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Sample records for progeria syndrome mutation

  1. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  2. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma J. H.; Merckx, Diane; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marcelis, Carlo L. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  3. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A.; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C.; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently,

  4. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  5. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  6. Progeria syndrome: A case report

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    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Zahoor Hussain Daraz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare genetic disease in which symptoms of aging are manifested at an early age. In the present report, we describe a 9 months old female child presented with a history of progressive coarsening of skin, failure to thrive and irregular bumps over thighs, buttocks and lower limbs for the last 7½ months. In the course of time, she developed alopecia, hyperpigmented spots over the abdomen with thickening and a typical facial profile of HGPS including micrognathia, absent ear lobules, prominent eyes, loss of eyelashes, eyebrows and a bluish hue over the nose.

  8. Progeria

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    Mohamed Riyaz S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare, sporadic, autosomal dominant syndrome that involves premature ageing and death at early age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. A 30-year-old male with clinical and radiologic features highly suggestive of HGPS is presented here with description of differential diagnosis, dental considerations and review of literature.

  9. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

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    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wilson A. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. J Gerontol A ... should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about ...

  11. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Agarwal Uma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  12. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

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    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  13. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  14. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

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    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  15. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

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    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  16. Progeria

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    Kaur Charandeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of progeria is being reported in a 7-year old boy. He had characteristic facies, short stature, alopecia, high pitched voice, coxa valga and sclerodermatous changes in skin.

  17. A homozygous ZMPSTE24 null mutation in combination with a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): insights into the pathophysiology of HGPS.

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    Denecke, Jonas; Brune, Thomas; Feldhaus, Tobias; Robenek, Horst; Kranz, Christian; Auchus, Richard J; Agarwal, Anil K; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2006-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder normally caused by a spontaneous heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that codes for the nuclear lamina protein lamin A. Several enzymes are involved in the processing of its precursor, prelamin A, to the mature lamin A. A functional knockout of one of the enzymes involved in prelamin A processing, the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24, causes an even more severe disorder with early neonatal death described as restrictive dermatopathy (RD). This work describes a HGPS patient with a combined defect of a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene and a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that results in a C-terminal elongation of the final lamin A. Whereas the loss of function mutation of ZMPSTE24 normally results in lethal RD, the truncation of LMNA seems to be a salvage alteration alleviating the clinical picture to the HGPS phenotype. The mutations of our patient indicate that farnesylated prelamin A is the deleterious agent leading to the HGPS phenotype, which gives further insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Lethal neonatal Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Rodríguez, J I; Pérez-Alonso, P; Funes, R; Pérez-Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-29

    We report on a 35-week gestation female fetus with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP). This patient, who is the first reported with neonatal HGP in the English literature but is the fourth, counting three previous French cases, supports the existence of a more severe prenatal form of progeria. She died 7 hours after birth and presented with intrauterine growth retardation, premature aging, absence of subcutaneous fat, brachydactyly, absent nipples, hypoplastic external genitalia, and abnormal ear lobes. The child's combination of clinical and skeletal manifestations differentiates this form of HGP from other progeroid syndromes with neonatal presentation. We also report previously undescribed autopsy findings including premature loss of hair follicles, premature regression of the renal nephrogenic layer, and premature closure of the growth plates in the distal phalanges that may be related to the aging processes in this condition. We could not find any histological data to support acro-osteolysis, which is the radiographic sign of brachydactyly. The terminal phalanges in HGP seem to be underdeveloped rather than osteolytic.

  19. Progeria

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    Raval Ranjan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old boy presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had senile looks, scanty scalp hair, stunted growth, and wrinkled skin with loss of subcutaneous fat. Sclerodermatous changes were found on both thighs and pelvic region, which was confirmed by histopathology.

  20. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-06-22

    Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently, to nuclear envelope alterations. In this work, we describe a novel phenotypic feature of the progeria spectrum affecting three unrelated newborns and identify its genetic cause. Patients reported herein present an extremely homogeneous phenotype that somewhat recapitulates those of patients with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. However, pathological signs appear earlier, are more aggressive and present distinctive features including episodes of severe upper airway obstruction. Exome and Sanger sequencing allowed the identification of heterozygous de novo c.163G>A, p.E55K and c.164A>G, p.E55G mutations in LMNA as the alterations responsible for this disorder. Functional analyses demonstrated that fibroblasts from these patients suffer important dysfunctions in nuclear lamina, which generate profound nuclear envelope abnormalities but without progerin accumulation. These nuclear alterations found in patients' dermal fibroblasts were also induced by ectopic expression of the corresponding site-specific LMNA mutants in control human fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate the causal role of p.E55K and p.E55G lamin A mutations in a disorder which manifests novel phenotypic features of the progeria spectrum characterised by neonatal presentation and aggressive clinical evolution, despite being caused by lamin A/C missense mutations with effective prelamin A processing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

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    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  2. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: review of the phenotype

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    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare but well known entity characterized by extreme short stature, low body weight, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, and facial features that resemble aged persons. Cardiovascular compromise leads

  3. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

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    Subhash Kashyap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  4. A case of progeria syndrome treated as VIP patient

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    Seema Mahant, Mahant PD, C.M. Reddy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is rare autosomal recessive genetic disease with an incidence of about one in eight million. He was 16 years old boy lying on the couch. He was short stature thin with minimal subcutaneous tissue, skin was thin and fragile with loss of hair over scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes, and his face was dismorphic with prominent eyes, beaked nose, small jaw and large cranium with visible veins over it. His voice was thin and high pitched. Overall, this gives them an extremely aged nearly 70 -80 years old man look. The patient was a known case of progeria syndrome and he was treated as a VIP patient by all faculty members and staff, though he belongs low socioeconomic status, no political issue with them. But still he was a VIP.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

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    Rajat G. Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest.

  6. A lamin A protein isoform overexpressed in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome interferes with mitosis in progeria and normal cells

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    Cao, Kan; Capell, Brian C.; Erdos, Michael R.; Djabali, Karima; Collins, Francis S.

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by dramatic premature aging. Classic HGPS is caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 (residue 1824, C → T) of the LMNA gene, activating a cryptic splice donor and resulting in a mutant lamin A (LA) protein termed “progerin/LAΔ50” that lacks the normal cleavage site to remove a C-terminal farnesyl group. During interphase, irreversibly farnesylated progerin/LAΔ50 anchors to the nuclear membrane and causes characteristic nuclear blebbing. Progerin/LAΔ50's localization and behavior during mitosis, however, are completely unknown. Here, we report that progerin/LAΔ50 mislocalizes into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates and membranes during mitosis and causes abnormal chromosome segregation and binucleation. These phenotypes are largely rescued with either farnesyltransferase inhibitors or a farnesylation-incompetent mutant progerin/LAΔ50. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small amounts of progerin/LAΔ50 exist in normal fibroblasts, and a significant percentage of these progerin/LAΔ50-expressing normal cells are binucleated, implicating progerin/LAΔ50 as causing similar mitotic defects in the normal aging process. Our findings present evidence of mitotic abnormality in HGPS and may shed light on the general phenomenon of aging. PMID:17360355

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with severe calcific aortic valve stenosis

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    Natesh B Hanumanthappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging syndrome that results from mutation in the Laminin A gene. This case report of a 12-year-old girl with HGPS is presented for the rarity of the syndrome and the classical clinical features that were observed in the patient. All patients with this condition should undergo early and periodic evaluation for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prognosis is poor and management is mainly conservative. There is no proven therapy available. Mortality in this uniformly fatal condition is primarily due to myocardial infarction, strokes or congestive cardiac failure between ages 7 and 21 years due to the rapidly progressive arteriosclerosis involving the large vessels.

  8. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Cleveland, Robert H. [Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Leslie B. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children' s Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Kleinman, Monica E. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Miller, David T. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Genetics, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology and Adolescent Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Snyder, Brian D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Nazarian, Ara [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Giobbie-Hurder, Anita [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Neuberg, Donna [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Kieran, Mark W. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  9. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A 36 years old woman with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report

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    Akrami S M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder with a frequency of 1 in 8 million live births. It is characterised by premature aging phenotype. The median age at death is 13.4 years. It is an autosomal dominat disease due to a de novo point mutation in the Lamin A gene exon 11 in the majority of cases. More than 100 cases have been reported world wide."nCase report: We describe here an exceptionally long-lived patient with HGPS, who is alive at age 36. She was referred by a cardiologist to our endocrinology clinic to be worked up for presence of a metabolic or genetic disorder before a heart surgery."nResults: Having more attention of clinicians about very rare diseases and referring the patients to geneticist are the main goals of this case report as well as describing the disease.

  11. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn

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    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, bu...

  12. Using drug treatments to control genome behaviour in normal and Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts, with and without hTERT immortalisation

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    Bikkul, Mehmet Ural

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an exceedingly rare genetic condition with striking features reminiscent of marked premature ageing. HGPS is commonly caused by a ‘classic’ mutation in the A-type lamin gene, LMNA (G608G). This leads to the expression of an aberrant truncated lamin A protein, progerin. The nuclear lamina is known to anchor chromosomes, stabilising and re...

  13. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphologi...

  14. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

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    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  15. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  16. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

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    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  17. Progeria caused by a rare LMNA mutation p.S143F associated with mild myopathy and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kmieć, Tomasz; Fidziańska, Anna; Rekawek, Joanna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2008-09-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with premature aging associated with mild myopathy, displaying muscle weakness, joint contractures and hyporeflexia. Genetic analysis revealed rare heterozygous point mutation in lamin A/C gene, g.428C>T. Cardiological evaluation showed atrial fibrillation, but we did not find signs of coronary heart disease, which is life-threatening cardiovascular complication in progeria. Electron microscopy of the muscle revealed abnormalities in nuclear architecture, i.e. blebbing, thick lamina and peripheral distribution of heterochromatin. As some diagnostic criteria characteristic for classic progeria are not fulfilled, this case could be regarded as atypical progeria associated with myopathy and atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the second case of such association described in the literature.

  18. Progeria syndrome with characteristic deformation of proximal radius observed on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, S.; Rao, R.C.K.; Ragav, B.; Berry, M. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Radio-Diagnosis)

    1991-01-01

    The progeria syndrome (Hutchinson-Gilford) is an uncommon disease. A peculiar shape of the proximal radial metaphyseal region caused by an infolding of the cortex was observed on CT in 2 brothers suffering from this disorder, a feature not previously reported. A brief review of the radiologic literature was undertaken. This new observation needs to be further evaluated as it may provide a clinching diagnostic feature of this disease. (orig.).

  19. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

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    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  20. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Kotb Abbass Metwalley; Fargalley, Hekma Saad

    2012-01-17

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL), low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL), raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL), raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L) and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL) levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  1. Simultaneous Shoulder and Hip Dislocation in a 12-Year-Old Girl with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Shirin Mardookhpour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  2. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

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    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  3. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

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    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  4. Progeria: A rare genetic premature ageing disorder

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    Jitendra Kumar Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs. As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent ′drug of hope′ for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs.

  5. Hip pathology in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a report of two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, Pouya; Jha, Shilpa; James, Kyle D; Hinves, Barry L; Buchanan, Jamie A F

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder. The estimated incidence is one in 4 million births. Orthopaedic manifestations include abnormality of the hips occurring early in the disease process. Severe coxa valga can be apparent by the age of 2 years. We report two cases of HGPS, one in a 7-year-old girl with avascular necrosis of the left hip and the second in a 13-year-old girl with recurrent traumatic hip dislocations. We demonstrate the pathoanatomical changes in the hip with HGPS using a combination of imaging modalities including radiographic, computed tomographic and MRI scans. These include coxa magna, coxa valga and acetabular dysplasia. We also comment on how these would affect the surgical management of this high-risk group of patients. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  6. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determine...

  7. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria.

  8. The two-faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2014-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces

  9. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determined to be a cerebrovascular accident. Subsequently, she returned almost completely to her pre-surgical neurologic status. Perioperative planning for HGPS patients should include risks typically considered in the planning for geriatric patient care. PMID:19373113

  10. Progeria: a new kind of Laminopathy-- report of the First European Symposium on Progeria and creation of EURO-Progeria, a European Consortium on Progeria and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brune, Thomas; Bonne, Gisele; Denecke, Jonas; Elcioglu, Nursel; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marquardt, Thorsten; Ozgen, Heval; Stamsnijder, Marjet; Steichen, Elisabeth; Steinmann, Beat; Wehnert, Manfred; Levy, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Progeria is a rare, genetically determined condition characterized by accelerated aging in children. Its name is derived from Greek (Geron) and means "prematurely old". The classic type is the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which was first described in England in 1886 by Dr. Jonathan

  11. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

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    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  12. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

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    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  13. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

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    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  14. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  15. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

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    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  16. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? ...

  18. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

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    Haoyue Zhang

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3. In this study, we explore the potential connection(s between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox, double strand breaks (DSBs are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency.

  19. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Damien Galant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD, Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD. We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  1. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-04-25

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  2. A new mutation in blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Gul, Davut; Demirkaya, Erkan; Gok, Faysal

    2015-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2-13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  3. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. A New Mutation in Blau Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Zeybek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2–13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  5. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  6. Labor Market Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  7. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  8. Stem cell aging in adult progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is considered an irreversible biological process and also a major risk factor for a spectrum of geriatric diseases. Advanced age-related decline in physiological functions, such as neurodegeneration, development of cardiovascular disease, endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, and neoplastic transformation, has become the focus in aging research. Natural aging is not regarded as a programmed process. However, accelerated aging due to inherited genetic defects in patients of progeria is programmed and resembles many aspects of natural aging. Among several premature aging syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS are two broadly investigated diseases. In this review, we discuss how stem cell aging in WS helps us understand the biology of aging. We also discuss briefly how the altered epigenetic landscape in aged cells can be reversed to a “juvenile” state. Lastly, we explore the potential application of the latest genomic editing technique for stem cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine in the context of aging.

  9. IDH1 mutated low grade astrocytoma occurring in MSH2 mutated Lynch syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alkhotani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is an autosomal dominant tumour predisposition syndrome caused by a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes.Patients with these mutations have an increased risk of brain tumours, the vast majority of which are glioblastomas and medulloblastomas, and their occurrence has been termed Turcot Syndrome. The case presented herein of a member of a Lynch syndrome family with an MSH2 mutation expands the spectrum of brain tumours occurring in Lynch syndrome to include low grade astrocytomas, and is the first reported case of an IDH1 (R132H mutated brain tumour occurring in a Lynch syndrome family.

  10. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  11. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  12. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with non......-syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non...

  14. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutati...

  15. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-09-21

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Harssel, J.J. van; Terhal, P.A.; Lieshout, S. van; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; Heyden, M.A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Haelst, M.M. van; Haaften, G. van; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  17. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; van Harssel, J.J.; Terhal, P.A.; van Lieshout, S.; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; van der Heyden, M.A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.; van der Smagt, J.J.; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; van Haelst, M.M.; van Haaften, G.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  18. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tatton-Brown (Katrina); A. Murray (Anna); S. Hanks (Sandra); J. Douglas (Jenny); R. Armstrong (Ruth); S. Banka (Siddharth); L.M. Bird (Lynne); C.L. Clericuzio (Carol); V. Cormier-Daire (Valerie); T. Cushing (Tom); F. Flinter (Frances); S. Jacquemont (Sébastien); S. Joss (Shelagh); E. Kinning (Esther); S.A. Lynch; A. Magee (Alex); V. Mcconnell (Vivienne); A. Medeira (Ana); K. Ozono (Keiichi); M. Patton (Michael); J. Rankin (Julia); D.J. Shears (Deborah); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); M. Splitt (M.); V. Strenger (Volker); K.E. Stuurman (Kyra); C. Taylor (Clare); H. Titheradge (Hannah); L. van Maldergem (Lionel); I.K. Temple; T.J. Cole (Trevor); S. Seal (Sheila); N. Rahman (Nazneen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWeaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with

  19. PTEN mutation in a family with Cowden syndrome and autism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goffin, A.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Bosgoed, E.A.J.; Swillen, A.; Fryns, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on a mother and son with Cowden syndrome and a PTEN mutation. The boy also exhibits autistic behavior and mental retardation, while his mother has a normal intelligence and social interaction pattern. We review the scanty literature data on the association of Cowden syndrome and autism and

  20. [Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. A rare case of neonatal occurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A; Bonfiglioli, G; Masignà Ricciardi, M G

    1986-01-01

    A case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is described in which phenotypic and metabolic symptoms were already evident at birth. Both under a clinical and autopsy point of view an early old age of organs and apparatuses was apparent, posing the problem of the reason why an early old aging occurs. The authors mention literature in favour of a genetic control of cellular aging and make the assumption that the genes controlling old age are various and that a greater or lesser presence and incidence of them could justify the earlier or normal appearance of this status.

  1. Blau syndrome associated with a CARD15/NOD2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyers, Bernadette; Dahan, Karin

    2006-12-01

    To report a new family with Blau syndrome caused by CARD15/NOD2 mutation. Observational case series. Detailed clinical evaluation in three affected relatives with Blau syndrome. Haplotype and mutation analysis of the CARD15/NOD2 gene were performed. Ocular manifestations identified in the proband include bilateral band keratopathy, cataract, iritis, vitritis and severe granulomatous choroidopathy. The mother and one brother of the proband exhibit the same characteristic organ involvements of this disease. Haplotype analysis from the pericentromeric region on chromosome 16 identified a common haplotype in all affected relatives that is absent in unaffected relatives. Sequencing analysis revealed a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, the previously reported p.R334W substitution. Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal-dominant disease that can lead to severe visual impairment. The search of a CARD15/NOD2 mutation could be helpful in the differential diagnosis of childhood uveitis.

  2. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  3. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome with biallelic UBE3B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tang, Sha; Reuter, Miriam S; Rahner, Nils; Grange, Dorothy K; Mortenson, Megan; Koty, Patrick; Feenstra, Heather; Farwell Gonzalez, Kelly D; Sticht, Heinrich; Boddaert, Nathalie; Désir, Julie; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Zweier, Christiane; Reis, André; Kubisch, Christian; Jewett, Tamison; Zeng, Wenqi; Borck, Guntram

    2014-07-01

    Biallelic mutations of UBE3B have recently been shown to cause Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (also reported as blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual disability syndrome), an autosomal recessive condition characterized by hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, characteristic facial dysmorphic features, and low cholesterol levels. To date, six patients with either missense mutations affecting the UBE3B HECT domain or truncating mutations have been described. Here, we report on the identification of homozygous or compound heterozygous UBE3B mutations in six additional patients from five unrelated families using either targeted UBE3B sequencing in individuals with suggestive facial dysmorphic features, or exome sequencing. Our results expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of the UBE3B-related disorder in several ways. First, we have identified UBE3B mutations in individuals who previously received distinct clinical diagnoses: two sibs with Toriello-Carey syndrome as well as the patient reported to have a "new" syndrome by Buntinx and Majewski in 1990. Second, we describe the adult phenotype and clinical variability of the syndrome. Third, we report on the first instance of homozygous missense alterations outside the HECT domain of UBE3B, observed in a patient with mildly dysmorphic facial features. We conclude that UBE3B mutations cause a clinically recognizable and possibly underdiagnosed syndrome characterized by distinct craniofacial features, hypotonia, failure to thrive, eye abnormalities, other congenital malformations, low cholesterol levels, and severe intellectual disability. We review the UBE3B-associated phenotypes, including forms that can mimick Toriello-Carey syndrome, and suggest the single designation "Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome".

  4. Noonan syndrome: comparing mutation-positive with mutation-negative dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croonen, E.A.; Nillesen, W.; Schrander, C.; Jongmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Noordam, C.; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Burgt, I. van der; Yntema, H.G.

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, short stature and congenital heart defects. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous and shows clinical overlap with other RASopathies. These syndromes are caused by mutations in a variety of genes leading

  5. Genetic syndromes caused by mutations in epigenetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel

    2013-04-01

    The orchestrated organization of epigenetic factors that control chromatin dynamism, including DNA methylation, histone marks, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and chromatin-remodeling proteins, is essential for the proper function of tissue homeostasis, cell identity and development. Indeed, deregulation of epigenetic profiles has been described in several human pathologies, including complex diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases), metabolic pathologies (type 2 diabetes and obesity) and imprinting disorders. Over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that mutations of genes involved in epigenetic mechanism, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methylases and members of the SWI/SNF family of chromatin remodelers are linked to human disorders, including Immunodeficiency Centromeric instability Facial syndrome 1, Rett syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Sotos syndrome or alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, among others. As new members of the epigenetic machinery are described, the number of human syndromes associated with epigenetic alterations increases. As recent examples, mutations of histone demethylases and members of the non-coding RNA machinery have recently been associated with Kabuki syndrome, Claes-Jensen X-linked mental retardation syndrome and Goiter syndrome. In this review, we describe the variety of germline mutations of epigenetic modifiers that are known to be associated with human disorders, and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs as palliative care strategies in the treatment of such disorders.

  6. Paternal Origin of FGFR2 Mutations in Sporadic Cases of Crouzon Syndrome and Pfeiffer Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Rivka L.; Jiang, Wen; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Tran, Alissa K.; Andrea A. Zachary; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Johnson, David; Walsh, Sinead; Oldridge, Michael; Wall, Steven A.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2000-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome and Pfeiffer syndrome are both autosomal dominant craniosynostotic disorders that can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. To determine the parental origin of these FGFR2 mutations, the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used. ARMS PCR primers were developed to recognize polymorphisms that could distinguish maternal and paternal alleles. A total of 4,374 bases between introns IIIa and 11 of the FGFR2 gene were sequen...

  7. The mutational spectrum of Lynch syndrome in cyprus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Loizidou

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer and is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Mutation carriers have an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other extracolonic tumours. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes within a cohort of Cypriot families that fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. The study cohort included 77 patients who fulfilled at least one of the revised Bethesda guidelines. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of 4 pathogenic mutations, 3 in the MLH1 gene and 1 in the MSH2 gene, in 5 unrelated individuals. It is noted that out of the 4 pathogenic mutations detected, one is novel (c.1610delG in exon 14 of the MLH1 and has been detected for the first time in the Cypriot population. Overall, the pathogenic mutation detection rate in our patient cohort was 7%. This percentage is relatively low but could be explained by the fact that the sole criterion for genetic screening was compliance to the revised Bethesda guidelines. Larger numbers of Lynch syndrome families and screening of the two additional predisposition genes, PMS2 and EPCAM, are needed in order to decipher the full spectrum of mutations associated with Lynch syndrome predisposition in Cyprus.

  8. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

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    Takao Oishi

    Full Text Available In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  9. Usher syndrome in Denmark: mutation spectrum and some clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Grønskov, Karen; Karstensen, Helena Gásdal; Brox, Vigdis; Nilssen, Øivind; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2016-09-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic methods. Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C,USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted NGS of ten known USH genes. Five novel pathogenic variants were identified. We combined our data with previously published, and obtained an overview of the USH mutation spectrum in Denmark, including 100 unrelated individuals; 32 with USH1, 67 with USH2, and 1 with USH3. Macular edema was observed in 44 of 117 individuals. Olfactory function was tested in 12 individuals and found to be within normal range in all. Mutations that lead to USH1 were predominantly identified in MYO7A (75%), whereas all mutations in USH2 cases were identified in USH2A. The MYO7A mutation c.93C>A, p.(Cys31*) accounted for 33% of all USH1 mutations and the USH2A c.2299delG, p.(Glu767Serfs*21) variant accounted for 45% of all USH2 mutations in the Danish cohort.

  10. CHD7 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with Kallmann syndrome - the clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M. C. J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Pitteloud, N.; Ogata, T.; Sato, N.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H. L.; van der Donk, K.; Seminara, S.; Bergman, J. E. H.; Brunner, H. G.; Crowley, W. F.; Hoefsloot, L. H.

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia, two features that are also frequently present in CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. We performed analysis of CHD7 in 36 patients with KS and 20 patients with

  11. Clinical manifestations in patients with SOS1 mutations range from Noonan syndrome to CFC syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Yoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masahiro; Cavé, Hélène; Verloes, Alain; Nishio, Kimio; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kawame, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Seiji; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Addor, Marie-Claude; Coeslier-Dieux, Anne; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Tabayashi, Koichi; Aoki, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Guliyeva, Afag; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome are autosomal dominant disorders characterized by heart defects, facial dysmorphism, ectodermal abnormalities, and mental retardation. There is a significant clinical overlap between NS and CFC syndrome, but ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation are more frequent in CFC syndrome. Mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS have been identified in patients with NS and those in KRAS, BRAF and MAP2K1/2 have been identified in patients with CFC syndrome, establishing a new role of the RAS/MAPK pathway in human development. Recently, mutations in the son of sevenless gene (SOS1) have also been identified in patients with NS. To clarify the clinical spectrum of patients with SOS1 mutations, we analyzed 24 patients with NS, including 3 patients in a three-generation family, and 30 patients with CFC syndrome without PTPN11, KRAS, HRAS, BRAF, and MAP2K1/2 (MEK1/2) mutations. We identified two SOS1 mutations in four NS patients, including three patients in the above-mentioned three-generation family. In the patients with a CFC phenotype, three mutations, including a novel three amino-acid insertion, were identified in one CFC patient and two patients with both NS and CFC phenotypes. These three patients exhibited ectodermal abnormalities, such as curly hair, sparse eyebrows, and dry skin, and two of them showed mental retardation. Our results suggest that patients with SOS1 mutations range from NS to CFC syndrome.

  12. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should...

  13. Expanding the mutation and clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Eid, Maha M; Tosson, Angie M S; Shousha, Wafaa Gh; Abdel Azeem, Amira A; Farag, Mona K; Mehrez, Mennat I; Gaber, Khaled R

    2016-07-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia syndrome are rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders representing the extremes of the spectrum of severity of the same condition, caused by mutations in ESCO2 gene. We report three new patients with Roberts syndrome from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families. All patients presented with growth retardation, mesomelic shortening of the limbs more in the upper than in the lower limbs and microcephaly. Patients were subjected to clinical, cytogenetic and radiologic examinations. Cytogenetic analysis showed the characteristic premature separation of centromeres and puffing of heterochromatic regions. Further, sequencing of the ESCO2 gene identified a novel mutation c.244_245dupCT (p.T83Pfs*20) in one family besides two previously reported mutations c.760_761insA (p.T254Nfs*27) and c.764_765delTT (p.F255Cfs*25). All mutations were in homozygous state, in exon 3. The severity of the mesomelic shortening of the limbs and craniofacial anomalies showed variability among patients. Interestingly, patient 1 had abnormal skin hypopigmentation. Serial fetal ultrasound examinations and measurements of long bones diagnosed two affected fetuses in two of the studied families. A literature review and case comparison was performed. In conclusion, we report a novel ESCO2 mutation and expand the clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  14. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Maria; Tabet, Lara; Yazbeck, Nadine; Araj, Alia; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Charaffedine, Khalil; Fares, Farah; Badra, Rebecca; Farra, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885(*))) and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671(*))) in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  15. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valencia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885* and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671* in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  16. A dominant STIM1 mutation causes Stormorken syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misceo, Doriana; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Louch, William E; Holme, Pål A; Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Morales, Raul J; De Paula, André Maues; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Lyle, Robert; Dalhus, Bjørn; Christensen, Geir; Stormorken, Helge; Tjønnfjord, Geir E; Frengen, Eirik

    2014-05-01

    Stormorken syndrome is a rare autosomal-dominant disease with mild bleeding tendency, thrombocytopathy, thrombocytopenia, mild anemia, asplenia, tubular aggregate myopathy, miosis, headache, and ichthyosis. A heterozygous missense mutation in STIM1 exon 7 (c.910C>T; p.Arg304Trp) (NM_003156.3) was found to segregate with the disease in six Stormorken syndrome patients in four families. Upon sensing Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, STIM1 undergoes a conformational change enabling it to interact with and open ORAI1, a Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channel located in the plasma membrane. The STIM1 mutation found in Stormorken syndrome patients is located in the coiled-coil 1 domain, which might play a role in keeping STIM1 inactive. In agreement with a possible gain-of-function mutation in STIM1, blood platelets from patients were in a preactivated state with high exposure of aminophospholipids on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. Resting Ca(2+) levels were elevated in platelets from the patients compared with controls, and store-operated Ca(2+) entry was markedly attenuated, further supporting constitutive activity of STIM1 and ORAI1. Thus, our data are compatible with a near-maximal activation of STIM1 in Stormorken syndrome patients. We conclude that the heterozygous mutation c.910C>T causes the complex phenotype that defines this syndrome. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  18. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  19. Spliceosome mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Virginie; Kosmider, Olivier; Damm, Frederik; Itzykson, Raphael; Bernard, Olivier A; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

    2012-11-01

    The recently discovered spliceosome mutations represent a group of acquired genetic alterations that affect both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. A substantial proportion of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytoic leukemia (CMML) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) harbor such mutations, which are often missense in type. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been observed, including the clustering of ring sideroblasts with SF3B1 mutations in MDS. Spliceosome mutations might result in defective small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes assembly on the pre-mRNA, deregulated global and alternative mRNA splicing, nuclear-cytoplasm export, and unpliced mRNA degradation, and thus may alter the expression of multiple genes. In the current review, we discuss the potential role of these mutations in cell transformation and how they could impact the therapeutic approaches.

  20. Angelman Syndrome Due to UBE3A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Jyotindra Narayan; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-12-18

    A 12-y-old boy presented with developmental delay, autism, epilepsy, limb tremors and behavioral problems which posed a diagnostic challenge. Though his clinical profile and electroencephalogram were suggestive of Angelman syndrome, initial genetic tests were unyielding. Exome sequencing revealed a previously unreported mutation of Ubiquitin Protein Ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, confirming the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. The case is aimed to sensitize pediatricians about Angelman syndrome and to highlight the role of sequential investigations in establishing the diagnosis.

  1. Cantu syndrome is caused by mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, B.W. van; Gilissen, C.; Grange, D.K.; Hennekam, R.C.; Kayserili, H.; Engels, H.; Reutter, H.; Ostergaard, J.R.; Morava, E.; Tsiakas, K.; Isidor, B.; Merrer, M. le; Eser, M.; Wieskamp, N.; Vries, P. de; Steehouwer, M.; Veltman, J.A.; Robertson, S.P.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, B.B. de; Hoischen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  2. Cantu Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Grange, Dorothy K.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kayserili, Hülya; Engels, Hartmut; Reutter, Heiko; Ostergaard, John R.; Morava, Eva; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Merrer, Martine; Eser, Metin; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Vries, Petra; Steehouwer, Marloes; Veltman, Joris A.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Brunner, Han G.; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Hoischen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  3. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dominici

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  4. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lattanzi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  5. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Syndrome: CDH1 Mutations and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Samantha; Kaurah, Pardeep; Li-Chang, Hector; Woo, Michelle; Senz, Janine; Pinheiro, Hugo; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Schaeffer, David F; Shumansky, Karey; Zogopoulos, George; Santos, Teresa Almeida; Claro, Isabel; Carvalho, Joana; Nielsen, Cydney; Padilla, Sarah; Lum, Amy; Talhouk, Aline; Baker-Lange, Katie; Richardson, Sue; Lewis, Ivy; Lindor, Noralane M; Pennell, Erin; MacMillan, Andree; Fernandez, Bridget; Keller, Gisella; Lynch, Henry; Shah, Sohrab P; Guilford, Parry; Gallinger, Steven; Corso, Giovanni; Roviello, Franco; Caldas, Carlos; Oliveira, Carla; Pharoah, Paul D P; Huntsman, David G

    2015-04-01

    . Clinically defined HDGC families can harbor mutations in genes (ie, BRCA2) with different clinical ramifications from CDH1. Therefore, we propose that HDGC syndrome may be best defined by mutations in CDH1 and closely related genes, rather than through clinical criteria that capture families with heterogeneous susceptibility profiles.

  6. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taghdiri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C in our patient. Another gene (ERCC6, which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  7. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G; O'Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C P; Green, Anthony R; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-11-21

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic "predestination," in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application.

  8. Exome sequencing reveals a de novo POLD1 mutation causing phenotypic variability in mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elouej, Sahar; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Caswell, Richard; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian; Desvignes, Jean Pierre; Béroud, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Mohammed, Shehla; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2017-06-01

    Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance and metabolic abnormalities. This syndrome is caused by heterozygous de novo mutations in the POLD1 gene. To date, 19 patients with MDPL have been reported in the literature and among them 14 patients have been characterized at the molecular level. Twelve unrelated patients carried a recurrent in-frame deletion of a single codon (p.Ser605del) and two other patients carried a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 13 (p.Arg507Cys). Additionally and interestingly, germline mutations of the same gene have been involved in familial polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. We describe a male and a female patient with MDPL respectively affected with mild and severe phenotypes. Both of them showed mandibular hypoplasia, a beaked nose with bird-like facies, prominent eyes, a small mouth, growth retardation, muscle and skin atrophy, but the female patient showed such a severe and early phenotype that a first working diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria was made. The exploration was performed by direct sequencing of POLD1 gene exon 15 in the male patient with a classical MDPL phenotype and by whole exome sequencing in the female patient and her unaffected parents. Exome sequencing identified in the latter patient a de novo heterozygous undescribed mutation in the POLD1 gene (NM_002691.3: c.3209T>A), predicted to cause the missense change p.Ile1070Asn in the ZnF2 (Zinc Finger 2) domain of the protein. This mutation was not reported in the 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP and Exome sequencing databases. Furthermore, the Isoleucine1070 residue of POLD1 is highly conserved among various species, suggesting that this substitution may cause a major impairment of POLD1 activity. For the second patient, affected with a typical MDPL phenotype, direct sequencing

  9. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  10. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152.

  11. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientific test to definitively diagnose children with Progeria. What is the Gene for HGPS? The gene responsible for HGPS is called LMNA (pronounced Lamin A). Within this gene there is a change in one element of DNA. This type of gene change is ...

  12. Novel Frameshift CHD7 Mutation Related to CHARGE Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, E; Rodríguez-González, F; Garay-Sánchez, P; Tugores, A

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare congenital condition characterized by 6 cardinal features: coloboma, heart defect, atresia choanae, retarded growth and development, genital anomalies, and ear anomalies/deafness. Mutations of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein gene CHD7 are reported to be a major cause of CHARGE syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 27-year-old patient presenting with typical symptoms who bears a novel heterozygous insertion in exon 2 of the CHD7 gene (c.327dupC) resulting in an amino acid substitution and a frameshift (p.Val110Argfs*22) that leads to a 131-amino-acid truncated polypeptide, likely representing a null allele. Parental genetic screening confirmed the sporadic origin of the mutation.

  13. GZF1 Mutations Expand the Genetic Heterogeneity of Larsen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Sakati, Nadia; Khan, Arif O; Softa, Ameen; Al-Fadhli, Fatima M; Hashem, Mais; Abdulwahab, Firdous M; Alshidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Alobeid, Eman; Wakil, Salma M; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-05-04

    Larsen syndrome is characterized by the dislocation of large joints and other less consistent clinical findings. Heterozygous FLNB mutations account for the majority of Larsen syndrome cases, but biallelic mutations in CHST3 and B4GALT7 have been more recently described, thus confirming the existence of recessive forms of the disease. In a multiplex consanguineous Saudi family affected by severe and recurrent large joint dislocation and severe myopia, we identified a homozygous truncating variant in GZF1 through a combined autozygome and exome approach. Independently, the same approach identified a second homozygous truncating GZF1 variant in another multiplex consanguineous family affected by severe myopia, retinal detachment, and milder skeletal involvement. GZF1 encodes GDNF-inducible zinc finger protein 1, a transcription factor of unknown developmental function, which we found to be expressed in the eyes and limbs of developing mice. Global transcriptional profiling of cells from affected individuals revealed a shared pattern of gene dysregulation and significant enrichment of genes encoding matrix proteins, including P3H2, which hints at a potential disease mechanism. Our results suggest that GZF1 mutations cause a phenotype of severe myopia and significant articular involvement not previously described in Larsen syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. GLI3 mutations in syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly in two Indian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rashmi; Singh, Chandra Bhan; Bhattacharya, Visweswar; Singh, Subodh Kumar; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-03-01

    The GLI3 protein is a zinc finger transcription factor, expressed early in development. The GLI3 gene exhibits allelic heterogeneity as mutations in this gene are associated with several developmental syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. The present study reports two cases: first, a familial case of Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly Syndrome (GCPS); the second is a sporadic case with both postaxial polydactyly (PAP) type A and B. Resequencing of GLI3 gene reveals a previously reported nonsense truncation mutation g.42007251G > A (p.R792X; rs121917714) in the GCPS family and a novel single nucleotide insertion g.42004239_42004240insA (p.E1478X) in the sporadic case of postaxial polydactyly (PAP). Both nonsense truncation mutations; p.R792X (GCPS) and p.E1478X (PAP) introduce a premature stop codon leading to loss of C-terminal domains. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  15. Congenital short bowel syndrome as the presenting symptom in male patients with FLNA mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Sribudiani, Yunia; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Carroll, Matthew; O'Loughlin, Edward; Chen, Chien-Huan; Brooks, Alice S.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Purpose: Autosomal recessive congenital short bowel syndrome is caused by mutations in CLMP. No mutations were found in the affected males of a family with presumed X-linked congenital short bowel syndrome or in an isolated male patient. Our aim was to identify the disease-causing mutation in these

  16. Three novel mutations responsible for Cockayne syndrome group A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yan; Saijo, Masafumi; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanaka, Kiyoji [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences; Nakai, Hiroshi [Hachinohe National Hospital, Aomori (Japan); Yamaizumi, Masaru [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Molecular Embryology and Genetics

    2003-02-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, which shows diverse clinical symptoms such as photosensitivity, severe mental retardation and developmental defects. CS cells are hypersensitive to killing by ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation and defective in transcription-coupled repair. Two genetic complementation groups in CS (CS-A and CS-B) have been identified. We analyzed mutations of the CSA gene in 5 CS-A patients and identified 3 types of mutations. Four unrelated CS-A patients (CS2OS, CS2AW, Nps2 and CS2SE) had a deletion including exon 4, suggesting that there is a founder effect on the CSA mutation in Japanese CS-A patients. Patient CS2SE was a compound heterozygote for this deletion and an amino acid substitution at the 106th glutamine to proline (Q106P) in the WD-40 repeat motif of the CSA protein, which resulted in a defective nucleotide excision repair. Patient Mps1 had a large deletion in the upstream region including exon 1 of the CSA gene. Our results indicate that a rapid and reliable diagnosis of CSA mutations could be achieved in CS-A patients by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and that the Q106P mutation could alter the propeller structure of the CSA protein which is important for the formation of the CSA protein complex. (author)

  17. Novel PAX9 mutation associated with syndromic tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowska, Adrianna; Zadurska, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Lianeri, Margarita; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2013-10-01

    Tooth agenesis is the most common anomaly of dental development. The purpose of the present study was to identify the causative mutation(s) in a family with a syndromic form of hypodontia. The male proband lacked 19 permanent teeth and showed defects of hair, but lacked ectodermal symptoms of skin and nails. Direct sequencing of the coding regions, including exon/intron boundaries of the msh homeobox 1 (MSX1), paired box 9 (PAX9), ectodysplasin A (EDA), and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 10 (WNT10A) genes, was carried out in affected family members. All identified nucleotide variations were tested in 200 healthy individuals using high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis to exclude the possibility that they represent rare polymorphisms. A novel heterozygous c.59delC mutation, segregating in the autosomal-dominant model, was identified in the PAX9 gene of the proband and the family members studied. This one-nucleotide deletion, located in a highly conserved paired box sequence, resulted in a frameshift (p.Pro20Argfs65) and in premature termination of translation, yielding a truncated protein 258 amino acids shorter than the wildtype protein. No pathogenic mutations were found in the MSX1, EDA, and WNT10A genes. In conclusion, the novel PAX9 deletion might be responsible for tooth agenesis and trichodysplasia in the investigated family. This c.59delC mutation potentially leads to PAX9 transcription factor haploinsufficiency. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. DNASE1L3 mutations in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçakar, Z Birsin; Foster, Joseph; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Kasapcopur, Ozgur; Fan, Yao-Shan; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-08-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is characterized by recurrent urticaria along with dermal vasculitis, arthritis, and glomerulonephritis. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) develops in >50% of patients with HUVS, although the pathogenesis is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the causative DNA mutations in 2 families with autosomal-recessive HUVS, in order to reveal the pathogenesis and facilitate the laboratory diagnosis. Autozygosity mapping was combined with whole-exome sequencing. In a family with 3 affected children, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation, c.289_290delAC, in DNASE1L3. We subsequently identified another homozygous DNASE1L3 mutation leading to exon skipping, c.320+4delAGTA, in an unrelated family. The detected mutations led to loss of function, via either nonsense-mediated messenger RNA decay or abolished endonuclease activity, as demonstrated by a plasmid nicking assay. These results show that HUVS is caused by mutations in DNASE1L3, encoding an endonuclease that previously has been associated with SLE. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Polyhydramnios, Transient Antenatal Bartter's Syndrome, and MAGED2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghmani, Kamel; Beck, Bodo B; Yang, Sung-Sen; Seaayfan, Elie; Wenzel, Andrea; Reusch, Björn; Vitzthum, Helga; Priem, Dario; Demaretz, Sylvie; Bergmann, Klasien; Duin, Leonie K; Göbel, Heike; Mache, Christoph; Thiele, Holger; Bartram, Malte P; Dombret, Carlos; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Levtchenko, Elena; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W; Klaus, Günter; Yigit, Gökhan; Lin, Shih-Hua; Timmer, Albert; de Koning, Tom J; Scherjon, Sicco A; Schlingmann, Karl P; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Rinschen, Markus M; de Backer, Olivier; Konrad, Martin; Kömhoff, Martin

    2016-05-12

    Three pregnancies with male offspring in one family were complicated by severe polyhydramnios and prematurity. One fetus died; the other two had transient massive salt-wasting and polyuria reminiscent of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. To uncover the molecular cause of this possibly X-linked disease, we performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from two members of the index family and targeted gene analysis of other members of this family and of six additional families with affected male fetuses. We also evaluated a series of women with idiopathic polyhydramnios who were pregnant with male fetuses. We performed immunohistochemical analysis, knockdown and overexpression experiments, and protein-protein interaction studies. We identified a mutation in MAGED2 in each of the 13 infants in our analysis who had transient antenatal Bartter's syndrome. MAGED2 encodes melanoma-associated antigen D2 (MAGE-D2) and maps to the X chromosome. We also identified two different MAGED2 mutations in two families with idiopathic polyhydramnios. Four patients died perinatally, and 11 survived. The initial presentation was more severe than in known types of antenatal Bartter's syndrome, as reflected by an earlier onset of polyhydramnios and labor. All symptoms disappeared spontaneously during follow-up in the infants who survived. We showed that MAGE-D2 affects the expression and function of the sodium chloride cotransporters NKCC2 and NCC (key components of salt reabsorption in the distal renal tubule), possibly through adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP signaling and a cytoplasmic heat-shock protein. We found that MAGED2 mutations caused X-linked polyhydramnios with prematurity and a severe but transient form of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. MAGE-D2 is essential for fetal renal salt reabsorption, amniotic fluid homeostasis, and the maintenance of pregnancy. (Funded by the University of Groningen and others.).

  20. Cockayne syndrome: the expanding clinical and mutational spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a progressive multisystem disorder characterized by a specific cellular defect in transcription-coupled repair. Typical features include developmental delay, failure to thrive, microcephaly, cutaneous photosensitivity, dental anomalies, progressive hearing loss, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts and enophthalmia. Various levels of severity have been described including the "classical" or moderate type I CS, the early-onset or severe type II and the mild or late-onset type III. Adult-onset cases with prolonged survival and normal initial development have also been identified. At the opposite end of the scale, the most severely affected patients, showing a prenatal onset of the symptoms, are overlapping with the cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome. These overlapping subtypes build a continuous spectrum without clear thresholds. Revised diagnostic criteria are proposed to improve the recognition of the disease. Two thirds of the patients are linked to mutations in the CSB (ERCC6) gene, one third to mutations in the CSA (ERCC8) gene. At least 78 different mutations are known in the CSB gene and 30 in the CSA gene to date, in more than 120 genetically confirmed patients. Large clinical and molecular databases are needed to unravel genotype-phenotype correlations and to gain more insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recessive mutations in PTHR1 cause contrasting skeletal dysplasias in Eiken and Blomstrand syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Cortes, Dina

    2005-01-01

    Eiken syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. We identified a truncation mutation in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PTHR1) gene as the cause of this syndrome. Eiken syndrome differs from Jansen...... and Blomstrand chondrodysplasia and from enchondromatosis, which are all syndromes caused by PTHR1 mutations. Notably, the skeletal features are opposite to those in Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, which is caused by inactivating recessive mutations in PTHR1. To our knowledge, this is the first description...... of opposite manifestations resulting from distinct recessive mutations in the same gene....

  2. A large-scale mutation search reveals genetic heterogeneity in 3M syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Céline; Delezoide, Anee-Lise; Guimiot, Fabien; Baumann, Clarisse; Malan, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Da Silva, Daniela Bezerra; Bonneau, Dominique; Chatelain, Pierre; Chu, Carol; Clark, Robin; Cox, Helen; Edery, Patrick; Edouard, Thomas; Fano, Virginia; Gibson, Kate; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Giovannucci-Uzielli, Maria-Luisa; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard Margarete; van Hagen, Johana-Maria; van Hest, Liselot; Horovitz, Dafne; Melki, Judith; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Plauchu, Henry; Rajab, Anna; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sillence, David; Steichen-Gersdorf, Elisabeth; Stewart, Helen; Unger, Sheila; Zenker, Martin; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    The 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder recently ascribed to mutations in the CUL7 gene and characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. Studying a series of 33 novel cases of 3M syndrome, we have identified deleterious CUL7 mutations in 23/33 patients, including 19 novel mutations and one paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 mutation. Lack of mutations in 10/33 cases and exclusion of the CUL7 locus on chromosome 6p21.1 in six consanguineous families strongly support the genetic heterogeneity of the 3M syndrome. PMID:19225462

  3. A new mutation of Fanconi–Bickel syndrome with liver failure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-12-13

    -2 gene that causes Fanconi–Bickel syndrome. Moreover, we show that pseudotumour cerebri and liver failure might be novel presentations of Fanconi–. Bickel syndrome and they might be associated with this new mutation.

  4. Triple A syndrome: two novel mutations in the AAAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, Susanne; Huebner, Angela; Baechler-Sadoul, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is a rare disease of autosomal recessive inheritance. It was first described in 1978. The typical triad includes adrenocorticotrophic-hormone-resistant glucocorticoid insufficiency, reduced or absent tearing (alacrima) and achalasia. But clinical symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous and of variable clinically expression. This report describes a 7-year-old boy with a 1 year history of fatigue and muscle weakness. Physical examination showed skin and mucosal hyperpigmentation, and hormonal analysis revealed isolated glucocorticoid function. Medical history was marked by megaoesophagus and achalasia. The absence of tears when crying had been noted since birth. In the presence of the classical triad, triple A syndrome was diagnosed. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the AAAS gene on chromosome 12q13. The novel compound heterozygous mutation c.1304delA and c.1292-1294delTTCinsA was found.

  5. Multiple arrhythmic syndromes in a newborn, owing to a novel mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Schmitt, Nicole; Grubb, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been linked to Brugada syndrome (BrS), conduction disease, Long QT syndrome (LQT3), atrial fibrillation (AF), and to pre- and neonatal ventricular arrhythmias.......Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been linked to Brugada syndrome (BrS), conduction disease, Long QT syndrome (LQT3), atrial fibrillation (AF), and to pre- and neonatal ventricular arrhythmias....

  6. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2....... After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations....... Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369...

  7. An Atypical Rett Syndrome Phenotype Due to a Novel Missense Mutation in CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, Madison V; Haws, Michael E; Standridge, Shannon M; Gilbert, Donald L

    2018-03-01

    Some typical and atypical Rett syndrome patients lack known genetic mutations. Mutations in the P/Q type calcium channel CACNA1A have been implicated in epileptic encephalopathy, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6, but not Rett syndrome. Patient Description: The authors describe a female patient with developmental regression and a de novo, likely pathogenic mutation in CACNA1A who meets 3 of 4 main criteria (stereotypic hand movements, loss of purposeful hand movements, gait disturbance), and 6 of 11 supportive criteria (impaired sleep, abnormal tone, vasomotor disturbance, scoliosis, growth retardation, and screaming spells) for atypical Rett syndrome. Furthermore, she resembles the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. Previously, 3 children with similar CACNA1A mutations have been reported, but a Rett syndrome phenotype has not been described. CACNA1A mutations should be considered in children presenting with an atypical Rett syndrome phenotype, specifically, the early seizure variant.

  8. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mutation Update for UBE3A variants in Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Fernandes, Priscilla; Zhang, Victor Wei; Ward, Patricia A; Miloslavskaya, Irene; Rhead, William; Rosenbaum, Richard; Gin, Robert; Roa, Benjamin; Fang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deficiency of the imprinted and maternally expressed UBE3A gene. Although de novo genetic and epigenetic imprinting defects of UBE3A genomic locus account for majority of Angelman diagnoses, approximately 10% of individuals affected with Angelman syndrome are a result of UBE3A loss-of-function mutations occurring on the expressed maternal chromosome. The variants described in this manuscript represent the analysis of 2,515 patients referred for UBE3A gene sequencing at our institution, along with a comprehensive review of the UBE3A mutation literature. Of these, 267 (10.62%) patients had a report issued for detection of a UBE3A gene nucleotide variant, which in many cases involved family studies resulting in reclassification of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Overall, 111 (4.41%) probands had a nucleotide change classified as pathogenic or strongly favored to be pathogenic, 29 (1.15%) had a VUS, and 126 (5.0%) had a nucleotide change classified as benign or strongly favored to be benign. All variants and their clinical interpretations are submitted to NCBI ClinVar, a freely accessible human variation and phenotype database. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor prevents both the onset and late progression of cardiovascular disease in a progeria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Cao, Kan; Faddah, Dina A; Tavarez, Urraca L; Conneely, Karen N; Qu, Xuan; San, Hong; Ganesh, Santhi K; Chen, Xiaoyan; Avallone, Hedwig; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2008-10-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is the most dramatic form of human premature aging. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 years, usually from heart attack or stroke. Almost all cases of HGPS are caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene that results in production of a mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. This protein is permanently modified by a lipid farnesyl group, and acts as a dominant negative, disrupting nuclear structure. Treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) has been shown to prevent and even reverse this nuclear abnormality in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We have previously created a mouse model of HGPS that shows progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media of the large arteries, in a pattern that is strikingly similar to the cardiovascular disease seen in patients with HGPS. Here we show that the dose-dependent administration of the FTI tipifarnib (R115777, Zarnestra) to this HGPS mouse model can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease. These observations provide encouraging evidence for the current clinical trial of FTIs for this rare and devastating disease.

  11. Syndromic parkinsonism and dementia associated with OPA 1 missense mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Olimpia; Caporali, Leonardo; Zanna, Claudia; La Morgia, Chiara; Del Dotto, Valentina; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Rugolo, Michela; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Iommarini, Luisa; Maresca, Alessandra; Barboni, Piero; Carbonelli, Michele; Trombetta, Costantino; Valente, Enza Maria; Patergnani, Simone; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Lodi, Raffaele; Avoni, Patrizia; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Toscano, Antonio; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mounting evidence links neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease with mitochondrial dysfunction, and recent emphasis has focused on mitochondrial dynamics and quality control. Mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA maintenance is another link recently emerged, implicating mutations in the mitochondrial fusion genes OPA1 and MFN2 in the pathogenesis of multisystem syndromes characterized by neurodegeneration and accumulation of mtDNA multiple deletions in postmitotic tissues. Here, we report 2 Italian families affected by dominant chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) complicated by parkinsonism and dementia. Methods Patients were extensively studied by optical coherence tomography (OCT) to assess retinal nerve fibers, and underwent muscle and brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and muscle biopsy and fibroblasts were analyzed. Candidate genes were sequenced, and mtDNA was analyzed for rearrangements. Results Affected individuals displayed a slowly progressive syndrome characterized by CPEO, mitochondrial myopathy, sensorineural deafness, peripheral neuropathy, parkinsonism, and/or cognitive impairment, in most cases without visual complains, but with subclinical loss of retinal nerve fibers at OCT. Muscle biopsies showed cytochrome c oxidase‐negative fibers and mtDNA multiple deletions, and MRS displayed defective oxidative metabolism in muscle and brain. We found 2 heterozygous OPA1 missense mutations affecting highly conserved amino acid positions (p.G488R, p.A495V) in the guanosine triphosphatase domain, each segregating with affected individuals. Fibroblast studies showed a reduced amount of OPA1 protein with normal mRNA expression, fragmented mitochondria, impaired bioenergetics, increased autophagy and mitophagy. Interpretation The association of CPEO and parkinsonism/dementia with subclinical optic neuropathy widens the phenotypic spectrum of OPA1 mutations, highlighting the association of

  12. Angelman Syndrome: Mutations Influence Features in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Hann; Bacino, Carlos A.; Skinner, Steven A.; Anselm, Irina; Barbieri-Welge, Rene; Bauer-Carlin, Astrid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Gentile, Jennifer K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Horowitz, Lucia T.; Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Lee, Hye-Seung; Nespeca, Mark P.; Peters, Sarika U.; Sahoo, Trilochan; Sarco, Dean; Waisbren, Susan E.; Bird, Lynne M.

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a lack of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A. Although the “classic” features of AS are well described, few large-scale studies have delineated the clinical features in AS. We present baseline data from 92 children with a molecular diagnosis of AS between 5 and 60 months old who are enrolled in the National Institutes of Health Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Angelman Syndrome Natural History Study from January 2006 to March 2008. Seventy-four percent of participants had deletions, 14% had either uniparental disomy (UPD) or imprinting defects, and 12% had UBE3A mutations. Participants with UPD/imprinting defects were heavier (P = 0.0002), while those with deletions were lighter, than the general population (P < 0.0001). Twenty out of 92 participants were underweight, all of whom had deletions or UBE3A mutations. Eight out of 92 participants (6/13 (46%) with UPD/imprinting defects and 2/11 (18%) with UBE3A mutations) were obese. Seventy-four out of 92 participants (80%) had absolute or relative microcephaly. No participant was macrocephalic. The most common behavioral findings were mouthing behavior (95%), short attention span (92%), ataxic or broad-based gait (88%), history of sleep difficulties (80%), and fascination with water (75%). Frequent, easily provoked laughter was observed in 60%. Clinical seizures were reported in 65% of participants but all electroencephalograms (EEGs) were abnormal. We conclude that the most characteristic feature of AS is the neurobehavioral phenotype, but specific EEG findings are highly sensitive for AS. Obesity is common among those with UPD/imprinting defects. PMID:21204213

  13. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  14. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burrage, L.C.; Charng, W.L.; Eldomery, M.K.; Willer, J.R.; Davis, E.E.; Lugtenberg, D.; Zhu, W.; Leduc, M.S.; Akdemir, Z.C.; Azamian, M.; Zapata, G.; Hernandez, P.P.; Schoots, J.; Munnik, S.A. de; Roepman, R.; Pearring, J.N.; Jhangiani, S.; Katsanis, N.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Beaudet, A.L.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Muzny, D.M.; Gibbs, R.A.; Eng, C.M.; Xia, F.; Lalani, S.R.; Lupski, J.R.; Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin

  15. Correlation between clinical features and MECP2 gene mutations in patients with Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Megahed

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Mutation screening for MECP2 is a fast and reliable method to diagnose patients clinically suspected to suffer from Rett syndrome or female patients with atypical Rett syndrome features, mental retardation, developmental delay and other neurological abnormalities who do not fit any specific diagnosis. Also, patients with MECP2 mutation presented with a more severe phenotype.

  16. Ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia, and photophobia syndrome associated with a new mutation in MBTPS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, K; Takeichi, T; Liu, L; Pramanik, R; Lee, J; Akiyama, M; McGrath, J A

    2015-07-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome (OMIM 308205) is a rare X-linked genetic disorder. Mutations in MBTPS2 underlie IFAP syndrome, with 19 different mutations reported to date. Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an allelic disorder that results from a single recurrent mutation, p.Asn508Ser. We report a case from the UK of IFAP syndrome resulting from a new mutation, p.Asn508Thr, emphasizing the significant overlap between IFAP and KFSD at both the molecular and clinical levels. An area of alopecia on the scalp of the proband's mother was also noted, suggesting lyonization. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Recurrent and Founder Mutations in the Netherlands: the Long-QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, N.; Jongbloed, R.; Postema, P.G.; Nannenberg, E.; Alders, M.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective The long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is associated with premature sudden cardiac deaths affecting whole families and is caused by mutations in genes encoding for cardiac proteins. When the same mutation is found in different families (recurrent mutations), this may imply either a

  18. Brief Report:MECP2 Mutations in People without Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Bernhard; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in "Methyl-CpG-Binding protein 2" ("MECP2") are commonly associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). However, some people with RTT do not have mutations in "MECP2," and interestingly there have been people identified with "MECP2" mutations that do not have the clinical…

  19. SCN5A mutations and the role of genetic background in the pathophysiology of Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Probst, Vincent; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Barc, Julien; Sacher, Frederic; Babuty, Dominique; Mabo, Philippe; Mansourati, Jacques; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Kyndt, Florence; Le Caignec, Cedric; Guicheney, Pascale; Gouas, Laetitia; Albuisson, Juliette; Meregalli, Paola G.; Le Marec, Hervé; Tan, Hanno L.; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SCN5A are identified in approximately 20% to 30% of probands affected by Brugada syndrome (BrS). However, in familial studies, the relationship between SCN5A mutations and BrS remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of SCN5A mutations and BrS

  20. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...... is required for maintenance of both activation and silencing of Hox genes. In total, 7 out of 13 subjects with a Bohring-Opitz phenotype had de novo ASXL1 mutations, suggesting that the syndrome is genetically heterogeneous....

  1. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  2. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, Liselotte P; Ruijs, Mariëlle W G; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A; Verhoef, Senno; van't Veer, Laura J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS. We present a family with LFS in which initially a novel germline TP53 intron 5 splice site mutation was found. A second germline TP53 mutation, the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation, was detected in this family through pre-symptomatic DNA testing. This latter mutation has been reported repeatedly in the literature as a pathogenic mutation involved in LFS. We provide evidence for pathogenicity of the novel intron 5 splice site mutation, whereas this evidence is lacking for the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation. Our findings emphasize the importance of performing additional tests in case of germline sequence variants with uncertain functional effects.

  4. Mutations in the TGF-beta repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)(1-4). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively

  5. Cardiac sodium channel overlap syndromes: different faces of SCN5A mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel dysfunction caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene is associated with a number of relatively uncommon arrhythmia syndromes, including long-QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome, conduction disease, sinus node dysfunction, and atrial standstill, which potentially lead to

  6. [Schinzel-Giedion syndrome: a new mutation in SETBP1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, V; Domingo-Jiménez, M R; Burglen, L; Ballesta-Martínez, M J; Whalen, S; Piñero-Fernández, J A; Guillén-Navarro, E

    2015-01-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) (#MIM 269150) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by very marked craniofacial dysmorphism, multiple congenital anomalies and severe intellectual disability. Most affected patients die in early childhood. SETBP1 was identified as the causative gene, but a limited number of patients with molecular confirmation have been reported to date. The case is reported of a 4 and a half year-old male patient, affected by SGS. SETBP1 sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a non-previously described mutation: c.2608G>T (p.Gly870Cys). The clinical features and differential diagnosis of this rare condition are reviewed. Dysmorphic features are strongly suggestive of SGS. Its clinical recognition is essential to enable an early diagnosis, a proper follow-up, and to provide the family with genetic counseling. To date, this is the seventeenth SGS patient published with SETBP1 mutation, and the first in Spain, helping to widen clinical and molecular knowledge of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. A new CARD15 mutation in Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duist, Marjan M; Albrecht, Mario; Podswiadek, Marta; Giachino, Daniela; Lengauer, Thomas; Punzi, Leonardo; De Marchi, Mario

    2005-06-01

    The caspase recruitment domain gene CARD15/NOD2, encoding a cellular receptor involved in an NF-kappaB-mediated pathway of innate immunity, was first identified as a major susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease (CD), and more recently, as responsible for Blau syndrome (BS), a rare autosomal-dominant trait characterized by arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and granulomatous inflammation. While CARD15 variants associated with CD are located within or near the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and cause decreased NF-kappaB activation, BS mutations affect the central nucleotide-binding NACHT domain and result in increased NF-kappaB activation. In an Italian family with BS, we detected a novel mutation E383K, whose pathogenicity is strongly supported by cosegregation with the disease in the family and absence in controls, and by the evolutionary conservation and structural role of the affected glutamate close to the Walker B motif of the nucleotide-binding site in the NACHT domain. Interestingly, substitutions at corresponding positions in another NACHT family member cause similar autoinflammatory phenotypes.

  8. Identification of SCN1A and PCDH19 mutations in Chinese children with Dravet syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ka-Yee Kwong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dravet syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy. Majority of patients have a mutation in SCN1A gene, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel. A recent study has demonstrated that 16% of SCN1A-negative patients have a mutation in PCDH19, the gene encoding protocadherin-19. Mutations in other genes account for only a very small proportion of families. TSPYL4 is a novel candidate gene within the locus 6q16.3-q22.31 identified by linkage study. OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the mutations in epileptic Chinese children with emphasis on Dravet syndrome. METHODS: A hundred children with severe epilepsy were divided into Dravet syndrome and non-Dravet syndrome groups and screened for SCN1A mutations by direct sequencing. SCN1A-negative Dravet syndrome patients and patients with phenotypes resembling Dravet syndrome were checked for PCDH19 and TSPYL4 mutations. RESULTS: Eighteen patients (9 males, 9 females were diagnosed to have Dravet syndrome. Among them, 83% (15/18 had SCN1A mutations including truncating (7, splice site (2 and missense mutations (6. The truncating/splice site mutations were associated with moderate to severe degree of intellectual disability (p<0.05. During the progression of disease, 73% (11/15 had features fitting into the diagnostic criteria of autism spectrum disorder and 53% (8/15 had history of vaccination-induced seizures. A novel PCDH19 p.D377N mutation was identified in one SCN1A-negative female patient with Dravet syndrome and a known PCDH19 p.N340S mutation in a female non-Dravet syndrome patient. The former also inherited a TSPYL4 p.G60R variant. CONCLUSION: A high percentage of SCN1A mutations was identified in our Chinese cohort of Dravet syndrome patients but none in the rest of patients. We demonstrated that truncating/splice site mutations were linked to moderate to severe intellectual disability in these patients. A de novo PCDH19 missense mutation together with an inherited TSPYL4 missense

  9. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing....... In contrast, diabetes insipidus was present in two subjects only. Various degrees and types of hearing impairment were diagnosed in six individuals and cataract was observed in five subjects.......Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  10. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Cancer risks and immunohistochemical profiles linked to the Danish MLH1 Lynch syndrome founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Founder mutations with a large impact in distinct populations have been described in Lynch syndrome. In Denmark, the MLH1 c.1667+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT mutation accounts for 25 % of the MLH1 mutant families. We used the national Danish hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer register...... to estimate the cumulative lifetime risks for Lynch syndrome-associated cancer in 16 founder mutation families with comparison to 47 other MLH1 mutant families. The founder mutation conferred comparable risks for colorectal cancer (relative risks, RR, of 0.99 for males and 0.79 for females) and lower risks...... in 68 % with extensive inter-tumor variability despite the same underlying germline mutation. In conclusion, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation that accounts for a significant proportion of Lynch syndrome and is associated with a lower risk for extracolonic cancers....

  12. Mutation update on the CHD7 gene involved in CHARGE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Nicole; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Swertz, Morris A

    2012-01-01

    CHD7 is a member of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) protein family that plays a role in transcription regulation by chromatin remodeling. Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 are known to cause CHARGE syndrome, an autosomal-dominant malformation syndrome in which several organ systems......, for example, the central nervous system, eye, ear, nose, and mediastinal organs, are variably involved. In this article, we review all the currently described CHD7 variants, including 183 new pathogenic mutations found by our laboratories. In total, we compiled 528 different pathogenic CHD7 alterations from...... 508 previously published patients with CHARGE syndrome and 294 unpublished patients analyzed by our laboratories. The mutations are equally distributed along the coding region of CHD7 and most are nonsense or frameshift mutations. Most mutations are unique, but we identified 94 recurrent mutations...

  13. [Clinical Characteristics and Gene Mutations of Gilbert Syndrome Complicated with Myeloproliferative Neoplasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Xin; Shi, Jun; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Shao, Ying-Qi; Nie, Neng; Zhang, Jing; Ge, Mei-Li; Huang, Jin-Bo; Zheng, Yi-Zhou

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and gene mutations of patients with Gilbert syndrome complicated with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Peripheral blood samples from 1 patient with Gilbert syndrome complicated with MPN and his son were collected to analyse all exon mutations of UGT1A1 gene. The patient with leukocytosis, thrombocythemia, mild anemia and positive JAK2/V617F mutation was initially diagnosed as MPN. The hyperbilirubinemia suggested concurrent disease. Further gene evaluation disclosed a insertion mutation in the (TA)6TAA box, and a missense mutation(G→A) at 211 bp of exon 1, corresponding to the deficiency in the bilirubin-conjugating enzyme uridine-diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase1A1 (UGT1A1). His son only carried some polymorphism mutation without manifestation of this disease. It is a first report case of MPN complicated with Gilbert syndrome that can highlight the differential diagnosis for hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. Absence of PTPN11 mutations in 28 cases of cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Andra; Tartaglia, Marco; Song, Xiaoling; Kalidas, Kamini; van der Burgt, Ineke; Shaw, Adam C; Ming, Jeffrey E; Zampino, Giuseppe; Zackai, Elaine H; Dean, John C S; Somer, Mirja; Parenti, Giancarlo; Crosby, Andrew H; Patton, Michael A; Gelb, Bruce D; Jeffery, Steve

    2002-10-01

    CFC (cardiofaciocutaneous) syndrome (MIM 115150) has been considered by several authors to be a more severe expression of Noonan syndrome. Affected patients present with congenital heart defects, cutaneous abnormalities, Noonan-like facial features and severe psychomotor developmental delay. We have recently demonstrated that Noonan syndrome can be caused by missense mutations in PTPN11(MIM 176876), a gene that encodes the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. In this report, we have evaluated the possible involvement of mutations in PTPN11 in CFC syndrome. A cohort of 28 CFC subjects rigorously assessed as having CFC based on OMIM diagnostic criteria was examined for mutations in the PTPN11 coding sequence by using DHPLC analysis. The results showed no abnormalities in the coding region of the PTPN11 gene in any CFC patient, nor any evidence of major deletions within the gene suggesting that mutations in other gene(s) are responsible for this syndrome.

  15. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  16. From the rarest to the most common: insights from progeroid syndromes into skin cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Tlougan, Brook E; Orlow, Seth J

    2009-10-01

    Despite their rarity, diseases of premature aging, or "progeroid" syndromes, have provided important insights into basic mechanisms that may underlie cancer and normal aging. In this review, we highlight these recent developments in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy, ataxia-telangiectasia, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. Though they are caused by different mutations in various genes and often result in quite disparate phenotypes, deciphering the molecular bases of these conditions has served to highlight their underlying basic similarities. Studies of progeroid syndromes, particularly HGPS, the most dramatic form of premature aging, have contributed to our knowledge of fundamental processes of importance to skin biology, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, genome instability, cellular senescence, and stem-cell differentiation.

  17. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of mismatch-repair (MMR) gene mutations have been identified in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. This study presents the population-based Danish MMR gene mutation profile, which contains 138 different MMR gene alterations. Among these, 88......+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT was identified in 14/58 (24%) MLH1 mutant families. The Danish Lynch syndrome population thus demonstrates that MSH6 mutations and recurrent/founder mutations have a larger contribution than previously recognized, which implies that the MSH6 gene should be included in routine diagnostics...

  18. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...... without mutations in familial HLH (FHL) causing genes or an established diagnosis of GS2. In addition, we report three patients with known GS2. Moreover, neurological involvement and RAB27A mutations in previously published patients with genetically verified GS2 are reviewed....

  19. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  20. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  1. NPHS1 gene mutations confirm congenital nephrotic syndrome in four Brazilian cases: A novel mutation is described.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaragna, Mara S; Cleto, Thaís Lira; Souza, Marcela Lopes; Lutaif, Anna Cristina G B; de Castro, Luiz Cláudio Gonçalves; Penido, Maria Goretti Moreira Guimarães; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Belangero, Vera M S; Guerra-Junior, Gil; De Mello, Maricilda P

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in NPHS1 gene are a common cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). The disorder is characterized by massive proteinuria that manifests in utero or in the neonatal period during the first 3 months of life. NPHS1 encodes nephrin, a member of the immunoglobulin family of cell adhesion molecules and the main protein expressed at the renal slit diaphragm. Currently, there are approximately 250 mutations described in the NPHS1 gene distributed among all nephrin domains. The main objective of this study was to perform the analysis of the NPHS1 gene in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome in order to determine the molecular cause of the disease. Direct sequencing of NPHS1 gene in four children was performed. Each patient was heterozygous for two pathogenic mutations disclosing the molecular cause of the disease in 100% of the cases. We identified six different mutations, consisting of one in-frame deletion, one frameshift, and four missense substitutions. The p.Val736Met mutation that is described here for the first time was considered pathogenic by different mutation predictive algorithms. Regardless of the type of mutation, three patients had a bad outcome and died Despite the small size of the cohort, this study contributed to the increasing number of deleterious mutations in the NPHS1 gene by describing a new mutation. Also, since we identified NPHS1 pathogenic mutations as the cause of the disease in all cases analyzed, it might be a frequent cause of CNS in the South Eastern region of Brazil, although the analysis of a larger sample is required to obtain more indicative epidemiological data. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Blau syndrome mutation of CARD15/NOD2 in sporadic early onset granulomatous arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Carlos D; Doyle, Trudy M; McIlvain-Simpson, Gail; Coffman, Jessica E; Rosenbaum, James T; Davey, Michael P; Martin, Tammy M

    2005-02-01

    Patients with sporadic early-onset granulomatous arthritis are clinically identical to Blau syndrome, but without the family history. Blau syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and is known to be caused by mutations in the CARD15 gene (also called NOD2). We investigated the hypothesis that an individual with sporadic early onset granulomatous arthritis may have a Blau syndrome mutation in CARD15/NOD2. Our patient's genomic DNA isolated from a buccal swab sample was subjected to amplification to include the region of exon 4 from the CARD15/NOD2 gene that contains known mutations that cause Blau syndrome. This region was screened for mutations by direct DNA sequencing in both directions. One of the mutations in CARD15/NOD2 attributed to Blau syndrome was found in the DNA sample. The nucleotide change encodes an amino acid substitution from arginine to tryptophan at position 334 of the protein. This mutation has been found in some Blau syndrome pedigrees reported in the literature. These data suggest that sporadic granulomatous arthritis may in fact be the sporadic form of Blau syndrome, but arising from a spontaneous neomutation. This would explain the profound clinical identity and the lack of disease history in the parents.

  3. Paternal germline mosaicism of a SCN2A mutation results in Ohtahara syndrome in half siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerem, Ayelet; Lev, Dorit; Blumkin, Lubov; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Michaeli-Yossef, Yael; Halevy, Ayelet; Kivity, Sara; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2014-09-01

    Ohtahara syndrome is a devastating early infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in different genes. We describe a patient with Ohtahara syndrome who presented on the first day of life with refractory tonic seizures and a suppression-burst pattern on EEG. The patient developed severe microcephaly, and never achieved any developmental milestones. He died at the age of 5 years. A de novo missense mutation (c. 4007C>A, p.S1336Y) in SCN2A was found. Interestingly, the father has another son with Ohtahara syndrome from a different mother. The half brother carries the same SCN2A mutation, strongly suggesting paternal gonadal mosaicism of the mutation. The broad clinical spectrum of SCN2A mutations now includes Ohtahara syndrome. This is the first report of familial Ohtahara syndrome due to a germline mosaic SCN2A mutation. Somatic mosaicism, including germline, has been described in several epileptic encephalopathies such as Dravet syndrome, KCNQ2 neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, SCN8A epileptic encephalopathy and STXBP1 related Ohtahara syndrome. Mosaicism should be considered as one of the important inheritance patterns when counseling parents with a child with these devastating diseases. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Allgrove syndrome in the mainland of China: clinical report and mutation analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chun-xiu; Wen, Ya-ran; Zhao, Xiu-li; Su, Chang; Cao, Bing-yan; Zhang, Xue

    2007-06-01

    Allgrove syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the triad of adrenal insufficiency, achalasia and alacrima and many cases have multi-systems disorder: endocrine, gastrointestinal tract, eyes and nervous system. This syndrome is also known as achalasia-addisonianism-alacrima syndrome or triple A syndrome. Allgrove syndrome is now known to be caused by mutations of AAAS gene encoding the aladin protein. In the present paper, we report a Chinese mainland girl with Allgrove syndrome with mutations in the AAAS gene. The patient was a 7-year-old girl complained of coma and dark skin; she was treated as Addison disease for 2 years and had vomiting for 9 months before the second admission. Gene analysis was performed after extracting genomic DNA by amplification and sequencing of the specific fragments of AAA gene. The patient was confirmed to have adrenal insufficiency at the age of 5 years and 6 months. During the second hospitalization, she was found to have a remarkable brisk reflexion, bilateral optic nerve atrophy, alacrima and achalasia besides ACTH resistance. The girl was born to consanguineous parents. Based on these findings, she was diagnosed as having Allgrove syndrome. Mutation analysis revealed a novel homozygous deletion of a single G, c.771delG, in exon 8 of the AAAS gene. This frame shift mutation was predicted to create a premature stop codon at locus 290, p.R258GfsX33, leading to a truncated and non-functioning aladin protein. Both the parents were heterozygous for the mutation. The clinical manifestations and AAAS gene mutations analysis confirmed the diagnosis of Allgrove syndrome. Gene analysis indicated that this syndrome is an autosomal recessive inherent disorder. ALADIN is significant for the normal cell function. When compared with reported cases, it seems that there are no remarkable relation between gene mutation loci and clinical manifestations in Allgrove syndrome.

  5. Novel SMAD3 Mutation in a Patient with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome with Significant Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi K. Fitzgerald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS caused by haploinsufficiency of SMAD3 is a recently described cause of syndromic familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD. We identified a novel SMAD3 mutation in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS who developed progressive aortic aneurysm requiring surgical replacement of the neoaortic root, ascending aorta, and proximal aortic arch. Family screening for the mutation revealed that his father, who has vascular and skeletal features of AOS, and his brother, who is asymptomatic, also have the pathogenic mutation. This is the first case report of a SMAD3 mutation in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This case highlights the importance of genetic testing for known causes of aneurysm in patients with congenital heart disease who develop aneurysmal disease as it may significantly impact the management of those patients and their family members.

  6. NEK1 Mutations Cause Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome Type Majewski

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thiel, Christian; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Dimmler, Arno; Shalev, Stavit A; von der Haar, Sigrun; Zenker, Martin; Zahnleiter, Diana; Stöss, Hartmut; Beinder, Ernst; Abou Jamra, Rami; Ekici, Arif B; Schröder-Kreß, Nadja; Aigner, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Reis, André; Brandstätter, Johann H; Rauch, Anita

    2011-01-01

    .... We used homozygosity mapping in two families with autosomal-recessive short-rib polydactyly syndrome Majewski type to identify mutations in NEK1 as an underlying cause of this lethal osteochondrodysplasia...

  7. Mutations in IFT172 cause isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bujakowska, K.M; Zhang, Q; Siemiatkowska, A.M; Liu, Q; Place, E; Falk, M.J; Consugar, M; Lancelot, M.E; Antonio, A; Lonjou, C; Carpentier, W; Mohand-Said, S; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M; Leroy, B.P; Gai, X; Sahel, J.A; Born, L.I. van den; Collin, R.W.J; Zeitz, C; Audo, I; Pierce, E.A

    2015-01-01

    ...)] that underlie an isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Extensive functional analyses of the identified mutations in cell culture, rat retina and in zebrafish demonstrated their hypomorphic or null nature...

  8. Polymorphism analysis and new JAG1 gene mutations of Alagille syndrome in Mexican population☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Varela-Fascinetto, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Constanza; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Sánchez-Boiso, Adriana; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Heller-Rosseau, Solange; Pelcastre-Luna, Erika Lisselly; Zenteno, Juan C.; Cerbón, Marco; Morán-Barroso, Verónica Fabiola

    2013-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is a multisystem disorder with an autosomic dominant pattern of inheritance that affects the liver, heart, eyes, kidneys, skeletal system and presents characteristic facial features. Mutations of the JAG1 gene have been identified in 20–89% of the patients with Alagille syndrome, this gene encodes for a ligand that activates the Notch signaling pathway. In the present study we analyzed 9 Mexican patients with Alagille syndrome who presented the clinical criteria for the classical presentation of the disease. By using the denaturing high performance liquid chromatography mutation analysis we were able to identify different mutations in 7 of the patients (77.77%), importantly, we found 5 novel mutations in JAG1 gene. The allelic frequency distribution of 13 polymorphisms in Mexican population is also reported. The overall results demonstrated an expanding mutational spectrum of JAG1 gene in the Mexican population. PMID:25606387

  9. Genetic heterogeneity of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, due to TWIST and FGFR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paznekas, W A; Cunningham, M L; Howard, T D; Korf, B R; Lipson, M H; Grix, A W; Feingold, M; Goldberg, R; Borochowitz, Z; Aleck, K; Mulliken, J; Yin, M; Jabs, E W

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-two unrelated patients with features of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, a common autosomal dominant condition of craniosynostosis and limb anomalies, were screened for mutations in TWIST, FGFR2, and FGFR3. Nine novel and three recurrent TWIST mutations were found in 12 families. Seven families were found to have the FGFR3 P250R mutation, and one individual was found to have an FGFR2 VV269-270 deletion. To date, our detection rate for TWIST or FGFR mutations is 68% in our Saethre-Chotzen syndrome patients, including our five patients elsewhere reported with TWIST mutations. More than 35 different TWIST mutations are now known in the literature. The most common phenotypic features, present in more than a third of our patients with TWIST mutations, are coronal synostosis, brachycephaly, low frontal hairline, facial asymmetry, ptosis, hypertelorism, broad great toes, and clinodactyly. Significant intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability is present for either TWIST mutations or FGFR mutations. The overlap in clinical features and the presence, in the same genes, of mutations for more than one craniosynostotic condition-such as Saethre-Chotzen, Crouzon, and Pfeiffer syndromes-support the hypothesis that TWIST and FGFRs are components of the same molecular pathway involved in the modulation of craniofacial and limb development in humans. PMID:9585583

  10. Mutations in JMJD1C are involved in Rett syndrome and intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez, Mauricio A.; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Moutinho, Cátia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Gómez, Antonio; Vidal, Enrique; Petazzi, Paolo; Szczesna, Karolina; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Lucariello, Mario; Lorden, Patricia; Delgado-Morales, Raul; de la Caridad, Olga J.; Huertas, Dori; Gelpí Buchaca, Josep Lluís

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Autism spectrum disorders are associated with defects in social response and communication that often occur in the context of intellectual disability. Rett syndrome is one example in which epilepsy, motor impairment, and motor disturbance may co-occur. Mutations in histone demethylases are known to occur in several of these syndromes. Herein, we aimed to identify whether mutations in the candidate histone demethylase JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C) are implicated in these disor...

  11. Multi-layered mutation in hedgehog-related genes in Gorlin syndrome may affect the phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Onodera

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance that predisposes the affected individual to a variety of disorders that are attributed largely to heterozygous germline patched1 (PTCH1 mutations. PTCH1 is a hedgehog (Hh receptor as well as a repressor, mutation of which leads to constitutive activation of Hh pathway. Hh pathway encompasses a wide variety of cellular signaling cascades, which involve several molecules; however, no associated genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported. Recently, mutations in Suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU or PTCH2 were reported in patients with Gorlin syndrome. These facts suggest that multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may contribute to the development of Gorlin syndrome. We demonstrated multiple mutations of Hh-related genes in addition to PTCH1, which possibly act in an additive or multiplicative manner and lead to Gorlin syndrome. High-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze exome sequences in four unrelated Gorlin syndrome patient genomes. Mutations in PTCH1 gene were detected in all four patients. Specific nucleotide variations or frameshift variations of PTCH1 were identified along with the inferred amino acid changes in all patients. We further filtered 84 different genes which are closely related to Hh signaling. Fifty three of these had enough coverage of over ×30. The sequencing results were filtered and compared to reduce the number of sequence variants identified in each of the affected individuals. We discovered three genes, PTCH2, BOC, and WNT9b, with mutations with a predicted functional impact assessed by MutationTaster2 or PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 analysis. It is noticeable that PTCH2 and BOC are Hh receptor molecules. No significant mutations were observed in SUFU. Multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may change the activation level of the Hh signals, which may explain the wide phenotypic variability of Gorlin syndrome.

  12. EIF2S3 Mutations Associated with Severe X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndrome MEHMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopkova, Martina; Hennig, Friederike; Shin, Byung-Sik; Turner, Clesson E; Stanikova, Daniela; Brennerova, Katarina; Stanik, Juraj; Fischer, Ute; Henden, Lyndal; Müller, Ulrich; Steinberger, Daniela; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Bottani, Armand; Kurdiova, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Nyitrayova, Olga; Kolnikova, Miriam; Klimes, Iwar; Borck, Guntram; Bahlo, Melanie; Haas, Stefan A; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lotspeich-Cole, Leda E; Gasperikova, Daniela; Dever, Thomas E; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2017-04-01

    Impairment of translation initiation and its regulation within the integrated stress response (ISR) and related unfolded-protein response has been identified as a cause of several multisystemic syndromes. Here, we link MEHMO syndrome, whose genetic etiology was unknown, to this group of disorders. MEHMO is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by profound intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. We have identified a C-terminal frameshift mutation (Ile465Serfs) in the EIF2S3 gene in three families with MEHMO syndrome and a novel maternally inherited missense EIF2S3 variant (c.324T>A; p.Ser108Arg) in another male patient with less severe clinical symptoms. The EIF2S3 gene encodes the γ subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2), crucial for initiation of protein synthesis and regulation of the ISR. Studies in patient fibroblasts confirm increased ISR activation due to the Ile465Serfs mutation and functional assays in yeast demonstrate that the Ile465Serfs mutation impairs eIF2γ function to a greater extent than tested missense mutations, consistent with the more severe clinical phenotype of the Ile465Serfs male mutation carriers. Thus, we propose that more severe EIF2S3 mutations cause the full MEHMO phenotype, while less deleterious mutations cause a milder form of the syndrome with only a subset of the symptoms. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Overlapping SETBP1 gain-of-function mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and hematologic malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acuna Hidalgo, R.; Deriziotis, P.; Steehouwer, M.; Gilissen, C.F.; Graham, S.A.; Dam, S van; Hoover-Fong, J.; Telegrafi, A.B.; Destree, A.; Smigiel, R.; Lambie, L.A.; Kayserili, H.; Altunoglu, U.; Lapi, E.; Uzielli, M.L.; Aracena, M.; Nur, B.G.; Mihci, E.; Moreira, L.M.; Borges Ferreira, V.; Horovitz, D.D.; Rocha, K.M.; Jezela-Stanek, A.; Brooks, A.S.; Reutter, H.; Cohen, J.S.; Fatemi, A.; Smitka, M.; Grebe, T.A.; Donato, N. Di; Deshpande, C.; Vandersteen, A.; Lourenco, C.; Dufke, A.; Rossier, E.; Andre, G.; Baumer, A.; Spencer, C.; McGaughran, J.; Franke, L.; Veltman, J.A.; Vries, B.B. de; Schinzel, A.; Fisher, S.E.; Hoischen, A.; Bon, B.W.M. van

    2017-01-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by multiple malformations, severe neurological alterations and increased risk of malignancy. SGS is caused by de novo germline mutations clustering to a 12bp hotspot in exon 4 of SETBP1. Mutations in this hotspot disrupt

  14. Overlapping SETBP1 gain-of-function mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and hematologic malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acuna-Hidalgo, R. (Rocio); Deriziotis, P. (Pelagia); Steehouwer, M. (Marloes); C. Gilissen (Christian); Graham, S.A. (Sarah A.); van Dam, S. (Sipko); Hoover-Fong, J. (Julie); Telegrafi, A.B. (Aida B.); A. Destrée (Anne); R. Smigiel (Robert); Lambie, L.A. (Lindsday A.); H. Kayserili (Hülya); U. Altunoglu (Umut); Lapi, E. (Elisabetta); Uzielli, M.L. (Maria Luisa); Aracena, M. (Mariana); Nur, B.G. (Banu G.); E. Mihci (Ercan); Moreira, L.M.A. (Lilia M. A.); Borges Ferreira, V. (Viviane); D.D.G. Horovitz (Dafne D. G.); da Rocha, K.M. (Katia M.); Jezela-Stanek, A. (Aleksandra); A.S. Brooks (Alice); H. Reutter (Heiko); Cohen, J.S. (Julie S.); Fatemi, A. (Ali); Smitka, M. (Martin); Grebe, T.A. (Theresa A.); N. Di Donato (Nataliya); C. Deshpande (Charu); A.M. Vandersteen (Anthony M.); Marques Lourenço, C. (Charles); Dufke, A. (Andreas); Rossier, E. (Eva); Andre, G. (Gwenaelle); Baumer, A. (Alessandra); Spencer, C. (Careni); J. McGaughran; L. Franke (Lude); J.A. Veltman (Joris); B. de Vries (Boukje); Schinzel, A. (Albert); S.E. Fisher (Simon); A. Hoischen (Alex); B. van Bon (Bregje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSchinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by multiple malformations, severe neurological alterations and increased risk of malignancy. SGS is caused by de novo germline mutations clustering to a 12bp hotspot in exon 4 of SETBP1. Mutations in this

  15. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We ident...

  16. Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome due to SIL1 mutations with a comment on the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvers, M.; Anttonen, A.K.; Lehesjoki, A.E.; Morava, E.; Wortmann, S.B.; Vermeer, S.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome is an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterised by cerebellar ataxia, myopathy, cataracts and intellectual disability, due to mutations in the SIL1 gene. METHODS: The clinical features and two novel SIL1 mutations of four Dutch patients with

  17. Genetic Testing for Long-QT Syndrome Distinguishing Pathogenic Mutations From Benign Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapa, Suraj; Tester, David J.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Harris-Kerr, Carole; Pungliya, Manish S.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Genetic testing for long-QT syndrome (LQTS) has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Hundreds of causative mutations in 12 known LQTS-susceptibility genes have been identified. Genetic testing that includes the 3 most commonly mutated genes is available clinically.

  18. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of RNA polymerases I and III cause Treacher Collins syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, J.G.; Dixon, J.; Seland, S.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Haeringen, A. van; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Peters, D.J.; Boers, A.C.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Maiwald, R.; Zweier, C.; Kerr, B.; Cobo, A.M.; Toral, J.F.; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.; Lohmann, D.R.; Hehr, U.; Dixon, M.J.; Breuning, M.H.; Wieczorek, D.

    2011-01-01

    We identified a deletion of a gene encoding a subunit of RNA polymerases I and III, POLR1D, in an individual with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). Subsequently, we detected 20 additional heterozygous mutations of POLR1D in 252 individuals with TCS. Furthermore, we discovered mutations in both

  19. Novel frame-shift mutations of GLI3 gene in non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuchan; Geng, Juan; Fu, Qihua; Xu, Yunlan; Shen, Yiping

    2014-06-10

    Polydactyly is a common congenital limb deformity. This anomaly may occur in isolation (non-syndromic) or as part of a syndrome. The glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3) is known to be associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. GLI3 plays a predominant role in the pathogenesis of syndromic polydactyly: mutations have been identified in 68% of patients with Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome and 91% of patients with Pallister-Hall syndrome. The knowledge regarding the contribution of GLI3 in non-syndromic polydactyly is currently very limited. In this study, we assembled a cohort of individuals of Chinese ethnicity with non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly. We presented the clinical features and molecular evaluations of 19 probands. GLI3 mutations were identified in 15.8% of probands (3/19) including two novel frame-shift mutations c.3855dupC (p.Met1286HisfsTer18) and c.4141delA (p.Arg1381GlyfsTer38) detected in sporadic cases and one previously reported nonsense mutation (c.1927C>T/p.Arg643Ter) in a familial case. Of note, GLI3 mutations were exclusively detected in patients with bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet. Three out of five (60%) probands with bilateral polydactyly on both hands and feet carried pathogenic mutations in GLI3. Our study demonstrated the role of GLI3 in a significant fraction of patients with non-syndromic bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Overlapping SETBP1 gain-of-function mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and hematologic malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Acuna-Hidalgo, Rocio; Deriziotis, Pelagia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Gilissen, Christian; Graham, Sarah A.; van Dam, Sipko; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Telegrafi, Aida B; Destree, Anne; Smigiel, Robert; Lambie, Lindsday A.; Kayserili, Hülya; Altunoglu, Umut; Lapi, Elisabetta; Uzielli, Maria Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by multiple malformations, severe neurological alterations and increased risk of malignancy. SGS is caused by de novo germline mutations clustering to a 12bp hotspot in exon 4 of SETBP1. Mutations in this hotspot disrupt a degron, a signal for the regulation of protein degradation, and lead to the accumulation of SETBP1 protein. Overlapping SETBP1 hotspot mutations have been observed recurrently as somatic events i...

