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Sample records for progeria syndrome fibroblasts

  1. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

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    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  2. Progeria syndrome: A case report

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    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  3. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Zahoor Hussain Daraz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare genetic disease in which symptoms of aging are manifested at an early age. In the present report, we describe a 9 months old female child presented with a history of progressive coarsening of skin, failure to thrive and irregular bumps over thighs, buttocks and lower limbs for the last 7½ months. In the course of time, she developed alopecia, hyperpigmented spots over the abdomen with thickening and a typical facial profile of HGPS including micrognathia, absent ear lobules, prominent eyes, loss of eyelashes, eyebrows and a bluish hue over the nose.

  4. Progeria

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    Mohamed Riyaz S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare, sporadic, autosomal dominant syndrome that involves premature ageing and death at early age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. A 30-year-old male with clinical and radiologic features highly suggestive of HGPS is presented here with description of differential diagnosis, dental considerations and review of literature.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  6. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

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    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

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    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  8. Using drug treatments to control genome behaviour in normal and Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts, with and without hTERT immortalisation

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    Bikkul, Mehmet Ural

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an exceedingly rare genetic condition with striking features reminiscent of marked premature ageing. HGPS is commonly caused by a ‘classic’ mutation in the A-type lamin gene, LMNA (G608G). This leads to the expression of an aberrant truncated lamin A protein, progerin. The nuclear lamina is known to anchor chromosomes, stabilising and re...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    ... Wilson A. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. J Gerontol A ... should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about ...

  10. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Agarwal Uma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  11. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

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    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  12. Progeria

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    Kaur Charandeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of progeria is being reported in a 7-year old boy. He had characteristic facies, short stature, alopecia, high pitched voice, coxa valga and sclerodermatous changes in skin.

  13. Lethal neonatal Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Rodríguez, J I; Pérez-Alonso, P; Funes, R; Pérez-Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-29

    We report on a 35-week gestation female fetus with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP). This patient, who is the first reported with neonatal HGP in the English literature but is the fourth, counting three previous French cases, supports the existence of a more severe prenatal form of progeria. She died 7 hours after birth and presented with intrauterine growth retardation, premature aging, absence of subcutaneous fat, brachydactyly, absent nipples, hypoplastic external genitalia, and abnormal ear lobes. The child's combination of clinical and skeletal manifestations differentiates this form of HGP from other progeroid syndromes with neonatal presentation. We also report previously undescribed autopsy findings including premature loss of hair follicles, premature regression of the renal nephrogenic layer, and premature closure of the growth plates in the distal phalanges that may be related to the aging processes in this condition. We could not find any histological data to support acro-osteolysis, which is the radiographic sign of brachydactyly. The terminal phalanges in HGP seem to be underdeveloped rather than osteolytic.

  14. Progeria

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    Raval Ranjan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old boy presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had senile looks, scanty scalp hair, stunted growth, and wrinkled skin with loss of subcutaneous fat. Sclerodermatous changes were found on both thighs and pelvic region, which was confirmed by histopathology.

  15. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

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    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  16. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: review of the phenotype

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    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare but well known entity characterized by extreme short stature, low body weight, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, and facial features that resemble aged persons. Cardiovascular compromise leads

  17. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  18. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

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    Subhash Kashyap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  19. A case of progeria syndrome treated as VIP patient

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    Seema Mahant, Mahant PD, C.M. Reddy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is rare autosomal recessive genetic disease with an incidence of about one in eight million. He was 16 years old boy lying on the couch. He was short stature thin with minimal subcutaneous tissue, skin was thin and fragile with loss of hair over scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes, and his face was dismorphic with prominent eyes, beaked nose, small jaw and large cranium with visible veins over it. His voice was thin and high pitched. Overall, this gives them an extremely aged nearly 70 -80 years old man look. The patient was a known case of progeria syndrome and he was treated as a VIP patient by all faculty members and staff, though he belongs low socioeconomic status, no political issue with them. But still he was a VIP.

  20. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

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    Rajat G. Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest.

  1. A lamin A protein isoform overexpressed in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome interferes with mitosis in progeria and normal cells

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    Cao, Kan; Capell, Brian C.; Erdos, Michael R.; Djabali, Karima; Collins, Francis S.

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by dramatic premature aging. Classic HGPS is caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 (residue 1824, C → T) of the LMNA gene, activating a cryptic splice donor and resulting in a mutant lamin A (LA) protein termed “progerin/LAΔ50” that lacks the normal cleavage site to remove a C-terminal farnesyl group. During interphase, irreversibly farnesylated progerin/LAΔ50 anchors to the nuclear membrane and causes characteristic nuclear blebbing. Progerin/LAΔ50's localization and behavior during mitosis, however, are completely unknown. Here, we report that progerin/LAΔ50 mislocalizes into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates and membranes during mitosis and causes abnormal chromosome segregation and binucleation. These phenotypes are largely rescued with either farnesyltransferase inhibitors or a farnesylation-incompetent mutant progerin/LAΔ50. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small amounts of progerin/LAΔ50 exist in normal fibroblasts, and a significant percentage of these progerin/LAΔ50-expressing normal cells are binucleated, implicating progerin/LAΔ50 as causing similar mitotic defects in the normal aging process. Our findings present evidence of mitotic abnormality in HGPS and may shed light on the general phenomenon of aging. PMID:17360355

  2. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Cleveland, Robert H. [Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Leslie B. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children' s Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Kleinman, Monica E. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Miller, David T. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Genetics, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology and Adolescent Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Snyder, Brian D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Nazarian, Ara [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Giobbie-Hurder, Anita [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Neuberg, Donna [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Kieran, Mark W. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

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    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  4. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

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    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  5. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation

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    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma J. H.; Merckx, Diane; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marcelis, Carlo L. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  6. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

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    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  7. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

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    S Dominici

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  8. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

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    G Lattanzi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  9. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  10. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

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    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  11. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

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    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  12. Progeria syndrome with characteristic deformation of proximal radius observed on CT

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    Sood, S.; Rao, R.C.K.; Ragav, B.; Berry, M. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Radio-Diagnosis)

    1991-01-01

    The progeria syndrome (Hutchinson-Gilford) is an uncommon disease. A peculiar shape of the proximal radial metaphyseal region caused by an infolding of the cortex was observed on CT in 2 brothers suffering from this disorder, a feature not previously reported. A brief review of the radiologic literature was undertaken. This new observation needs to be further evaluated as it may provide a clinching diagnostic feature of this disease. (orig.).

  13. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

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    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  14. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Kotb Abbass Metwalley; Fargalley, Hekma Saad

    2012-01-17

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL), low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL), raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL), raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L) and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL) levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  15. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  16. Simultaneous Shoulder and Hip Dislocation in a 12-Year-Old Girl with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Mardookhpour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  17. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  18. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome: new case with normal telomere length in skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniszewski, L; Nowak, R; Oknińska-Hoffmann, E; Skórka, A; Gieruszczak-Białek, D; Sawadro-Rochowska, M

    2001-10-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition with characteristic appearance of premature aging present at birth (aged face, natal teeth, and wrinkled skin). Other features of the syndrome are generalized lipoatrophy with specific fat accumulation in the lateral suprabuttock region, hypotrichosis, macrocephaly (pseudohydrocephalus), and mental retardation. We report on a new case that demonstrates all typical features of the syndrome. The girl is now 16 years and 10 months old and has had follow-up from birth. We measured terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length to evaluate whether the patient's premature aging process is accompanied by shortening of telomere length in her cultured fibroblasts. Mean TRF of 13.5 kb found in our patient's fibroblasts is not shortened as compared to that of normal fibroblasts. Our results differ from those observed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with severe calcific aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesh B Hanumanthappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging syndrome that results from mutation in the Laminin A gene. This case report of a 12-year-old girl with HGPS is presented for the rarity of the syndrome and the classical clinical features that were observed in the patient. All patients with this condition should undergo early and periodic evaluation for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prognosis is poor and management is mainly conservative. There is no proven therapy available. Mortality in this uniformly fatal condition is primarily due to myocardial infarction, strokes or congestive cardiac failure between ages 7 and 21 years due to the rapidly progressive arteriosclerosis involving the large vessels.

  20. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A 36 years old woman with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrami S M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder with a frequency of 1 in 8 million live births. It is characterised by premature aging phenotype. The median age at death is 13.4 years. It is an autosomal dominat disease due to a de novo point mutation in the Lamin A gene exon 11 in the majority of cases. More than 100 cases have been reported world wide."nCase report: We describe here an exceptionally long-lived patient with HGPS, who is alive at age 36. She was referred by a cardiologist to our endocrinology clinic to be worked up for presence of a metabolic or genetic disorder before a heart surgery."nResults: Having more attention of clinicians about very rare diseases and referring the patients to geneticist are the main goals of this case report as well as describing the disease.

  3. Hip pathology in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a report of two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, Pouya; Jha, Shilpa; James, Kyle D; Hinves, Barry L; Buchanan, Jamie A F

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder. The estimated incidence is one in 4 million births. Orthopaedic manifestations include abnormality of the hips occurring early in the disease process. Severe coxa valga can be apparent by the age of 2 years. We report two cases of HGPS, one in a 7-year-old girl with avascular necrosis of the left hip and the second in a 13-year-old girl with recurrent traumatic hip dislocations. We demonstrate the pathoanatomical changes in the hip with HGPS using a combination of imaging modalities including radiographic, computed tomographic and MRI scans. These include coxa magna, coxa valga and acetabular dysplasia. We also comment on how these would affect the surgical management of this high-risk group of patients. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  4. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determine...

  5. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria.

  6. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  7. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  8. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determined to be a cerebrovascular accident. Subsequently, she returned almost completely to her pre-surgical neurologic status. Perioperative planning for HGPS patients should include risks typically considered in the planning for geriatric patient care. PMID:19373113

  9. Progeria: a new kind of Laminopathy-- report of the First European Symposium on Progeria and creation of EURO-Progeria, a European Consortium on Progeria and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brune, Thomas; Bonne, Gisele; Denecke, Jonas; Elcioglu, Nursel; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marquardt, Thorsten; Ozgen, Heval; Stamsnijder, Marjet; Steichen, Elisabeth; Steinmann, Beat; Wehnert, Manfred; Levy, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Progeria is a rare, genetically determined condition characterized by accelerated aging in children. Its name is derived from Greek (Geron) and means "prematurely old". The classic type is the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which was first described in England in 1886 by Dr. Jonathan

  10. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  11. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A.; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C.; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently,

  12. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  13. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphologi...

  14. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  15. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-06-22

    Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently, to nuclear envelope alterations. In this work, we describe a novel phenotypic feature of the progeria spectrum affecting three unrelated newborns and identify its genetic cause. Patients reported herein present an extremely homogeneous phenotype that somewhat recapitulates those of patients with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. However, pathological signs appear earlier, are more aggressive and present distinctive features including episodes of severe upper airway obstruction. Exome and Sanger sequencing allowed the identification of heterozygous de novo c.163G>A, p.E55K and c.164A>G, p.E55G mutations in LMNA as the alterations responsible for this disorder. Functional analyses demonstrated that fibroblasts from these patients suffer important dysfunctions in nuclear lamina, which generate profound nuclear envelope abnormalities but without progerin accumulation. These nuclear alterations found in patients' dermal fibroblasts were also induced by ectopic expression of the corresponding site-specific LMNA mutants in control human fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate the causal role of p.E55K and p.E55G lamin A mutations in a disorder which manifests novel phenotypic features of the progeria spectrum characterised by neonatal presentation and aggressive clinical evolution, despite being caused by lamin A/C missense mutations with effective prelamin A processing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, bu...

  18. Progeria: A rare genetic premature ageing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs. As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent ′drug of hope′ for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs.

  19. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie B.; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C.; de Zeeuw, Chris I.; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Mitchell, James R.

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a

  20. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  1. Labor Market Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  2. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  3. PTCH1 +/- dermal fibroblasts isolated from healthy skin of Gorlin syndrome patients exhibit features of carcinoma associated fibroblasts.

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    Alexandre Valin

    Full Text Available Gorlin's or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS causes predisposition to basal cell carcinoma (BCC, the commonest cancer in adult human. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTCH1 are responsible for this autosomal dominant syndrome. In NBCCS patients, as in the general population, ultraviolet exposure is a major risk factor for BCC development. However these patients also develop BCCs in sun-protected areas of the skin, suggesting the existence of other mechanisms for BCC predisposition in NBCCS patients. As increasing evidence supports the idea that the stroma influences carcinoma development, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could facilitate BCC occurence of the patients. WT (n = 3 and NBCCS fibroblasts bearing either nonsense (n = 3 or missense (n = 3 PTCH1 mutations were cultured in dermal equivalents made of a collagen matrix and their transcriptomes were compared by whole genome microarray analyses. Strikingly, NBCCS fibroblasts over-expressed mRNAs encoding pro-tumoral factors such as Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 3 and tenascin C. They also over-expressed mRNA of pro-proliferative diffusible factors such as fibroblast growth factor 7 and the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha, known for its expression in carcinoma associated fibroblasts. These data indicate that the PTCH1(+/- genotype of healthy NBCCS fibroblasts results in phenotypic traits highly reminiscent of those of BCC associated fibroblasts, a clue to the yet mysterious proneness to non photo-exposed BCCs in NBCCS patients.

  4. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

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    Haoyue Zhang

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3. In this study, we explore the potential connection(s between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox, double strand breaks (DSBs are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency.

  5. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

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    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  6. Autophagic degradation of farnesylated prelamin A as a therapeutic approach to lamin-linked progeria

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    V. Cenni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Farnesylated prelamin A is a processing intermediate produced in the lamin A maturation pathway. Accumulation of a truncated farnesylated prelamin A form, called progerin, is a hallmark of the severe premature ageing syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Progerin elicits toxic effects in cells, leading to chromatin damage and cellular senescence and ultimately causes skin and endothelial defects, bone resorption, lipodystrophy and accelerated ageing. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying prelamin A turnover is critical for the development of clinically effective protein inhibitors that can avoid accumulation to toxic levels without impairing lamin A/C expression, which is essential for normal biological functions. Little is known about specific molecules that may target farnesylated prelamin A to elicit protein degradation. Here, we report the discovery of rapamycin as a novel inhibitor of progerin, which dramatically and selectively decreases protein levels through a mechanism involving autophagic degradation. Rapamycin treatment of progeria cells lowers progerin, as well as wild-type prelamin A levels, and rescues the chromatin phenotype of cultured fibroblasts, including histone methylation status and BAF and LAP2alpha distribution patterns. Importantly, rapamycin treatment does not affect lamin C protein levels, but increases the relative expression of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24. Thus, rapamycin, an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides, previously found to increase longevity in mouse models, can serve as a therapeutic tool, to eliminate progerin, avoid farnesylated prelamin A accumulation, and restore chromatin dynamics in progeroid laminopathies.

  7. Stem cell aging in adult progeria

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    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is considered an irreversible biological process and also a major risk factor for a spectrum of geriatric diseases. Advanced age-related decline in physiological functions, such as neurodegeneration, development of cardiovascular disease, endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, and neoplastic transformation, has become the focus in aging research. Natural aging is not regarded as a programmed process. However, accelerated aging due to inherited genetic defects in patients of progeria is programmed and resembles many aspects of natural aging. Among several premature aging syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS are two broadly investigated diseases. In this review, we discuss how stem cell aging in WS helps us understand the biology of aging. We also discuss briefly how the altered epigenetic landscape in aged cells can be reversed to a “juvenile” state. Lastly, we explore the potential application of the latest genomic editing technique for stem cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine in the context of aging.

  8. Clonal analysis of stable chromosome rearrangements in Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, H; Salk, D

    1984-04-01

    In situ cytogenetic analysis was performed on colonies derived from single cells of cultured skin fibroblast-like strains from two patients with Bloom's syndrome (GM 1492 and GM 2520). Metaphases in all of the colonies displayed structural chromosome rearrangements. Among 212 metaphases from 24 colonies of GM 1492, only 16% were pseudodiploid, and there was a high incidence of de novo rearrangements within individual colonies. There were two "families" of 16 and five colonies, respectively, each containing identical or related aneusomies, and these could be arranged into pedigrees showing clonal evolution. The heterochromatic region of chromosome #1 and the telomeric regions of chromosome arms 2q, 3q, 4p, and 11q were most frequently involved in the rearrangements. In contrast, strain GM 2520 showed less intraclonal variation, was primarily pseudodiploid, and displayed only three clonal types, one of which had extensive subclonal variation (19 of 24 clones). A remarkable finding in GM 2520 was that, in some clones, extra copies of specific chromosome segments were present as translocations. These results caution against the use of strain GM 1492 as a prototype Bloom's syndrome strain for cell biological studies.

  9. Functional deficiency of fibroblasts heterozygous for Bloom syndrome as specific manifestation of the primary defect.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartram, C R; Rüdiger, H W; Schmidt-Preuss, U; Passarge, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect on the rate of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts by cocultivation with Fanconi anemia and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and with Bloom syndrome heterozygotes was studied. Cells of Fanconi anemia and xeroderma origin reduced the rate of SCEs in Bloom cells by about 45%-50%, just as control cells do. In contrast, heterozygous Bloom cells reduced the rate of SCEs by only 16%-28%. In absolute figures, Fanconi cells reduced the mean rate of SCE in Bloom...

  10. The two-faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2014-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces

  11. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  12. DNA Damage Accumulation and TRF2 Degradation in Atypical Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

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    Bidisha eSaha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome (AWS, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, -H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  13. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

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    Takao Oishi

    Full Text Available In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  14. A homozygous ZMPSTE24 null mutation in combination with a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): insights into the pathophysiology of HGPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Jonas; Brune, Thomas; Feldhaus, Tobias; Robenek, Horst; Kranz, Christian; Auchus, Richard J; Agarwal, Anil K; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2006-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder normally caused by a spontaneous heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that codes for the nuclear lamina protein lamin A. Several enzymes are involved in the processing of its precursor, prelamin A, to the mature lamin A. A functional knockout of one of the enzymes involved in prelamin A processing, the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24, causes an even more severe disorder with early neonatal death described as restrictive dermatopathy (RD). This work describes a HGPS patient with a combined defect of a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene and a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that results in a C-terminal elongation of the final lamin A. Whereas the loss of function mutation of ZMPSTE24 normally results in lethal RD, the truncation of LMNA seems to be a salvage alteration alleviating the clinical picture to the HGPS phenotype. The mutations of our patient indicate that farnesylated prelamin A is the deleterious agent leading to the HGPS phenotype, which gives further insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Gamma-ray-enhanced reactivation of irradiated adenovirus in Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeves, W.P.; Rainbow, A.J.

    1983-06-01

    A ..gamma..-ray-enhanced reactivation (..gamma..RER) of uv-irradiated as well as of ..gamma..-irradiated human adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was detected following infection of normal, Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblasts that had been preirradiated with ..gamma.. rays. Gamma-irradiated or nonirradiated fibroblasts were infected with either nonirradiated or irradiated Ad 2, and 48 hr after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using immunofluorescent staining. Results obtained using seven different normal fibroblast strains showed that irradiation of host monolayers with 1 krad immediately prior to infection resulted in a ..gamma..RER factor +-SE of 4.5 +- 1.6 for uv-irradiated virus and 4.3 +- 1.3 for ..gamma..-irradiated virus. CS fibroblasts, as well as excision repair-deficient XP fibroblasts from complementation groups A and D, were all found to be capable of expressing ..gamma..RER of irradiated Ad 2. XP variant cells expressed lower levels of ..gamma..RER compared to most normal strains, suggesting a possible role for cellular postreplication repair in the mechanism responsible for ER in human cells. An excision-deficient XP fibroblast strain belonging to complementation group A, but derived from a patient afflicted with the severe De Sanctis-Cacchione form of XP, although proficient in ..gamma..RER of ..gamma..-irradiated Ad 2, yielded barely detectable levels of ..gamma..RER for uv-irradiated Ad 2.

  16. [Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. A rare case of neonatal occurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A; Bonfiglioli, G; Masignà Ricciardi, M G

    1986-01-01

    A case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is described in which phenotypic and metabolic symptoms were already evident at birth. Both under a clinical and autopsy point of view an early old age of organs and apparatuses was apparent, posing the problem of the reason why an early old aging occurs. The authors mention literature in favour of a genetic control of cellular aging and make the assumption that the genes controlling old age are various and that a greater or lesser presence and incidence of them could justify the earlier or normal appearance of this status.

  17. The expression of pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein genes in Meckel-Gruber syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shao-Ming; Cham, Wai-Yee [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with multiple congenital malformations. The only available prenatal diagnostic marker for this disorder is the amniotic fluid level of pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein (PSG). PSG is a family of proteins which are expressed at high levels during pregnancy. Increasing maternal serum PSG levels correlate with the progression of pregnancy and can be used as indicators for pregnancy outcome and fetal well-being. The amniotic fluid PSG level is about one-tenth of that of the maternal serum level in normal pregnancy, but are elevated in all cases of MS examined so far. On the other hand, the maternal serum PSG level and third trimester placental PSG content are normal in most cases of MS. This study aims at comparing the expression of PSG in fibroblasts derived from a fetus afflicted with MS. Total cellular RNA was extracted from two MS cultured fibroblast lines (M3206 and GM7817) and four age- and sex-matched control fibroblast lines obtained from the Human Genetic Mutant Cell Repository, Camden, NJ. The expression of eight PSG genes namely, PSG1, PSG2, PSG3, PSG4, PSG5, PSG6, PSG9 and PSG11, were examined with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All PSG transcripts present in the cell were first amplified using universal primers in a 28-cycle PCR. Specific PSG gene products were then amplified with PSG gene-specific primers. Results showed that there is no significant difference in PSG expression between control and disease fibroblasts. In both cases, the most abundant transcript was the type II transcript of PSG5 followed by the type I transcripts of PSG1 and PG4. PSG9, PSG11 and PSG 3 were expressed at very low levels or not expressed at all in MS as well as in normal control fibroblasts. These results showed that PSG gene expression was not altered in MS fibroblasts.

  18. Decreased host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated adenovirus 5 by fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.S. III; Ziolkowski, C.H.J.; DiMattina, M. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1981-11-01

    Over a period of 5 years, 29 experiments were performed in which survival curves of UV-irradiated adenovirus were determined using fibroblast strains from 10 normal persons and from 7 persons having Cockayne's syndrome. In all of these, the survival of UV-irradiated adenovirus 5 was less when assayed using monolayers of fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome patients than from normal persons. Survival curves using normal fibroblasts were, within error, straight lines on a log survival vs. linear fluence plot. Survival curves obtained using Cockayne's syndrome fibroblasts showed 2 components: an initial sensitive component, reflecting the behavior of approx. 75% of the infected cells, followed by a component having normal sensitivity. In the 28 experiments that were considered reliable, 58 curves were done using Cockayne's fibroblasts, 41 using normal human fibroblasts. Although experimental variation was encountered, there was no individual case in which sensitivity as measured using Cockayne's was equal to (or less than) the sensitivity measured using normal fibroblasts.

  19. Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  20. Preneoplastic phenotype and chromosome changes of cultured human Bloom syndrome fibroblasts (strain GM 1492).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothman, A R; Cram, L S; Bartholdi, M F; Kraemer, P M

    1986-02-01

    The Bloom syndrome fibroblast strain, GM 1492, was examined for phenotypic properties generally associated with neoplastic cells. A serial clonogenicity assay indicated that these cells can proliferate in culture, achieving approximately twice the number of population doublings as compared to normal human skin fibroblasts. Strain GM 1492 appeared to be partially transformed in that these cells showed a slight degree of anchorage independence when grown in methylcellulose, and also appeared to have relaxed growth requirements compared to normal fibroblasts. GM 1492 cells are heteroploid, with 20 to 80 chromosomes/cell and a modal chromosome number of 44. Cytogenetic analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes indicated that most cells contained at least one copy of each normal human chromosome, and many cells exhibited only aneuploidies with no detectable chromosomal rearrangements. Minute chromosomes were seen in a few of the metaphase cells examined. GM 1492 cells did not form tumors in athymic nude mice. Since many of the characteristics of GM 1492 cells are similar to those seen only in tumor cells, but the strain is nontumorigenic, we suggest that GM 1492 cells are preneoplastic and thus represent an ideal system for the in vitro study of human neoplastic progression.

  1. Redox Imbalance and Morphological Changes in Skin Fibroblasts in Typical Rett Syndrome

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    Cinzia Signorini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of oxidative stress has been reported in the blood of patients with Rett syndrome (RTT, a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. Little is known regarding the redox status in RTT cellular systems and its relationship with the morphological phenotype. In RTT patients (n = 16 we investigated four different oxidative stress markers, F2-Isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs, F4-Neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs, nonprotein bound iron (NPBI, and (4-HNE PAs, and glutathione in one of the most accessible cells, that is, skin fibroblasts, and searched for possible changes in cellular/intracellular structure and qualitative modifications of synthesized collagen. Significantly increased F4-NeuroPs (12-folds, F2-IsoPs (7.5-folds NPBI (2.3-folds, 4-HNE PAs (1.48-folds, and GSSG (1.44-folds were detected, with significantly decreased GSH (−43.6% and GSH/GSSG ratio (−3.05 folds. A marked dilation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, associated with several cytoplasmic multilamellar bodies, was detectable in RTT fibroblasts. Colocalization of collagen I and collagen III, as well as the percentage of type I collagen as derived by semiquantitative immunofluorescence staining analyses, appears to be significantly reduced in RTT cells. Our findings indicate the presence of a redox imbalance and previously unrecognized morphological skin fibroblast abnormalities in RTT patients.

  2. An altered redox balance mediates the hypersensitivity of Cockayne syndrome primary fibroblasts to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Barbara; Lemma, Tiziana; Iorio, Egidio; Giovannini, Sara; Vaz, Bruno; Iavarone, Ivano; Calcagnile, Angelo; Narciso, Laura; Degan, Paolo; Podo, Franca; Roginskya, Vera; Janjic, Bratislav M; Van Houten, Bennett; Stefanini, Miria; Dogliotti, Eugenia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria

    2012-06-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare hereditary multisystem disease characterized by neurological and development impairment, and premature aging. Cockayne syndrome cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unresolved. Here we provide the first evidence that primary fibroblasts derived from patients with CS-A and CS-B present an altered redox balance with increased steady-state levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and basal and induced DNA oxidative damage, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and a significant decrease in the rate of basal oxidative phosphorylation. The Na/K-ATPase, a relevant target of oxidative stress, is also affected with reduced transcription in CS fibroblasts and normal protein levels restored upon complementation with wild-type genes. High-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a significantly perturbed metabolic profile in CS-A and CS-B primary fibroblasts compared with normal cells in agreement with increased oxidative stress and alterations in cell bioenergetics. The affected processes include oxidative metabolism, glycolysis, choline phospholipid metabolism, and osmoregulation. The alterations in intracellular ROS content, oxidative DNA damage, and metabolic profile were partially rescued by the addition of an antioxidant in the culture medium suggesting that the continuous oxidative stress that characterizes CS cells plays a causative role in the underlying pathophysiology. The changes of oxidative and energy metabolism offer a clue for the clinical features of patients with CS and provide novel tools valuable for both diagnosis and therapy. © 2012 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Contribution of Cdc42 to cholesterol efflux in fibroblasts from Tangier disease and Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Zhang, Zhongyan

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a life-threatening disorder. Cholesterol efflux from the cells is the rate-limiting step in regulating the intracellular cholesterol content as well as raft structure in the plasma membrane. The defect of cholesterol efflux leads to the development of atherosclerosis. Tangier disease (TD), a hereditary high-density lipoprotein deficiency, is characterized by the presence of defective cellular cholesterol efflux. Using the cDNA subtraction technique, we found that expression of Cdc42 was decreased markedly in fibroblasts and macrophages from patients with TD. Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing the dominant-negative form of Cdc42 had a reduced lipid efflux; inversely, cells expressing the active form had increased efflux. Furthermore, we found that cellular lipid efflux was defective and Cdc42 was reduced in fibroblasts from a premature aging disorder, Werner syndrome. Complementation experiments using an adenovirus carrying wild-type Cdc42 successfully corrected impaired lipid efflux in Werner syndrome cells. We concluded that Cdc42 may play important roles in cellular cholesterol efflux and that dysregulation of this type of RhoGTPase might lead to the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  4. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor prevents both the onset and late progression of cardiovascular disease in a progeria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Cao, Kan; Faddah, Dina A; Tavarez, Urraca L; Conneely, Karen N; Qu, Xuan; San, Hong; Ganesh, Santhi K; Chen, Xiaoyan; Avallone, Hedwig; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2008-10-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is the most dramatic form of human premature aging. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 years, usually from heart attack or stroke. Almost all cases of HGPS are caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene that results in production of a mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. This protein is permanently modified by a lipid farnesyl group, and acts as a dominant negative, disrupting nuclear structure. Treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) has been shown to prevent and even reverse this nuclear abnormality in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We have previously created a mouse model of HGPS that shows progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media of the large arteries, in a pattern that is strikingly similar to the cardiovascular disease seen in patients with HGPS. Here we show that the dose-dependent administration of the FTI tipifarnib (R115777, Zarnestra) to this HGPS mouse model can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease. These observations provide encouraging evidence for the current clinical trial of FTIs for this rare and devastating disease.

  5. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientific test to definitively diagnose children with Progeria. What is the Gene for HGPS? The gene responsible for HGPS is called LMNA (pronounced Lamin A). Within this gene there is a change in one element of DNA. This type of gene change is ...

  6. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  7. Effects of DNA damaging agents on cultured fibroblasts derived from patients with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, M H; Chu, E H

    1979-01-01

    The cytotoxic action of physical and chemical agents on 10 skin fibroblast strains in culture derived from individuals with Cockayne's syndrome was measured in terms of colony-forming ability. As compared to fibroblasts from normal donors, all Cockayne cell strains tested exhibited a significantly increased sensitivity to UV light and a normal sensitivity to X-rays. Cells from two sets of parents of unrelated Cockayne children showed an intermediate level of UV sensitivity. There was no effect of 0.5 mM caffeine on UV survival in normal and two Cockayne strains tested, indicating that postreplicational repair in Cockayne cells as measured by caffeine sensitivity was probably normal. Sensitivity of normal and Cockayne cells to the chemical carcinogens and mutagens 4NQO, N-AcO-AAF, ICR-170 and EMS was also compared. An increased sensitivity of Cockayne cells to 4NQO or N-AcO-AAF, but not the ICR-170 or EMS, was observed. However, unlike the intermediate UV sensitivity, the cell strains from two parents of Cockayne patients showed the same sensitivity to N-AcO-AAF or 4NQO as fibroblasts from normal individuals. Quantiation of damage to the DNA after 20 J . m-2 UV irradiation indicates normal levels of [3H] thymidine incorporation in the Cockayne cells, in contrast to UV-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP 12BE) in which there was a very low level of repari synthesis. Moreover, we have shown previously that excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in 2 of the 10 Cockayne cell strains was normal.

  8. Mitotic defects lead to pervasive aneuploidy and accompany loss of RB1 activity in mouse LmnaDhe dermal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Herbert Pratt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A (LMNA is a component of the nuclear lamina and is mutated in several human diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD; OMIM ID# 181350 and the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS; OMIM ID# 176670. Cells from progeria patients exhibit cell cycle defects in both interphase and mitosis. Mouse models with loss of LMNA function have reduced Retinoblastoma protein (RB1 activity, leading to aberrant cell cycle control in interphase, but how mitosis is affected by LMNA is not well understood.We examined the cell cycle and structural phenotypes of cells from mice with the Lmna allele, Disheveled hair and ears (Lmna(Dhe. We found that dermal fibroblasts from heterozygous Lmna(Dhe (Lmna(Dhe/+ mice exhibit many phenotypes of human laminopathy cells. These include severe perturbations to the nuclear shape and lamina, increased DNA damage, and slow growth rates due to mitotic delay. Interestingly, Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts also had reduced levels of hypophosphorylated RB1 and the non-SMC condensin II-subunit D3 (NCAP-D3, a mitosis specific centromere condensin subunit that depends on RB1 activity. Mitotic check point control by mitotic arrest deficient-like 1 (MAD2L1 also was perturbed in Lmna(Dhe/+ cells. Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts were consistently aneuploid and had higher levels of micronuclei and anaphase bridges than normal fibroblasts, consistent with chromosome segregation defects.These data indicate that RB1 may be a key regulator of cellular phenotype in laminopathy-related cells, and suggest that the effects of LMNA on RB1 include both interphase and mitotic cell cycle control.

  9. Decreased cell proliferation and higher oxidative stress in fibroblasts from Down Syndrome fetuses. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Amparo; García-Giménez, José Luis; Audí, Laura; Toran, Nuria; Andaluz, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease and is also known for its decreased incidence of solid tumors and its progeroid phenotype. Cellular and systemic oxidative stress has been considered as one of the Down Syndrome phenotype causes. We correlated, in a preliminary study, the fibroblast proliferation rate and different cell proliferation key regulators, like Rcan1 and the telomere length from Down Syndrome fetuses, with their oxidative stress profile and the Ribonucleic acid and protein expression of the main antioxidant enzymes together with their activity. Increased oxidized glutathione/glutathione ratio and high peroxide production were found in our cell model. These results correlated with a distorted antioxidant shield. The messenger RNA (SOD1) and protein levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase were increased together with a decreased mRNA expression and protein levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). As a consequence the [Cu/ZnSOD/(catalase+GPx)] activity ratio increases which explains the oxidative stress generated in the cell model. In addition, the expression of thioredoxin 1 and glutaredoxin 1 is decreased. The results obtained show a decreased antioxidant phenotype that correlates with increased levels of Regulator of calcineurin 1 and attrition of telomeres, both related to oxidative stress and cell cycle impairment. Our preliminary results may explain the proneness to a progeroid phenotype. © 2013.

  10. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  11. U. V. enhanced reactivation of U. V. - and. gamma. -irradiated adenovirus in Cockayne syndrome and Xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeves, W.P.; Rainbow, A.J. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology; McMaster Univ., Hamilton (Canada). Dept. of Radiology)

    1983-06-01

    U.V.-enhanced reactivation (UVER) of both U.V.-irradiated and ..gamma..-irradiated human adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was examined following the infection of a variety of Cockayne Syndrome (CS) and Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblast strains which had been pre-irradiated with U.V. light. U.V.-irradiated or non-irradiated fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or irradiated Ad 2, and at 48 hours after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using immunofluorescent staining.

  12. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-06-24

    Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II-treated fibroblasts. Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  13. Involvement of antipain-sensitive protease activity in the interferon-beta-induced UV-refractoriness of Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, K; Suzuki, N; Niimi, H

    1996-10-25

    Fibroblast cells obtained from two siblings and a female patient with Cockayne syndrome (CS), when pretreated with human interferon (HuIFN)-beta prior to irradiation with UV light (254 nm wavelength), exhibited transiently induced fibrinolytic protease activity immediately after the irradiation in association with increased refractoriness to UV cell-killing. A protease inhibitor, antipain, inhibited the induction of protease activity in lysates of the CS fibroblasts from these 3 cases after the combination of HuIFN-beta pretreatment and UV irradiation, whereas elastatinal and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) inhibited the activity less than antipain did. Antipain also suppressed the increase in UV-refractoriness of HuIFN-beta-pretreated CS fibroblasts, as revealed by culturing cells for 24 h in medium containing the inhibitor immediately after UV exposure and thereafter evaluating the ability of colony formation by the cells. Thus, an antipain-sensitive protease may be involved in the UV-refractoriness induced by HuIFN-beta in CS fibroblast strains.

  14. Complementation of transformed fibroblasts from patients with combined xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, A R; Nouspikel, T; Jaspers, N G; Clarkson, S G; Gruenert, D C

    1998-08-25

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are human hereditary disorders characterized at the cellular level by an inability to repair certain types of DNA damage. Usually, XP and CS are clinically and genetically distinct. However, in rare cases, CS patients have been shown to have mutations in genes that were previously linked to the development of XP. The linkage between XP and CS has been difficult to study because few permanent cell lines have been established from XP/CS patients. To generate permanent cell lines, primary fibroblast cultures from two patients, displaying characteristics associated with CS and belonging to XP complementation group G, were transformed with anorigin-of-replication-deficient simian virus 40 (SV40). The new cell lines, summation operatorXPCS1LVo- and summation operatorXPCS1ROo-,were characterized phenotypically and genotypically to verify that properties of the primary cells are preserved after transformation. The cell lines exhibited rapid growth in culture and were shown, by immunostaining, to express the SV40 T antigen. The summation operatorXPCS1LVo- and summation operatorXPCS1ROo- cell lines were hypersensitive to UV light and had an impaired ability to reactivate a UV-irradiated reporter gene. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and restriction enzyme cleavage, the summation operatorXPCS1ROo- cells were shown to retain the homozygous T deletion at XPG position 2972. This mutation also characterizes the parental primary cells and was evident in the XPG RNA. Finally, to characterize the XPG DNA repair deficiency in these cell lines, an episomal expression vector containing wild-type XPG cDNA was used to correct UV-induced damage in a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  15. Relative repair of adenovirus damaged by sunlamp, UV and gamma-irradiation in Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts is different from that in xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    The DNA repair capacities of three unrelated Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblast strains were compared to that of three unrelated xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) strains for three different DNA damaging agents using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was treated with either UV light, gamma-rays or sunlamp-irradiation and subsequently assayed for its ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the CS and XP strains using immunofluorescent straining, D{sub 37} values for the survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the CS and XP strains, expressed as a percentage of those obtained in normal strains, were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values in the XP strains XP25RO, XP2BE and XP5BE respectively were lowest for UV (6, 14 and 6%), intermediate for sunlamp-irradiation (18, 32 and 10%) and highest for gamma-irradiation (65, 61 and 60%), whereas for the CS strains CS1BE, CS3BE and CS278CTO respectively, percent HCR values were lowest for UV (26, 30 and 34%), intermediate for gamma-irradiation (61, 64 and 69%) and near normal for sunlamp-irradiation (82, 73 and 89%). These results suggest that the 'spectrum of lesions' which is defectively repaired in CS is not the same as that which is defectively repaired in XP. (author).

  16. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mitochondrial vulnerability and increased susceptibility to nutrient-induced cytotoxicity in fibroblasts from leigh syndrome French canadian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Burelle

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRPPRC are responsible for the French Canadian variant of Leigh Syndrome (LSFC, a severe disorder characterized biochemically by a tissue-specific deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase (COX and clinically by the occurrence of severe and deadly acidotic crises. Factors that precipitate these crises remain unclear. To better understand the physiopathology and identify potential treatments, we performed a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial function in LSFC and control fibroblasts. Furthermore, we have used this cell-based model to screen for conditions that promote premature cell death in LSFC cells and test the protective effect of ten interventions targeting well-defined aspects of mitochondrial function. We show that, despite maintaining normal ATP levels, LSFC fibroblasts present several mitochondrial functional abnormalities under normal baseline conditions, which likely impair their capacity to respond to stress. This includes mitochondrial network fragmentation, impaired oxidative phosphorylation capacity, lower membrane potential, increased sensitivity to Ca2+-induced permeability transition, but no changes in reactive oxygen species production. We also show that LSFC fibroblasts display enhanced susceptibility to cell death when exposed to palmitate, an effect that is potentiated by high lactate, while high glucose or acidosis alone or in combination were neutral. Furthermore, we demonstrate that compounds that are known to promote flux through the electron transport chain independent of phosphorylation (methylene blue, dinitrophenol, or modulate fatty acid (L-carnitine or Krebs cycle metabolism (propionate are protective, while antioxidants (idebenone, N-acetyl cysteine, resveratrol exacerbate palmitate plus lactate-induced cell death. Collectively, beyond highlighting multiple alterations in mitochondrial function and increased susceptibility to nutrient-induced cytotoxicity in LSFC fibroblasts, these results raise

  18. Early onset Cockayne's syndrome: case reports with neuropathological and fibroblast studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, M A; Giannelli, F; Francis, A J; Baraitser, M; Harding, B; Williams, A J

    1989-01-01

    Two patients with early onset Cockayne's syndrome are presented. In each case there was a striking failure of growth and developmental deterioration around six months of age. It has been suggested that early onset Cockayne's syndrome is a syndrome distinct from Cockayne's syndrome, but when the first patient died aged two years 10 months, examination of the brain showed a leucodystrohy with 'tigroid' demyelination similar to that reported in later onset cases of Cockayne's syndrome. Studies o...

  19. Generation of a clonal induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line expressing the mutant MECP2 allele from a Rett Syndrome patient fibroblast line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Hunihan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human fibroblast cells collected from a 3-year old, female Rett Syndrome patient with a 32 bp deletion in the X-linked MECP2 gene were obtained from the Coriell Institute. Fibroblasts were reprogrammed to iPSC cells using a Sendai-virus delivery system expressing human KOSM transcription factors. Cell-line pluripotency was demonstrated by gene expression, immunocytochemistry, in-vitro differentiation trilineage capacity and was of normal karyotype. Interestingly, subsequent clones retained the epigenetic memory of the parent fibroblasts allowing for the segregation of wild-type and mutant expressing clones. This MECP2 mutant expressing clone may serve as a model for investigating MECP2 reactivation in Rett's Syndrome.

  20. Deficiency in the repair of UV and. gamma. -ray damaged DNA in fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Radiology)

    1982-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of V antigen production for irradiated adenovirus was examined in fibroblasts from 5 unrelated patients with Cockayne's syndrome (CS) and 2 CS heterozygotes. The fibroblast cultures were infected with either irradiated or non-irradiated adenovirus and subsequently examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. All CS-homozygous strains showed a reduced host-cell reactivation (HCR) of this viral function for both UV-and ..gamma..-irradiated virus. For UV-irradiation of the virus, D/sub 37/ values expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal strains, ranged from 14 to 35%. For ..gamma..-irradiation of the virus these values ranged from 61 to 80%. These results indicate some defect in the repair of both UV- and ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA damage for CS. 1 CS-heterozygote strain tested also showed a reduced HCR for UV-irradiated adenovirus intermediate between that of the patient strain and normal, whereas another CS-heterozygote strain showed an apparently normal HCR level.

  1. The mechanism of inhibition of beta-oxidation by aspirin metabolites in skin fibroblasts from Reye's syndrome patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, J F; Middleton, B; Moore, R; Gray, A; Hill, J

    1999-05-31

    The effects of aspirin metabolites on beta-oxidation were studied in skin fibroblasts from eight typical Reye's syndrome (RS) patients and controls. RS patients' cells did not differ from controls in rates of palmitate oxidation or in the three component activities of the mitochondrial trifunctional enzyme (MTE), indicating no inherited beta-oxidation defect. Aspirin metabolites salicylate, hydroxyhippurate and gentisate, but not aspirin, directly inhibited palmitate oxidation in control and RS cells. RS cells were significantly more sensitive to inhibition than controls at 0.5 to 5 mM salicylate. Inhibition was concentration-dependent and reversible. Inhibition did not occur in fibroblasts lacking activity of the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) activity of MTE. Salicylate was therefore inhibiting beta-oxidation at this step. Hydroxyhippurate and salicylate reversibly inhibited HAD activities in extracts of control and RS cells. Studies with pure short-chain HAD and LCHAD (MTE) showed hydroxyhippurate and salicylate were competitive inhibitors of the former but mixed (not competitive) inhibitors of the latter. Both compounds inhibited the combined, three-step, MTE reaction measured in the physiological direction. We conclude that (1) salicylate and hydroxyhippurate decrease beta-oxidation in intact cells by reversible inhibition of LCHAD activity of the MTE, and (2) beta-oxidation in RS cells is inherently more sensitive to inhibition by low concentrations of salicylate than controls.

  2. Cholesterol metabolism is altered in Rett syndrome: a study on plasma and primary cultured fibroblasts derived from patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Segatto

    Full Text Available Rett (RTT syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that affects almost exclusively females. Several detectable mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 are responsible for the onset of the disease. MeCP2 is a key transcription regulator involved in gene silencing via methylation-dependent remodeling of chromatin. Recent data highlight that lipid metabolism is perturbed in brains and livers of MECP2-null male mice. In addition, altered plasma lipid profile in RTT patients has been observed. Thus, the aim of the work is to investigate the protein network involved in cholesterol homeostasis maintenance on freshly isolated fibroblasts and plasma from both RTT and healthy donors. To this end, protein expression of 3-hydroxy-3methyl glutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr and scavenger receptor B-1 (SRB-1 was assessed in cultured skin fibroblasts from unaffected individuals and RTT patients. In addition, lipid profile and the abundance of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 were analyzed on plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrate that the main proteins belonging to cholesterol regulatory network are altered in RTT female patients, providing the proof of principle that cholesterol metabolism may be taken into account as a new target for the treatment of specific features of RTT pathology.

  3. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? ...

  4. The cellular phenotype of Roberts syndrome fibroblasts as revealed by ectopic expression of ESCO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra van der Lelij

    Full Text Available Cohesion between sister chromatids is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, the acetyltransferase Eco1/Ctf7 establishes cohesion during DNA replication in S phase and in response to DNA double strand breaks in G2/M phase. In humans two Eco1 orthologs exist: ESCO1 and ESCO2. Both proteins are required for proper sister chromatid cohesion, but their exact function is unclear at present. Since ESCO2 has been identified as the gene defective in the rare autosomal recessive cohesinopathy Roberts syndrome (RBS, cells from RBS patients can be used to elucidate the role of ESCO2. We investigated for the first time RBS cells in comparison to isogenic controls that stably express V5- or GFP-tagged ESCO2. We show that the sister chromatid cohesion defect in the transfected cell lines is rescued and suggest that ESCO2 is regulated by proteasomal degradation in a cell cycle-dependent manner. In comparison to the corrected cells RBS cells were hypersensitive to the DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C, camptothecin and etoposide, while no particular sensitivity to UV, ionizing radiation, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin was found. The cohesion defect of RBS cells and their hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents were not corrected by a patient-derived ESCO2 acetyltransferase mutant (W539G, indicating that the acetyltransferase activity of ESCO2 is essential for its function. In contrast to a previous study on cells from patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome, another cohesinopathy, RBS cells failed to exhibit excessive chromosome aberrations after irradiation in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our results point at an S phase-specific role for ESCO2 in the maintenance of genome stability.

  5. Generation of porcine fibroblasts overexpressing 11β-HSD1 with adipose tissue-specific aP2 promoter as a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eui-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Jeong, Young-Hee; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome arises from a combination of disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In previous studies, it was observed that overexpression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) induced obesity and the insulin resistance that accompanies metabolic syndrome in rodent adipose tissue. Based on these observations, it was hypothesized that overexpression of 11β-HSD1 may be suitable for the generation of a porcine model of metabolic syndrome. It was evaluated that promoter activities of the porcine adipose fatty acid-binding protein (aP2) gene generates adipose tissue-specific 11β-HSD1 expression. In adipose tissue, the maximum promoter activity (-2,826 to +51 nt) of aP2 was 200-fold higher than that of a promoterless construct. In addition, 11β-HSD1 transcriptional levels were significantly increased following the introduction of the aP2 promoter into 3T3‑L1 adipocytes. These observations indicate that the aP2 promoter may facilitate 11β-HSD1 overexpression in porcine adipose tissue. Transgenic fibroblasts were generated containing 11β-HSD1 cDNA controlled by the aP2 promoter with two screening markers, green fluorescence protein and a neomycin-resistance gene. It was hypothesized that transgenic fibroblasts may be useful for generating a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

  6. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Zhang, Y.S.; Pitrez, P.R.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Miscuglio, M.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, M.R.; Nissan, X.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2017-01-01

    A progeria-on-a-chip model is engineered to recapitulate the biomechanical dynamics of vascular disease and aging. The model shows an exacerbated injury response to strain and is rescued by pharmacological treatments. The progeria-on-a-chip is expected to drive the discovery of new drugs and to

  7. Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweikert Hans-Udo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular programs of normal and abnormal genital development, clear-cut definition of androgen-dependent gene expression patterns, without the influence of genotype (46, XX vs. 46, XY, is warranted. Previously, we have identified global gene expression profiles in genital-derived fibroblasts that differ between 46, XY males and 46, XY females with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS due to inactivating mutations of the androgen receptor (AR. While these differences could be due to cell autonomous changes in gene expression induced by androgen programming, recent work suggests they could also be influenced by the location from which the fibroblasts were harvested (topology. To minimize the influence of topology, we compared gene expression patterns of fibroblasts derived from identical urogenital anlagen: the scrotum in normally virilized 46, XY males and the labia majora from completely feminized 46, XY individuals with CAIS. Results 612 transcripts representing 440 unique genes differed significantly in expression levels between scrotum and CAIS labia majora, suggesting the effects of androgen programming. While some genes coincided with those we had identified previously (TBX3, IGFBP5, EGFR, CSPG2, a significant number did not, implying that topology had influenced gene expression in our previous experiments. Supervised clustering of gene expression data derived from a large set of fibroblast cultures from individuals with partial AIS revealed that the new, topology controlled data set better classified the specimens. Conclusion Inactivating mutations of the AR, in themselves, appear to induce lasting changes in gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, independent of topology and genotype. Genes identified are likely to be relevant candidates to decipher androgen-dependent normal and abnormal genital development.

  8. Spontaneous chromosomal aberrations in Fanconi anaemia, ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast and Bloom's syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines as detected by conventional cytogenetic analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto Hojo, E T; van Diemen, P C; Darroudi, F; Natarajan, A T

    1995-02-01

    Several primary and transformed human cell lines derived from cancer prone patients are employed routinely for biochemical and DNA repair studies. Since transformation leads to some chromosomal instability a cytogenetic analysis of spontaneous chromosome aberrations in fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with Fanconi anaemia (FA), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), and in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Bloom's syndrome (BS), was undertaken. Unstable aberrations were analysed in Giemsa stained preparations and the chromosome painting technique was used for evaluating the frequencies of stable aberrations (translocations). In addition, the frequency of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was determined in differentially stained metaphases. The SV40-transformed fibroblasts from these cell lines have higher frequencies of unstable aberrations than the primary fibroblasts. In the four lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from BS patients higher frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in comparison to normal TK6wt cells were also evident. The frequency of spontaneously occurring chromosome translocations was determined with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and using DNA libraries specific for chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 19, 20 and X. The translocation levels were found to be elevated for primary FA fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells derived from BS patients in comparison with control cell lines, hetero- and homozygote BS cell lines not differing in this respect. The SV40-transformed cell lines showed very high frequencies of translocations independent of their origin and almost every cell contained at least one translocation. In addition, clonal translocations were found in transformed control TK6wt and AT cell lines for chromosomes 20 and 14, respectively. The spontaneous frequencies of SCEs were similar in transformed fibroblasts derived from normal individuals and AT patients, whereas in SV40-transformed FA

  9. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van de Ven

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age, including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPD(G602D/R722W/XPA(-/- that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80(-/- mouse. Specific (but not all types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage.

  10. Identification of fragile X syndrome specific molecular markers in human fibroblasts: a useful model to test the efficacy of therapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Daman; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Nadel, Jeffrey; Moulton, Kristen; Zeak, Nicole M; Glicksman, Anne; Dobkin, Carl; Brick, David J; Schwartz, Philip H; Smith, Carolyn B; Klann, Eric; Usdin, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism. It is caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in the regulation of translation of a subset of brain mRNAs. In Fmr1 knockout mice, the absence of FMRP results in elevated protein synthesis in the brain as well as increased signaling of many translational regulators. Whether protein synthesis is also dysregulated in FXS patients is not firmly established. Here, we demonstrate that fibroblasts from FXS patients have significantly elevated rates of basal protein synthesis along with increased levels of phosphorylated mechanistic target of rapamycin (p-mTOR), phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, and phosphorylated p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p-S6K1). The treatment with small molecules that inhibit S6K1 and a known FMRP target, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110β, lowered the rates of protein synthesis in both control and patient fibroblasts. Our data thus demonstrate that fibroblasts from FXS patients may be a useful in vitro model to test the efficacy and toxicity of potential therapeutics prior to clinical trials, as well as for drug screening and designing personalized treatment approaches. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Damien Galant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD, Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD. We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  12. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-04-25

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  13. Protein kinase A subunit expression is altered in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts and the BLM protein is increased in adrenocortical hyperplasias: inverse findings for BLM and PRKAR1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, S L; Boikos, S; Horvath, A; Giatzakis, C; Bossis, I; Stratakis, C A

    2008-06-01

    Bloom syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with chromosomal instability and a predisposition to tumors that is caused by germline mutations of the BLM gene, a RecQ helicase. Benign adrenocortical tumors display a degree of chromosomal instability that is more significant than benign tumors of other tissues. Cortisol-producing hyperplasias, such as primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which has been associated with protein kinase A (PKA) abnormalities and/or PRKAR1A mutations, also show genomic instability. Another RecQ helicase, WRN, directly interacts with the PRKAR1B subunit of PKA. In this study, we have investigated the PRKAR1A expression in primary human Bloom syndrome cell lines with known BLM mutations and examined the BLM gene expression in PPNAD and other adrenal tumor tissues. PRKAR1A and other protein kinase A (PKA) subunits were expressed in Bloom syndrome cells and their level of expression differed by subunit and cell type. Overall, fibroblasts exhibited a significant decrease in protein expression of all PKA subunits except for PRKAR1A, a pattern that has been associated with neoplastic transformation in several cell types. The BLM protein was upregulated in PPNAD and other hyperplasias, compared to samples from normal adrenals and normal cortex, as well as samples from cortisol- and aldosterone-producing adenomas (in which BLM was largely absent). These data reveal an inverse relationship between BLM and PRKAR1A: BLM deficiency is associated with a relative excess of PRKAR1A in fibroblasts compared to other PKA subunits; and PRKAR1A deficiency is associated with increased BLM protein in adrenal hyperplasias.

  14. Abnormal responses to the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide of cultured fibroblasts from patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome and hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Greene, M.H.; Adams, D.; Paterson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) is a preneoplastic melanocyte abnormality which occurs in families affected by hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma (HCMM). A putative role of host-environmental interactions in the etiology of hereditary melanoma has been strengthened by the recent finding that fibroblasts derived from HCMM/DNS patients demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to u.v.-irradiation in vitro. An extension of these studies is reported in which we have examined the invitro responses to a model environmental carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), of six non-tumor skin fibroblast strains from HCMM/DNS patients representing five families. Three of the six HCMM/DNS strains showed enhanced cell killing with sensitivities greater than that of a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant strain but less than those of ataxia telangiectasia and XP Group D cell strains. The inhibition and recovery of de novo DNA synthesis, together with the expression of repair synthesis, following 4NQO exposure appeared to be normal in HCMM/DNS strains, irrespective of their subsequent clonogenic potential. The data point to a metabolic anomaly which may contribute to the carcinogenic risk of the melanoma prone preneoplastic state presented by some DNS patients.

  15. Mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in accelerated aging syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Collins, Francis S; Nabel, Elizabeth G

    2007-07-06

    In the past several years, remarkable progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanisms of premature aging. These rare, genetic conditions offer valuable insights into the normal aging process and the complex biology of cardiovascular disease. Many of these advances have been made in the most dramatic of these disorders, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Although characterized by features of normal aging such as alopecia, skin wrinkling, and osteoporosis, patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are affected by accelerated, premature arteriosclerotic disease that leads to heart attacks and strokes at a mean age of 13 years. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the biology of premature aging uncovered in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and other accelerated aging syndromes, advances that provide insight into the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases ranging from atherosclerosis to arrhythmias.

  16. Host cell reactivation of ultraviolet light irradiated adenovirus 5 in fibroblasts from patients with Cockayne syndrome. A study with six Japanese cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watatani, Masahiro; Ohtani, Hideaki; Takai, Shin-ichiro; Ikenaga, Mituo (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    Host cell reactivation of plaque-forming ability of ultraviolet light (UV)-irradiated adenovirus 5 was compared between skin fibroblasts derived from 6 unrelated patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) and those from normal donors. UV survivals of adenovirus were determined with two different virus stocks, one prepared by infecting to HeLa cells and the other prepared from hamster BHK cells. For both of these virus stocks UV survival curves obtained using CS cells showed two components with an initial sensitive portion followed by a component having almost normal sensitivity. This made a marked contrast to the single-hit inactivation curves obtained with normal cells. Consequently, at low UV dose ranges, CS cells were 2 - 3 times less able to reactivate the UV-inactivated adenovirus than normal cells. These results further support our hypothesis that CS cells may be partially defective in excision repair of damaged DNA.

  17. Investigating the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinases in the proliferation of Werner syndrome fibroblasts using diaminopyridine inhibitors

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    Davis Terence

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome show reduced replicative lifespan and a "stressed" morphology, both alleviated using the MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. However, interpretation of these data is problematical because although SB203580 has the stress-activated kinases p38 and JNK1/2 as its preferred targets, it does show relatively low overall kinase selectivity. Several lines of data support a role for both p38 and JNK1/2 activation in the control of cellular proliferation and also the pathology of diseases of ageing, including type II diabetes, diseases to which Werner Syndrome individuals are prone, thus making the use of JNK inhibitors attractive as possible therapeutics. We have thus tested the effects of the widely used JNK inhibitor SP600125 on the proliferation and morphology of WS cells. In addition we synthesised and tested two recently described aminopyridine based inhibitors. SP600125 treatment resulted in the cessation of proliferation of WS cells and resulted in a senescent-like cellular phenotype that does not appear to be related to the inhibition of JNK1/2. In contrast, use of the more selective aminopyridine CMPD 6o at concentrations that fully inhibit JNK1/2 had a positive effect on cellular proliferation of immortalised WS cells, but no effect on the replicative lifespan of primary WS fibroblasts. In addition, CMPD 6o corrected the stressed WS cellular morphology. The aminopyridine CMPD 6r, however, had little effect on WS cells. CMDP 6o was also found to be a weak inhibitor of MK2, which may partially explain its effects on WS cells, since MK2 is known to be involved in regulating cellular morphology via HSP27 phosphorylation, and is thought to play a role in cell cycle arrest. These data suggest that total JNK1/2 activity does not play a substantial role in the proliferation control in WS cells.

  18. Human 45,X fibroblast transcriptome reveals distinct differentially expressed genes including long noncoding RNAs potentially associated with the pathophysiology of Turner syndrome.

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    Shriram N Rajpathak

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes.

  19. Fibroblastic rheumatism

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    Jyoti Ranjan Parida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic rheumatism (FR is a rare dermoarthopathy reported from different parts of the world since 1980. Although the exact cause is unknown, few reports implicate infection may be a triggering event. Patients usually present with multiple skin nodules and polyarthropathy with progressive skin contractures. Laboratory parameters including acute phase reactants are usually normal. The confirmatory diagnosis is based on histopathologic study of skin nodules, which demonstrate fibroblastic proliferation, thickened collagen fibers, dermal fibrosis, and decreased number of elastic fibers. Immunoreactivity for b-catenin, smooth muscle actin, and the monoclonal antibody HHF35 show myofibroblastic differentiation. Treatments with oral prednisolone and other disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate, infliximab, and interferon have been tried with variable success. In general, skin lesions respond more aptly than joint symptoms indicating that skin fibroblast is more amenable to treatment than synovial fibroblasts. Awareness regarding this orphan disease among clinicians and pathologists will help in more reporting of such cases and finding out optimal treatment regimen.

  20. An unidentified neonatal progeroid syndrome: follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, H R

    1979-01-18

    Two male infants with a pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome with natal teeth are compared with two very similar female cases reported in the literature and interpreted as congenital progeria. All these cases may represent a separate entity, a previously unrecognized genetic progeroid syndrome.

  1. DNA single strand break in fibroblast from Down syndrome patients; Pojedyncze pekniecia DNA fibroblastow od osob z zespolem Downa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozga, B. [Lodz Univ. (Poland)

    1992-12-31

    The radiosensitivity of tree trisomic (trisomia +21) strains of human fibroblasts to gamma radiation has been investigated in vitro and the causes of induction and repair of single strand DNA breaks in these cells have been estimated. The single strand breaks in DNA of normal and trisomic cells have been found to be ameliorated with an approximately equal efficiency. Repair has been found to be three times slower in trisomic cells compared to their normal relevant, most likely due to their elevated sensitivity to ionizing radiation and the following mortality of trisomic cells, and/or the potential occurrence of a great number of chromosome aberrations in cells irradiated in vitro. (author). 28 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII), which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition into the ECM of

  3. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Chiarelli

    Full Text Available Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII, which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition

  4. Impaired jun-NH2-terminal kinase activation by ultraviolet irradiation in fibroblasts of patients with Cockayne syndrome complementation group B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Adler, V; Lehmann, A; Ronai, Z

    1996-06-01

    c-jun-NH2 kinases (JNK) are among the UV-activated protein kinases that play an important role in cellular stress response via the phosphorylation of c-jun, ATF2, and p53. Activation of JNK by UV irradiation requires cooperation between membrane and nuclear components, including DNA lesions per se. The role of DNA lesions in JNK activation led us to explore the inducibility of these kinases in cells of repair-deficient patients. Analyses of primary fibroblast cell lines from patients with Cockayne Syndrome of complementation group B (CS-B) revealed poor JNK activation after UV irradiation in four of five cases when compared with three repair-proficient, normal human fibroblast cell lines. Impaired ability to activate JNK persisted at various time points and with different doses of UV irradiation and coincided with failure of in vitro damaged DNA to activate these kinases. In contrast to UV irradiation, other forms of stress, such as H2O2 or heat shock were capable of inducing JNK activation in CS-B cells. Interestingly, when UV irradiation was administered after osmotic shock, it led to JNK activation in CS-B cells, indicating that alternate signal transduction pathways that are activated in response to other forms of stress can potentiate JNK activation by UV irradiation. Unlike CS-B cells, those of other repair-deficient cells, including xeroderma pigmentosum of different complementation groups, revealed proper activation of JNK by UV irradiation. Together, our findings point to deficiency of JNK activation by UV irradiation in CS-B cells, a phenomenon which may be associated with impaired CS-B, the mutant repair gene in these patients.

  5. Ex vivo treatment with a novel synthetic aminoglycoside NB54 in primary fibroblasts from Rett syndrome patients suppresses MECP2 nonsense mutations.

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    Manuela Vecsler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsense mutations in the X-linked methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2 comprise a significant proportion of causative MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome (RTT. Naturally occurring aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, have been shown to enable partial suppression of nonsense mutations related to several human genetic disorders, however, their clinical applicability has been compromised by parallel findings of severe toxic effects. Recently developed synthetic NB aminoglycosides have demonstrated significantly improved effects compared to gentamicin evident in substantially higher suppression and reduced acute toxicity in vitro. RESULTS: We performed comparative study of suppression effects of the novel NB54 and gentamicin on three MECP2 nonsense mutations (R294X, R270X and R168X common in RTT, using ex vivo treatment of primary fibroblasts from RTT patients harboring these mutations and testing for the C-terminal containing full-length MeCP2. We observed that NB54 induces dose-dependent suppression of MECP2 nonsense mutations more efficiently than gentamicin, which was evident at concentrations as low as 50 µg/ml. NB54 read-through activity was mutation specific, with maximal full-length MeCP2 recovery in R168X (38%, R270X (27% and R294X (18%. In addition, the recovered MeCP2 was translocated to the cell nucleus and moreover led to parallel increase in one of the most important MeCP2 downstream effectors, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that NB54 may induce restoration of the potentially functional MeCP2 in primary RTT fibroblasts and encourage further studies of NB54 and other rationally designed aminoglycoside derivatives as potential therapeutic agents for nonsense MECP2 mutations in RTT.

  6. Could Metabolic Syndrome, Lipodystrophy, and Aging Be Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exhaustion Syndromes?

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    Eduardo Mansilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important and complex diseases of modern society is metabolic syndrome. This syndrome has not been completely understood, and therefore an effective treatment is not available yet. We propose a possible stem cell mechanism involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. This way of thinking lets us consider also other significant pathologies that could have similar etiopathogenic pathways, like lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and aging. All these clinical situations could be the consequence of a progressive and persistent stem cell exhaustion syndrome (SCES. The main outcome of this SCES would be an irreversible loss of the effective regenerative mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs pools. In this way, the normal repairing capacities of the organism could become inefficient. Our point of view could open the possibility for a new strategy of treatment in metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and even aging: stem cell therapies.

  7. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, James E; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond A; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-09-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role.

  8. Fibroblast cholesterol efflux to plasma from metabolic syndrome subjects is not defective despite low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Groen, Albert K.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Vries, Rindert; Sluiter, Wim J.; van Tol, Arie

    Objective: We tested whether in metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux. an early step in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. is maintained despite low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Design: In 76 subjects

  9. Fibroblast cholesterol efflux to plasma from metabolic syndrome subjects is not defective despite low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Groen, Albert K.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Vries, Rindert; Sluiter, Wim J.; van Tol, Arie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested whether in metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an early step in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway, is maintained despite low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. DESIGN: In 76 subjects

  10. Fibroblast cholesterol efflux to plasma from metabolic syndrome subjects is not defective despite low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); A. Groen (Albert); G.M. Dallinga-Thie (Geesje); R. de Vries (Rindert); W. Sluiter (Wim); A. van Tol (Arie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We tested whether in metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an early step in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway, is maintained despite low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Design: In

  11. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 cause Kallmann syndrome with a wide spectrum of reproductive phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Meysing, Astrid; Quinton, Richard; Acierno, James S.; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Plummer, Lacey; Fliers, Eric; Boepple, Paul; Hayes, Frances; Seminara, Stephanie; Hughes, Viriginia A.; Ma, Jinghong; Bouloux, Pierre; Mohammadi, Moosa; Crowley, William F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kallmann's syndrome (KS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder consisting of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and anosmia. Mutations in KAL1 causing the X-linked form of KS have been identified in 10% of all KS patients and consistently result in a severe

  12. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan-Olle Andressoo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of "null" alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals.

  13. Therapeutic potential of gingival fibroblasts for cutaneous radiation syndrome: comparison to bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cell grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Christine; Tissedre, Frederique; Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Leclerc, Thomas; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Couty, Ludovic; L'homme, Bruno; Benderitter, Marc; Lafont, Antoine; Lataillade, Jean Jacques; Coulomb, Bernard

    2015-05-15

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has recently been investigated as a potential treatment for cutaneous radiation burns. We tested the hypothesis that injection of local gingival fibroblasts (GFs) would promote healing of radiation burn lesions and compared results with those for MSC transplantation. Human clinical- grade GFs or bone marrow-derived MSCs were intradermally injected into mice 21 days after local leg irradiation. Immunostaining and real-time PCR analysis were used to assess the effects of each treatment on extracellular matrix remodeling and inflammation in skin on days 28 and 50 postirradiation. GFs induced the early development of thick, fully regenerated epidermis, skin appendages, and hair follicles, earlier than MSCs did. The acceleration of wound healing by GFs involved rearrangement of the deposited collagen, modification of the Col/MMP/TIMP balance, and modulation of the expression and localization of tenascin-C and of the expression of growth factors (VEGF, EGF, and FGF7). As MSC treatment did, GF injection decreased the irradiation-induced inflammatory response and switched the differentiation of macrophages toward an M2-like phenotype, characterized by CD163(+) macrophage infiltration and strong expression of arginase-1. These findings indicate that GFs are an attractive target for regenerative medicine, for easier to collect, can grow in culture, and promote cutaneous wound healing in irradiation burn lesions.

  14. Roles of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis in repair and replication in normal human, Cockayne syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Goto, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Ichihashi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Roles of poly(ADP-ribose) in repair and replication were studied in UV-irradiated normal, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblasts. UV radiation reduced cellular NAD with concurrent synthesis of poly-(ADP-ribose) in a dose-dependent manner in normal and CS cells, but not in XP cells. Enzymatic incision of DNA of UV-irradiated XP cells by T4-endonuclease V activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) also reduced the cellular NAD in all the above strains. However, inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis did not affect UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and UV and MMS survivals. Thus, poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis may have a chromatin-stabilizing effect, but not the key role in excision repair of UV damage, unlike in the repair of dimethyl sulfate alkylation. CS cells were deficient in the NAD pool and in the recovery of post-UV DNA synthesis, which were rescued by an exogenous supply of NAD. Such normalization in CS cells was inhibited by excess nicotinamide as in normal cells, suggesting that replicon reinitiation may require specific poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in UV-irradiated human cells.

  15. Sensitivity of excision repair in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum variant and Cockayne's syndrome fibroblasts to inhibition by cytosine arabinoside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1981-08-01

    Inhibition of the gap-filling, polymerizing step of excision repair by 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) after irradiation with ultraviolet light in human diploid fibroblasts resulted in the formation of persistent DNA strand breaks in G/sub 1/, G/sub 2/, and plateau phase cells, but not in S phase cells. Addition of hydroxyurea to ara-C resulted in partial inhibition of repair in S phase cells. These observations can be explained either in terms of changing roles in repair for different DNA polymerases throughout the cell cycle or by the presence of a pool of deoxycytidine nucleotides during S phase equivalent to an external source of deoxycytidine at 50 ..mu..M concentration. A similar concentration dependence on ara-C was observed for inhibition of repair in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant, and Cockayne's syndrome cells. Ara-C produced a similar number of breaks in normal and Cockayne's syndrome cells. Ara-C produced a similar number of breaks in normal and Cockayne's syndrome cells but slightly more in XP variant cells. Exonuclease III and S1 nuclease independently both degraded about 50% of the /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporated into repaired regions in the presence of ara-C. Sequential digestion with both enzymes degraded nearly 90% of the repaired regions. These observations can be explained if excision repair proceeds by displacing the damaged strand so that both the /sup 3/H-labeled patch and the damaged region are still ligated to high molecular weight DNA and compete for the same complementary strand during in vitro incubation with the nucleases. The amount of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporated in DNA by repair decreased with increasing concentrations of ara-C and hydroxyurea, suggesting that the incomplete patches became shorter under these conditions. Extrapolation of the digestion kinetics with exonuclease III permits an estimate of the normal patch size of about 100 nucleotides, consistent with previous estimates.

  16. Postprandial changes in glucose oxidation and insulin sensitivity in metabolic syndrome: Influence of fibroblast growth factor 21 and vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Kaveri; Soares, Mario J; Zhao, Yun; James, Anthony P; Sherriff, Jillian L; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic inflexibility due to insulin resistance has been reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS). Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and vitamin D status may improve insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate glucose-induced thermogenesis and oxidation in MetS, and to examine whether changes in FGF21 or prevailing vitamin D status modulated defined metabolic parameters. Forty-eight overweight and obese older adults (14 men, 34 women; ages 51 ± 15 y) were studied. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured before and intermittently for 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The total area under the curve (TAUC) was calculated. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was determined as 10 4 /(insulin × glucose) for fasting and 2 h venous blood. Fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Participants were grouped by metabolic syndrome (MetS+ for disease presence; MetS- when no disease was present) and by median 25 hydroxyvitamin D (OHD) concentration as VD_low and VD_high. 25 OHD was also tested as a continuous variable. A parsimonious 2 × 2 analysis of variance included age, FM, FFM and MetS × sex interaction. Adjusted RMR was similar between groups but an interactive effect of MetS and sex was noted. Fasting RQ was significantly different between vitamin groups (VD_low: 0.835 ± 0.008 versus VD_high: 0.810 ± 0.008; P = 0.024) and fasting ISI was significantly greater in MetS- compared with MetS+ (P = 0.037). Postglucose increases in thermogenesis, RQ, and FGF21 were significant, but ISI decreased. Adjusted postprandial TAUC_RQ (VD_low: 1.71 ± 0.01; VD_high: 1.74 ± 0.001; P = 0.041) and ISI_2 h (VD_low: 35.41 ± 0.21; VD_high: 101.90 ± 0.21; P = 0.001) were significantly different. Adjusted FGF21 was similar across all comparisons before and after OGTT. Higher vitamin D status, but not FGF21, was associated with greater postprandial

  17. Progeria caused by a rare LMNA mutation p.S143F associated with mild myopathy and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kmieć, Tomasz; Fidziańska, Anna; Rekawek, Joanna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2008-09-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with premature aging associated with mild myopathy, displaying muscle weakness, joint contractures and hyporeflexia. Genetic analysis revealed rare heterozygous point mutation in lamin A/C gene, g.428C>T. Cardiological evaluation showed atrial fibrillation, but we did not find signs of coronary heart disease, which is life-threatening cardiovascular complication in progeria. Electron microscopy of the muscle revealed abnormalities in nuclear architecture, i.e. blebbing, thick lamina and peripheral distribution of heterochromatin. As some diagnostic criteria characteristic for classic progeria are not fulfilled, this case could be regarded as atypical progeria associated with myopathy and atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the second case of such association described in the literature.

  18. Computational Exploration for Lead Compounds That Can Reverse the Nuclear Morphology in Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailima Rampogu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging that eventually leads to death and is noticed globally. Despite alarming conditions, this disease lacks effective medications; however, the farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs are a hope in the dark. Therefore, the objective of the present article is to identify new compounds from the databases employing pharmacophore based virtual screening. Utilizing nine training set compounds along with lonafarnib, a common feature pharmacophore was constructed consisting of four features. The validated Hypo1 was subsequently allowed to screen Maybridge, Chembridge, and Asinex databases to retrieve the novel lead candidates, which were then subjected to Lipinski’s rule of 5 and ADMET for drug-like assessment. The obtained 3,372 compounds were forwarded to docking simulations and were manually examined for the key interactions with the crucial residues. Two compounds that have demonstrated a higher dock score than the reference compounds and showed interactions with the crucial residues were subjected to MD simulations and binding free energy calculations to assess the stability of docked conformation and to investigate the binding interactions in detail. Furthermore, this study suggests that the Hits may be more effective against progeria and further the DFT studies were executed to understand their orbital energies.

  19. Temsirolimus Partially Rescues the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Cellular Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gabriel

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670, a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. Lamins help maintain the shape and stability of the nuclear envelope in addition to regulating DNA replication, DNA transcription, proliferation and differentiation. The LMNA mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal region of prelamin A, producing the truncated, farnesylated protein progerin. The accumulation of progerin in HGPS nuclei causes numerous morphological and functional changes that lead to premature cellular senescence. Attempts to reverse this HGPS phenotype have identified rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, as a drug that is able to rescue the HGPS cellular phenotype by promoting autophagy and reducing progerin accumulation. Rapamycin is an obvious candidate for the treatment of HGPS disease but is difficult to utilize clinically. To further assess rapamycin's efficacy with regard to proteostasis, mitochondrial function and the degree of DNA damage, we tested temsirolimus, a rapamycin analog with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile than rapamycin. We report that temsirolimus decreases progerin levels, increases proliferation, reduces misshapen nuclei, and partially ameliorates DNA damage, but does not improve proteasome activity or mitochondrial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that future therapeutic strategies should identify new drug combinations and treatment regimens that target all the dysfunctional hallmarks that characterize HGPS cells.

  20. Peroxisomal very long-chain fatty acid [beta]-oxidation in human skin fibroblasts: activity in Zellweger syndrome and other peroxisomal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Roermund, C.W.T. van; Wijland, M.J.A. van; Heikoop, J.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Schram, A.W.; Tager, J.M.; Bosch, H. van den; Poll-Thé, B.T.; Saudubray, J.M.; Moser, H.W.; Moser, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    Since very long-chain fatty acids with a chain length of 24 carbons or more are known to accumulate in tissues and body fluids from patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome, infantile Refsum disease, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, we studied very

  1. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutati...

  2. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  3. X-ray sensitivity of fifty-three human diploid fibroblast cell strains from patients with characterized genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    The in vitro response of 53 human diploid fibroblast strains to x-irradiation was studied using a clonogenic survival assay. The strains, derived from patients with a variety of characterized clinical conditions, most with a genetic component, ranged in Do (a measure of the slope of the survival curve) from 43 to 168 rads. The mean Do's of six strains from normal individuals was 140 to 152 rads, with an overall range, based on the extremes of their standard errors, of 128 to 164 rads. Three-quarters of the strains studied fell within this range. Strains identified as sensitive came from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, progeria, the two genetic forms of retinoblastoma, and partial trisomy of chromosome 13. No marked radiosensitivity was found among strains derived from patients with a number of other conditions associated with a predisposition to malignancy.

  4. Relation between replicative senescence of human fibroblasts and life history characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Andrea B.; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    Replicative ageing of fibroblasts in vitro has often been used as a model for organismal ageing. The general assumption that the ageing process is mirrored by cellular senescence in vitro is based on lower replicative capacity of human fibroblasts from patients with accelerated ageing syndromes,

  5. Nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic responses in a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, N; Yamamoto, S; Hayasaka, S; Fukuo, Y; Koike, T

    1995-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl complained or poor vision in both eyes. The patient showed progeria, physical and mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, cutaneous photosensitivity, hyperopia, poor pupillary dilation, exotropia, salt-and-pepper fundi, nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic (ERG) responses, cerebral atrophy on computed tomography, and demyelination of periventricular white matter on magnetic resonance imaging. We believe that nondetectable cone and rod ERG responses in Cockayne syndrome, as demonstrated in our patient, may be uncommon.

  6. Altered Nuclear Functions in Progeroid Syndromes: a Paradigm for Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndromes of accelerated aging could provide an entry point for identifying and dissecting the cellular pathways that are involved in the development of age-related pathologies in the general population. However, their usefulness for aging research has been controversial, as it has been argued that these diseases do not faithfully reflect the process of natural aging. Here we review recent findings on the molecular basis of two progeroid diseases, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, and highlight functional connections to cellular processes that may contribute to normal aging.

  7. Significant gender difference in serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 in Danish children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Amalie; Sørensen, Kaspar; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic factor with effect on glucose and lipid metabolism, and shown to be elevated in diseases related to metabolic syndrome. Due to the increasing frequency of metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population, and as FGF21 studies in...

  8. Multikinase activity of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors SU5402, PD173074, AZD1480, AZD4547 and BGJ398 compromises the use of small chemicals targeting FGFR catalytic activity for therapy of short-stature syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gudernová, I.; Veselá, Iva; Balek, L.; Buchtová, Marcela; Dosedělová, Hana; Kunová, M.; Pivnička, J.; Jelínková, I.; Roubalová, L.; Kozubík, Alois; Krejčí, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2016), s. 9-23 ISSN 0964-6906 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31540S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : fibroblast growth factor receptor * tyrosine kinase domain * ERK MAP kinase Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 5.340, year: 2016

  9. Isolation of fibroblasts and epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Kathryn; Albares, Luke; Wendt, Chris; Hubel, Allison

    2013-04-01

    The long-term outcome of lung transplants is poor with 60%-70% of patients developing chronic rejection. Chronic rejection is manifested histologically by obliterative bronchiolitis with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), the clinical surrogate. Recent studies suggest that fibroblasts and epithelial cells present in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) may be a clinically relevant biomarker for BOS. The goal of this investigation was to develop a fast, repeatable method to individually isolate these low-frequency cell types. Fibroblasts and epithelial cells were isolated from BAL using attachment methods and the phenotype of the cells confirmed using immunostaining for vimentin (fibroblasts) and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, epithelial cells). Both fibroblasts and epithelial cells were isolated in every sample of BAL processed with the frequency of fibroblasts ranging from 0.03% to 0.48% and epithelial cells ranging from 0.05% to 1.5% of the total sample. Additional studies were performed using cytospins of cells after macrophages were depleted; cells exhibiting characteristics of both fibroblasts and epithelial cells were observed. The frequency of the cells of interest suggests that conventional methods of immunomagnetic isolation will not be effective in isolating these subpopulations. Finally, some of the low-frequency cells isolated via cytospin exhibit characteristics of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (which was not observed in plating incubations), indicating that the epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition fibroblasts may be nonadherent. In future studies, this technique and dataset may be of use to statistically correlate low-frequency cell type abundance to the onset and development of BOS.

  10. The epidemiology of premature aging and associated comorbidities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Werner syndrome, also known as childhood- and adulthood-progeria, respectively, represent two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases with clinical...

  11. From the rarest to the most common: insights from progeroid syndromes into skin cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Tlougan, Brook E; Orlow, Seth J

    2009-10-01

    Despite their rarity, diseases of premature aging, or "progeroid" syndromes, have provided important insights into basic mechanisms that may underlie cancer and normal aging. In this review, we highlight these recent developments in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy, ataxia-telangiectasia, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. Though they are caused by different mutations in various genes and often result in quite disparate phenotypes, deciphering the molecular bases of these conditions has served to highlight their underlying basic similarities. Studies of progeroid syndromes, particularly HGPS, the most dramatic form of premature aging, have contributed to our knowledge of fundamental processes of importance to skin biology, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, genome instability, cellular senescence, and stem-cell differentiation.

  12. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  13. Endothelial cells, fibroblasts and vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Christopher D.; Rainger, G.Ed; Nash, Gerard B; Raza, Karim

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important questions in vasculitis research is not why inflammation of blood vessels occurs but why it persists, often in a site-specific manner. In this review we illustrate how stromal cells, such as fibroblasts and pericytes, might play an important role in regulating the site at which vasculitis occurs. Smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts directly influence the behaviour of overlying vascular cells, amplifying the response of the endothelium to proinflammatory agents such a...

  14. An adult case of Cockayne syndrome without sclerotic angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Sano, N; Ito, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Okauchi, Y; Kondo, H; Horiuchi, N; Nakao, K; Iwata, M

    1997-08-01

    We report an autopsy case of Cockayne syndrome (CS). A 40-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital for cachexia. She had displayed the striking features of CS, including dwarfism, mental retardation, neural deafness, ataxia, intracranial calcifications, and progeria since her childhood. Endocrinological examinations suggested normal pituitary function and a disorder of the hypothalamus or the cerebrum. She died of acute pneumonia at the age of 42. Autopsy findings showed typical abnormalities in the central nervous system compatible with CS; however, no atherosclerotic change was observed in the systemic arteries.

  15. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  16. Case report 511: Fibroblastic rheumatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Martel, W.; Headington, J.T.; Kaufman, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    We report a ten-year-old child with the newly described entity of fibroblastic rheumatism. This child developed rapid, progressive, symmetrical polyarthritis, similar to the radiographic appearance of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, except for the rapidity of progression. The polyarthritis was preceded by the development of skin nodules with characteristic histological changes. (orig./GDG).

  17. Micronucleus assay in human fibroblasts: a measure of spontaneous chromosomal instability and mutagen hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, N.L.; Hoar, D.I.; Greentree, C.L.; Dimnik, L.S.; Hennig, U.S.S.

    1988-01-01

    By comparing fibroblast strains derived from individuals exhibiting chromosome instability and/or mutagen hypersensitivity (Cockayne syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi anemia) with strains derived from health donors, the fibroblast micronucleus assay has been established as a reproducible measure of the genotypic variation in spontaneous or mitomycin C (MMC)-induced chromosomal instability. The patient strains that were moderately or exquisitely sensitive to MMC could be distinguished readily from the control strains, both in levels of spontaneous micronuclei and in sensitivity to MMC, whereas the mildly sensitive strain (Cockayne syndrome) overlapped with the control range. The reproducibility of the assay was evaluated within and between experiments. In addition to its value as a test system for genotoxins, the fibroblast micronucleus assay may be useful for investigating genetically determined hypersensitivity to mutagens, elevated spontaneous chromosomal breakage, and chromosome segregation errors.

  18. Characteristics of human infant primary fibroblast cultures from Achilles tendons removed post-mortem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Primary cell cultures were investigated as a tool for molecular diagnostics in a forensic setting. Fibroblast cultures had been established from human Achilles tendon resected at autopsies, from cases of sudden infant death syndrome and control infants who died in traumatic events (n=41). After...

  19. Sensitivity of fibroblast growth factor 23 measurements in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imel, Erik A; Peacock, Munro; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit

    2006-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome of hypophosphatemia, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, normal or low serum 1,25-dihydryxyvitamin-D concentration, myopathy, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic protein overexpressed in tumors...

  20. AGE AND MULTIPLICATION OF FIBROBLASTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, A; Ebeling, A H

    1921-11-30

    Pure cultures of fibroblasts displayed marked differences in their activity in the plasma of young, middle aged, and old chickens. The rate of cell multiplication varied in inverse ratio to the age of the animal from which the plasma was taken. There was a definite relation between the age of the animal and the amount of new tissue produced in its plasma in a given time (Text-figs. 1 to 10). The chart obtained by plotting the rate of cell proliferation in ordinates, and the age of the animal in abscissae, showed that the rate of growth decreased more quickly than the age increased (Text-fig. 12). The decrease in the rate of growth was 50 per cent during the first 3 years of life, while in the following 6 years it was only 30 per cent. When the duration of the life of the cultures in the four plasmas was compared, a curve was obtained which showed about the same characteristics (Text-fig. 11). The duration of life of the fibroblasts in vitro varied in inverse ratio to the age of the animal, and decreased more quickly than the age increased. As the differences in the amount of new tissue produced in the plasma of young, middle aged, and old chickens were large, the growth of a pure culture of fibroblasts could be employed as a reagent for detecting certain changes occurring in the plasma under the influence of age. But the method possesses the necessary accuracy only when it is used as has already been described, and by technicians thoroughly trained in the details of its application. A comparative study of the growth of fibroblasts in media containing no serum, and serum under low and high concentrations, was made in order to ascertain whether the decreasing rate of cell multiplication was due to the loss of an accelerating factor, or to the increase See PDF for Structure of an inhibiting one. In high and low concentrations of the serum of young animals, no difference in the rate of multiplication of fibroblasts was observed. This showed that the serum of an

  1. [Cockayne syndrome and epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (Hallopeau-Siemens). Simultaneous occurrence in a family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubach, D; Riechers, U

    1982-09-01

    A Turkish family with four children is described, two boys suffering from Cockayne's syndrome and a girl from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (Hallopeau-Siemens). The outstanding features in the brothers are a pronounced delay in growth which began in both children at the age of about 1.5 years, progeria-like facial features, and a high degree of light sensitivity noticed very soon after birth. The daughter died of septicemia at the age of 4 years. Both diseases are rare and probably the consequence of extremely high consanguinity.

  2. [Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch). A follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenstrauch, T; Snigula, F; Wiedemann, H R

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS) are: intrauterine and postnatal growth failure, hydrocephalic appearance, prominent scalp veins, old-looking face, absence of subcutaneous fat and neonatal teeth. Until now altogether nine cases have been reported, which were predominant diagnosed in infant age. The NPS is in general assigned to the autosomal recessive trait. With increasing age the outward appearance stays unchanged. The in 1977 under diagnose progeria presented patient is now 16 years old. With her a considerable atactic movement disturbance developed next to a psychomotoric retardation. The change in metabolism of proteoglycane that was remarkable in infant age is now no longer provable.

  3. MicroRNA transcriptome analysis identifies miR-365 as a novel negative regulator of cell proliferation in Zmpste24-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xing-dong [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Jung, Hwa Jin [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Gombar, Saurabh [Departments of Systems Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Park, Jung Yoon [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Zhang, Chun-long; Zheng, Huiling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Ruan, Jie; Li, Jiang-bin [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Kaeberlein, Matt [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive miRNA transcriptome of MEFs from Zmpste24{sup −/−} and control mice. • Identification of miR-365 as a down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs. • Characterization of miR-365 as a modulator of cellular growth in part by targeting Rasd1. - Abstract: Zmpste24 is a metalloproteinase responsible for the posttranslational processing and cleavage of prelamin A into mature laminA. Zmpste24{sup −/−} mice display a range of progeroid phenotypes overlapping with mice expressing progerin, an altered version of lamin A associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Increasing evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs contribute to the regulation of normal aging process, but their roles in progeroid disorders remain poorly understood. Here we report the miRNA transcriptomes of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) established from wild type (WT) and Zmpste24{sup −/−} progeroid mice using a massively parallel sequencing technology. With data from 19.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from WT MEFs and 16.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, we discovered a total of 306 known miRNAs expressed in MEFs with a wide dynamic range of read counts ranging from 10 to over 1 million. A total of 8 miRNAs were found to be significantly down-regulated, with only 2 miRNAs upregulated, in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs as compared to WT MEFs. Functional studies revealed that miR-365, a significantly down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, modulates cellular growth phenotypes in MEFs. Overexpression of miR-365 in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs increased cellular proliferation and decreased the percentage of SA-β-gal-positive cells, while inhibition of miR-365 function led to an increase of SA-β-gal-positive cells in WT MEFs. Furthermore, we identified Rasd1, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, as a functional target of miR-365. While expression of miR-365 suppressed Rasd1 3′ UTR luciferase-reporter activity

  4. Faulty DNA-polymerase {delta}/{epsilon}-mediated excision-repair in response to gamma-radiation or ultraviolet-light in P53-deficient fibroblast strains from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzayans, R.; Enns, L.; Dietrich, K.; Barley, R.D.C.; Paterson, M.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Cross Cancer Inst.]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Oncology]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Science

    1996-04-01

    Dermal fibroblast strains cultured from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) harbor a point mutation in one allele of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, resulting in loss of normal p53-deficient strains to carry out the long-patch mode of excision repair, mediated by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon, after exposure to Co-60 gamma radiation or far ultraviolet (UV) (chiefly 254 mm) light. Repair was monitored by incubation of the irradiated cultures in the presence of aphidicolin (ape) or 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC), each a specific inhibitor of long-patch repair, followed by measurement of drug-induced DNA strand breaks (reflecting non-ligated strand incision events) by alkaline surcrose velocity sedimentation. The LFS strains displayed deficient repair capacity in response to both gamma rays and UV light. The repair anomaly in UV-irradiated LFS cultures was manifested not only in the overall genome, but also in the transcriptionally active, preferentially repaired c-myc gene. Using autoradiography we also assessed unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV irradiation and found this conventional measure of repair replication to be deficient in LFS strains. Moreover, both ape and araC decreased the level of UV-induced UDS by similar to 75% in normal cells, but each had only a marginal effect on LFS cells. We further demonstrated that the LFS strains are impaired in the recovery of both RNA and replicative DNA syntheses after UV treatment, two molecular anomalies of the DNA repair deficiency disorders xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne`s syndrome. Together these results imply a critical role for wild-type p53 protein in DNA polymerase delta/epsilon-mediated excision repair, both the mechanism operating on the entire genome and that acting on expressed genes. (Author).

  5. Discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics in a patient with Cockayne syndrome during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Hitosugi, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a kind of progeria with autosomal chromosome recessiveness described first by Cockayne in 1936. Patients with this syndrome were characterized by retarded growth, cerebral atrophy, and mental retardation. We experienced an anesthetic management of a patient with Cockayne syndrome, who underwent dental treatment twice. The primary concern was discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics. The values of bispectral index showed a sharp fall to 1 digit and suppression ratio more than 40, while hemodynamics was stable during induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane 8%. We should pay attention to anesthetic depth in the central nervous system in patients with Cockayne syndrome. Titration of anesthetics should be performed by the information from electroencephalography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lithium Attenuates TGF-β 1-Induced Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts Transition in Bronchial Fibroblasts Derived from Asthmatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Marta; Wójcik, Katarzyna Anna; Jakieła, Bogdan; Szpak, Katarzyna; Pierzchalska, Małgorzata; Sanak, Marek; Madeja, Zbigniew; Czyż, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic disorder accompanied by phenotypic transitions of bronchial epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. Human bronchial fibroblasts (HBFs) derived from patients with diagnosed asthma display predestination towards TGF-β-induced phenotypic switches. Since the interference between TGF-β and GSK-3β signaling contributes to pathophysiology of chronic lung diseases, we investigated the effect of lithium, a nonspecific GSK-3β inhibitor, on TGF-β 1-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast transition (FMT) in HBF and found that the inhibition of GSK-3β attenuates TGF-β 1-induced FMT in HBF populations derived from asthmatic but not healthy donors. Cytoplasmically sequestrated β-catenin, abundant in TGF-β 1/LiCl-stimulated asthmatic HBFs, most likely interacts with and inhibits the nuclear accumulation and signal transduction of Smad proteins. These data indicate that the specific cellular context determines FMT-related responses of HBFs to factors interfering with the TGF-β signaling pathway. They may also provide a mechanistic explanation for epidemiological data revealing coincidental remission of asthmatic syndromes and their recurrence upon the discontinuation of lithium therapy in certain psychiatric diseases. PMID:22988467

  7. Lithium Attenuates TGF-β1-Induced Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts Transition in Bronchial Fibroblasts Derived from Asthmatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Michalik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a chronic disorder accompanied by phenotypic transitions of bronchial epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. Human bronchial fibroblasts (HBFs derived from patients with diagnosed asthma display predestination towards TGF-β-induced phenotypic switches. Since the interference between TGF-β and GSK-3β signaling contributes to pathophysiology of chronic lung diseases, we investigated the effect of lithium, a nonspecific GSK-3β inhibitor, on TGF-β1-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast transition (FMT in HBF and found that the inhibition of GSK-3β attenuates TGF-β1-induced FMT in HBF populations derived from asthmatic but not healthy donors. Cytoplasmically sequestrated β-catenin, abundant in TGF-β1/LiCl-stimulated asthmatic HBFs, most likely interacts with and inhibits the nuclear accumulation and signal transduction of Smad proteins. These data indicate that the specific cellular context determines FMT-related responses of HBFs to factors interfering with the TGF-β signaling pathway. They may also provide a mechanistic explanation for epidemiological data revealing coincidental remission of asthmatic syndromes and their recurrence upon the discontinuation of lithium therapy in certain psychiatric diseases.

  8. Lithium Attenuates TGF-β(1)-Induced Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts Transition in Bronchial Fibroblasts Derived from Asthmatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Marta; Wójcik, Katarzyna Anna; Jakieła, Bogdan; Szpak, Katarzyna; Pierzchalska, Małgorzata; Sanak, Marek; Madeja, Zbigniew; Czyż, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic disorder accompanied by phenotypic transitions of bronchial epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. Human bronchial fibroblasts (HBFs) derived from patients with diagnosed asthma display predestination towards TGF-β-induced phenotypic switches. Since the interference between TGF-β and GSK-3β signaling contributes to pathophysiology of chronic lung diseases, we investigated the effect of lithium, a nonspecific GSK-3β inhibitor, on TGF-β(1)-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast transition (FMT) in HBF and found that the inhibition of GSK-3β attenuates TGF-β(1)-induced FMT in HBF populations derived from asthmatic but not healthy donors. Cytoplasmically sequestrated β-catenin, abundant in TGF-β(1)/LiCl-stimulated asthmatic HBFs, most likely interacts with and inhibits the nuclear accumulation and signal transduction of Smad proteins. These data indicate that the specific cellular context determines FMT-related responses of HBFs to factors interfering with the TGF-β signaling pathway. They may also provide a mechanistic explanation for epidemiological data revealing coincidental remission of asthmatic syndromes and their recurrence upon the discontinuation of lithium therapy in certain psychiatric diseases.

  9. Recombinant interferon regulation of lung fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, J.A.; Freundlich, B.; Rossman, M.D.; Gustilo, K.; Jimenez, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors characterized the effect on human lung fibroblast proliferation of recombinant interferons (gamma (..gamma..), alpha/sub A/ (..cap alpha../sub A/), alpha/sub D/ (..cap alpha../sub D/) and beta (..beta..)). Quiescent and log phase fibroblasts were used. Proliferation was assessed using /sup 3/HTdr uptake and cell counts. ..gamma.. stimulated the /sup 3/HTdr uptake of quiescent cells. Maximal stimulation was seen between 100 and 500 IU/ml. Fibroblasts incubated in 100 IU/ml incorporated 160 +/- 9% as much /sup 3/HTdr as quiescent controls (p < .04). In contrast, ..gamma.. caused a dose dependent inhibition of the /sup 3/HTdr uptake of log phase cells. Fibroblasts incubated in 1000 IU/ml incorporated 41 +/- 9% as much /sup 3/HTdr as log phase controls (p < .02). Unlike ..gamma.., ..cap alpha../sub A/, ..cap alpha../sub D/ and ..beta.. did not stimulate the proliferation of quiescent cells. However, they did inhibit the proliferation of log phase cells. Fibroblasts incubated in 1000 IU/ml of ..cap alpha../sub A/, ..cap alpha../sub D/ and ..beta.. incorporated 64 +/- 10, 81 +/- 4 and 62 +/- 7% as much /sup 3/HTdr as log phase controls (p < .03 for all). ..gamma.., ..cap alpha../sub A/, ..cap alpha../sub D/ and ..beta.. did not stimulate fibroblast prostaglandin E (PGE) production and incubating fibroblasts with indomethacin did not reverse the inhibition of fibroblast proliferation caused by the interferons. Thus, (1) ..gamma.. can stimulate or inhibit fibroblast growth, (2) ..cap alpha../sub A/, ..cap alpha../sub D/ and ..beta.. only inhibit fibroblast growth, (3) the inhibition of fibroblast growth caused by ..gamma.., ..cap alpha../sub A/, ..cap alpha../sub D/ and ..beta.. is largely independent of fibroblast PGE production.

  10. Response of dupuytren fibroblasts to different oxygen environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Tolga; Murphy, Erin; Kaufman, Christina L; Kutz, Joseph E; Meister, Edward A; Hoying, James B

    2013-12-01

    It is thought that local ischemia and oxygen radicals are responsible for fibroblast-to-myofibroblast cell transformation and proliferation. We hypothesized that hypoxia could differentially activate the contractility of fibroblasts from normal human palmar fascia and from fibroblasts-myofibroblasts of Dupuytren cords. Normal palmar fascia from 5 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and Dupuytren cords from 5 patients were harvested. Cells were cultured from all tissue samples, and collagen lattices were prepared containing these cells. Oxygen treatment subgroups were created and incubated under hypoxic (1% O(2), 5% CO(2), and 94% N(2)), normoxic (21% O(2), 5% CO(2), and 74% N(2)), and hyperoxic (100% oxygen using 2.4 atm pressure twice a day for 7 d) conditions. After 7 days, each subgroup was photographed, and lattices were released from dishes. Postrelease photographs were taken immediately, 5 minutes after release, and after 1 hour. Areas of the lattices at each time point were calculated using MetaMorph software. Actin staining and live/dead cell analysis was performed. Linear repeated measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis given that contraction levels were measured over 3 distinct time points. We found a statistically significant difference between normal samples and Dupuytren samples in mean contraction levels over time. There was no statistically significant difference between tissue groups over the 3 time periods based on the oxygen treatment received. Our results showed a greater degree of contractility in Dupuytren disease cells than normal fibroblasts. However, the contraction in either group was not affected by oxygen level. Future in vivo research is needed to better understand the nature of pathophysiology of Dupuytren disease. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Gorlin's Patients: a Matter of Fibroblasts-Led Protumoral Microenvironment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gache, Yannick; Brellier, Florence; Rouanet, Sophie; Al-Qaraghuli, Sahar; Goncalves-Maia, Maria; Burty-Valin, Elodie; Barnay, Stéphanie; Scarzello, Sabine; Ruat, Martial; Sevenet, Nicolas; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest tumor in human. About 70% sporadic BCCs bear somatic mutations in the PATCHED1 tumor suppressor gene which encodes the receptor for the Sonic Hedgehog morphogen (SHH). PATCHED1 germinal mutations are associated with the dominant Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), a major hallmark of which is a high susceptibility to BCCs. Although the vast majority of sporadic BCCs arises exclusively in sun exposed skin areas, 40 to 50% BCCs from NBCCS patients develop in non photo-exposed skin. Since overwhelming evidences indicate that microenvironment may both be modified by- and influence the- epithelial tumor, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could contribute to BCCs in NBCCS patients, notably those developing in non photo-exposed skin areas. The functional impact of NBCCS fibroblasts was then assessed in organotypic skin cultures with control keratinocytes. Onset of epidermal differentiation was delayed in the presence of primary NBCCS fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, keratinocyte proliferation was severely reduced and showed high levels of nuclear P53 in both organotypic skin cultures and in fibroblast-led conditioning experiments. However, in spite of increased levels of senescence associated β-galactosidase activity in keratinocytes cultured in the presence of medium conditioned by NBCCS fibroblasts, we failed to observe activation of P16 and P21 and then of bona fide features of senescence. Constitutive extinction of P53 in WT keratinocytes resulted in an invasive phenotype in the presence of NBCCS fibroblasts. Finally, we found that expression of SHH was limited to fibroblasts but was dependent on the presence of keratinocytes. Inhibition of SHH binding resulted in improved epidermal morphogenesis. Altogether, these data suggest that the repertoire of diffusible factors (including SHH) expressed by primary NBCCS fibroblasts generate a stress affecting keratinocytes behavior and epidermal homeostasis. Our findings

  13. Nuclear matrix, nuclear envelope and premature aging syndromes in a translational research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Pierre; Navarro, Claire; Harhouri, Karim; Roll, Patrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; Kaspi, Elise; Perrin, Sophie; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lévy, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Lamin A-related progeroid syndromes are genetically determined, extremely rare and severe. In the past ten years, our knowledge and perspectives for these diseases has widely progressed, through the progressive dissection of their pathophysiological mechanisms leading to precocious and accelerated aging, from the genes mutations discovery until therapeutic trials in affected children. A-type lamins are major actors in several structural and functional activities at the nuclear periphery, as they are major components of the nuclear lamina. However, while this is usually poorly considered, they also play a key role within the rest of the nucleoplasm, whose defects are related to cell senescence. Although nuclear shape and nuclear envelope deformities are obvious and visible events, nuclear matrix disorganization and abnormal composition certainly represent the most important causes of cell defects with dramatic pathological consequences. Therefore, lamin-associated diseases should be better referred as laminopathies instead of envelopathies, this later being too restrictive, considering neither the key structural and functional roles of soluble lamins in the entire nucleoplasm, nor the nuclear matrix contribution to the pathophysiology of lamin-associated disorders and in particular in defective lamin A processing-associated aging diseases. Based on both our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and the biological and clinical consequences of progeria and related diseases, therapeutic trials have been conducted in patients and were terminated less than 10 years after the gene discovery, a quite fast issue for a genetic disease. Pharmacological drugs have been repurposed and used to decrease the toxicity of the accumulated, unprocessed and truncated prelaminA in progeria. To date, none of them may be considered as a cure for progeria and these clinical strategies were essentially designed toward reducing a subset of the most dramatic and morbid features

  14. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  15. Altered fibroblast proteoglycan production in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Nihlberg, Kristian; Dahlbäck, Magnus; Bjermer, Leif; Eriksson, Leif T; Erjefält, Jonas S; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2010-05-11

    Airway remodeling in COPD includes reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Proteoglycans play a crucial role in this process as regulators of the integrity of the extracellular matrix. Altered proteoglycan immunostaining has been demonstrated in COPD lungs and this has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis. The major cell type responsible for production and maintenance of ECM constituents, such as proteoglycans, are fibroblasts. Interestingly, it has been proposed that central airways and alveolar lung parenchyma contain distinct fibroblast populations. This study explores the hypothesis that altered depositions of proteoglycans in COPD lungs, and in particular versican and perlecan, is a result of dysregulated fibroblast proteoglycan production. Proliferation, proteoglycan production and the response to TGF-beta1 were examined in vitro in centrally and distally derived fibroblasts isolated from COPD patients (GOLD stage IV) and from control subjects. Phenotypically different fibroblast populations were identified in central airways and in the lung parenchyma. Versican production was higher in distal fibroblasts from COPD patients than from control subjects (p proteoglycan production in distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients and control subjects. In contrast, centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients were less responsive to TGF-beta1 than those from control subjects. The results show that fibroblasts from COPD patients have alterations in proteoglycan production that may contribute to disease development. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients have enhanced production of versican that may have a negative influence on the elastic recoil. In addition, a lower perlecan production in centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients may indicate alterations in bronchial basement membrane integrity in severe COPD.

  16. Altered fibroblast proteoglycan production in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erjefält Jonas S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway remodeling in COPD includes reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Proteoglycans play a crucial role in this process as regulators of the integrity of the extracellular matrix. Altered proteoglycan immunostaining has been demonstrated in COPD lungs and this has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis. The major cell type responsible for production and maintenance of ECM constituents, such as proteoglycans, are fibroblasts. Interestingly, it has been proposed that central airways and alveolar lung parenchyma contain distinct fibroblast populations. This study explores the hypothesis that altered depositions of proteoglycans in COPD lungs, and in particular versican and perlecan, is a result of dysregulated fibroblast proteoglycan production. Methods Proliferation, proteoglycan production and the response to TGF-β1 were examined in vitro in centrally and distally derived fibroblasts isolated from COPD patients (GOLD stage IV and from control subjects. Results Phenotypically different fibroblast populations were identified in central airways and in the lung parenchyma. Versican production was higher in distal fibroblasts from COPD patients than from control subjects (p 1 triggered similar increases in proteoglycan production in distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients and control subjects. In contrast, centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients were less responsive to TGF-β1 than those from control subjects. Conclusions The results show that fibroblasts from COPD patients have alterations in proteoglycan production that may contribute to disease development. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients have enhanced production of versican that may have a negative influence on the elastic recoil. In addition, a lower perlecan production in centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients may indicate alterations in bronchial basement membrane integrity in severe COPD.

  17. Endothelial cells, fibroblasts and vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B; Raza, Karim

    2005-07-01

    One of the most important questions in vasculitis research is not why inflammation of blood vessels occurs but why it persists, often in a site-specific manner. In this review we illustrate how stromal cells, such as fibroblasts and pericytes, might play an important role in regulating the site at which vasculitis occurs. Smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts directly influence the behaviour of overlying vascular cells, amplifying the response of the endothelium to proinflammatory agents such as TNF-alpha and allowing enhanced and inappropriate leucocyte recruitment. An abnormal local vascular stromal environment can therefore influence local endothelial function and drive the persistence of local vascular inflammation. However, such local vascular inflammation can have distant effects on the systemic vascular system, leading to widespread endothelial cell dysfunction. Vascular endothelial dysfunction is common in a range of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, is seen in multiple vascular beds, and is reversible following the induction of disease remission. The mechanisms that drive such systemic vascular endothelial dysfunction are unclear but factors such as TNF-alpha and CRP may play a role. Persistence of such widespread endothelial dysfunction in systemic vasculitis appears to have long-term consequences, leading to the acceleration of atherosclerosis and premature ischaemic heart disease. It may also underlie the accelerated atherosclerosis seen in other immune-mediated rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yin Lo

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90 iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM, and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM, abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in HGPS

  19. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie da Costa Eiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Huntchinson-Gilford (Progeria é uma rara doença autossômica dominante, caracterizada pelo envelhecimento precoce. Relata-se caso de uma criança, que aos 6 meses iniciou alopecia na região occipital e placas esclerodermiformes no abdome. Esta síndrome apresenta alterações em vários órgãos e sistemas como a pele, esquelético e sistema cardiovascular. O diagnóstico é clínico e não possui tratamento, porém seu reconhecimento é necessário para minimizar a aterosclerose precoce através do controle da dislipidemia.Huntchinson-Gilford Syndrome (Progeria is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by premature aging. It is reported the case of child whose alopecia started at the age of 6 months on the occipital region. The child also presented scleroderma plaques on the abdomen. This syndrome presents alterations in many organs and systems such as the skin and the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. The diagnosis is clinical and there is no treatment for it but recognition is necessary to minimize early atherosclerosis through the control of dyslipidemia.

  20. Re-evaluation of in vitro radiosensitivity of human fibroblasts of different genetic origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.

    1986-08-01

    Statistical analysis of the radiosensitivity of 204 survival curves of non-transformed human fibroblast cell strains of different genetic origins was made using the multi-target one-hit model (characterized by parameters eta and D/sub 0/), the surviving fraction for a 2 Gy dose (S/sub 2/) and the mean inactivation dose (D-bar). D-bar is found to be the parameter for characterization of anomalous radiosensitivity linked to a genetic disorder and discrimination between groups of cell strains of differing radiosensitivity. It allows the description of a range of 'normal' radiosensitivity for control fibroblasts and classification of genetic disorders as a function of their mean radiosensitivity expressed in terms of D-bar. Nine groups of cell strains appear to exhibit radiosensitivity differing significantly from the controls: seven groups are hypersensitive (ataxia-telengiectasia homozygotes and heterozygotes, Cockayne's syndrome, Gardner's syndrome, 5-oxoprolinuria homozygotes and heterozygotes, Fanconi's anaemia) and two groups are more radioresistant (fibroblasts from retinoblastoma patients and individuals with chromosome 13 anomalies). Since the coupled parameter eta and D/sub 0/ failed to discriminate between the radiosensitivity of the different genetic groups, the use of D-bar to make an intercomparison of intrinsic radiosensitivity of non-transformed human fibroblasts is recommended. (U.K.).

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neidich JA, Wilcox WR. Subtle radiographic findings of achondroplasia in patients with Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans ... of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 disorders: the achondroplasia family of skeletal dysplasias, Muenke craniosynostosis, and Crouzon ...

  2. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Epigenetic characterization of the FMR1 promoter in induced pluripotent stem cells from human fibroblasts carrying an unmethylated full mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Esch, Celine E F; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W; Munshi, Shashini T; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; de Vrij, Femke M S; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM)

  4. Epigenetic characterization of the FMR1 promoter in induced pluripotent stem cells from human fibroblasts carrying an unmethylated full mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Esch (Celine); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); F. Loos (Friedemann); N. Schelling-Kazaryan (Nune); W. Widagdo; S.T. Munshi (Shashini T.); E. van der Wal (Erik); H. Douben (Hannie); N. Gunhanlar (Nilhan); S.A. Kushner (Steven); W.W.M.P. Pijnappel (Pim); F.M.S. Vrij (Femke); N. Geijsen (Niels); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); R. Willemsen (Rob)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSilencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full

  5. Sustained systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies by genetically modified skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, D; Pelegrin, M; Brockly, F

    2000-01-01

    In vivo production and systemic delivery of therapeutic antibodies by engineered cells might advantageously replace injection of purified antibodies for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. We report here t....... This supports the notion that skin fibroblasts can potentially be used in antibody-based gene/cell therapy protocols without inducing any adverse immune response in treated individuals....

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Hypophosphatemia: A Case of Hypophosphatemia along the Rickets-Osteomalacia Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Georges, George T.; Nájera, O.; Sowers, Kurt; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is a key component of bone, and a deficiency results in poor mineralization along with other systemic symptoms of hypophosphatemia. Various causes of hypophosphatemia with renal wasting of phosphorus have been identified. These include the Fanconi syndrome, various genetic mutations of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) handling and the sodium/phosphate cotransporter, and those due to FGF23 secretion by mesenchymal tumors. Depending on the cause, vitamin D metabolism may also be i...

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vernia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a target of the hepatic JNK-signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21 deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. Moreover, the protective effects of hepatic JNK deficiency to suppress metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice were not observed in mice with hepatocyte-specific FGF21 deficiency, including reduced blood glucose concentration and reduced intolerance to glucose and insulin. Furthermore, we show that JNK contributes to the regulation of hepatic FGF21 expression during fasting/feeding cycles. These data demonstrate that the hepatokine FGF21 is a key mediator of JNK-regulated metabolic syndrome.

  8. Fibroblasts in fibrosis: novel roles and mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Kendall

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are the most common cell type of the connective tissues found throughout the body and the principal source of the extensive extracellular matrix (ECM characteristic of these tissues. They are also the central mediators of the pathological fibrotic accumulation of ECM and the cellular proliferation and differentiation that occurs in response to prolonged tissue injury and chronic inflammation. The transformation of the fibroblast cell lineage involves classical developmental signaling programs and includes a surprisingly diverse range of precursor cell types—most notably, myofibroblasts that are the apex of the fibrotic phenotype. Myofibroblasts display exaggerated ECM production; constitutively secrete and are hypersensitive to chemical signals such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; and are endowed with a contractile apparatus allowing them to manipulate the ECM fibers physically to close open wounds. In addition to ECM production, fibroblasts have multiple concomitant biological roles, such as in wound healing, inflammation, and angiogenesis, which are each interwoven with the process of fibrosis. We now recognize many common fibroblast-related features across various physiological and pathological protracted processes. Indeed, a new appreciation has emerged for the role of noncancerous fibroblast interactions with tumors in cancer progression. Although the predominant current clinical treatments of fibrosis involve nonspecific immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative drugs, a variety of potential therapies under investigation specifically target fibroblast biology.

  9. PDGFRaa Signaling Is Regulated through the Primary Cilium in Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian Alexandro; Teilmann, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings show that cilia are sensory organelles that display specific receptors and ion channels, which transmit signals from the extracellular environment via the cilium to the cell to control tissue homeostasis and function [ [1] , [2] , [3] , [4] , [5] and [6] ]. Agenesis of primary cilia...... or mislocation of ciliary signal components affects human pathologies, such as polycystic kidney disease [ 7 ] and disorders associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome [ 8 ]. Primary cilia are essential for hedgehog ligand-induced signaling cascade regulating growth and patterning [ [9] and [10] ]. Here, we show...... is followed by activation of Akt and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathways, with Mek1/2 being phosphorylated within the cilium and at the basal body. Fibroblasts derived from Tg737orpk mutants fail to form normal cilia and to upregulate the level of PDGFRa; PDGF-AA fails to activate PDGFRaa and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathway...

  10. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find The Other 150 Kids Video Gallery In Memory Of Life According To Sam Awards & Reviews Buy & ... 2018 in Boston MA: Night of Wonder 2018: Music to your ears! Learn More College Diabetes Network ...

  11. Progeria 101/FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth failure, loss of body fat and hair, aged-looking skin and stiffness of joints. As children get older, they suffer from osteoporosis, generalized atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (heart) disease and stroke. The ...

  12. Learning about Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Projects Grant Information NIH Common Fund NIH RePORTER Research at NHGRI An Overview Branches Clinical Research ... use of high-throughput screening technology to identify chemical compounds that might reverse nuclear membrane abnormalities of ...

  13. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1.

  14. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  15. N-cadherin is overexpressed in Crohn's stricture fibroblasts and promotes intestinal fibroblast migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, John P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal fibroblasts mediate stricture formation in Crohn\\'s disease (CD). Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is important in fibroblast activation, while cell attachment and migration is regulated by the adhesion molecule N-cadherin. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of N-cadherin in intestinal fibroblasts in patients with fibrostenosing CD. METHODS: Intestinal fibroblasts were cultured from seromuscular biopsies from patients undergoing resection for terminal ileal fibrostenosing CD (n = 14) or controls patients (n = 8). N-cadherin expression was assessed using Western blot and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Fibroblasts were stimulated with TGF-beta and selective pathway inhibitors Y27632, PD98050, and LY294002 were used to examine the Rho\\/ROCK, ERK-1\\/2, and Akt signaling pathways, respectively. Cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound assay. N-cadherin was selectively overexpressed using a plasmid. RESULTS: Fibroblasts from fibrostenosing CD express increased constitutive N-cadherin mRNA and protein and exhibit enhanced basal cell migration relative to those from directly adjacent normal bowel. Control fibroblasts treated with TGF-beta induced N-cadherin in a dose-dependent manner which was inhibited by Rho\\/ROCK and Akt pathway modulation. Control fibroblasts exhibited enhanced cell migration in response to treatment with TGF-beta or transfection with an N-cadherin plasmid. CONCLUSIONS: Fibroblasts from strictures in CD express increased constitutive N-cadherin and exhibit enhanced basal cell migration. TGF-beta is a potent inducer of N-cadherin in intestinal fibroblasts resulting in enhanced cell migration. The TGF-beta-mediated induction of N-cadherin may potentiate Crohn\\'s stricture formation.

  16. Growth and cell cycle abnormalities of fibroblasts from Tangier disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnik, W; Liebisch, G; Biederer, C; Tr mbach, B; Rogler, G; Müller, P; Schmitz, G

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the abnormal proliferation and morphology of fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease (TD), a high density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency syndrome that is characterized by impairment of HDL3-mediated lipid efflux and Gi-protein-mediated signaling via phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD). TD fibroblasts displayed a 30% to 50% reduced in vitro growth rate and a 1.6-fold increased cell surface area. The response to different mitogens was diminished, and asynchronously growing TD fibroblasts showed 4.4+/-0.3% S-phase and 19.1+/-0.5% G2/M-phase cells compared with 9.7+/-0.6% and 7.8+/-0.5%, respectively, in controls. Monensin, but not brefeldin A, induced an S- and G2/M-phase distribution in control cells similar to that found in TD fibroblasts. This effect of monensin was accompanied by an increase of ceramide levels in controls, whereas TD fibroblasts already had a 2.5-fold increased basal ceramide concentration. Incubation of control cells with C2 ceramide and threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) mimicked the effect of monensin on the cell cycle. The inhibition of neither Gi protein function by pertussis toxin nor PLD by butanol resulted in a G2/M-phase arrest. Propranolol, known to increase phosphatidic acid levels, was ineffective in reversing the G2/M-phase arrest in TD fibroblasts. In addition, cDNA sequences and mRNA expression of the participants of PI-PLC or PLD signaling, ie, G-protein subunits alphai1, alphai2, and alphai3; phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins-alpha and -beta; and ADP ribosylation factors 1 and 3 were found to be normal. Thus, growth and cell cycle abnormalities in TD fibroblasts are likely to be related to impaired Golgi function and sphingolipid signaling rather than inoperative G-protein signal transduction. Because PDMP was also found to decrease HDL3-mediated lipid efflux in control but not TD fibroblasts, similar pathways seem to be involved

  17. Hedgehog signaling contributes to basic fibroblast growth factor-regulated fibroblast migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhong Xin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Sun, Cong Cong [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Ting Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Wang, Tao; Chi, Li Sha; Cai, Wan Hui [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zheng, Jia Yong [Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhou, Xuan [Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Cong, Wei Tao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Xiao Kun, E-mail: proflxk@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Jin, Li Tai, E-mail: jin_litai@126.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2017-06-15

    Fibroblast migration is a central process in skin wound healing, which requires the coordination of several types of growth factors. bFGF, a well-known fibroblast growth factor (FGF), is able to accelerate fibroblast migration; however, the underlying mechanism of bFGF regulation fibroblast migration remains unclear. Through the RNA-seq analysis, we had identified that the hedgehog (Hh) canonical pathway genes including Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1, were regulated by bFGF. Further analysis revealed that activation of the Hh pathway via up-regulation of Smo promoted fibroblast migration, invasion, and skin wound healing, but which significantly reduced by GANT61, a selective antagonist of Gli1/Gli2. Western blot analyses and siRNA transfection assays demonstrated that Smo acted upstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-β-catenin to promote cell migration. Moreover, RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that Hh pathway genes including Smo and Gli1 were under control of β-catenin, suggesting that β-catenin turn feedback activates Hh signaling. Taken together, our analyses identified a new bFGF-regulating mechanism by which Hh signaling regulates human fibroblast migration, and the data presented here opens a new avenue for the wound healing therapy. - Highlights: • bFGF regulates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in fibroblasts. • The Smo and Gli two master regulators of Hh signaling positively regulate fibroblast migration. • Smo facilitates β-catenin nuclear translocation via activation PI3K/JNK/GSK3β. • β-catenin positively regulates fibroblast cell migration and the expression of Hh signaling genes including Smo and Gli.

  18. Cryopreservation of canine ovarian and testicular fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Il-Jeoung; Leibo, S P; Songsasen, Nucharin; Dresser, Betsy L; Kim, In-Shik

    2009-01-01

    To derive a practical procedure to store canine somatic cells, fibroblasts isolated from testicular or ovarian tissues were cryopreserved in 1.2 M ethylene glycol or in 1.2 M dimethylsulfoxide prepared in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium as cryoprotectants, and were frozen either in plastic straws or vials. Thawed cells were cultured for 24 hr at 38.5 degree C in a humidified atmosphere of 5 percent CO2 95 percent air, and then their membrane integrity was assayed with a double fluorescent stain, Fertilight. In addition, frozen-thawed fibroblasts were cultured for 4 days, and then their functional survival was measured after staining small colonies with trypan blue. After freezing and thawing, membrane integrity of testicular fibroblasts was 55-70 percent and functional survival ranged from 20-40 percent. With frozen-thawed ovarian cells, the average membrane integrity was 55-75 percent and the average functional survival was 35-40 percent. When frozen in ethylene glycol, functional survival of ovarian fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of testicular cells (P less than 0.05). These methods should prove useful to preserve cells collected from canids in the wild.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 23 - et fosfatregulerende hormon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Signe; Pedersen, Susanne Møller; Kassem, Moustapha

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) er et nyligt identificeret fosfatonin. FGF23's fysiologiske hovedfunktion er at opretholde normalt serumfosfat og at virke som et D-vitaminmodregulatorisk hormon. Sygdomme, der er koblet til forhøjet serum FGF23, er hypofosfatæmisk rakitis, fibrøs dysplasi og...

  20. UV-induced extracellular factor from human fibroblasts communicates the UV response to nonirradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorpp, M.; Mallick, U.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P.

    1984-07-01

    Ultraviolet light enhances the synthesis of at least eight abundant proteins in human fibroblasts within 2 hr. These proteins are identical with those induced by the tumor promoter TPA. The inducing signal is generated by DNA damage, as these proteins are induced by lower doses of UV in fibroblasts from patients with Cockayne's syndrome or Xeroderma pigmentosum. In the supernatant of UV-treated cells, a heat-labile ammonium sulfate precipitable factor of more than 10 kd (EPIF) was detected which, upon transfer to nonirradiated cells, mimicked UV in the UV-induced synthesis of gene products. The response to UV, TPA, or EPIF was inhibited by fluocinolone acetonide, but not by retinoic acid, protease inhibitors, or superoxide dismutase.

  1. Allogeneic fibroblasts in dermal substitutes induce inflammation and scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, Evert N.; van Leeuwen, Rene T. J.; Mekkes, Jan R.; Middelkoop, Esther

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the use of autologous versus allogeneic fibroblasts in dermal skin substitutes in a porcine wound model. The allogeneic fibroblast populations were isolated from female and a male pig (allo-1, - 2 and - 3) and the controls, autologous fibroblasts, from female

  2. HETEROGENIC SERUM, AGE, AND MULTIPLICATION OF FIBROBLASTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, A; Ebeling, A H

    1922-01-01

    The presence in a culture medium of heterogenic serum of various concentrations exerts a definite influence on the rate of multiplication of fibroblasts. Dog serum does not inhibit the growth of See PDF for Structure chicken fibroblasts markedly until its concentration reaches 15 per cent. Beyond this figure, each increase of the concentration brings about a rapid decrease in the rate of cell multiplication. When the concentration reaches from 30 to 45 per cent, no growth takes place. The inhibiting action of cat serum begins to manifest itself at a concentration of 25 per cent and prevents cell proliferation completely at a concentration of 55 and 60 per cent. The ratio, See PDF for Equation can be taken as expressing the action of the serum on fibroblast multiplication; that is, as the growth index of the serum. See PDF for Structure The inhibiting influence of heterogenic serum was found to vary in direct ratio to the age of the animal from which it was obtained. The rate of proliferation of chicken fibroblasts was studied comparatively in media containing varied concentrations of serum from young and old animals. For each concentration of serum, the rate of growth in the serum of the old animal was expressed in relation to the rate of growth in the serum of the young animal. When cat serum was used, the curve obtained in plotting this ratio in ordinates and the serum concentration in abscissae showed a rapid increase in the inhibiting action of the old serum as soon as the concentration reached 30 per cent. The same tests were repeated with the serum from young and old dogs. The general results were identical, although See PDF for Structure the quantitative inhibiting action of both sera was greater than that of cat serum. It may be concluded that under the conditions of the experiments: 1. Heterogenicsera inhibit and prevent the growth of chicken fibroblasts when their concentration is made to vary within certain limits. 2. A relation exists between the rate

  3. Fibroblast α11β1 integrin regulates tensional homeostasis in fibroblast/A549 carcinoma heterospheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Lu

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that fibroblast expression of α11β1 integrin stimulates A549 carcinoma cell growth in a xenograft tumor model. To understand the molecular mechanisms whereby a collagen receptor on fibroblast can regulate tumor growth we have used a 3D heterospheroid system composed of A549 tumor cells and fibroblasts without (α11+/+ or with a deletion (α11-/- in integrin α11 gene. Our data show that α11-/-/A549 spheroids are larger than α11+/+/A549 spheroids, and that A549 cell number, cell migration and cell invasion in a collagen I gel are decreased in α11-/-/A549 spheroids. Gene expression profiling of differentially expressed genes in fibroblast/A549 spheroids identified CXCL5 as one molecule down-regulated in A549 cells in the absence of α11 on the fibroblasts. Blocking CXCL5 function with the CXCR2 inhibitor SB225002 reduced cell proliferation and cell migration of A549 cells within spheroids, demonstrating that the fibroblast integrin α11β1 in a 3D heterospheroid context affects carcinoma cell growth and invasion by stimulating autocrine secretion of CXCL5. We furthermore suggest that fibroblast α11β1 in fibroblast/A549 spheroids regulates interstitial fluid pressure by compacting the collagen matrix, in turn implying a role for stromal collagen receptors in regulating tensional hemostasis in tumors. In summary, blocking stromal α11β1 integrin function might thus be a stroma-targeted therapeutic strategy to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy.

  4. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  5. The effect of tranilast on fibroblast activation protein α (FAP-α expression in normal and keloid fibroblasts in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł P. Antończak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Tranilast (N-(3’,4’-demethoxycinnamoyl-anthranilic acid is an anti-allergic drug. Its mechanism of action is based on the inhibition of antigen-induced release of chemical mediators from mast cells and basophils. It also reveals antifibroproliferative activities. These properties of tranilast are used in the treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids. Keloids are characterized by incorrect extracellular matrix components turnover. Fibroblasts derived from keloids reveal overproduction of collagen type I and decreased degradation of extracellular matrix in comparison with normal fibroblasts. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAP-α may play an important role in remodeling of extracellular matrix and the invasive properties of keloids. Objective . In the present study, the effect of tranilast on expression of FAP-α gene and its protein was evaluated in normal human dermal fibroblasts and fibroblasts derived from keloids cultured in vitro . Materials and methods. In the first stage of the study, the influence of tranilast on cell viability was estimated. The second stage of the study included the quantitative evaluation of FAP-α mRNA expression in normal and keloid fibroblasts treated with tranilast. The third stage of the study comprised fibroblast activation protein α expression analysis in the examined cells treated with tranilast. Results and conclusions . The expression of FAP-α gene and fibroblast activation protein α is higher in keloid fibroblasts. Tranilast at concentrations of 3 μM and 30 μM up-regulated mRNA FAP-α expression in normal fibroblasts but did not influence keloid fibroblasts. The drug, at concentrations of 30 μM and 300 μM up-regulated fibroblast activation protein α expression in normal fibroblasts and did not influence keloid fibroblasts. Tranilast antiproliferative effect is not associated with FAP-α expression in keloid fibroblasts.

  6. Cockayne syndrome in two adult siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, H; Horio, T; Akaeda, T; Asada, Y; Chang, H R; Ishizaki, K; Ikenaga, M

    1994-02-01

    Although survival beyond the second decade is unusual in patients who have Cockayne syndrome, we describe two brothers with the syndrome who are 42 and 55 years of age. Their cultured skin fibroblasts showed extreme UV sensitivity but had almost normal UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. The patients were classified as genetic complementation group B after study of the recovery of RNA synthesis after UV irradiation of fused cells. Clinical phototesting revealed a reduced threshold for UVB erythema.

  7. Overexpression of wild-type creatine transporter (SLC6A8) restores creatine uptake in primary SLC6A8-deficient fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Efraim H; Muñoz, Cristina Martínez; Degrauw, Ton J; Jakobs, Cor nelis; Salomons, Gajja S

    2006-01-01

    In the study reported, we prove that mutations in the SLC6A8 gene are responsible for SLC6A8 deficiency, a cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome (CCDS), since overexpression of the wild-type SLC6A8 open reading frame (ORF) restores the creatine uptake profile in SLC6A8-deficient fibroblasts.

  8. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1? activates ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Doucet, Michele; Tomlinson, Ryan E; Han, Xiaobin; Quarles, L Darryl; Collins, Michael T; Clemens, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome in which ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) by non-malignant mesenchymal tumors causes phosphate wasting and bone fractures. Recent studies have implicated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) in other phosphate wasting disorders caused by elevated FGF23, including X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemia. Here we provide evidence that HIF-1? mediates aberrant FGF23 i...

  9. Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promotes Vascular Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Thorir D.; Dryjski, Maciej; Tluczek, John; Mennie, Robert; Ronan, John; Mellin, Theodore N.; Thomas, Kenneth A.

    1991-10-01

    Intravascular injury to arteries can result in thickening of the intimal smooth muscle layer adjacent to the lumen by migration and proliferation of cells from the underlying medial smooth muscle layer accompanied by deposition of extracellular matrix. This pathological response, which decreases lumen diameter, might, in part, be the result of the access of smooth muscle cells to plasma and platelet-derived growth factors as a consequence of denudation of the overlying confluent monolayer of vascular endothelial cells. Injured rat carotid arteries were treated by i.v. administration of acidic fibroblast growth factor, a heparin-binding protein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular endothelial cells. The growth factor treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of intimal thickening with parallel promotion of endothelial regeneration over the injured area. Therefore, acidic fibroblast growth factor might be efficacious in the prevention of restenosis caused by intimal thickening following angioplasty in humans.

  10. Fibroblasts as architects of cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Timothy; Pietras, Kristian; McAllister, Sandra S

    2013-07-01

    Studies of epithelial cancers (i.e., carcinomas) traditionally focused on transformation of the epithelium (i.e., the cancer cells) and how aberrant signaling within the cancer cells modulates the surrounding tissue of origin. In more recent decades, the normal cells, blood vessels, molecules, and extracellular components that surround the tumor cells, collectively known as the "tumor microenvironment" or "stroma", have received increasing attention and are now thought to be key regulators of tumor initiation and progression. Of particular relevance to the work reviewed herein are the fibroblasts, which make up the major cell type within the microenvironment of most carcinomas. Due to their inherent heterogeneity, plasticity, and function, it is perhaps not surprising that fibroblasts are ideal modulators of normal and cancerous epithelium; however, these aspects also present challenges if we are to interrupt their tumor-supportive functions. Here, we review the current body of knowledge and the many questions that still remain about the special entity known as the cancer-associated fibroblast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fibrosis: Translation of basic research to human disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Fibroblasts as maestros orchestrating tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Soares, Raquel; Granja, Pedro L

    2017-01-20

    Fibroblasts constitute a dynamic and versatile population of cells of mesenchymal origin, implicated in both regenerative strategies and pathological conditions. Despite being frequently associated to disease development, particularly through the establishment of fibrotic tissue, fibroblasts hold great potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. They are responsible for synthesizing and depositing extracellular matrix components, allowing other cells to settle and migrate along a three-dimensional support and thereby generating an organ-specific architecture. Additionally, they produce bioactive molecules that are involved in several physiological processes, including angiogenesis and tissue repair. Although there seems to be much still to unveil about these fascinating cells they have been attracting increasing interest and are now being intensively explored as a cell source to develop bioengineered tissue constructs or to improve stem cell-based technologies. This review intends to highlight the potential of fibroblasts in orchestrating tissue regeneration, as well as to contribute to uncover uncharted prospective applications of these cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh L. Thangapazham

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices.

  13. Pericellular Versican Regulates the Fibroblast-Myofibroblast Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Carrino, David A.; Lauer, Mark E.; Vasanji, Amit; Wylie, James D.; Nelson, Courtney M.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2011-01-01

    The cell and its glycosaminoglycan-rich pericellular matrix (PCM) comprise a functional unit. Because modification of PCM influences cell behavior, we investigated molecular mechanisms that regulate PCM volume and composition. In fibroblasts and other cells, aggregates of hyaluronan and versican are found in the PCM. Dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5−/− mice, which lack a versican-degrading protease, ADAMTS5, had reduced versican proteolysis, increased PCM, altered cell shape, enhanced α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression and increased contractility within three-dimensional collagen gels. The myofibroblast-like phenotype was associated with activation of TGFβ signaling. We tested the hypothesis that fibroblast-myofibroblast transition in Adamts5−/− cells resulted from versican accumulation in PCM. First, we noted that versican overexpression in human dermal fibroblasts led to increased SMA expression, enhanced contractility, and increased Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts from Vcan haploinsufficient (Vcanhdf/+) mice had reduced contractility relative to wild type fibroblasts. Using a genetic approach to directly test if myofibroblast transition in Adamts5−/− cells resulted from increased PCM versican content, we generated Adamts5−/−;Vcanhdf/+ mice and isolated their dermal fibroblasts for comparison with dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5−/− mice. In Adamts5−/− fibroblasts, Vcan haploinsufficiency or exogenous ADAMTS5 restored normal fibroblast contractility. These findings demonstrate that altering PCM versican content through proteolytic activity of ADAMTS5 profoundly influenced the dermal fibroblast phenotype and may regulate a phenotypic continuum between the fibroblast and its alter ego, the myofibroblast. We propose that a physiological function of ADAMTS5 in dermal fibroblasts is to maintain optimal versican content and PCM volume by continually trimming versican in hyaluronan-versican aggregates. PMID:21828051

  14. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ying; Prochazka, Jan; Goodwin, Alice F; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the central role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in mammalian tooth development. The FGF family consists of 22 members, most of which bind to four different receptor tyrosine kinases, which in turn signal through a cascade of intracellular proteins. This signaling regulates a number of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, cell adhesion and cell mobility. FGF signaling first becomes important in the presumptive dental epithelium at the initiation stage of tooth development, and subsequently, it controls the invagination of the dental epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Later, FGFs are critical in tooth shape formation and differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts, as well as in the development and homeostasis of the stem cell niche that fuels the continuously growing mouse incisor. In addition, FGF signaling is critical in human teeth, as mutations in genes encoding FGF ligands or receptors result in several congenital syndromes characterized by alterations in tooth number, morphology or enamel structure. The parallel roles of FGF signaling in mouse and human tooth development demonstrate the conserved importance of FGF signaling in mammalian odontogenesis.

  15. Primary cell culture from human oral tissue: gingival keratinocytes,gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreya Wanichpakorn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary cell culture of human oral tissue has many applications for oral biology research. There are two techniques in primary culture, which includes the enzymatic and direct explant technique. The objectives of this study were (1 to isolate and investigate the difference in percentage the success in culturing three cell types from human oral tissue: gingival keratinocytes, gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament fibroblasts by using the direct explant technique; (2 to compare the effect of sex and age on the success of tissue culturing. Twenty seven tissue samples were obtained from healthy human gingival tissue, 19 female and 8 male patients aged 14-67 years (37.7±17.5. The tissue was cut into 1x1 mm pieces and placed on plastic culture plates containing Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, 100 U/ml penicillin, 100 µg/ml streptomycin and 1% amphotericin B. For the keratinocytes culture, after the epithelial cells started to multiply around the gingival origin and the diameter was 2-5 mm., the fibroblasts were liminated by mechanical removal under inverted microscope to prevent fibroblast overgrowth and the medium was changed to keratinocyte-SFM (Gibco, BRL supplemented with 5 µg/ml gentamycin. The results revealed that gingival fibroblast gave the highest success rate in culture (96.3%, followed by gingival keratinocytes (88.9% and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (81.5%. There was no significant difference in the success rate of cultivation between younger and older individuals, as between sex of the subjects (p>0.05. The risk of failure in culture techniques is mainly caused by microbiological contamination from the tissue samples.

  16. Lipoxin A4 promotes lung epithelial repair whilst inhibiting fibroblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxing Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapy that promotes epithelial repair whilst protecting against fibroproliferation is critical for restoring lung function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Primary human alveolar type II cells were used to model the effects of lipoxin A4 in vitro upon wound repair, proliferation, apoptosis and transdifferention. Effects of lipoxin A4 upon primary human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and myofibroblast differentiation were also assessed. Lipoxin A4 promoted type II cell wound repair and proliferation, blocked the negative effects of soluble Fas ligand/tumour necrosis factor α upon cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, and augmented the epithelial cell proliferative response to bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In contrast, Lipoxin A4 reduced fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation induced by transforming growth factor β and BALF from ARDS. The effects of Lipoxin A4 were phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase dependent and mediated via the lipoxin A4 receptor. Lipoxin A4 appears to promote alveolar epithelial repair by stimulating epitheial cell wound repair, proliferation, reducing apoptosis and promoting trans-differentiation of alveolar type II cells into type I cells. Lipoxin A4 reduces fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation. These data suggest that targeting lipoxin actions may be a therapeutic strategy for treating the resolution phase of ARDS.

  17. Brain vascular changes in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Miwa-Saito, Naho; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Kubota, Masaya

    2012-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are caused by deficient nucleotide excision repair. CS is characterized by cachectic dwarfism, mental disability, microcephaly and progeria features. Neuropathological examination of CS patients reveals dysmyelination and basal ganglia calcification. In addition, arteriosclerosis in the brain and subdural hemorrhage have been reported in a few CS cases. Herein, we performed elastica van Gieson (EVG) staining and immunohistochemistry for collagen type IV, CD34 and aquaporin 4 to evaluate the brain vessels in autopsy cases of CS, XP group A (XP-A) and controls. Small arteries without arteriosclerosis in the subarachnoid space had increased in CS cases but not in either XP-A cases or controls. In addition, string vessels (twisted capillaries) in the cerebral white matter and increased density of CD34-immunoreactive vessels were observed in CS cases. Immunohistochemistry findings for aquaporin 4 indicated no pathological changes in either CS or XP-A cases. Hence, the increased subarachnoid artery space may have caused subdural hemorrhage. Since such vascular changes were not observed in XP-A cases, the increased density of vessels in CS cases was not caused by brain atrophy. Hence, brain vascular changes may be involved in neurological disturbances in CS. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged herpes virus in ultraviolet pretreated skin fibroblasts of cancer prone donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J.; Menezes, S.

    1981-01-01

    An enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged (u.v. at 254 nm) unclear replicating double-stranded DNA viruses occurs when corresponding host cells are treated with radiation or carcinogens prior to infection. This phenomenon seems to be due to an induced DNA repair activity the nature of which is yet unknown. The u.v.-induced enhanced reactivation (ER) of u.v.-damaged herpes simplex virus (u.v. - HSV) was compared in dividing skin fibroblasts of 30 donors either normal or afflicted by genetic disorders, some of which confer a high risk for sunlight induced skin cancers. Cultures were exposed to a single dose of 1.0-25 J.m-2 from 0-60 h before infection with u.v.-HSV (at about 10-3 survival) and the rate of viral production was determined. ER was maximal for a 36 h time interval in all lines. The u.v. dose eliciting maximal ER was 15 J.m-2 in fibroblasts from normal donors, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) heterozygotes, Mibelli's porokeratosis, diffused naevomatosis, Down's syndrome, xerodermoids, XP variants and epidermodysplasia verruciformis. However, in the latter 3 cases, ER was almost 10 times more pronounced than in the normal cases. The u.v. dose eliciting maximal ER was 0.1, 0.3 and 2 J.m-2 in excision deficient XP fibroblasts from groups A, D and C, respectively, 2.5 J.m-2 in 11961 fibroblasts and 5 J.m-2 in fibroblast lines from cockayne s syndrome.

  19. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Reddy, Sita, E-mail: sitaredd@usc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Comai, Lucio, E-mail: comai@usc.edu [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  20. [Analysis of chromosome karyotype of oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Chen, Qian-Ming; Li, Bing-Qi

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the fundamental genetic character of oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts changes through contrasting and analyzing the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and the normal fibroblasts of oral mucosa. The two kinds of cells were treated with colchicine and microsometic fluid, and then were expanded with cold acetic acid and formalized with methyl alcohol. The cells were observed under the oil microscope after Giemsa staining. The chromosome karyotype of the two kinds of cells was analyzed by Visus 2. 1. There were not obvious differences in the way of chromosome karyotype between the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and the normal fibroblasts of oral mucosa. The basic genetic characteristics of the normal cells are conserved in the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, which means the cells have no malignant changes.

  1. Tumor-secreted LOXL2 activates fibroblasts through FAK signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Holly E; Bird, Demelza; Lang, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    models. Here, we discovered that tumor-derived LOXL2 directly activated stromal fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment. Genetic manipulation or antibody inhibition of LOXL2 in orthotopically grown mammary tumors reduced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Using a marker for reticular...... fibroblasts, it was determined that expression of α-SMA was localized to fibroblasts recruited from the host tissue. This marker also revealed that the matrix present in tumors with reduced levels of LOXL2 was more scattered compared with control tumors which exhibited matrices with dense, parallel alignments....... Importantly, in vitro assays revealed that tumor-derived LOXL2 and a recombinant LOXL2 protein induced fibroblast branching on collagen matrices, as well as increased fibroblast-mediated collagen contraction and invasion of fibroblasts through extracellular matrix. Moreover, LOXL2 induced the expression of α-SMA...

  2. Paternal Origin of FGFR2 Mutations in Sporadic Cases of Crouzon Syndrome and Pfeiffer Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Rivka L.; Jiang, Wen; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Tran, Alissa K.; Andrea A. Zachary; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Johnson, David; Walsh, Sinead; Oldridge, Michael; Wall, Steven A.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2000-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome and Pfeiffer syndrome are both autosomal dominant craniosynostotic disorders that can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. To determine the parental origin of these FGFR2 mutations, the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used. ARMS PCR primers were developed to recognize polymorphisms that could distinguish maternal and paternal alleles. A total of 4,374 bases between introns IIIa and 11 of the FGFR2 gene were sequen...

  3. The neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch): a model for the study of human aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Ramírez, Nelson; Arboleda, Humberto

    2007-10-01

    The Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS) characterises a premature aging syndrome in which several features of human aging are apparent at birth therefore allowing their grouping as a neonatal progeroid condition. This differentiates WRS from other progeroid entities such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) in which characteristics of premature aging become apparent some time after birth. The etiology of WRS remains unknown. Some studies have observed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Several studies analysing telomere length and lamin A gene have not revealed any alterations. However, mutations in LMNA have been reported in several other atypical progeroid syndromes. Based on these observations, several hypothesis could be withdrawn concerning the etiology of WRS. The study of genes associated with lamin A metabolism, such as Zmpste24, and the metabolic pathways associated with insulin, such as protein kinase B or AKT, are of particular interest. We believe that WRS characteristics indicate that discovery of the gene and the metabolic pathway associated with this syndrome will most likely lead to new knowledge about the physiopathology of human aging.

  4. HGF is released from buccal fibroblasts after smokeless tobacco stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, S; Christensen, S; Gron, B

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of smokeless tobacco (ST) on (1) HGF, KGF and GM-CSF expression by buccal fibroblasts and (2) on keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation. Buccal fibroblasts were stimulated with different concentrations of ST extracts in a double dilution from 0.50% w/v to 0.03% w/v. S....... Keratinocytes and fibroblasts showed no increase in proliferation after stimulation with increased concentrations of ST. The results suggest that HGF and KGF may play an important role as a paracrine growth factor in epithelial hyperplasia in ST lesions....

  5. Hsp90 regulation of fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Wang, Yunguan; Kasam, Rajesh K.; Sinner, Debora; Reddy, Geereddy B.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; McCormack, Francis X.; Jegga, Anil G.; Madala, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe fibrotic lung disease associated with fibroblast activation that includes excessive proliferation, tissue invasiveness, myofibroblast transformation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. To identify inhibitors that can attenuate fibroblast activation, we queried IPF gene signatures against a library of small-molecule-induced gene-expression profiles and identified Hsp90 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents that can suppress fibroblast activation in IPF. Although Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that regulates multiple processes involved in fibroblast activation, it has not been previously proposed as a molecular target in IPF. Here, we found elevated Hsp90 staining in lung biopsies of patients with IPF. Notably, fibroblasts isolated from fibrotic lesions showed heightened Hsp90 ATPase activity compared with normal fibroblasts. 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90 ATPase activity, attenuated fibroblast activation and also TGF-β–driven effects on fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation. The loss of the Hsp90AB, but not the Hsp90AA isoform, resulted in reduced fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast transformation, and ECM production. Finally, in vivo therapy with 17-AAG attenuated progression of established and ongoing fibrosis in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis, suggesting that targeting Hsp90 represents an effective strategy for the treatment of fibrotic lung disease. PMID:28239659

  6. Oral fibroblasts produce more HGF and KGF than skin fibroblasts in response to co-culture with keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Birgitte; Stoltze, Kaj; Andersson, Anders

    2002-01-01

    The production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in subepithelial fibroblasts from buccal mucosa, periodontal ligament, and skin was determined after co-culture with keratinocytes. The purpose was to detect differences between the fibroblast subpopulations...... that could explain regional variation in epithelial growth and wound healing. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured on polystyrene or maintained in collagen matrix and stimulated with keratinocytes cultured on membranes. The amount of HGF and KGF protein in the culture medium was determined every 24 h for 5...... days by ELISA. When cultured on polystyrene, the constitutive level of KGF and HGF in periodontal fibroblasts was higher than the level in buccal and skin fibroblasts. In the presence of keratinocytes, all three types of fibroblasts in general increased their HGF and KGF production 2-3 times. When...

  7. Gene Signature of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts: Comparison with Dermal Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Keiko; Horiguchi, Taigo; Tanimura, Ayako; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucosa is a useful material for regeneration therapy with the advantages of its accessibility and versatility regardless of age and gender. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of oral mucosa. Here we report the first comparative profiles of the gene signatures of human oral mucosa fibroblasts (hOFs), human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs), and hOF-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hOF-iPSCs), linking these with biological roles by functional annotation and pathway analyses. As a common feature of fibroblasts, both hOFs and hDFs expressed glycolipid metabolism-related genes at higher levels compared with hOF-iPSCs. Distinct characteristics of hOFs compared with hDFs included a high expression of glycoprotein genes, involved in signaling, extracellular matrix, membrane, and receptor proteins, besides a low expression of HOX genes, the hDFs-markers. The results of the pathway analyses indicated that tissue-reconstructive, proliferative, and signaling pathways are active, whereas senescence-related genes in p53 pathway are inactive in hOFs. Furthermore, more than half of hOF-specific genes were similarly expressed to those of hOF-iPSC genes and might be controlled by WNT signaling. Our findings demonstrated that hOFs have unique cellular characteristics in specificity and plasticity. These data may provide useful insight into application of oral fibroblasts for direct reprograming.

  8. Differences in motility pattern between human buccal fibroblasts and periodontal and skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepekhin, Eugene; Grøn, Birgitte; Berezin, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    at these sites can be explained by differences in the motile behavior of their respective fibroblast populations. The migratory characteristics were studied in a two-dimensional culture system. The migration of single cells was time-lapse video recorded at intervals of 15 min for a period of 6 h using a computer...

  9. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytle, C.D. (Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA)); Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Wirtschafter, J.D. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Hospitals); Dupuy, J.M. (Quebec Univ., Laval-des-Rapides (Canada). Inst. Armand-Frappier)

    1983-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration.

  10. Metabolic disorders mimicking Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P F; Huang, S F; Hwu, W L; Hou, J W; Ni, Y H; Chang, M H

    2000-04-01

    Several metabolic disorders such as encephalopathy and hepatic dysfunction have been described as Reye's-like syndrome because they present with similar clinical manifestations that mimic Reye's syndrome. We performed a retrospective study to explore the underlying metabolic etiologies of Reye's-like syndrome in patients treated at National Taiwan University Hospital. From January 1991 to June 1998, 19 children with a syndrome fitting the Reye's-like syndrome description were identified for study. Urine organic acid analysis, plasma amino acid analysis, liver pathology, and skin fibroblast enzyme assays were studied during the acute stage of illness. The etiologies of patients' syndromes included urea cycle disorders (n = 7), glycogen storage disease type Ia (4), primary carnitine deficiency (2), hereditary fructose intolerance (1), methylmalonic acidemia (2), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acidemia (1). Fatty acid oxidation defects were suspected in the remaining two cases. A significant number of patients who present with Reye's-like syndrome have an underlying inherited metabolic disorder. In patients with Reye's-like syndrome, an accurate diagnosis is essential to ensure normal growth and development and to prevent recurrence of the condition.

  11. Replacement of murine fibroblasts by human fibroblasts irradiated in obtaining feeder layer for the culture of human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshito, Daniele; Sufi, Bianca S.; Santin, Stefany P.; Mathor, Monica B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Altran, Silvana C.; Isaac, Cesar [Universidade Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Lab. de Microcirurgia Plastica; Esteves-Pedro, Natalia M. [Universidade Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Lab. de Controle Biologico; Herson, Marisa R. [DonorTissue Bank of Victoria (Australia)

    2011-07-01

    Human autologous epithelia cultivated in vitro, have been used successfully in treating damage to skin integrity. The methodology allowed the cultivation of these epithelia was described by Rheinwald and Green in 1975, this methodology consisted in seeding keratinocytes onto a feeder layer composed of lineage 3T3 murine fibroblasts, the proliferation rate is controlled through the action of ionizing radiation. However, currently there is a growing concern about the possibility of transmitting prions and murine viruses to transplanted patients. Taking into account this concern, in this present work, we replaced the feeder layer originally composed of murine fibroblasts by human fibroblasts. To obtain this new feeder layer was necessary to standardize the enough irradiation dose to inhibit the replication of human fibroblasts and the verification of effectiveness of the development of keratinocytes culture on a feeder layer thus obtained. According to the obtained results we can verify that the human fibroblasts irradiated at various tested doses (60, 70, 100, 200, 250 and 300 Gy) had their mitotic activity inactivated by irradiation, allowing the use of any of these doses to confection of the feeder layer, since these fibroblasts irradiated still showed viable until fourteen days of cultivation. In the test of colony formation efficiency was observed that keratinocytes seeded on irradiated human fibroblasts were able to develop satisfactorily, preserving their clonogenic potential. Therefore it was possible the replacement of murine fibroblasts by human fibroblasts in confection of the feeder layer, in order to eliminate this xenobiotic component of the keratinocytes culture. (author)

  12. Toll-like receptor 9 mediated responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kristine Ohm

    Full Text Available Altered cardiac Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 signaling is important in several experimental cardiovascular disorders. These studies have predominantly focused on cardiac myocytes or the heart as a whole. Cardiac fibroblasts have recently been attributed increasing significance in mediating inflammatory signaling. However, putative TLR9-signaling through cardiac fibroblasts remains non-investigated. Thus, our aim was to explore TLR9-signaling in cardiac fibroblasts and investigate the consequence of such receptor activity on classical cardiac fibroblast cellular functions. Cultivated murine cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with different TLR9 agonists (CpG A, B and C and assayed for the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα], CXCL2 and interferon α/β. Expression of functional cardiac fibroblast TLR9 was proven as stimulation with CpG B and -C caused significant CXCL2 and TNFα-release. These responses were TLR9-specific as complete inhibition of receptor-stimulated responses was achieved by co-treatment with a TLR9-antagonist (ODN 2088 or chloroquine diphosphate. TLR9-stimulated responses were also found more potent in cardiac fibroblasts when compared with classical innate immune cells. Stimulation of cardiac fibroblasts TLR9 was also found to attenuate migration and proliferation, but did not influence myofibroblast differentiation in vitro. Finally, results from in vivo TLR9-stimulation with subsequent fractionation of specific cardiac cell-types (cardiac myocytes, CD45+ cells, CD31+ cells and cardiac fibroblast-enriched cell-fractions corroborated our in vitro data and provided evidence of differentiated cell-specific cardiac responses. Thus, we conclude that cardiac fibroblast may constitute a significant TLR9 responder cell within the myocardium and, further, that such receptor activity may impact important cardiac fibroblast cellular functions.

  13. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Pulecio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41+, display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  14. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, ...

  15. Nuclear targeting of IGF-1 receptor in orbital fibroblasts from Graves' disease: apparent role of ADAM17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Hoa

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R comprises two subunits, including a ligand binding domain on extra- cellular IGF-1Rα and a tyrosine phosphorylation site located on IGF-1Rβ. IGF-1R is over-expressed by orbital fibroblasts in the autoimmune syndrome, Graves' disease (GD. When activated by IGF-1 or GD-derived IgG (GD-IgG, these fibroblasts produce RANTES and IL-16, while those from healthy donors do not. We now report that IGF-1 and GD-IgG provoke IGF-1R accumulation in the cell nucleus of GD fibroblasts where it co-localizes with chromatin. Nuclear IGF-1R is detected with anti-IGF-1Rα-specific mAb and migrates to approximately 110 kDa, consistent with its identity as an IGF-1R fragment. Nuclear IGF-1R migrating as a 200 kDa protein and consistent with an intact receptor was undetectable when probed with either anti-IGF-1Rα or anti-IGF-1Rβ mAbs. Nuclear redistribution of IGF-1R is absent in control orbital fibroblasts. In GD fibroblasts, it can be abolished by an IGF-1R-blocking mAb, 1H7 and by physiological concentrations of glucocorticoids. When cell-surface IGF-1R is cross-linked with (125I IGF-1, (125I-IGF-1/IGF-1R complexes accumulate in the nuclei of GD fibroblasts. This requires active ADAM17, a membrane associated metalloproteinase, and the phosphorylation of IGF-1R. In contrast, virally encoded IGF-1Rα/GFP fusion protein localizes equivalently in nuclei in both control and GD fibroblasts. This result suggests that generation of IGF-1R fragments may limit the accumulation of nuclear IGF-1R. We thus identify a heretofore-unrecognized behavior of IGF-1R that appears limited to GD-derived fibroblasts. Nuclear IGF-1R may play a role in disease pathogenesis.

  16. Rac inhibition reverses the phenotype of fibrotic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-wen Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibrosis, the excessive deposition of scar tissue by fibroblasts, is one of the largest groups of diseases for which there is no therapy. Fibroblasts from lesional areas of scleroderma patients possess elevated abilities to contract matrix and produce alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA, type I collagen and CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor, CTGF. The basis for this phenomenon is poorly understood, and is a necessary prerequisite for developing novel, rational anti-fibrotic strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Compared to healthy skin fibroblasts, dermal fibroblasts cultured from lesional areas of scleroderma (SSc patients possess elevated Rac activity. NSC23766, a Rac inhibitor, suppressed the persistent fibrotic phenotype of lesional SSc fibroblasts. NSC23766 caused a decrease in migration on and contraction of matrix, and alpha-SMA, type I collagen and CCN2 mRNA and protein expression. SSc fibroblasts possessed elevated Akt phosphorylation, which was also blocked by NSC23766. Overexpression of rac1 in normal fibroblasts induced matrix contraction and alpha-SMA, type I collagen and CCN2 mRNA and protein expression. Rac1 activity was blocked by PI3kinase/Akt inhibition. Basal fibroblast activity was not affected by NSC23766. CONCLUSION: Rac inhibition may be considered as a novel treatment for the fibrosis observed in SSc.

  17. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In p...

  18. Fibroblastic rheumatism: Scientific Letter | Kawtar | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblastic Rheumatism (FR) is a rare rheumatologic entity of unknown etiology. The pathophysiological mechanism involving fibroblast proliferation is characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis associated with sudden onset of cutaneous nodules, flexion contractures. Bone erosion can occur as the disease progresses and ...

  19. Growth modulation of fibroblasts by chitosan-polyvinyl pyrrolidone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wounds in adults and fetuses differ in their healing ability with respect to scar formation. In adults, wounds lacking the epidermis exhibit excess collagen production and scar formation. Fibroblasts synthesize and deposit a collagen rich extracellular matrix. The early migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in the wound area ...

  20. Myogenic conversion of bladder fibroblasts by construction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gene therapy of detrusor underactivity, by autologous cells transplantation, is limited by the number of primary myogenic. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Myod1 could induce primary bladder fibroblasts to undergo myogenic conversion. Primary bladder fibroblasts from Sprague-Daley rats were cultured ...

  1. Fibroblasts in myocardial infarction: a role in inflammation and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Arti V.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts do not only serve as matrix-producing reparative cells, but exhibit a wide range of functions in inflammatory and immune responses, angiogenesis and neoplasia. The adult mammalian myocardium contains abundant fibroblasts enmeshed within the interstitial and perivascular extracellular matrix. The current review manuscript discusses the dynamic phenotypic and functional alterations of cardiac fibroblasts following myocardial infarction. Extensive necrosis of cardiomyocytes in the infarcted heart triggers an intense inflammatory reaction. In the early stages of infarct healing, fibroblasts become pro-inflammatory cells, activating the inflammasome and producing cytokines, chemokines and proteases. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as Interleukin-1) delay myofibroblast transformation, until the wound is cleared from dead cells and matrix debris. Resolution of the inflammatory infiltrate is associated with fibroblast migration, proliferation, matrix protein synthesis and myofibroblast conversion. Growth factors and matricellular proteins play an important role in myofibroblast activation during the proliferative phase of healing. Formation of a mature cross-linked scar is associated with clearance of fibroblasts, as poorly-understood inhibitory signals restrain the fibrotic response. However, in the non-infarcted remodeling myocardium, local fibroblasts may remain activated in response to volume and pressure overload and may promote interstitial fibrosis. Considering their abundance, their crucial role in cardiac inflammation and repair, and their involvement in myocardial dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis, cardiac fibroblasts may be key therapeutic targets in cardiac remodeling. PMID:24321195

  2. Rho A and the Rho kinase pathway regulate fibroblast contraction: Enhanced contraction in constitutively active Rho A fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Koji, E-mail: kojinobe@pharm.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Nobe, Hiromi [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physical Therapy, Bunkyo-Gakuin University (Japan); Yoshida, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kolodney, Michael S. [Dermatology Division, Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Paul, Richard J. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Honda, Kazuo [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanisms of fibroblast cell contraction in collagen matrix. {yields} Assessed an isometric force development using 3D-reconstituted-fibroblast fiber. {yields} Constitutively active Rho A induced the over-contraction of fibroblast cells. {yields} Rho A and Rho kinase pathway has a central role in fibroblast cell contraction. -- Abstract: Fibroblast cells play a central role in the proliferation phase of wound healing processes, contributing to force development. The intracellular signaling pathways regulating this non-muscle contraction are only partially understood. To study the relations between Rho A and contractile responses, constitutively active Rho A (CA-Rho A) fibroblast cells were reconstituted into fibers and the effects of calf serum (CS) on isometric force were studied. CS-induced force in CA-Rho A fibroblast fibers was twice as large as that in wild type (NIH 3T3) fibroblast fibers. During this response, the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane was detected by Rho A activity assays and Western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with a Rho specific inhibitor (C3-exoenzyme) suppressed translocation as well as contraction. These results indicate that Rho A activation is essential for fibroblast contraction. The Rho kinase inhibitor ( (Y27632)) inhibited both NIH 3T3 and CA-Rho A fibroblast fiber contractions. Activation of Rho A is thus directly coupled with Rho kinase activity. We conclude that the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane and the Rho kinase pathway can regulate wound healing processes mediated by fibroblast contraction.

  3. Influence of three laser wavelengths on human fibroblasts cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Bogdan; Soritau, Olga; Baciut, Mihaela; Campian, Radu; Crisan, Liana; Baciut, Grigore

    2013-02-01

    Although experimental studies in vitro and vivo have been numerous, the effect of laser wavelength irradiation on human fibroblast cell culture is poorly understood. This emphasizes the need of additional cellular and molecular research into laser influence with low energy and power. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of three different laser wavelengths on the human skin fibroblasts cell culture. We wanted to evaluate if near infrared lasers had any influence in healing of wounds by stimulating mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts. The cells were irradiated using 830-, 980- and 2,940-nm laser wavelengths. The irradiated cells were incubated and their mitochondrial activity was assessed by the MTT assay at 24, 48 and 72 h. Simultaneously, an apoptosis assay was assessed on the irradiated fibroblasts. It can be concluded that laser light of the near-infrared region (830 and 980 nm) influences fibroblasts mitochondrial activity compared to the 2,940-nm wavelength which produces apoptosis.

  4. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaron, M.; Yaron, I.; Levita, M.; Herzberg, M.

    1977-03-01

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) and yttrium (/sup 90/Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine. Fibroblast growth and hyaluronic acid production were measured. Radioactive gold and yttrium particles induced a significant increase of hyaluronic acid synthesis rate (pg/cell/day) and inhibited fibroblast growth. Fibroblasts continued to overproduce hyaluronic acid and to show growth inhibition 3 weeks after irradiation with radioactive gold. Hydrocortisone inhibited hyaluronic acid overproduction induced by radioactive gold. Overproduction of hyaluronic acid induced by the x-ray machine was inhibited by hydrocortisone, actinomycin-D, and cycloheximide. Fibroblasts derived from normal and rheumatoid patients responded similarly to ionizing irradiation.

  5. Novel therapeutic strategies targeting fibroblasts and fibrosis in heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdie, Robert G.; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of cardiac fibroblast functions has moved beyond their roles in heart structure and extracellular matrix generation, and now includes contributions to paracrine, mechanical and electrical signalling during ontogenesis and normal cardiac activity. Fibroblasts have central roles in pathogenic remodelling during myocardial ischaemia, hypertension and heart failure. As key contributors to scar formation, they are crucial for tissue repair after interventions including surgery and ablation. Novel experimental approaches targeting cardiac fibroblasts are promising potential therapies for heart disease. Indeed, several existing drugs act, at least partially, through effects on cardiac connective tissue. This Review outlines the origins and roles of fibroblasts in cardiac development, homeostasis and disease; illustrates the involvement of fibroblasts in current and emerging clinical interventions; and identifies future targets for research and development. PMID:27339799

  6. Bradykinin-induced asthmatic fibroblast/myofibroblast activities via bradykinin B2 receptor and different MAPK pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatini, Federica; Luppi, Fabrizio; Petecchia, Loredana; Stefano, Antonino Di; Longo, Anna M.; Eva, Alessandra; Vanni, Cristina; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Sorbello, Valentina; Fabbri, Leonardo M.; Rossi, Giovanni A.; Ricciardolo, Fabio L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bradykinin drives normal lung fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, induces fibroblast proliferation and activates mitogen activated protein kinase pathways (MAPK) but its effects on bronchial fibroblasts from asthmatics (HBAFb) have not been yet studied. We studied bradykinin-induced fibroblast

  7. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  8. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  9. The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on cardiac fibroblasts grown under altered gravity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Leder, Annekatrin; Pietsch, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Myocardium is very sensitive to gravitational changes. During a spaceflight cardiovascular atrophy paired with rhythm problems and orthostatic intolerance can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor...... (VEGF) on cardiac fibroblasts (CF) grown under altered gravity conditions....

  10. Fibroblastic osteosarcoma in a lion (Panthera leo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leonardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of spontaneous fibroblastic osteosarcoma in the humerus of a lion from a private park in Perugia, Italy. The tumor had an irregular, smooth, brown surface and a generally firm, rubbery consistence with gritty to hard areas interspersed. The mass was poorly vascularized with areas of necrosis at the periphery. The cut surface showed a multilobulated mass that had breached the humeral cortex, with periosteal production of reactive bone. The mass invaded the epiphysis, the synovial membrane, the joint capsule and ligaments. A mild hemorrhagic effusion appeared in the joint space. Clinical signs, gross and histopathologic findings are described in this rare case of a malignant bone tumor.

  11. A stromal address code defined by fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonage, Greg; Filer, Andrew D; Haworth, Oliver; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed; Salmon, Michael; Buckley, Christopher D

    2005-03-01

    To navigate into and within tissues, leukocytes require guidance cues that enable them to recognize which tissues to enter and which to avoid. Such cues are partly provided at the time of extravasation from blood by an endothelial address code on the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium. Here, we review the evidence that fibroblasts help define an additional stromal address code that directs leukocyte behaviour within tissues. We examine how this stromal code regulates site-specific leukocyte accumulation, differentiation and survival in a variety of physiological stromal niches, and how the aberrant expression of components of this code in the wrong tissue at the wrong time contributes to the persistence of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  12. Beryllium induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Shannon S A; Lehnert, Bruce E; Sharma, Sunil; Kindell, Susan M; Gary, Ronald K

    2007-07-01

    After cells have completed a sufficient number of cell divisions, they exit the cell cycle and enter replicative senescence. Here, we report that beryllium causes proliferation arrest with premature expression of the principal markers of senescence. After young presenescent human fibroblasts were treated with 3 microM BeSO(4) for 24 h, p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor mRNA increased by >200%. Longer periods of exposure caused mRNA and protein levels to increase for both p21 and p16(Ink4a), a senescence regulator that prevents pRb-mediated cell cycle progression. BeSO(4) also caused dose-dependent induction of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity (SA-beta-gal). Untreated cells had 48 relative fluorescence units (RFU)/microg/h of SA-beta-gal, whereas 3 microM BeSO(4) caused activity to increase to 84 RFU/microg/h. In chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, BeSO(4) caused p53 protein to associate with its DNA binding site in the promoter region of the p21 gene, indicating that p53 transcriptional activity is responsible for the large increase in p21 mRNA elicited by beryllium. Forced expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) rendered HFL-1 cells incapable of normal replicative senescence. However, there was no difference in the responsiveness of normal HFL-1 fibroblasts (IC(50) = 1.9 microM) and hTERT-immortalized cells (IC(50) = 1.7 microM) to BeSO(4) in a 9-day proliferation assay. The effects of beryllium resemble those of histone deacetylase-inhibiting drugs, which also cause large increases in p21. However, beryllium produced no changes in histone acetylation, suggesting that Be(2+) acts as a novel and potent pharmacological inducer of premature senescence.

  13. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ...

  14. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  15. Early activation of fibroblasts during PDT treatment in leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Alessandro; Lecci, Pier P; Bacci, Stefano; Cappugi, Pietro; Pimpinelli, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study was aimed to assess the variations of some microscopical parameters in skin ulcers, caused by chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities (chronic leg ulcers), in 15 patients refractory to previous conventional treatments during photodynamic therapy (PDT). Samples of control, wounded and PDT treated skin were taken and analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The cellular infiltrate, as well as the thickness of epidermis, vascularization, mast cell and fibroblast numbers, were increased in chronic wounds as compared to healthy skin. After completion of PDT, fibroblasts appeared further increased in number. Mast cells, closely clustered with fibroblasts, also showed an increase in their numbers, degranulation index and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor. The present findings support a primary role of fibroblasts in the wound healing process upon PDT treatment, given their early and intense reaction to injury. Mast cells seem to play an accessory yet important role, on the basis of their number and degranulation index variations and expression of basic FGF. In addition, the clustering of mast cells with fibroblasts around blood vessels suggest that these cells may stimulate angiogenesis and, in parallel, fibroblasts to secrete extracellular matrix during PDT therapy.

  16. LIF Mediates Proinvasive Activation of Stromal Fibroblasts in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Albrengues

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts confers proinvasive properties to the tumor microenvironment. Here, we identify leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF as a tumor promoter that mediates proinvasive activation of stromal fibroblasts independent of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression. We demonstrate that a pulse of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β establishes stable proinvasive fibroblast activation by inducing LIF production in both fibroblasts and tumor cells. In fibroblasts, LIF mediates TGF-β-dependent actomyosin contractility and extracellular matrix remodeling, which results in collective carcinoma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, carcinomas from multiple origins and melanomas display strong LIF upregulation, which correlates with dense collagen fiber organization, cancer cell collective invasion, and poor clinical outcome. Blockade of JAK activity by Ruxolitinib (JAK inhibitor counteracts fibroblast-dependent carcinoma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. These findings establish LIF as a proinvasive fibroblast producer independent of α-SMA and may open novel therapeutic perspectives for patients with aggressive primary tumors.

  17. Climateric: fatigue or third stage of the general adaptation syndrome Climaterio: fatiga o tercera etapa del síndrome de adaptación general

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William Alvarez Gaviria

    2004-01-01

    ...; for him, climacteric is the final response to fatigue or the third stage of the general adaptation syndrome, just as in elderly people there is a loss of the capacity of proliferation of fibroblasts...

  18. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  19. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes profibrotic activation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts play a critical role in intestinal wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of commensal gut bacteria. The effects of LPS on intestinal fibroblast activation were characterized. METHODS: Expression of the LPS receptor, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, was assessed in cultured primary human intestinal fibroblasts using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Fibroblasts were treated with LPS and\\/or transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. Nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) pathway activation was assessed by inhibitory kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and NFkappaB promoter activity. Fibroblast contractility was measured using a fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. Smad-7, a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression were assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The NFkappaB pathway was inhibited by IkappaBalpha transfection. RESULTS: TLR-4 was present on the surface of intestinal fibroblasts. LPS treatment of fibroblasts induced IkappaBalpha degradation, enhanced NFkappaB promoter activity and increased collagen contraction. Pretreatment with LPS (before TGF-beta1) significantly increased CTGF production relative to treatment with TGF-beta1 alone. LPS reduced whereas TGF-beta1 increased smad-7 expression. Transfection with an IkappaBalpha plasmid enhanced basal smad-7 expression. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fibroblasts express TLR-4 and respond to LPS by activating NFkappaB and inducing collagen contraction. LPS acts in concert with TGF-beta1 to induce CTGF. LPS reduces the expression of the TGF-beta1 inhibitor, smad-7.

  20. Cytogenetic demonstration of a corrective factor in Bloom's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, H W

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Bloom's syndrome, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder, have a highly increased risk of developing early malignancies of various types. The chromosomes of such patients exhibit an enhanced rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchange. Cocultivation of patients' fibroblasts (as responder cells) with fibroblasts from healthy donors or from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum or Fanconi's anaemia (as effector cells) produces a dose-dependent reduction in Bloom-specific sister chromatid exchange; however, Bloom heterozygotes exhibit a reduced corrective capacity. The reduction in Bloom-specific sister chromatid exchange is related to the presence of a soluble factor (m.w. 10 000-20 000) which is produced in culture by normal proliferating fibroblasts. This corrective factor might represent a cancer-protective principle that is defective in patients with Bloom's syndrome.

  1. Alzheimer skin fibroblasts show increased susceptibility to free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, G; Latorraca, S; Piersanti, P; Piacentini, S; Amaducci, L; Sorbi, S

    1992-11-01

    We have studied the response to toxic oxygen metabolites of fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies of 5 patients with familial (FAD) and 4 with sporadic (AD) Alzheimer's disease compared with those derived from 4 normal controls. Fibroblasts were damaged by the generation of oxygen metabolites during the enzymatic oxidation of acetaldehyde by 50 munits of xanthine-oxidase (Xo). To quantify cell damage we measured lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the culture medium and cell viability in fibroblast cultures. We found a significant increase in LDH activity in the FAD vs. controls and also in the AD vs. controls.

  2. Cancer-associated fibroblasts promote proliferation of endometrial cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita S Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic malignancy worldwide; yet the tumor microenvironment, especially the fibroblast cells surrounding the cancer cells, is poorly understood. We established four primary cultures of fibroblasts from human endometrial cancer tissues (cancer-associated fibroblasts, CAFs using antibody-conjugated magnetic bead isolation. These relatively homogenous fibroblast cultures expressed fibroblast markers (CD90, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin and hormonal (estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conditioned media collected from CAFs induced a dose-dependent proliferation of both primary cultures and cell lines of endometrial cancer in vitro (175% when compared to non-treated cells, in contrast to those from normal endometrial fibroblast cell line (51% (P<0.0001. These effects were not observed in fibroblast culture derived from benign endometrial hyperplasia tissues, indicating the specificity of CAFs in affecting endometrial cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying the differential fibroblast effects, we compared the activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathways in endometrial cancer cells following treatment with normal fibroblasts- and CAFs-conditioned media. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of both phosphorylated forms of Akt and Erk were significantly down-regulated in normal fibroblasts-treated cells, but were up-regulated/maintained in CAFs-treated cells. Treatment with specific inhibitors LY294002 and U0126 reversed the CAFs-mediated cell proliferation (P<0.0001, suggesting for a role of these pathways in modulating endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Rapamycin, which targets a downstream molecule in PI3K pathway (mTOR, also suppressed CAFs-induced cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Cytokine profiling analysis revealed that CAFs secrete higher levels of macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, RANTES and vascular

  3. The radiation response of human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Stephen Andrew

    A clinically reliable predictive assay based on normal-tissue radiosensitivity may lead to improved tumour control through individualised dose prescriptions. In-vitro fibroblast radiosensitivity has been shown, in several studies, to correlate with late radiation morbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate some of the cellular mechanisms underlying the normal-tissue response. In this study, seventeen primary fibroblast strains were established by enzymatic disaggregation of skin biopsies obtained from patients. These comprised seven who experienced acute tissue reactions to radiotherapy, four patients with a normal response and six non-cancer volunteers. An AT cell line was included as a positive control for radiosensitivity. In-vitro radiosensitivity was measured using a clonogenic assay at both high (HDR: 1.6 Gymin-1) and low dose rate (LDR: 0.01 Gymin-1). The radiation parameter HDR SF2 was the most sensitive in discriminating the seven sensitive patients from the remaining ten normal patients (range 0.11-0.19 sensitive patients compared with 0.17-0.34 control patients: pDNA damage. However, a strong correlation was found between clonogenic survival and both residual DNA damage (measured over 10-70 Gy, allowing 4 h repair, correlation coefficient: 0.90, DNA damage, with the sensitive cell lines generally showing a higher level of residual DNA damage. Cell-cycle delays were found in all 18 cell strains in response to 2 Gy irradiation, but were not found to discriminate between sensitive and normal patients. Associated studies found no mutations of the ATM gene in the five radiosensitive patients studied. However, a coding sequence alteration was found in the XRCC1 gene in one of the radiosensitive patients. These findings indicate that a DNA repair defect may be partly responsible for the extreme reactions to radiotherapy observed in a small percentage of patients and that with further modifications, an assay based on measurement of residual DNA damage

  4. Relationship among expression of basic-fibroblast growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among expression of basic-fibroblast growth factor, MTDH/Astrocyte elevated gene-1, adenomatous polyposis coli, matrix metalloproteinase 9,and COX-2 markers with prognostic factors in prostate carcinomas.

  5. Eugenol Toxicity in Human Dental Pulp Fibroblasts of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-García, Maria; Rodríguez-Contreras, Karen; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the eugenol concentrations at which toxicity occurs in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth. Samples of primary dental pulp tissue were taken. Tissue samples were seeded by means of explant technique and used in the 4(th)-5th pass. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet), phenazine MeThoSulfate (MTS), LIVE/DEAD Cell Viability/Toxicity and trypan blue assays for evaluation of the cytotoxicity of increasing concentrations of eugenol (0.06 to 810 μM) were performed. The results of toxicity tests showed toxic effects on dental pulp fibroblasts, even at very low concentrations of eugenol (0.06 μM). Very low concentrations of eugenol produce high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts. All of the concentrations of eugenol that we evaluated produced high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth.

  6. Improved Fibroblast Functionalities by Microporous Pattern Fabricated by Microelectromechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongbo; Zhao, Lingzhou; Chen, Bangdao; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts, which play an important role in biological seal formation and maintenance, determine the long-term success of percutaneous implants. In this study, well-defined microporous structures with micropore diameters of 10–60 µm were fabricated by microelectromechanical systems and their influence on the fibroblast functionalities was observed. The results show that the microporous structures with micropore diameters of 10–60 µm did not influence the initial adherent fibroblast number; however, those with diameters of 40 and 50 µm improved the spread, actin stress fiber organization, proliferation and fibronectin secretion of the fibroblasts. The microporous structures with micropore diameters of 40–50 µm may be promising for application in the percutaneous part of an implant. PMID:25054322

  7. Further studies on the survival of non-proliferating human diploid fibroblasts irradiated with ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, G.L.; Little, J.B. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

    1982-04-01

    Labelling index data showed that in AG1518 cells, a diploid human fibroblast strain, there was a lag period of at least 14 hours between subculture from the density-inhibited plateau phase of growth and entry into DNA synthesis. Cells irradiated with 254nm wavelength U.V. light 8 hours after subculture did not exhibit the same degree of resistance as cells irradiated in plateau phase and subcultured immediately. When cells were arrested from proliferation by maintenance in an arginine and glutamine deficient medium for 72 hours, they were nearly as resistant to U.V. light as plateau phase cells although maintenance in this medium for 24 hours after irradiation supported further recovery only after low U.V. doses. One strain of Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts was found to be resistant to U.V. light in plateau phase while another strain was found to have the same survival response whether it was irradiated in the plateau or log phase of growth.

  8. Fibroblast behavior after titanium surfaces exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Candotto, Valentina; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    The main requirements for a good material are its ability to promote attraction and adhesion of bone precursor cells and their proliferation and differentiation. Different biocompatible materials are currently employed as scaffold. Among these, titanium is considered a gold standard because of its biocompatibility and good corrosion resistance. The aim of this work was to compare two different AoN titanium layers (GR4 and GR5) to investigate which one had a greater osteoconductive power using human fibroblasts (HFb) culture at two different time-points. The expression levels of some adhesion and traction-resistance related genes (COL11A1, COL2A1, COL9A1, DSP, ELN, HAS1, and TFRC) were analyzed using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. After 7 days of treatment with TiA 4GR, the only two up-regulated genes were COL2A1 and DSP. After 15 days of treatment, none of genes over expressed. Our preliminary results suggest that neither AoN 4GR nor AoN 5GR are able to promote the production of protein involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and in stress-resistance, required for a good outcome in dental implantology.

  9. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  10. Rosmarinic acid potentiates carnosic acid induced apoptosis in lung fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bahri, Sana; Mies, Fr?d?rique; Ben Ali, Ridha; Mlika, Mona; Jameleddine, Saloua; Mc Entee, Kathleen; Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by over-population and excessive activation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts disrupting normal lung structure and functioning. Rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid (CA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) was reported to cure bleomycin-(BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. We demonstrate that CA decreased human lung fibroblast (HLF) viability with IC50 value of 17.13?1.06 ?M, while RA had no cytotoxic effect. In the presence of 50 ?M of RA, dose-response for CA shifted...

  11. Abscisic acid ameliorates the systemic sclerosis fibroblast phenotype in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzone, Santina, E-mail: santina.bruzzone@unige.it [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genova (Italy); Battaglia, Florinda [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Mannino, Elena [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Parodi, Alessia [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fruscione, Floriana [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genova (Italy); Basile, Giovanna [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Salis, Annalisa; Sturla, Laura [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Negrini, Simone; Kalli, Francesca; Stringara, Silvia [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Filaci, Gilberto [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Department of Internal Medicine, Viale Benedetto XV 6, 16132 Genova (Italy); and others

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABA is an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABA reverts some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-B irradiation increases ABA content in SSc cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SSc fibroblasts could benefit from exposure to ABA and/or to UV-B. -- Abstract: The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been recently identified as an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell functions, including inflammatory processes, insulin release and glucose uptake. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in fibrosis of skin and internal organs. In this study, we investigated the effect of exogenous ABA on fibroblasts obtained from healthy subjects and from SSc patients. Migration of control fibroblasts induced by ABA was comparable to that induced by transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}). Conversely, migration toward ABA, but not toward TGF-{beta}, was impaired in SSc fibroblasts. In addition, ABA increased cell proliferation in fibroblasts from SSc patients, but not from healthy subjects. Most importantly, presence of ABA significantly decreased collagen deposition by SSc fibroblasts, at the same time increasing matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity and decreasing the expression level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1). Thus, exogenously added ABA appeared to revert some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. Interestingly, ABA levels in plasma from SSc patients were found to be significantly lower than in healthy subjects. UV-B irradiation induced an almost 3-fold increase in ABA content in SSc cultures. Altogether, these results suggest that the fibrotic skin lesions in SSc patients could benefit from exposure to high(er) ABA levels.

  12. Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0512 TITLE: Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0512 5c. PROGRAM...blocked by the addition of Pim inhibitors. These results suggest that the Pim protein kinase can regulate stromal cell biology to modulate epithelial

  13. Regulating Cancer Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT There is an urgent need to develop both new approaches to the treatment of prostate cancer. Analysis of human prostate...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0512 TITLE: Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew...CONTRACT NUMBER Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0512 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  14. Small molecules enable highly efficient neuronal conversion of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig, Julia; Mertens, Jerome; Kesavan, Jaideep; Doerr, Jonas; Poppe, Daniel; Glaue, Finnja; Herms, Stefan; Wernet, Peter; Kögler, Gesine; Müller, Franz-Josef; Koch, Philipp; Brüstle, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    Forced expression of proneural transcription factors has been shown to direct neuronal conversion of fibroblasts. Because neurons are postmitotic, conversion efficiencies are an important parameter for this process. We present a minimalist approach combining two-factor neuronal programming with small molecule-based inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and SMAD signaling, which converts postnatal human fibroblasts into functional neuron-like cells with yields up to >200% and neuronal purities up to >80%.

  15. SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF FIBROBLAST NUCLEAR CHROMOCENTERS: COMPONENT TREE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Snapp, Robert R.; Goveia, Elyse; Peet, Lindsay; Bouffard, Nicole A; Badger, Gary J.; Langevin, Helene M

    2013-01-01

    The nuclei of mouse connective tissue fibroblasts contain chromocenters which are well-defined zones of heterochromatin that can be used as positional landmarks to examine nuclear remodeling in response to a mechanical perturbation. This study used component tree analysis, an image segmentation algorithm that detects high intensity voxels that are topologically connected, to quantify the spatial organization of chromocenters in fibroblasts within whole mouse connective tissue fixed and staine...

  16. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING INDUCED BY TISSUE STRETCH INVOLVES ATP SIGNALING

    OpenAIRE

    Langevin, HM; Fujita, T.; Bouffard, NA; Takano, T; Koptiuch, C; Badger, GJ; Nedergaard, M

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts in whole areolar connective tissue respond to static stretching of the tissue by expanding and remodeling their cytoskeleton within minutes both ex vivo and in vivo. This study tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of fibroblast expansion in response to tissue stretch involves extracellular ATP signaling. In response to tissue stretch ex vivo, ATP levels in the bath solution increased significantly, and this increase was sustained for 20 minutes, returning to baseline at 60 min...

  17. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Rui [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Lotze, Michael T., E-mail: lotzemt@upcm.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Zeh III, Herbert J., E-mail: zehh@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  18. Fascial components of the myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Antonio; Gesi, Marco; Stecco, Carla; Stern, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is described as the muscle, sensory, motor, and autonomic nervous system symptoms caused by stimulation of myofascial trigger points (MTP). The participation of fascia in this syndrome has often been neglected. Several manual and physical approaches have been proposed to improve myofascial function after traumatic injuries, but the processes that induce pathological modifications of myofascial tissue after trauma remain unclear. Alterations in collagen fiber composition, in fibroblasts or in extracellular matrix composition have been postulated. We summarize here recent developments in the biology of fascia, and in particular, its associated hyaluronan (HA)-rich matrix that address the issue of MPS.

  19. Oncogenes induce the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype: metabolic symbiosis and "fibroblast addiction" are new therapeutic targets for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic coupling, between mitochondria in cancer cells and catabolism in stromal fibroblasts, promotes tumor growth, recurrence, metastasis, and predicts anticancer drug resistance. Catabolic fibroblasts donate the necessary fuels (such as L-lactate, ketones, glutamine, other amino acids, and fatty acids) to anabolic cancer cells, to metabolize via their TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). This provides a simple mechanism by which metabolic energy and biomass are transferred from the host microenvironment to cancer cells. Recently, we showed that catabolic metabolism and "glycolytic reprogramming" in the tumor microenvironment are orchestrated by oncogene activation and inflammation, which originates in epithelial cancer cells. Oncogenes drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype in adjacent normal fibroblasts via paracrine oxidative stress. This oncogene-induced transition to malignancy is "mirrored" by a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and an increase in MCT4 in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, functionally reflecting catabolic metabolism in the tumor microenvironment. Virtually identical findings were obtained using BRCA1-deficient breast and ovarian cancer cells. Thus, oncogene activation (RAS, NFkB, TGF-β) and/or tumor suppressor loss (BRCA1) have similar functional effects on adjacent stromal fibroblasts, initiating "metabolic symbiosis" and the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. New therapeutic strategies that metabolically uncouple oxidative cancer cells from their glycolytic stroma or modulate oxidative stress could be used to target this lethal subtype of cancers. Targeting "fibroblast addiction" in primary and metastatic tumor cells may expose a critical Achilles' heel, leading to disease regression in both sporadic and familial cancers.

  20. Preparation of extracellular matrices produced by cultured and primary fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Beacham, Dorothy A.; Amatangelo, Michael D.; Cukierman, Edna

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts secrete and organize extracellular matrix (ECM), which provides structural support for their adhesion, migration, and tissue organization, besides regulating cellular functions such as growth and survival. Cell-to-matrix interactions are vital for vertebrate development. Disorders in these processes have been associated with fibrosis, developmental malformations, cancer, and other diseases. This unit describes a method for preparing a three-dimensional matrix derived from fibroblastic cells; the matrix is three-dimensional, cell and debris free, and attached to a two-dimensional culture surface. Cell adhesion and spreading are normal on these matrices. This matrix can also be compressed into a two-dimensional matrix and solubilized to study the matrix biochemically. Culturing fibroblasts on traditional two-dimensional (2-D) substrates induces an artificial polarity between lower and upper surfaces of these normally nonpolar cells. Not surprisingly, fibroblast morphology and migration differ once suspended in three-dimensional (3-D) collagen gels (Friedl and Brocker, 2000). However, the molecular composition of collagen gels does not mimic the natural fibroblast (i.e., mesenchymal) microenvironment. Fibroblasts secrete and organize ECM, which provides structural support for their adhesion, migration, and tissue organization, in addition to regulating cellular functions such as growth and survival (Buck and Horwitz, 1987; Hay, 1991; Hynes, 1999; Geiger et al., 2001). Cell-to-matrix interactions are vital for vertebrate development. Disorders in these processes have been associated with fibrosis, developmental malformations, cancer (i.e., desmoplastic tumor microenvironment), and other diseases (Rybinski et al., 2014). This unit describes methods for generating tissue culture surfaces coated with a fibroblast-derived 3-D ECM produced and deposited by both established and primary fibroblasts. The matrices closely resemble in vivo mesenchymal matrices and

  1. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A support group can be helpful for emotional support and for giving and receiving practical advice. The following organization provides additional information about Williams Syndrome: Williams Syndrome Association -- www.williams-syndrome.org

  2. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  3. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  4. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  5. Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Asperger Syndrome Information Page Asperger Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder. It is ...

  6. The influence of genistein on free radicals in normal dermal fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts examined by EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurzak, Magdalena; Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Normal and keloid fibroblasts were examined using X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of genistein on the concentration of free radicals in both normal dermal and keloid fibroblasts after ultraviolet irradiation was investigated. The highest concentration of free radicals was seen in keloid fibroblasts, with normal fibroblasts containing a lower concentration. The concentration of free radicals in both normal and keloid fibroblasts was altered in a concentration-dependent manner by the presence of genistein. The change in intra-cellular free radical concentration after the ultraviolet irradiation of both normal and keloid fibroblasts is also discussed. The antioxidant properties of genistein, using its 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging activity as a model, were tested, and the effect of ultraviolet irradiation on its interaction with free radicals was examined. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of DPPH showed quenching by genistein. The interaction of genistein with DPPH free radicals in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation was shown to be slow, but this interaction was much faster under ultraviolet irradiation. Ultraviolet irradiation enhanced the free radical-scavenging activity of genistein.

  7. Cockayne syndrome: Clinical features, model systems and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties, leading to death by 12 years of age on average. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, with a prevalence of approximately 2.5 per million. There are several phenotypes (1-3) and two complementation groups (CSA and CSB), and CS overlaps with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). It has been considered a progeria, and many of the clinical features resemble accelerated aging. As such, the study of CS affords an opportunity to better understand the underlying mechanisms of aging. The molecular basis of CS has traditionally been ascribed to defects in transcription and transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER). However, recent work suggests that defects in base excision DNA repair and mitochondrial functions may also play key roles. This opens up the possibility for molecular interventions in CS, and by extrapolation, possibly in aging. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  9. POLYDACTYLY IN P FEIFFER SYNDROME II - OMIM #10160 0 A RARE ASSOCIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pfeiffer syndrome (PS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder occurring in approximately 1:100,000 live births. Mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1(FGFR1 or FGFR2 gene can cause Pfeiffer syndrome. Craniosynostosis, brachycephaly, mid - facial hypoplasia, broad deviated thumbs and great toes c haracterize the syndrome. Pfeiffer syndrome depending on severity of the phenotype is of three types. The types 2 and 3 occur as sporadic cases and have poor prognosis. We report a case of Pfeiffer Syndrome type 2 having polydactyly, which to the best of o ur knowledge is first case of such an association

  10. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S. (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4{degree}C using a mixture of {sup 3}H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between {sup 3}H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37{degree}C after treating cells with {sup 3}H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours.

  11. Functional screen of paracrine signals in breast carcinoma fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Su

    Full Text Available Stromal fibroblasts actively participate in normal mammary gland homeostasis and in breast carcinoma growth and progression by secreting paracrine factors; however, little is known about the identity of paracrine mediators in individual patients. The purpose of this study was to characterize paracrine signaling pathways between breast carcinoma cells and breast carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF or normal mammary fibroblasts (NF, respectively. CAF and NF were isolated from breast carcinoma tissue samples and adjacent normal mammary gland tissue of 28 patients. The fibroblasts were grown in 3D collagen gel co-culture with T47D human breast carcinoma cells and T47D cell growth was measured. CAF stimulated T47D cell growth to a significantly greater degree than NF. We detected a considerable inter-individual heterogeneity of paracrine interactions but identified FGF2, HB-EGF, heparanase-1 and SDF1 as factors that were consistently responsible for the activity of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. CAF from low-grade but not high-grade carcinomas required insulin-like growth factor 1 and transforming growth factor beta 1 to stimulate carcinoma growth. Paradoxically, blocking of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease stimulated T47D cell growth in co-culture with NF. The results were largely mirrored by treating the fibroblasts with siRNA oligonucleotides prior to co-culture, implicating the fibroblasts as principal production site for the secreted mediators. In summary, we identify a paracrine signaling network with inter-individual commonalities and differences. These findings have significant implications for the design of stroma-targeted therapies.

  12. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  13. Site-Specific Keloid Fibroblasts Alter the Behaviour of Normal Skin and Normal Scar Fibroblasts through Paracrine Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is an abnormal cutaneous fibroproliferative disorder of unknown aetiopathogenesis. Keloid fibroblasts (KF) are implicated as mediators of elevated extracellular matrix deposition. Aberrant secretory behaviour by KF relative to normal skin fibroblasts (NF) may influence the disease state. To date, no previous reports exist on the ability of site-specific KF to induce fibrotic-like phenotypic changes in NF or normal scar fibroblasts (NS) by paracrine mechanisms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of conditioned media from site-specific KF on the cellular and molecular behaviour of both NF and NS enabled by paracrine mechanisms. Conditioned media was collected from cultured primary fibroblasts during a proliferative log phase of growth including: NF, NS, peri-lesional keloid fibroblasts (PKF) and intra-lesional keloid fibroblasts (IKF). Conditioned media was used to grow NF, NS, PKF and IKF cells over 240 hrs. Cellular behavior was monitored through real time cell analysis (RTCA), proliferation rates and migration in a scratch wound assay. Fibrosis-associated marker expression was determined at both protein and gene level. PKF conditioned media treatment of both NF and NS elicited enhanced cell proliferation, spreading and viability as measured in real time over 240 hrs versus control conditioned media. Following PKF and IKF media treatments up to 240 hrs, both NF and NS showed significantly elevated proliferation rates (pmedia from growing marginal PKF elicited the strongest effects. In conclusion, primary NF and NS cells treated with PKF or IKF conditioned media exhibit enhanced expression of fibrosis-associated molecular markers and increased cellular activity as a result of keloid fibroblast-derived paracrine factors. PMID:24348987

  14. Orthodontic adhesives induce human gingival fibroblast toxicity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Pao-Hsin; Li, Han Yu; Ding, Shinn Jyh; Yen, Min; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2008-05-01

    To test the null hypothesis that the resin base and the resin hybrid glass ionomer base adhesives do not cause inflammation after contacting primary human gingival fibroblasts in vitro. The resin base and resin hybrid glass ionomer base adhesives were used to treat human gingival fibroblasts to evaluate the survival rate using MTT colorimetric assay to detect the level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique and COX-2 protein expression using Western blot analysis. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Tests of differences of the treatments were analyzed using the Tukey test and a value of P adhesive and the liquid of glass ionomer adhesive showed decreasing survival rates after 24 hours of treatment (P adhesives induced COX-2 protein expression in human gingival fibroblasts. The exposure of quiescent human gingival fibroblasts to adhesives resulted in the induction of COX-2 mRNA expression. The investigations of the time-dependent COX-2 mRNA expression in adhesive-treated human gingival fibroblasts revealed different patterns. The hypothesis is rejected. For orthodontic patients with gingival inflammation, except for those with oral hygiene problems, the activation of COX-2 expression by orthodontic adhesive may be one of the potential mechanisms.

  15. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodríguez, Lucía; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier

    2017-07-13

    Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2-1 W and energy density: 1-7 J/cm²) using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed). The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm²; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  16. Androgen receptor characteristics in skin fibroblasts from hirsute women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eil, C; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L

    1985-01-01

    Hormonal measurements in some women with hirsutism often reveal little or no elevation in androgen levels to explain the disorder. Thus, it has been postulated that increased sensitivity of the hair follicle to androgen may contribute to the development of hirsutism in such patients. We, therefore, sought androgen receptor abnormalities in skin fibroblasts cultured from 10 hirsute women (ages 17-43) and normal or mildly elevated plasma testosterone levels (28-82 ng/dl). Androgen receptor content (Ro) and binding affinity (Kd) in cultured pubic skin fibroblasts were measured using a dispersed, whole cell assay. Ten such cell lines from these women were compared with 19 pubic skin cell lines from 9 normal volunteers (6 males and 3 females) and from 10 other subjects (males with gynecomastia or hypospadias). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean androgen receptor content (11,600 +/- 2700 (SE) sites/cell fibroblasts vs 7900 +/- 700 sites/cell or binding affinity (2.0 +/- 0.3 (SE) X 10(-9) M vs 1.5 +/- 0.2 X 10(-9) M, respectively) between the patients' fibroblasts and those of the controls. We conclude that hirsutism cannot be explained by abnormalities in fibroblast androgen receptor number or affinity. These observations do not exclude the possibility that other mechanisms might lead to increased peripheral androgen sensitivity in such patients.

  17. Dysregulated proinflammatory and fibrogenic phenotype of fibroblasts in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Huaux

    Full Text Available Morbi-mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF is mainly related to chronic lung infection and inflammation, uncontrolled tissue rearrangements and fibrosis, and yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We evaluated inflammatory and fibrosis responses to bleomycin in F508del homozygous and wild-type mice, and phenotype of fibroblasts explanted from mouse lungs and skin. The effect of vardenafil, a cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, was tested in vivo and in culture. Responses of proinflammatory and fibrotic markers to bleomycin were enhanced in lungs and skin of CF mice and were prevented by treatment with vardenafil. Purified lung and skin fibroblasts from CF mice proliferated and differentiated into myofibroblasts more prominently and displayed higher sensitivity to growth factors than those recovered from wild-type littermates. Under inflammatory stimulation, mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory mediators were higher in CF than in wild-type fibroblasts, in which CFTR expression reached similar levels to those observed in other non-epithelial cells, such as macrophages. Increased proinflammatory responses in CF fibroblasts were reduced by half with submicromolar concentrations of vardenafil. Proinflammatory and fibrogenic functions of fibroblasts are upregulated in CF and are reduced by vardenafil. This study provides compelling new support for targeting cGMP signaling pathway in CF pharmacotherapy.

  18. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Illescas-Montes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. Methods: The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2–1 W and energy density: 1–7 J/cm2 using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed. The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. Results: fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm2; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. Conclusion: The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  19. Anatomic demarcation by positional variation in fibroblast gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Rinn

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are ubiquitous mesenchymal cells with many vital functions during development, tissue repair, and disease. Fibroblasts from different anatomic sites have distinct and characteristic gene expression patterns, but the principles that govern their molecular specialization are poorly understood. Spatial organization of cellular differentiation may be achieved by unique specification of each cell type; alternatively, organization may arise by cells interpreting their position along a coordinate system. Here we test these models by analyzing the genome-wide gene expression profiles of primary fibroblast populations from 43 unique anatomical sites spanning the human body. Large-scale differences in the gene expression programs were related to three anatomic divisions: anterior-posterior (rostral-caudal, proximal-distal, and dermal versus nondermal. A set of 337 genes that varied according to these positional divisions was able to group all 47 samples by their anatomic sites of origin. Genes involved in pattern formation, cell-cell signaling, and matrix remodeling were enriched among this minimal set of positional identifier genes. Many important features of the embryonic pattern of HOX gene expression were retained in fibroblasts and were confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that site-specific variations in fibroblast gene expression programs are not idiosyncratic but rather are systematically related to their positional identities relative to major anatomic axes.

  20. Sporadic Alzheimer disease fibroblasts display an oxidative stress phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Dunn, Christopher; Kasmer, Cindy; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-09-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major health problem in the United States, affecting one in eight Americans over the age of 65. The number of elderly suffering from AD is expected to continue to increase over the next decade, as the average age of the U.S. population increases. The risk factors for and etiology of AD are not well understood; however, recent studies suggest that exposure to oxidative stress may be a contributing factor. Here, microarray gene expression signatures were compared in AD-patient-derived fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts exposed to hydrogen peroxide or menadione (to simulate conditions of oxidative stress). Using the 23K Illumina cDNA microarray to screen expression of >14,000 human genes, we identified a total of 1017 genes that are chronically up- or downregulated in AD fibroblasts, 215 of which were also differentially expressed in normal human fibroblasts within 12h after exposure to hydrogen peroxide or menadione. Pathway analysis of these 215 genes and their associated pathways revealed cellular functions that may be critically dysregulated by oxidative stress and play a critical role in the etiology and/or pathology of AD. We then examined the AD fibroblasts for the presence of oxidative DNA damage and found increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine. These results indicate the possible role of oxidative stress in the gene expression profile seen in AD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  2. Fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling induced by tissue stretch involves ATP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M; Fujita, Takumi; Bouffard, Nicole A; Takano, Takahiro; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Badger, Gary J; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-09-01

    Fibroblasts in whole areolar connective tissue respond to static stretching of the tissue by expanding and remodeling their cytoskeleton within minutes both ex vivo and in vivo. This study tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of fibroblast expansion in response to tissue stretch involves extracellular ATP signaling. In response to tissue stretch ex vivo, ATP levels in the bath solution increased significantly, and this increase was sustained for 20 min, returning to baseline at 60 min. No increase in ATP was observed in tissue incubated without stretch or tissue stretched in the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. The increase in fibroblast cross sectional area in response to tissue stretch was blocked by both suramin (a purinergic receptor blocker) and apyrase (an enzyme that selectively degrades extracellular ATP). Furthermore, connexin channel blockers (octanol and carbenoxolone), but not VRAC (fluoxetine) or pannexin (probenecid) channel blockers, inhibited fibroblast expansion. Together, these results support a mechanism in which extracellular ATP signaling via connexin hemichannels mediate the active change in fibroblast shape that occurs in response to a static increase in tissue length. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interaction of human gingival fibroblasts with PVA/gelatine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Stefania; Mattii, Letizia; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Lazzeri, Luigi; Serino, Lorenzo Pio; Dolfi, Amelio; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2008-07-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds should be able to reproduce optimal microenvironments in order to support cell attachment, three-dimensional growth, migration and, regarding fibroblasts, must also promote extracellular matrix production. Various bioactive molecules are employed in the preparation of spongy scaffolds to obtain biomimetic matrices by either surface-coating or introducing them into the bulk composition of the biomaterial. The biomimetic properties of a spongy matrix composed of PVA combined with the natural component gelatine were evaluated by culturing human gingival fibroblasts on the scaffold. Cell adhesion, morphology and distribution within the scaffold were assessed by histology and electron microscopy; viability and metabolic activity as well as extracellular matrix production were analyzed by MTT assay, cytochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Fibroblasts interacted positively with PVA/gelatine. They adhered to the PVA/gelatine matrix in which they had good spreading activity and active metabolism; fibroblasts were also able to produce extracellular matrix molecules (type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin) compared to bi-dimensionally grown cells. The in situ creation of a biological matrix by human fibroblasts together with the ability to produce growth factor TGF-beta1 and the intracellular signal transduction molecule RhoA, suggests that this kind of PVA/gelatine sponge may represent a suitable support for in vitro extracellular matrix production and connective tissue regeneration.

  4. Cockayne syndrome: a cellular sensitivity to ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickel, R D; Chu, E H; Trosko, J E; Chang, C C

    1977-08-01

    Two unrelated children, a boy 2 1/2 years old and a girl 4 years old, were affected with the cachectic dwarfism of Cockayne syndrome. Fibroblast cultures derived from these patients exhibited increased sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light, but not to x-irradiation, as measured by colony-forming ability. In both Cockayne fibroblast cultures, the rate of removal of thymidine dimer from the irradiated cellular DNA was normal. This demonstration of a cellular defect in Cockayne cells suggests that there may be an enzymatic defect in the repair of UV light-induced damage.

  5. Keratinocyte growth factor mRNA expression in periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, S; Wandall, H H; Grøn, B

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF mRNA is expres......Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF m...

  6. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  7. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Latha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group. These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments. Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02, hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that

  8. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  9. Secretome Analysis of Human Primary Fibroblasts Undergoing Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas

    Introduction Cultures of diploid human fibroblasts can replicate only a finite number of times; rapid proliferation is followed by decline in replicative frequency and finally cells become senescent and are incapable of further proliferation. Senescencent cells display altered growth, morphology......-degrading. In this study we use proteomic tools to characterise the secretome of young and senescent fibroblasts.   Methods Three independent preparations of primary human foreskin fibroblasts were grown to senescence. Young, rapidly proliferating cells at passage 11 and cells from passage 28 displaying senescent...... spectrometry; peptide count was used to estimate protein abundance.   Results 2DGE based analysis of secretion profiles of young and senescent cells derived from the same cell lineage revealed a number of protein spots differentially expressed. We have observed an increased secretion of matrix...

  10. Chemical Conversion of Human Fibroblasts into Functional Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C. Thoma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct transdifferentiation of somatic cells is a promising approach to obtain patient-specific cells for numerous applications. However, conversion across germ-layer borders often requires ectopic gene expression with unpredictable side effects. Here, we present a gene-free approach that allows efficient conversion of human fibroblasts via a transient progenitor stage into Schwann cells, the major glial cell type of peripheral nerves. Using a multikinase inhibitor, we transdifferentiated fibroblasts into transient neural precursors that were subsequently further differentiated into Schwann cells. The resulting induced Schwann cells (iSCs expressed numerous Schwann cell-specific proteins and displayed neurosupportive and myelination capacity in vitro. Thus, we established a strategy to obtain mature Schwann cells from human postnatal fibroblasts under chemically defined conditions without the introduction of ectopic genes.

  11. Systems-level modeling of cancer-fibroblast interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond C Wadlow

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells interact with surrounding stromal fibroblasts during tumorigenesis, but the complex molecular rules that govern these interactions remain poorly understood thus hindering the development of therapeutic strategies to target cancer stroma. We have taken a mathematical approach to begin defining these rules by performing the first large-scale quantitative analysis of fibroblast effects on cancer cell proliferation across more than four hundred heterotypic cell line pairings. Systems-level modeling of this complex dataset using singular value decomposition revealed that normal tissue fibroblasts variably express at least two functionally distinct activities, one which reflects transcriptional programs associated with activated mesenchymal cells, that act either coordinately or at cross-purposes to modulate cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that quantitative approaches may prove useful for identifying organizational principles that govern complex heterotypic cell-cell interactions in cancer and other contexts.

  12. Expression of the endocannabinoid system in fibroblasts and myofascial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, John M

    2008-04-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, like the better-known endorphin system, consists of cell membrane receptors, endogenous ligands and ligand-metabolizing enzymes. Two cannabinoid receptors are known: CB(1) is principally located in the nervous system, whereas CB(2) is primarily associated with the immune system. Two eCB ligands, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are mimicked by cannabis plant compounds. The first purpose of this paper was to review the eCB system in detail, highlighting aspects of interest to bodyworkers, especially eCB modulation of pain and inflammation. Evidence suggests the eCB system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, expression of the eCB system in myofascial tissues has not been established. The second purpose of this paper was to investigate the eCB system in fibroblasts and other fascia-related cells. The investigation used a bioinformatics approach, obtaining microarray data via the GEO database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/). GEO data mining revealed that fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, chondrocytes and synoviocytes expressed CB(1), CB(2) and eCB ligand-metabolizing enzymes. Fibroblast CB(1) levels nearly equalled levels expressed by adipocytes. CB(1) levels upregulated after exposure to inflammatory cytokines and equiaxial stretching of fibroblasts. The eCB system affects fibroblast remodeling through lipid rafts associated with focal adhesions and dampens cartilage destruction by decreasing fibroblast-secreted metalloproteinase enzymes. In conclusion, the eCB system helps shape biodynamic embryological development, diminishes nociception and pain, reduces inflammation in myofascial tissues and plays a role in fascial reorganization. Practitioners wield several tools that upregulate eCB activity, including myofascial manipulation, diet and lifestyle modifications, and pharmaceutical approaches.

  13. Chloride transport in human fibroblasts is activated by hypotonic shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugolo, M.; Mastocola, T.; Flamigni, A.; Lenaz, G. (Universita' di Bologna (Italy))

    1989-05-15

    Incubation of human skin fibroblasts in hypotonic media induced the activation of {sup 36}Cl- efflux which was roughly proportional to the decrease in the osmolality of the media. The efflux of {sup 36}Cl- was insensitive to DIDS plus furosemide and inhibited by addition of a Cl- channel blocker such as 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB). We propose that a conductive pathway for Cl- transport, almost silent in isotonic conditions, is activated by exposing human fibroblasts to hypotonic shock, this conclusion being supported by evidence that also {sup 36}Cl- influx was enhanced by hypotonic medium.

  14. Application of Allogeneic Fibroblast Cells in Cellular Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Connective tissue cells include fibroblasts, chondrocytes, adipocyte, and osteocytes. These cells are specialized for the secretion of collagenous extracellular matrix and are responsible for the architectural framework of the human body. Evidence Acquisition Connective tissue cells play a central role in supporting as well as repairing tissues and organs. Fibroblast cell therapy could be used for the treatment of burn wounds, scars, diabetic foot ulcers, acne scars and skin aging. This review focused on biology of fibroblasts and their role in cell therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB. Results Fibroblasts are known to play a pivotal role in skin structure and integrity, and dermal fibroblasts are believed to promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation via collagen production. Conclusions Fibroblasts can be used in transplantations to ameliorate an immune system response, in order to reduce antigen production. Human fibroblasts suppress ongoing mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs between lymphocyte cells from two individuals, and supernatant materials from fibroblast cultures suppress MLRs.

  15. Gingival fibroblast responsiveness is differentially affected by Porphyromonas gingivalis: implications for the pathogenesis of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, N.; Crielaard, W.

    2013-01-01

    In periodontitis, tissue damage results mainly from aberrant host responses to oral microorganisms. Fibroblasts can play an important role in this. Gingival fibroblasts do not develop tolerance against the lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in periodontitis, which

  16. Cardiac fibroblast-derived microRNA passenger strand-enriched exosomes mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bang, Claudia; Batkai, Sandor; Dangwal, Seema; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Foinquinos, Ariana; Holzmann, Angelika; Just, Annette; Remke, Janet; Zimmer, Karina; Zeug, Andre; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Schmiedl, Andreas; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Halder, Rashi; Fischer, Andre; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Schober, Andreas; Fiedler, Jan; Thum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ...; however, miRNAs have emerged recently as paracrine signaling mediators. Thus, we investigated a potential paracrine miRNA crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes and found that cardiac fibroblasts secrete miRNA-enriched exosomes...

  17. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidation in peroxisomal disorders: studies in cultured human fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, N. M.; Schor, D. S.; Roe, C. R.; Wanders, R. J.; Jakobs, C.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid in human fibroblasts of controls and patients affected with classical Refsum disease, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, generalized peroxisomal disorders and peroxisomal bifunctional protein deficiency. Cultured fibroblasts were incubated with

  18. Water-filtered near-infrared influences collagen synthesis of keloid-fibroblasts in contrast to normal foreskin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Nadja; König, Anke; Butting, Manuel; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August; Valesky, Eva; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic scar development is associated to impaired wound healing, imbalanced fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. Stigmatization, physical restrictions and high recurrence rates are only some aspects that illustrate the severe influence impaired wound healing can have on patients' life. The treatment of hypertrophic scars especially keloids is still a challenge. In recent years water-filtered near-infrared irradiation (wIRA) composed of near-infrared (NIR) and a thermal component is applied for an increasing penal of clinical purposes. It is described to beneficially influence e.g. wound healing. But discrimination between the thermal and the NIR dependent components of these effects has not been conclusively elucidated. Aim of our study was therefore to investigate the influence of the light fraction on the thermal impact of wIRA irradiation in dermal cells. We concentrated our analysis on morphological properties and collagen synthesis. Foreskin fibroblasts and the keloid fibroblast cell line KF111 were exposed to temperatures between 37°C and 46°C with or without additional irradiation with 360J/cm(2) NIR. Our results show that viability was not influenced by irradiation. Independent of the analysed fibroblast species temperature dependent occurrence of spheric cells could be observed. These morphological changes were clearly counteracted by additional light exposure. Convective heat reduced collagen type I synthesis in both cell species depending on the applied temperature. Co-treatment with NIR significantly reversed this effect in keloid fibroblast cultures treated at 46°C whereas no difference could be observed in the foreskin fibroblasts. The observed influence on collagen type I synthesis was associated to a temperature dependent TGF-β1 secretion reduction. Co-stimulation of keloid cultures with NIR at 46°C completely abolished the temperature dependent TGF-β1 secretion reduction. In foreskin fibroblast cultures co

  19. Switch in FGFR3 and -4 expression profile during human renal development may account for transient hypercalcemia in patients with Sotos syndrome due to 5q35 microdeletions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Levtchenko, Elena N; Martinerie, Laetitia; Pertijs, Jeanne C L M; Allegaert, Karel; Devriendt, Koenraad; Masereeuw, Roos; Monnens, Leo A H; Lombès, Marc

    CONTEXT: Sotos syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a distinct phenotypic spectrum including overgrowth and learning difficulties. Here we describe a new case of Sotos syndrome with a 5q35 microdeletion, affecting the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) gene, presenting with infantile

  20. Switch in FGFR3 and -4 expression profile during human renal development may account for transient hypercalcemia in patients with Sotos syndrome due to 5q35 microdeletions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaers, H.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Martinerie, L.; Pertijs, J.C.L.M.; Allegaert, K.; Devriendt, K.; Masereeuw, R.; Monnens, L.A.; Lombes, M.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Sotos syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a distinct phenotypic spectrum including overgrowth and learning difficulties. Here we describe a new case of Sotos syndrome with a 5q35 microdeletion, affecting the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) gene, presenting with infantile

  1. Protective Effect of Modified Human Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether modified acidic fibroblast growth factor (MaFGF) can protect NRK52E cell against apoptotic death induced by actinomycin D (Act D) and the effect of MaFGF on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Methods: NRK52E cell apoptotic death was measured by several methods including cell morphologic ...

  2. Transient expression of acidic fibroblast growth factor in pea ( Pisum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, there are many therapeutic proteins produced in different host plants in transient easy to perform, short production cycle, efficient and inexpensive. In this study, the modified pea early browning virus (PEBV) vector containing GFP and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was introduced into pea plants by leave ...

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and dietary factors in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Cunha Baia, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids and mineral metabolism: novel therapy for cardiovascular disease in renal patients? Deregulations in mineral metabolism, particularly related to phosphate and its regulating hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), are common in patients with chronic kidney

  4. Airway smooth muscle and fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a disease characterized by marked structural changes within the airway wall. These changes include deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and an increase in the numbers of airway smooth muscle cells and subepithelial fibroblasts. Both these cell types possess properties that would

  5. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts: Perspectives in Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells is increasingly recognized as a main driver of tumor progression and metastasis. This Forum article highlights the role of cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumorigenesis and discusses the potential for developing specific stromal

  6. Optimum microcurrent stimulation intensity for galvanotaxis in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, M; Maeshige, N; Honda, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Uemura, M; Yamamoto, M; Terashi, H

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we develop methods to measure galvanotaxis of fibroblasts and determined the optimum conditions of electrical stimulation. An inverted 35mm dish containing cell suspensions (3×105 primary human skin fibroblasts, DMEM, and 10% FBS) was placed on the centre of a 100mm dish. The 35mm dish was removed 24 hours later, and culture medium was added to the 100mm dish. Fibroblasts were randomised (double-blind) into three groups, where electrical stimulation was given at varying intensities: 0UA (control), 50UA, and 100UA. Electrical stimulation (frequency=0.3Hz) was conducted, for a duration of 4 hours, with platinum electrodes in a CO2 incubator. We took pictures immediately before and 20 hours after stimulation. We calculated the migration ratio to the negative pole by dividing the area of attached fibroblasts after stimulation with that before stimulation. The migration ratio to the negative pole was significantly higher in the 100UA group than in the control group (pmicrocurrent efficacy for pressure ulcer healing. Electrical stimulation based on our in vitro experiment might be important for the development of physical therapy for pressure ulcers.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 23: a potential cause of cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) has been identified as one of the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although FGF-23 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphate balance, it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular ...

  8. Pulsed short-wave diathermy effects on human fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan; Lewis, Martyn; Mills, Pauline; Kielty, Cay

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the influence of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD) on fibroblast and chondrocyte cell proliferation rates and to establish the influences of different dosages applied. Four single-blind trials. Laboratory, in vitro study. Human adult dermal fibroblast and chondrocyte cells were plated at known concentrations and incubated for 5 days. Exposure to PSWD, twice daily, on days 2, 3, and 4. After crystal violet staining (day 5), optical density (cell number) was determined spectrophotometrically. PSWD, given at mean power of 48W for 10 minutes, increased fibroblast proliferation compared with control groups (P<.001). There was a relationship between cell proliferation and the amount of energy given (P<0.001). The optimal mean power for proliferation was estimated to be 13.8W. While keeping mean power constant at 6W, altering pulse duration and pulse repetition rate dosage parameters did not have a significant effect on proliferation (P=.519). Chondrocyte proliferation also increased with PSWD exposure of 6W at 10 minutes duration (P=.015). In addition, treatment time was significantly associated with chondrocyte proliferation (P<.001). PSWD is associated with increased rates of fibroblast and chondrocyte proliferation in vitro, which is dose dependent. These results contribute to an understanding of the physiologic mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of PSWD. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  9. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  11. Photodynamic inactivation of fibroblasts by a cationic porphyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Schwartz, Kevin R.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Dankert, Jacob B.

    2005-01-01

    An important determinant of the clinical applicability and value of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is the cytotoxicity of the treatment to human cells. We evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDI to human dermal fibroblasts using 5-phenyl-10,15,20-tris(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin

  12. Constitutive Reprogramming of Fibroblast Mitochondrial Metabolism in Pulmonary Hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Tauber, Jan; Li, M.; Zhang, H.; Flockton, A. R.; Pullamsetti, S. S.; Chelladurai, P.; D'Alessandro, A.; El Kasmi, K. C.; Ježek, Petr; Stenmark, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2016), s. 47-57 ISSN 1044-1549 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11055; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15071 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * complex I * oxidative metabolism * pulmonary hypertension * adventitial fibroblasts Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.100, year: 2016

  13. Spatial organization of fibroblast nuclear chromocenters: component tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Robert R; Goveia, Elyse; Peet, Lindsay; Bouffard, Nicole A; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2013-09-01

    The nuclei of mouse connective tissue fibroblasts contain chromocenters which are well-defined zones of heterochromatin that can be used as positional landmarks to examine nuclear remodeling in response to a mechanical perturbation. This study used component tree analysis, an image segmentation algorithm that detects high intensity voxels that are topologically connected, to quantify the spatial organization of chromocenters in fibroblasts within whole mouse connective tissue fixed and stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The component tree analysis method was applied to confocal microscopy images of whole mouse areolar connective tissue incubated for 30 min ex vivo with or without static stretch. In stretched tissue, the mean distance between chromocenters within fibroblast nuclei was significantly greater (vs. non-stretched, P stretch and no stretch. Average chromocenter distance was positively correlated with nuclear cross-sectional area (r = 0.78, P Static stretching of mouse areolar connective tissue for 30 min resulted in substantially increased separation of nuclear chromocenters in connective tissue fibroblasts. This interior remodeling of the nucleus induced by tissue stretch may impact transcriptionally active euchromatin within the inter-chromocenter space. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  14. fibroblast growth factor, MTDH/Astrocyte elevated gene-1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-05

    Dec 5, 2012 ... Background: The etiopathogenesis of prostate cancer (PC) is still not clear, but hormonal, genetic, and environmental factors are thought to play a role in the tumor pathogenesis. ... many genetic and epigenetic alterations have been detected in human PC.[1]. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), also ...

  15. Involvement of the mitochondrial compartment in human NCL fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzini, Francesco; Gismondi, Floriana [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Tessa, Alessandra [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Tonin, Paola [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Carrozzo, Rosalba [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Hospital-Molecular Medicine Unit, Roma (Italy); Mole, Sara E. [MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, Molecular Medicines Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London (United Kingdom); Santorelli, Filippo M. [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Simonati, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.simonati@univr.it [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial reticulum fragmentation occurs in human CLN1 and CLN6 fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Likewise mitochondrial shift-to periphery and decreased mitochondrial density are seen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced caspase-mediated apoptosis occurs following STS treatment in CLN1 fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders of childhood, characterized by the endo-lysosomal storage of autofluorescent material. Impaired mitochondrial function is often associated with neurodegeneration, possibly related to the apoptotic cascade. In this study we investigated the possible effects of lysosomal accumulation on the mitochondrial compartment in the fibroblasts of two NCL forms, CLN1 and CLN6. Fragmented mitochondrial reticulum was observed in all cells by using the intravital fluorescent marker Mitotracker, mainly in the perinuclear region. This was also associated with intense signal from the lysosomal markers Lysotracker and LAMP2. Likewise, mitochondria appeared to be reduced in number and shifted to the cell periphery by electron microscopy; moreover the mitochondrial markers VDCA and COX IV were reduced following quantitative Western blot analysis. Whilst there was no evidence of increased cell death under basal condition, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic nuclei following Staurosporine treatment in CLN1 cells only. In conclusion, the mitochondrial compartment is affected in NCL fibroblasts invitro, and CLN1 cells seem to be more vulnerable to the negative effects of stressed mitochondrial membrane than CLN6 cells.

  16. Fibroblastic osteosarcoma in a lion ( Panthera leo ) | Leonardi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report describes a case of spontaneous fibroblastic osteosarcoma in the humerus of a lion from a private park in Perugia, Italy. The tumor had an irregular, smooth, brown surface and a generally firm, rubbery consistence with gritty to hard areas interspersed. The mass was poorly vascularized with areas of necrosis at ...

  17. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    Human embryonic skin fibroblasts have been shown to attach and spread on laminin substrates in the absence of protein synthesis and presence of fibronectin-depleted serum and anti-fibronectin antibodies. Rates of attachment and the type of spreading are virtually identical on fibronectin and lami...

  18. Cellular electrophysiological principles that modulate secretion from synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R B; Schmidt, T A; Sachse, F B; Boyle, D; Firestein, G S; Giles, W R

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease that affects both pediatric and adult populations. The cellular basis for RA has been investigated extensively using animal models, human tissues and isolated cells in culture. However, many aspects of its aetiology and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Some of the electrophysiological principles that regulate secretion of essential lubricants (hyaluronan and lubricin) and cytokines from synovial fibroblasts have been identified. Data sets describing the main types of ion channels that are expressed in human synovial fibroblast preparations have begun to provide important new insights into the interplay among: (i) ion fluxes, (ii) Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, (iii) intercellular coupling, and (iv) both transient and longer duration changes in synovial fibroblast membrane potential. A combination of this information, knowledge of similar patterns of responses in cells that regulate the immune system, and the availability of adult human synovial fibroblasts are likely to provide new pathophysiological insights. © 2016 University of Calgary. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  19. High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... High-level expression of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor in Escherichia coli presents research opportunities such as analysis ... The general agreement from the published data on heterologous gene ..... for protein expression (Casimiro et al., 1997; Gold et al.,. 1981; Hamdan et al., 2002; ...

  20. Basic FGF and PDGF-BB synergistically stimulate hyaluronan and IL-6 production by orbital fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Virakul (Sita); J.W. Heutz (Judith W.); V.A.S.H. Dalm (Virgil); R.P. Peeters (Robin); A.D.A. Paridaens (Dion); W.A. van den Bosch (Willem); N. Hirankarn (Nattiya); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); W.A. Dik (Willem)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractOrbital fibroblast activation is a central pathologic feature of Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been proposed to contribute to GO, but their effects on orbital fibroblasts are largely unknown.We found

  1. File list: DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 DNase-seq Others Fibroblasts SRX100966,SRX480646,...SRX480648,SRX135564,SRX089279,SRX480647,SRX089280,SRX480645,SRX100965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 All antigens Others Fibroblasts SRX396266,SRX4814...X651506,SRX480793,SRX480792,SRX396262 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 Unclassified Others Tail fibroblast SRX306689,...SRX306688,SRX306687,SRX306686,SRX306691,SRX306690 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast mm9 Histone Others Fibroblast SRX024353,SRX024354,SRX02...4352 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast mm9 All antigens Others Fibroblast SRX191057,SRX024353,...SRX024354,SRX024355,SRX024352 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblast.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 All antigens Others Fibroblasts SRX338979,SRX4814...X396257,SRX396265,SRX396258,SRX396256 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 Unclassified Others Tail fibroblast SRX306689,...SRX306688,SRX306691,SRX306690,SRX306687,SRX306686 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  8. Effect of β3-adrenoceptor on cardiac fibrosis in rat cardiac fibroblast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of β3-adrenoceptors (β3-AR) up-regulation on fibrosis in cardiac fibroblast cells in rats and its potential mechanism. Methods: Cardiac fibroblast cells (CFB) were isolated and identified from rats' hearts. The β3-ARupregulated cardiac fibroblast cells were constructed by lentiviral transfection ...

  9. Enhanced ROCK1 dependent contractility in fibroblast from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Rolandsson, Sara; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Nihlberg, Kristian; Wieslander, Elisabet; Kvist-Reimer, Martina; Dahlbäck, Magnus; Eriksson, Leif; Bjermer, Leif; Erjefält, Jonas S; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2012-08-22

    During wound healing processes fibroblasts account for wound closure by adopting a contractile phenotype. One disease manifestation of COPD is emphysema which is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls and our hypothesis is that fibroblasts in the COPD lungs differentiate into a more contractile phenotype as a response to the deteriorating environment. Bronchial (central) and parenchymal (distal) fibroblasts were isolated from lung explants from COPD patients (n = 9) (GOLD stage IV) and from biopsies from control subjects and from donor lungs (n = 12). Tissue-derived fibroblasts were assessed for expression of proteins involved in fibroblast contraction by western blotting whereas contraction capacity was measured in three-dimensional collagen gels. The basal expression of rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) was increased in both centrally and distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients compared to fibroblasts from control subjects (p < 0.001) and (p < 0.01), respectively. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients had increased contractile capacity compared to control fibroblasts (p < 0.01). The contraction was dependent on ROCK1 activity as the ROCK inhibitor Y27632 dose-dependently blocked contraction in fibroblasts from COPD patients. ROCK1-positive fibroblasts were also identified by immunohistochemistry in the alveolar parenchyma in lung tissue sections from COPD patients. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients have an enhanced contractile phenotype that is dependent on ROCK1 activity. This feature may be of importance for the elastic dynamics of small airways and the parenchyma in late stages of COPD.

  10. File list: His.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 Histone Others Tail fibroblast SRX335673,SRX33...5668,SRX335667,SRX335674,SRX335665 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 RNA polymerase Others Tail fibroblast SRX33566...6 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 All antigens Others Tail fibroblast SRX306690,...5 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblast mm9 Histone Others Fibroblast SRX024353,SRX024354,SRX02...4352 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblast.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 RNA polymerase Others Tail fibroblast SRX33566...6 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 TFs and others Others Fibroblasts SRX396266,SRX39...396255,SRX396268,SRX396252,SRX396257,SRX396260,SRX396256,SRX396253,SRX396265 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 DNase-seq Others Fibroblasts SRX135564,SRX089279,...SRX480648,SRX100966,SRX480645,SRX480646,SRX089280,SRX100965,SRX480647 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Oth.20.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast mm9 All antigens Others Fibroblast SRX024353,SRX191057,...SRX024355,SRX024354,SRX024352 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 Histone Others Fibroblasts SRX651503,SRX651504,SR...X651505,SRX651506,SRX480793,SRX480792 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 TFs and others Others Fibroblasts SRX338979,SRX48...396255,SRX481483,SRX396260,SRX396266,SRX396257,SRX396265,SRX396258,SRX396256 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Oth.50.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 Histone Others Fibroblasts SRX651503,SRX651504,SR...X651505,SRX651506,SRX480793,SRX480792 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 Unclassified Others Tail fibroblast SRX306690,...SRX306689,SRX306688,SRX306691,SRX306687,SRX306686 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 DNase-seq Others Fibroblasts SRX100966,SRX135564,...SRX480646,SRX480648,SRX089279,SRX480647,SRX480645,SRX089280,SRX100965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast mm9 Histone Others Fibroblast SRX024353,SRX024354,SRX02...4352 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.AllAg.Fibroblast.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts hg19 TFs and others Others Fibroblasts SRX396266,SRX48...396251,SRX396255,SRX396257,SRX396268,SRX396260,SRX396253,SRX396256,SRX396265 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Fibroblasts.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 All antigens Others Tail fibroblast SRX335673,...5 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast mm9 Histone Others Tail fibroblast SRX335673,SRX33...5668,SRX335667,SRX335674,SRX335665 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.AllAg.Tail_fibroblast.bed ...

  7. Progeroid syndrome patients with ZMPSTE24 deficiency could benefit when treated with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Baris; Sankella, Shireesha; Gilpin, Christopher; Ozono, Keiichi; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with progeroid syndromes such as mandibuloacral dysplasia, type B (MADB) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) harbor mutations in zinc metalloproteinase (ZMPSTE24), an enzyme essential for posttranslational proteolysis of prelamin A to form mature lamin A. Dermal fibroblasts from these patients show increased nuclear dysmorphology and reduced proliferation; however, the efficacy of various pharmacological agents in reversing these cellular phenotypes remains unknown. In this study, fibroblasts from MADB patients exhibited marked nuclear abnormalities and reduced proliferation that improved upon treatment with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide but not with other agents, including farnesyl transferase inhibitors. Surprisingly, fibroblasts from an RD patient with a homozygous null mutation in ZMPSTE24, resulting in exclusive accumulation of prelamin A with no lamin A on immunoblotting of cellular lysate, exhibited few nuclear abnormalities and near-normal cellular proliferation. An unbiased proteomic analysis of the cellular lysate from RD fibroblasts revealed a lack of processing of vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein. Interestingly, the assembly of the vimentin microfibrils in MADB fibroblasts improved with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide. We conclude that rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide are beneficial for improving nuclear morphology and cell proliferation of MADB fibroblasts. Data from a single RD patient's fibroblasts also suggest that prelamin A accumulation by itself might not be detrimental and requires additional alterations at the cellular level to manifest the phenotype. PMID:28050601

  8. Effects of microelectrical current on migration of nasal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk; Cho, Jung-Sun; Park, Il Ho; Yoon, Hu Geun; Lee, Heung-Man

    2011-01-01

    Migration of fibroblasts is critical in wound healing. The question of how wounded electric fields guide migration of nasal fibroblasts remains to be elucidated. This study was designed to determine morphology, directedness, and migration rate of nasal fibroblasts during microcurrent application, which is simulated by an endogenous electric field at the vicinity of the wound. Nasal fibroblasts were exposed to a microelectric field at 50, 100, and 250 mV/mm for 3 hours at 37°C. In this experiment, the field polarity was reversed for an additional 3 hours. During in vitro testing, the cells were incubated in a newly developed miniature, microcurrent generating chamber system, with 5% CO(2), at 37°C; the media was circulated by a pump system. A wound was created by scratching a cell-free area (∼150 μm wide) into a confluent monolayer. The average migration speed was calculated as the distance traveled by the cell divided by time. A microelectric field of 100 mV/mm or more induced significant cell migration in the direction of the cathode. Trajectory speeds at 50, 100, and 250 mV/mm were 9.8 ± 0.3, 11.8 ± 0.3, and 13.5 ± 0.9 μm/mm, respectively. A significant difference was observed between migratory rate of controls and that of 50 mV/mm (p < 0.05). Microelectric fields appear to have a crucial role in control of nasal fibroblast activity in the process of wound healing.

  9. Reprogramming of fibroblast nuclei after transfer into bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, P A; Winger, Q; Hill, J R; Jones, K; Watson, A J; Westhusin, M E

    1999-01-01

    Recent landmark achievements in animal cloning have demonstrated that the events of cell differentiation can, in principle, be reversed. This reversal necessarily requires large-scale genetic reprogramming, of which little is known. In the present study we characterized the extent to which blastocyst stage-specific mRNA expression would be conserved in bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer (NT) using fetal fibroblasts as nuclei donors (FF NT). The mRNA pool of FF NT embryos was compared with that of NT embryos reconstructed from embryonic blastomeres (Emb NT), with embryos produced under in vivo or in vitro conditions, and finally with fibroblast cells. Embryo/cell-specific mRNA pools were contrasted using differential display methodology. Random oligonucleotide primer pair combinations were used to subfractionate mRNA populations and represent individual mRNAs as copy DNA (cDNA) bands ranging in size from 100 to 800 base pairs. Regardless of whether bovine blastocysts developed in vivo or in vitro, or were derived after nuclear transplantation with embryonic blastomeres or fetal fibroblasts, their mRNA profile was highly conserved and distinct from that of fetal fibroblast cells. There was approximately 95% conservation in cDNA banding patterns between FF NT, Emb NT, and in vivo derived blastocysts, when compared with in vitro derived blastocysts. In contrast, the cDNA banding in fibroblasts was only 67% conserved with in vitro derived blastocysts (p types to serve as nuclear donors for embryo reconstruction and provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency of cloning animals by nuclear transplantation.

  10. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ...

  11. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  12. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  13. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  14. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ...

  15. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criton S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a hamartomatous disorder characterised by focal overgrowths that can involve any structure of the body. An eleven-year-old girl with Proteus syndrome has been described with clitoromegaly.

  16. Overlap syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Rust, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In hepatology, the term overlap syndrome describes variant forms of the major hepatobiliary autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic

  17. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  18. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  19. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  1. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  2. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  3. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Many people with Alport syndrome also have hearing problems and abnormalities with their eyes. Other signs and ... and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, hearing and vision problems tend to be more common in males than ...

  4. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ...

  5. A novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in transformation of quiescent fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts by breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Fan, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    We tested the novel hypothesis that EMMPRIN/CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed in breast cancer cells, has a previously unknown role in transforming fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts, and that cancer-associated fibroblasts in turn induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells. Co-culture of fibroblasts with breast cancer cells or treatment of fibroblasts with breast cancer cell conditioned culture medium or recombinant EMMPRIN/CD147 induced expression of α-SMA in the fibroblasts in an EMMPRIN/CD147-dependent manner and promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells and enhanced cell migration potential. These findings support a novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in regulating the interaction between cancer and stroma. PMID:23474495

  6. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  7. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  8. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  9. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Preferred Language Guide Down Syndrome Facts Down ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Facts Preferred Language Guide Publications ...

  10. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Usher Syndrome > Facts About Usher Syndrome Facts About Usher Syndrome This information was developed by the National Eye ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Usher Syndrome Defined What is Usher syndrome? Usher syndrome is ...

  11. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  12. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  13. Caspase 3 activity in isolated fetal rat lung fibroblasts and rat periodontal ligament fibroblasts: cigarette smoke-induced alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Elliot Scott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the world. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary, oral and systemic diseases. Smoking during pregnancy is clearly a risk factor for the developing fetus and may be a major cause of infant mortality. Moreover, the oral cavity is the first site of exposure to cigarette smoke and may be a possible source for the spread of toxins to other organs of the body. Fibroblasts in general are morphologically heterogeneous connective tissue cells with diverse functions. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a crucial process during embryogenesis and for the maintenance of homeostasis throughout life. Deregulation of apoptosis has been implicated in abnormal lung development in the fetus and disease progression in adults. Caspases, are proteases which belong to the family of cysteine aspartic acid proteases and are the key components for the downstream amplification of intra-cellular apoptotic signals. Of the 14 caspases known, caspase-3 is the key executioner of apoptosis. Fetal rat lung fibroblasts but not PDL viability is reduced by exposure to CSE. In addition Caspase 3 activity is elevated after CSE exposure in fetal lung fibroblasts but not in PDLs. Expression of caspase 3 is induced in CSE exposed lung fibroblasts but not in PDLs. Caspase 3 was localized to the cytoplasm in both cell types.

  14. Site-specific keloid fibroblasts alter the behaviour of normal skin and normal scar fibroblasts through paracrine signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Ashcroft

    Full Text Available Keloid disease (KD is an abnormal cutaneous fibroproliferative disorder of unknown aetiopathogenesis. Keloid fibroblasts (KF are implicated as mediators of elevated extracellular matrix deposition. Aberrant secretory behaviour by KF relative to normal skin fibroblasts (NF may influence the disease state. To date, no previous reports exist on the ability of site-specific KF to induce fibrotic-like phenotypic changes in NF or normal scar fibroblasts (NS by paracrine mechanisms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of conditioned media from site-specific KF on the cellular and molecular behaviour of both NF and NS enabled by paracrine mechanisms. Conditioned media was collected from cultured primary fibroblasts during a proliferative log phase of growth including: NF, NS, peri-lesional keloid fibroblasts (PKF and intra-lesional keloid fibroblasts (IKF. Conditioned media was used to grow NF, NS, PKF and IKF cells over 240 hrs. Cellular behavior was monitored through real time cell analysis (RTCA, proliferation rates and migration in a scratch wound assay. Fibrosis-associated marker expression was determined at both protein and gene level. PKF conditioned media treatment of both NF and NS elicited enhanced cell proliferation, spreading and viability as measured in real time over 240 hrs versus control conditioned media. Following PKF and IKF media treatments up to 240 hrs, both NF and NS showed significantly elevated proliferation rates (p<0.03 and migration in a scratch wound assay (p<0.04. Concomitant up-regulation of collagen I, fibronectin, α-SMA, PAI-1, TGF-β and CTGF (p<0.03 protein expression were also observed. Corresponding qRT-PCR analysis supported these findings (P<0.03. In all cases, conditioned media from growing marginal PKF elicited the strongest effects. In conclusion, primary NF and NS cells treated with PKF or IKF conditioned media exhibit enhanced expression of fibrosis-associated molecular markers

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much saturated fat, and does not get enough physical activity may develop metabolic syndrome. Other causes include insulin resistance and a family ... you’re overweight. It also includes getting more physical activity and eating a ... syndrome treatment If you already have metabolic syndrome, making ...

  16. Goodpasture Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessary. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition Eating, diet, and nutrition have not been shown to play a role in causing or preventing Goodpasture syndrome. Points to Remember Goodpasture syndrome is a pulmonary-renal syndrome, which is a group of acute illnesses ...

  17. [Reye's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, I

    2000-11-01

    A nationwide survey on Reye's syndrome(RS) was described. And problems between RS and influenza virus such as etiology, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and epidemiology were reviewed. So-called aspirin issue on RS was re-evaluated according to recent advance of RS research. Finally future aspect of Reye's syndrome was also discussed.

  18. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Reye's Syndrome Information Page Reye's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? Much ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Reye's Syndrome × What research is being done? Much of the ...

  19. [Cardiorenal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleck, D; John, S

    2017-09-13

    Patients in the intensive care unit often suffer from cardiorenal syndrome, which can have an important influence on the patient's outcome. The heart and kidney influence each other via organ crosstalk. We screened and evaluated current publications on cardiorenal syndromes and their therapy. A key role in the management of cardiorenal syndromes is renal decongestion via loop diuretics.

  20. Garcia-Hafner-Happle syndrome: A case report and review of a rare sub-type of epidermal nevus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Soaham Dilip; Vora, Rita; Bharani, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Garcia-Hafner-Happle syndrome, also known as Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 epidermal nevus syndrome, is a new neurocutaneous phenotype, which has been identified in 2008 by Garcı'a-Vargas et al. The disorder is caused by a mosaic R248C mutation of the FGFR3 gene, which is characterized by a keratinocytic epidermal nevus, acanthosis nigricans, and neurological abnormalities like seizures, intellectual impairment, cortical atrophy, and underdevelopment of corpus callosum. The epidermal nevus syndromes represent a group of distinct disorders in which an epidermal nevus is associated with abnormalities in other organ systems like central nervous system, cardiovascular system, genitourinary system, eyes, and bone. Recently, nine well-defined different epidermal nevus syndromes (ENSs) have been identified on clinical, histopathologic, and molecular basis. We present here the details of a patient with the clinical features and skin biopsy findings suggestive of Garcia-Hafner-Happle syndrome.

  1. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteases in Human Fibroblasts with Different Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lindner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are widely distributed cells and are responsible for the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM components but also secrete ECM-degrading matrix metalloproteases. A finely balanced equilibrium between deposition and degradation of ECM is essential for structural integrity of tissues. In the past, fibroblasts have typically been understood as a uniform cell population with comparable functions regardless of their origin. Here, we determined growth curves of fibroblasts derived from heart, skin, and lung and clearly show the lowest proliferation rate for cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, we examined basal expression levels of collagen and different MMPs in these three types of fibroblasts and compared these concerning their site of origin. Interestingly, we found major differences in basal mRNA expression especially for MMP1 and MMP3. Moreover, we treated fibroblasts with TNF-α and observed different alterations under these proinflammatory conditions. In conclusion, fibroblasts show different properties in proliferation and MMP expression regarding their originated tissue.

  2. Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome: diagnostic applications of activity-based probes and lipid analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaspar, Paulo; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Strijland, Anneke; Scheij, Saskia; van Eijk, Marco; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Balreira, Andrea; Zunke, Friederike; Schwake, Michael; Sá Miranda, Clara; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP2) mediates trafficking of glucocerebrosidase (GBA) to lysosomes. Deficiency of LIMP2 causes action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome (AMRF). LIMP2-deficient fibroblasts virtually lack GBA like the cells of patients with Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal

  3. Multiple Directional Differentiation Difference of Neonatal Rat Fibroblasts from Six Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiao Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fibroblasts are abundantly distributed throughout connective tissues in the body and are very important in maintaining the structural and functional integrity. Recent reports have proved that fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells share much more in common than previously recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate comparative studies in fibroblasts on the differences in the expression of molecular markers and differentiation capacity from different organs. Methods: Combined trypsin/collagenase enzymes digestion method was used to isolate and culture the fibroblasts derived from heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and skin. Cell activity was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay. Common molecular markers for fibroblasts such as vimentin, DDR2 and FSP1, stem cell markers nanog, c-kit and sca-1 were detected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and western blotting. The osteogenic, adipogenic and cardiogenic differentiations of fibroblasts were performed by inductive culture in special mediums, and analyzed by Alizarin red, Oil red O and immunofluorescence staining of cTnT respectively. Results: The proliferation rate of fibroblasts in lung was faster than in other five organs. Common molecular markers for fibroblasts were expressed differently in different organs. DDR2 was strongly expressed in fibroblasts in the heart, partly expressed in the heart, skin, liver and spleen. Interestingly, no expression of DDR2 was detected in liver and kidney. However, vimentin and FSP1 were consistently expressed in fibroblasts from skin, liver, kidney, spleen and lung. nanog expression in fibroblasts from lung was less than that from heart, skin, liver and spleen (P . c-kit expression in fibroblasts from heart, skin and kidney was higher than that from spleen (P , while the c-kit positive fibroblasts from liver was obviously higher than that from spleen (P . But sca-1 expression in fibroblasts from lung was the lowest among six

  4. IGF2 expression and β-catenin levels are increased in Frozen Shoulder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykha, Christina N; Crawford, Justin D; Burry, Andrea F; Drosdowech, Darren S; Faber, Kenneth J; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David B

    2014-08-01

    Frozen Shoulder Syndrome is a fibrosis of the shoulder joint capsule that is clinically associated with Dupuytren's disease, a fibrosis of the palmar fascia. Little is known about any commonalities in the pathophysiology of these connective tissue fibroses. β-catenin, a protein that transactivates gene expression, and levels of IGF2 mRNA, encoding insulin-like growth factor-II, are elevated in Dupuytren's disease. The aim of this study was to determine if correlating changes in β-catenin levels and IGF2 expression are evident in Frozen Shoulder Syndrome. Tissue from patients with Frozen Shoulder Syndrome and rotator cuff tear were obtained during shoulder arthroscopies. Total protein extracts were prepared from tissue aliquots and β-catenin immunoreactivity was assessed by Western immunoblotting. In parallel, primary fibroblasts were derived from these tissues and assessed for IGF2 expression by quantitative PCR. β-catenin levels were significantly increased in Frozen Shoulder Syndrome relative to rotator cuff tear when assessed by Western immunoblotting analyses. IGF2 mRNA levels were significantly increased in primary fibroblasts derived from frozen shoulder syndrome tissues relative to fibroblasts derived from rotator cuff tissues. As in Dupuytren's disease, β-catenin levels and IGF2 expression are elevated in Frozen Shoulder Syndrome. These findings support the hypothesis that these connective tissue fibroses share a common pathophysiology.

  5. RNA-Guided Activation of Pluripotency Genes in Human Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Kai; Zhou, Yan; Blichfeld, Kristian Aabo

    2017-01-01

    -associated protein 9 (dCas9)-VP64 (CRISPRa) alone, or a combination of dCas9-VP64 and MS2-P65-HSF1 [synergistic activation mediator (SAM) system] mediated activation of five pluripotency genes: KLF4 (K), LIN28 (L), MYC (M), OCT4 (O), and SOX2 (S) in human cells (HEK293T, HeLa, HepG2, and primary fibroblasts...... could be obtained from these SAM fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study showed that CRISPR/Cas9-based ATFs are potent to activate and maintain transcription of endogenous human pluripotent genes. However, future improvements of the system are still required to improve activation efficiency and cellular...

  6. Bio-artificial pleura using an autologous dermal fibroblast sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Masato; Takagi, Ryo; Washio, Kaoru; Kokubo, Mami; Yamato, Masayuki

    2017-10-01

    Air leaks (ALs) are observed after pulmonary resections, and without proper treatment, can produce severe complications. AL prevention is a critical objective for managing patients after pulmonary resection. This study applied autologous dermal fibroblast sheets (DFS) to close ALs. For sealing ALs in a 44-year-old male human patient with multiple bullae, a 5 × 15-mm section of skin was surgically excised. From this skin specimen, primary dermal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured for 4 weeks to produce DFSs that were harvested after a 10-day culture. ALs were completely sealed using surgical placement of these autologous DFSs. DFS were found to be a durable long-term AL sealant, exhibiting requisite flexibility, elasticity, durability, biocompatibility, and usability, resulting reliable AL closure. DFS should prove to be an extremely useful tissue-engineered pleura substitute.

  7. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Takagaki, K.; Kubo, K.; Morikawa, A.; Tamura, S.; Endo, M. (Hirosaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-15

    The chain length of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine was investigated. ({sup 3}H)Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

  8. Fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix in right ventricular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2017-10-01

    Right ventricular failure predicts adverse outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), and in subjects with left ventricular heart failure and is associated with interstitial fibrosis. This review manuscript discusses the cellular effectors and molecular mechanisms implicated in right ventricular fibrosis. The right ventricular interstitium contains vascular cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells, enmeshed in a collagen-based matrix. Right ventricular pressure overload in PH is associated with the expansion of the fibroblast population, myofibroblast activation, and secretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Mechanosensitive transduction of adrenergic signalling and stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone cascade trigger the activation of right ventricular fibroblasts. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines may contribute to expansion and activation of macrophages that may serve as a source of fibrogenic growth factors, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Endothelin-1, TGF-βs, and matricellular proteins co-operate to activate cardiac myofibroblasts, and promote synthesis of matrix proteins. In comparison with the left ventricle, the RV tolerates well volume overload and ischemia; whether the right ventricular interstitial cells and matrix are implicated in these favourable responses remains unknown. Expansion of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix protein deposition are prominent features of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of arrhythmic events. Prevailing conceptual paradigms on right ventricular remodelling are based on extrapolation of findings in models of left ventricular injury. Considering the unique embryologic, morphological, and physiologic properties of the RV and the clinical significance of right ventricular failure, there is a need further to dissect RV-specific mechanisms of fibrosis and interstitial remodelling. Published on behalf of the European Society of

  9. Rosmarinic acid potentiates carnosic acid induced apoptosis in lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Sana; Mies, Frédérique; Ben Ali, Ridha; Mlika, Mona; Jameleddine, Saloua; Mc Entee, Kathleen; Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by over-population and excessive activation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts disrupting normal lung structure and functioning. Rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid (CA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) was reported to cure bleomycin-(BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. We demonstrate that CA decreased human lung fibroblast (HLF) viability with IC50 value of 17.13±1.06 μM, while RA had no cytotoxic effect. In the presence of 50 μM of RA, dose-response for CA shifted to IC50 value of 11.70±1.46 μM, indicating synergic action. TGFβ-transformed HLF, rat lung fibroblasts and L929 cells presented similar sensitivity to CA and CA+RA (20μM+100μM, respectively) treatment. Rat alveolar epithelial cells died only under CA+RA treatment, while A549 cells were not affected. Annexin V staining and DNA quantification suggested that HLF are arrested in G0/G1 cell cycle phase and undergo apoptosis. CA caused sustained activation of phospho-Akt and phospho-p38 expression and inhibition of p21 protein.Addition of RA potentiated these effects, while RA added alone had no action.Only triple combination of inhibitors (MAPK-p38, pan-caspase, PI3K/Akt/autophagy) partially attenuated apoptosis; this suggests that cytotoxicity of CA+RA treatment has a complex mechanism involving several parallel signaling pathways. The in vivo antifibrotic effect of CA and RA was compared with that of Vitamine-E in BLM-induced fibrosis model in rats. We found comparable reduction in fibrosis score by CA, RA and CA+RA, attenuation of collagen deposition and normalization of oxidative stress markers. In conclusion, antifibrotic effect of CA+RA is due to synergistic pro-apoptotic action on lung fibroblasts and myofibroblasts.

  10. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  11. Rosmarinic acid potentiates carnosic acid induced apoptosis in lung fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Bahri

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by over-population and excessive activation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts disrupting normal lung structure and functioning. Rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid (CA and rosmarinic acid (RA was reported to cure bleomycin-(BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. We demonstrate that CA decreased human lung fibroblast (HLF viability with IC50 value of 17.13±1.06 μM, while RA had no cytotoxic effect. In the presence of 50 μM of RA, dose-response for CA shifted to IC50 value of 11.70±1.46 μM, indicating synergic action. TGFβ-transformed HLF, rat lung fibroblasts and L929 cells presented similar sensitivity to CA and CA+RA (20μM+100μM, respectively treatment. Rat alveolar epithelial cells died only under CA+RA treatment, while A549 cells were not affected. Annexin V staining and DNA quantification suggested that HLF are arrested in G0/G1 cell cycle phase and undergo apoptosis. CA caused sustained activation of phospho-Akt and phospho-p38 expression and inhibition of p21 protein.Addition of RA potentiated these effects, while RA added alone had no action.Only triple combination of inhibitors (MAPK-p38, pan-caspase, PI3K/Akt/autophagy partially attenuated apoptosis; this suggests that cytotoxicity of CA+RA treatment has a complex mechanism involving several parallel signaling pathways. The in vivo antifibrotic effect of CA and RA was compared with that of Vitamine-E in BLM-induced fibrosis model in rats. We found comparable reduction in fibrosis score by CA, RA and CA+RA, attenuation of collagen deposition and normalization of oxidative stress markers. In conclusion, antifibrotic effect of CA+RA is due to synergistic pro-apoptotic action on lung fibroblasts and myofibroblasts.

  12. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Makwana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Moyamoya disease is a disorder of blood vessels in the brain, specifically the internal carotid arteries and the arteries that branch from them. The primary idiopathic form “moyamoya disease” has been distinguished from an associated form of “moyamoya syndrome,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease, fibromuscular dysplasia, activated protein C resistance, or head trauma. There have been only 47 previous cases of moyamoya syndrome in association with Down syndrome reported in the world literature. Recently, we have come across a Case of Downs’ Syndrome with Moyamoya Syndrome. Because of its rarity we want to report our case.

  13. RNA sequencing of creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficient fibroblasts reveals impairment of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Benjamin; Ndika, Joseph D T; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Kanhai, Warsha A; van Dooren, Silvy J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Pals, Gerard; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency is the most common cause of cerebral creatine syndromes, and is characterized by depletion of creatine in the brain. Manifestations of this X-linked disorder include intellectual disability, speech/language impairment, behavior abnormalities, and seizures. At the moment, no effective treatment is available. In order to investigate the molecular pathophysiology of this disorder, we performed RNA sequencing on fibroblasts derived from patients. The transcriptomes of fibroblast cells from eight unrelated individuals with SLC6A8 deficiency and three wild-type controls were sequenced. SLC6A8 mutations with different effects on the protein product resulted in different gene expression profiles. Differential gene expression analysis followed by gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that especially the expression of genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton are altered in SLC6A8 deficiency, such as collagens, keratins, integrins, and cadherins. This suggests an important novel role for creatine in the structural development and maintenance of cells. It is likely that the (extracellular) structure of brain cells is also impaired in SLC6A8-deficient patients, and future studies are necessary to confirm this and to reveal the true functions of creatine in the brain. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine E.F. de Esch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene.

  15. Elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling Is Critical for the Pathogenesis of the Dwarfism in Evc2/Limbin Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghao; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Takehito; Takeda, Haruko; Scott, Greg; Rajderkar, Sudha; Ray, Manas K; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Allen, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Hung, Irene H; Ornitz, David M; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Mishina, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a skeletal dysplasia, characterized by short limbs, postaxial polydactyly, and dental abnormalities. EvC syndrome is also categorized as a ciliopathy because of ciliary localization of proteins encoded by the two causative genes, EVC and EVC2 (aka LIMBIN). While recent studies demonstrated important roles for EVC/EVC2 in Hedgehog signaling, there is still little known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the skeletal dysplasia features of EvC patients, and in particular why limb development is affected, but not other aspects of organogenesis that also require Hedgehog signaling. In this report, we comprehensively analyze limb skeletogenesis in Evc2 mutant mice and in cell and tissue cultures derived from these mice. Both in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling in Evc2 mutant growth plates, in addition to compromised but not abrogated Hedgehog-PTHrP feedback loop. Elevation of FGF signaling, mainly due to increased Fgf18 expression upon inactivation of Evc2 in the perichondrium, critically contributes to the pathogenesis of limb dwarfism. The limb dwarfism phenotype is partially rescued by inactivation of one allele of Fgf18 in the Evc2 mutant mice. Taken together, our data uncover a novel pathogenic mechanism to understand limb dwarfism in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

  16. Elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling Is Critical for the Pathogenesis of the Dwarfism in Evc2/Limbin Mutant Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is a skeletal dysplasia, characterized by short limbs, postaxial polydactyly, and dental abnormalities. EvC syndrome is also categorized as a ciliopathy because of ciliary localization of proteins encoded by the two causative genes, EVC and EVC2 (aka LIMBIN. While recent studies demonstrated important roles for EVC/EVC2 in Hedgehog signaling, there is still little known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the skeletal dysplasia features of EvC patients, and in particular why limb development is affected, but not other aspects of organogenesis that also require Hedgehog signaling. In this report, we comprehensively analyze limb skeletogenesis in Evc2 mutant mice and in cell and tissue cultures derived from these mice. Both in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF signaling in Evc2 mutant growth plates, in addition to compromised but not abrogated Hedgehog-PTHrP feedback loop. Elevation of FGF signaling, mainly due to increased Fgf18 expression upon inactivation of Evc2 in the perichondrium, critically contributes to the pathogenesis of limb dwarfism. The limb dwarfism phenotype is partially rescued by inactivation of one allele of Fgf18 in the Evc2 mutant mice. Taken together, our data uncover a novel pathogenic mechanism to understand limb dwarfism in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

  17. Antioxidants successfully reduce ROS production in propionic acidemia fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Villar, Lorena; Pérez, Belén; Ugarte, Magdalena; Desviat, Lourdes R; Richard, Eva

    2014-09-26

    Propionic acidemia (PA), caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial biotin dependent enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) is one of the most frequent organic acidurias in humans. Most PA patients present in the neonatal period with metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia, developing different neurological symptoms, movement disorders and cardiac complications. There is strong evidence indicating that oxidative damage could be a pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative, mitochondrial and metabolic diseases. Recently, we identified an increase in ROS levels in PA patients-derived fibroblasts. Here, we analyze the capability of seven antioxidants to scavenge ROS production in PA patients' cells. