662 patients with a positive skin test to any aeroallergen, 66 (2.5%) reacted with FB. Ten patients showed isolated sensitization to FB. Although FB-positive subjects were more often co-sensitized to Hevea latex than FB-negative (10.6% vs 3.8%, PFicus-fruit syndrome'). This cross-reactivity is mediated at least in part by thiolproteases.

  14. The Marfan syndrome genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Pungerčič

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue. It is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene encoding glycoprotein fibrillin-1, a component of microfibrils of extracellular matrix. Patients with Marfan syndrome show wide spectra of clinical signs, primarily on skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular organ systems. Cardiovascular complications (especially aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection are the most common cause of mortality of Marfan syndrome patients. Discovering genotype-phenotype correlations is complicated because of the large number of mutations reported as well as clinical heterogeneity among individuals with the same mutation. Despite the progress in the knowledge of the molecular nature of Marfan syndrome the diagnosis is still based mainly on the clinical features in the different body systems.Conclusions: Early identification of patient with Marfan syndrome is of considerable importance because of appropriate treatment that can greatly improve life expectancy. Unfortunately, despite the improvement of diagnostic methods, medical and surgical therapy, the mortality due to undiagnosed Marfan syndrome is still high. The present article reviews the molecular genetic studies of Marfan syndrome since the discovery of the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene.

  15. Postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Chapman, Kristine; Traboulsee, Anthony

    2011-10-01

    Although postvaccination Guillain-Barré syndrome is commonly reported, there have only been 2 previously reported cases of postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome, and none in association with the novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine. To describe a case of Miller Fisher syndrome following receipt of the seasonal influenza and novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine. Case report and literature review. Vancouver General Hospital. A 77-year-old Chinese woman. The patient presented with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, areflexia, and a sensory neuropathy within 2 weeks of immunization. Findings of parainfectious evaluation were unremarkable. Treatment with 2 courses of intravenous immunoglobulin led to clinical improvement. Her presentation and natural history of disease were similar to the 2 previously published cases. We present the third case of postvaccination Miller Fisher syndrome in the literature and the first associated with the novel influenza A(H1N1) vaccine.

  16. Cardio Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, physicians have recognized that the kidney and the heart are related especially when there is severe dysfunction of either of them. Dysfunction of one of these organs seldom occurs in isolation. Of late the cardio renal syndrome is assuming significance because of its increasing incidence, awareness and complications. There is no definite definition of the cardio renal syndrome. However, an attempted definition states that it is a "decline in renal function in the setting of advanced heart failure". This definition does not cover the whole gamut of the cardio renal syndrome. Cardiac diseases are associated independently with a decrease in renal function and progression of existing renal disease. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and outcome. This bidirectional nature of cardiac and renal interaction is called Cardio Renal Syndrome (CRS.

  17. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  18. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ...

  19. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  20. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  1. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  2. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ...

  3. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criton S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a hamartomatous disorder characterised by focal overgrowths that can involve any structure of the body. An eleven-year-old girl with Proteus syndrome has been described with clitoromegaly.

  4. Overlap syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Rust, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In hepatology, the term overlap syndrome describes variant forms of the major hepatobiliary autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic

  5. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  6. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  7. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  8. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  9. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  10. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  11. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Many people with Alport syndrome also have hearing problems and abnormalities with their eyes. Other signs and ... and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, hearing and vision problems tend to be more common in males than ...

  12. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ...

  13. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  14. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  15. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  16. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Preferred Language Guide Down Syndrome Facts Down ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Facts Preferred Language Guide Publications ...

  17. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Usher Syndrome > Facts About Usher Syndrome Facts About Usher Syndrome This information was developed by the National Eye ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Usher Syndrome Defined What is Usher syndrome? Usher syndrome is ...

  18. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  19. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study

  20. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  1. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much saturated fat, and does not get enough physical activity may develop metabolic syndrome. Other causes include insulin resistance and a family ... you’re overweight. It also includes getting more physical activity and eating a ... syndrome treatment If you already have metabolic syndrome, making ...

  2. Goodpasture Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessary. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition Eating, diet, and nutrition have not been shown to play a role in causing or preventing Goodpasture syndrome. Points to Remember Goodpasture syndrome is a pulmonary-renal syndrome, which is a group of acute illnesses ...

  3. [Reye's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, I

    2000-11-01

    A nationwide survey on Reye's syndrome(RS) was described. And problems between RS and influenza virus such as etiology, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and epidemiology were reviewed. So-called aspirin issue on RS was re-evaluated according to recent advance of RS research. Finally future aspect of Reye's syndrome was also discussed.

  4. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Reye's Syndrome Information Page Reye's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? Much ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Reye's Syndrome × What research is being done? Much of the ...

  5. [Cardiorenal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleck, D; John, S

    2017-09-13

    Patients in the intensive care unit often suffer from cardiorenal syndrome, which can have an important influence on the patient's outcome. The heart and kidney influence each other via organ crosstalk. We screened and evaluated current publications on cardiorenal syndromes and their therapy. A key role in the management of cardiorenal syndromes is renal decongestion via loop diuretics.

  6. Nature of fatty acids in high fat diets differentially delineates obesity-linked metabolic syndrome components in male and female C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Akoum Souhad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse effects of high-fat diets (HFD on metabolic homeostasis are linked to adipose tissue dysfunction. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of the HFD nature on adipose tissue activity, metabolic disturbances and glucose homeostasis alterations in male mice compared with female mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were fed either a chow diet or HFD including vegetal (VD or animal (AD fat. Body weight, plasmatic parameters and adipose tissue mRNA expression levels of key genes were evaluated after 20 weeks of HFD feeding. Results HFD-fed mice were significantly heavier than control at the end of the protocol. Greater abdominal visceral fat accumulation was observed in mice fed with AD compared to those fed a chow diet or VD. Correlated with weight gain, leptin levels in systemic circulation were increased in HFD-fed mice in both sexes with a significant higher level in AD group compared to VD group. Circulating adiponectin levels as well as adipose tissue mRNA expression levels were significantly decreased in HFD-fed male mice. Although its plasma levels remained unchanged in females, adiponectin mRNA levels were significantly reduced in adipose tissue of both HFD-fed groups with a more marked decrease in AD group compared to VD group. Only HFD-fed male mice were diabetic with increased fasting glycaemia. On the other hand, insulin levels were only increased in AD-fed group in both sexes associated with increased resistin levels. VD did not induce any apparent metabolic alteration in females despite the increased weight gain. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma-2 (PPARγ2 and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα mRNA expression levels in adipose tissue were decreased up to 70% in HFD-fed mice but were more markedly reduced in male mice as compared with female mice. Conclusions The nature of dietary fat determines the extent of metabolic alterations reflected in adipocytes through modifications in the pattern of

  7. A cohort of 17 patients with kyphoscoliotic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14: expansion of the clinical and mutational spectrum and description of the natural history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Cecilia; Baumann, Matthias; Fauth, Christine; Lindert, Uschi; Abdalla, Ebtesam M; Brady, Angela F; Collins, James; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Donkervoort, Sandra; Ghali, Neeti; Johnson, Diana S; Kariminejad, Ariana; Koch, Johannes; Kraenzlin, Marius; Lahiri, Nayana; Lozic, Bernarda; Manzur, Adnan Y; Morton, Jenny E V; Pilch, Jacek; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Schreiber, Gudrun; Shannon, Nora L; Sobey, Glenda; Vandersteen, Anthony; van Dijk, Fleur S; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Zschocke, Johannes; Pope, F Michael; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Rohrbach, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose In 2012 we reported in six individuals a clinical condition almost indistinguishable from PLOD1-kyphoscoliotic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (PLOD1-kEDS), caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14, and characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss in addition to connective tissue abnormalities such as joint hypermobility and hyperelastic skin. FKBP14 is an ER-resident protein belonging to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerases (PPIases); it catalyzes the folding of type III collagen and interacts with type III, type VI, and type X collagens. Only nine affected individuals have been reported to date. Methods We report on a cohort of 17 individuals with FKBP14-kEDS and the follow-up of three previously reported patients, and provide an extensive overview of the disorder and its natural history based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetics data. Results Based on the frequency of the clinical features of 23 patients from the present and previous cohorts, we define major and minor features of FKBP14-kEDS. We show that myopathy is confirmed by histology and muscle imaging only in some patients, and that hearing impairment is predominantly sensorineural and may not be present in all individuals. Conclusion Our data further support the extensive clinical overlap with PLOD1-kEDS and show that vascular complications are rare manifestations of FKBP14-kEDS. PMID:28617417

  8. Natural Childbirth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold, ice Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Natural Childbirth KidsHealth > For Parents > Natural Childbirth Print A A ... the pain, extremely empowering and rewarding. About Natural Childbirth Natural childbirth is a "low-tech" way of ...