  1. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; Hout, A.H. van der; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Kate, L.P. Ten; Menko, F.H.; Veer, L.J. van 't

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  2. [Analysis common gene mutation spots of 127 non-syndromic deafness natients in Guangxi Drovince].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuixia; Xu, Liang; Chen, Bowen; Liu, Min; Qu, Shenghong; Liang, Jianping; Tang, Fengzhu; Shi, Min; Peng, Lu; Jing, Yan; Li, Fengti; Liang, Youqiong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the mutation characteristics of common deafness gene from 127 non-syndromic hearing loss patients in Guangxi province. Deafness-related gene mutations detection kit was used to detect 15 mutation sites in four deafness-associated genes, and a total of 127 hearing impaired patients were tested. The samples that could not be diagnosed with DNA microarray were subjected to PCR and sequenced to detect other mutations. Among the 127 patients with non-syndromic deafness, the total mutation rate is 8.66% (11/127), including GJB2 235delC homozygous in 3 cases (2.36%), 235delC single heterozygous mutation in 2 cases (1.57%), GJB2 235delC and 109 A > G mutations in 2 cases (1.57%); SLC26A4 1229C > T homozygous in 1 case (0.79%), IVS7-2A > G, IVS11 + 47T > C and 15448insC mutaion in 2 cases (1.57%); mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations were not detected. The result indicates that GJB2 and SLC26A4 were the main genes in this study, and the mutation rate is significantly lower than the national average level. Three new mutations (SLC26A4 IVS11 + 47T > C,1548insC and GJB2 109A > G) were found. There may be rare mutations among sites or genes associated with deafness in Guangxi.

  3. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality.

  4. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, M.M.; Bonnard, C.; Mans, D.A.; Altunoglu, U.; Tohari, S.; Ng, A.Y.; Eskin, A.; Lee, H.; Rupar, C.A.; Wagenaar, N.P. de; Wu, K.M.; Lahiry, P.; Pazour, G.J.; Nelson, S.F.; Hegele, R.A.; Roepman, R.; Kayserili, H.; Venkatesh, B.; Siu, V.M.; Reversade, B.; Arts, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib

  5. A Mosaic Activating Mutation in AKT1 Associated with the Proteus Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Finn, Erin M.; Peters, Kathryn; Turner, Joyce; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Bick, David; Blakemore, Laurel; Blumhorst, Catherine; Brockmann, Knut; Calder, Peter; Cherman, Natasha; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Everman, David B.; Golas, Gretchen; Greenstein, Robert M.; Kato, B. Maya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Miyamoto, Richard T.; Newman, Kurt; Ng, David; O'Brien, Kevin; Rothenberg, Steven; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Singhal, Virender; Tirabosco, Roberto; Upton, Joseph; Wientroub, Shlomo; Zackai, Elaine H.; Hoag, Kimberly; Whitewood-Neal, Tracey; Robey, Pamela G.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Tosi, Laura L.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Proteus syndrome is characterized by the overgrowth of skin, connective tissue, brain, and other tissues. It has been hypothesized that the syndrome is caused by somatic mosaicism for a mutation that is lethal in the nonmosaic state. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of DNA from

  6. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  7. SCN5A Mutations in Brugada Syndrome Are Associated with Increased Cardiac Dimensions and Reduced Contractility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, Frans; Campian, Maria E.; Spijkerboer, Anje; Blom, Marieke T.; Planken, R. Nils; van Rossum, Albert C.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Groenink, Maarten; Tan, Hanno L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The cardiac sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) controls cardiac excitability. Accordingly, SCN5A mutations that result in loss-of-function of Na(v)1.5 are associated with various inherited arrhythmia syndromes that revolve around reduced cardiac excitability, most notably Brugada syndrome (BrS).

  8. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalff-Suske, M.; Wild, A.; Topp, J.; Wessling, M.; Jacobsen, E. M.; Bornholdt, D.; Engel, H.; Heuer, H.; Aalfs, C. M.; Ausems, M. G.; Barone, R.; Herzog, A.; Heutink, P.; Homfray, T.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; König, R.; Kunze, J.; Meinecke, P.; Müller, D.; Rizzo, R.; Strenge, S.; Superti-Furga, A.; Grzeschik, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome

  9. A molecular and clinical study of Larsen syndrome caused by mutations in FLNB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknell, Louise S.; Farrington-Rock, Claire; Shafeghati, Yousef; Rump, Patrick; Alanay, Yasemin; Alembik, Yves; Al-Madani, Navid; Firth, Helen; Karimi-Nejad, Mohammad Hassan; Kim, Chong Ae; Leask, Kathryn; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Moran, Ellen; Pappas, John G.; Prontera, Paolo; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Fryer, Alan; Unger, Sheila; Wilson, L. C.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Rimoin, David L.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Robertson, Stephen P.

    Background: Larsen syndrome is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterised by large-joint dislocations and craniofacial anomalies. Recently, Larsen syndrome was shown to be caused by missense mutations or small inframe deletions in FLNB, encoding the cytoskeletal protein filamin B. To

  10. Mutation update on the CHD7 gene involved in CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Nicole; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Swertz, Morris A.; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Lodahl, Marianne; Schoots, Jeroen; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    CHD7 is a member of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) protein family that plays a role in transcription regulation by chromatin remodeling. Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 are known to cause CHARGE syndrome, an autosomal-dominant malformation syndrome in which several organ systems, for

  11. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...

  12. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hest, Liselotte P.; Ruijs, Mariëlle W. G.; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A.; Verhoef, Senno; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS.

  13. BCOR and BCORL1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Frederik; Chesnais, Virginie; Nagata, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kenichi; Scourzic, Laurianne; Okuno, Yusuke; Itzykson, Raphael; Sanada, Masashi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Gelsi-Boyer, Véronique; Renneville, Aline; Miyano, Satoru; Mori, Hiraku; Shih, Lee-Yung; Park, Sophie; Dreyfus, François; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Solary, Eric; Rose, Christian; Cheze, Stéphane; Prébet, Thomas; Vey, Norbert; Legentil, Marion; Duffourd, Yannis; de Botton, Stéphane; Preudhomme, Claude; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bernard, Olivier A; Ogawa, Seishi; Fontenay, Michaela; Kosmider, Olivier

    2013-10-31

    Patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) that rapidly progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain a challenge in disease management. Using whole-exome sequencing of an MDS patient, we identified a somatic mutation in the BCOR gene also mutated in AML. Sequencing of BCOR and related BCORL1 genes in a cohort of 354 MDS patients identified 4.2% and 0.8% of mutations respectively. BCOR mutations were associated with RUNX1 (P = .002) and DNMT3A mutations (P = .015). BCOR is also mutated in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients (7.4%) and BCORL1 in AML patients with myelodysplasia-related changes (9.1%). Using deep sequencing, we show that BCOR mutations arise after mutations affecting genes involved in splicing machinery or epigenetic regulation. In univariate analysis, BCOR mutations were associated with poor prognosis in MDS (overall survival [OS]: P = .013; cumulative incidence of AML transformation: P = .005). Multivariate analysis including age, International Prognostic Scoring System, transfusion dependency, and mutational status confirmed a significant inferior OS to patients with a BCOR mutation (hazard ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.1; P = .008). These data suggest that BCOR mutations define the clinical course rather than disease initiation. Despite infrequent mutations, BCOR analyses should be considered in risk stratification.

  14. LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome associated with a mitochondrial MTND1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Emma L; de Silva, Rajith; King, Andrew; Schwarzer, Verena; Harrower, Tim; Dawidek, Gervase; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2005-05-01

    Pathogenic point mutations in the mitochondrial MTND1 gene have previously been described in association with two distinct clinical phenotypes -- Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Here we report the first heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutation (3376G>A) in the MTND1 gene associated with an overlap syndrome comprising the clinical features of both LHON and MELAS. Muscle histochemistry revealed subtle mitochondrial abnormalities, while biochemical analysis showed an isolated complex I deficiency. Our findings serve to highlight the growing importance of mutations in mitochondrial complex I structural genes in MELAS and its associated overlap syndromes.

  15. De novo KCNH1 mutations in four patients with syndromic developmental delay, hypotonia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Ryoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Sakai, Yasunari; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Hubshman, Monika Weisz; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-05-01

    The voltage-gated Kv10.1 potassium channel, also known as ether-a-go-go-related gene 1, encoded by KCNH1 (potassium voltage-gated channel, subfamily H (eag related), member 1) is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system. Recently, de novo missense KCNH1 mutations have been identified in six patients with Zimmermann-Laband syndrome and in four patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome. These syndromes were historically considered distinct. Here we report three de novo missense KCNH1 mutations in four patients with syndromic developmental delay and epilepsy. Two novel KCNH1 mutations (p.R357Q and p.R357P), found in three patients, were located at the evolutionally highly conserved arginine in the channel voltage-sensor domain (S4). Another mutation (p.G496E) was found in the channel pore domain (S6) helix, which acts as a hinge in activation gating and mainly conducts non-inactivating outward potassium current. A previously reported p.G496R mutation was shown to produce no voltage-dependent outward current in CHO cells, suggesting that p.G496E may also disrupt the proper function of the Kv channel pore. Our report confirms that KCNH1 mutations are associated with syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder, and also support the functional importance of the S4 domain.

  16. A novel nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 mutation in a family with Blau syndrome: Phenotype and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lawrence Tc; Nachbur, Ueli; Rowczenio, Dorota; Ziegler, John B; Fischer, Eddy; Lin, Ming Wei

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain of the PRR, NOD2, are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis. Current theories suggest that constitutive activation of the NOD2 pathway may be responsible for pathogenesis of these diseases. Here, we report the phenotype of a kindred with Blau syndrome caused by a novel NOD2 mutation (p.E383D). Signaling protein and cytokine expression were examined, and the results of these experiments challenge current theories of constitutive NOD2 activation in the pathophysiology of Blau syndrome.

  17. Mutation Profile of the CDH23 Gene in 56 Probands with Usher Syndrome Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A.; Jaijo, T.; Aller, E.; Millan, J.M.; Carney, C.; Usami, S.; Moller, C.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human gene encoding cadherin 23 (CDH23) cause Usher syndrome type 1D (USH1D) and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Individuals with Usher syndrome type I have profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia and usually begin to exhibit signs of RP in early adolescence. In the present study, we carried out the mutation analysis in all 69 exons of the CDH23 gene in 56 Usher type 1 probands already screened for mutations in MYO7A. A total of 18 of 56 subjects (32.1%) were observed to have one or two CDH23 variants that are presumed to be pathologic. Twenty one different pathologic genome variants were observed of which 15 were novel. Out of a total of 112 alleles, 31 (27.7%) were considered pathologic. Based on our results it is estimated that about 20% of patients with Usher syndrome type I have CDH23 mutations. PMID:18429043

  18. Coexisting somatic promoter hypermethylation and pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, N; Friedrichs, N; Steinke, V; Aretz, S; Friedl, W; Buettner, R; Mangold, E; Propping, P; Walldorf, C

    2008-01-01

    Somatic epimutations in the MLH1 promoter mimic the phenotype of Lynch syndrome. To date, no somatic hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter in the carrier of a pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation has been identified, prompting the recommendation that a germline mutation in MLH1 should only be sought in the absence of tumour tissue methylation. We aimed to determine whether methylation of the MLH1 promoter may coexist in carriers of a pathogenic germline mutation in MLH1. We examined the methylation status of the MLH1 promoter in 123 tumour tissue samples, demonstrating high microsatellite instability and loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein (60 cases with MLH1 germline mutation, 25 cases without mutation, 38 cases with MSH2 mutations), using combined bisulphite restriction analysis (COBRA) and SNaPshot analysis. Methylation of the MLH1 promoter was found in two patients with pathogenic germline mutations, one a carrier of a MLH1 mutation and the other a carrier of a MSH2 mutation. Our results demonstrate that methylation of the MLH1 promoter region does not exclude the presence of a germline mutation in a mismatch repair (MMR) gene. Hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter may be present in most cases of sporadic colorectal cancers, but this does not exclude a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  19. Identification of a novel CLRN1 gene mutation in Usher syndrome type 3: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Oshikawa, Chie; Nakayama, Jun; Moteki, Hideaki; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    This study examines the CLRN1 gene mutation analysis in Japanese patients who were diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) on the basis of clinical findings. Genetic analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) was conducted to search for 9 causative USH genes in 2 USH3 patients. We identified the novel pathogenic mutation in the CLRN1 gene in 2 patients. The missense mutation was confirmed by functional prediction software and segregation analysis. Both patients were diagnosed as having USH3 caused by the CLRN1 gene mutation. This is the first report of USH3 with a CLRN1 gene mutation in Asian populations. Validating the presence of clinical findings is imperative for properly differentiating among USH subtypes. In addition, mutation screening using MPS enables the identification of causative mutations in USH. The clinical diagnosis of this phenotypically variable disease can then be confirmed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Mutations in JMJD1C are involved in Rett syndrome and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Mauricio A; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Moutinho, Catia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Gomez, Antonio; Vidal, Enrique; Petazzi, Paolo; Szczesna, Karolina; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Lucariello, Mario; Lorden, Patricia; Delgado-Morales, Raul; de la Caridad, Olga J; Huertas, Dori; Gelpí, Josep L; Orozco, Modesto; López-Doriga, Adriana; Milà, Montserrat; Perez-Jurado, Luís A; Pineda, Mercedes; Armstrong, Judith; Lázaro, Conxi; Esteller, Manel

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are associated with defects in social response and communication that often occur in the context of intellectual disability. Rett syndrome is one example in which epilepsy, motor impairment, and motor disturbance may co-occur. Mutations in histone demethylases are known to occur in several of these syndromes. Herein, we aimed to identify whether mutations in the candidate histone demethylase JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C) are implicated in these disorders. We performed the mutational and functional analysis of JMJD1C in 215 cases of autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, and Rett syndrome without a known genetic defect. We found seven JMJD1C variants that were not present in any control sample (~ 6,000) and caused an amino acid change involving a different functional group. From these, two de novo JMJD1C germline mutations were identified in a case of Rett syndrome and in a patient with intellectual disability. The functional study of the JMJD1C mutant Rett syndrome patient demonstrated that the altered protein had abnormal subcellular localization, diminished activity to demethylate the DNA damage-response protein MDC1, and reduced binding to MECP2. We confirmed that JMJD1C protein is widely expressed in brain regions and that its depletion compromises dendritic activity. Our findings indicate that mutations in JMJD1C contribute to the development of Rett syndrome and intellectual disability.Genet Med 18 1, 378-385.

  1. Two Novel Heterozygous Mutations in ERCC8 Cause Cockayne Syndrome in a Chinese Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun-Pu; Chen, Yi-Yu; Wang, Xue-Mei; Wang, Xin-Li; Nan, Xu; Zhao, Hongshan

    2015-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (MIM #133540, Cockayne syndrome B; 216400, Cockayne syndrome A) is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disease in which the characteristic symptoms are premature aging, cachectic dwarfism, lack of subcutaneous fat, neurological alterations, light sensitivity, and failure to thrive. The mutated gene responsible for this syndrome has been identified as usually either CSA (CKN1, ERCC8) or CSB (ERCC6). In this study, we describe the case of a 7-year-old Chinese boy with characteristic symptoms of Cockayne syndrome A and the conduction of mutation screening of the CSA gene. The patient was diagnosed with Cockayne syndrome in the pediatrics clinic for growth failure and developmental delay. We collected peripheral blood samples of the patient and his parents and then extracted the genomic DNA. DNA samples from control subjects and the patient were subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification. All exons and the flanking intron-exon boundaries of CSA were amplified; then, the polymerase chain reaction products were directly sequenced for mutation screening. Two novel heterozygous CSA mutations, c.551-2A>C and c.394_398delTTACA, were identified in the patient. The c.551-2A>C mutation originates from his father and changed the splice acceptor site AG to CG, thus possibly causing alternative splicing. The c.394_398delTTACA from his mother caused a frameshift after the amino acid at position 132, thus introducing a premature stop codon in the gene sequence. These mutations extend the mutation spectrum of Cockayne syndrome in the context of Chinese race and provide possibilities of prenatal diagnosis for future offsprings in this family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of mutations in the gene doublecortin in patients with double cortex syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, J G; Minnerath, S R; Fox, J W; Allen, K M; Luo, R F; Hong, S E; Berg, M J; Kuzniecky, R; Reitnauer, P J; Borgatti, R; Mira, A P; Guerrini, R; Holmes, G L; Rooney, C M; Berkovic, S; Scheffer, I; Cooper, E C; Ricci, S; Cusmai, R; Crawford, T O; Leroy, R; Andermann, E; Wheless, J W; Dobyns, W B; Walsh, C A

    1999-02-01

    Mutations in the X-linked gene doublecortin, which encodes a protein with no dear structural homologues, are found in pedigrees in which affected females show "double cortex" syndrome (DC; also known as subcortical band heterotopia or laminar heterotopia) and affected males show X-linked lissencephaly. Mutations in doublecortin also cause sporadic DC in females. To determine the incidence of doublecortin mutations in DC, we investigated a cohort of eight pedigrees and 47 sporadic patients with DC for mutations in the doublecortin open reading frame as assessed by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. Mutations were identified in each of the eight DC pedigrees (100%), and in 18 of the 47 sporadic DC patients (38%). Identified mutations were of two types, protein truncation mutations and single amino acid substitution mutations. However, pedigrees with DC displayed almost exclusively single amino acid substitution mutations, suggesting that patients with these mutations may have less of a reproductive disadvantage versus those patients with protein truncation mutations. Single amino acid substitution mutations were tightly clustered in two regions of the open reading frame, suggesting that these two regions are critical for the function of the Doublecortin protein.

  3. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  4. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Bonnard, Carine; Mans, Dorus A; Altunoglu, Umut; Tohari, Sumanty; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Rupar, C Anthony; de Wagenaar, Nathalie P; Wu, Ka Man; Lahiry, Piya; Pazour, Gregory J; Nelson, Stanley F; Hegele, Robert A; Roepman, Ronald; Kayserili, Hülya; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Siu, Victoria M; Reversade, Bruno; Arts, Heleen H

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mutation with the previously reported ICK variant on ciliogenesis and cilium morphology. Through homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a second variant (c.358G > T; p.G120C) in ICK in a Turkish fetus presenting with ECO syndrome. In vitro studies of wild-type and mutant mRFP-ICK (p.G120C and p.R272Q) revealed that, in contrast to the wild-type protein that localizes along the ciliary axoneme and/or is present in the ciliary base, mutant proteins rather enrich in the ciliary tip. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed a decreased number of cilia in ICK p.R272Q-affected cells. Through identification of a novel ICK mutation, we confirm that disruption of ICK causes ECO syndrome, which clinically overlaps with the spectrum of ciliopathies. Expression of ICK-mutated proteins result in an abnormal ciliary localization compared to wild-type protein. Primary fibroblasts derived from an individual with ECO syndrome display ciliogenesis defects. In aggregate, our findings are consistent with recent reports that show that ICK regulates ciliary biology in vitro and in mice, confirming that ECO syndrome is a severe ciliopathy.

  5. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations : A case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoid (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations

  6. Autophagic degradation of farnesylated prelamin A as a therapeutic approach to lamin-linked progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cenni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Farnesylated prelamin A is a processing intermediate produced in the lamin A maturation pathway. Accumulation of a truncated farnesylated prelamin A form, called progerin, is a hallmark of the severe premature ageing syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Progerin elicits toxic effects in cells, leading to chromatin damage and cellular senescence and ultimately causes skin and endothelial defects, bone resorption, lipodystrophy and accelerated ageing. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying prelamin A turnover is critical for the development of clinically effective protein inhibitors that can avoid accumulation to toxic levels without impairing lamin A/C expression, which is essential for normal biological functions. Little is known about specific molecules that may target farnesylated prelamin A to elicit protein degradation. Here, we report the discovery of rapamycin as a novel inhibitor of progerin, which dramatically and selectively decreases protein levels through a mechanism involving autophagic degradation. Rapamycin treatment of progeria cells lowers progerin, as well as wild-type prelamin A levels, and rescues the chromatin phenotype of cultured fibroblasts, including histone methylation status and BAF and LAP2alpha distribution patterns. Importantly, rapamycin treatment does not affect lamin C protein levels, but increases the relative expression of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24. Thus, rapamycin, an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides, previously found to increase longevity in mouse models, can serve as a therapeutic tool, to eliminate progerin, avoid farnesylated prelamin A accumulation, and restore chromatin dynamics in progeroid laminopathies.

  7. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients With Suspected Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R; Bowles, Karla R; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-09-01

    Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene, next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All patients had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients' personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Of the 1260 patients, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%-90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P = .0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. A total of 479 individuals had 1 or more VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%-41%). In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high-penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes, many

  8. Splicing Analysis of Exonic OCRL Mutations Causing Lowe Syndrome or Dent-2 Disease

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    Lorena Suarez-Artiles

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the OCRL gene are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Patients with Lowe syndrome present congenital cataracts, mental disabilities and a renal proximal tubulopathy, whereas patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit similar proximal tubule dysfunction but only mild, or no additional clinical defects. It is not yet understood why some OCRL mutations cause the phenotype of Lowe syndrome, while others develop the milder phenotype of Dent-2 disease. Our goal was to gain new insights into the consequences of OCRL exonic mutations on pre-mRNA splicing. Using predictive bioinformatics tools, we selected thirteen missense mutations and one synonymous mutation based on their potential effects on splicing regulatory elements or splice sites. These mutations were analyzed in a minigene splicing assay. Results of the RNA analysis showed that three presumed missense mutations caused alterations in pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation c.741G>T; p.(Trp247Cys generated splicing silencer sequences and disrupted splicing enhancer motifs that resulted in skipping of exon 9, while mutations c.2581G>A; p.(Ala861Thr and c.2581G>C; p.(Ala861Pro abolished a 5′ splice site leading to skipping of exon 23. Mutation c.741G>T represents the first OCRL exonic variant outside the conserved splice site dinucleotides that results in alteration of pre-mRNA splicing. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of OCRL exonic mutations at the mRNA level.

  9. SETBP1 mutations as a biomarker for myelodysplasia /myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Katherine; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Liu, Delong

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) /myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) overlap syndrome has been described since the 2001 WHO classification as disorders that have both proliferative and dysplastic changes simultaneously. Specific disorders include chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), BCR-ABL negative atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) and unclassifiable MDS/MPN (MPN/MDS-U). Recurrent gene mutations in these conditions have been described. Among them, SETBP1 mutations have been identified in up to 32% of aCML, 24% of JMML, 18% of CMML and 10% of MDS/MPN-U patients. The mutation hotspot lies in the amino acid residues 858-871 in the SETBP1 protein. SETBP1 mutations in MDS/MPN overlap syndrome is associated with accelerated transformation to leukemia and poor prognosis. In this review, we summarized the latest data on the role of SETBP1 mutations in the overlap syndrome. SETBP1 mutations may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and poor prognosis of the overlap syndrome.

  10. CHD7 mutations causing CHARGE syndrome are predominantly of paternal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, S; von Velsen, N; Burfeind, P; Steckel, M; Mänz, J; Buchholz, A; Borozdin, W; Kohlhase, J

    2012-03-01

    CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies and deafness) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene in approximately 2/3 of cases. In the vast majority of cases, CHARGE syndrome is sporadic. There are only a few reports of parent-to-child transmission and somatic or gonadal mosaicism. To determine the parental origin of CHD7 mutations in sporadic CHARGE syndrome, we screened 30 families for informative exonic or intronic polymorphisms located near the detected CHD7 mutation. An informative polymorphism could be identified in 13 out of 30 families. Linkage analysis was performed between the CHD7 mutation and the polymorphism in the child. In 12 out of 13 families, the mutation affected the paternal allele (92.3%). In our cohort, the mean paternal age at birth was 32.92 years. Comparing the age of fathers of an affected CHARGE patient with the paternal age of the German population in general, we could not observe any paternal age effect. Taken together, we show in this study that de novo CHD7 mutations occur predominantly in the male germ line. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Three cases with L1 syndrome and two novel mutations in the L1CAM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Rosario; Ley-Martos, Miriam; Gutiérrez, Gema; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Felicidad; Arroyo, Diego; Mora-López, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the L1CAM gene have been identified in the following various X-linked neurological disorders: congenital hydrocephalus; mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. These conditions are currently considered different phenotypes of a single entity known as L1 syndrome. We present three families with L1 syndrome. Sequencing of the L1CAM gene allowed the identification of the following mutations involved: a known splicing mutation (c.3531-12G>A) and two novel ones: a missense mutation (c.1754A>C; p.Asp585Ala) and a nonsense mutation (c.3478C>T; p.Gln1160Stop). The number of affected males and carrier females identified in a relatively small population suggests that L1 syndrome may be under-diagnosed. L1 syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intellectual disability or mental retardation in children, especially when other signs such as hydrocephalus or adducted thumbs are present.

  12. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  13. Segmental overgrowth syndrome due to an activating PIK3CA mutation identified in affected muscle tissue by exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Weigert, Karen Petra

    2014-01-01

    Mosaic PIK3CA-mutations have been described in an increasing number of overgrowth syndromes. We describe a patient with a previously unreported segmental overgrowth syndrome with the mutation, PIKCA3 c.3140A>G (p.His1047Arg) in affected tissue diagnosed by exome sequencing. This PIK3CA-associated......-associated segmental overgrowth syndrome overlaps with CLOVES syndrome and fibroadipose hyperplasia but is distinct from each of these entities....

  14. Functional Study of Ectodysplasin-A Mutations Causing Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis.

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    Wenjing Shen

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that ectodysplasin-A (EDA mutations are associated with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Indeed, we were the first to report three novel EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H in sporadic non-syndromic tooth agenesis. We studied the mechanism linking EDA mutations and non-syndromic tooth agenesis in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and mouse ameloblast-derived LS8 cells transfected with mutant isoforms of EDA. The receptor binding capability of the mutant EDA1 protein was impaired in comparison to wild-type EDA1. Although the non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutants possessed residual binding capability, the transcriptional activation of the receptor's downstream target, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, was compromised. We also analyzed the changes of selected genes in other signaling pathways, such as WNT and BMP, after EDA mutation. We found that non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutant proteins upregulate BMP4 (bone morphogenetic protein 4 mRNA expression and downregulate WNT10A and WNT10B (wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 10A and 10B mRNA expression. Our results indicated that non-syndromic tooth agenesis causing EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H were loss-of-function, and suggested that EDA may regulate the expression of WNT10A, WNT10B and BMP4 via NF-κB during tooth development. The results from our study may help to understand the molecular mechanism linking specific EDA mutations with non-syndromic tooth agenesis.

  15. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

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    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  16. Tumor protein 53 mutations and inherited cancer: beyond Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir I; Achatz, Maria Iw; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Olivier, Magali; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Germline TP53 (tumor protein 53) mutations are the molecular basis of a complex cancer predisposition syndrome, the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The present review discusses the diversity of tumor patterns in TP53 mutation carriers, focusing on molecular factors that may explain familial and individual differences, such as genotype/phenotype correlations, genetic modifiers and genetic anticipation. Initially identified 20 years ago, germline TP53 mutations appear to be associated with an extremely diverse range of cancers. Although no other gene has been found in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, recent results show that the functional effects of particular mutations, polymorphisms in TP53 or in regulators such as MDM2 (murine double minute 2), variations in DNA copy number and variations in telomere length, have a strong impact on individual risk and on tumor patterns. Furthermore, recent studies in large cohorts suggest that TP53 germline mutations may occur in up to 1: 5000 individuals. Germline TP53 mutations may be responsible for a large fraction (15-20%) of all inherited cancers. Although mutations are detectable by sequencing, counseling and follow-up remain problematic due to the wide variations in disease presentation. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the predisposition caused by TP53 deficiency may help to develop better, evidence-based and personalized clinical protocols.

  17. Mutation spectrum of MLL2 in a cohort of kabuki syndrome patients

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    Renieri Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kabuki syndrome (Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome is a rare, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome characterized by a peculiar face, short stature, skeletal, visceral and dermatoglyphic abnormalities, cardiac anomalies, and immunological defects. Recently mutations in the histone methyl transferase MLL2 gene have been identified as its underlying cause. Methods Genomic DNAs were extracted from 62 index patients clinically diagnosed as affected by Kabuki syndrome. Sanger sequencing was performed to analyze the whole coding region of the MLL2 gene including intron-exon junctions. The putative causal and possible functional effect of each nucleotide variant identified was estimated by in silico prediction tools. Results We identified 45 patients with MLL2 nucleotide variants. 38 out of the 42 variants were never described before. Consistently with previous reports, the majority are nonsense or frameshift mutations predicted to generate a truncated polypeptide. We also identified 3 indel, 7 missense and 3 splice site. Conclusions This study emphasizes the relevance of mutational screening of the MLL2 gene among patients diagnosed with Kabuki syndrome. The identification of a large spectrum of MLL2 mutations possibly offers the opportunity to improve the actual knowledge on the clinical basis of this multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome, design functional studies to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, establish genotype-phenotype correlations and improve clinical management.

  18. Association of germline mutation in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene and Proteus and Proteus-like syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.; Hampel, H.; Thiele, H.; Gorlin, R. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Parisi, M.; Winter, R. M.; Eng, C.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular aetiology of Proteus syndrome (PS) remains elusive. Germline mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, which are hereditary hamartoma syndromes. Some features-eg, macrocephaly, lipomatosis, and vascular malformations-can be seen in all three

  19. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post......) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among...... transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase...

  20. Mutations of the SBDS gene are present in most patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynek, Jill R; Rothbaum, Robert J; Rawls, Amy S; Minx, Patrick J; Wilson, Richard K; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Link, Daniel C

    2004-12-01

    Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, bone marrow dysfunction, and metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. Recent studies show that mutations of SBDS, a gene of unknown function, are present in the majority of patients with SDS. In the present study, we show that most, but not all, patients classified based on rigorous clinical criteria as having SDS had compound heterozygous mutations of SBDS. Full-length SBDS protein was not detected in leukocytes of SDS patients with the most common SBDS mutations, consistent with a loss-of-function mechanism. In contrast, SBDS protein was expressed at normal levels in SDS patients without SBDS mutations. These data confirm the absence of SBDS mutations in this subgroup of patients and suggest that SDS is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. The presence (or absence) of SBDS mutations may define subgroups of patients with SDS who share distinct clinical features or natural history.

  1. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  2. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. The histology of the resected polyps was consistent with juvenile polyps. Subsequent genetic screening revealed a novel mutation in SMAD4, exon 5 (p.Ser144Stop. To the best of our knowledge, this mutation has not been reported before. Offering genotypic diagnosis for patients with JPS is an important step for strategic plan of management.

  3. De novo SHANK3 mutation causes Rett syndrome-like phenotype in a female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Munetsugu; Ohba, Chihiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Females with the MECP2 mutations exhibit a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from classical Rett syndrome to asymptomatic carriers. Mutations of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) are also found in early onset RTT variants. Here, we present the first report of a female patient with RTT-like phenotype caused by SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankylin repeat domain 3) mutation, indicating that the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 mutations may extend to RTT-like phenotype in addition to (severe) developmental delay, absence of expressive speech, autistic behaviors and intellectual disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  5. H-ABC syndrome and DYT4: Variable expressivity or pleiotropy of TUBB4 mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erro, Roberto; Hersheson, Joshua; Ganos, Christos; Mencacci, Niccoló E; Stamelou, Maria; Batla, Amit; Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Bras, Jose M; Guerreiro, Rita J; Hardy, John; Quinn, Niall P; Houlden, Henry; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2015-05-01

    Recently, mutations in the TUBB4A gene have been found to underlie hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC) syndrome, a rare neurodegenerative disorder of infancy and childhood. TUBB4A mutations also have been described as causative of DYT4 ("hereditary whispering dysphonia"). However, in DYT4, brain imaging has been reported to be normal and, therefore, H-ABC syndrome and DYT4 have been construed to be different disorders, despite some phenotypic overlap. Hence, the question of whether these disorders reflect variable expressivity or pleiotropy of TUBB4A mutations has been raised. We report four unrelated patients with imaging findings either partially or totally consistent with H-ABC syndrome, who were found to have TUBB4A mutations. All four subjects had a relatively homogenous phenotype characterized by severe generalized dystonia with superimposed pyramidal and cerebellar signs, and also bulbar involvement leading to complete aphonia and swallowing difficulties, even though one of the cases had an intermediate phenotype between H-ABC syndrome and DYT4. Genetic analysis of the TUBB4A gene showed one previously described and two novel mutations (c.941C>T; p.Ala314Val and c.900G>T; p.Met300Ile) in the exon 4 of the gene. While expanding the genetic spectrum of H-ABC syndrome, we confirm its radiological heterogeneity and demonstrate that phenotypic overlap with DYT4. Moreover, reappraisal of previously reported cases would also argue against pleiotropy of TUBB4A mutations. We therefore suggest that H-ABC and DYT4 belong to a continuous phenotypic spectrum associated with TUBB4A mutations. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Toshiya; Furuichi, Kengo; Higashide, Tomomi; Sakurai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS) is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene. To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated. Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases) with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2) and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4) were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) diagnosed from kidney biopsies. The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS.

  7. Somatic frameshift mutations in the Bloom syndrome BLM gene are frequent in sporadic gastric carcinomas with microsatellite mutator phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matei Irina

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability has been reported at microsatellite tracts in few coding sequences. We have shown that the Bloom syndrome BLM gene may be a target of microsatelliteinstability (MSI in a short poly-adenine repeat located in its coding region. To further characterize the involvement of BLM in tumorigenesis, we have investigated mutations in nine genes containing coding microsatellites in microsatellite mutator phenotype (MMP positive and negative gastric carcinomas (GCs. Methods We analyzed 50 gastric carcinomas (GCs for mutations in the BLM poly(A tract aswell as in the coding microsatellites of the TGFβ1-RII, IGFIIR, hMSH3, hMSH6, BAX, WRN, RECQL and CBL genes. Results BLM mutations were found in 27% of MMP+ GCs (4/15 cases but not in any of the MMP negative GCs (0/35 cases. The frequency of mutations in the other eight coding regions microsatellite was the following: TGFβ1-RII (60 %, BAX (27%, hMSH6 (20%,hMSH3 (13%, CBL (13%, IGFIIR (7%, RECQL (0% and WRN (0%. Mutations in BLM appear to be more frequently associated with frameshifts in BAX and in hMSH6and/or hMSH3. Tumors with BLM alterations present a higher frequency of unstable mono- and trinucleotide repeats located in coding regions as compared with mutator phenotype tumors without BLM frameshifts. Conclusions BLM frameshifts are frequent alterations in GCs specifically associated with MMP+tumors. We suggest that BLM loss of function by MSI may increase the genetic instability of a pre-existent unstable genotype in gastric tumors.

  8. Two novel mutations in ERCC6 cause Cockayne syndrome B in a Chinese family

    OpenAIRE

    He, Chunxia; Sun, Mao; Wang, Guoxia; Yang, Ying; Yao, Libo; Wu, Yuanming

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized principally by progressive growth failure, neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Mutations of excision repair cross-complementation group 6 (ERCC6) and ERCC8 are predominantly responsible for CS, of which mutation of ERCC6 accounts for approximately two thirds of cases. The current report describes two siblings with severe neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Whole exome sequencing identified two novel mu...

  9. Mutations in SRCAP, Encoding SNF2-Related CREBBP Activator Protein, Cause Floating-Harbor Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Rebecca L.; Lines, Matthew A.; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J.M.; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S.; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L.; Quaio, Caio Robledo D.C.; Gomy, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected perso...

  10. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  11. First case report of Cohen syndrome in the Tunisian population caused by VPS13B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeb, Imen; Jilani, Houweyda; Elaribi, Yasmina; Hizem, Syrine; Hila, Lamia; Zillahrdt, Julia Lauer; Chelly, Jamel; Benjemaa, Lamia

    2017-11-17

    Cohen syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive developmental disorder that comprises variable clinical features counting developmental delay, pigmentary retinopathy, myopia, acquired microcephaly, truncal obesity, joint hypermobility, friendly disposition and intermittent neutropenia. VPS13B (vacuolar protein sorting 13, yeast, homologue of B) gene is the only gene responsible for Cohen Syndrome, causative mutations include nonsense, missense, indel and splice-site variants. The integrity of the Golgi apparatus requires the presence of the peripheral membrane protein VPS13B that have an essential function in intracellular protein transport and vesicle-mediated sorting. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in a Tunisian family with two young cases having developmental delay, hypotonia, autism spectrum disorder, ptosis and thick hair and eyebrows. The proposita presented also pigmentory retinopathy. Compound heterozygous mutation in VPS13B gene was detected by WES. This mutation inherited from healthy heterozygous parents, supports an unpredictable clinical diagnosis of Cohen Syndrome. The proband's phenotype is explained by the presence of compound heterozygous mutations in the VPS13B gene. This finding refined the understanding of genotype-phenotype correlation. This is the first report of a Tunisian family with Cohen syndrome mutated in the VPS13B gene.

  12. Gene mutations and clinical phenotypes in Chinese children with Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caifeng; Zhang, Junmei; Li, Shipeng; Han, Tongxin; Kuang, Weiying; Zhou, Yifang; Deng, Jianghong; Tan, Xiaohua

    2017-07-01

    The mutations of CARD15 gene and clinical features of Chinese patients with Blau syndrome were analyzed. We identified 10 missense mutations, out of which five were new: R334L, E383D, R471C, C495R and D512F. The rest of them, R334W, R334Q, G481D, M513T and R587C, have been reported previously. Among all the mutations, R334W, R334Q and C495R had the highest frequency. Blau syndrome was found at early age after birth. It began with lepidic rash and symmetric polyarthritis and was phenotypically characterized by typical rash, arthritis, iridocyclitis and arteritis. Cardiac involvement was also found in Blau syndrome. In addition to nerve deafness, renal involvement, osteochondroma and central nervous system involvement were also found in our patients. Therefore, Chinese children with Blau syndrome have unique gene mutations and complicated clinical phenotypes. Pathologic examination and CARD15 mutation testing should be considered for diagnosis as early as possible for suspected patients.

  13. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikara, Barshagul T; Zholdybayeva, Elena V; Rakhimova, Saule E; Nigmatullina, Nazym B; Momynaliev, Kuvat T; Ramanculov, Yerlan M

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alport syndrome due to COL4A5 gene mutations. All 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene were screened by linkage analysis and direct DNA sequencing, resulting in the identification of a novel mutation (G641E) in exon 25. The mutation was found only in two affected family individuals but was not present in healthy family members or 200 unrelated healthy controls. This result demonstrates that this novel mutation is pathogenic and has meaningful implications for the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome.

  14. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barshagul T Baikara

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alport syndrome due to COL4A5 gene mutations. All 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene were screened by linkage analysis and direct DNA sequencing, resulting in the identification of a novel mutation (G641E in exon 25. The mutation was found only in two affected family individuals but was not present in healthy family members or 200 unrelated healthy controls. This result demonstrates that this novel mutation is pathogenic and has meaningful implications for the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome.

  15. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Millonig Gunda; Muckenthaler Martina U; Mueller Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unle...

  16. Absence of PAX6 gene mutations in Gillespie syndrome (partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, T.; Maas, R.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Ton, C.C.T.; Housman, D.E. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)); Mueller, R.; Oliver, C. (Leeds General Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Petzl-Erler, M.L. (Federal Univ. of Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)); Nevin, N.C. (Queen' s Univ. of Belfast (Ireland))

    1994-01-01

    The PAX6 gene is expressed at high levels in the developing eye and cerebellum and is mutated in patients with autosomal dominant aniridia. The authors have tested the role of PAX6 mutations in three families with Gillespie syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive condition consisting of partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of affected individuals revealed no alteration of PAX6 sequences. In two families, the disease trait segregates independently from chromosome 11p markers flanking PAX6. The authors conclude that Gillespie syndrome is genetically distinct from autosomal dominant aniridia. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome – a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum

    Objective: QT interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome (TS). This study set out to explore the presence of known pathogenic long QT (LQT) mutations in TS and to examine the corrected QT interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the TS phenotype. Methods......QTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome (LQTS) was determined in females with TS and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results: The mean hQTc in females with TS (414.0±25.5 ms...

  18. A family with Townes-Brocks syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism and a novel mutation of the SALL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ik; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Han Wook; Oh, Sung Hee

    2010-12-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder caused by mutations in the SALL1 gene. Its signs and symptoms overlap with other genetic syndromes, including VACTERL association, Pendred syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, and cat eye syndrome. Structural vertebral abnormalities, hypoplasia of the thumb, and radial bone abnormalities, which are not usually associated with TBS, help in the differential diagnosis of these syndromes. We report the case of a family whose members were diagnosed with TBS with congenital hypothyroidism and had a novel SALL1 gene mutation.

  19. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1.

  20. Muckle-Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muckle - Wells syndrome (MWS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population.

  1. Ocular findings in a patient with Cockayne syndrome with two mutations in the ERCC6 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan; Zheng, Yajie; Yan, Xiaoming; Huang, Yu; Jiang, Yuwu; Li, Haili

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, multisystem disorder that causes a senile appearance. Ophthalmic abnormalities are frequently present. Here, we report a wide range of ocular findings in a child with Cockayne syndrome. The systemic and ocular findings were reviewed. A mutation analysis was performed in the patient and her parents. The patient underwent a complete ocular examination. Both eyes had low visual acuity, corneal epithelial degeneration, punctate opacities of the lens, and retina disorders. The systemic findings included growth deficiency and a senile appearance. Gene analysis showed mutations in exons 4 and 18 of the ERCC6 gene. Multiple ocular abnormalities were observed in a patient with Cockayne syndrome. A detailed ophthalmic evaluation of children with Cockayne syndrome is advised.

  2. A familial case of Blau syndrome caused by a novel NOD2 genetic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojoong; Park, Eujin; Ahn, Yo Han; Lee, Jiwon M; Kang, Hee Gyung; Kim, Byung Joo; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-11-01

    Blau syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal dominant, inflammatory syndrome that is characterized by the clinical triad of granulomatous dermatitis, symmetric arthritis, and recurrent uveitis. Mutations in the nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) gene are responsible for causing BS. To date, up to 30 Blau-associated genetic mutations have been identified within this gene. We report a novel NOD2 genetic mutation that causes BS. A girl, aged 8 years, and her brother, aged 10 years, developed erythematous skin rashes and uveitis. The computed tomography angiogram of the younger sister showed features of midaortic dysplastic syndrome. The brother had more prominent joint involvement than the sister. Their father (38 years) was also affected by uveitis; however, only minimal skin involvement was observed in his case. The paternal aunt (39 years) and her daughter (13 years) were previously diagnosed with sarcoidosis. Mutational analysis revealed a novel c.1439 A>G mutation in the NOD2 gene in both siblings. The novel c.1439 A>G mutation in the NOD2 gene was found in a familial case of BS. Although BS is rare, it should always be considered in patients presenting with sarcoidosis-like features at a young age. Early diagnosis of BS and prompt multisystem workup including the eyes and joints can improve the patient's outcome.

  3. Whole-exome sequencing revealed two novel mutations in Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koparir, Asuman; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Atayoglu, Ali Timucin; Yuksel, Bayram; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Seven, Mehmet; Ulucan, Hakan; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive inherited disorder accompanied by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Since the associated genes are various and quite large, we utilized whole-exome sequencing (WES) as a diagnostic tool to identify the molecular basis of Usher syndrome. DNA from a 12-year-old male diagnosed with Usher syndrome was analyzed by WES. Mutations detected were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The pathogenicity of these mutations was determined by in silico analysis. A maternally inherited deleterious frameshift mutation, c.14439_14454del in exon 66 and a paternally inherited non-sense c.10830G>A stop-gain SNV in exon 55 of USH2A were found as two novel compound heterozygous mutations. Both of these mutations disrupt the C terminal of USH2A protein. As a result, WES revealed two novel compound heterozygous mutations in a Turkish USH2A patient. This approach gave us an opportunity to have an appropriate diagnosis and provide genetic counseling to the family within a reasonable time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaney, S.F.; Oldridge, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel SfiI and BstUI restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Physical interaction between SLX4 (FANCP) and XPF (FANCQ) proteins and biological consequences of interaction-defective missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Keiji; Wada, Kunio; Matsumoto, Kyomu; Moriya, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    SLX4 (FANCP) and XPF (FANCQ) proteins interact with each other and play a vital role in the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway. We have identified a SLX4 region and several amino acid residues that are responsible for this interaction. The study has revealed that the global minor allele, SLX4(Y546C), is defective in this interaction and cannot complement Fancp knockout mouse cells in mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity or chromosomal aberrations. These results highly suggest this allele, as well as SLX4(L530Q), to be pathogenic. The interacting partner XPF is involved in various DNA repair pathways, and certain XPF mutations cause progeria, Cockayne syndrome (CS), and/or FA phenotypes. Because several atypical xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) phenotype-causing XPF missense mutations are located in the SLX4-interacting region, we suspected the disruption of the interaction with SLX4 in these XPF mutants, thereby causing severer phenotypes. The immunoprecipitation assay of cell extracts revealed that those XPF mutations, except XPF(C236R), located in the SLX4-interacting region cause instability of XPF protein, which could be the reason for the FA, progeria and/or CS phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation ...

  7. Prostate cancer in a male with Holt-Oram syndrome: first clinical association of the TBX5 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Noel J

    2013-08-05

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  8. Interstitial pneumonitis in Blau syndrome with documented mutation in CARD15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Mara L; Martin, Tammy M; Doyle, Trudy M; Rosé, Carlos D

    2007-04-01

    This is the first report of a CARD15 mutation-positive patient with Blau syndrome who exhibited interstitial lung disease, a feature historically considered absent from Blau syndrome, while typical of the adult form of sarcoidosis. This case illustrates the continued evolution of the phenotype of a disease initially conceived as a familial inflammatory granulomatous disease limited to the triad of synovitis, dermatitis, and uveitis.

  9. Mutations in CEP290, which encodes a centrosomal protein, cause pleiotropic forms of Joubert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Enza Maria; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Brancati, Francesco; Barrano, Giuseppe; Krishnaswami, Suguna Rani; Castori, Marco; Lancaster, Madeline A; Boltshauser, Eugen; Boccone, Loredana; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina; Louie, Carrie M; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Bertini, Enrico; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2006-06-01

    Joubert syndrome-related disorders (JSRD) are a group of syndromes sharing the neuroradiological features of cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and a peculiar brainstem malformation known as the 'molar tooth sign'. We identified mutations in the CEP290 gene in five families with variable neurological, retinal and renal manifestations. CEP290 expression was detected mostly in proliferating cerebellar granule neuron populations and showed centrosome and ciliary localization, linking JSRDs to other human ciliopathies.

  10. A Novel De Novo EFNB1 Gene Mutation in a Mexican Patient with Craniofrontonasal Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, M. A.; Chacon-Camacho, O. F.; Leyva-Hernandez, C.; Cardenas-Conejo, A.; Zenteno, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CNFS) is an X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the EFNB1 gene in which, paradoxically, heterozygous females are more severely affected than hemizygous males. In this paper, the clinical and molecular studies of a female subject with CFNS are described. A novel de novo c.473T>C (p.M158T) mutation in exon 3 of EFNB1 was demonstrated in this patient. The M158 residue of the Ephrin-B1 protein is highly conserved between species. Our results expand the mutational spectrum exposed by CNFS. PMID:23509643

  11. A Novel De Novo EFNB1 Gene Mutation in a Mexican Patient with Craniofrontonasal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ramirez-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CNFS is an X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the EFNB1 gene in which, paradoxically, heterozygous females are more severely affected than hemizygous males. In this paper, the clinical and molecular studies of a female subject with CFNS are described. A novel de novo c.473T>C (p.M158T mutation in exon 3 of EFNB1 was demonstrated in this patient. The M158 residue of the Ephrin-B1 protein is highly conserved between species. Our results expand the mutational spectrum exposed by CNFS.

  12. Mutational analysis of the PLCE1 gene in steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Olivia; Benoit, Geneviève; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Pawtowski, Audrey; Bilge, Ilmay; Bircan, Zelal; Deschênes, Georges; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Hall, Michelle; Macher, Marie-Alice; Soulami, Kenza; Stefanidis, Constantinos J; Weiss, Robert; Loirat, Chantal; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-07-01

    Mutations in the PLCE1 gene encoding phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCepsilon1) have been recently described in patients with early onset nephrotic syndrome (NS) and diffuse mesangial sclerosis (DMS). In addition, two cases of PLCE1 mutations associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and later NS onset have been reported. In order to better assess the spectrum of phenotypes associated with PLCE1 mutations, mutational analysis was performed in a worldwide cohort of 139 patients (95 familial cases belonging to 68 families and 44 sporadic cases) with steroid resistant NS presenting at a median age of 23.0 months (range 0-373). Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations were identified in 33% (8/24) of DMS cases. PLCE1 mutations were found in 8% (6/78) of FSGS cases without NPHS2 mutations. Nine were novel mutations. No clear genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, with either truncating or missense mutations detected in both DMS and FSGS, and leading to a similar renal evolution. Surprisingly, three unaffected and unrelated individuals were also found to carry the homozygous mutations identified in their respective families. PLCE1 is a major gene of DMS and is mutated in a non-negligible proportion of FSGS cases without NPHS2 mutations. Although additional variants in 19 candidate genes (16 other PLC genes, BRAF,IQGAP1 and NPHS1) were not identified, it is speculated that other modifier genes or environmental factors may play a role in the renal phenotype variability observed in individuals bearing PLCE1 mutations. This observation needs to be considered in the genetic counselling offered to patients.

  13. Overlapping SETBP1 gain-of-function mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and hematologic malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Acuna-Hidalgo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS is a rare developmental disorder characterized by multiple malformations, severe neurological alterations and increased risk of malignancy. SGS is caused by de novo germline mutations clustering to a 12bp hotspot in exon 4 of SETBP1. Mutations in this hotspot disrupt a degron, a signal for the regulation of protein degradation, and lead to the accumulation of SETBP1 protein. Overlapping SETBP1 hotspot mutations have been observed recurrently as somatic events in leukemia. We collected clinical information of 47 SGS patients (including 26 novel cases with germline SETBP1 mutations and of four individuals with a milder phenotype caused by de novo germline mutations adjacent to the SETBP1 hotspot. Different mutations within and around the SETBP1 hotspot have varying effects on SETBP1 stability and protein levels in vitro and in in silico modeling. Substitutions in SETBP1 residue I871 result in a weak increase in protein levels and mutations affecting this residue are significantly more frequent in SGS than in leukemia. On the other hand, substitutions in residue D868 lead to the largest increase in protein levels. Individuals with germline mutations affecting D868 have enhanced cell proliferation in vitro and higher incidence of cancer compared to patients with other germline SETBP1 mutations. Our findings substantiate that, despite their overlap, somatic SETBP1 mutations driving malignancy are more disruptive to the degron than germline SETBP1 mutations causing SGS. Additionally, this suggests that the functional threshold for the development of cancer driven by the disruption of the SETBP1 degron is higher than for the alteration in prenatal development in SGS. Drawing on previous studies of somatic SETBP1 mutations in leukemia, our results reveal a genotype-phenotype correlation in germline SETBP1 mutations spanning a molecular, cellular and clinical phenotype.

  14. The first PTPN1 1 mutations in hotspot exons reported in Moroccan children with Noonan syndrome and comparison of mutation rate to previous studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouchikhi, Ihssane; Samri, Imane; Iraqui Houssaini, Mohammed; Trhanint, Saaid; Bouguenouch, Laila; Sayel, Hanane; Hida, Moustapha; Atmani, Samir; Ouldim, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of 1/1000-2500. It results from protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) mutations in roughly 50% of cases. Mutational screening of PTPN11 has been carried out in different populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to screen, for the first time, PTPN11 mutations in a series of Moroccan Noonan syndrome patients. We used bidirectional sequencing of exons 3 and 8, considered as PTPN11 mutation hot spots, and then compared the rate of mutational events of these exons between different populations using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. We detected 3 heterozygous mutations (Asp6lGly, Tyr63Cys, and Asn308Ser) in 4 individuals of 16 sporadic patients (25%). The rate of mutation in our cohort did not differ from that of other populations. However, we found significant differences in the mutation rate of exon 8 between one Japanese cohort and some populations, which requires more investigations to be explained. The present study allowed identification of mutations clustered in exons 3 and 8 of the PTPN11 gene in a Moroccan Noonan syndrome cohort and enabled us to give appropriate genetic counseling to the mutation-positive patients.

  15. PTPN11 mutations are not responsible for the Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavamura, M I; Pomponi, M G; Zollino, M; Lecce, R; Murdolo, M; Brunoni, D; Alchorne, M M A; Opitz, J M; Neri, G

    2003-01-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome characterized by congenital heart defects, characteristic facial appearance, short stature, ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation. It was described in 1986, and to date is of unknown genetic etiology. All reported cases are sporadic, born to non-consanguineous parents and have apparently normal chromosomes. Noonan and Costello syndromes remain its main differential diagnosis. The recent finding of PTPN11 missense mutations in 45-50% of the Noonan patients studied with penetrance of almost 100% and the fact that in animals mutations of this gene cause defects of semilunar valvulogenesis, made PTPN11 mutation screening in CFC patients a matter of interest. We sequenced the entire coding region of the PTPN11 gene in ten well-characterised CFC patients and found no base changes. We also studied PTPN11 cDNA in our patients and demonstrated that there are no interstitial deletions either. The genetic cause of CFC syndrome remains unknown, and PTPN11 can be reasonably excluded as a candidate gene for the CFC syndrome, which we regard as molecular evidence that CFC and Noonan syndromes are distinct genetic entities.

  16. Identification and expression analysis of a novel intragenic EFNB1 mutation causing craniofrontonasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar F; Arce-Gonzalez, Rocio; Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Pelcastre-Luna, Erika; Uría-Gómez, Conrado E; Granillo-Alvarez, Mariella; Zenteno, Juan C

    2014-12-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS) is an X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the EFNB1 gene and characterized by distinctive craniofacial and digital malformations. In contrast with most X-linked traits, female patients with CFNS display a more severe phenotype than males. In this report, the clinical, molecular and RNA expression analyses of a female subject with CFNS are described. A novel c.445_449delGAGGG deletion in exon 3 of EFNB1 was demonstrated in this patient. To assess the effect of this novel mutation at the transcript level, the expression of EFNB1 mRNA was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an EFNB1 transcript carrying a truncating mutation in exon 3 is demonstrated to undergo degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Our results expand the mutational spectrum of CFNS and add to the functional consequences of truncating EFNB1 mutations.

  17. Mutational Analysis of PTPN11 Gene in Taiwanese Children with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Sui Hung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder presenting with characteristic facies, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Mutations in protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 11 (PTPN11, encoding SHP-2, account for 33-50% of NS. This study screened for mutations in the PTPN11 gene in 34 Taiwanese patients with NS. Mutation analysis of the 15 coding exons and exon/intron boundaries was performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the PTPN11 gene. We identified 10 different missense mutations in 13 (38% patients, including a novel missense mutation (855T > G, F285L. These mutations were clustered in exon 3 (n = 6 encoding the N-SH2 domain, exon 4 (n = 2 encoding the C-SH2 domain, and in exons 8 (n = 2 and 13 (n = 3 encoding the PTP domain. In conclusion, this study provides further support that PTPN11 mutations are responsible for Noonan syndrome in Taiwanese patients. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:169-172

  18. Malignant phenotype and two SDHD mutations in a family with paraganglioma syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenz, Franciele B; Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; Oliveira, Marcelo; Mamede, Marcelo; Sarquis, Marta; Friedman, Eitan; de Marco, Luiz

    2015-03-30

    Paraganglioma syndrome type 1 (PGL1) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome associated with multiple, overwhelmingly benign, pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, attributed to SDHD gene mutations. Clinically and molecularly characterize a family with uncommon malignant phenotype of paragangliomas attributed to two seemingly pathogenic SDHD germline mutations. The proband presented with large bilateral carotid body tumours and family history of cervical masses in his five siblings. All family members underwent clinical examination, imaging studies (18F-FDG PET/CT) and genotyping of relevant genes. The proband was diagnosed with locally advanced paraganglioma; his hypertensive, otherwise asymptomatic father, had locally advanced pheochromocytoma and his three siblings showed multiple head and neck masses, confirmed to be paragangliomas with local metastasis. All affected patients carried two germline mutations in the SDHD gene; a previously reported nonsense mutation in exon 1 (p.Trp5X) and a novel missense mutation in exon 2 (p.Pro53Leu), highly deleterious by in silico analysis. Allelic loss at the SDHD locus was not shown for any of the analysed tumours. This is a rare case of malignant PGL1 with seemingly double pathogenic mutations in the SDHD gene, highlighting the possibility that the presence of both mutations is associated with the more aggressive phenotype.

  19. Destabilization of CHK2 by a missense mutation associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S B; Kim, S H; Bell, D W; Wahrer, D C; Schiripo, T A; Jorczak, M M; Sgroi, D C; Garber, J E; Li, F P; Nichols, K E; Varley, J M; Godwin, A K; Shannon, K M; Harlow, E; Haber, D A

    2001-11-15

    Li Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a multicancer phenotype, most commonly associated with germ-line mutations in TP53. In a kindred with LFS without an inherited TP53 mutation, we have previously reported a truncating mutation (1100delC) in CHK2, encoding a kinase that phosphorylates p53 on Ser(20). Here, we describe a CHK2 missense mutation (R145W) in another LFS family. This mutation destabilizes the encoded protein, reducing its half-life from >120 min to 30 min. This effect is abrogated by treatment of cells with a proteosome inhibitor, suggesting that CHK2(R145W) is targeted through this degradation pathway. Both 1100delC and R145W germ-line mutations in CHK2 are associated with loss of the wild-type allele in the corresponding tumor specimens, and neither tumor harbors a somatic TP53 mutation. Our observations support the functional significance of CHK2 mutations in rare cases of LFS and suggest that such mutations may substitute for inactivation of TP53.

  20. Analysis of recessive CD2AP and ACTN4 mutations in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Nevo, Fabien; Gribouval, Olivier; Lepage, David; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-03-01

    Mutations in podocyte genes have been identified in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Point mutations in the ACTN4 gene cause an autosomal dominant form of human focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS); however, reports of CD2AP mutations remain scarce. Based on the phenotype of Actn4 and Cd2ap null mice, we aimed to define the role of recessive CD2AP and ACTN4 mutations in a cohort of children with SRNS for which NPHS1, NPHS2, and PLCE1 mutations had been previously excluded. CD2AP and ACTN4 mutational analysis was performed in 42 children from 35 unrelated families. The median age of disease onset was 20 (range 0-102) months. Sixteen patients reached end-stage kidney disease at a median age of 84 (range 4-161) months. Renal histology showed FSGS lesions and minimal glomerular changes in 49% and 20% of patients, respectively. Microsatellite marker analysis excluded linkage to the CD2AP locus in 26 families and to the ACTN4 locus in 31 families. No disease-causing mutations were identified in the remaining families. Recessive CD2AP and ACTN4 mutations are rare in children with SRNS. The absence of mutations in this study suggests that there are other genetic causes of SRNS that still need to be identified.

  1. Floating-Harbor syndrome and polycystic kidneys associated with SRCAP mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschen, Michael; Kini, Usha; Hood, Rebecca L; Boycott, Kym M; Hurst, Jane; O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare genetic disorder recently shown to be caused by mutations in the Snf2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein gene (SRCAP). It comprises three key clinical features of characteristic facies, expressive and receptive speech impairment and short stature. We report on a patient with this syndrome associated with early adult-onset hypertension and bilateral polycystic kidneys. Family screening for polycystic kidney disease was negative and mutations in polycystic kidney disease 1 and 2 genes (PKD1 and PKD2) were absent. Sequencing of the SRCAP gene demonstrated a de novo mutation matching one of the known FHS-associated mutations. The patient required treatment with anti-hypertensives and will require lifelong renal monitoring. We suggest this patient's presentation may be due to the pleiotropic effects of SRCAP mutations. Further, the protein encoded by SRCAP is known to interact with CREB-binding protein, the product of the gene mutated in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, which is associated with renal abnormalities. A literature review of the renal findings in patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome identified another patient with possible polycystic kidneys, two patients with early onset hypertension, and a young patient with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, which can be a feature of classic adult polycystic kidney disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that all patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome should undergo regular blood pressure monitoring and screening for polycystic kidneys by ultrasound at the time of the FHS diagnosis with imaging to be repeated during adulthood if a childhood ultrasound was negative. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Truncating mutations in the last exon of NOTCH3 cause lateral meningocele syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Robbins, Katherine M; Sobreira, Nara L; Witmer, P Dane; Bird, Lynne M; Avela, Kristiina; Makitie, Outi; Alves, Daniela; Hogue, Jacob S; Zackai, Elaine H; Doheny, Kimberly F; Stabley, Deborah L; Sol-Church, Katia

    2015-02-01

    Lateral meningocele syndrome (LMS, OMIM%130720), also known as Lehman syndrome, is a very rare skeletal disorder with facial anomalies, hypotonia and meningocele-related neurologic dysfunction. The characteristic lateral meningoceles represent the severe end of the dural ectasia spectrum and are typically most severe in the lower spine. Facial features of LMS include hypertelorism and telecanthus, high arched eyebrows, ptosis, midfacial hypoplasia, micrognathia, high and narrow palate, low-set ears and a hypotonic appearance. Hyperextensibility, hernias and scoliosis reflect a connective tissue abnormality, and aortic dilation, a high-pitched nasal voice, wormian bones and osteolysis may be present. Lateral meningocele syndrome has phenotypic overlap with Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. We performed exome resequencing in five unrelated individuals with LMS and identified heterozygous truncating NOTCH3 mutations. In an additional unrelated individual Sanger sequencing revealed a deleterious variant in the same exon 33. In total, five novel de novo NOTCH3 mutations were identified in six unrelated patients. One had a 26 bp deletion (c.6461_6486del, p.G2154fsTer78), two carried the same single base pair insertion (c.6692_93insC, p.P2231fsTer11), and three individuals had a nonsense point mutation at c.6247A > T (pK2083*), c.6663C > G (p.Y2221*) or c.6732C > A, (p.Y2244*). All mutations cluster into the last coding exon, resulting in premature termination of the protein and truncation of the negative regulatory proline-glutamate-serine-threonine rich PEST domain. Our results suggest that mutant mRNA products escape nonsense mediated decay. The truncated NOTCH3 may cause gain-of-function through decreased clearance of the active intracellular product, resembling NOTCH2 mutations in the clinically related Hajdu-Cheney syndrome and contrasting the NOTCH3 missense mutations causing CADASIL. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Taghdiri, Maryam; Dastsooz, Hassan; Fardaei, Majid; Mohammadi, Sanaz; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. There...

  5. A novel mitochondrial mutation m.8989G>C associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa - the NARP syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Baggesen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial point mutation, m.8989G>C, in a patient presenting with neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa constituting the classical NARP phenotype. This mutation alters the amino acid right next to canonical NARP mutation. We suggest that classic NARP syndrome relates to a defined dysfunction of p...

  6. The genetic basis of Brugada syndrome: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    of inheritance with an average prevalence of 5:10,000 worldwide. Currently, more than 100 mutations in seven genes have been associated with BrS. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Na(v)1.5 sodium ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(Na) current, causes 15-20% of Br......S cases. A few mutations have been described in GPD1L, which encodes glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 like protein; CACNA1C, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(L,Ca) current; CACNB2, which encodes the stimulating beta2-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion...

  7. A novel TP53 splicing mutation in a Li-Fraumeni syndrome family: a patient with Wilms' tumour is not a mutation carrier.

    OpenAIRE

    Varley, J. M.; McGown, G; Thorncroft, M.; White, G. R.; Tricker, K. J.; Kelsey, A M; Birch, J M; Evans, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    We report a Li-Fraumeni syndrome family in which we have detected a splice acceptor mutation in intron 3 of TP53. The mutation affects one of the invariant residues at the splice acceptor site, as a result of which two aberrant transcripts are produced. A child with Wilms' tumour aged 3 years in this family was shown not to be a mutation carrier.

  8. A novel TP53 splicing mutation in a Li-Fraumeni syndrome family: a patient with Wilms' tumour is not a mutation carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, J. M.; McGown, G.; Thorncroft, M.; White, G. R.; Tricker, K. J.; Kelsey, A. M.; Birch, J. M.; Evans, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    We report a Li-Fraumeni syndrome family in which we have detected a splice acceptor mutation in intron 3 of TP53. The mutation affects one of the invariant residues at the splice acceptor site, as a result of which two aberrant transcripts are produced. A child with Wilms' tumour aged 3 years in this family was shown not to be a mutation carrier. PMID:9792154

  9. A Mosaic Activating Mutation in AKT1 Associated with the Proteus Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Finn, Erin M.; Peters, Kathryn; Turner, Joyce; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Bick, David; Blakemore, Laurel; Blumhorst, Catherine; Brockmann, Knut; Calder, Peter; Cherman, Natasha; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Everman, David B.; Golas, Gretchen; Greenstein, Robert M.; Kato, B. Maya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Miyamoto, Richard T.; Newman, Kurt; Ng, David; O’Brien, Kevin; Rothenberg, Steven; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Singhal, Virender; Tirabosco, Roberto; Upton, Joseph; Wientroub, Shlomo; Zackai, Elaine H.; Hoag, Kimberly; Whitewood-Neal, Tracey; Robey, Pamela G.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Tosi, Laura L.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Proteus syndrome is characterized by the overgrowth of skin, connective tissue, brain, and other tissues. It has been hypothesized that the syndrome is caused by somatic mosaicism for a mutation that is lethal in the nonmosaic state. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of DNA from biopsy samples obtained from patients with the Proteus syndrome and compared the resultant DNA sequences with those of unaffected tissues obtained from the same patients. We confirmed and extended an observed association, using a custom restriction-enzyme assay to analyze the DNA in 158 samples from 29 patients with the Proteus syndrome. We then assayed activation of the AKT protein in affected tissues, using phosphorylation-specific antibodies on Western blots. RESULTS Of 29 patients with the Proteus syndrome, 26 had a somatic activating mutation (c.49G→A, p.Glu17Lys) in the oncogene AKT1, encoding the AKT1 kinase, an enzyme known to mediate processes such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. Tissues and cell lines from patients with the Proteus syndrome harbored admixtures of mutant alleles that ranged from 1% to approximately 50%. Mutant cell lines showed greater AKT phosphorylation than did control cell lines. A pair of single-cell clones that were established from the same starting culture and differed with respect to their mutation status had different levels of AKT phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS The Proteus syndrome is caused by a somatic activating mutation in AKT1, proving the hypothesis of somatic mosaicism and implicating activation of the PI3K–AKT pathway in the characteristic clinical findings of overgrowth and tumor susceptibility in this disorder. (Funded by the Intramural Research Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute.) PMID:21793738

  10. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function Mutations in DLL4 Cause Adams-Oliver Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meester, Josephina A. N.; Southgate, Laura; Stittrich, Anna-Barbara; Venselaar, Hanka; Beekmans, Sander J. A.; den Hollander, Nicolette; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; den Enden, Appolonia Helderman-van; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared C.; Lehman, Anna; Patel, Millan S.; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Itin, Peter; Prescott, Katrina; Clarke, Sheila; Trembath, Richard; Zenker, Martin; Sukalo, Maja; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart; Wuyts, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by the presence of aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp vertex and terminal limb-reduction defects. Cardiovascular anomalies are also frequently observed. Mutations in five genes have been identified as a cause for AOS

  11. A new mutation in the CSB gene in a Chinese patient with mild Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Ling, Yan; Chen, Jiachao; Xu, Xi; Chen, Chen; Leng, Fei; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Min; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by growth failure and progressive neurological degeneration. Here we report a mild form of CS patient who was homozygous for the C526T transition resulting in a new nonsense mutation, which converts Arg176 to a stop codon.

  12. A novel PITX2 mutation in non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarak, Narin; Theerapanon, Thanakorn; Ittiwut, Chupong; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2017-11-09

    To identify oro-dental characteristics and genetic etiology of a family affected with non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies. Physical and oral features were characterised. DNA was collected from an affected Thai family. Whole exome sequencing was employed to identify the pathogenic variants associated with inherited oro-dental anomalies. The presence of the identified mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We observed unique oro-dental manifestations including oligodontia, retained primary teeth, taurodont molars, peg-shaped maxillary central incisors, high attached frenum with nodule, and midline diastema in the proband and her mother. Mutation analyses revealed a novel heterozygous frameshift deletion, c.573_574delCA, p.L193QfsX5, in exon 5 of PITX2A in affected family members. The amino acid alterations, localised in the transcriptional activation domain 2 in the C terminus of PITX2, were evolutionarily conserved. Mutations in PITX2 have been associated with autosomal-dominant Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and non-syndromic eye abnormalities, but never been found to cause isolated oral anomalies. This study for the first time demonstrates that the PITX2 mutation could lead to non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies in humans. We propose that the specific location in the C-terminal domain of PITX2 is exclusively necessary for tooth development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-Syndrome affecting its cellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kersseboom (Simone); G.J. Kremers (Gert-Jan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); W. Edward Visser (W.); W. Klootwijk (Willem); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of

  14. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Familial Mediterranean fever, Inflammation and Nephrotic Syndrome: Fibrillary Glomerulopathy and the M680I Missense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semerdjian Ronald J

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by inflammatory serositis (fever, peritonitis, synovitis and pleuritis. The gene locus responsible for FMF was identified in 1992 and localized to the short arm of chromosome 16. In 1997, a specific FMF gene locus, MEFV, was discovered to encode for a protein, pyrin that mediates inflammation. To date, more than forty missense mutations are known to exist. The diversity of mutations identified has provided insight into the variability of clinical presentation and disease progression. Case Report We report an individual heterozygous for the M680I gene mutation with a clinical diagnosis of FMF using the Tel-Hashomer criteria. Subsequently, the patient developed nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-confirmed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN. Further diagnostic studies were unremarkable with clinical workup negative for amyloidosis or other secondary causes of nephrotic syndrome. Discussion Individuals with FMF are at greater risk for developing nephrotic syndrome. The most serious etiology is amyloidosis (AA variant with renal involvement, ultimately progressing to end-stage renal disease. Other known renal diseases in the FMF population include IgA nephropathy, IgM nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein purpura as well as polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first association between FMF and the M680I mutation later complicated by nephrotic syndrome and fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

  16. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... is Senior-Loken syndrome, a hereditary heterogeneous multiorgan disorder, which combines neph- ronophthisis with ... Case report: Here, we are reporting two children from an Arab family with a novel frameshift mutation found in ..... diseases, which are scattered in the Arab world and Middle. East to help ...

  17. Identification of a novel STAT3 mutation in a patient with hyper-IgE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Trine H; Jakobsen, Marianne; Larsen, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a patient with hyper-IgE syndrome presenting with recurrent staphylococcal abscesses, pneumonia, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and report the identification of a novel STAT3 mutation at amino acid position 621, which has not previously been described. In addition, we...

  18. De novo mutations in SMCHD1 cause Bosma arhinia microphthalmia syndrome and abrogate nasal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, Christopher T.; Xue, Shifeng; Yigit, Gökhan; Filali, Hicham; Chen, Kelan; Rosin, Nadine; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Oufadem, Myriam; Beck, Tamara J.; McGowan, Ruth; Magee, Alex C.; Altmüller, Janine; Dion, Camille; Thiele, Holger; Gurzau, Alexandra D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Meschede, Dieter; Mühlbauer, Wolfgang; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Varghese, Vinod; Irving, Rachel; Sigaudy, Sabine; Williams, Denise; Ahmed, S. Faisal; Bonnard, Carine; Kong, Mung Kei; Ratbi, Ilham; Fejjal, Nawfal; Fikri, Meriem; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Reigstad, Hallvard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Ragge, Nicola; Lévy, Nicolas; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; teo, Audrey S. M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Kayserili, Hülya; Murphy, James M.; Chatdokmaiprai, Chalermpong; Hillmer, Axel M.; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Magdinier, Frédérique; Javed, Asif; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Amiel, Jeanne; Wollnik, Bernd; Reversade, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Bosma arhinia microphthalmia syndrome (BAMS) is an extremely rare and striking condition characterized by complete absence of the nose with or without ocular defects. We report here that missense mutations in the epigenetic regulator SMCHD1 mapping to the extended ATPase domain of the encoded

  19. Mutation and phenotypic spectrum in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous and Costello syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, A.L.; Albrecht, B.; Arici, C.; Burgt, I. van der; Buske, A.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Heller, R.; Horn, D.; Hubner, C.A.; Korenke, G.C.; Konig, R.; Kress, W.; Kruger, G.; Meinecke, P.; Mucke, J.; Plecko, B.; Rossier, E.; Schinzel, A.; Schulze, A.; Seemanova, E.; Seidel, H.; Spranger, S.; Tuysuz, B.; Uhrig, S.; Wieczorek, D.; Kutsche, K.; Zenker, M.

    2008-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) and Costello syndrome (CS) are congenital disorders with a significant clinical overlap. The recent discovery of heterozygous mutations in genes encoding components of the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway in both CFC and CS suggested a similar underlying pathogenesis of these two

  20. The spectrum of mutations in UBE3A causing Angelman syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Fang (Ping); E. Lev-Lehman (Efrat); T.-F. Tsai (Ting-Fen); N. Matsuura (Nobuo); S. Benton (Sabrina); J.S. Sutcliffe (James); S.L. Christian (Susan); T. Kubota (Takeo); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Langlois (Sylvie); J.M. Graham (John); J. Beuten (Joke); P.J. Willems (Patrick); A.M. Ledbetter (Andrew M.); L. Beaudet (Lucille)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAngelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by mental retardation, absence of speech, seizures and motor dysfunction. AS is caused by maternal deletions for chromosome 15q11-q13, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting defects or loss-of-function mutations in the UBE3A locus which

  1. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Juergen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation

  2. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  3. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  4. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants

  5. Mutation in the KCNQ1 gene leading to the short QT-interval syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellocq, Chloé; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Alders, Mariel; Escande, Denis; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Baró, Isabelle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background - The electrocardiographic short QT-interval syndrome forms a distinct clinical entity presenting with a high rate of sudden death and exceptionally short QT intervals. The disorder has recently been linked to gain-of-function mutation in KCNH2. The present study demonstrates that this

  6. Progressive Encephalopathy in Boys with Symptoms of Rett Syndrome and MECP2 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Four young boys with neonatal onset of encephalopathy, a progressive course, and MECP2 mutations are reported from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL Symptoms suggestive of Rett syndrome included failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, hypotonia, movement disorder, with myoclonic, dyskinetic, and choreiform patterns, and repetitive face scratching or nose rubbing stereotypies.

  7. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  8. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  9. Novel SCN5A mutation associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation due to subclinical Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jiménez-Jáimez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation can be caused by subclinical channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome. Our objective is to study the clinical behaviour of a new SCN5A mutation found in a woman with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. A 53-year-old woman presented with multiple episodes of ventricular fibrillation, a structurally normal heart and normal baseline electrocardiogram. Genetic testing included KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, KCNE2 and KCNJ2 and identified a mutation in SCN5A (D1816fs/g98747-98748insT. We studied 15 immediate family members by means of electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, flecainide challenge test and genetic study. Eight subjects had the mutation. The flecainide challenge test was positive for Brugada syndrome in two subjects in the case group and none in the control group. The PR and QRS intervals on the baseline electrocardiogram were longer in the case group. The left atrial volume indexed to body surface was higher in the case group, likely due to the fact that two patients with the mutation had atrial fibrillation and none had it in the control group. The D1816fs/g98747-98748insT mutation in SCN5A may be associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and Brugada syndrome with a broad phenotypic spectrum and incomplete penetrance. Genetic testing may be useful to identify the etiology of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation in patients with a negative thorough clinical evaluation.

  10. Sox2 cooperates with Chd7 to regulate genes that are mutated in human syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Erik; Akinci, Umut; Bryne, Jan Christian; Hou, Jun; Gontan, Cristina; Moen, Maaike; Szumska, Dorota; Kockx, Christel; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Dekkers, Dick H W; Demmers, Jeroen; Rijkers, Erik-Jan; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Philipsen, Sjaak; Pevny, Larysa H; Grosveld, Frank G; Rottier, Robbert J; Lenhard, Boris; Poot, Raymond A

    2011-06-01

    The HMG-box transcription factor Sox2 plays a role throughout neurogenesis and also acts at other stages of development, as illustrated by the multiple organs affected in the anophthalmia syndrome caused by SOX2 mutations. Here we combined proteomic and genomic approaches to characterize gene regulation by Sox2 in neural stem cells. Chd7, a chromatin remodeling ATPase associated with CHARGE syndrome, was identified as a Sox2 transcriptional cofactor. Sox2 and Chd7 physically interact, have overlapping genome-wide binding sites and regulate a set of common target genes including Jag1, Gli3 and Mycn, genes mutated in Alagille, Pallister-Hall and Feingold syndromes, which show malformations also associated with SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome or CHARGE syndrome. Regulation of disease-associated genes by a Sox2-Chd7 complex provides a plausible explanation for several malformations associated with SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome or CHARGE syndrome. Indeed, we found that Chd7-haploinsufficient embryos showed severely reduced expression of Jag1 in the developing inner ear.

  11. Spectrum of MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in Chilean families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Karin; Hurtado, Claudia; Hevia, Montserrat A; Wielandt, Ana Maria; de la Fuente, Marjorie; Church, James; Carvallo, Pilar; López-Köstner, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited syndrome of colorectal cancer, caused principally by germline mutations in MLH1 and MSH2. We report our experience with genetic screening in the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in Chile, a country previously underserved in the capacity to diagnose hereditary colorectal cancer. Families from our Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry were selected for this study if they fulfilled either Amsterdam I/II or Bethesda criteria for classification of Lynch syndrome. Analysis of colorectal tumors from probands included a microsatellite instability study and immunohistochemical evaluation for MLH1 and MSH2. Screening of germline mutations was performed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. A total of 21 families were evaluated, 14 meeting Amsterdam criteria and 7 meeting Bethesda criteria. Tumors in 20 families (95%) showed microsatellite instability (19 high and 1 low) and 9 of these 20 families (45%) harbored a germline mutation (7 of 13 Amsterdam and 2 of 7 Bethesda families). Of the 9 mutations identified, 6 were in MLH1 and 3 in MSH2. Two of the mutations were novel, 3 were previously found in 1 to 2 European populations, and 4 were previously found in various ethnic populations worldwide. Only 2 mutations were previously found in another Latin American population (Colombia). In our probands, colorectal cancer was located mainly (57%) in the right or transverse colon. Pedigree information from 104 family affected members of 21 studied families showed endometrial cancer to be the most frequent primary extracolonic tumor, accounting for 15.1% of total cases, followed by stomach (13.2%) and breast cancer (11.3%). Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes showed a strong Amerindian genetic component in 15 (71.4%) of the 21 families analyzed. The study of Lynch syndrome in families of different ethnic origins contributes to the definition of genetic and clinical differences among populations. Wide

  12. A Case of Blau Syndrome with NOD2 E383K Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Jun; Nakajima, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Nobuo

    2016-11-01

    We report a 3.5-year-old Japanese boy who developed lichenoid papules and erythema with noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with a scant lymphocytic infiltrate histologically on his limbs at the age of 8 months. Genetic analysis of the patient and his parents, who had no medical past history, revealed heterozygous 1147G>A (E383K) mutation of NOD2 in the patient and in his father, so the patient was diagnosed with Blau syndrome and his father as an asymptomatic carrier. Although Blau syndrome has been reported as a genetic disease with high penetrance, asymptomatic carrier cases of a family with the same E383K mutation have also been reported. These results suggest that some contributing factors are required for the development of inflammatory and granulomatous responses in heterozygous carriers of a NOD2 E383K mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Not all floating-harbor syndrome cases are due to mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clémentine; Bottani, Armand; Doray, Berenice; Goldenberg, Alice; Moncla, Anne; Odent, Sylvie; Nitschke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Faivre, Laurence; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare disorder characterized by short stature, delayed bone age, speech delay, and dysmorphic facial features. We report here the molecular analysis of nine cases, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for FHS. Using exome sequencing, we identified SRCAP as the disease gene in two cases and subsequently found SRCAP truncating mutations in 6/9 cases. All mutations occurred de novo and were located in exon 34, in accordance with the recent report of Hood et al. However, the absence of SRCAP mutations in 3/9 cases supported genetic heterogeneity of FH syndrome. Importantly, no major clinical differences were observed supporting clinical homogeneity in this series of FHS patients. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome due to a BMPR1A mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2010-06-01

    The conditions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome (JPS) and Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome (HMPS) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. The genetic mechanisms which explain these conditions have until recently been poorly understood. Recent interest has focused on the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway and, in particular, on mutations in the SMAD4 gene. However, not all cases of JPS and HMPS have mutations in SMAD4 and focus has now shifted to other components of the TGF-beta pathway to clarify the genetic mechanisms involved in these conditions. In this report, we describe the significance of a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A gene mutation in an Irish family.

  15. Germline and somatic mosaicism for FGFR2 mutation in the mother of a child with Crouzon syndrome: Implications for genetic testing in ?paternal age-effect? syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Goriely, Anne; Lord, Helen; Lim, Jasmine; Johnson, David; Lester, Tracy; Firth, Helen V.; Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by craniosynostosis and facial dysostosis, caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene; it belongs to a class of disorders that mostly arise as de novo mutations and exhibit a near-exclusive paternal origin of mutation and elevated paternal age (?paternal age effect?). However, even if this is the major mode of origin of mutations in paternal age-effect disorders, germline mosaicism may also occu...

  16. A Novel Mutation inERCC8Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdiri, Maryam; Dastsooz, Hassan; Fardaei, Majid; Mohammadi, Sanaz; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C) in our patient. Another gene ( ERCC6 ), which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  17. Mutations of KCNJ10 Together with Mutations of SLC26A4 Cause Digenic Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss Associated with Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    YANG, TAO; Gurrola II, Jose G.; Wu, Hao; Chiu, Sui M.; Wangemann, Philine; Snyder, Peter M.; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SLC26A4 cause nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA, also known as DFNB4) and Pendred syndrome (PS), the most common type of autosomal-recessive syndromic deafness. In many patients with an EVA/PS phenotype, mutation screening of SLC26A4 fails to identify two disease-causing allele variants. That a sizable fraction of patients carry only one SLC26A4 mutation suggests that EVA/PS is a complex disease involving other genetic factors. Here, w...

  18. Rare and unusual endocrine cancer syndromes with mutated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-12-01

    The study of a number of rare familial syndromes associated with endocrine tumor development has led to the identification of genes involved in the development of these tumors. Major advances have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these rare endocrine tumors, resulting in the elucidation of causative genes in rare familial diseases and a better understanding of the signaling pathways implicated in endocrine cancers. Recognition of the familial syndrome associated with a particular patient's endocrine tumor has important implications in terms of prognosis, screening of family members, and screening for associated conditions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Angelman Syndrome: Mutations Influence Features in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Wen-Hann; Bacino, Carlos A; Skinner, Steven A.; Anselm, Irina; Barbieri-Welge, Rene; Bauer-Carlin, Astrid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Gentile, Jennifer K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Horowitz, Lucia T.; Sanjeev V. Kothare; Lee, Hye-Seung; Nespeca, Mark P.; Peters, Sarika U.

    2011-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a lack of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A. Although the “classic” features of AS are well described, few large-scale studies have delineated the clinical features in AS. We present baseline data from 92 children with a molecular diagnosis of AS between 5 and 60 months old who are enrolled in the National Institutes of Health Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Angelman Syndrome Natural History Study from January 20...

  20. Mutations in SRCAP, encoding SNF2-related CREBBP activator protein, cause Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rebecca L; Lines, Matthew A; Nikkel, Sarah M; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L; Quaio, Caio Robledo D C; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora R; Albrecht, Beate; Platzer, Konrad; McGillivray, George; Zou, Ruobing; McLeod, D Ross; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Marcadier, Janet; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis E; White, Susan M; Boycott, Kym M

    2012-02-10

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected persons. Mutations were de novo in all six instances in which parental DNA was available. SRCAP is an SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling factor that serves as a coactivator for CREB-binding protein (CREBBP, better known as CBP, the major cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome [RTS]). Five SRCAP mutations, two of which are recurrent, were identified; all are tightly clustered within a small (111 codon) region of the final exon. These mutations are predicted to abolish three C-terminal AT-hook DNA-binding motifs while leaving the CBP-binding and ATPase domains intact. Our findings show that SRCAP mutations are the major cause of FHS and offer an explanation for the clinical overlap between FHS and RTS. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital Hereditary Endothelial Dystrophy Caused by SLC4A11 Mutations Progresses to Harboyan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Salina; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Rice, Aine; Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Naylor, Steven G.; Rivera-de la Parra, David; Spokes, David M.; James, Nigel; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Homozygous mutations in SLC4A11 cause 2 rare recessive conditions: congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED), affecting the cornea alone, and Harboyan syndrome consisting of corneal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss. In addition, adult-onset Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is associated with dominant mutations in SLC4A11. In this report, we investigate whether patients with CHED go on to develop hearing loss and whether their parents, who are carriers of an SLC4A11 mutation, show signs of having FECD. Methods: Patients with CHED were screened for mutations in the SLC4A11 gene and underwent audiometric testing. The patients and their parents underwent a clinical examination and specular microscopy. Results: Molecular analyses confirmed SLC4A11 mutations in 4 affected individuals from 3 families. All the patients were found to have varying degrees of sensorineural hearing loss at a higher frequency range. Guttate lesions were seen in 2 of the 4 parents who were available for examination. Conclusions: Our observations suggest that CHED caused by homozygous SLC4A11 mutations progresses to Harboyan syndrome, but the severity of this may vary considerably. Patients with CHED should therefore be monitored for progressive hearing loss. We could not determine conclusively whether the parents of the patients with CHED were at increased risk of developing late-onset FECD. PMID:24351571

  2. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Morrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C>T (p.Q1208X and c.11002G>T (p.E3668X. Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS.

  3. Familial case of Blau syndrome associated with a CARD15/NOD2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Arellanes-García, Lourdes; Cubas-Lorenzo, Victoria; Jimenez-Martinez, Maria C; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early onset granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and camptodactyly. We report a familial case of Blau syndrome associated with a CARD15/NOD2 mutation. PCR amplification and automated DNA sequencing of the complete CARD15/NOD2 coding sequence was performed. Molecular analysis in affected subjects disclosed a heterozygous c.1147G>C point mutation in CARD15/NOD2 exon 4, that predicts a p.E383K change at the protein level. Blau syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood uveitis and the genetic analysis of the CARD15/NOD2 gene is helpful in the diagnosis.

  4. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Megalencephaly syndromes: exome pipeline strategies for detecting low-level mosaic mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Tapper

    Full Text Available Two megalencephaly (MEG syndromes, megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP and megalencephaly-polymicrogyriapolydactyly-hydrocephalus (MPPH, have recently been defined on the basis of physical and neuroimaging features. Subsequently, exome sequencing of ten MEG cases identified de-novo postzygotic mutations in PIK3CA which cause MCAP and de-novo mutations in AKT and PIK3R2 which cause MPPH. Here we present findings from exome sequencing three unrelated megalencephaly patients which identified a causal PIK3CA mutation in two cases and a causal PIK3R2 mutation in the third case. However, our patient with the PIK3R2 mutation which is considered to cause MPPH has a marked bifrontal band heterotopia which is a feature of MCAP. Furthermore, one of our patients with a PIK3CA mutation lacks syndactyly/polydactyly which is a characteristic of MCAP. These findings suggest that the overlap between MCAP and MPPH may be greater than the available studies suggest. In addition, the PIK3CA mutation in one of our patients could not be detected using standard exome analysis because the mutation was observed at a low frequency consistent with somatic mosaicism. We have therefore investigated several alternative methods of exome analysis and demonstrate that alteration of the initial allele frequency spectrum (AFS, used as a prior for variant calling in samtools, had the greatest power to detect variants with low mutant allele frequencies in our 3 MEG exomes and in simulated data. We therefore recommend non-default settings of the AFS in combination with stringent quality control when searching for causal mutation(s that could have low levels of mutant reads due to post-zygotic mutation.

  6. PITX2 and FOXC1 spectrum of mutations in ocular syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Volkmann Kloss, Bethany A; Schilter, Kala F; Levin, Alex V; Lowry, R Brian; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Stroh, Eliza; Broeckel, Ulrich; Murray, Jeffrey C; Semina, Elena V

    2012-12-01

    Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) encompasses a broad spectrum of developmental conditions affecting anterior ocular structures and associated with an increased risk for glaucoma. Various systemic anomalies are often observed in ASD conditions such as Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) and De Hauwere syndrome. We report DNA sequencing and copy number analysis of PITX2 and FOXC1 in 76 patients with syndromic or isolated ASD and related conditions. PITX2 mutations and deletions were found in 24 patients with dental and/or umbilical anomalies seen in all. Seven PITX2-mutant alleles were novel including c.708_730del, the most C-terminal mutation reported to date. A second case of deletion of the distant upstream but not coding region of PITX2 was identified, highlighting the importance of this recently discovered mechanism for ARS. FOXC1 deletions were observed in four cases, three of which demonstrated hearing and/or heart defects, including a patient with De Hauwere syndrome; no nucleotide mutations in FOXC1 were identified. Review of the literature identified several other patients with 6p25 deletions and features of De Hauwere syndrome. The 1.3-Mb deletion of 6p25 presented here defines the critical region for this phenotype and includes the FOXC1, FOXF2, and FOXQ1 genes. In summary, PITX2 or FOXC1 disruptions explained 63% of ARS and 6% of other ASD in our cohort; all affected patients demonstrated additional systemic defects with PITX2 mutations showing a strong association with dental and/or umbilical anomalies and FOXC1 with heart and hearing defects. FOXC1 deletion was also found to be associated with De Hauwere syndrome.

  7. Mutations in TMEM76* cause mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (Sanfilippo C syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrebícek, Martin; Mrázová, Lenka; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Durand, Stéphanie; Roslin, Nicole M.; Nosková, Lenka; Hartmannová, Hana; Ivánek, Robert; Cízkova, Alena; Poupetová, Helena; Sikora, Jakub; Urinovská, Jana; Stranecký, Viktor; Zeman, Jirí; Lepage, Pierre; Roquis, David; Verner, Andrei; Ausseil, Jérome; Beesley, Clare E.; Maire, Irène; Poorthuis, Ben J. H. M.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Diggelen, Otto P.; Wevers, Ron A.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Majewski, Jacek; Morgan, Kenneth; Kmoch, Stanislav; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.

    2006-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (MPS IIIC, or Sanfilippo C syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A: alpha -glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (N-acetyltransferase), which leads to impaired degradation of heparan

  8. Polyhydramnios, Transient Antenatal Bartter's Syndrome, and MAGED2 Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laghmani, Kamel; Beck, Bodo B.; Yang, Sung-Sen; Seaayfan, Elie; Wenzel, Andrea; Reusch, Bjorn; Vitzthum, Helga; Priem, Dario; Demaretz, Sylvie; Bergmann, Klasien; Duin, Leonie K.; Goebel, Heike; Mache, Christoph; Thiele, Holger; Bartram, Malte P.; Dombret, Carlos; Altmueller, Janine; Nuernberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Levtchenko, Elena; Seyberth, Hannsjoerg W.; Klaus, Guenter; Yigit, Goekhan; Lin, Shih-Hua; Timmer, Albert; de Koning, Tom J.; Scherjon, Sicco; Schlingmann, Karl P.; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Rinschen, Markus M.; de Backer, Olivier; Konrad, Martin; Koemhoff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Three' pregnancies with male offspring in one family were complicated by severe polyhydramnios and prematurity. One fetus died; the other two had transient massive salt-wasting and polyuria reminiscent of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. METHODS To uncover the molecular cause of this

  9. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T; Jenkins, Mark A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Kupfer, Sonia S

    2015-11-01

    African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence of and mortality resulting from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States. Few data are available on genetic and nongenetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC condition, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch syndrome. We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk, studying members of the mutation-carrying families. We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual, and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at 80 years of age were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%-83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%-76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44-56.5). We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1, some of which were found in multiple individuals and some that have not been previously reported. Differences in mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations du gene de la filamine et syndromes malformatifs | Koffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toutefois, il est démontré que l'absence ou le déficit en filamine, ou la perte de fonction de la filamine est à l'origine de ces anomalies malformatives. La recherche de mutations dans le gène de la filamine est donc un examen qui vient compléter le bilan diagnostique à réaliser en matière de malformation congénitale.

  11. Novel missense mutations in a conserved loop between ERCC6 (CSB) helicase motifs V and VI: Insights into Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian T; Lochan, Anneline; Stark, Zornitza; Sutton, Ruth E

    2016-03-01

    Cockayne syndrome is caused by biallelic ERCC8 (CSA) or ERCC6 (CSB) mutations and is characterized by growth restriction, microcephaly, developmental delay, and premature pathological aging. Typically affected patients also have dermal photosensitivity. Although Cockayne syndrome is considered a DNA repair disorder, patients with UV-sensitive syndrome, with ERCC8 (CSA) or ERCC6 (CSB) mutations have indistinguishable DNA repair defects, but none of the extradermal features of Cockayne syndrome. We report novel missense mutations affecting a conserved loop in the ERCC6 (CSB) protein, associated with the Cockayne syndrome phenotype. Indeed, the amino acid sequence of this loop is more highly conserved than the adjacent helicase motifs V and VI, suggesting that this is a crucial structural component of the SWI/SNF family of proteins, to which ERCC6 (CSB) belongs. These comprise two RecA-like domains, separated by an interdomain linker, which interact through helicase motif VI. As the observed mutations are likely to act through destabilizing the tertiary protein structure, this prompted us to re-evaluate ERCC6 (CSB) mutation data in relation to the structure of SWI/SNF proteins. Our analysis suggests that antimorphic mutations cause Cockayne syndrome and that biallelic interdomain linker deletions produce more severe phenotypes. Based on our observations, we propose that further investigation of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Cockayne syndrome should focus on the effect of antimorphic rather than null ERCC6 (CSB) mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Homozygous mutation of the PHOX2B gene in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (Ondine's Curse).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Delphine; de Pontual, Loïc; Estêvao, Maria Helena; Mathieu, Yves; Munnich, Arnold; Feingold, J; Goridis, Christo; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne

    2008-05-01

    Homozygosity for a dominant allele is relatively rare and preferentially observed in communities with high inbreeding. According to the definition of true dominance, similar phenotypes should be observed in patients heterozygous and homozygous for a dominant mutation. However, the homozygous phenotype usually tends to be more severe than the heterozygous one. In these cases, the wild-type and mutant alleles are semi-dominant. Here we report a patient with a Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS) phenotype and homozygosity for a PHOX2B gene mutation leading to an alanine expansion shorter than the threshold hitherto observed in CCHS patients with a heterozygous mutation. This observation adds the concept of mutational threshold per se to the discussion about dominant and recessive alleles.

  13. R368X mutation in MID1 among recurrent mutations in patients with X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiksaitiene, Egle; Krasovskaja, Natalija; Utkus, Algirdas; Kasnauskiene, Jurate; Meškienė, Raimonda; Paulauskiene, Iveta; Valevičienė, Nomeda R; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2015-01-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous condition, with both autosomal dominant and X-linked forms. The MID1 gene is associated with X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome. Most mutations identified are unique, which makes it difficult to assess possible genotype/phenotype correlations. We report on a familial c.1102C>T (p.R368X) mutation in the MID1 gene, previously reported by Cox et al. (Hum Mol Genet 9:2553-2562, 2000), and document it as a recurrent mutation causing Opitz G/BBB syndrome. This mutation may result in various midline defects, including cleft lip/palate, laryngeal cleft, hypertelorism, Dandy-Walker malformation, ventricular septal defect and hypospadias in male patients, with intrafamilial variability. Seven other mutations (c.712G>T, c.829C>T, c.1108A>G, c.1444_1447dupAACA, c.1483C>T, c.1798dupC and entire gene deletions) have been previously reported as recurrent mutations. The presented family with the c.1102C>T mutation provides additional information about the clinical consequences of the nonsense mutation causing premature truncation of the protein at the level of the COS domain.

  14. Novel and heteroplasmic mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes in Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah Tafti, Mahsasadat; Khatami, Mehri; Rezaei, Shiva; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Hadadzadeh, Mehdi

    2017-10-05

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac arrhythmia characterized by sudden death associated with electrocardiogram patterns characterized by incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevations in the anterior precordial leads. This syndrome predominantly is seen in younger males with structurally normal hearts. Mitochondrial variants particularly mt-tRNA mutations, are hot spots that lead to cardiological disorders. Previous studies have shown that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes play an important causal or modifying role in BrS. The present study aims to evaluate the involvement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in arrhythmogenic BrS. In this study, 40 Iranian patients were investigated for the presence of the mutations in 6 mitochondrial tRNA genes (tRNA Ile, Met, Gln, Asn, Ala and Trp) by PCR-SSCP analysis. There were 4 mutations in tRNA genes, that for first time, were found in Brugada patients and these mutations were not in controls. Three of them were heteroplasmic and located in tRNAGln (T4377A) and tRNAMet (G4407A and C4456T) which were assessed as pathogenic mutations. A homoplasmic variant (5580T > C) in tRNATrp gene was located within the junction region between tRNATrp and tRNAAla genes. This mutation may disturb the processing of mt-tRNATrp. The results of this study suggest that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes might lead to deficiencies in translational process of critical proteins of the respiratory chain and potentially lead to BrS in Iranian subjects.

  15. Novel and recurrent EVC and EVC2 mutations in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dyostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asdia, Maria Cecilia; Torrente, Isabella; Consoli, Federica; Ferese, Rosangela; Magliozzi, Monia; Bernardini, Laura; Guida, Valentina; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis are allelic disorders caused by mutations in EVC or EVC2 genes. We illustrate the results of direct analysis of whole EVC and EVC2 genes' coding regions in 32 unrelated families with clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome and in 2 families with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. We identified mutations in 27/32 (84%) cases with Ellis van Creveld syndrome and 2/2 cases with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. Of the Ellis van Creveld syndrome cases, 20/27 (74%) had a mutation in EVC and 7/27 (26%) in EVC2 genes. The two subjects with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis had a heterozygous mutation in the last exon of EVC2. In total, we detected 25 independent EVC and 11 independent EVC2 mutations. Nineteen EVC mutations (19/25, 76%) and 4 EVC2 mutations (4/11, 36%) were novel. Also one EVC2 gene mutation found in Weyers acrofacial dysostosis was novel. In 5 unrelated cases with a clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome, we did not find any mutation in either EVC or EVC2 genes. Current findings expand the Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutation spectra, and provide further evidence that the last exon of EVC2 gene is a hot spot for Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutations. Accordingly, EVC2 exon 22 should be analyzed with priority by mutation screening in individuals with a suspected diagnosis of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. A comprehensive functional analysis of PTEN mutations: implications in tumor- and autism-related syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Oliver, María D; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Pulido, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) phosphatase is unique in mammals in terms of its tumor suppressor activity, exerted by dephosphorylation of the lipid second messenger PIP(3) (phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate), which activates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) oncogenic pathway. Loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN gene are frequent in human cancer and in the germline of patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor-related syndromes (PHTSs). In addition, PTEN is mutated in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), although no functional information on these mutations is available. Here, we report a comprehensive in vivo functional analysis of human PTEN using a heterologous yeast reconstitution system. Ala-scanning mutagenesis at the catalytic loops of PTEN outlined the critical role of residues within the P-catalytic loop for PIP(3) phosphatase activity in vivo. PTEN mutations that mimic the P-catalytic loop of mammalian PTEN-like proteins (TPTE, TPIP, tensins and auxilins) affected PTEN function variably, whereas tumor- or PHTS-associated mutations targeting the PTEN P-loop produced complete loss of function. Conversely, Ala-substitutions, as well as tumor-related mutations at the WPD- and TI-catalytic loops, displayed partial activity in many cases. Interestingly, a tumor-related D92N mutation was partially active, supporting the notion that the PTEN Asp92 residue might not function as the catalytic general acid. The analysis of a panel of ASD-associated hereditary PTEN mutations revealed that most of them did not substantially abrogate PTEN activity in vivo, whereas most of PHTS-associated mutations did. Our findings reveal distinctive functional patterns among PTEN mutations found in tumors and in the germline of PHTS and ASD patients, which could be relevant for therapy.

  17. Mutations in FGFR1 and FGFR2 cause familial and sporadic Pfeiffer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, U; Hehr, A; Feldman, G J; Robin, N H; Zackai, E H; de Die-Smulders, C; Viskochil, D H; Stewart, J M; Wolff, G; Ohashi, H

    1995-03-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder which affects the bones of the skull, hands and feet. Previously, we have mapped PS in a subset of families to chromosome 8cen by linkage analysis and demonstrated a common mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) gene in the linked families. Here we report a second locus for PS on chromosome 10q25, and present evidence that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) gene on 10q25 cause PS in an additional subset of familial and sporadic cases. Three different point mutations in FGFR2, which alter the same acceptor splice site of exon B, were observed in both sporadic and familial PS. In addition, a T to C transition in exon B predicting a cysteine to arginine substitution was identified in three sporadic PS individuals. Interestingly, this T to C change is identical to a mutation in FGFR2 previously reported in Crouzon syndrome, a phenotypically similar disorder but one lacking the hand and foot anomalies seen in PS. Our results highlight the genetic heterogeneity in PS and suggest that the molecular data will be an important complement to the clinical phenotype in defining craniosynostosis syndromes.

  18. Adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxia syndromes due to MTATP6 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Blakely, Emma L; Alston, Charlotte L; Hassani, Adam; Boggild, Mike; Horvath, Rita; Samuels, David C; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2012-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia syndromes presenting in adulthood have a broad range of causes, and despite extensive investigation remain undiagnosed in up to ∼50% cases. Mutations in the mitochondrially encoded MTATP6 gene typically cause infantile-onset Leigh syndrome and, occasionally, have onset later in childhood. The authors report two families with onset of ataxia in adulthood (with pyramidal dysfunction and/or peripheral neuropathy variably present), who are clinically indistinguishable from other spinocerebellar ataxia patients. Genetic screening study of the MTATP6 gene in 64 pedigrees with unexplained ataxia, and case series of two families who had MTATP6 mutations. Three pedigrees had mutations in MTATP6, two of which have not been reported previously and are detailed in this report. These families had the m.9185T>C and m.9035T>C mutations, respectively, which have not previously been associated with adult-onset cerebellar syndromes. Other investigations including muscle biopsy and respiratory chain enzyme activity were non-specific or normal. MTATP6 sequencing should be considered in the workup of undiagnosed ataxia, even if other investigations do not suggest a mitochondrial DNA disorder.

  19. Next-generation sequencing reveals the mutational landscape of clinically diagnosed Usher syndrome: copy number variations, phenocopies, a predominant target for translational read-through, and PEX26 mutated in Heimler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Christine; Eisenberger, Tobias; Decker, Christian; Nagl, Sandra; Blank, Cornelia; Pfister, Markus; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Müller-Hofstede, Cornelie; Charbel Issa, Peter; Heller, Raoul; Beck, Bodo; Rüther, Klaus; Mitter, Diana; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Steinhauer, Ute; Korbmacher, Heike M; Huhle, Dagmar; Elsayed, Solaf M; Taha, Hesham M; Baig, Shahid M; Stöhr, Heidi; Preising, Markus; Markus, Susanne; Moeller, Fabian; Lorenz, Birgit; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Khan, Arif O; Bolz, Hanno J

    2017-09-01

    Combined retinal degeneration and sensorineural hearing impairment is mostly due to autosomal recessive Usher syndrome (USH1: congenital deafness, early retinitis pigmentosa (RP); USH2: progressive hearing impairment, RP). Sanger sequencing and NGS of 112 genes (Usher syndrome, nonsyndromic deafness, overlapping conditions), MLPA, and array-CGH were conducted in 138 patients clinically diagnosed with Usher syndrome. A molecular diagnosis was achieved in 97% of both USH1 and USH2 patients, with biallelic mutations in 97% (USH1) and 90% (USH2), respectively. Quantitative readout reliably detected CNVs (confirmed by MLPA or array-CGH), qualifying targeted NGS as one tool for detecting point mutations and CNVs. CNVs accounted for 10% of identified USH2A alleles, often in trans to seemingly monoallelic point mutations. We demonstrate PTC124-induced read-through of the common p.Trp3955* nonsense mutation (13% of detected USH2A alleles), a potential therapy target. Usher gene mutations were found in most patients with atypical Usher syndrome, but the diagnosis was adjusted in case of double homozygosity for mutations in OTOA and NR2E3, genes implicated in isolated deafness and RP. Two patients with additional enamel dysplasia had biallelic PEX26 mutations, for the first time linking this gene to Heimler syndrome. Targeted NGS not restricted to Usher genes proved beneficial in uncovering conditions mimicking Usher syndrome.

  20. A novel missense mutation in the paired domain of PAX9 causes non-syndromic oligodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumlongras, Dolrudee; Lin, Jenn-Yih; Chapra, Anas; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Maas, Richard L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2004-02-01

    PAX9, a paired domain transcription factor, has important functions in craniofacial and limb development. Heterozygous mutations of PAX9, including deletion, nonsense, or frameshift mutations that lead to a premature stop codon, and missense mutations, were previously shown to be associated with autosomal dominant oligodontia. Here, we report a novel missense mutation that lies in the highly conserved paired domain of PAX9 and that is associated with non-syndromic oligodontia in one family. The mutation, 83G-->C, is predicted to result in the substitution of arginine by proline (R28P) in the N-terminal subdomain of PAX9 paired domain. To rule out the possibility that this substitution is a rare polymorphism and to test whether the predicted amino acid substitution disrupts protein-DNA binding, we analyzed the binding of wild-type and mutant PAX9 paired domain to double-stranded DNA targets. The R28P mutation dramatically reduces DNA binding of the PAX9 paired domain and supports the hypothesis that loss of DNA binding is the pathogenic mechanism by which the mutation causes oligodontia.

  1. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  2. Two novel mutations in ERCC6 cause Cockayne syndrome B in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunxia; Sun, Mao; Wang, Guoxia; Yang, Ying; Yao, Libo; Wu, Yuanming

    2017-06-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized principally by progressive growth failure, neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Mutations of excision repair cross‑complementation group 6 (ERCC6) and ERCC8 are predominantly responsible for CS, of which mutation of ERCC6 accounts for approximately two thirds of cases. The current report describes two siblings with severe neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Whole exome sequencing identified two novel mutations in ERCC6 that had not been previously reported. One was a nonsense mutation at codon 612 in exon 9 (c.1834C>T, p.Arg612Ter), and the other a missense mutation at codon 975 in exon 16 (c.2923C>T, p.Arg975Trp). Cosegregation analysis revealed c.1834C>T was paternal and c.2923C>T was maternal. A healthy baby with no mutated alleles was delivered based on prenatal diagnosis performed by genetic testing of amniocytes for the causative mutation. The present study will enrich the clinical and genetic spectrum of CS in China and world wide, and provides more evidence for future genotype‑phenotype studies.

  3. Two novel mutations in ERCC6 cause Cockayne syndrome B in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunxia; Sun, Mao; Wang, Guoxia; Yang, Ying; Yao, Libo; Wu, Yuanming

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized principally by progressive growth failure, neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Mutations of excision repair cross-complementation group 6 (ERCC6) and ERCC8 are predominantly responsible for CS, of which mutation of ERCC6 accounts for approximately two thirds of cases. The current report describes two siblings with severe neurologic abnormality and premature aging. Whole exome sequencing identified two novel mutations in ERCC6 that had not been previously reported. One was a nonsense mutation at codon 612 in exon 9 (c.1834C>T, p.Arg612Ter), and the other a missense mutation at codon 975 in exon 16 (c.2923C>T, p.Arg975Trp). Cosegregation analysis revealed c.1834C>T was paternal and c.2923C>T was maternal. A healthy baby with no mutated alleles was delivered based on prenatal diagnosis performed by genetic testing of amniocytes for the causative mutation. The present study will enrich the clinical and genetic spectrum of CS in China and world wide, and provides more evidence for future genotype-phenotype studies. PMID:28440418

  4. Missense mutations in the growth hormone receptor dimerization region in Laron syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Stanford, CA (United States); Geffner, M.E.; Bersch, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition characterized by insensitivity to endogenous and exogenous GH. Affected individuals have severe episodes and other characteristic features. GH receptor gene mutations are present in all affected individuals in whom molecular studies have been reported. The GH receptor is a plasma membrane-spanning protein in which the extracellular domain binds circulating GH and the intracellular domain interacts with the JAK-2 kinase and possibly other intracellular signaling molecules. GH receptor dimerization occurs on GH binding and is thought to be required for normal signal transduction. We have studied the GH receptor genes of four unrelated individuals affected with LS from the United States, Italy, Saudi Arabia, and India. We have identified four different missense mutations that alter consecutive amino acids 152 to 155 in or near the dimerization domain of the GH receptor. One of these mutations, D152H, has been reported previously in Asian LS patients and, in in vitro studies, the mutant receptor was unable to dimerize. This report increases to over 20 the number of different GH receptor gene mutations that have been reported in LS patients and defines the first apparent mutational {open_quotes}hotspot{close_quotes} region in this gene. This cluster of mutations in patients with classic LS phenotype provides additional in vivo evidence that receptor dimerization plays an important role in signaling GH`s growth promoting and metabolic effects. Further in vitro studies of the mutations in this region are in progress.

  5. Mutations in the MESP2 Gene Cause Spondylothoracic Dysostosis/Jarcho-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornier, Alberto S.; Staehling-Hampton, Karen; Delventhal, Kym M.; Saga, Yumiko; Caubet, Jean-Francois; Sasaki, Nobuo; Ellard, Sian; Young, Elizabeth; Ramirez, Norman; Carlo, Simon E.; Torres, Jose; Emans, John B.; Turnpenny, Peter D.; Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Spondylothoracic dysostosis (STD), also known as Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS), is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by abnormal vertebral segmentation and defects affecting spine formation, with complete bilateral fusion of the ribs at the costovertebral junction producing a “crab-like” configuration of the thorax. The shortened spine and trunk can severely affect respiratory function during early childhood. The condition is prevalent in the Puerto Rican population, although it is a panethnic disorder. By sequencing a set of candidate genes involved in mouse segmentation, we identified a recessive E103X nonsense mutation in the mesoderm posterior 2 homolog (MESP2) gene in a patient, of Puerto Rican origin and from the Boston area, who had been diagnosed with STD/JLS. We then analyzed 12 Puerto Rican families with STD probands for the MESP2 E103X mutation. Ten patients were homozygous for the E103X mutation, three patients were compound heterozygous for a second nonsense mutation, E230X, or a missense mutation, L125V, which affects a conserved leucine residue within the bHLH region. Thus, all affected probands harbored the E103X mutation. Our findings suggest a founder-effect mutation in the MESP2 gene as a major cause of the classical Puerto Rican form of STD/JLS. PMID:18485326

  6. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  7. Paternal bias in parental origin of HRAS mutations in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol-Church, Katia; Stabley, Deborah L; Nicholson, Linda; Gonzalez, Iris L; Gripp, Karen W

    2006-08-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital condition caused by heterozygous de novo missense mutations affecting the codon for glycine 12 or 13 of the HRAS gene. We have identified 39 CS patients harboring the p.Gly12Ser mutation (NM_005343.2:c.34 G > A), two patients with c.35G > C mutations resulting in p.Gly12Ala substitutions, and one patient carrying the p.Gly13Cys substitution (c.37G > A). We analyzed the region flanking the mutated sites in 42 probands and 59 parents, and used four polymorphic markers to trace the parental origin of the germline mutations: one highly polymorphic hexanucleotide (GGGCCT) repeat region, defining three alleles with different numbers of repeat units (two, three, or four), and three SNPs. One of the SNPs, rs12628 (c.81T > C), was found in strong linkage disequilibrium with the hexanucleotide repeat region. Out of a total of 24 probands with polymorphic markers, 16 informative families were tested and the paternal origin of the germline mutation was found in 14 CS probands; a distribution that is neither consistent with an equal likelihood of mutations arising in either parent (P = 0.0018), nor with exclusive paternal origin.

  8. Wiedemann-Steiner Syndrome With 2 Novel KMT2A Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Ko, Jung; Cho, Jae So; Yoo, Yongjin; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; Lee, Hye-Ran; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2017-02-01

    Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, hairy elbows, facial dysmorphism, and developmental delay. It can also be accompanied by musculoskeletal anomalies such as muscular hypotonia and small hands and feet. Mutations in the KMT2A gene have only recently been identified as the cause of Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome; therefore, only 16 patients from 15 families have been described, and new phenotypic features continue to be added. In this report, we describe 2 newly identified patients with Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome who presented with variable severity. One girl exhibited developmental dysplasia of the hip and fibromatosis colli accompanied by other clinical features, including facial dysmorphism, hypertrichosis, patent ductus arteriosus, growth retardation, and borderline intellectual disability. The other patient, a boy, showed severe developmental retardation with automatic self-mutilation, facial dysmorphism, and hypertrichosis at a later age. Exome sequencing analysis of these patients and their parents revealed a de novo nonsense mutation, p.Gln1978*, of KMT2A in the former, and a missense mutation, p.Gly1168Asp, in the latter, which molecularly confirmed the diagnosis of Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome.

  9. FGFR2 exon IIIa and IIIc mutations in Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes: Evidence for missense changes, insertions, and a deletion due to alternative RNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, G.A.; Przylepa, K.A.; Scott, A.F. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) mutations have been associated with the craniosynostotic conditions Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes. Previously, mutations were described in the exons IIIa and IIIc, which form the extracellular, third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgM) and adjacent linker regions, both of which are normally involved in ligand binding. For all three conditions, mutations were found in exon IIIc. Only in Crouzon syndrome were mutations identified in exon IIIa. In this study, 39 cases with one of these three conditions were screened for exon IIIa or IIIc mutations. Eleven mutations are reported in 17 unrelated cases. Mutations in exon IIIa are identified for not only Crouzon but also Jackson-Weiss and Pfeiffer syndromes. Four mutations in either exon IIIa or exon IIIc reported only in Crouzon syndrome are present also in one of the other two syndromes. Two insertions, one in exon IIIa in a Crouzon syndrome patient and the other in exon IIIc in a Pfeiffer syndrome patient, were observed. The latter mutation has the same alternative RNA splicing effect as a reported synonymous mutation for Crouzon syndrome. A missense mutation was detected in one Pfeiffer syndrome family in which two members had craniosynostosis without limb anomalies. The inter- and intrafamilial variability in expression of FGFR2 mutations suggests that these three syndromes, presumed to be clinically distinct, are instead representative of a spectrum of related craniosynostotic and digital disorders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation......-dependent amplification analysis was used for the detection of intragenic deletions. We identified 77 different COL2A1 mutations in 100 affected individuals. Analysis of the splice site mutations showed unusual RNA isoforms, most of which contained a premature stop codon. Vitreous anomalies and retinal detachments were...

  11. NOD2/CARD15 gene mutation identified in a Chinese family with Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Haotian; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Mengping; Zhou, Xiaomin; Li, Zhen; Yan, Naihong; Li, Shiguang; Han, Yu; Gong, Qiyong; Liu, Xuyang

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with Blau syndrome and to identify mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2/caspase recruitment domain family, member 15) gene. Clinical features of this family were evaluated. Genomic DNA was obtained from blood samples, and all exons of NOD2/CARD15 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct DNA sequencing of PCR products was performed for mutations in NOD2/CARD15. Granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, and skin granulomas were found in all affected members. Sequencing analysis demonstrated a heterozygous C>T mutation in exon 4 of NOD2/CARD15 in all patients of this pedigree, which resulted in an amino acid substitution at position 334 (p.R334W). The R334W mutation in NOD2/CARD15 caused Blau syndrome in a Chinese pedigree. This is the first report of R334W mutation in NOD2/CARD15 in a Chinese pedigree of this disease.

  12. Compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations segregating Usher syndrome type 2 in a Han family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ling; Chen, Kaitian; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-11-01

    Identification of rare deafness genes for inherited congenital sensorineural hearing impairment remains difficult, because a large variety of genes are implicated. In this study we applied targeted capture and next-generation sequencing to uncover the underlying gene in a three-generation Han family segregating recessive inherited hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. After excluding mutations in common deafness genes GJB2, SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial gene, genomic DNA of the proband of a Han family was subjected to targeted next-generation sequencing. The candidate mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and subsequently analyzed with in silico tools. An unreported splice site mutation c.3924+1G > C compound with c.6028G > A in the MYO7A gene were detected to cosegregate with the phenotype in this pedigree. Both mutations, located in the evolutionarily conserved FERM domain in myosin VIIA, were predicted to be pathogenic. In this family, profound sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa without vestibular disorder, constituted the typical Usher syndrome type 2. Identification of novel mutation in compound heterozygosity in MYO7A gene revealed the genetic origin of Usher syndrome type 2 in this Han family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SDH mutations in tumorigenesis and inherited endocrine tumours: lesson from the phaeochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, B; Stratakis, C A

    2009-07-01

    A genetic predisposition for paragangliomas and adrenal or extra-adrenal phaeochromocytomas was recognized years ago. Beside the well-known syndromes associated with an increased risk of adrenal phaeochromocytoma, Von Hippel Lindau disease, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and neurofibromatosis type 1, the study of inherited predisposition to head and neck paragangliomas led to the discovery of the novel 'paraganglioma-phaeochromocytoma syndrome' caused by germline mutations in three genes encoding subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD) thus opening an unexpected connection between mitochondrial tumour suppressor genes and neural crest-derived cancers. Germline mutations in SDH genes are responsible for 6% and 9% of sporadic paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas, respectively, 29% of paediatric cases, 38% of malignant tumours and more than 80% of familial aggregations of paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma. The disease is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance with a peculiar parent-of-origin effect for SDHD mutations. Life-time tumour risk seems higher than 70% with variable clinical manifestantions depending on the mutated gene. In this review we summarize the most recent knowledge about the role of SDH deficiency in tumorigenesis, the spectrum and prevalence of SDH mutations derived from several series of cases, the related clinical manifestantions including rare phenotypes, such as the association of paragangliomas with gastrointestinal stromal tumours and kidney cancers, and the biological hypotheses attempting to explain genotype to phenotype correlation.

  14. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

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    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  15. Identification of a novel mutation in an Indian patient with CAII deficiency syndrome

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    Shivaprasad C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII deficiency syndrome characterized by osteopetrosis (OP, renal tubular acidosis (RTA, and cerebral calcifications is caused by mutations in the carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2 gene. Severity of this disorder varies depending on the nature of the mutation and its effect on the protein. We present here, the clinical and radiographic details along with, results of mutational analysis of the CA2 gene in an individual clinically diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis, osteopetrosis and mental retardation and his family members to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. A novel homozygous deletion mutation c.251delT was seen in the patient resulting in a frameshift and a premature stop codon at amino acid position 90 generating a truncated protein leading to a complete loss of function and a consequential deficiency of the enzyme making this a pathogenic mutation. Confirmation of clinical diagnosis by molecular methods is essential as the clinical features of the CAII deficiency syndrome are similar to other forms of OP but the treatment modalities are different. Genetic confirmation of the diagnosis at an early age leads to the timely institution of therapy improving the growth potential, reduces other complications like fractures, and aids in providing prenatal testing and genetic counseling to the parents planning a pregnancy.

  16. Observational cohort study of ventricular arrhythmia in adults with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations.

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    Ali Aydin

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation.We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h, as ventricular couplets (Couplet, or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT, and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT events (VTE such as sudden cardiac death (SCD, and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT. We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%, Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%, and VTE in 6 patients (8%, including 3 with SCD (4%. PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020, to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003, and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006, respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24-32 (P = .021. Kaplan-Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001 and with mutations in exons 24-32 (P<.001.Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24-32 may be risk factors of VTE.

  17. HANAC Syndrome Col4a1 Mutation Causes Neonate Glomerular Hyperpermeability and Adult Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyong; Migeon, Tiffany; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Zaidan, Mohamad; Sado, Yoshikazu; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Ronco, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in COL4A1 that encodes the α1 chain of collagen IV, a major component of basement membranes. Patients present with cerebral small vessel disease, retinal tortuosity, muscle cramps, and kidney disease consisting of multiple renal cysts, chronic kidney failure, and sometimes hematuria. Mutations producing HANAC syndrome localize within the integrin binding site containing CB3[IV] fragment of the COL4A1 protein. To investigate the pathophysiology of HANAC syndrome, we generated mice harboring the Col4a1 p.Gly498Val mutation identified in a family with the syndrome. Col4a1 G498V mutation resulted in delayed glomerulogenesis and podocyte differentiation without reduction of nephron number, causing albuminuria and hematuria in newborns. The glomerular defects resolved within the first month, but glomerular cysts developed in 3-month-old mutant mice. Abnormal structure of Bowman’s capsule was associated with metalloproteinase induction and activation of the glomerular parietal epithelial cells that abnormally expressed CD44, α-SMA, ILK, and DDR1. Inflammatory infiltrates were observed around glomeruli and arterioles. Homozygous Col4a1 G498V mutant mice additionally showed dysmorphic papillae and urinary concentration defects. These results reveal a developmental role for the α1α1α2 collagen IV molecule in the embryonic glomerular basement membrane, affecting podocyte differentiation. The observed association between molecular alteration of the collagenous network in Bowman’s capsule of the mature kidney and activation of parietal epithelial cells, matrix remodeling, and inflammation may account for glomerular cyst development and CKD in patients with COL4A1-related disorders. PMID:26260163

  18. Mutations of KCNJ10 together with mutations of SLC26A4 cause digenic nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Gurrola, Jose G; Wu, Hao; Chiu, Sui M; Wangemann, Philine; Snyder, Peter M; Smith, Richard J H

    2009-05-01

    Mutations in SLC26A4 cause nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA, also known as DFNB4) and Pendred syndrome (PS), the most common type of autosomal-recessive syndromic deafness. In many patients with an EVA/PS phenotype, mutation screening of SLC26A4 fails to identify two disease-causing allele variants. That a sizable fraction of patients carry only one SLC26A4 mutation suggests that EVA/PS is a complex disease involving other genetic factors. Here, we show that mutations in the inwardly rectifying K(+) channel gene KCNJ10 are associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss in carriers of SLC26A4 mutations with an EVA/PS phenotype. In probands from two families, we identified double heterozygosity in affected individuals. These persons carried single mutations in both SLC26A4 and KCNJ10. The identified SLC26A4 mutations have been previously implicated in EVA/PS, and the KCNJ10 mutations reduce K(+) conductance activity, which is critical for generating and maintaining the endocochlear potential. In addition, we show that haploinsufficiency of Slc26a4 in the Slc26a4(+/-) mouse mutant results in reduced protein expression of Kcnj10 in the stria vascularis of the inner ear. Our results link KCNJ10 mutations with EVA/PS and provide further support for the model of EVA/PS as a multigenic complex disease.

  19. Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and spectrum of PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Bach-Holm, Daniella

    2009-01-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, which encompasses a range of congential malformations affecting the anterior segment of the eye. ARS shows genetic heterogeneity and mutations of the two genes, PITX2 and FOXC1, are known to be associated with the pathogenesis....... There are several excellent reviews dealing with the complexity of the phenotype and genotype of ARS. In this study, we will attempt to give a brief review of the clinical features and the relevant diagnostic approaches, together with a detailed review of published PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations....

  20. PHOX2B Mutation in a Taiwanese Newborn with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

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    Tzu-Chiang Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is characterized by defective automatic regulation of breathing, mostly during sleep. The diagnostic criteria of CCHS include persistent sleep hypoventilation without primary cardiac, pulmonary disease or neuromuscular dysfunction, and no arousal response to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Mutations in the PHOX2B gene have been indentified in 93–100% of patients with CCHS. We report a CCHS case with presentation of hypoventilation during sleep and Hirschsprung disease; moreover, a genetic study of the patient confirmed the PHOX2B gene mutation as polyanaline stretch.

  1. Clinical and mutational spectrum of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belge, Hendrica; Dahan, Karin; Cambier, Jean-François; Benoit, Valérie; Morelle, Johann; Bloch, Julie; Vanhille, Philippe; Pirson, Yves; Demoulin, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, secondary to mutations in the GATA-3 gene. Due to its wide range of penetrance and expressivity, the disease may not always be recognized. We herein describe clinical and genetic features of patients with HDR syndrome, highlighting diagnostic clues. Medical records of eight patients from five unrelated families exhibiting GATA-3 mutations were reviewed retrospectively, in conjunction with all previously reported cases. HDR syndrome was diagnosed in eight patients between the ages of 18 and 60 years. Sensorineural deafness was consistently diagnosed, ranging from clinical hearing loss since infancy in seven patients to deafness detected only by audiometry in adulthood in one single patient. Hypoparathyroidism was present in six patients (with hypocalcaemia and inaugural seizures in two out of six). Renal abnormalities observed in six patients were diverse and of dysplastic nature. Three patients displayed nephrotic-range proteinuria and reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between the ages of 19 and 61 years, whilst lesions of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis were histologically demonstrated in one of them. Interestingly, phenotype severity differed significantly between a mother and son within one family. Five new mutations of GATA-3 were identified, including three missense mutations affecting zinc finger motifs [NM_001002295.1: c.856A>G (p.N286D) and c.1017C>G (p.C339W)] or the conserved linker region [c.896G>A (p.R299G)], and two splicing mutations (c.924+4_924+19del and c.1051-2A>G). Review of 115 previously reported cases of GATA-3 mutations showed hypoparathyroidism and deafness in 95% of patients, and renal abnormalities in only 60%. Overall, 10% of patients had reached ESRD. We herein expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of HDR syndrome, illustrating considerable inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Diagnosis of HDR should be

  2. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy

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    Zeynep Ozcan Dag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST. Factor 5 leiden (FVL is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  3. IDH mutations are closely associated with mutations of DNMT3A, ASXL1 and SRSF2 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and are stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chin; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lai, Yan-Jun; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Current information about clinical significance of IDH mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), their association with other genetic alterations and the stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, IDH mutations were identified in 4.6% of 477 patients with MDS based on the FAB classification and in 2.2 % of 368 patients based on the 2008 WHO classification. IDH mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, and mutations of DNMT3A (36.4% vs. 8.7%, P IDH2 mutation was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with lower-risk MDS, based on international prognosis scoring system (IPSS), FAB classification, WHO classification, or revised IPSS (all P ≦ 0.001), but not in higher-risk groups. Sequential studies in 151 patients demonstrated that all IDH-mutated patients retained the same mutation during disease evolution while none of the IDH-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during follow-ups. In conclusion, IDH mutation is a useful biomarker for risk stratification of patients with lower-risk MDS. IDH mutations are stable during the clinical course. The mutation, in association with other genetic alterations, may play a role in the development, but not progression of MDS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

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    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  5. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Willer, Jason R; Davis, Erica E; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Brunner, Han G; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R; Lupski, James R; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yang, Yaping

    2015-12-03

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5' end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1(st) coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6(∗)) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs(∗)4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5' end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5' to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Connecxin 26 Gene Mutations in Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss in Hamadan Province

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    Y. Shafeghati

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective : Hearing loss is the most prevalent form of sensory impairment in humans, affecting approximately one in 1000 infants. In more than half of the cases, the deafness is inherited, and about 80% of hereditary deafness transmitted by autosomal recessive pattern. In hereditary congenital deafness, numerous mutations in GJB2 make the largest fractional contribution in many world populations. The GJB2 gene locus was identified in long arm of chromosome 13 (13q11-12. Materials & Methods : In this study, we investigated 76 probands (152 chromosomes of 76 families from Hamadan Province, suffering from severe to profound non-syndromic deafness, to determine the frequencies of GJB2 mutations. All samples were screened for 35delG mutation in GJB2 gene by allele-specific PCR (ARMS-PCR. Study was terminated for those who were homozygote for 35delG mutation. DHPLC analysis had been done on others to find abnormal elution profiles, followed by direct sequencing on samples with abnormal elution profiles. Results : We identified allelic variants and mutations in exons 1 & 2 of CX26 ( 35delG, R127H, V27I, V153I, E114G, -3170G>A. Interestingly we found a novel frame-shift mutation (507insAACG, that was not reported before in related medical literature. Also we detected a previously reported complex allelic variant "V27I;E114G/wt. 11 persons carried the 35delG allele (8 homozygote, 3 heterozygote, 2 cases were compound heterozygote for 35delG/wt and 3170G>A/wt and 1 proband showed the V27I;E114G/wt mutation.Conclusion : Based on these data, GJB2 mutations account for approximately 18.1% of severe-to-profound congenital deafness in the Hamadan population, and the most common of this mutation is 35delG.

  8. Mutations in STAT3 and diagnostic guidelines for hyper-IgE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellner, Cristina; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Lagos, Macarena; Perro, Mario; Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Pietrogrande, Maria C; Cossu, Fausto; Franco, José L; Matamoros, Nuria; Pietrucha, Barbara; Heropolitańska-Pliszka, Edyta; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Moin, Mostafa; Español, Teresa; Ehl, Stephan; Gennery, Andrew R; Abinun, Mario; Breborowicz, Anna; Niehues, Tim; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Junker, Anne; Turvey, Stuart E; Plebani, Alessandro; Sánchez, Berta; Garty, Ben-Zion; Pignata, Claudio; Cancrini, Caterina; Litzman, Jiri; Sanal, Ozden; Baumann, Ulrich; Bacchetta, Rosa; Hsu, Amy P; Davis, Joie N; Hammarström, Lennart; Davies, E Graham; Eren, Efrem; Arkwright, Peter D; Moilanen, Jukka S; Viemann, Dorothee; Khan, Sujoy; Maródi, László; Cant, Andrew J; Freeman, Alexandra F; Puck, Jennifer M; Holland, Steven M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2010-02-01

    The hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections of the lung and skin, elevated serum IgE, and involvement of the soft and bony tissues. Recently, HIES has been associated with heterozygous dominant-negative mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and severe reductions of T(H)17 cells. To determine whether there is a correlation between the genotype and the phenotype of patients with HIES and to establish diagnostic criteria to distinguish between STAT3 mutated and STAT3 wild-type patients. We collected clinical data, determined T(H)17 cell numbers, and sequenced STAT3 in 100 patients with a strong clinical suspicion of HIES and serum IgE >1000 IU/mL. We explored diagnostic criteria by using a machine-learning approach to identify which features best predict a STAT3 mutation. In 64 patients, we identified 31 different STAT3 mutations, 18 of which were novel. These included mutations at splice sites and outside the previously implicated DNA-binding and Src homology 2 domains. A combination of 5 clinical features predicted STAT3 mutations with 85% accuracy. T(H)17 cells were profoundly reduced in patients harboring STAT3 mutations, whereas 10 of 13 patients without mutations had low (1000IU/mL plus a weighted score of clinical features >30 based on recurrent pneumonia, newborn rash, pathologic bone fractures, characteristic face, and high palate. Probable: These characteristics plus lack of T(H)17 cells or a family history for definitive HIES. Definitive: These characteristics plus a dominant-negative heterozygous mutation in STAT3. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic characterization of a large European family with Brugada syndrome displaying a sudden unexpected death syndrome mutation in SCN5A:.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kui; Berruezo-Sanchez, Antonio; Poungvarin, Naravat; Oliva, Antonio; Vatta, Matteo; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Pedro; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Dumaine, Robert; Piñero-Galvez, Carlos; Antzelevitch, Charles; Brugada, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is characterized by sudden death secondary to malignant arrhythmias and the presence of ST segment elevation in leads V(1) to V(3) of patients with structurally normal hearts. This ECG pattern often is concealed but can be unmasked using potent sodium channel blockers. Like congenital long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) and sudden unexpected death syndrome, Brugada syndrome has been linked to mutations in SCN5A. We screened a large European family with Brugada syndrome. Three members (two female) had suffered malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Ten members showed an ECG pattern characteristic of Brugada syndrome at baseline, and eight showed the pattern only after administration of ajmaline (total 12 female). Haplotype analysis revealed that all individuals with positive ECG at baseline shared the SCN5A locus. Sequencing of SCN5A identified a missense mutation, R367H, previously associated with sudden unexpected death syndrome. Two of the eight individuals who displayed a positive ECG after the administration of ajmaline, but not before, did not have the R367H mutation, and sequencing analysis failed to identify any other mutation in SCN5A. The R367H mutation failed to generate any current when heterologously expressed in HEK cells. Our results support the hypothesis that (1) sudden unexpected death syndrome and Brugada syndrome are the same disease; (2) male predominance of the phenotype observed in sudden unexpected death syndrome does not apply to this family, suggesting that factors other than the specific mutation determine the gender distinction; and (3) ajmaline may provide false-positive results. These findings have broad implications relative to the diagnosis and risk stratification of family members of patients with the Brugada syndrome.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is associated with a novel G984R COL3A1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yao; Wei, Shijie; Hu, Shijun; Chen, Jinlan; Tan, Zhiping; Yang, Yifeng

    2015-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease. Mutations in COL3A1 have been identified to underlie this disease; however, to the best of our knowledge, no COL3A1 mutations have been reported in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patients with an ascending aortic aneurysm. In order to develop further understanding of COL3A1 mutations, an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patient diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm and a familial history of sudden mortality was analyzed. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of the patient and his family members. All coding exons of eight aneurysm-related genes (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR 2, MYH11, ACTA2, SLC2A10, NOTCH1 and COL3A1) were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were sequenced with the ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer, and a mutation was predicted and identified using Polyphen-2, SIFT and Mutation Taster. The novel mutation was identified as c.2950G>A in COL3A1, which results in p.G984R. All three programs predicted this mutation to be deleterous to the protein function. The novel mutation identified in this study is potentially responsible for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in this patient, and expands the spectrum of COL3A1 mutations.

  11. The genetic basis of long QT and short QT syndromes: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    are characteristic of LQTS, while SQTS is characterized by shortened QT interval with tall peaked T-waves and a propensity for atrial fibrillation. Both syndromes represent a high risk for syncope and sudden death. LQTS exists as a congenital genetic disease (cLQTS) with more than 700 mutations described in 12 genes......Long QT and short QT syndromes (LQTS and SQTS) are cardiac repolarization abnormalities that are characterized by length perturbations of the QT interval as measured on electrocardiogram (ECG). Prolonged QT interval and a propensity for ventricular tachycardia of the torsades de pointes (TdP) type...

  12. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Barshagul T Baikara; Zholdybayeva, Elena V.; Rakhimova, Saule E.; Nazym B Nigmatullina; Momynaliev, Kuvat T.; Ramanculov, Yerlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alpo...

  13. Lateral meningocele (Lehman) syndrome: A child with a novel NOTCH3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Resham; Qin, Wen; Huang, Lijia; Blaser, Susan; Tetreault, Martine; Hartley, Taila; Boycott, Kym M; Carter, Melissa T

    2016-04-01

    Lateral meningocele syndrome (LMS), or Lehman syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by multiple lateral spinal meningoceles, distinctive facial features, joint hypermobility and hypotonia, along with skeletal, cardiac, and urogenital anomalies. Heterozygous NOTCH3 mutations affecting the terminal exon 33 were recently reported as causative in six families with LMS. We report a boy with LMS, the fourteenth reported case, with a de novo 80 base pair deletion in exon 33 of NOTCH3. Our patient's prenatal findings, complex cardiac anomalies, and severe feeding difficulties further expand our understanding of this rare condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Zhang, Y.S.; Pitrez, P.R.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Miscuglio, M.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, M.R.; Nissan, X.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2017-01-01

    A progeria-on-a-chip model is engineered to recapitulate the biomechanical dynamics of vascular disease and aging. The model shows an exacerbated injury response to strain and is rescued by pharmacological treatments. The progeria-on-a-chip is expected to drive the discovery of new drugs and to

  15. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  16. Urinary Tract Cancer in Lynch Syndrome; Increased Risk in Carriers of MSH2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of urothelial cancer in the upper urinary tract and the bladder, determine the contribution from the different mismatch-repair genes, and define clinical characteristics of urothelial cancer in Lynch syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The national hereditary...... lifetime risks were determined. RESULTS: In total, 48 cancers of the ureter, 34 cancers of the renal pelvis, and 54 urinary bladder cancers developed at a mean age of 61 (24-89) years. The tumors were typically of high grade, showed loss of mismatch-repair protein expression in 90% of the tumors...... and the urinary bladder are included in the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum. Urothelial cancers are predominantly linked to MSH2 mutations, which suggest that surveillance should be targeted at individuals with mutations herein....

  17. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations......Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern...

  18. A de novo SOX10 mutation causing severe type 4 Waardenburg syndrome without Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajer, Yves; Coldéa, Cristina; Meire, Françoise; Delpierre, Isabelle; Sekhara, Tayeb; Touraine, Renaud L

    2008-04-15

    Type 4 Waardenburg syndrome represents a well define entity caused by neural crest derivatives anomalies (melanocytes, intrinsic ganglion cells, central, autonomous and peripheral nervous systems) leading, with variable expressivity, to pigmentary anomalies, deafness, mental retardation, peripheral neuropathy, and Hirschsprung disease. Autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is prevalent when Sox10 gene mutation is identified. We report the natural history of a child who presented with synophrys, vivid blue eye, deafness, bilateral complete semicircular canals agenesis with mental retardation, subtle signs for peripheral neuropathy and lack of Hirschsprung disease. SOX10 gene sequencing identified "de novo" splice site mutation (c.698-2A > C). The present phenotype and the genotype findings underline the wide spectrum of SOX10 gene implication in unusual type 4 Waardenburg syndrome patient. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Epistasis between RET and BBS mutations modulates enteric innervation and causes syndromic Hirschsprung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pontual, Loïc; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Thomas, Sophie; Davis, Erica E.; Mcgaughey, David M.; Dollfus, Hélène; Baumann, Clarisse; Bessling, Seneca L.; Babarit, Candice; Pelet, Anna; Gascue, Cecilia; Beales, Philip; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Etchevers, Heather; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Badano, Jose L.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Amiel, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a common, multigenic neurocristopathy characterized by incomplete innervation along a variable length of the gut. The pivotal gene in isolated HSCR cases, either sporadic or familial, is RET. HSCR also presents in various syndromes, including Shah–Waardenburg syndrome (WS), Down (DS), and Bardet–Biedl (BBS). Here, we report 3 families with BBS and HSCR with concomitant mutations in BBS genes and regulatory RET elements, whose functionality is tested in physiologically relevant assays. Our data suggest that BBS mutations can potentiate HSCR predisposing RET alleles, which by themselves are insufficient to cause disease. We also demonstrate that these genes interact genetically in vivo to modulate gut innervation, and that this interaction likely occurs through complementary, yet independent, pathways that converge on the same biological process. PMID:19666486

  20. Precision Medicine in Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Leukemias: Lessons from Sequential Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2017-01-14

    Precision medicine can be simply defined as the identification of personalized treatment that matches patient-specific clinical and genomic characteristics. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic makeup of diseases, especially cancers. The identification of somatic mutations that can drive cancer has led to the development of therapies that specifically target the abnormal proteins derived from these mutations. This has led to a paradigm shift in our treatment methodology. Although some success has been achieved in targeting some genetic abnormalities, several challenges and limitations exist when applying precision-medicine concepts in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. We review the current understanding of genomics in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and leukemias and the limitations of precision-medicine concepts in MDS.

  1. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (i.e., in association with Hirschsprung disease [HD]) and heterozygous mutations in isolated HD. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of six heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5%-6% of WS2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular analysis of mutations in the CSB (ERCC6) gene in patients with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, D L; Tanganelli, B; Colella, S; Steingrimsdottir, H; van Gool, A J; Troelstra, C; Stefanini, M; Lehmann, A R

    1998-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a multisystem sun-sensitive genetic disorder associated with a specific defect in the ability to perform transcription-coupled repair of active genes after UV irradiation. Two complementation groups (CS-A and CS-B) have been identified, and 80% of patients have been assigned to the CS-B complementation group. We have analyzed the sites of the mutations in the CSB gene in 16 patients, to determine the spectrum of mutations in this gene and to see whether the nature of the mutation correlates with the type and severity of the clinical symptoms. In nine of the patients, the mutations resulted in truncated products in both alleles, whereas, in the other seven, at least one allele contained a single amino acid change. The latter mutations were confined to the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein and were shown to be inactivating by their failure to restore UV-irradiation resistance to hamster UV61 cells, which are known to be defective in the CSB gene. Neither the site nor the nature of the mutation correlated with the severity of the clinical features. Severe truncations were found in different patients with either classical or early-onset forms of the disease.

  3. GATA1 mutations in a cohort of Malaysian children with Down syndrome-associated myeloid disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Su Han; Choong, Soo Sin; Krishnan, Shekhar; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Ariffin, Hany

    2016-06-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk of developing distinctive clonal myeloid disorders, including transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) and myeloid leukaemia of DS (ML-DS). TAM connotes a spontaneously resolving congenital myeloproliferative state observed in 10%-20% of DS newborns. Following varying intervals of apparent remission, a proportion of children with TAM progress to develop ML-DS in early childhood. Therefore, TAM and ML-DS represent a biological continuum. Both disorders are characterised by recurring truncating somatic mutations of the GATA1 gene, which are considered key pathogenetic events. We herein report, to our knowledge, the first observation on the frequency and nature of GATA1 gene mutations in a cohort of Malaysian children with DS-associated TAM (n = 9) and ML-DS (n = 24) encountered successively over a period of five years at a national referral centre. Of the 29 patients who underwent GATA1 analysis, GATA1 mutations were observed in 15 (51.7%) patients, including 6 (75.0%) out of 8 patients with TAM, and 9 (42.9%) of 21 patients with ML-DS. All identified mutations were located in exon 2 and the majority were sequence-terminating insertions or deletions (66.7%), including several hitherto unreported mutations (12 out of 15). The low frequency of GATA1 mutations in ML-DS patients is unusual and potentially indicates distinctive genomic events in our patient cohort. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  4. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Riahi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3 are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys, in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24, and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*. Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  6. A restricted spectrum of mutations in the SMAD4 tumor-suppressor gene underlies Myhre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Viviana; Cianetti, Luciano; Niceta, Marcello; Carta, Claudio; Ciolfi, Andrea; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Carrani, Eugenio; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Biamino, Elisa; Belligni, Elga; Garavelli, Livia; Boccone, Loredana; Melis, Daniela; Andria, Generoso; Gelb, Bruce D; Stella, Lorenzo; Silengo, Margherita; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Tartaglia, Marco

    2012-01-13

    Myhre syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by reduced growth, generalized muscular hypertrophy, facial dysmorphism, deafness, cognitive deficits, joint stiffness, and skeletal anomalies. Here, by performing exome sequencing of a single affected individual and coupling the results to a hypothesis-driven filtering strategy, we establish that heterozygous mutations in SMAD4, which encodes for a transducer mediating transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic protein signaling branches, underlie this rare Mendelian trait. Two recurrent de novo SMAD4 mutations were identified in eight unrelated subjects. Both mutations were missense changes altering Ile500 within the evolutionary conserved MAD homology 2 domain, a well known mutational hot spot in malignancies. Structural analyses suggest that the substituted residues are likely to perturb the binding properties of the mutant protein to signaling partners. Although SMAD4 has been established as a tumor suppressor gene somatically mutated in pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and skin cancers, and germline loss-of-function lesions and deletions of this gene have been documented to cause disorders that predispose individuals to gastrointestinal cancer and vascular dysplasias, the present report identifies a previously unrecognized class of mutations in the gene with profound impact on development and growth. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Novel mutations in SKIV2L and TTC37 genes in Malaysian children with trichohepatoenteric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Way Seah; Teo, Kai Ming; Ng, Ruey Terng; Chong, Sze Yee; Kee, Boon Pin; Chua, Kek Heng

    2016-07-15

    Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is classically associated with intractable diarrhea with an onset within the first few months of life. Herein, we investigated and reported novel mutations in two causal genes in 3 Malaysian cases. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood obtained from patients in two Malaysian Chinese families. The exons of SKIV2L and TTC37 genes were amplified and sequenced by bi-directional sequencing to identify the point mutations within the coding sequence. Three Chinese boys from two families with characteristic features and clinical course were diagnosed with THES. In family-1, two point mutations were identified in the SKIV2L gene (c.1891G>A and c.3187C>T). In family-2, a single-nucleotide duplication (c.3426dupA) was found in the TTC37 gene. These mutations cause the production of abnormal non-functional gene product leading to the clinical manifestations in the patients. We reported three point mutations, which have not been previously described in other patients with THES in SKIV2L and TTC37 genes, including one nonsense, one frameshift, and one missense mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [An update on epigenetic regulator gene mutations and pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Yu; Xiao, Zhi-Jian

    2011-10-01

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal disorders. So far, the etiology and pathogenesis of MDS is poorly understood. Recently, more and more epigenetic regulator gene such as TET2, ASXL1, EZH2, DNMT3A and UTX mutations were detected in patients with MDS: TET2 may convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC). TET2 is the most frequently mutated gene in MDS known so far and it may act as tumor-suppressor gene. ASXL1 belongs to the enhancer of trithorax and Polycomb (ETP) gene group. MDS phenotypes may be caused not only by loss-of-function of ASXL1 but also by gain-of-function mutations, overexpression of this gene and so on. EZH2 is a kind of histone methyltransferase. EZH2 is frequently over-expressed in a wide variety of cancerous tissue types, which reveals it has oncogenic activity. While, defined mutations resulted in dysfunction of histone methyltransferase activity, suggesting that EZH2 acts as a tumor suppressor for myeloid malignancies. DNMT3A belongs to the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) gene family. It may be correlated with abnormal methylation status in patients with MDS. UTX coding protein is a histone demethylase, and UTX can affect cell proliferation as well as cell fate decision. Inactivating UTX mutations are found in multiple cancer types recently. These gene mutations may play key roles in the pathogenesis of MDS, which are summarized in this review.

  10. De novo SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome and related epileptic encephalopathies are largely of paternal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Sarah E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Iona, Xenia; Zuberi, Sameer M; Birch, Rachael; McMahon, Jacinta M; Bruce, Carla M; Berkovic, Samuel F; Mulley, John C

    2010-02-01

    Dravet syndrome is a severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused in approximately 80% of cases by mutations in the voltage gated sodium channel subunit gene SCN1A. The majority of these mutations are de novo. The parental origin of de novo mutations varies widely among genetic disorders and the aim of this study was to determine this for Dravet syndrome. 91 patients with de novo SCN1A mutations and their parents were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the region surrounding their mutation. Allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on informative SNPs was used to separately amplify and sequence the paternal and maternal alleles to determine in which parental chromosome the mutation arose. The parental origin of SCN1A mutations was established in 44 patients for whom both parents were available and SNPs were informative. The mutations were of paternal origin in 33 cases and of maternal origin in the remaining 11 cases. De novo mutation of SCN1A most commonly, but not exclusively, originates from the paternal chromosome. The average age of parents originating mutations did not differ from that of the general population. The greater frequency of paternally derived mutations in SCN1A is likely to be due to the greater chance of mutational events during the increased number of mitoses which occur during spermatogenesis compared to oogenesis, and the greater susceptibility to mutagenesis of the methylated DNA characteristic of sperm cells.

  11. Sporadic Blau syndrome with a double CARD15 mutation. Report of a case with lifelong follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priori, Roberta; Bombardieri, Michele; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Merlin, Françoise; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; La Cava, Maurizio; Scavalli, Antonio Sili; Guerrisi, Raffaele; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Valesini, Guido

    2004-10-01

    Blau syndrome (MIM 186580) is a rare granulomatous disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant manner characterized by the early appearance of granulomatous arthritis, skin rash and anterior uveitis. Missense mutations in CARD15, usually on codon 334, have been described in several families with Blau syndrome. The disorder has been described as familial; here we report the first evidence of a sporadic case of Blau syndrome in a 19 year-old man with two CARD15 mutations (R334Q and G908R). His healthy mother, father and brother did not carry the R334Q mutation, which was thus considered a neo-mutation, nor did they carry the other mutation, usually found in Crohn's disease. An extensive radiologic, histologic and laboratory evaluation and a life-long clinical follow-up is available for this patient who presented skin, joint, epididimal and eye involvement.

  12. KCNQ1 mutations associated with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome in India-expanding the spectrum of long QT syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Bijal; Puri, Ratna D; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Nair, Mohan; Sharma, Deepak; Movva, Sireesha; Saxena, Renu; Bohora, Shomu; Aggarwal, Neeraj; Vora, Amit; Kumar, Jatinder; Singh, Tarandeep; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-06-01

    Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) is the most common type of all Long QT syndromes (LQTS) and occurs due to mutations in KCNQ1. Biallelic mutations with deafness is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) and without deafness is autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome (AR RWS). In this prospective study, we report biallelic mutations in KCNQ1 in Indian patients with LQT1 syndrome. Forty patients with a clinical diagnosis of LQT1 syndrome were referred for molecular testing. Of these, 18 were excluded from the analysis as they did not fulfill the inclusion criteria of broad T wave ECG pattern of the study. Direct sequencing of KCNQ1 was performed in 22 unrelated probands, parents and at-risk family members. Mutations were identified in 17 patients, of which seven had heterozygous mutations and were excluded in this analysis. Biallelic mutations were identified in 10 patients. Five of 10 patients did not have deafness and were categorized as AR RWS, the rest being JLNS. Eight mutations identified in this study have not been reported in the literature and predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis. We hypothesize that the homozygous biallelic mutations identified in 67% of families was due to endogamous marriages in the absence of consanguinity. This study presents biallelic gene mutations in KCNQ1 in Asian Indian patients with AR JLNS and RWS. It adds to the scant worldwide literature of mutation studies in AR RWS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Germline mutation in BRAF codon 600 is compatible with human development: de novo p.V600G mutation identified in a patient with CFC syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, K J; Bunag, C; Estep, A L; Jones, J R; Bolt, C H; Rogers, R C; Rauen, K A; Everman, D B

    2011-05-01

    BRAF, the protein product of BRAF, is a serine/threonine protein kinase and one of the direct downstream effectors of Ras. Somatic mutations in BRAF occur in numerous human cancers, whereas germline BRAF mutations cause cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome. One recurrent somatic mutation, p.V600E, is frequently found in several tumor types, such as melanoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, colon cancer, and ovarian cancer. However, a germline mutation affecting codon 600 has never been described. Here, we present a patient with CFC syndrome and a de novo germline mutation involving codon 600 of BRAF, thus providing the first evidence that a pathogenic germline mutation involving this critical codon is not only compatible with development but can also cause the CFC phenotype. In vitro functional analysis shows that this mutation, which replaces a valine with a glycine at codon 600 (p.V600G), leads to increased ERK and ELK phosphorylation compared to wild-type BRAF but is less strongly activating than the cancer-associated p.V600E mutation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Mutation Spectrum and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Krantz, Ian D.; Musio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder. Clinical features include growth retardation, intellectual disability, limb defects, typical facial dysmorphism, and other systemic involvement. The increased understanding of the genetic basis of CdLS has led to diagnostic improvement and expansion of the phenotype. Mutations in five genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8), all regulators or structural components of cohesin, have been...

  15. A severe congenital myasthenic syndrome with "dropped head" caused by novel MUSK mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Giarrana, Miriam L; Joset, Pascal; Sticht, Heinrich; Robb, Stephanie; Steindl, Katharina; Rauch, Anita; Klein, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Congenital myasthenic syndromes are rare. Mutations in MUSK were first described in 2004. Thirteen patients have been reported to date, mostly with a relatively mild course. The molecular diagnosis has implications for choice of treatment and genetic counseling. METHODS: Clinical course and electrophysiological, pathological, and genetic findings were assessed. RESULTS: We describe the case of a boy with prenatal onset and severe respiratory symptoms with a persisting need...

  16. A frameshift mutation in MOCOS is associated with familial renal syndrome (xanthinuria) in Tyrolean Grey cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Piffer, Christian; Diez-Prieto, Inmaculada; Bolcato, Marilena; Gentile, Arcangelo; Dr?gem?ller, Cord

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal syndromes are occasionally reported in domestic animals. Two identical twin Tyrolean Grey calves exhibited weight loss, skeletal abnormalities and delayed development associated with kidney abnormalities and formation of uroliths. These signs resembled inherited renal tubular dysplasia found in Japanese Black cattle which is associated with mutations in the claudin 16 gene. Despite demonstrating striking phenotypic similarities, no obvious presence of pathogenic variants of t...

  17. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Warth, Richard

    2010-08-10

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K(+) channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the human kidney, KCNJ10 staining was additionally observed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. EM of distal tubular cells of a patient with EAST syndrome showed reduced basal infoldings in this nephron segment, which likely reflects the morphological consequences of the impaired salt reabsorption capacity. When expressed in CHO and HEK293 cells, the KCNJ10 mutations R65P, G77R, and R175Q caused a marked impairment of channel function. R199X showed complete loss of function. Single-channel analysis revealed a strongly reduced mean open time. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with coexpression of KCNJ10/KCNJ16, suggesting a dominance of KCNJ10 function in native renal KCNJ10/KCNJ16 heteromers. The decrease in the current of R65P and R175Q was mainly caused by a remarkable shift of pH sensitivity to the alkaline range. In summary, EAST mutations of KCNJ10 lead to impaired channel function and structural changes in distal convoluted tubules. Intriguingly, the metabolic alkalosis present in patients carrying the R65P mutation possibly improves residual function of KCNJ10, which shows higher activity at alkaline pH.

  18. Novel resequencing chip customized to diagnose mutations in patients with inherited syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Aronow, Bruce J; Jegga, Anil G; Wang, Ning; Miethke, Alex; Mourya, Reena; Bezerra, Jorge A

    2007-01-01

    Inherited syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis commonly result from mutations in the genes SERPINA1 (alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency), JAG1 (Alagille syndrome), ATP8B1 (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 [PFIC1]), ABCB11 (PFIC2), and ABCB4 (PFIC3). However, the large gene sizes and lack of mutational hotspots make it difficult to survey for disease-causing mutations in clinical practice. Here, we aimed to develop a technological tool that reads out the nucleotide sequence of these genes rapidly and accurately. 25-mer nucleotide probes were designed to identify each base for all exons, 10 bases of intronic sequence bordering exons, 280-500 bases upstream from the first exon for each gene, and 350 bases of the second intron of the JAG1 gene and tiled using the Affymetrix resequencing platform. We then developed high-fidelity polymerase chain reactions to produce amplicons using 1 mL of blood from each subject; amplicons were hybridized to the chip, and nucleotide calls were validated by standard capillary sequencing methods. Hybridization of amplicons with the chip produced a high nucleotide sequence readout for all 5 genes in a single assay, with an automated call rate of 93.5% (range, 90.3%-95.7%). The accuracy of nucleotide calls was 99.99% when compared with capillary sequencing. Testing the chip on subjects with cholestatic syndromes identified disease-causing mutations in SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, or ABCB4. The resequencing chip efficiently reads SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 with a high call rate and accuracy in one assay and identifies disease-causing mutations.

  19. Mutations of the CEP290 gene encoding a centrosomal protein cause Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Valeska; den Hollander, Anneke I; Brüchle, Nadina Ortiz; Zonneveld, Marijke N; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Becker, Christian; Du Bois, Gabriele; Kendziorra, Heide; Roosing, Susanne; Senderek, Jan; Nürnberg, Peter; Cremers, Frans P M; Zerres, Klaus; Bergmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive, lethal multisystemic disorder characterized by meningooccipital encephalocele, cystic kidney dysplasia, hepatobiliary ductal plate malformation, and postaxial polydactyly. Recently, genes for MKS1 and MKS3 were identified, putting MKS on the list of ciliary disorders (ciliopathies). By positional cloning in a distantly related multiplex family, we mapped a novel locus for MKS to a 3-Mb interval on 12q21. Sequencing of the CEP290 gene located in the minimal critical region showed a homozygous 1-bp deletion supposed to lead to loss of function of the encoded centrosomal protein CEP290/nephrocystin-6. CEP290 is thought to be involved in chromosome segregation and localizes to cilia, centrosomes, and the nucleus. Subsequent analysis of another consanguineous multiplex family revealed homozygous haplotypes and the same frameshift mutation. Our findings add to the increasing body of evidence that ciliopathies can cause a broad spectrum of disease phenotypes, and pleiotropic effects of CEP290 mutations range from single organ involvement with isolated Leber congenital amaurosis to Joubert syndrome and lethal early embryonic multisystemic malformations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome. We compiled clinical and genetic data of all patients with CEP290 mutations described so far. No clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlations were apparent as almost all mutations are nonsense, frameshift, or splice-site changes and scattered throughout the gene irrespective of the patients' phenotypes. Conclusively, other factors than the type and location of CEP290 mutations may underlie phenotypic variability. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Novel FREM1 mutations in a patient with MOTA syndrome: Clinical findings, mutation update and review of FREM1-related disorders literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar F; Zenker, Martin; Schanze, Denny; Ledesma-Gil, Jasbeth; Zenteno, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is an uncommon condition arising from biallelic mutations of FREM1 gene and clinically characterized by a variable spectrum of eyelid malformations, aberrant hairline, bifid or broad nasal tip, and gastrointestinal anomalies. In this report, we describe a patient with a phenotype compatible with MOTA syndrome (aberrant anterior hair line, hypertelorism, unilateral anophthalmia, and bifid and broad nasal tip) in whom two novel FREM1 mutations (c.305 A > G, p.Asp102Gly; and c.2626delG, p.Val876Tyrfs*16) were identified in the compound heterozygous state, thus broadening the mutational spectrum of the disease. We performed a literature review of the clinical and genetic features of individuals carrying FREM1 mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutations in PURA Cause Profound Neonatal Hypotonia, Seizures, and Encephalopathy in 5q31.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lalani, Seema R.; Zhang, Jing; Schaaf, Christian P.; Brown, Chester W.; Magoulas, Pilar; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Wierenga, Klaas J.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Fong, Chin-To; Barbaro-Dieber, Tina; Kukolich, Mary K.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Austin, Elise; Keller, Kory

    2014-01-01

    5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, encephalopathy with or without epilepsy, and severe developmental delay, and the minimal critical deletion interval harbors three genes. We describe 11 individuals with clinical features of 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and de novo mutations in PURA, encoding transcriptional activator protein Pur-α, within the critical region. These data implicate causative PURA mutations responsible for the severe neurological phenotypes o...

  2. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  3. Mutation profile of BBS genes in Iranian patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome: genetic characterization and report of nine novel mutations in five BBS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Rostami, Parvin; Najmabadi, Amin; Mohseni, Marzieh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kariminejad, Ariana; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2014-07-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare ciliopathy disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with 18 known genes. This study was performed to characterize responsible genes and mutation spectrum in a cohort of 14 Iranian families with BBS. Sanger sequencing of the most commonly mutated genes (BBS1, BBS2 and BBS10) accounting for ∼50% of BBS patients determined mutations only in BBS2, including three novel mutations. Next, three of the remaining patients were subjected to whole exome sequencing with 96% at 20 × depth of coverage that revealed novel BBS4 mutation. Observation of no mutation in the other patients represents the possible presence of novel genes. Screening of the remaining patients for six other genes (BBS3, BBS4, BBS6, BBS7, BBS9 and BBS12) revealed five novel mutations. This result represents another indication for the genetic heterogeneity of BBS and extends the mutational spectrum of the disease by introducing nine novel mutations in five BBS genes. In conclusion, although BBS1 and BBS10 are among the most commonly mutated genes in other populations like Caucasian, these two seem not to have an important role in Iranian patients. This suggests that a different strategy in molecular genetics diagnostic approaches in Middle Eastern countries such as Iran should be considered.

  4. Identification of Two Novel ERCC6 Mutations in Old Order Amish with Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, B; Wang, H

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive multisystem degeneration and segmental premature aging. Mutations in the DNA repair gene ERCC6 are responsible for the majority of CS cases reported. In this study, we identified 4 patients presenting with CS from 2 Old Order Amish families. Sequence analysis of the ERCC6 gene revealed 2 novel mutations associated with the disorder in these patients. The patients from family 1 were homozygous for a splice-site mutation, c.2709 + 1G>T, in intron 14 of ERCC6, whereas the patients from family 2 were compound heterozygous for c.2709 + 1G>T and a short deletion in exon 5 (c.1293_1320del). Our findings provide evidence of allelic heterogeneity in Old Order Amish, which is extremely uncommon for a rare condition in an isolated founder population.

  5. Predicting the impact of Lynch syndrome-causing missense mutations from structural calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V,; Stein, Amelie; Dinitzen, Alexander B.

    2017-01-01

    inherent loss of function, and accordingly our in silico modeling data accurately identifies disease-causing mutations and outperforms the traditionally used genetic disease predictors. Thus, in conclusion, in silico biophysical modeling should be considered for making genotype-phenotype predictions......Accurate methods to assess the pathogenicity of mutations are needed to fully leverage the possibilities of genome sequencing in diagnosis. Current data-driven and bioinformatics approaches are, however, limited by the large number of new variations found in each newly sequenced genome, and often...... selected the human mismatch repair protein, MSH2, where missense variants are known to cause the hereditary cancer predisposition disease, known as Lynch syndrome. We show that the majority of disease-causing MSH2 mutations give rise to folding defects and proteasome-dependent degradation rather than...

  6. A PLK4 mutation causing azoospermia in a man with Sertoli cell-only syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Bando, Y; Koh, E; Tsujimura, A; Miyagawa, Y; Iijima, M; Namiki, M; Shiina, M; Ogata, K; Matsumoto, N; Sengoku, K

    2016-01-01

    About 15% of couples wishing to have children are infertile; approximately half these cases involve a male factor. Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK-4) is a member of the polo protein family and a key regulator of centriole duplication. Male mice with a point mutation in the Plk4 gene show azoospermia associated with germ cell loss. Mutational analysis of 81 patients with azoospermia and Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS) identified one man with a heterozygous 13-bp deletion in the Ser/Thr kinase domain of PLK4. Division of centrioles occurred in wild-type PLK4-transfected cells, but was hampered in PLK-4-mutant transfectants, which also showed abnormal nuclei. Thus, this PLK4 mutation might be a cause of human SCOS and nonobstructive azoospermia. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome mutation in two Turkish siblings with X-linked thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Leblebisatan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a clinical condition characterized by thrombocytopenia, eczema, and life-threatening infections. In some cases autoimmunity-related problems and even malignancy might be seen; however, some patients have milder clinical manifestations due to mutations in the same gene family, such as in X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT, which is generally not associated with serious symptoms of disease, except for thrombocytopenia. Herein we report 2 siblings with chronic thrombocytopenia that were diagnosed with XLT based on a missense mutation in the WASP gene (223G>A, Val75Met. To the best of our knowledge this mutation has not been previously reported in a Turkish patient with XLT.

  8. Human CHN1 mutations hyperactivate α2-chimaerin and cause Duane’s retraction syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Chilton, John; Psatha, Maria; Cheng, Long; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Law, Krystal; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Cheung, Michelle; Allen, James; Gutowski, Nick J; Ellard, Sian; Young, Elizabeth; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Appukuttan, Binoy; Stout, J. Timothy; Christiansen, Stephen; Ciccarelli, Maria Laura; Baldi, Alfonso; Campioni, Mara; Zenteno, Juan C.; Davenport, Dominic; Mariani, Laura E.; Sahin, Mustafa; Guthrie, Sarah; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2008-01-01

    The RacGAP molecule α2-chimaerin is implicated in neuronal signaling pathways required for precise guidance of developing corticospinal axons. We now demonstrate that a variant of Duane’s retraction syndrome, a congenital eye movement disorder in which affected individuals show aberrant development of axon projections to the extraocular muscles, can result from gain-of-function heterozygous missense mutations in CHN1 that increase α2-chimaerin RacGAP activity in vitro. A subset of mutations enhances α2-chimaerin membrane translocation and/or α2-chimaerin’s previously unrecognized ability to form a complex with itself. In ovo expression of mutant CHN1 alters the development of ocular motor axons. These data demonstrate that human CHN1 mutations can hyperactivate α2-chimaerin and result in aberrant cranial motor neuron development. PMID:18653847

  9. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millonig Gunda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unleashed ferritin translation. This paper reviews all 31 mutations (27 single nucleotide transitions and four deletions that have been described since 1995. Laboratory test showing hyperferritinaemia, normal serum iron and normal transferrin saturation are indicative for HHCS after exclusion of other causes of increased ferritin levels (inflammation, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and should prompt an ophthalmological consultation for diagnostic confirmation. Invasive diagnostics such as liver biopsy are not indicated. HHCS is an important differential diagnosis of hyperferritinaemia. Haematologists, gastroenterologists and ophthalmologists should be aware of this syndrome to spare patients from further invasive diagnosis (liver biopsy, and also from a false diagnosis of hereditary haemochromatosis followed by venesections. Patients diagnosed with HHCS should be counselled regarding the relative harmlessness of this genetic disease, with early cataract surgery as the only clinical consequence.

  10. Analysis of giant cell tumour of bone cells for Noonan syndrome/cherubism-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovszky, Linda; Idowu, Bernadine; Taylor, Richard; Mertens, Fredrik; Athanasou, Nicholas; Flanagan, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic tumour which contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells and a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells (MSC). Giant cell-rich osteolytic lesions can also develop in the jaw bones in Noonan syndrome, a cherubism-like developmental abnormality that is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, often because of mutation in the PTPN11 or BRAF genes. We screened GCTBs for mutations in PTPN11 and BRAF to determine whether GCTBs develop through alterations of genes involved in Noonan syndrome. MSC were isolated from 10 GCTBs. Chromosome banding analysis of these cells revealed telomeric associations (tas) in 7 of the 10 cases. Thus, the cultured cells expressed a cytogenetic abnormality typically found in short-term cultures from GCTBs. Sequencing of DNA extracted from the seven GCTB-derived MSC cultures displaying tas did not identify any mutation in PTPN11 or in exons 9-15 of BRAF. Our findings indicate that the molecular pathways involved in GCTB development are different from those causing Noonan syndrome. The method for isolating and culturing GCTB stromal cells described in this study generated a population of MSC that contained tas, indicating that it is useful for obtaining stromal cells from GCTB and other giant cell-rich lesions, such as giant cell reparative granuloma, for genetic and other studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Familial Wolfram syndrome due to compound heterozygosity for two novel WFS1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Ruiz, Gabriela; Pérez-Cano, Hector J; Camargo, Mayra

    2008-07-25

    To describe the first instance of genotyping in a Latin American family with Wolfram syndrome (WS). Four affected siblings and their healthy parents were studied. Ophthalmologic examination included best corrected visual acuity determination, funduscopy, fluorescein retinal angiography, and Goldmann kinetic perimetry. Molecular methods included linkage analysis using microsatellites markers located on the markers located on the Wofram syndrome 1 (WFS1) region at 4p16.1, PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing analysis of the complete coding region and exon/intron junctions of WFS1. In addition, allele-specific cloning and sequencing techniques were used to characterize a heterozygous frameshift mutation. The four affected siblings presented with a homogeneous clinical picture characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus, severe optic atrophy, and progressive hearing loss. Linkage analysis indicated that all four sibs were heterozygous for markers linked to the WFS1 region and that each inherited the same allele from the mother and the same from the father, suggesting compound heterozygosity. Direct WFS1 analysis disclosed a paternally inherited novel missense R177P mutation whereas allele-specific cloning and sequencing revealed a novel WFS1 16 bp deletion that was inherited from the mother. Our report of two novel WFS1 mutations expands the molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome. This is the first documented case of the molecular basis of the disease in a Latin American family. Analysis of more patients from this population will establish if compound heterozygosity is commonly found in affected individuals from this ethnic group.

  12. The landscape of somatic mutations in Down syndrome-related myeloid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenichi; Toki, Tsutomu; Okuno, Yusuke; Kanezaki, Rika; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sanada, Masashi; Park, Myoung-ja; Terui, Kiminori; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kon, Ayana; Nagata, Yasunobu; Sato, Yusuke; Wang, RuNan; Shiba, Norio; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Hama, Asahito; Muramatsu, Hideki; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Adachi, Souichi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kato, Koji; Nishimura, Ryosei; Izraeli, Shai; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Miyano, Satoru; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Etsuro; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-11-01

    Transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) is a myeloid proliferation resembling acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL), mostly affecting perinatal infants with Down syndrome. Although self-limiting in a majority of cases, TAM may evolve as non-self-limiting AMKL after spontaneous remission (DS-AMKL). Pathogenesis of these Down syndrome-related myeloid disorders is poorly understood, except for GATA1 mutations found in most cases. Here we report genomic profiling of 41 TAM, 49 DS-AMKL and 19 non-DS-AMKL samples, including whole-genome and/or whole-exome sequencing of 15 TAM and 14 DS-AMKL samples. TAM appears to be caused by a single GATA1 mutation and constitutive trisomy 21. Subsequent AMKL evolves from a pre-existing TAM clone through the acquisition of additional mutations, with major mutational targets including multiple cohesin components (53%), CTCF (20%), and EZH2, KANSL1 and other epigenetic regulators (45%), as well as common signaling pathways, such as the JAK family kinases, MPL, SH2B3 (LNK) and multiple RAS pathway genes (47%).

  13. SCN5A mutations in Brugada syndrome are associated with increased cardiac dimensions and reduced contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans van Hoorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cardiac sodium channel (Na(v1.5 controls cardiac excitability. Accordingly, SCN5A mutations that result in loss-of-function of Na(v1.5 are associated with various inherited arrhythmia syndromes that revolve around reduced cardiac excitability, most notably Brugada syndrome (BrS. Experimental studies have indicated that Na(v1.5 interacts with the cytoskeleton and may also be involved in maintaining structural integrity of the heart. We aimed to determine whether clinical evidence may be obtained that Na(v1.5 is involved in maintaining cardiac structural integrity. METHODS: Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging, we compared right ventricular (RV and left ventricular (LV dimensions and ejection fractions between 40 BrS patients with SCN5A mutations (SCN5a-mut-positive and 98 BrS patients without SCN5A mutations (SCN5a-mut-negative. We also studied 18 age/sex-matched healthy volunteers. RESULTS: SCN5a-mut-positive patients had significantly larger end-diastolic and end-systolic RV and LV volumes, and lower LV ejection fractions, than SCN5a-mut-negative patients or volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: Loss-of-function SCN5A mutations are associated with dilatation and impairment in contractile function of both ventricles that can be detected by CMR analysis.

  14. SCN5A mutations in Brugada syndrome are associated with increased cardiac dimensions and reduced contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Frans; Campian, Maria E; Spijkerboer, Anje; Blom, Marieke T; Planken, R Nils; van Rossum, Albert C; de Bakker, Jacques M T; Wilde, Arthur A M; Groenink, Maarten; Tan, Hanno L

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) controls cardiac excitability. Accordingly, SCN5A mutations that result in loss-of-function of Na(v)1.5 are associated with various inherited arrhythmia syndromes that revolve around reduced cardiac excitability, most notably Brugada syndrome (BrS). Experimental studies have indicated that Na(v)1.5 interacts with the cytoskeleton and may also be involved in maintaining structural integrity of the heart. We aimed to determine whether clinical evidence may be obtained that Na(v)1.5 is involved in maintaining cardiac structural integrity. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, we compared right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) dimensions and ejection fractions between 40 BrS patients with SCN5A mutations (SCN5a-mut-positive) and 98 BrS patients without SCN5A mutations (SCN5a-mut-negative). We also studied 18 age/sex-matched healthy volunteers. SCN5a-mut-positive patients had significantly larger end-diastolic and end-systolic RV and LV volumes, and lower LV ejection fractions, than SCN5a-mut-negative patients or volunteers. Loss-of-function SCN5A mutations are associated with dilatation and impairment in contractile function of both ventricles that can be detected by CMR analysis.

  15. Mutational Analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 in Patients With Treacher Collins Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shaojuan; Jin, Lei; Wang, Huijun; Li, Chenlong; Zheng, Fengyun; Ma, Duan; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant craniofacial malformation mainly caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Few cases have been observed in the Chinese population. Herein, the authors report the mutational analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 to determine the mutational features of the 3 genes in Chinese patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Genomic DNA of the patients and their parents was extracted from peripheral blood following a standard protocol. DNA sequencing analysis was performed on all exons and the exon-intron borders of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 in addition to the 1200-bp upstream of TCOF1. Four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in TCOF1, one of which was in the promoter region. Mutations in GSC and HOXA2 were not found in the 3 patients. Our results suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity or different mechanisms leading to the disease. Further functional study of the alteration is necessary to obtain more definitive information. PMID:27526242

  16. Novel frameshift mutation in the KCNQ1 gene responsible for Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Amirian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Jervell and Lange–Nielsen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. The disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and long QT syndrome. Methods: Here we present a 3.5-year-old female patient, an offspring of consanguineous marriage, who had a history of recurrent syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. The patient and the family members were screened for mutations in KCNQ1 gene by linkage analysis and DNA sequencing. Results: DNA sequencing showed a c.1532_1534delG (p. A512Pfs*81 mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in homozygous form. The results of short tandem repeat (STR markers showed that the disease in the family is linked to the KCNQ1 gene. The mutation was confirmed in the parents in heterozygous form. Conclusion: This is the first report of this variant in KCNQ1 gene in an Iranian family. The data of this study could be used for early diagnosis of the condition in the family and genetic counseling.

  17. TP53 mutations in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q) predict disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jädersten, Martin; Saft, Leonie; Smith, Alexander; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Pomplun, Sabine; Göhring, Gudrun; Hedlund, Anette; Hast, Robert; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Porwit, Anna; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2011-05-20

    To determine the frequency of TP53 mutations and the level of p53 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with del(5q) and to assess their impact on disease progression. Pre- and postprogression bone marrow (BM) samples from 55 consecutive patients with International Prognostic Scoring System low risk (n = 32) or intermediate-1 risk (n = 23) were studied by next-generation sequencing of TP53. IHC for p53 was performed on 148 sequential BM samples. TP53 mutations with a median clone size of 11% (range, 1% to 54%) were detected in 10 patients (18%) already at an early phase of the disease. Mutations were equally common in low-risk and intermediate-1-risk patients and were associated with evolution to acute myeloid leukemia (5 of 10 v 7 of 45; P = .045). Nine of 10 patients carrying mutations showed more than 2% BM progenitors with strong p53 staining. The probability of a complete cytogenetic response to lenalidomide was lower in mutated patients (0 of 7 v 12 of 24; P = .024). By using sensitive deep-sequencing technology, we demonstrated that TP53 mutated populations may occur at an early disease stage in almost a fifth of low-risk MDS patients with del(5q). Importantly, mutations were present years before disease progression and were associated with an increased risk of leukemic evolution. TP53 mutations could not be predicted by common clinical features but were associated with p53 overexpression. Our findings indicate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity of the disease which may significantly affect clinical decision making.

  18. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. COL4A3/COL4A4 mutations: from familial hematuria to autosomal-dominant or recessive Alport syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Longo, Ilaria; Porcedda, Paola; Mari, Francesca; Giachino, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Deplano, Carla; Brusco, Alfredo; Bosio, Maurizio; Massella, Laura; Lavoratti, Giancarlo; Roccatello, Dario; Frascá, Giovanni; Mazzucco, Gianna; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Conti, Maura; Fasciolo, Federica; Arrondel, Christelle; Heidet, Laurence; Renieri, Alessandra; De Marchi, Mario

    2002-01-01

    .... Mutations of the type IV collagen COL4A5 gene cause X-linked Alport syndrome (ATS). Mutations of COL4A3 and COL4A4 have been reported both in autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant ATS, as well as in benign familial hematuria (BFH...

  20. Evidence that WT1 mutations in Denys-Drash syndrome patients may act in a dominant-negative fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, M. H.; Williamson, K. A.; Mannens, M.; Kelsey, A.; Gosden, C.; Hastie, N. D.; van Heyningen, V.

    1993-01-01

    The triad of nephropathy, partial gonadal dysgenesis and Wilms' tumour (WT) is known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). The WT predisposition gene WT1, which plays a vital role in both genital and renal development, is known to be mutated in DDS patients. The WT1 mutations in these patients are

  1. Further insights into the allan-herndon-dudley syndrome: Clinical and functional characterization of a novel MCT8 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, C.M. (Christine M.); S. Kersseboom (Simone); Yoon, G. (Grace); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Mutations in the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 have been identified as the cause for Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), characterized by severe psychomotor retardation and altered TH serum levels. Here we report a novel MCT8 mutation identified in 4 generations of

  2. Mutations in two nonhomologous genes in a head-to-head configuration cause Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Perez, V.L.; Tompson, S.W.; Blair, H.J.; Espinoza-Valdez, C.; Lapunzina, P.; Silva, E.O.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Gibbs, J.L.; Young, I.D.; Wright, M.J.; Goodship, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. Elsewhere, we described mutations in EVC in patients with this condition (Ruiz-Perez et al. 2000). We now report that mutations in EVC2 also cause EvC. These two genes lie in a head-to-head configuration that is conserved

  3. Functional and electrophysiological characterization of four non-truncating mutations responsible for creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valayannopoulos, V.; Bakouh, N.; Mazzuca, M.; Nonnenmacher, L.; Hubert, L.; Makaci, F.L.; Chabli, A.; Salomons, G.S.; Mellot-Draznieks, C.; Brule, E.; de Lonlay, P.; Toulhoat, H.; Munnich, A.; Planelles, G.; de Keyzer, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability coupled with epilepsy are clinical hallmarks of the creatine (Cr) transporter deficiency syndrome resulting from mutations in the SLC6A8 gene. So far characterization of pathogenic mutations of SLC6A8 has been limited to Cr uptake. The aim of our study was to characterize the

  4. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10,000 carriers of this mutation in the United States alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected...

  5. De novo CCND2 mutations leading to stabilization of cyclin D2 cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Mirzaa (Ghayda); D.A. Parry (David); N.K. Fry; K.A. Giamanco (Kristin); J.A. Schwartzentruber (Jeremy); M. Vanstone (Megan); C.V. Logan (Clare); N. Roberts (Nicola); C.A. Johnson (Colin); S. Singh (Shawn); S.S. Kholmanskikh (Stanislav); C. Adams (Carissa); R.D. Hodge (Rebecca); R.F. Hevner (Robert); D.T. Bonthron (David); K.P.J. Braun (Kees P.); L. Faivre (Laurence); J.-B. Riviere; C. St-Onge (Christina); K.W. Gripp (Karen); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); K. Pang (Ki); E. Sweeney (Elizabeth); H. van Esch (Hilde); N.E. Verbeek (Nienke); D. Wieczorek (Dagmar); M. Steinraths (Michelle); J. Majewski (Jacek); K.M. Boycott (Kym); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); M.E. Ross (M Elizabeth); W.B. Dobyns (William); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); J. Friedman; S. Michaud; F. Bernier (Francois); M. Brudno (M.); B. Fernandez (B.); A. Knoppers (Annelies); J. Samuels (Jonathan); S.W. Scherer (Stephen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractActivating mutations in genes encoding phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway components cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly- hydrocephalus syndrome (MPPH, OMIM 603387). Here we report that individuals with MPPH lacking upstream PI3K-AKT pathway mutations carry de

  6. Impact Of Mutation-derived Antigens In Immune Recognition Of Hematological Malignancies, Specifically Myeloid Dysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Sunil Kumar; Dorfmüller, S.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Mutation-derived neoepitopes have been suggested as a major component for immune recognition of solid tumors with a high mutational load, e.g. Melanoma and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by increasin...

  7. Arts syndrome with a novel missense mutation in the PRPS1 gene: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Koichi; Ogaya, Shunsuke; Kurahashi, Naoko; Umemura, Ayako; Yamada, Keitaro; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Takashima, Hiroshi; Torres, Rosa J; Aso, Kosaburo

    2016-11-01

    Arts syndrome is characterized by early-onset hypotonia, ataxia, intellectual disability, sensorineural hearing impairment, progressive optic atrophy, and a tendency to develop infections. Arts syndrome is an X-linked disorder caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the PRPS1 gene, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1. Only three families have been reported. Here, we report another family with Arts syndrome. The initial symptoms of the 1-year-old proband were hypotonia and ataxia, worsening recurrent infection-triggered muscle weakness, motor and intellectual developmental delay, and hearing loss. Both central nervous system involvement and peripheral neuropathy were demonstrated. His three maternal uncles had died before the age of 3years. A genetic analysis of PRPS1 revealed a novel missense mutation, c.367C>G (p.His123Asp). PRPS enzymatic activity was markedly reduced in the patient. His mother was supposed to be an asymptomatic carrier. Arts syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of infantile hypotonia and weakness aggravated by recurrent infection with a family history of X-linked inheritance. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental aspects of long QT syndrome type 3 and Brugada syndrome on the basis of a single SCN5A mutation in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; van Tintelen, JP; Viersma, JW; Bezzina, CR; Bink-Boelkens, MTE

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim was to investigate at what age electrocardiographic characteristics of long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BS), based on a single SNC5A mutation, appear. BACKGROUND The QT interval (QT) in LQT3 is prolonged during bradycardia. It is not clear yet if this is

  9. Uveitis in Blau syndrome from a de novo mutation of the NOD2/CARD15 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiji, Veena Rao; Miller, Marijean M; Jung, L K

    2011-04-01

    Blau syndrome (MIM 186580) is a rare autoinflammatory, familial granulomatous condition that occurs secondary to a single amino acid mutation of the NOD2/CARD15 gene on chromosome 16p12-q21. We report the case of a 2.5-year-old girl who presented for ophthalmic examination in the setting of rash and synovitis. Initially, small, evanescent, ovoid corneal subepithelial opacities unique to Blau syndrome were observed. She later developed a fulminant panuveitis that responded to immunomodulatory therapy. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of Blau syndrome. Despite immunosuppression, at almost 7 years of age, she continues to have persistent panuveitis with vision of 20/20. Copyright © 2011 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes: non-linkage with syndromes of Wolfram and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ouweland, J M; Bruining, G J; Lindhout, D; Wit, J M; Veldhuyzen, B F; Maassen, J A

    1992-01-01

    We have recently identified a point mutation in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene which associates with a combination of type II diabetes mellitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a large pedigree. To extend this finding to other syndromes which exhibit a combination of diabetes mellitus and hearing loss we have sequenced all mitochondrial tRNA genes from two patients with the Wolfram syndrome, a rare congenital disease characterized by diabetes mellitus, deafness, diabetes insipidus and optic atrophy. In each patient, a single different mutation was identified. One is an A to G transition mutation at np 12,308 in tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene in a region which is highly conserved between species during evolution. This mutation has been described by Lauber et al. (1) as associating with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). The other is a C to T transition mutation at np 15,904 in tRNA(Thr) gene. Both mutations are also present in the general population (frequency tRNA(Leu(CUN)) mutation 0.16, tRNA(Thr) mutation 0.015). These findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved regions in mitochondrial tRNA genes can exhibit a significant polymorphism in humans, and that the mutation at np 12,308 in the tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene is unlikely to be associated with CPEO and Wolfram syndrome. Images PMID:1542564

  11. Mandibuloacral Dysplasia Caused by LMNA Mutations and Uniparental Disomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaochun Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies, skeletal malformations, and mottled cutaneous pigmentation. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is characterized by the clinical features of accelerated aging in childhood. Both MAD and HGPS can be caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. In this study, we describe a 2-year-old boy with overlapping features of MAD and HGPS. Mutation analysis of the LMNA gene revealed a homozygous missense change, p.M540T, while only the mother carries the mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD analysis for chromosome 1 showed the presence of maternal UPD. Markers in the 1q21.3–q22 region flanking the LMNA locus were isodisomic, while markers in the short arm and distal 1q region were heterodisomic. These results suggest that nondisjunction in maternal meiosis followed by loss of the paternal chromosome 1 during trisomy rescue might result in the UPD1 and homozygosity for the p.M540T mutation observed in this patient.

  12. A case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA with a novel PLOD1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ayşe; Kurtgoz, Serkan; Dursun, Siar; Bozkurt, Gokay

    2014-10-01

    The kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by soft extensible skin, laxity of joints, severe muscle hypotonia at birth, and kyphoscoliosis. We describe a 3-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome whose parents were cousins. She was born with breech presentation by vaginal delivery at term after a normal pregnancy. At birth she manifested hypotonia and congenital kyphosis. On the second postnatal day, subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhages were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. During follow-up at 18 months of age, strabismus, umbilical hernia, kyphoscoliosis, joint laxity, bilateral hip dislocation, muscular hypotonia, and motor developmental delay. The cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormal signal related to previous hemorrhage. Metabolic investigations and neuromuscular evaluation were normal, excluding other possible explanations of hypotonia. An analysis of urinary cross-links demonstrated an increase in the lysyl-pyridinoline to hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline ratio, suggesting the diagnosis of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Molecular analysis of the PLOD1 gene revealed that she had a novel homozygous p.Pro622Argfs*3 (c. 1863_1864dupCG) mutation in exon 17 that is expected to cause complete loss of the enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 1 and to cause kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We describe a child with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a novel mutation of the PLOD1 gene. Our observations suggest that vascular lesions in the neonatal period may be a rare additional clinical feature of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Expression and New SPINK5 Splicing Defects in Netherton Syndrome: Unmasking a Frequent Founder Synonymous Mutation and Unconventional Intronic Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Lacaze-Buzy, Laetitia; Furio, Laetitia

    2012-01-01

    11. Haplotype analysis indicates that this mutation is a founder mutation in Greece. Two other new deep intronic mutations, c.283-12T>A in intron 4 and c.1820+53G>A in intron 19, induced partial intronic sequence retention. A new nonsense c.2557C>T (p.Arg853X) mutation was also identified. All......Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe skin disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5) encoding the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Here, we disclose new SPINK5 defects in 12 patients, who presented...

  14. Kleefstra syndrome: Considerations about treatment strategy in 2 patients with a causative Ehmt1 mutation and apathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Leeuw, N. de; Kleefstra, T.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Kleefstra syndrome [OMIM: 610253] is caused by a 9q34.3 micro-deletion or an intragenic mutation in the EHMT1 gene. Its core phenotype comprises intellectual disability, childhood hypotonia and distinct dysmorphisms. The syndrome can be associated with congenital anomalies, epilepsy,

  15. A novel deletion mutation in proteoglycan-4 underlies camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa-vara-pericarditis syndrome in a consanguineous pakistani family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basit, S.; Iqbal, Z.; Umicevic-Mirkov, M.; Kamran Ul-Hassan Naqvi, S.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Ansar, M.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ahmad, W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa-vara-pericarditis (CACP) syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition that mostly affects joints and tendons but can also affect the pericardium, which is a surface surrounding the heart. CACP syndrome is caused by mutations in a secreted

  16. The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

    OpenAIRE

    Nikkel, Sarah M; Dauber, Andrew; de Munnik, Sonja; Connolly, Meghan; Hood, Rebecca L; Caluseriu, Oana; Hurst, Jane; Kini, Usha; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Afenjar, Alexandra; Albrecht, Beate; Allanson, Judith E; Balestri, Paolo; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Brancati, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA based confirmatory test, we set forth to define the clinical features of this syndrome. Methods and results Clinical in...

  17. EEC syndrome, Arg227Gln TP63 mutation and micturition difficulties: Is there a genotype-phenotype correlation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maclean, K.; Holme, S.A.; Gilmour, E.; Taylor, M.; Scheffer, H.; Graf, N.; Smith, G.H.; Onikul, E.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Moss, C.; Ades, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on two unrelated families with EEC syndrome (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate), each with an Arg227Gln TP63 gene mutation, where the phenotype overlapped extensively with the allelic disorder, limb-mammary syndrome (LMS). Features common to both families were an

  18. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  19. A new mutation site in the AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wufei; Hu, Zhen; Liao, Xiangyu; Chen, Xing; Huang, Wenrong; Zhong, Yu; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 2403000) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is caused by autoimmune regulator (AIRE). The main symptoms of APS-1 are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) and hypoparathyroidism. We collected APS-1 cases and analysed them. The AIRE genes of the patient and his family members were sequenced to identify whether the APS-1 patient had an AIRE mutation. We discovered a mutation site (c.206A>C) that had never before been reported in the AIRE gene located in exon 2 of the AIRE gene. This homogyzous mutation caused a substitution of the 69th amino acid of the AIRE protein from glutamine to proline (p.Q69P). A yeast two-hybrid assay, which was used to analyse the homodimerization properties of the mutant AIRE protein, showed that the mutant AIRE protein could not interact with the normal AIRE protein. Flow cytometry and RT-qPCR analyses indicated that the new mutation site could decrease the expression levels of the AIRE, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) proteins to affect central immune tolerance. In conclusion, our research has shown that the new mutation site (c.206A>C) may influence the homodimerization and expression levels and other aspects of the AIRE protein. It may also impact the expression levels of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), leading to a series of autoimmune diseases.

  20. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation impairs the ORC1-nucleosome association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Saumya; Gozani, Or; Song, Jikui

    2015-05-15

    Recent studies have identified several genetic mutations within the BAH domain of human Origin Recognition Complex subunit 1 (hORC1BAH), including the R105Q mutation, implicated in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). However, the pathological role of the hORC1 R105Q mutation remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated the interactions of the hORC1BAH domain with histone H4K20me2, DNA, and the nucleosome core particle labeled with H4Kc20me2, a chemical analog of H4K20me2. Our study revealed a nucleosomal DNA binding site for hORC1BAH. The R105Q mutation reduces the hORC1BAH-DNA binding affinity, leading to impaired hORC1BAH-nucleosome interaction, which likely influences DNA replication initiation and MGS pathogenesis. This study provides an etiologic link between the hORC1 R105Q mutation and MGS.

  1. Cornelia de Lange syndrome mutations in SMC1A or SMC3 affect binding to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenkova, Ekaterina; Focarelli, Maria Luisa; Susani, Lucia; Paulis, Marianna; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Mannini, Linda; Frattini, Annalisa; Delia, Domenico; Krantz, Ian; Vezzoni, Paolo; Jessberger, Rolf; Musio, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, upper limb malformations, growth and cognitive retardation. Mutations in the sister chromatid cohesion factor genes NIPBL, SMC1A and SMC3 are present in ∼65% of CdLS patients. In addition to their canonical roles in chromosome segregation, the cohesin proteins are involved in other biological processes such as regulation of gene expression, DNA repair and maintenance of genome stability. To gain insights into the molecular basis of CdLS, we analyzed the affinity of mutated SMC1A and SMC3 hinge domains for DNA. Mutated hinge dimers bind DNA with higher affinity than wild-type proteins. SMC1A- and SMC3-mutated CdLS cell lines display genomic instability and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinking agents. We propose that SMC1A and SMC3 CdLS mutations affect the dynamic association between SMC proteins and DNA, providing new clues to the underlying molecular cause of CdLS. PMID:18996922

  2. A survey of 90 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome related to TNFRSF6 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Bénédicte; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Florkin, Benoit; Gobert, Delphine; Lambotte, Olivier; De Somer, Lien; Lanzarotti, Nina; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Chantrain, Christophe; Bertrand, Yves; Jeziorski, Eric; Leverger, Guy; Michel, Gérard; Suarez, Felipe; Oksenhendler, Eric; Hermine, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-11-03

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a genetic disorder characterized by early-onset, chronic, nonmalignant lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations, and susceptibility to lymphoma. The majority of ALPS patients carry heterozygous germline (ALPS-FAS) or somatic mutations (ALPS-sFAS) of the TNFRSF6 gene coding for FAS. Although the clinical features of ALPS have been described previously, long-term follow-up data on morbidity and mortality are scarce. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical and genetic features of 90 ALPS-FAS and ALPS-sFAS patients monitored over a median period of 20.5 years. Heterozygous germline mutations of TNFRSF6 were identified in 83% of probands. Somatic TNFRSF6 mutations were found in 17% of index cases (all located within the intracellular domain of FAS). Sixty percent of the ALPS-FAS patients with mutations in the extracellular domain had a somatic mutation affecting the second allele of TNFRSF6; age at onset was later in these patients. No other genotype-phenotype correlations could be found. Long-term analysis confirmed a trend toward spontaneous remission of lymphoproliferation in adulthood but mixed outcomes for autoimmune manifestations. We observed significant and potentially life-threatening disease and treatment-related morbidity, including a high risk of sepsis after splenectomy that calls for careful long-term monitoring of ALPS patients. We also noted a significantly greater occurrence of disease-related symptoms in male than in female patients.

  3. Structural and functional analyses of disease-causing missense mutations in Bloom syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong-Bing; Rigolet, Pascal; Ren, Hua; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye; Amor-Gueret, Mounira; Xi, Xu Guang

    2007-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the early development of many types of cancer. Missense mutations have been identified in the BLM gene (encoding a RecQ helicase) in affected individuals, but the molecular mechanism and the structural basis of the effects of these mutations remain to be elucidated. We analysed five disease-causing missense mutations that are localized in the BLM helicase core region: Q672R, I841T, C878R, G891E and C901Y. The disease-causing mutants had low ATPase and helicase activities but their ATP binding abilities were normal, except for Q672, whose ATP binding activity was lower than that of the intact BLM helicase. Mutants C878R, mapping near motif IV, and G891E and C901Y, mapping in motif IV, displayed severe DNA-binding defects. We used molecular modelling to analyse these mutations. Our work provides insights into the molecular basis of BLM pathology, and reveals structural elements implicated in coupling DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis and DNA unwinding. Our findings will help to explain the mechanism underlying BLM catalysis and interpreting new BLM causing mutations identified in the future.

  4. Identification of a novel MYO7A mutation in Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ling; Yu, Hongsong; Jiang, Yan; He, Juan; Pu, Sisi; Li, Xin; Zhang, Li

    2018-01-05

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. In view of the high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH, performing genetic screening with traditional methods is impractical. In the present study, we carried out targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to uncover the underlying gene in an USH family (2 USH patients and 15 unaffected relatives). One hundred and thirty-five genes associated with inherited retinal degeneration were selected for deep exome sequencing. Subsequently, variant analysis, Sanger validation and segregation tests were utilized to identify the disease-causing mutations in this family. All affected individuals had a classic USH type I (USH1) phenotype which included deafness, vestibular dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa. Targeted NGS and Sanger sequencing validation suggested that USH1 patients carried an unreported splice site mutation, c.5168+1G>A, as a compound heterozygous mutation with c.6070C>T (p.R2024X) in the MYO7A gene. A functional study revealed decreased expression of the MYO7A gene in the individuals carrying heterozygous mutations. In conclusion, targeted next-generation sequencing provided a comprehensive and efficient diagnosis for USH1. This study revealed the genetic defects in the MYO7A gene and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with USH1 mutations.

  5. Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome with a Novel Mutation in the FLCN Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Gulsum; Yılmaz Demirci, Nilgun; Turktas, Haluk; Ergun, Mehmet Ali

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by hair follicle hamartomas, kidney tumors, and spontaneous pneumothorax; its cause is a heterozygous mutation in the FLCN gene. Colorectal polyps and carcinoma have also been reported in BHDS. FLCN mutations can be detected in patients with isolated primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP), so PSP may present as part of BHDS. The aim of this report is to enhance awareness that patients presenting with spontaneous PSP should be evaluated for FLCN mutations. A 44-year-old woman with PSP and her parents were analyzed for FLCN mutations. One of the patient's paternal aunts had a PSP and two of her paternal aunts had colon cancer diagnosed at early ages. A novel in-frame deletion in the FLCN gene, c.932_933delCT (P311Rfs*78), was detected in the proband and in her unaffected father. We recommend that molecular analysis of the FLCN gene be performed in patients with PSP and their families, and that mutation carriers be examined for kidney and colon tumors.

  6. Novel mutations of TCOF1 gene in European patients with treacher Collins syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is one of the most severe autosomal dominant congenital disorders of craniofacial development and shows variable phenotypic expression. TCS is extremely rare, occurring with an incidence of 1 in 50.000 live births. The TCS distinguishing characteristics are represented by down slanting palpebral fissures, coloboma of the eyelid, micrognathia, microtia and other deformity of the ears, hypoplastic zygomatic arches, and macrostomia. Conductive hearing loss and cleft palate are often present. TCS results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene located on chromosome 5, which encodes a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phospho-protein called Treacle. However, alterations in the TCOF1 gene have been implicated in only 81-93% of TCS cases. Methods In this study, the entire coding regions of the TCOF1 gene, including newly described exons 6A and 16A, were sequenced in 46 unrelated subjects suspected of TCS clinical indication. Results Fifteen mutations were reported, including twelve novel and three already described in 14 sporadic patients and in 3 familial cases. Moreover, seven novel polymorphisms were also described. Most of the mutations characterised were microdeletions spanning one or more nucleotides, in addition to an insertion of one nucleotide in exon 18 and a stop mutation. The deletions and the insertion described cause a premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusion This study confirms that almost all the TCOF1 pathogenic mutations fall in the coding region and lead to an aberrant protein.

  7. Familial Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with Germline KIT Mutations Accompanying Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekido, Yuki; Ohigashi, Seiji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Naoki; Suzuki, Koyu; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-03-01

    Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare disease with germline mutations in the c-kit gene (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha gene (PDGFRA). We had encountered multiple GISTs in the stomach and small intestine during a screening of ovarian cancer for a woman with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) with breast cancer susceptibility gene II (BRCA2) mutations. The aim of this study was to examine this case in detail. A 65-year-old woman diagnosed with HBOC harboring BRCA2 mutations was found to have multiple tumors in the stomach and small intestine by abdominal screening. All tumors were resected, and KIT gene mutations (p.Trp557Leu and p.Lys558Glu) in exon 11 were detected in all tumors and peripheral blood leukocytes. The patient was diagnosed with familial GIST. This was an extremely rare case in which familial GIST with germline KIT gene mutations co-existed with HBOC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Hearing impairment caused by mutations in two different genes responsible for nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss within a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepokój, Katarzyna; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Jurczak, Piotr; Kujko, Aleksandra A; Śniegórska, Dominika; Sawicka, Justyna; Grabarczyk, Alicja; Bal, Jerzy; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna

    2017-11-18

    Usher syndrome is rare genetic disorder impairing two human senses, hearing and vision, with the characteristic late onset of vision loss. This syndrome is divided into three types. In all cases, the vision loss is postlingual, while loss of hearing is usually prelingual. The vestibular functions may also be disturbed in Usher type 1 and sometimes in type 3. Vestibular areflexia is helpful in making a proper diagnosis of the syndrome, but, often, the syndrome is misdiagnosed as a nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, we present a Polish family with hearing loss, which was clinically classified as nonsyndromic. After excluding mutations in the DFNB1 locus, we implemented the next-generation sequencing method and revealed that hearing loss was syndromic and mutations in the USH2A gene indicate Usher syndrome. This research highlights the importance of molecular analysis in establishing a clinical diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

  9. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  10. Risks of less common cancers in proven mutation carriers with lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Schackert, Hans K; Goergens, Heike; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Goecke, Timm O; Schmiegel, Wolff; Buettner, Reinhard; Moeslein, Gabriela; Letteboer, Tom G W; Gómez García, Encarna; Hes, Frederik J; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Menko, Fred H; van Os, Theo A M; Sijmons, Rolf H; Wagner, Anja; Kluijt, Irma; Propping, Peter; Vasen, Hans F A

    2012-12-10

    Patients with Lynch syndrome are at high risk for colon and endometrial cancer, but also at an elevated risk for other less common cancers. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to provide risk estimates for these less common cancers in proven carriers of pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. Data were pooled from the German and Dutch national Lynch syndrome registries. Seven different cancer types were analyzed: stomach, small bowel, urinary bladder, other urothelial, breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer. Age-, sex- and MMR gene-specific cumulative risks (CRs) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Sex-specific incidence rates were compared with general population incidence rates by calculating standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the impact of sex and mutated gene on cancer risk. The cohort comprised 2,118 MMR gene mutation carriers (MLH1, n = 806; MSH2, n = 1,004; MSH6, n = 308). All cancers were significantly more frequent than in the general population. The highest risks were found for male small bowel cancer (SIR, 251; 95% CI, 177 to 346; CR at 70 years, 12.0; 95% CI, 5.7 to 18.2). Breast cancer showed an SIR of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.4) and a CR of 14.4 (95% CI, 9.5 to 19.3). MSH2 mutation carriers had a considerably higher risk of developing urothelial cancer than MLH1 or MSH6 carriers. The sex- and gene-specific differences of less common cancer risks should be taken into account in cancer surveillance and prevention programs for patients with Lynch syndrome.

  11. Somatic GNAQ Mutation is Enriched in Brain Endothelial Cells in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Couto, Javier A; Pinto, Anna; Alexandrescu, Sanda; Madsen, Joseph R; Greene, Arin K; Sahin, Mustafa; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital neurocutaneous disorder characterized by facial and extracraniofacial capillary malformations and capillary-venule malformations in the leptomeninges. A somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ (c.548G>A; p.R183Q) was found in SWS brain and skin capillary malformations. Our laboratory showed endothelial cells in skin capillary malformations are enriched for the GNAQ mutation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the GNAQ mutation is also enriched in endothelial cells in affected SWS brain. Two human SWS brain specimens were fractionated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting into hematopoietic (CD45), endothelial (CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2), and perivascular (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) cells and cells negative for all markers. The sorted cell populations were analyzed for GNAQ p.R183Q mutation by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells were selected by anti-CD31-coated magnetic beads and cultured in endothelial growth medium in vitro. The GNAQ p.R183Q mutation was present in brain endothelial cells in two SWS specimens, with mutant allelic frequencies of 34.7% and 24.0%. Cells negative for all markers also harbored the GNAQ mutation. The mutant allelic frequencies in these unidentified cells were 9.2% and 8.4%. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells with mutant allelic frequencies of 14.7% and 21% survived and proliferated in vitro. Our study provides evidence that GNAQ p.R183Q mutation is enriched in endothelial cells in SWS brain lesions and thereby reveals endothelial cells as a source of aberrant Gαq signaling. This will help to understand the pathophysiology of SWS, to discover biomarkers for predicting cerebral involvement, and to develop therapeutic targets to prevent neurological impairments in SWS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A common CHRNE mutation in Brazilian patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Eduardo de Paula; Sobreira, Cláudia Ferreira da Rosa; Dos Santos, André Clériston José; Tomaselli, Pedro José; Marques, Wilson; Ortega, Roberta Paiva Magalhães; Costa, Marcela Câmara Machado; da Silva, André Macedo Serafim; Mendonça, Rodrigo Holanda; Caldas, Vitor Marques; Zambon, Antonio Alberto; Abath Neto, Osório; Marchiori, Paulo Eurípedes; Heise, Carlos Otto; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Töpf, Ana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Zanoteli, Edmar

    2018-01-30

    The most common causes of congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are CHRNE mutations, and some pathogenic allelic variants in this gene are especially frequent in certain ethnic groups. In the southern region of Brazil, a study found the c.130dupG CHRNE mutation in up to 33% of families with CMS. Here, we aimed to verify the frequency of this mutation among individuals with CMS in a larger cohort of CMS patients from different areas of Brazil and to characterize clinical features of these patients. Eighty-four patients with CMS, from 72 families, were clinically evaluated and submitted to direct sequencing of the exon 2 of CHRNE. The c.130dupG mutation was found in 32 patients (23 families), with 26 patients (19 families, 26.3%) in homozygosis, confirming its high prevalence in different regions of Brazil. Among the homozygous patients, the following characteristics were frequent: onset of symptoms before 2 years of age (92.3%), little functional restriction (92.3%), fluctuating symptoms (100%), ocular muscle impairment (96.1%), ptosis (100%), limb weakness (88.4%), response to pyridostigmine (100%), facial involvement (77%), and bulbar symptoms (70.8%). The pretest probability of finding at least one allele harbouring the c.130dupG mutation was 38.1%. Selecting only patients with impaired eye movement together with limb weakness and improvement with pyridostigmine, the probability increases to 72.2%. This clinical pre-selection of patients is likely a useful tool for regions where CHRNE mutations have a founder effect. In conclusion, the CHRNE mutation c.130dupG leads to fairly benign natural course of the disease with relative homogeneity.

  13. Clinically proven mtDNA mutations are not common in those with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Elizna M; Van Der Westhuizen, Francois H; Erasmus, Elardus; van Dyk, Etresia; Knowles, Charlotte V Y; Al-Ali, Shereen; Ng, Wan-Fai; Taylor, Robert W; Newton, Julia L; Elson, Joanna L

    2017-03-16

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a prevalent debilitating condition that affects approximately 250,000 people in the UK. There is growing interest in the role of mitochondrial function and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in CFS. It is now known that fatigue is common and often severe in patients with mitochondrial disease irrespective of their age, gender or mtDNA genotype. More recently, it has been suggested that some CFS patients harbour clinically proven mtDNA mutations. MtDNA sequencing of 93 CFS patients from the United Kingdom (UK) and South Africa (RSA) was performed using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The sequence data was examined for any evidence of clinically proven mutations, currently; more than 200 clinically proven mtDNA mutations point mutations have been identified. We report the complete mtDNA sequence of 93 CFS patients from the UK and RSA, without finding evidence of clinically proven mtDNA mutations. This finding demonstrates that clinically proven mtDNA mutations are not a common element in the aetiology of disease in CFS patients. That is patients having a clinically proven mtDNA mutation and subsequently being misdiagnosed with CFS are likely to be rare. The work supports the assertion that CFS should not be considered to fall within the spectrum of mtDNA disease. However, the current study cannot exclude a role for nuclear genes with a mitochondrial function, nor a role of mtDNA population variants in susceptibility to disease. This study highlights the need for more to be done to understand the pathophysiology of CFS.

  14. Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M; van der Klift, Heleen M; Velthuizen, Mary E; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Sijmons, Rolf H; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T

    2015-02-01

    The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Data were collected from 98 PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52 years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P < .001). Significant SIRs were observed for cancers of the small bowel, ovaries, breast, and renal pelvis. CRC and EC risks were found to be markedly lower than those previously reported for the other MMR. However, these risks embody the isolated risk of carrying a PMS2 mutation, and it should be noted that we observed a substantial variation in cancer phenotype within and between families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. A mouse model of the human Fragile X syndrome I304N mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie B Zang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mental retardation, autistic features, and behavioral abnormalities characteristic of the Fragile X mental retardation syndrome result from the loss of function of the RNA-binding protein FMRP. The disease is usually caused by a triplet repeat expansion in the 5'UTR of the FMR1 gene. This leads to loss of function through transcriptional gene silencing, pointing to a key function for FMRP, but precluding genetic identification of critical activities within the protein. Moreover, antisense transcripts (FMR4, ASFMR1 in the same locus have been reported to be silenced by the repeat expansion. Missense mutations offer one means of confirming a central role for FMRP in the disease, but to date, only a single such patient has been described. This patient harbors an isoleucine to asparagine mutation (I304N in the second FMRP KH-type RNA-binding domain, however, this single case report was complicated because the patient harbored a superimposed familial liver disease. To address these issues, we have generated a new Fragile X Syndrome mouse model in which the endogenous Fmr1 gene harbors the I304N mutation. These mice phenocopy the symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in the existing Fmr1-null mouse, as assessed by testicular size, behavioral phenotyping, and electrophysiological assays of synaptic plasticity. I304N FMRP retains some functions, but has specifically lost RNA binding and polyribosome association; moreover, levels of the mutant protein are markedly reduced in the brain specifically at a time when synapses are forming postnatally. These data suggest that loss of FMRP function, particularly in KH2-mediated RNA binding and in synaptic plasticity, play critical roles in pathogenesis of the Fragile X Syndrome and establish a new model for studying the disorder.

  16. Episodic tremors representing cortical myoclonus are characteristic in Angelman syndrome due to UBE3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masahide; Saito, Yoshiaki; Honda, Ryoko; Saito, Takashi; Sugai, Kenji; Matsuda, Yuko; Miyatake, Chiharu; Takeshita, Eri; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Uto, Chieko; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Motoki, Takahiro; Saitoh, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    Neurological manifestations including psychomotor developmental delay and epilepsy in patients with Angelman syndrome caused by ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) mutations has been considered similar but is relatively milder than that in patients with deletion-type Angelman syndrome. This makes the diagnosis of the former subgroup often difficult. We here characterized epilepsy, specifically the types of tremulous movement, in 4 patients (age, 3-38years) with Angelman syndrome caused by UBE3A mutations. Ictal electroencephalography was used to record episodic tremors in all study patients. Jerk-locked averaging was performed using digital electroencephalography and surface electromyogram data from patients who were monitored for 24h. All patients had tremors in the limbs, head, and trunk, which resulted in 2 patients falling backward. These tremors lasted several seconds, and could emerge in clusters for hours in older patients. In addition, the tremors coincided with 7-8Hz rhythmic activity with a frontocentral predominance, diffuse spike-wave bursts, or no apparent change on electroencephalography. In 2 patients, these tremors were confirmed as cortical myoclonus using jerk-locked averaging. The other seizure types were isolated generalized myoclonus and tonic seizures. None of the patients experienced atypical absence seizures. Levetiracetam therapy was effective in controlling the myoclonic events in 2 of the 3 patients. Semirhythmic myoclonus is common in patients with Angelman syndrome caused by UBE3A mutations, and such myoclonic events are often life disabling. The preserved expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunit genes located proximal to UBE3A might explain the low prevalence of absence seizures in this population. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. LBR mutation and nuclear envelope defects in a patient affected with Reynolds syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline; Roll, Patrice; Esteves-Vieira, Vera; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Grob, Jean Jacques; Cau, Pierre; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2010-06-01

    BACKGROUND Lamins are proteins of the nuclear envelope involved in 'laminopathies', an heterogeneous group of diseases sharing clinical similarities with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods In this context, a search was undertaken for mutations in LMNA, encoding Lamins A/C, and ZMPSTE24, LBR, LMNB1, LMNB2, MAN1, SYNE1a and LAP2, encoding Lamins A/C molecular partners, in a Caucasian woman affected with Reynolds syndrome, a particular nosologic entity specifically associating limited cutaneous SSc and primary biliary cirrhosis. RESULTS Coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of these genes were PCR amplified and sequenced, revealing a single heterozygous missense mutation in LBR exon 9 (c.1114C/T; p.R372C). This variant was absent in 400 control chromosomes. The mutation was predicted to induce a change in Lamin B receptor (LBR) tertiary structure and molecular interactions by bioinformatic tools. Further functional explorations were performed on the patient's fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cell lines. On the latter, the expression levels of LBR, Lamins A/C, Lamin B1, Lamin B2, and HP1a were conserved. Conversely, in the patient's skin fibroblasts, LBR and the aforementioned molecular partners showed dramatically reduced or abolished expression levels. The immunofluorescence analyses performed on both cell lines corroborated these findings. CONCLUSION The fibroblast specific abnormalities observed suggest that this particular LBR mutation might have dominant negative deleterious effects in a tissue specific fashion, possibly through the perturbation of the interactions or stability of the nuclear envelope protein network. LBR mutations might thus be associated with Reynolds syndrome.

  18. Mutation of the MYH7 gene in a child with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkowski, Waldemar; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nowak, Agnieszka; Jagielski, Józef; Gonerska, Marzena; Lebioda, Arleta; Siwińska, Aldona

    2007-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) displays autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetration of defective genes. Data concerning the familial occurrence of ventricular preexcitation, i.e. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, also indicate autosomal dominant inheritance. In the literature, only a gene mutation on chromosome 7q3 has been described in familial HCM coexisting with WPW syndrome to date. The present paper describes the case of a 7-year-old boy with HCM and coexisting WPW syndrome. On his chromosome 14, molecular diagnostics revealed a C 9123 mutation (arginine changed into cysteine in position 453) in exon 14 in a copy of the gene for beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7). It is the first known case of mutation of the MYH7 gene in a child with both HCM and WPW. Since no linkage between MYH7 mutation and HCM with WPW syndrome has been reported to date, we cannot conclude whether the observed mutation is a common cause for both diseases, or this patient presents an incidental co-occurrence of HCM (caused by MYH7 mutation) and WPW syndrome.

  19. Hereditary nephrotic syndrome: a systematic approach for genetic testing and a review of associated podocyte gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-09-01

    Several genes have been implicated in genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome occurring in children. It is now known that the phenotypes associated with mutations in these genes display significant variability, rendering genetic testing and counselling a more complex task. This review will focus on the recent clinical findings associated with those genes known to be involved in isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in children and, thereby, propose an approach for appropriate mutational screening. The recurrence of proteinuria after transplantation in patients with hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome will also be discussed.

  20. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hirano

    Full Text Available We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome. In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79 had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  2. Novel PSTPIP1 gene mutation in a patient with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Elvira; Singla, Shikha; Davis, William E; Quinet, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sterile arthritis. As the child ages into puberty, cutaneous features develop and arthritis subsides. We report the case of a now 25-year-old male patient with PAPA syndrome with the E250K mutation in PSTPIP1. We also present a systematic literature review of other PAPA cases. We conducted a literature search of PubMed using the following search terms: E250K mutation, PSTPIP1, and PAPA. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations on chromosome 15q affecting the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1) gene, also known as CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1). The reported cases of PAPA syndrome currently in the literature involve mutations in A230T and E250Q. One case of a novel E250K mutation has been reported, which presented with a different phenotype to previously described cases of PAPA syndrome. With variation present between disease presentations from case to case, it is possible that the spectrum of PAPA syndrome is wider than currently thought. Further research is needed which may uncover an as-yet undiscovered genetic abnormality linking these interrelated diseases together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of 51 novel exons of the Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) gene that encode multiple conserved functional domains and that are mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E. van; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Claassen, A.M.W.; Yntema, H.G.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The USH2A gene is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type IIa, which is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome and is characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutation analysis by DNA sequencing of exons 1-21 revealed only ~63% of the expected USH2A mutations, we

  4. A novel mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a child with clinical and histological features of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Tranebjaerg, L; Esberg, G

    2011-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare congenital ectodermal disorder, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in GJB2, encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26. The commonest mutation is the p.Asp50Asn mutation, and only a few other mutations have been described to date....

  5. Comprehensive population-wide analysis of Lynch syndrome in Iceland reveals founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Rafnar, Thorunn; Frankel, Wendy L

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes, is associated with increased cancer risk. Here using a large whole-genome sequencing data bank, cancer registry and colorectal tumour bank we determine the prevalence of Lynch syndrome, associated cancer risks...... and pathogenicity of several variants in the Icelandic population. We use colorectal cancer samples from 1,182 patients diagnosed between 2000-2009. One-hundred and thirty-two (11.2%) tumours are mismatch repair deficient per immunohistochemistry. Twenty-one (1.8%) have Lynch syndrome while 106 (9.0%) have somatic...... hypermethylation or mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The population prevalence of Lynch syndrome is 0.442%. We discover a translocation disrupting MLH1 and three mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 that increase endometrial, colorectal, brain and ovarian cancer risk. We find thirteen mismatch repair variants...

  6. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Hispanic families with adenomatous polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Mendez, Vanessa; Vazquez, Pedro Juan; Lozada, Maria Eugenia; Freyre, Katerina; Lathroum, Liselle; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Hernandez-Marrero, Jessica; Giardiello, Francis; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2013-09-01

    Several genetically defined hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes are associated with colonic polyposis including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH adenomatous polyposis (MAP). Limited data exists on the clinical characterization and genotypic spectrum of polyposis syndromes among Hispanics. To describe the phenotype and genotype of Puerto Rican Hispanic patients with FAP and MUTYH and compare with other ethnic and racial groups. Probands were identified from the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (PURIFICAR). Recruited individuals completed risk factors, medical, and family history questionnaires and underwent genetic testing for genotype analysis. Frequency analysis, Chi square, Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used for statistical analysis methods. A total of 31 FAP (from 19 families) and 13 MAP (from 13 families) Hispanic patients recruited from the PURIFICAR were evaluated. Among the FAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 27.6 (range 9-71 years); 67.7 % cases had more than 100 polyps and 41.9 % had upper gastrointestinal polyps. Among the 19 FAP families, there were 77 affected FAP individuals and 26 colorectal cancer cases. Genetic mutations were available for 42.2 % of FAP families; all mutations identified were unique. Surgeries were reported in 31 cases; 14 (45.2 %) prophylactic surgeries and 6 (19.4 %) therapeutic surgeries for management of CRC. Among MAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 53 (range 34-76 years). Genetic analysis revealed homozygous biallelic mutations (G382D) in 53.8 %, compound heterozygous mutations (G382/Y165C) in 23 %, and non-G382/Y165C monoallelic mutations in 23 %. Familial cancer registries should be promoted as vehicles for detection, education and follow up of families at-risk of acquiring familial cancers. PURIFICAR is the first and only familial cancer registry in Puerto Rico providing these services to families affected with familial cancer syndromes promoting education, testing

  7. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; McEvoy, Fintan J; Heegaard, Steffen; Charlier, Carole; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord

    2017-08-02

    Surveillance for bovine genetic diseases in Denmark identified a hitherto unreported congenital syndrome occurring among progeny of a Holstein sire used for artificial breeding. A genetic aetiology due to a dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or a mosaic germline mutation was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial dysplasia and complete prolapse of the eyes. Consequently the syndrome was named facial dysplasia syndrome (FDS). Furthermore, extensive brain malformations, including microencephaly, hydrocephalus, lobation of the cerebral hemispheres and compression of the brain were present. Subsequent data analysis of progeny of the sire revealed that around 0.5% of his offspring suffered from FDS. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping data of the seven cases and their parents were used to map the defect in the bovine genome. Significant genetic linkage was obtained for three regions, including chromosome 26 where whole genome sequencing of a case-parent trio revealed two de novo variants perfectly associated with the disease: an intronic SNP in the DMBT1 gene and a single non-synonymous variant in the FGFR2 gene. This FGFR2 missense variant (c.927G>T) affects a gene encoding a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, where amino acid sequence is highly conserved between members and across species. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved tryptophan into a cysteine residue (p.Trp309Cys). Both variant alleles were proven to result from de novo mutation events in the germline of the sire. FDS is a novel genetic disorder of Holstein cattle. Mutations in the human FGFR2 gene are associated with various dominant inherited craniofacial dysostosis syndromes. Given

  8. Mutations in the TGF-β Repressor SKI Cause Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome with Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Increased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)1-4. However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS would intuitively infer diminished TGF-β signaling5. Taken together, these data have engendered controversy regarding the specific role of TGF-β in disease pathogenesis. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) has considerable phenotypic overlap with MFS and LDS, including aortic aneurysm6-8. We identified causative variation in 10 patients with SGS in the proto-oncogene SKI, a known repressor of TGF-β activity9,10. Cultured patient dermal fibroblasts showed enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling cascades and increased expression of TGF-β responsive genes. Morpholino-induced silencing of SKI paralogs in zebrafish recapitulated abnormalities seen in SGS patients. These data support the conclusion that increased TGF-β signaling is the mechanism underlying SGS and contributes to multiple syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm. PMID:23023332

  9. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A.; Dittrich, B.; Greger, V.; Buiting, K.; Lalande, M.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Anvret, M.; Horsthemke, B.

    1994-01-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. We have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, we have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. We propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8178815

  10. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, A. (Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. (Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (United Kingdom)); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Anvret, M. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Predicting the impact of Lynch syndrome-causing missense mutations from structural calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie V Nielsen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate methods to assess the pathogenicity of mutations are needed to fully leverage the possibilities of genome sequencing in diagnosis. Current data-driven and bioinformatics approaches are, however, limited by the large number of new variations found in each newly sequenced genome, and often do not provide direct mechanistic insight. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that saturation mutagenesis, biophysical modeling and co-variation analysis, performed in silico, can predict the abundance, metabolic stability, and function of proteins inside living cells. As a model system, we selected the human mismatch repair protein, MSH2, where missense variants are known to cause the hereditary cancer predisposition disease, known as Lynch syndrome. We show that the majority of disease-causing MSH2 mutations give rise to folding defects and proteasome-dependent degradation rather than inherent loss of function, and accordingly our in silico modeling data accurately identifies disease-causing mutations and outperforms the traditionally used genetic disease predictors. Thus, in conclusion, in silico biophysical modeling should be considered for making genotype-phenotype predictions and for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, and perhaps other hereditary diseases.

  12. Ocular manifestations in Blau syndrome associated with a CARD15/Nod2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Toru; Kikuchi, Takanobu; Ohta, Kouichi; Imai, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2003-10-01

    To report cases of Blau syndrome with a CARD15/Nod2 mutation. Observational and interventional case report. A 10-year-old Japanese boy (proband) was seen with secondary angle-closure glaucoma (iris bombe), uveitis, skin rashes, and camptodactyly. His sister had posterior synechia and camptodactyly. She had iritis in both eyes during the follow-up period. Both eyes of the father were phthisical because of granulomatous uveitis and secondary glaucoma. The father also had camptodactyly. Surgery was performed to release the iris bombe. Ocular inflammation was treated by topical and systemic steroids. Biopsy specimens from the skin rash and from the iris (from iridectomy) were obtained from the proband. Genetic analyses were performed on the proband, his sister, and their mother for a CARD15/Nod2 mutation. Clinical features, pathologic findings of the skin and iris specimens, and genetic analysis of the CARD15/Nod2 gene. Phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and peripheral iridectomy released the iris bombe. The biopsy specimen from the skin rash showed noncaseating, granulomatous infiltration with epithelioid cells and lymphocytes. The iridectomy specimen showed nonspecific inflammation. Systemic and topical steroid therapy partly reduced the ocular inflammation. Genetic analyses showed that the proband and his sister had an R334W mutation in the CARD15/Nod2 gene, but their mother was of the wild type. Blau syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood uveitis. Genetic analysis of the CARD15/Nod2 gene is helpful in the diagnosis.

  13. A novel APC mutation defines a second locus for Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Faqeih, Eissa; Anazi, Shams; Alfawareh, Mohammad; Wakil, Salma M; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-05-01

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by a unique pattern of syndactyly, and variable penetrance of renal agenesis and facial dysmorphism. LRP4 mutations were identified in most, but not all patients with this syndrome, suggesting the presence of at least one additional locus. Clinical characterisation of a new CLS family followed by autozygosity mapping, whole-exome sequencing and global gene expression profiling. We describe an extended consanguineous Saudi family with typical CLS features in addition to significant scoliosis. The disease in this family maps to a single autozygous interval on 5q22.2, in which whole-exome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel splicing mutation in APC that results in ∼ 80% reduction of the wild-type transcript and the creation of an aberrant transcript that predicts a severely truncated APC. This was found to be associated with upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. In a pattern similar to how LRP4 mutations are predicted to negate the protein's antagonistic effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, we propose that reduction of APC may increase the availability of β-catenin by virtue of impaired degradation, leading to a similar phenotypic outcome. This is the first time APC is linked to a human phenotype distinct from its established role in oncology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Target sequencing approach intended to discover new mutations in non-syndromic intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna; Gandin, Ilaria; Belcaro, Chiara; Palumbo, Pietro; Palumbo, Orazio; Biamino, Elisa; Dal Col, Valentina; Laurini, Erik; Pricl, Sabrina; Bosco, Paolo; Carella, Massimo; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Romano, Corrado; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Faletra, Flavio; Vozzi, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The technological improvements over the last years made considerable progresses in the knowledge of the etiology of intellectual Disability (ID). However, at present very little is known about the genetic heterogeneity underlying the non-syndromic form of ID (NS-ID). To investigate the genetic basis of NS-ID we analyzed 43 trios and 22 isolated NS-ID patients using a targeted sequencing (TS) approach. 71 NS-ID genes have been selected and sequenced in all subjects. We found putative pathogenic mutations in 7 out of 65 patients. The pathogenic role of mutations was evaluated through sequence comparison and structural analysis was performed to predict the effect of alterations in a 3D computational model through molecular dynamics simulations. Additionally, a deep patient clinical re-evaluation has been performed after the molecular results. This approach allowed us to find novel pathogenic mutations with a detection rate close to 11% in our cohort of patients. This result supports the hypothesis that many NS-ID related genes still remain to be discovered and that NS-ID is a more complex phenotype compared to syndromic form, likely caused by a complex and broad interaction between genes alterations and environment factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A mutation causing Alport syndrome with tardive hearing loss is common in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.; Denison, J.C.; Atkin, C.L. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the COL4A5 gene, located at Xq22, cause Alport syndrome (AS), a nephritis characterized by progressive deterioration of the glomerular basement membrane and usually associated with progressive hearing loss. We have identified a novel mutation, L1649R, present in 9 of 121 independently ascertained families. Affected males shared the same haplotype of eight polymorphic markers tightly linked to COL4A5, indicating common ancestry. Genealogical studies place the birth of this ancestor >200 years ago. The L1649R mutation is a relatively common cause of Alport syndrome in the western United States, in part because of the rapid growth and migratory expansion of mid-nineteenth-century pioneer populations carrying the gene. L1649R affects a highly conserved residue in the NC1 domain, which is involved in key inter- and intramolecular interactions, but results in a relatively mild disease phenotype. Renal failure in an L1649R male typically occurs in the 4th or 5th decade and precedes the onset of significant hearing loss by {approximately}10 years. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Mutations in RECQL4 cause a subset of cases of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, S; Shimamoto, A; Goto, M; Miller, R W; Smithson, W A; Lindor, N M; Furuichi, Y

    1999-05-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS; also known as poikiloderma congenitale) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by abnormalities in skin and skeleton, juvenile cataracts, premature ageing and a predisposition to neoplasia. Cytogenetic studies indicate that cells from affected patients show genomic instability often associated with chromosomal rearrangements causing an acquired somatic mosaicism. The gene(s) responsible for RTS remains unknown. The genes responsible for Werner and Bloom syndromes (WRN and BLM, respectively) have been identified as homologues of Escherichia coli RecQ, which encodes a DNA helicase that unwinds double-stranded DNA into single-stranded DNAs. Other eukaryotic homologues thus far identified are human RECQL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rqh1. We recently cloned two new human helicase genes, RECQL4 at 8q24.3 and RECQL5 at 17q25, which encode members of the RecQ helicase family. Here, we report that three RTS patients carried two types of compound heterozygous mutations in RECQL4. The fact that the mutated alleles were inherited from the parents in one affected family and were not found in ethnically matched controls suggests that mutation of RECQL4 at human chromosome 8q24.3 is responsible for at least some cases of RTS.

  17. A new mutation in Muir-Torre syndrome associated with familiar transmission of different gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, M; Olasz, J; Lukács, G; Tanyi, J L; Tóth, L; Antal-Szalmás, P; Ress, Z; Bubán, T; András, C; Damjanovich, L

    2009-10-01

    Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Carcinoma (HNPCC) is the most frequent inherited disease which can lead to the development of tumors in the colon and other locations. Its genetic basis is related to the germline mutation of the Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes. Muir-Torre syndrome is considered one of the subtypes of this disease, in which the HNPCC tumor spectrum is frequently associated with sebaceous carcinoma of the skin or keratoacanthoma. A 57 years old male patient is presented with a mucinous carcinoma of the caecum and an adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. A malignant sebaceous carcinoma was removed from his left neck area. His family history was significant for two cases of colon carcinoma, two cases of stomach cancer and a case of metacron endometrial and skin tumor as well. Both the colon carcinoma and the skin tumor proved to be microsatellite unstable. An Arg>Pro switch missense mutation was found in codon 265 of the hMLH1 gene. This error was found in 4 other members of his family. The detected genetic alteration was considered pathogenic and was not published yet in English literature. The significance of this particular case is the rare tumor association in a patient with Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS). In cases of sebaceous skin lesions, evaluation of family history is of utmost importance in the early detection of HNPCC and in the follow up care of family members with the particular mutation.

  18. A Case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome Due To a Novel Mutation in Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Thulasi BA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by motor, sensory, and cranial neuronopathies, associated with mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 genes that code for human riboflavin transporters RFVT2 and RFVT3, respectively. The authors describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl with Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome and a novel homozygous mutation c.1156T>C in the SLC52A3 gene, who presented at the age of 2.5 years with progressive brain stem dysfunction including ptosis, facial weakness, hearing loss, dysphagia, anarthria with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, and ataxic gait. She subsequently developed respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy and worsening dysphagia necessitating a gastrostomy. Following riboflavin supplementation, resolution of facial diplegia and ataxia, improvements in ptosis, and bulbar function including vocalization and respiration were noted. However, her sensorineural hearing loss remained unchanged. Similar to other cases of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, our patient responded favorably to early riboflavin supplementation with significant but not complete neurologic recovery.

  19. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  20. DNA Damage Accumulation and TRF2 Degradation in Atypical Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidisha eSaha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome (AWS, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, -H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  1. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...... and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10,000 carriers of this mutation in the United States alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected...

  2. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within......-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14...

  3. [Description of a new TP53 gene germline mutation in a family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic counselling to healthy mutation carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaña, Judith; Nomdedéu, Josep; Díez, Orland; Sabaté, Josep Maria; Balil, Anna; Pericay, Carles; López López, Juan José; Brunet, Joan; Baiget, Montse; Alonso, Carmen

    2002-10-19

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by early-onset breast cancer, soft-tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas, acute leukemia, adrenocortical neoplasms and central nervous system tumors. Germline mutations in gene TP53 are identified in a percentage of affected families. Eight families with aggregation of childhood sarcomas, brain tumors, breast cancers in pre-menopausal women, and renal tumors were screened for TP53 germ-line mutations. SSCP and posterior direct sequencing were performed for genetic analysis. We also report a previously undescribed family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome carrying a germline mutation. Seven families fulfilled so-called Li-Fraumeni like criteria and one fulfilled classical criteria. A new germ-line mutation in codon 238 at exon 7 of the gene TP53 was identified in the family fulfilling classical criteria. This mutation has not been previously reported. The clinical heterogeneity as well as the molecular complexity and consequences of mutation analysis and genetic counseling make it necessary to develop protocols in this area. A multidisciplinary approach is needed; this approach should be coordinated by a Familial Cancer Genetic Counseling Unit.

  4. Mutations in SOX2 cause anophthalmia-esophageal-genital (AEG) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathleen A; Hever, Ann M; Rainger, Joe; Rogers, R Curtis; Magee, Alex; Fiedler, Zdenek; Keng, Wee Teik; Sharkey, Freddie H; McGill, Niolette; Hill, Clare J; Schneider, Adele; Messina, Mario; Turnpenny, Peter D; Fantes, Judy A; van Heyningen, Veronica; FitzPatrick, David R

    2006-05-01

    We report heterozygous, loss-of-function SOX2 mutations in three unrelated individuals with Anophthalmia-Esophageal-Genital (AEG) syndrome. One previously reported case [Rogers, R.C. (1988) Unknown cases. Proceedings of the Greenwood Genetic Center. 7, 57.] has a 2.7 Mb deletion encompassing SOX2 and associated with a cryptic translocation t(3;7)(q28;p21.3). The deletion and translocation breakpoints on chromosome 3q are >8.6 Mb apart and both chromosome rearrangements have occurred de novo. Another published case [Petrackova et al. (2004) Association of oesophageal atresia, anophthalmia and renal duplex. Eur. J. Pediatr., 163, 333-334.] has a de novo nonsense mutation, Q55X. A previously unreported case with severe bilateral microphthalmia and oesophageal atresia has a de novo missense mutation, R74P, that alters a highly evolutionarily conserved residue within the high mobility group domain, which is critical for DNA-binding of SOX2. In a yeast one-hybrid assay, this mutation abolishes Sox2-induced activation of the chick delta-crystallin DC5 enhancer. Four other reported AEG syndrome cases were extensively screened and do not have detectable SOX2 mutations. Two of these cases have unilateral eye malformations. SOX2 mutations are known to cause severe bilateral eye malformations but this is the first report implicating loss of function mutations in this transcription factor in oesophageal malformations. SOX2 is expressed in the developing foregut in mouse and zebrafish embryos and an apparently normal pattern of expression is maintained in Shh-/- mouse embryos, suggesting either that Sox2 acts upstream of Shh or functions in a different pathway. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the major morphological events in the developing foregut and eye from Carnegie Stages 12 and 13 human embryos are presented and compared with the data from model organisms. SOX2, with NMYC and CHD7, is now the third transcriptional regulator known to be critical for normal oesophageal

  5. De Novo Mutation in the SCN5A Gene Associated with Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumin Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS is a genetically determined cardiac electrical disorder, characterized by typical electrocardiography (ECG alterations, and it is an arrhythmogenic syndrome that may lead to sudden cardiac death. The most common genotype found among BrS patients is caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene, which lead to a loss of function of the cardiac sodium (Na+ channel (Nav1.5 by different mechanisms. Methods: The assay of confocal laser microscopy and western blot were used to identify the expression and location of L812Q at the cell surface. Characterization of Nav1.5 L812Q mutant Na+ channels was text by patch-clamp recordings, and the PHYRE2 server was used to build a model for human Nav1.5 channel. Results: Here, we report that a novel missense SCN5A mutation, L812Q, localized in the DII-S4 transmembrane region of the Nav1.5 channel protein, was identified in an index patient who showed a typical BrS type-1 ECG phenotype. The mutation was absent in the patient's parents and brother. Heterologous expression of the wild-type (WT and L812Q mutant Nav1.5 channels in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 cells reveals that the mutation results in a reduction of Na+ current density as well as ∼20 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage dependence of inactivation. The voltage dependence of activation and the time course for recovery from inactivation are not affected by the mutation. The hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage dependence of inactivation caused a reduction of the Na+ window current as well. In addition, western blot and confocal laser microscopy imaging experiments showed that the mutation causes fewer channel to be expressed at the membrane than WT channel. A large proportion of the mutant channels are retained in the cytoplasm, probably in the endoplasmic reticulum. Conclusion: The decrease of channel expression, hyperpolarizing shift of voltage dependence of inactivation, and a decline of Na+ window current

  6. Nuclear matrix, nuclear envelope and premature aging syndromes in a translational research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Pierre; Navarro, Claire; Harhouri, Karim; Roll, Patrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; Kaspi, Elise; Perrin, Sophie; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lévy, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Lamin A-related progeroid syndromes are genetically determined, extremely rare and severe. In the past ten years, our knowledge and perspectives for these diseases has widely progressed, through the progressive dissection of their pathophysiological mechanisms leading to precocious and accelerated aging, from the genes mutations discovery until therapeutic trials in affected children. A-type lamins are major actors in several structural and functional activities at the nuclear periphery, as they are major components of the nuclear lamina. However, while this is usually poorly considered, they also play a key role within the rest of the nucleoplasm, whose defects are related to cell senescence. Although nuclear shape and nuclear envelope deformities are obvious and visible events, nuclear matrix disorganization and abnormal composition certainly represent the most important causes of cell defects with dramatic pathological consequences. Therefore, lamin-associated diseases should be better referred as laminopathies instead of envelopathies, this later being too restrictive, considering neither the key structural and functional roles of soluble lamins in the entire nucleoplasm, nor the nuclear matrix contribution to the pathophysiology of lamin-associated disorders and in particular in defective lamin A processing-associated aging diseases. Based on both our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and the biological and clinical consequences of progeria and related diseases, therapeutic trials have been conducted in patients and were terminated less than 10 years after the gene discovery, a quite fast issue for a genetic disease. Pharmacological drugs have been repurposed and used to decrease the toxicity of the accumulated, unprocessed and truncated prelaminA in progeria. To date, none of them may be considered as a cure for progeria and these clinical strategies were essentially designed toward reducing a subset of the most dramatic and morbid features

  7. Second malignant neoplasms in patients with Cowden syndrome with underlying germline PTEN mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Joanne; Stanuch, Kim; Mester, Jessica L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Eng, Charis

    2014-06-10

    Patients with Cowden syndrome (CS) with underlying germline PTEN mutations are at increased risk of breast, thyroid, endometrial, and renal cancers. To our knowledge, risk of subsequent cancers in these patients has not been previously explored or quantified. We conducted a 7-year multicenter prospective study (2005 to 2012) of patients with CS or CS-like disease, all of whom underwent comprehensive PTEN mutational analysis. Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) were ascertained by medical records and confirmed by pathology reports. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all SMNs combined and for breast, thyroid, endometrial, and renal cancers were calculated. Of the 2,912 adult patients included in our analysis, 2,024 had an invasive cancer history. Germline pathogenic PTEN mutations (PTEN mutation positive) were identified in 114 patients (5.6%). Of these 114 patients, 46 (40%) had an SMN. Median age of SMN diagnosis was 50 years (range, 21 to 71 years). Median interval between primary cancer and SMN was 5 years (range, <1 to 35 years). Of the 51 PTEN mutation-positive patients who presented with primary breast cancer, 11 (22%) had a subsequent new primary breast cancer and 10-year second breast cancer cumulative risk of 29% (95% CI, 15.3 to 43.7). Risk of SMNs compared with that of the general population was significantly elevated for all cancers (SIR, 7.74; 95% CI, 5.84 to 10.07), specifically for breast (SIR, 8.92; 95% CI, 5.85 to 13.07), thyroid (SIR, 5.83; 95% CI, 3.01 to 10.18), and endometrial SMNs (SIR, 14.08.07; 95% CI, 7.10 to 27.21). Patients with CS with germline PTEN mutations are at higher risk for SMNs compared with the general population. Prophylactic mastectomy should be considered on an individual basis given the significant risk of subsequent breast cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome-Associated Mutations in the Sodium Channel Beta Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bi-Hua; Pundi, Kavitha N; Van Norstrand, David W; Valdivia, Carmen R; Tester, David J; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 10% of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may stem from potentially lethal cardiac channelopathies, with approximately half of channelopathic SIDS involving the NaV1.5 cardiac sodium channel. Recently, NaV beta subunits have been implicated in various cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, the four genes encoding NaV beta subunits represent plausible candidate genes for SIDS. Objective To determine the spectrum, prevalence and functional consequences of sodium channel beta subunit mutations in a SIDS cohort. Methods In this IRB-approved study, mutational analysis of the 4 beta subunit genes: SCN1B – 4B was performed using PCR, DHPLC, and direct DNA sequencing of DNA derived from 292 SIDS cases. Engineered mutations were co-expressed with SCN5A in HEK 293 cells, and whole cell patch clamped. One of the putative SIDS-associated mutations was similarly studied in adenovirally transduced adult rat ventricular myocytes. Results 3 rare (absent in 200–800 reference alleles) missense mutations (β3-V36M, β3-V54G and β4-S206L) were identified in 3/292 SIDS cases. Compared to SCN5A+β3-WT, β3-V36M significantly decreased peak INa and increased late INa while β3-V54G resulted in a marked loss-of-function. β4-S206L accentuated late INa and positively shifted the midpoint of inactivation compared to SCN5A+β4-WT. In native cardiomyocytes, β4-S206L accentuated late INa and increased the ventricular action potential duration (APD) compared to β4-WT. Conclusion This study provides the first molecular and functional evidence to implicate the NaV beta subunits in SIDS pathogenesis. Altered NaV1.5 sodium channel function due to beta subunit mutations may account for the molecular pathogenic mechanism underlying approximately 1% of SIDS. PMID:20226894

  9. Beneficial Outcome of Losartan Therapy Depends on Type of FBN1 Mutation in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Romy; den Hartog, Alexander W; Radonic, Teodora; Micha, Dimitra; Maugeri, Alessandra; van Dijk, Fleur S; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Groenink, Maarten; Mulder, Barbara J M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that losartan reduces aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan syndrome. However, treatment response is highly variable. This study investigates losartan effectiveness in genetically classified subgroups. In this predefined substudy of COMPARE, Marfan patients were randomized to daily receive losartan 100 mg or no losartan. Aortic root dimensions were measured by MRI at baseline and after 3 years. FBN1 mutations were classified based on fibrillin-1 protein effect into (1) haploinsufficiency, decreased amount of normal fibrillin-1, or (2) dominant negative, normal fibrillin-1 abundance with mutant fibrillin-1 incorporated in the matrix. A pathogenic FBN1 mutation was found in 117 patients, of whom 79 patients were positive for a dominant negative mutation (67.5%) and 38 for a mutation causing haploinsufficiency (32.5%). Baseline characteristics between treatment groups were similar. Overall, losartan significantly reduced aortic root dilatation rate (no losartan, 1.3±1.5 mm/3 years, n=59 versus losartan, 0.8±1.4 mm/3 years, n=58; P=0.009). However, losartan reduced only aortic root dilatation rate in haploinsufficient patients (no losartan, 1.8±1.5 mm/3 years, n=21 versus losartan 0.5±0.8 mm/3 years, n=17; P=0.001) and not in dominant negative patients (no losartan, 1.2±1.7 mm/3 years, n=38 versus losartan 0.8±1.3 mm/3 years, n=41; P=0.197). Marfan patients with haploinsufficient FBN1 mutations seem to be more responsive to losartan therapy for inhibition of aortic root dilatation rate compared with dominant negative patients. Additional treatment strategies are needed in Marfan patients with dominant negative FBN1 mutations. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/index.asp; Unique Identifier: NTR1423. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. [NPHS2 Mutation analysis study in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar, Marta; Vega, Álvaro; Farfán, Mauricio; Cano, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Podocin is a protein located in the glomerular slit diaphragm where it takes part in the regulation of glomerular filtration. Mutations of the NPHS2 gene that codes podocin are the main cause of autosomal recessive steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). To identify the NPHS2 mutations in Chilean children with SRNS, and to determine the prevalence of the most common variants in a group of healthy adults. Mutation analysis of NPHS2 in 34 Chilean children with SRNS. Once the two most common variants of NPHS2 were identified, screening for these mutations was performed on 233 healthy adults. The mutation analysis was performed by the direct sequencing of the eight coding exons by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The DNA sequencing was performed using a fluorometric method, and then evaluated with SeqPilot software. The relationship between the presence of NPHS2 variants and SRNS was calculated by comparing the allele frequency between patients with SRNS and those of the healthy volunteers using the exact Fisher test. A P<.05 was considered significant. Pathogenic NPHS2 mutations were detected in 7 (21%) of the 34 patients studied, of which 6 were heterozygotes for p.R229Q and p.A284V. The presence of p.R229Q was 2.46% in the healthy volunteers. This study shows that p.R229Q and p.A284V are the most frequent variants in Chilean children with SRNS. It is the first time that this relationship has been reported in Chilean children. Based on this, a screening strategy is proposed for the genetic study in patients with SRNS and their families. A parallel or sequential search strategy for p.R229Q and p.A284V in these patients is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. CANDLE syndrome: chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature-a rare case with a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Miria Paula V; Brunelli, Juliana B; Miranda, Clarissa C; Novak, Glaucia V; Malle, Louise; Aikawa, Nadia E; Jesus, Adriana A; Silva, Clovis Artur

    2016-05-01

    We described herein a patient with chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome and a novel mutation in PSMB8 gene. This patient had multiple visceral inflammatory involvements, including rare manifestations, such as Sweet syndrome and pericarditis. A 3-year-old male, Caucasian, was born to consanguineous healthy parents. At the age of 11 months, he presented daily fever (temperature >40 °C), irritability, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly; and tender and itching, erythematous papular and edematous plaque lesions. Echocardiogram showed mild pericarditis. Skin biopsy revealed a neutrophil infiltrate without vasculitis suggesting Sweet syndrome. Mutational screening of PSMB8 gene revealed homozygous c.280G>C, p.A94P mutation. He responded partially to high doses of oral glucorticoid and intravenous methylprednisolone. Colchicine, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine, and intravenous immunoglobulin were not efficacious. At the age of 3 years and 1 month, tocilizumab was administered resulting in remission of daily fever and irritability. However, there was no improvement of the skin tenderness and itching lesions. A new mutation in a CANDLE syndrome patient was reported with pericarditis and mimicking Sweet syndrome. The disease manifestations were refractory to immunosuppressive agents and partially responsive to tocilizumab therapy. • Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) include four rare diseases. • Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome was seldom reported. What is New: • We described a Brazilian patient with CANDLE syndrome possessing a novel mutation in the PSMB8 gene. • This patient had multiple visceral inflammatory involvements, including rare manifestations, such as pericarditis and mimicking Sweet syndrome.

  12. [Mitochondrial DNA mutations in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Kearns-Sayre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-xia; Yuan, Yun; Gao, Feng; Qi, Yu; Shen, Ding-guo; Chen, Qing-tang

    2003-08-01

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) belong to neurological diseases caused by a defect in the energy-producing system of mitochondria, and are known to be associated with a deletion in the mitochondrial genome. This study was aimed to understand with greater clearness the characteristics of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in 11 Chinese patients with CPEO (7 cases) or KSS (4 cases). Densitometry of the bands on Southern blot, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing were performed to search large scale deletions and A3243G point mutation in patients' muscle mtDNA. Large deletions in mtDNA were detected in 2 CPEO and 3 KSS patients, the size of deletion ranged from 3.0 kb to 8.0 kb. Moreover, mtDNA A3243G point mutation was identified in 1 KSS patient. The proportion of mutant mtDNA was 37.6%-87.0%. Direct sequencing of the PCR products revealed 5 novel large deletions not reported by others. The findings in this study being consistent with the reports by others, large scale deletions of mtDNA are frequently found in Chinese patients with KSS and CPEO. mtDNA A3243G mutation may also exist in some patients with KSS and CPEO.

  13. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weining Rong

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  14. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome due to DOK7 mutations in a family from Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Bevilacqua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS are neuromuscular transmission disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding neuromuscular junction proteins. A 61-year-old female and her older sister showed bilateral ptosis, facial and proximal limb weakness, and scoliosis since childhood. Another female sibling had milder signs, while other family members were asymptomatic. Facial nerve repetitive stimulation in the proband showed decrement of muscle responses. Single fiber EMG revealed increased jitter and blocking. Muscle biopsy showed type 2-fiber atrophy, without tubular aggregates. Mutational analysis in the three affected siblings revealed two compound heterozygous mutations in DOK7: c.1457delC, that predicts p.Pro486Argfs*13 and truncates the protein C-terminal domain, and c.473G>A, that predicts p.Arg158Gln and disruption of the dok7-MuSK interaction in the phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domain. Unaffected family members carried only one or neither mutation. Discussion. Two of the affected sisters showed marked improvement with salbutamol treatment, which illustrates the benefits of a correct diagnosis and treatment of DOK7-CMS.

  15. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome: Two case reports with a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamuran, Karaman; Çetin, Mecnun; Geylan, Hadi; Karaman, Serap; Demir, Nihat; Yurekturk, Eyyup; Yavuz, İbrahim; Yavuz, Göknur; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2017-12-04

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is X-linked recessive disorder associated with microplatelet thrombocytopenia, eczema, infections, and an increased risk of autoimmunity and lymphoid neoplasia. The originally described features of WAS include susceptibility to infections, microthrombocytopenia, and eczema. In this case report, we present our experience about two cases diagnosed with a new mutation. We report phenotypical and laboratory description of two cases with WAS. We, for the first time, detected a new hemizygote mutation of WAS gene (NM_000377.2 p.M393lfs*102 (c.1178dupT)) in two patients. The first case was an 11-month-old boy presenting with complaints of recurrent soft tissue infection, ear infection, anemia, and thrombocytopenia with a low platelet volume. The second case was a 2-month-old boy presenting with thrombocytopenia and a low platelet volume. Both cases were the first-degree relatives: they were cousins and their mothers were sisters. Herein, we report two cases of WAS and a new gene mutation which would disrupt the WAS protein function within the Polyproline (PPP) domain. This report adds to the growing number of mutations which cause complex clinical manifestations associated with WAS.

  16. Truncating mutations in LRP4 lead to a prenatal lethal form of Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindy, Amanda S; Bupp, Caleb P; McGee, Stephen J; Steed, Erin; Stevenson, Roger E; Basehore, Monica J; Friez, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia that results in malformations of the distal limb, renal anomalies, and characteristic facies. In 2010, this condition was found to be caused by mutations in LRP4, a member of the low-density lipoprotein family of receptors. LRP4 has been shown to antagonize LRP5/LRP6 activation of WNT and β-catenin signaling. Loss of LRP4 function leads to excessive Wnt and β-catenin signaling in the limb bud, which causes abnormal limb development. The large majority of patients with CLS reported in the literature have splicing and missense mutations, which result in syndactyly, oligodactyly, and minor renal malformations. More recently, a patient with CLS has been identified with a homozygous nonsense mutation and a more severe presentation of findings typically associated with this condition. Here we present two sibling fetuses with a prenatal lethal presentation of mesomelic limb reductions, oligosyndactyly, genitourinary malformation and compound heterozygosity for two novel truncating mutations in LRP4. These findings lend further support to the CLS genotype-phenotype correlation presented in recent publications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Atypical Alstrom syndrome with novel ALMS1 mutations precluded by current diagnostic criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian

    2014-02-01

    We report on clinical and genetic studies in a non-consanguineous Irish sib-pair with infantile dilated cardiomyopathy and retinopathy. A diagnosis of Alström Syndrome (AS) was considered and diagnostic testing pursued. The Alströms gene (ALMS1) is very large (23 exons) and diagnostic testing of mutational hotspots (exon 6, 8 and 10) was negative. Furthermore the siblings were tall and did not have the typical phenotype of nystagmus, photophobia, obesity or hearing loss and so the AS diagnosis was removed. We then sought to identify the causative gene in this family using whole exome sequencing. Unexpectedly, the exome analysis identified novel compound heterozygous ALMS1 mutations in exon 5 (c.777delT:p.D260fs*26) and exon 20 (c.12145_12146insC:p.S4049fs*36) that segregated with the phenotype. Although the siblings show some clinical overlap with AS, their phenotype is not classical. It is plausible that their atypical presentation may be due to the location of the ALMS1 mutations outside the usual mutational hotspots. Our findings show how atypical cases of AS may be missed under the current diagnostic guidelines and support consideration of complete ALMS1 sequencing in children with two or more features, even if all of the core clinical features of AS are not present.

  18. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: Mutation analysis of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Angrist, M.; Schwartz, S.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) usually occurs as an isolated phenotype. However, 16% of the index cases are also affected with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Complex segregation analysis suggests that CCHS is familial and has the same inheritance pattern with or without HSCR. We postulate that alteration of normal function of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, may contribute to CCHS based on RET`s expression pattern and the identification of RET mutations in HSCR patients. To further explore the nature of the inheritance of CCHS, we have undertaken two main routes of investigation: cytogenetic analysis and mutation detection. Cytogenetic analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed normal karyotypes in 13 of the 14 evaluated index cases; one index case carried a familial pericentric inversion on chromosome 2. Mutation analysis showed no sequence changes unique to index cases, as compared to control individuals, and as studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding region of RET. We conclude that point mutations in the RET coding region cannot account for a substantial fraction of CCHS in this patient population, and that other candidate genes involved in neural crest cell differentiation and development must be considered. 54 refs.

  19. Cobalamin C defect-hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by new mutation in MMACHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrovic, Amra; Canpolat, Nur; Caliskan, Salim; Sever, Lale; Kıykım, Ertugrul; Agbas, Ayse; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is mostly linked to defects in the regulation of alternative complement pathway, but a rare form is caused by an inherited defect of cobalamin 1 metabolism. Cobalamin C (cblC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of vitamin B12 metabolism that results from mutations in methylmalonic aciduria and homocysteinuria (MMACHC). The most severe form of cblC deficiency and the associated high mortality rate are mostly observed in neonates or in infants severe multiorgan involvement at the age of 5 months and who was successfully treated with vitamin B12, betaine, coenzyme Q10 and l-carnitene, and who had a new homozygous mutation of MMACHC. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Heterozygous germ line hCHK2 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D W; Varley, J M; Szydlo, T E; Kang, D H; Wahrer, D C; Shannon, K E; Lubratovich, M; Verselis, S J; Isselbacher, K J; Fraumeni, J F; Birch, J M; Li, F P; Garber, J E; Haber, D A

    1999-12-24

    The hCHK2 gene encodes the human homolog of the yeast Cds1 and Rad53 G2 checkpoint kinases, whose activation in response to DNA damage prevents cellular entry into mitosis. Here, it is shown that heterozygous germ line mutations in hCHK2 occur in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a highly penetrant familial cancer phenotype usually associated with inherited mutations in the TP53 gene. These observations suggest that hCHK2 is a tumor suppressor gene conferring predisposition to sarcoma, breast cancer, and brain tumors, and they also provide a link between the central role of p53 inactivation in human cancer and the well-defined G2 checkpoint in yeast.

  1. Gain-of-function mutations in the calcium channel CACNA1C (Cav1.2) cause non-syndromic long-QT but not Timothy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Friedrich, Corinna; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Zumhagen, Sven; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Rinné, Susanne; Sachse, Frank B; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in CACNA1C, encoding the L-type Ca(2+) channel Cav1.2, cause Timothy syndrome (TS), a multi-systemic disorder with dysmorphic features, long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and autism spectrum disorders. TS patients have heterozygous mutations (G402S and G406R) located in the alternatively spliced exon 8, causing a gain-of-function by reduced voltage-dependence of inactivation. Screening 540 unrelated patients with non-syndromic forms of LQTS, we identified six functional relevant CACNA1C mutations in different regions of the channel. All these mutations caused a gain-of-function combining different mechanisms, including changes in current amplitude, rate of inactivation and voltage-dependence of activation or inactivation, similar as in TS. Computer simulations support the theory that the novel CACNA1C mutations prolong action potential duration. We conclude that genotype-negative LQTS patients should be investigated for mutations in CACNA1C, as a gain-of-function in Cav1.2 is likely to cause LQTS and only specific and rare mutations, i.e. in exon 8, cause the multi-systemic TS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  3. A novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome: a Norwegian family with four affected members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, N; Ursin, K; Rødevand, E; Nielsen, F C; Hansen, T V O

    2009-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a chronic granulomatous disease with an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the triad granulomatous dermatitis, arthritis, and uveitis. It is caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, also termed the CARD15 gene. To report a novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome. The proband was a 68-year-old ethnic Norwegian male who had uveitis and arthritis since 10 years of age followed by lifelong recurrent arthritis and chronic eye involvement. Genetic analysis showed a heterozygous c.1814 C>A, T605N mutation in NOD2 that has not previously been described. All of his three children had Blau syndrome and had inherited the NOD2 mutation. The proband's first son had exanthema, arthritis, and uveitis from 10 years of age and later presented with granulomatous lymphadenopathy, granulomatous parotitis, and granulomatous intestinal inflammation. The proband's daughter had arthritis, uveitis, and exanthema from 3 years of age. The proband's second son had uveitis, exanthema, and arthritis from 1.5 years of age. None of the cases had any involvement of the heart or lungs. We report a novel Blau syndrome-associated mutation with an autosomal dominant heritage. Most likely the mutation has arisen de novo in the proband. Genetic counselling and antenatal diagnostics should be available to the involved families.

  4. Contribution of a KCNH2 variant in genotyped long QT syndrome: Romano-Ward syndrome under double mutations and acquired long QT syndrome under heterozygote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Yuichi; Hayashi, Kenshi; Ding, Wei-Guang; Tomita, Yukinori; Fukumoto, Daisuke; Wada, Yuko; Ichikawa, Mari; Sonoda, Keiko; Ozawa, Junichi; Makiyama, Takeru; Ohno, Seiko; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Horie, Minoru; Itoh, Hideki

    2017-07-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) presents two clinical phenotypes, congenital and acquired forms. This study aims to evaluate the genetic contribution of a KCNH2 variant for the two LQTS phenotypes. From 1996 to 2014, genetic screening for LQTS probands was performed for five major genes: KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 and 389 probands were found to be mutation carriers. We analyzed the clinical phenotypes of p.His492Tyr carriers in KCNH2. Heterozygous p.His492Tyr variant was identified in 10 LQTS families. Six probands (mean age, 26±23 years) carried another mutation, and two of six had syncope associated with emotional stress or telephone ringing. The remaining four probands were significantly older at diagnosis (mean age, 42±33 years) and carried no other compound mutations. All the four probands had fatal arrhythmic events in the presence of additional precipitating factors such as culprit drugs in 2, hypokalemia in 1, and bradycardia in 1. The QTc interval of carriers with p.His492Tyr alone was 445±10ms and significantly shorter than that in double mutation carriers (481±40ms, p=0.041). KCNH2 p.His492Tyr variant presented Romano-Ward syndrome in the presence of another mutation and heterozygous carriers had mild phenotypes while even heterozygous carriers should be cared for not to encounter secondary factors because incidental factors could manifest "latent" form of p.His492Tyr heterozygous carriers. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Long QT syndrome with mutations in three genes: A rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marina; Martins Ribeiro, Sílvia; Sanfins, Victor; Lourenço, António

    2015-05-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare hereditary disease, with an incidence of 1 in 2000, characterized by prolonged ventricular repolarization and malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, previously diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope, in whom LQTS was identified. The patient received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia under beta-blocker therapy. Molecular genetic testing identified three mutations in heterozygosity in the KCNH2, KCNQ1 and SCN5A genes, which is a rare finding and is associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Brittle Cornea Syndrome Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Elisabeth; Knappskog, Per Morten; Midtbø, Marit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diverse clinical manifestations, identify the causative mutation and explain the association with red hair in a family with brittle cornea syndrome (BCS). Methods: Eight family members in three generations underwent ophthalmic, dental, and general medical examination...... mapping with SNP markers, DNA sequencing, and MC1R genotyping. Results: At 42 and 48 years of age, respectively, both affected individuals were blind due to retinal detachment and secondary glaucoma. They had extremely thin and bulging corneas, velvety skin, chestnut colored hair, scoliosis, reduced BMD...

  7. Mutation in the human homeobox gene NKX5-3 causes an oculo-auricular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorderet, Daniel F; Nichini, Olivia; Boisset, Gaëlle; Polok, Bozena; Tiab, Leila; Mayeur, Hélène; Raji, Bahija; de la Houssaye, Gauillaume; Abitbol, Marc M; Munier, Francis L

    2008-05-01

    Several dysmorphic syndromes affect the development of both the eye and the ear, but only a few are restricted to the eye and the external ear. We describe a developmental defect affecting the eye and the external ear in three members of a consanguineous family. This syndrome is characterized by ophthalmic anomalies (microcornea, microphthalmia, anterior-segment dysgenesis, cataract, coloboma of various parts of the eye, abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelium, and rod-cone dystrophy) and a particular cleft ear lobule. Linkage analysis and mutation screening revealed in the first exon of the NKX5-3 gene a homozygous 26 nucleotide deletion, generating a truncating protein that lacked the complete homeodomain. Morpholino knockdown expression of the zebrafish nkx5-3 induced microphthalmia and disorganization of the developing retina, thus confirming that this gene represents an additional member implicated in axial patterning of the retina.

  8. Down-Syndrome associated with MBL-deficiency, IgG-deficiency, vasculitis and mutated prothrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Hermann M; Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2009-01-01

    The association of Down syndrome with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)-deficiency, recurrent infections and vasculitis has not been reported. We report a 30 year-old female with Down-syndrome associated with MBL-deficiency with the genotype LXA/HYD, IgG-deficiency, recurrent uro-genital infections, cutaneous vasculitis, G20.210A prothrombin mutation, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. MBL-deficiency in combination with IgG deficiency might have favored the development of recurrent uro-genital infections. Immunodeficiency might be also involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous vasculitis. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were attributed to the genetically determined prothrombotic state and intake of oral contraceptives.

  9. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

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    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  10. Compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations cause non-syndromic LHON-like optic neuropathy.

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    Gerber, Sylvie; Ding, Martina G; Gérard, Xavier; Zwicker, Klaus; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Rio, Marlène; Serre, Valérie; Hanein, Sylvain; Munnich, Arnold; Rotig, Agnès; Bianchi, Lucas; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Elpeleg, Orly; Kaplan, Josseline; Brandt, Ulrich; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathy (HON) has been ascribed to mutations in mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics genes, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory enzyme genes or nuclear genes of poorly known mitochondrial function. However, the disease causing gene remains unknown in many families. The objective of the present study was to identify the molecular cause of non-syndromic LHON-like disease in siblings born to non-consanguineous parents of French origin. We used a combination of genetic analysis (gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing) in a multiplex family of non-syndromic HON and of functional analyses in patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified compound heterozygote NDUFS2 disease-causing mutations (p.Tyr53Cys; p.Tyr308Cys). Studies using patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts revealed mildly decreased NDUFS2 and complex I abundance but apparently normal respiratory chain activity. In the yeast Y. lipolytica ortholog NUCM, the mutations resulted in absence of complex I and moderate reduction in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity, respectively. Biallelism for NDUFS2 mutations causing severe complex I deficiency has been previously reported to cause Leigh syndrome with optic neuropathy. Our results are consistent with the view that compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations can cause non-syndromic HON. This observation suggests a direct correlation between the severity of NDUFS2 mutations and that of the disease and further support that there exist a genetic overlap between non-syndromic and syndromic HON due to defective mitochondrial function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Novel mutations in PRG4 gene in two Indian families with camptodactyly-arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome

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    Rajashree S Nandagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Camptodactyly - arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PRG4 (proteoglycan 4 gene. Hallmarks of the syndrome include congenital or early-onset camptodactyly and arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, progressive coxa vara deformity and non-inflammatory pericardial effusions. Till date only around 25 pathogenic mutations have been reported in this gene and none have been reported from India. We report here the mutations in the PRG4 gene in three patients of CACP from two unrelated families from India. Methods: Molecular genetic studies were done for the three patients with the CACP syndrome, from two unrelated Indian families, through sequence analysis of all coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the PRG4 gene. Results: Two novel frame-shift deletion mutations leading to premature protein termination were found. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a 2 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2645_2646delGA and the two affected siblings from the other family were found to be homozygous for a 4 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2883_2886delAAGA. Conclusions: This is perhaps the first report of PRG4 mutations from India. Further mutation studies in Indian CACP cases will help to determine the mutation spectrum of the PRG4 gene in the Indian population and also help to further elucidate the molecular pathology and the genotype-phenotype correlation of this rare disease.

  12. Identification of two missense mutations of ERCC6 in three Chinese sisters with Cockayne syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

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    Shanshan Yu

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, the primary manifestations of which are poor growth and neurologic abnormality. Mutations of the ERCC6 and ERCC8 genes are the predominant cause of Cockayne syndrome, and the ERCC6 gene mutation is present in approximately 65% of cases. The present report describes a case of Cockayne syndrome in a Chinese family, with the patients carrying two missense mutations (c.1595A>G, p.Asp532Gly and c.1607T>G, p.Leu536Trp in the ERCC6 gene in an apparently compound heterozygote status, especially, p.Asp532Gly has never been reported. The compound heterozygote mutation was found in three patients in the family using whole exome sequencing. The patients' father and mother carried a heterozygous allele at different locations of the ERCC6 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger DNA sequencing. The two mutations are both located in the highly conserved motif I of ATP-binding helicase and are considered "Damaging," "Probably Damaging," "Disease Causing," and "Conserved", indicating the role of DNA damage in the pathogenetic process of the disease. The results not only enrich the ERCC6 mutations database, but also indicate that whole exome sequencing will be a powerful tool for discovering the disease causing mutations in clinical diagnosis.

  13. Identification of two missense mutations of ERCC6 in three Chinese sisters with Cockayne syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

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    Yu, Shanshan; Chen, Liyuan; Ye, Lili; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Tian, Yujiao; Geng, Qian; Yi, Xin; Xie, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, the primary manifestations of which are poor growth and neurologic abnormality. Mutations of the ERCC6 and ERCC8 genes are the predominant cause of Cockayne syndrome, and the ERCC6 gene mutation is present in approximately 65% of cases. The present report describes a case of Cockayne syndrome in a Chinese family, with the patients carrying two missense mutations (c.1595A>G, p.Asp532Gly and c.1607T>G, p.Leu536Trp) in the ERCC6 gene in an apparently compound heterozygote status, especially, p.Asp532Gly has never been reported. The compound heterozygote mutation was found in three patients in the family using whole exome sequencing. The patients' father and mother carried a heterozygous allele at different locations of the ERCC6 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger DNA sequencing. The two mutations are both located in the highly conserved motif I of ATP-binding helicase and are considered "Damaging," "Probably Damaging," "Disease Causing," and "Conserved", indicating the role of DNA damage in the pathogenetic process of the disease. The results not only enrich the ERCC6 mutations database, but also indicate that whole exome sequencing will be a powerful tool for discovering the disease causing mutations in clinical diagnosis.

  14. Novel mutation in forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) gene in an Indian patient with Rett syndrome.

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    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Jadhav, Vaishali; Ghattargi, Vikas C; Udani, Vrajesh

    2014-03-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the progressive loss of intellectual functioning, fine and gross motor skills and communicative abilities, deceleration of head growth, and the development of stereotypic hand movements, occurring after a period of normal development. The classic form of RTT involves mutation in MECP2 while the involvement of CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes has been identified in atypical RTT phenotype. FOXG1 gene encodes for a fork-head box protein G1, a transcription factor acting primarily as transcriptional repressor through DNA binding in the embryonic telencephalon as well as a number of other neurodevelopmental processes. In this report we have described the molecular analysis of FOXG1 gene in Indian patients with Rett syndrome. FOXG1 gene mutation analysis was done in a cohort of 34 MECP2/CDKL5 mutation negative RTT patients. We have identified a novel mutation (p. D263VfsX190) in FOXG1 gene in a patient with congenital variant of Rett syndrome. This mutation resulted into a frameshift, thereby causing an alteration in the reading frames of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. The start position of the frameshift (Asp263) and amino acid towards the carboxyl terminal end of the protein was found to be well conserved across species using multiple sequence alignment. Since the mutation is located at forkhead binding domain, the resultant mutation disrupts the secondary structure of the protein making it non-functional. This is the first report from India showing mutation in FOXG1 gene in Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CEP78 is mutated in a distinct type of Usher syndrome.

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    Fu, Qing; Xu, Mingchu; Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Yuan, Zhisheng; Liu, Yani; Li, Huajin; Sun, Zixi; Li, Huiping; Yang, Lizhu; Wang, Keqing; Zhang, Fangxia; Li, Yumei; Zhao, Chen; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder featured by combined visual impairment and hearing loss. Despite a dozen of genes involved in Usher syndrome having been identified, the genetic basis remains unknown in 20-30% of patients. In this study, we aimed to identify the novel disease-causing gene of a distinct subtype of Usher syndrome. Ophthalmic examinations and hearing tests were performed on patients with Usher syndrome in two consanguineous families. Target capture sequencing was initially performed to screen causative mutations in known retinal disease-causing loci. Whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were applied for identifying novel disease-causing genes. RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to evaluate the splicing-altering effect of identified CEP78 variants. Patients from the two independent families show a mild Usher syndrome phenotype featured by juvenile or adult-onset cone-rod dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss. WES and WGS identified two homozygous rare variants that affect mRNA splicing of a ciliary gene CEP78. RT-PCR confirmed that the two variants indeed lead to abnormal splicing, resulting in premature stop of protein translation due to frameshift. Our results provide evidence that CEP78 is a novel disease-causing gene for Usher syndrome, demonstrating an additional link between ciliopathy and Usher protein network in photoreceptor cells and inner ear hair cells. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. A mutation in TGFB3 associated with a syndrome of low muscle mass, growth retardation, distal arthrogryposis and clinical features overlapping with Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

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    Rienhoff, Hugh Young; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Morissette, Rachel; Khrebtukova, Irina; Melnick, Jonathan; Luo, Shujun; Leng, Nan; Kim, Yeon-Jin; Schroth, Gary; Westwick, John; Vogel, Hannes; McDonnell, Nazli; Hall, Judith G; Whitman, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of growth factors are key regulators of mammalian development and their dysregulation is implicated in human disease, notably, heritable vasculopathies including Marfan (MFS, OMIM #154700) and Loeys-Dietz syndromes (LDS, OMIM #609192). We described a syndrome presenting at birth with distal arthrogryposis, hypotonia, bifid uvula, a failure of normal post-natal muscle development but no evidence of vascular disease; some of these features overlap with MFS and LDS. A de novo mutation in TGFB3 was identified by exome sequencing. Several lines of evidence indicate the mutation is hypomorphic suggesting that decreased TGF-β signaling from a loss of TGFB3 activity is likely responsible for the clinical phenotype. This is the first example of a mutation in the coding portion of TGFB3 implicated in a clinical syndrome suggesting TGFB3 is essential for both human palatogenesis and normal muscle growth. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

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    Caitlin J Rinz

    Full Text Available Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD. Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C that results in the substi