  9. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Makwana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Moyamoya disease is a disorder of blood vessels in the brain, specifically the internal carotid arteries and the arteries that branch from them. The primary idiopathic form “moyamoya disease” has been distinguished from an associated form of “moyamoya syndrome,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease, fibromuscular dysplasia, activated protein C resistance, or head trauma. There have been only 47 previous cases of moyamoya syndrome in association with Down syndrome reported in the world literature. Recently, we have come across a Case of Downs’ Syndrome with Moyamoya Syndrome. Because of its rarity we want to report our case.

  10. METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dikanović, Marinko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders that include hyperlipidemia, inadequate insulin resistance, hypertension, and abdominal type obesity. Patients who suffer from this syndrome have an increased risk for heart disease and blood vessel disease, stroke and type II diabetes. The world's leading healthcare institutions also disagree on the exact definition of this organization poremećaja. NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program) defines metabolic syndrome as a situation in which the...

  11. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  12. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  13. [Caroli's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Qiu, Zheng-Qing; Wei, Min

    2009-01-01

    Caroli's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease. Here a case of Caroli's syndrome associated with medullary sponge kidney was reported. The patient was a 2-years and 10 months-old boy. He presented with hepatosplenomegaly. Fever, abdominal pain or jaundice was not found. The imaging examination showed intrahepatic bile duct dilation, splenomegaly, medullary sponge kidney and nephrocalcinosis. After introduction of the case, this paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of Caroli's syndrome.

  14. Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS Myotonia Congenita Information Page NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Congenital ...

  15. [Cardiorenal syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Késöi, István; Sági, Balázs; Vas, Tibor; Pintér, Tünde; Kovács, Tibor; Wittmann, István; Nagy, Judit

    2011-09-18

    Cardiac and kidney diseases are very common, and increasingly coexist. Classification for cardiorenal syndrome and for its specific subtypes has been developed and published recently by a consensus group of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative. Cardiorenal syndromes have been classified according to whether the impairment of each organ is primary, secondary or whether heart and kidney dysfunction occurs simultaneously as a systemic disease. The different syndromes were classified into five subtypes. Type-1: acute cardiorenal syndrome: an abrupt worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-2: chronic cardiorenal syndrome: chronic abnormalities in cardiac function causing kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-3: acute renocardiac syndrome: abrupt worsening of kidney function leading to heart injury and/or dysfunction. Type-4: chronic renocardiac syndrome: chronic kidney diseases leading to heart injury, disease and/or dysfunction. Type-5: secondary cardiorenal syndrome: acute or chronic systemic diseases leading to simultaneous injury and/or dysfunction of heart and kidney. The identification of patients and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying each syndrome subtype will help cardiologists, nephrologists and physicians working on intensive care units to characterize groups of their patients with cardiac and renal impairment and to provide a more accurate treatment for them.

  16. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  17. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  18. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  19. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Manohar MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever.

  20. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  2. Urologic manifestations of postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, V Y; Hubbard, D; Vordermark, J S

    1996-07-01

    To determine the character and prevalence of bladder dysfunction among persons with a history of polio, we conducted a survey of randomly selected polio survivors. The survey solicited information on the acute episode of polio and the nature of late-onset neurologic symptoms that could be attributed to postpolio syndrome. There were 242 female and 88 male respondents to the study. Symptoms attributable to postpolio syndrome were present in 87.2% of female subjects and 73.9% of male subjects. Respondents with postpolio syndrome had a significantly greater prevalence of urologic symptoms than seen among respondents without postpolio syndrome, although no dominant pattern of voiding dysfunction was noted. The early onset of erectile dysfunction was more common among male subjects with postpolio syndrome than among male subjects without postpolio syndrome. Genuine stress incontinence was seen in 36.3% of the survey population. Sixteen women with postpolio syndrome underwent surgical repair for urinary incontinence, with a success rate of 60.5%. Bladder disorders are common among persons with PPS, but further clinical and urodynamic data are necessary to define the nature and magnitude of this dysfunction.

  3. [Effect of 5 warm-hot nature Chinese drugs for promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis on 5-HT, NE, and endocrine hormones of rats of cold coagulation and blood stasis syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Fu, Xian-Jun; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Zhen-Guo

    2014-11-01

    To study the mechanism of warm-hot nature Chinese drugs (WHNCD) for promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis (PBCRBS) for intervening model rats of cold coagulation and blood stasis syndrome (CCBSS). CCBSS rat model was set up in outbred SD rats using ice water immersion method. Totally 300 successfully modeled CCBSS rats were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the principle of balance weight, 60 in each group. Contents of triothyrone (T3), tetraiodothyroine (T4), progesterone (P), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and noradrenalin (NE) were paralleledly detected in all groups. Then rats in each group were subdivided into 6 subgroups as the model group, the curcuma group, the Ligsticum Chuanxiong group, the safflower group, the Rhizoma Corydalis group, and the Olibanumg group. Besides, 5 normal control groups were set up for 5 indices, 50 rats in total. We need 70 rats (7 groups) to finish observing 1 index, 350 rats in total for 5 indices. Except those in the model group and the normal control group, rats were administered with corresponding decoction at 20 g crude drugs/kg body weight by gastrogavage, 3 mL each time, once daily for 7 successive days. Equal volume of normal saline was given to rats in the normal control group and the model group. Contents of T3, T4, P, 5-HT, and NE were detected before treatment and 1 week after treatment. Compared with before treatment in the same group, T3 increased in the Ligsticum Chuanxiong group and the Olibanumg group, 5-HT increased in the Ligsticum Chuanxiong group, T4, NE, and P increased in all medicated groups (P model group decreased (P model group, contents of T3, T4, 5-HT, and NE increased in each medicated group (P modeled rats of CCBSS. They could promote the thyroid gland-gonadal axis function, enhance the function of the endocrine system, which might be one of the pharmacodynamic mechanism of WHNCD for PBCRBS in intervening CCBSS.

  4. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner; Özge Keleş; Nevzat Uzuner

    2016-01-01

    Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual fie...

  5. Natural Course of Neonatal Progeroid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: Increased chromosomal breakage and the presence of basal ganglia calcification after early childhood suggest that DNA repair defects are involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. This rare disorder represents a complex of symptoms with unknown cause and pathogenesis, and more than one disease may account for the clinical variability of NPS.

  6. Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, E D; Zimmerman, A W; Grunnet, M L; Lewis, R A; Spackman, T J

    1982-12-01

    The diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome was established with the aid of cranial computed tomography (CT) in a child with growth deficiency, mental retardation, and neurologic findings which are typical for this rare childhood disorder. Calcification of basal ganglia and hydrocephalus ex vacuo are neuropathologic characteristics of Cockayne syndrome which may be present on CT as early as 3 years of age.

  7. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  8. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  10. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or nonvasospastic angina secondary ... to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral ... a likely diagnosis and blood was sent for.

  11. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  12. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  13. Marshall's syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Elisa; de Almeida, Ana Paula Moura; Souza, Gabriela Maria Assis de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Marshall´s syndrome is a form of acquired cutis laxa without systemic involvement, which is preceded by an inflammatory dermatitis with a neutrophilic component. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy with clinical and histopathological features of this syndrome. The etiology remains unknown and there is no definitive treatment. PMID:23739715

  14. Moyamoya Syndrome: A Window of Moyamoya Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya-like vasculopathy develops in association with various systemic diseases and conditions, which is termed moyamoya syndrome. Relatively common diseases and conditions are related to moyamoya syndrome, including neurofibromatosis type 1, Down syndrome, thyroid disease, and cranial irradiation. Moyamoya syndrome shares phenotypical characteristics with idiopathic moyamoya disease. However, they differ in other details, including clinical presentations, natural history, and treatment considerations. The study of moyamoya syndrome can provide clinicians and researchers with valuable knowledge and insight. Although it is infrequently encountered in clinical practice, moyamoya-like vasculopathy can severely complicate outcomes for patients with various underlying diseases when the clinician fails to expect or diagnose moyamoya syndrome development. Furthermore, moyamoya syndrome could be used as a doorway to more enigmatic moyamoya disease in research. More comprehensive survey and investigation are required to uncover the secrets of all the moyamoya-like phenomena. PMID:26180607

  15. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Olivier

    2002-05-01

    CREST syndrome has been described as a form of progressive systemic sclerosis in which there is relatively limited involvement of the skin, prominence of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction and telangiectasia. The acronym CREST was coined in 1964 by Winterbauer in the USA but the very first case report was by French physicians Thibierge and Weissenbach in 1910. Antinuclear antibodies recognizing chromosomal centromere proteins are characteristic of CREST syndrome and are present in more than 50% of the cases. The prognosis of CREST syndrome is relatively good with a long lasting disease duration (>10 years). Two complications are seldom associated with CREST syndrome: digital gangrene with finger losses and pulmonary hypertension (3 to 14% of CREST syndrome). Pulmonary hypertension is a very late event and the prognosis is very severe (mortality rate of 50% after 2 years).

  17. [Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-15

    In this study we report on the different genetic syndromes in which autism has been described as one of the possible manifestations. Certain genetic syndromes are providing us with extremely valuable information about the role played by genetics in autism. This is the case of the following syndromes: Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, 15q11-q13 duplication, fragile X syndrome, fragile X premutation, deletion of chromosome 2q, XYY syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Apert syndrome, mutations in the ARX gene, De Lange syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome, Williams syndrome, Rett syndrome, Noonan syndrome, Down syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Steinert disease, tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Lujan-Fryns syndrome, Moebius syndrome, hypomelanosis of Ito, neurofibromatosis type 1, CHARGE syndrome and HEADD syndrome.

  18. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  19. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...... a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  20. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  1. Novel identification and characterisation of Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channels on Natural Killer cells and B lymphocytes: effects on cell signalling in Chronic fatigue syndrome/Myalgic encephalomyelitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T; Staines, D; Nilius, B; Smith, P; Marshall-Gradisnik, S

    2016-05-31

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) cation channels are ubiquitously expressed by multiple cells and have an important regulatory role in calcium-dependent cell signalling to help maintain cellular homeostasis. TRPM3 protein expression has yet to be determined on Natural Killer (NK) cells and B lymphocytes. Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported in TRPM3 genes from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, NK and B cells in Chronic fatigue syndrome/Myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients and have been proposed to correlate with illness presentation. The object of the study was to assess TRPM3 surface expression on NK and B lymphocytes from healthy controls, followed by a comparative investigation examining TRPM3 surface expression, and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium influx in CD19(+) B cells, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) cell populations from CFS/ME patients. TRPM3 cell surface expression was identified for NK and B lymphocytes in healthy controls (CD56(bright) TRPM3 35.72 % ± 7.37; CD56(dim) 5.74 % ± 2.00; B lymphocytes 2.05 % ± 0.19, respectively). There was a significant reduction of TRPM3 surface expression on CD19(+) B cells (1.56 ± 0.191) and CD56(bright) NK cells (17.37 % ± 5.34) in CFS/ME compared with healthy controls. Anti-CD21 and anti-IgM conjugated biotin was cross-linked with streptavidin,and subsequently treatment with thapsigargin. This showed a significant reduction in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentration in CD19(+) B lymphocytes. CD56(bright) NK cells also had a significant decrease in cytoplasmic calcium in the presence of 2-APB and thapsigargin in CFS/ME patients. The results from this preliminary investigation identify, for the first time, TRPM3 surface expression on both NK and B lymphocytes in healthy controls. We also report for the first time, significant reduction in TRPM3 cell surface expression in NK and B lymphocytes, as well as decreased intracellular calcium within

  2. ERK1/2, MEK1/2 and p38 downstream signalling molecules impaired in CD56 dim CD16+ and CD56 bright CD16 dim/- natural killer cells in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Teilah Kathryn; Staines, Donald; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya

    2016-04-21

    Natural Killer (NK) cell effector functions are dependent on phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway to produce an effective immune response for the clearance of target cells infected with viruses, bacteria or malignantly transformed cells. Intracellular signals activating NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxic activity are propagated through protein phosphorylation of MAPKs including MEK1/2, ERK1/2, p38 and JNK. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity is consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients and intracellular signalling by MAPK in NK cells remains to be investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to investigate MAPK downstream signalling molecules in NK cell phenotypes from CFS/ME patients. Flow cytometric protocols were used to measure phosphorylation of the MAPK pathway in CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) and CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells following stimulation with K562 tumour cells or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate plus ionomycin. NK cell cytotoxic activity, degranulation, lytic proteins and cytokine production were also measured as markers for CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) and CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cell function using flow cytometric protocols. CFS/ME patients (n = 14) had a significant decrease in ERK1/2 in CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells compared to the non-fatigued controls (n = 11) after incubation with K562 cells. CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) NK cells from CFS/ME patients had a significant increase in MEK1/2 and p38 following incubation with K562 cells. This is the first study to report significant differences in MAPK intracellular signalling molecules in CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) NK cells from CFS/ME patients. The current results highlight the importance of intracellular signalling through the MAPK pathway for synergistic effector function of CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) NK cells to ensure efficient clearance of target cells. In CFS/ME patients

  3. Callosal warning syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Johnston, William James; Jacob, P C; Arunodaya, G R

    2012-03-15

    To report the clinical and imaging findings in a patient with an initial fluctuating disconnection syndrome due to corpus callosal ischemia that ultimately culminated in infarction with persistent symptoms. A 40-year-old, hypertensive, right-handed man presented with transient, stereotyped symptoms of corpus callosal disconnection (intermanual conflict, apraxia, dysgraphia and construction difficulties in his left hand). Serial magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated the ischemic nature of the initial fluctuating symptoms and later showed callosal infarction when the symptoms were persistent. Magnetic resonance angiogram did not reveal significant stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid or proximal portion of anterior cerebral arteries. Patient received standard treatment for ischemic stroke and at follow-up 1 month later, had mild left hand apraxia, dysgraphia and construction difficulties. The case highlights the unusual occurrence of crescendo transient ischemic attacks culminating in infarction in the location of corpus callosum. We have termed this novel stroke syndrome as 'callosal warning syndrome' as the temporal profile was quite indistinguishable from that of relatively well-known stroke warning syndromes in the location of internal capsule and pontine tegmentum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Allen Wilcox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  5. Moebius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1990-01-01

    Brain stem calcification on CT scan, suggesting prenatal brain stem ischemia, is reported in an infant with Moebius syndrome examined in the Department of Pediatrics and Neonatal Medicine, State University of Gent, Gent, Belgium.

  6. Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the set located behind your jaw and in front of your ears Skin rashes or dry skin Vaginal dryness Persistent dry cough Prolonged fatigue Causes Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder. Your immune system mistakenly ...

  7. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Genetic Brain Disorders Show More Show Less ... Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of ...

  8. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  9. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  10. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a ... medicine to treat an inflammatory disease leads to Cushing's. Some kinds of tumors produce a hormone that ...

  11. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drawings. Frequently, there is also an impairment in reading. Children with a high level of intellectual functioning as well as those with brain damage may be affected with the disorder. × Definition Gerstmann's syndrome is a cognitive impairment that results ...

  12. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Paraneoplastic Syndromes Information ...

  13. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information ...

  14. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormone. People suffering from depression, alcoholism, malnutrition, or panic disorders also have increased cortisol levels. When the ... five times more often than men. Ectopic ACTH Syndrome Some benign or, more often, cancerous tumors that ...

  15. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Diarrhea Reye's syndrome Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a focal brain lesion (damage contained to one area of the brain) surgery may be beneficial. Other therapies are ... Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page ...

  17. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  18. Klinefelter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility is the most common symptom of Klinefelter syndrome. Symptoms may include any of the following: Abnormal body proportions (long legs, short trunk, shoulder equal to hip size) Abnormally large breasts ( gynecomastia ) ...

  19. Angelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the gene Other tests may include: Brain MRI EEG Treatment There is no cure for Angelman syndrome. ... nih.gov/pubmed/20301323 . Accessed August 1, 2015. Review Date 8/1/2015 Updated by: Chad Haldeman- ...

  20. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  1. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programs can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  2. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether you have Marfan syndrome. Medical and Family Histories Your doctor will ask about your medical history ... and football. You also may need to avoid sports that involve physical contact with other players or ...

  3. Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may cause problems with chewing Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Exams and Tests A doctor can often make ... those with Down syndrome to: Be taught about pregnancy and taking the proper precautions Learn to advocate ...

  4. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an increased risk of an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) due to the autoimmune disorder Hashimoto's thyroiditis. They also have an increased risk of diabetes. Some women with Turner syndrome have gluten intolerance (celiac disease) or inflammatory bowel disease. Skeletal ...

  5. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  6. Horner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether treatment of the cause is successful. Possible Complications There are no direct complications of Horner syndrome ... Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  7. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord ... basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects ...

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barré Syndrome Information Page Headache Information Page Hemicrania Continua Information Page Hemifacial Spasm Information Page Hereditary Spastic ... the Spotlight Find NINDS Clinical Trials Patient & Caregiver Education Fact Sheets Hope Through Research Know Your Brain ...

  9. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  10. Goldenhar Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fariba Tarhani

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Goldenhar Syndrome is a congenital abnormally which manly affects face, but another organs involvement should be considered .Cardiac problems are the main causes of death in these patients.

  11. Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nand Lal

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease of complex clinical phenotype that usually presents in early childhood. Characteristically the child presents with delayed milestones, growth and mental retardation associated with typical facies, photosensitivity, retinitis pigmentosa, deafness and ataxia. The various features are attributed to abnormal transcription rather than abnormal repair of photodamaged DNA. Based on clinical criteria a classical case of Cockayne syndrome in a 7 year old girl is described.

  12. Reye's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolmson, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses Reye's syndrome and the hypotheses relating to its causes and associating its incidence with that of chickenpox and influenza A and B. The recent decline in the incidence of Reye's syndrome appears to be related to the reduced use of Aspirin in children and adolescents. Although evidence so far is circumstantial, North American P(a)ediatric Associations have indicated that Aspirin should not be used to control fever in children who have viral infections but es...

  13. Binder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chummun, Shaheel; McLean, N R; Nugent, M; Anderson, P J; David, David J

    2012-07-01

    Patients with chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) usually present with Binder-type features, and often CDP is misdiagnosed as Binder syndrome. This study reviewed the management and outcome of patients with Binder syndrome and CDP in a multidisciplinary setting. The notes and radiographs of the patients managed at the Australian Craniofacial Unit with a multidisciplinary setting since 1976 were reviewed, and data were collected on patient demographics, associated medical and surgical problems, subsequent management, and complications. Seventy-seven patients were treated over the 30-year period (5 patients were lost to follow-up); of the remaining 72 patients, 60 (83%) had Binder syndrome, and 12 (17%) were patients with CDP. Forty were males, and 32 were females, with an age range of 6 months to 47 years. Thirteen patients (18%) had a strong family history, and 65 patients (90%) have so far undergone surgical correction, and of those, 35 (54%) have completed their treatment, the longest follow-up time being 18 years. The mean number of surgical procedures was 2.4, and 18 patients (28%) had postoperative complications, which included partial necrosis of the maxilla, osteomyelitis of the mandible, facial nerve and inferior alveolar nerve neuropraxia, nasal bone graft exposure, and cellulitis. Because of the phenotypic characteristics shared by both Binder syndrome and CDP, it is most likely that Binder syndrome is not a syndrome, nor is it an entity, but most likely to be an "association." We would advocate that these patients should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting.

  14. Musculo-Skeletal Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Al Kaissi; Elisabeth Zwettler; Rudolf Ganger; Simone Schreiner; Klaus Klaushofer; Franz Grill

    2013-01-01

    Background A leptosomic body type is tall and thin with long hands. Marfanoid features may be familial in nature or pathological, as occurs in congenital contractual arachnodactyly (Beal?s syndrome) and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome mimicking some of the changes of Marfan syndrome, although not accompanied by luxation of lens and dissecting aneurysm of aorta. Methods In this article we collected eight patients who were consistent with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome via phenotypic and genotyp...

  15. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Likelihood of Having a Child with Down Syndrome? Down syndrome occurs in people of all races and ... care and treatment of babies born with Down syndrome. Does Down Syndrome Run in Families? All 3 types of ...

  16. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation CLICK HERE to watch Dr. Leslie ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  17. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  18. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  19. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  20. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  1. Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can I get more information? What is Rett syndrome? Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmenal disorder that affects girls ... as “asymptomatic female carriers.” top Who gets Rett syndrome? Rett syndrome is estimated to affect one in every ...

  2. Rett Syndrome: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Rett Syndrome Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder ... ultimately reverse the disorder's effects. Common Names Rett syndrome Rett disorder RTT Medical or Scientific Names Autism-dementia- ...

  3. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skating Living With Stepparents Be a Green Kid Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  4. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual field rather than blindness in neurologic examination of the patient. He had simultanagnosia, optic ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. There are multiple infarcts in bilaterally occipital and parietal regions in the patient’s cerebral MRI. In this case, we have present a rare disorder of the Balint’s syndrome.

  5. PLURALIZING NATURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    not necessary mean planning for a one common nature. As exemplified by the River Aire Re-naturalization Project (2002-2015), landscape architecture might provide an alternative approach to nature restoration that is more site specific and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. In the presentation...

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms...

  7. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  8. The epidemiology of premature aging and associated comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppedè F

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fabio Coppedè Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Hutchinson–Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Werner syndrome, also known as childhood- and adulthood-progeria, respectively, represent two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases with clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age. The discovery of their genetic basis has led to the identification of several gene mutations leading to a spectrum of progeroid phenotypes ranging from moderate and mild–severe to very aggressive forms. In parallel, the creation of disease registers and databases provided available data for the design of relatively large-scale epidemiological studies, thereby allowing a better understanding of the nature and frequency of the premature aging-associated signs and symptoms. The aim of this article is to review the most recent findings concerning the epidemiology of premature aging disorders, their genetic basis, and the most recent reports on the frequency of associated diseases. Keywords: Hutchinson–Gilford Progeria Syndrome, Werner syndrome, premature aging disorders, epidemiology, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, atherosclerosis, genetics, sign and symptoms

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  10. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S C

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  11. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  13. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  14. Cardiorenal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) have been subclassified as five defined entities which represent clinical circumstances in which both the heart and the kidney are involved in a bidirectional injury and dysfunction via a final common pathway of cell-to-cell death and accelerated apoptosis mediated by oxidative stress. Types 1 and 2 involve acute and chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) scenarios leading to acute kidney injury or accelerated chronic kidney disease. Types 2 and 3 describe acute and chronic kidney disease leading primarily to heart failure, although it is possible that acute coronary syndromes, stroke, and arrhythmias could be CVD outcomes in these forms of CRS. Finally, CRS type 5 describes a simultaneous insult to both heart and kidneys, such as sepsis, where both organs are injured simultaneously. Both blood and urine biomarkers are reviewed in this paper and offer a considerable opportunity to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiology and known epidemiology of these recently defined syndromes. PMID:21286212

  15. Dressler Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dressler Syndrome (DS is a febrile illness secondary to an inflammatory reaction involving the pleura and pericardium. It is more common in patients who have undergone surgery that involves opening the pericardium. However, DS has also been described following myocardial infarction and as an unusual complication after percutaneous procedures such as coronary stent implantation, after implantation of epicardial pacemaker leads and transvenous pacemaker leads, and following blunt trauma, stab wounds, and heart puncture. Pericardial effusions often accompany the syndrome and may develop into early or late postoperative cardiac tamponade and even recurrent cardiac tamponade. The syndrome is also characterized by pericardial or pleuritic pain, pleural effusions, pneumonitis, and abnormal ECG and radiography findings.

  16. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  17. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  18. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  19. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  20. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  1. [Terson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielska, Agnieszka; Czarnecki, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The syndrome of intra-vitreous bleeding in association with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was first describe by French ophthalmologist Albert Terson in 1900. In last 10 years only a few cases were recorded. Early recognition of TS is of high importance, since diminution of visual acuity even to functional blindness, can hamper the rehabilitative process. The treatment methods are various, based on clinical manifestation. The surgical procedure of choice is the pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The importance of being aware of the syndrome is very crucial, both in order to provide the adequate nursing care and to be able to perform early vitrectomy, to restore the visual function.

  2. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  3. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  4. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  5. Dissonant Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2013-01-01

    Nature restoration is far from being a neural undertaking. Just like any other type of heritage production it can be the source of dissonance – ‘our’ nature is not necessary ‘their’ nature. Often this dissonance is managed in ways, which are not particular sensitive to site-specificity. As exempl...... and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. Evidence can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015), a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... older adults. The signs and symptoms of Costello syndrome overlap significantly with those of two other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, ...

  7. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J. C.; van Engelen, K.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B. C.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  8. Matematica Natural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  9. Framing nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis is about communication concerning nature in the Netherlands. The purpose of this exploratory study is to take both a theoretical and an empirical look at whether (implicit) religious elements play a role in this communication about nature in the Netherlands.   In this PhD thesis

  10. Natur formet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011.......Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011....

  11. Sotos syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    A Juneja; Sultan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications...

  12. Cowden syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Chermi, Zied Mohamed; Marrekchi, Slaheddine; Raida, Ben Salah; Boudaya, Sonia; Mseddi, Madiha; Jalel, Meziou Taha; Turki, Hamida

    2011-03-26

    Cowden syndrome is a rare genodermatosis charactarized by presence of multiple hamartomas. The aim of the study was to specify the clinical, therapeutic and prognostic aspects of Cowden syndrome. Our study included 4 patients with Cowden syndrome, 2 males and 2 females between 14 and 46 years old. Clinical examination of the skin revealed facials papules (4 cases), acral keratosis (1 case), translucent keratotic papules (2 cases). Oral examination revealed papules (4 cases), papillomatosis (4 cases), gingival hypertrophy (4 cases) and scrotal tongue (2 cases). Investigations revealed thyroid lesions (2 cases), fibrocystic disease and lipoma of the breast in 1 case, "glycogenic acanthosis" (1 case), macrocephaly (2 cases), dysmorphic face (1 case) and lichen nitidus (1 case). Oral etretinate and acitretine were temporary efficient in 2 patients. Topical treatment with tretinoin lotion resulted in some improvement in cutaneous, but not mucosal lesions in one patient. No cancer was revealed. The pathognomonic mucocutaneous lesions were found in all patients. However, no degenerative lesions have been revealed. A new association of Cowden syndrome with lichen nitidus was found. Treatment with oral retinoids was efficient on cutaneous lesions.

  13. kartagener's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    upper and lower respiratory tract infections such as sinusitis, otitis media and bronchiectasis (6). Males are generally infertile because of immotile sperms (8). In rare cases, no structural cilliary abnormalities are detectable even though cilliary function is abnormal and the clinical syndrome is typical (9). Some males have ...

  14. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe cardiovascular complications exemplifies the challenges faced in resource-limited countries towards making diagnosis and treatment of rare conditions. Elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans levels or a ...

  15. Ortner syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-02

    Feb 2, 2009 ... Division of Otolaryngology, University of Cape Town. L J Zühlke, MB ChB, DCH, FCPaed, Cert in Paed Card. Department of Paediatric Cardiology, University of Cape Town and Red Cross Children's Hospital, Cape Town. 170 SAJCH DECEMBER 2008 VOL. 2 NO. 4. CASE REPORT. Ortner syndrome, or ...

  16. Kostmann Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has shown promise in the treatment of non-responders. About 60-80% of. SCN cases are associated with constitutive mutations in one copy of the gene encoding neutrophil elastase ELA2. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. (MDS/AML) have been ...

  17. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Gorlin syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these patients are hypersensitive to radiation and prone to develop multiple malignancies. Patients can ... maxillofacial surgeons, radiation oncologists and dermatologists, and it will be to the benefit of the patient with this syndrome for these specialists ... grandmother had been diagnosed with breast cancer, and there was.

  19. Hunter syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dermatan et sulfate d'heparin. L'accumulation de l'intra et extracellulaire de ce matieres provoquent un organe multisystémique anormal. Nous présentons un patient atteint du syndrome de chasseur impliquant 1a peau systeme cardiovasculaire, des yeux et systeme musculosquelettique. Nous avons aussi écrit le compte ...

  20. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an audiologist , an endocrinologist , a clinical geneticist , a genetic counselor , an otolaryngologist , and a speech-language pathologist . To reduce the likelihood of hearing loss progression, children and adults with Pendred syndrome should avoid contact sports that might lead to head injury; wear head ...

  1. Goldenhar syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operational on the derivatives of the first and second bran- chial arches and clefts before the end of the organogenetic period (7'h or 8'h week of embryonic life)? ..... Marshman WE, Schalit G, Jones RB, Lee JP, Mathews TD and McCabe S: Congenital anomalies in patients with Duane retraction syndrome and their relatives.

  2. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    the two enzymes required to break down the sugar chains into proteins and ... Clinical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's syndrome). He was born of ... He is the only child in a separated family and is currently staying with ...

  3. Ortner syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-02

    Feb 2, 2009 ... A 3-month-old baby girl was brought to the Ear, Nose and ... had died of cardiac failure at a very young age. ... on adduction, allowing for her good voice. Further follow- up and a cardiac ultrasound scan showed improved cardiac function. Discussion. Ortner first described this syndrome in 1897 after seeing ...

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives. continue How Do Kids Get It? Marfan syndrome affects 1 in every 5,000 people all over the world. That makes it pretty rare. It's a genetic (say: juh-NEH-tik) disease, which means it is caused by a problem with a ...

  5. Postthrombotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. 2,12 Additional Resources Here are some Internet links that will give you more information about ... CrossRef PubMed ↵ Kahn SR, Ginsberg JS. Relationship between deep venous thrombosis and the postthrombotic syndrome. Arch Intern ...

  6. Hunter's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    disorder due to deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase with patients rarely living till adulthood. Failure to identify ... case report. CASE DETAILS: An eight year old patient with Hunter's syndrome identified five years after disease onset with severe .... mitral valve prolapse with severe regurgitation, moderate ...

  7. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine: Clinical Essentials. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 27, 2015. Imazio M, et al. Postpericardiotomy syndrome: A proposal for diagnostic criteria. Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine. 2013:14:351. Alraies MC, ...

  8. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2009-01-01

    -to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  9. Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, I. van der

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set

  10. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  11. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  12. Kosenow syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spina bifida was also noted. MRI was performed and showed absence of osseous or cartilaginous tissue in the normal location of the ilium. Instead there was a soft-tissue structure, hypo-intense in all sequences, suggestive of fibrous tissue. Imaging features of a rare case of scapuloiliac dysostosis (Kosenow syndrome) in ...

  13. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  14. Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Once hearing problems are corrected, most people with this syndrome should be able to lead a normal life. Those with ... require part of large bowel to be removed Hearing loss Self-esteem problems, or other problems related to appearance Slight decreased ...

  15. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  16. Compartment syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss. Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes. Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma. As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within this compartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume. Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms. Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods. While the direct methods are quite accurate, they are impractical and not feasible for routine practice. Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder. Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement. The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  17. Pendred syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Kopp, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that is classically defined by the combination of sensorineural deafness/hearing impairment, goiter, and an abnormal organification of iodide with or without hypothyroidism. The hallmark of the syndrome is the impaired hearing, which is associated with inner ear malformations such as an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). The thyroid phenotype is variable and may be modified by the nutritional iodine intake. Pendred syndrome is caused by biallelic mutations in the SLC26A4/PDS gene, which encodes the multifunctional anion exchanger pendrin. Pendrin has affinity for chloride, iodide, and bicarbonate, among other anions. In the inner ear, pendrin functions as a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger that is essential for maintaining the composition and the potential of the endolymph. In the thyroid, pendrin is expressed at the apical membrane of thyroid cells facing the follicular lumen. Functional studies have demonstrated that pendrin can mediate iodide efflux in heterologous cells. This, together with the thyroid phenotype observed in humans (goiter, impaired iodine organification) suggests that pendrin could be involved in iodide efflux into the lumen, one of the steps required for thyroid hormone synthesis. Iodide efflux can, however, also occur in the absence of pendrin suggesting that other exchangers or channels are involved. It has been suggested that Anoctamin 1 (ANO1/TMEM16A), a calcium-activated anion channel, which is also expressed at the apical membrane of thyrocytes, could participate in mediating apical efflux. In the kidney, pendrin is involved in bicarbonate secretion and chloride reabsorption. While there is no renal phenotype under basal conditions, severe metabolic alkalosis has been reported in Pendred syndrome patients exposed to an increased alkali load. This review provides an overview on the clinical spectrum of Pendred syndrome, the functional data on pendrin with a focus on its potential role in

  18. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Resources » Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  19. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  20. Natural Propositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernfelt, Frederik

    Preface -- Introduction -- The generality of signs -- Dicisigns -- Some consequences of the dicisign doctrine -- Dicisigns and cognition -- Natural propositions--the evolution of semiotic self-control -- Dicisigns beyond language -- Operational and optimal iconicity in Peirce's diagrammatology...

  1. Natural Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the locations of known tracts of high quality natural communities in Kansas, generalized to the PLSS section. It is not a compehensive dataset of...

  2. Pluralising Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is recognised for its democratic approach to planning, and for the idea of planning for the common good. This interest in the common good and in common values also seems to be reflected in the way that the restoration of nature is planned and managed, suggesting that there is one common...... “nature” that everyone can agree on. But nature restoration is far from being an unproblematic undertaking. As with any other type of heritage production, it can be the source of dissonance. As exemplified by the Skjern River Restoration Project, one perception of a landscape and its value as “nature” can...... suppress other valid perceptions, in conflict with the need for different groups of people to be able to identify with the same territory. However, planning for the common good, in the case of nature restoration, does not necessarily mean planning for one common nature. Understanding and working...

  3. Writing Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Asdal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies is interested in how nature, in different versions and forms, is invited into our studies, analyses, and stories. How is it that we “write nature”? How is it that we provide space for, and actually describe the actors, agents, or surroundings, in our stories and analyses? The articles in the issue each deal with different understandings of both the practices of writing and the introduction of various natures into these. In this introduction to the issue the editors engage with actor-network theory as a material semiotic resource for writing nature. We propose to foreground actor-network theory as a writing tool, at the expense of actor-network theory as a distinct vocabulary. In doing this and pointing out the semiotic origins to material-semiotics we also want to problematize a clear-cut material approach to writing nature.

  4. Blau syndrome presenting with ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Grant; Halbert, Anne

    2005-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with uveitis, joint disease and ichthyosis resembling ichthyosis vulgaris. A biopsy taken from the affected lower leg demonstrated sarcoidal-type granulomas. Synovial biopsy from the knee also showed granulomas. There was a family history of similar clinical features in the patient's younger sister. There were no other systemic features present to suggest a diagnosis of sarcoidosis or other granulomatous disease such as Crohn's disease or tuberculosis. The familial nature of the condition also made these diagnoses less likely. A clinical diagnosis of Blau syndrome was made. Blau syndrome is an uncommon sarcoidosis-like multisystem autosomal-dominant granulomatous disorder caused by mutations in the CARD15 gene. This gene has also recently been found to be a factor in the development of psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. Although many forms of skin involvement have been described in Blau syndrome, this is the first case described of ichthyosis as the primary skin manifestation.

  5. Second Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Skjonsberg, Matthew; Geuze, Adriaan

    2015-01-01

    The idea of virgin nature is more metaphor than reality – a metaphor best represented by the fabled garden paradise from which Homo sapiens’ ancient forebears were exiled. Despite the fact that virtually every development site borders on an existing city or infrastructure, and that billboards or industry are visible in every panorama, contemporary planning and modern architecture have stubbornly continued to cherish the illusion of a nature that is authentic. In an increasingly urbanized worl...

  6. Natural aphrodisiacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloul, Rany

    2010-01-01

    The search for a remedy or a prescription that can enhance sexual function and/or treat male erectile dysfunction has been an obsession throughout known history. Whether it was an Eastern civilization or a Western one, religious or atheist, man's aspiration for a better or best "manhood" has been a history-time goal. This review will discuss the current research done on the most popular natural aphrodisiacs and examine the weight of evidence to support or discourage the use of any of these substances to enhance sexual desire and/or function. Review of the current evidence on the use of natural substances as aphrodisiacs. Efficacy of natural aphrodisiacs in enhancing sexual function in men and women. There is little evidence from literature to recommend the usage of natural aphrodisiacs for the enhancement of sexual desire and/or performance. Data on yohimbine's efficacy does not support the wide use of the drug, which has only mild effects in the treatment of psychogenic ED. Although there's a positive trend towards recommending ginseng as an effective aphrodisiac, however, more in depth studies involving large number of subjects and its mechanism of action are needed before definite conclusions could be reached. Data on the use of natural aphrodisiacs in women is limited. The current body of objective evidence does not support the use of any natural aphrodisiac as an effective treatment for male or female sexual dysfunctions. Potent men and men with ED will continue the search for natural aphrodisiacs despite the current disappointing data on their effectiveness. Care should be taken regarding the fraud addition of sildenafil analogues to natural aphrodisiacs.

  7. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  8. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  9. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...... strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been...

  10. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  11. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  12. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  13. Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlander, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  14. [Cockayne syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Mei; Cui, Yun-Pu; Liu, Yun-Feng; Wei, Ling; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin-Li; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease. This paper reports a case of Cockayne syndrome confirmed by gene analysis. The baby (male, 7 years old) was referred to Peking University Third Hospital with recurrent desquamation, pigmentation and growth and development failure for 6 years, and recurrent dental caries and tooth loss for 2 years. Physical examination showed very low body weight, body length and head circumference, yellow hair, a lot of fawn spots on the face, skin dry and less elastic, and subcutaneous lipopenia. He had an unusual appearance with sunken eyes, sharp nose, sharp mandible, big auricle and dental caries and tooth loss. Crura spasticity and ataxia with excessive tendon reflexion, and ankle movement limitation while bending back were observed. He had slured speech. The level of serum insulin like growth factor I was low, and the results of blood and urinary amino acid analysis suggested malnutrition. The results of blood growth hormone, thyroxin, parathyroxin, liver function, renal function, lipoprotein profile and blood glucose and electrolytes were all within normal limit. An electronic hearing examination showed moderate neural hearing loss. The sonogram of eyes revealed small eye axis and vitreous body opacity of right side. MRI of brain revealed bilateral calcification of basal ganglia and generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, and brainstem and callus were also atrophic. Genetic analysis confirmed with CSA gene mutation. So the boy was definitely diagnosed with Cockayne syndrome. He was discharged because of no effective treatment.

  15. SUSAC SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kevin H; Haug, Sara J; Imes, Richard K; Cunningham, Emmett T; McDonald, H Richard

    2015-01-01

    To describe an atypical presentation of Susac syndrome. Observational case report. A 44-year-old man with no significant medical history presented with inferonasal visual field loss in his left eye of several months of duration. He was found to have bilateral migratory arteritis with focal areas of arteriolar occlusion in both eyes and peripheral ischemia superotemporally in his left eye. An extensive hematologic workup was negative for autoimmune disease or coagulopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast of his brain revealed a hyperintense lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Auditory testing was significant for nonspecific high-frequency hearing loss in the right ear. Given the full clinical picture, a diagnosis of Susac syndrome was made. Susac syndrome is a multisystemic, immune-mediated occlusive endotheliopathy characterized by the clinical triad of encephalopathy, branch retinal artery occlusions, and hearing loss. However, patients may present with varying degrees of this triad; thus, there should be a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with multiple artery occlusions or multifocal arteritis. (C) 2015 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.

  16. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  17. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome.

  18. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  19. Lambert-Eaton syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasthenic syndrome; Eaton-Lambert syndrome; Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome; LEMS; LES ... get up from a sitting or lying position Problems talking Problems chewing or swallowing, which may include ...

  20. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain ...

  1. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Tourette Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Tourette Syndrome Print A ... have their tics continue into adulthood. Dealing With Tourette Syndrome Many people don't understand what Tourette ...

  2. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... reduce the risk of fractures if you develop osteoporosis. Taking medicine to decrease the amount of glucocorticoid ...

  3. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de Guillain-Barré Guillain-Barré Syndrome Information Page Guillain-Barre Syndrome information sheet compiled by NINDS. See all related publications Order NINDS Publications Definition Miller Fisher syndrome is a rare, acquired nerve ...

  4. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  5. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  6. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Central Cord Syndrome Information Page Central Cord Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? Our understanding of central cord syndrome has increased greatly in recent decades as ...

  7. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are caused by ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  8. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. Your browser does not support the video tag. ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. Help us fix the law and end #LawSyndrome. ...

  9. Imaging in the investigation of paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, G.-C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham UK (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gaylerutherford@doctors.org.uk; Dineen, R.A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham UK (United Kingdom); O' Connor, A. [Nottingham City Hospital, Hucknall Road, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of disease presentations caused by underlying tumours. As they are non-metastatic in nature an intensive diagnostic evaluation is warranted to identify potentially curable lesions. The selection of the appropriate method of imaging is important in these cases, especially when history and physical examination are unrevealing. In this review the important paraneoplastic syndromes and underlying malignancies are discussed along with relevant imaging strategies.

  10. Diogenes Syndrome in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Catherine M; Mendez, Mario F

    2017-11-01

    Diogenes syndrome refers to the combination of extreme self-neglect and excessive collecting with clutter and squalor, which is often present in patients with dementia. Diogenes syndrome may be particularly common in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and the investigation of these patients may help clarify the nature of this syndrome. We describe 5 patients with bvFTD who exhibited a decline in self-care accompanied by hoarding behaviors. These patients, and a review of the literature, suggest a combination of frontal lobe disturbances: loss of insight or self-awareness with a failure to clean up or discard, a general compulsive drive, and an innate impulse to take environmental items. This impulse may be part of the environmental dependency syndrome in frontal disease, with specific involvement of a right frontolimbic-striatal system. Further investigation of the similarities and mechanisms of these symptoms in bvFTD could help in understanding Diogenes syndrome and lead to potential treatment options.

  11. Cushing Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Cushing Syndrome: Other FAQs Are there disorders or conditions associated with Cushing syndrome? Very rarely, a surgeon cannot remove all ...

  12. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skeletal Syndrome (COFS) Information Page Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Information Page Chorea Information Page Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Coffin Lowry Syndrome Information ...

  13. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially during infancy and childhood. Seizure disorder (epilepsy). Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Top of page How is WAGR syndrome diagnosed? Symptoms that suggest WAGR syndrome, like aniridia, ...

  14. Emancipating Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The issue of riverine flooding in the UK is closely tied up with computer simulations. Arguably, these modelling practices are ripe with the anticipation of nature. They aspire to pre-empt it, hence expect it to be ‘out there’, and ultimately work through formalized distillations of it – hydrodyn......The issue of riverine flooding in the UK is closely tied up with computer simulations. Arguably, these modelling practices are ripe with the anticipation of nature. They aspire to pre-empt it, hence expect it to be ‘out there’, and ultimately work through formalized distillations...... of it – hydrodynamic equations – which have their own anticipations and place their own demands on their modellers. Through the experience of a flood modelling apprenticeship I argue that the taking-place of such anticipations paradoxically relies on the birth of a hybrid, the model-modeller, and thus on a nature...

  15. An Abundant Evolutionarily Conserved CSB-PiggyBac Fusion Protein Expressed in Cockayne Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John C.; Bailey, Arnold D.; Fan, Hua-Ying; Pavelitz, Thomas; Weiner, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3′ terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1–5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein. PMID:18369450

  16. An abundant evolutionarily conserved CSB-PiggyBac fusion protein expressed in Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Newman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3' terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1-5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein.

  17. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  18. Provincialising Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provincialising Nature: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Politics of the Environment in Latin America offers a timely analysis of some of the crucial challenges, contradictions and promises within current environmental discourses and practices in the region. This book shows both challenging...... scenarios and original perspectives that have emerged in Latin America in relation to the globally urgent issues of climate change and the environmental crisis. Two interconnected analytical frameworks guide the discussions in the book: the relationship between nature, knowledge and identity and their role...

  19. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 3. Nature Watch: Symbiosis in Coastal Marine Communities. Neelam Pereira. Feature Article Volume 20 Issue 3 March 2015 pp 245-253. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Nature Watch The Amazing Desert Gerbil. Ishwar Prakash. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 54-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/10/0054-0061 ...

  1. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Nature Watch - On Observing the Night Sky. P N Shankar B S Shylaja. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 89-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/07/0089-0096 ...

  2. Kritikkens natur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    1999-01-01

    Artiklen introducerer det nye forskningsfelt inden for samtænkning af litteratur, kultur og natur, den såkaldt økologiske kritik, og kaster et kritisk blik på  dens brug af romantisk litteratur som proto-økologisk kanon....

  3. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 9. Nature Watch - Coral Reefs and their Fauna: An Underwater Fantasyland. Anuradha Bhat. Feature Article Volume 9 Issue 9 September 2004 pp 62-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Natural sweetener

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy University of Illinois at. Chicago USA. 2002; 18-39. 44. Ramesh K, Singh V and NW Megeji Cultivation of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.): A comprehensive review. Rita Elkins MH. 1997. Stevia nature's sweetener (Eds). Stevia. Woodland Publishing, Inc. 2006; 160: 1-29.

  5. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nature Watch - Sociality in a Solitary Primate: How Gregarious is the Slender Loris? Sindhu Radhakrishna. Feature Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 64-81 ... Keywords. Primates; strepsirrhines; social organisation; slender loris.

  6. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Nature Watch - Singapore's Jurong BirdPark: A Study Model. Abraham Verghese. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 74-88. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Nature Watch - Thinking Like a Tahr: When Males and Females go their Separate Ways. M D Madhusudan. Feature Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 43-47 ...

  8. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Nature Watch: On the Trail of Skinks of the Western Ghats. Anirudha Datta-Roy. Feature Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 753-763. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Nature Watch: A Tale of Two Turtles. V Deepak. Feature Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 47-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/020/01/0047-0054. Keywords. Ecology ...

  10. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 8. Nature Watch - The Treasures of the Night Sky. P N Shankar B S Shylaja. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 8 August 2001 pp 82-89. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/08/0082- ...

  11. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 8. Nature Watch - Hornbills – Giants Among the Forest Birds. T R Shankar Raman Divya Mudappa. Feature Article Volume 3 Issue 8 August 1998 pp 56-65. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Naturalizing Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley N. Salthe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain definitions of information can be seen to be compatible with each other if their relationships are properly understood as referring to different levels of organization in a subsumptive hierarchy. The resulting hierarchy, with thermodynamics subsuming information theory, and that in turn subsuming semiotics, amounts to a naturalizing of the information concept.

  13. of Natural

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    natural resources throughout the country. www .idrc.ca/in_focus_comanagement. Learning together to share resources in the mountains of Bhutan. Researchers and villagers set an example for the nation. Tradition is strong among the mountain people of Bhutan. Often it is tradition that governs the sharing of resources, ...

  14. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Nature Watch The Kokum Tree. M D Subash Chandran. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/01/0086-0089 ...

  15. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 10. Nature Watch - When Dragons Fly. K A Subramanian. Feature Article Volume 7 Issue 10 October 2002 pp 69-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/10/0069-0078 ...

  16. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 7. Nature Watch - The Odyssey of the Olive Ridley. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 4 Issue 7 July 1999 pp 68-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/07/0068-0078 ...

  17. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. Nature Watch - Secrets of the Shieldtails. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 8 August 1996 pp 64-70. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/08/0064-0070 ...

  18. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Nature Watch Will the Meek Inherit the Earth? Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 54-59. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/05/0054-0059 ...

  19. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. Nature Watch Decline of a Montane Ecosystem. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 75-82. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/02/0075-0082 ...

  20. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Nature Watch - Sarus Crane: On its Way to Extinction. Alok Kumar Mishra. Feature ... Author Affiliations. Alok Kumar Mishra1. Azim Premji Foundation, 134, Doddakannelli, Next to Wipro Corporate Office, Sarjapur Road, Bangalore 560035.

  1. Natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  2. Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sivasankari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is the autosomal dominant-inherited multisystem connective-tissue disorder, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 individuals and equal distribution in both genders. The main clinical manifestation of this disorder consists of an exaggerated length of the upper and lower limbs, hyperlaxity, scoliosis, alterations in the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, and atypical bone overgrowth. Orofacial manifestations such as high-arched palate, hypodontia, long narrow teeth, bifid uvula, mandibular prognathism, and temporomandibular disorders are also common. Early diagnosis of MFS is essential to prevent the cardiovascular complications and treatment of orofacial manifestations, thus to increase the quality of life of the patient.

  3. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  4. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  5. [Dependency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorisalo, Sailaritta

    2013-01-01

    The most common causes of lower limb edema include cardiac insufficiency, venous insufficiency, insufficiency of lymph flow, and side effects of drugs. It can also be due to dependency syndrome, in which the edema and skin changes can only be explained by a passive calf muscle pump and the resulting venous hypertension. Underlying the drop foot is always immobilization for one reason or other. The patient must be given an explanation about the situation, activated to move if possible, and in any case guided to the use of support stockings and postural therapy.

  6. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  7. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  8. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  9. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  10. Wells′ syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Ajay

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic cellulitis/Wells′ syndrome is a rare dermatosis with erythematous, urticarial plaques that become more indurated and eventually have grey blue discoloration. The histopathology is distinctive, with a diffuse infiltrate composed predominantly of eosinophils but admixed with lymphocytes, histicytes and occasionally multinucleated histiocytes. There is dermal edema with so called "flame figures" that is composed of collagen focally enveloped with aggregates of eosinophilic granules. These collagen fibres may be surrounded by palisading histiocyes. The course is variable with waxing and waning and eventual spontaneous resolution.

  11. Cardiorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Di Lullo, Luca

    2014-04-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) includes a broad spectrum of diseases within which both the heart and kidneys are involved, acutely or chronically. An effective classification of CRS in 2008 essentially divides CRS in two main groups, cardiorenal and renocardiac CRS, based on primum movens of disease (cardiac or renal); both cardiorenal and renocardiac CRS are then divided into acute and chronic, according to onset of disease. The fifth type of CRS integrates all cardiorenal involvement induced by systemic disease. This article addresses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of the 5 distinct types of CRS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  13. Cotard Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is often described as the delusional belief that one is dead or non-existent. However, Jules Cotard's initial description (1880) of the "delusion of negations" was much richer and also involved delusions and claims of immortality and enormity, feelings of damnation, and illusions of bodily dissolution and transformation. Alternatively conceived as an extreme case of depression, hypochondria, or psychosis, the condition is considered rare and remains poorly understood. Cotard himself provided a taxonomy and several explanations for the condition, focusing on its distinction from classical persecutory delusions and suggesting that it could be a kind of reversed grandiosity. He proposed a psychosensory basis in the dissolution of mental imagery, which he then extended to a more general psychomotor impairment of volition. Other early authors highlighted a disorder of the bodily self, and more recent theories postulated an impairment of right hemispheric functions, leading to perceptual and somatosensory feelings of unreality, which coupled with reasoning impairments and an internalized attributional style led in turn to beliefs of non-existence. However, despite its striking presentation and its relevance to our understanding of self-awareness, Cotard's syndrome remains an elusive condition, rarely reported and poorly researched. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Tourette's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Donald L; Lipps, Tara D

    2005-05-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, frequently accompanied by symptoms of obsessiveness and/or compulsiveness, anxiety, and behavioral impulsivity. Treatment of Tourette's syndrome symptoms should be considered when symptoms cause significant functional or social impairment or pain, as occurs with self-injurious tics. Because comorbid psychiatric disorders, particularly attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder often are present, clinicians must work with affected persons and families and prioritize treatment targets based on the specific disorder-related impairment. Treatment with alpha-2 adrenergic agonists may reduce tics and improve ADHD symptoms. Effective treatment of ADHD, even with stimulant medications, in most cases does not exacerbate tics. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may reduce obsessive-compulsive and anxiety symptoms, secondarily reducing tics. Neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics may be used for severe tics, but the risk of neurologic side effects and weight gain is significantly higher. Habit reversal treatment shows promise as a nonpharmacologic intervention. Use of deep brain stimulation has produced benefit in three severely affected adults but should still be considered experimental.

  15. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  16. Jagtens natur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Borkfelt, Sune; Gamborg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Jagt kan ses som en konfrontation mellem menneskeverdenen og den vilde natur. I dag kan det dog være svært at få øje på det vilde i naturen i et land som Danmark, hvor over 60 % af det samlede areal anvendes til landbrug, og kun få pletter er overladt til sig selv. Ikke desto mindre spiller naturen...... en stor rolle for både jægerne og for de, der forholder sig kritisk til jagt. Der er stor enighed mellem disse parter om, at naturen er noget, vi skal tage vare på – men når det kommer til, hvilken natur der sigtes til, og hvordan vi skal tage vare på den, skilles vandene. Det skal bemærkes, at vi i...

  17. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth / For Parents / Asperger Syndrome What's in ... Print en español Síndrome de Asperger What Is Asperger Syndrome? Asperger syndrome (AS) is a type of ...

  18. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  19. Brain Fag Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The Brain Fag Syndrome (BFS) was defined in the Diagnostic and. Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a culture bound syndrome in 1994, just like Koro syndrome and other culture related syndromes.1 BFS is a tetrad of somatic complaints; cognitive impairments; sleep related complaints; and ...

  20. Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome with cleft palate, absent nipples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2015-06-27

    Jun 27, 2015 ... The Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome (CST syndrome) is the rare an- or hypohidrotic form of the ectodermal dysplasia. [6]. It was first described in 1848 by Thurnam [7] and later by. Darwin [8]. In 1913, Christ characterized it as a congenital ectodermal defect, Siemens confirmed the X-linked nature.

  1. Adult Reye-like syndrome associated with serologic evidence of acute parvovirus B19 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da; Ribeiro, Geyza Machado; Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Casali, Thaís Gomes; Leite, Flávio José Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Reye's syndrome is an infrequently diagnosed medical condition affecting mainly children. The etiology, epidemiology and natural history of Reye's syndrome have been cloudily written in footnotes of medical books and exotic papers since the initial description in early 1950s. We report here a case of adult Reye's syndrome associated with serologic evidence of parvovirus B19 infection.

  2. Adult Reye-like syndrome associated with serologic evidence of acute parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da Costa

    Full Text Available Reye's syndrome is an infrequently diagnosed medical condition affecting mainly children. The etiology, epidemiology and natural history of Reye's syndrome have been cloudily written in footnotes of medical books and exotic papers since the initial description in early 1950s. We report here a case of adult Reye's syndrome associated with serologic evidence of parvovirus B19 infection.

  3. Divorce in Families of Children with Down Syndrome: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature, timing, and correlates of divorce in families of children with Down syndrome (647), other birth defects (10,283) and no identified disability (361,154). Divorce rates among families of children with Down syndrome were lower than in the other two groups. When divorce did occur in the Down syndrome group,…

  4. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  5. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vaccaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS is the collective name of three rare congenital conditions characterised by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. The three known types of TRPS have different modalities of genetic transmission: namely, TRPS I and III are inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, while the cases of TRPS II are essentially sporadic.The diagnosis of the different types of TRPS is based on clinical and radiological findings, eventually integrated by genetic analysis, particularly useful in some cases with the non-classical clinical presentation. Alopecia and structural abnormalities of the nose and the hands should be considered as clinical hallmarks, whereas endocrine disorders, renal alterations, ureteral reflux, heart pathology and bone dysplasia have been documented, in the setting of a multisystem involvement.

  7. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  8. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...... treatment options included anticoagulants in 46% of cases, which is unwarrantedly high, as to date, no evidence of the positive effects of anticoagulants in LS exists. Only two cases had ligation of the internal jugular vein performed. This review confirms the rare, but severe aspects of LS. Mortality from...

  9. Frailty syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Potpara, Tatjana S; Bjerregaard Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The age of patients presenting with complex arrhythmias is increasing. Frailty is a multifaceted syndrome characterized by an increased vulnerability to stressors and a decreased ability to maintain homeostasis. The prevalence of frailty is associated with age. The aims of this European Heart...... Rhythm Association (EHRA) EP Wire survey were to evaluate the proportion of patients with frailty and its influence on the clinical management of arrhythmias. A total of 41 centres-members of the EHRA Electrophysiology Research Network-in 14 European countries completed the web-based questionnaire...... in June 2017. Patients over 70 years represented 53% of the total treated population, with the proportion of frail elderly individuals reaching approximately 10%; 91.7% of the responding centres reported treating frail subjects in the previous year. The respondents usually recognized frailty based...

  10. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... stillborn. Eye anomalies were found in 20/24 (83%), syndactyly in 14/24 (58%), and laryngeal anomalies in 5/24 (21%) patients. Ambiguous genitalia were observed in 3/24 (13%) cases. Bilateral renal agenesis was present in 12/24 (50%) and unilateral in 4/24 (17%) cases. The frequency of anorectal anomalies...

  11. Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M M; Akhonda, A H; Islam, M F; Akonjee, A R

    2012-07-01

    A female child of 10 months age from Netrokona, Bangladesh was admitted in the department of ophthalmology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh on 20.01.12 with the complaints of swelling on both her eyes and swelling of area in front of both ears. The child is mentally alert. Her fixation reflex is central, steady and maintained. On examination whitish growth on limbus, hard in consistency, non mobile, non tender, fixed with underlying structure both eyes. There are pre auricular skin tags. There is no cardiac abnormality and ENT consultation done reveals normal except pre-auricular ear tags. X ray of mandible and maxilla shows hypoplasia of maxilla and mandible. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed the diagnosis as Goldenhar syndrome.

  12. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Patrick O; Sternberg, Lauren J; Phelps, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    The dermatology staff was called to evaluate abnormal hair on a 22-month-old Hispanic girl whose parents were first cousins. Her medical history was significant for leptomeningitis with subsequent neurologic devastation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis, liver dysfunction, pan-cytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She had developed normally for the first year of life. At 13 months she became progressively lethargic and developed floppy muscle tone; a delay in mental and motor milestones was recognized. Results of a metabolic workup were negative. On examination she was noted to have generalized excessively fair skin when compared with her parents. She had silver-gray hair (Figure 1) and white eyebrows and body hair. Her maternal grandfather and granduncles had silver hair since childhood, but were without health problems. A maternal family member was said to have light skin. The presumed diagnosis before pathologic examination was Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Hematoxylin and eosin stain tests revealed prominent melanocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. The melanocytes were large and distended with a large volume of melanin (Figure 2). The adjacent keratinocytes were completely devoid of melanin. Application of Masson-Fontana ammoniac silver stain highlighted prominent melanocytic melanin and a relative paucity of melanin in the adjacent keratinocytes (Figure 3). Microscopic examination of her hair revealed clumps of melanin of various sizes and shapes irregularly distributed throughout the hair shaft. Ultrastructural examination of the epidermis showed the melanocytes were distended by an accumulation of large stage IV mature melanosomes. Peripheral blood smear failed to show abnormal granules, even after repeated examination. Based on the clinical features and the pathologic findings, a diagnosis of Griscelli syndrome type 2 was made.

  13. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  14. [The syndrome of Cotard: an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eynde, F; Debruyne, H; Portzky, M; De Saedeleer, S; Audenaert, K

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing controversy about whether psychiatric illnesses should be divided into categories. One of the reasons is that such a categorial system, by its very nature, cannot provide a detailed description of specific psychopathological symptoms. A patient with Cotard's syndrome, for instance, is characterised by a nihilistic delusion relating to his own body and the syndrome does not fit into any one category. We report on a case of Cotard's syndrome encountered at our clinic. To provide an overview of the characteristics of Cotard's syndrome, including its history, phenomenology, pathogenesis and treatment. A Medline search was conducted for the period 1980-2006 using the search term 'Cotard$'. This resulted in 68 publications, of which 18 were not used. Cross-references were used as well. Cotard's syndrome cannot be fitted unambiguously into any one category of the current classification system. Current evidence regarding Cotard's syndrome is based mainly on case studies and therefore no clarity can be obtained about the various aspects of the syndrome, such as prevalence, pathogenesis, treatment.

  15. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. A multicenter study on Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, Kalliopi; De Coo, Irenaeus F M; Isohanni, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leigh syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, associated with primary or secondary dysfunction of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Despite the fact that Leigh syndrome is the most common phenotype of mitochondrial disorders in children, longitudinal natural...... history data is missing. This study was undertaken to assess the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of patients with Leigh syndrome, characterise the clinical course and identify predictors of survival in a large cohort of patients. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with Leigh syndrome...... was significantly correlated to a more severe disease course, characterised by early onset before 6 months of age, acute exacerbations and/or relapses, as well as brainstem involvement. 39% of patients had died by the age of 21 years, at a median age of 2.4 years. Disease onset before 6 months of age, failure...

  17. Rapunzel syndrome: a rare postpartum case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Oloniyo, Kolawole; Ha, Ngoc-Tram; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman.

  18. Rapunzel Syndrome: A Rare Postpartum Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Tegene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman.

  19. Guillain—Barré syndrome: Biological basis, treatment and care

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon-Parkes, K.; Cornock, M.

    1997-01-01

    Guillain-Barr~ syndrome is a complex disorder that affects around 0.5-2 individuals per 100 000 per year (Hund et al 1993). The outcome can range from a sensation of araesthesia to death. This article discusses the biological nature of Guillain-Barrb syndrome, major diagnostic criteria and the treatment that is available. It highlights the nurse's role in management of the syndrome and describes how the extent of the syndrome in individual patients may be evaluated in the clinical area.

  20. Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This is a practical review of Tourette syndrome, including phenomenology, natural history, and state-of-the-art assessment and treatment. Method: Computerized literature searches were conducted under the keywords Tourette syndrome,tics, and children-adolescents. Results: Studies have documented the natural history of Tourette syndrome and its frequent co-occurrence with attention problems, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and a range of other mood and anxiety disorders, which are often of primary concern to patients and their families. Proper diagnosis and education are often very helpful for patients, parents, siblings, teachers, and peers. When necessary, available anti-tic treatments have proven efficacious. First-line options include the alpha adrenergic agents and the atypical neuroleptics, as well as behavioral interventions such as habit reversal. Conclusions: The study of tics and Tourette symdrome has led to the development of several pathophysiological models and helped in the development of management options. However, fully explanatory models are still needed that would allow for accurate prognostication in the course of illness and the development of improved treatments. PMID:21152158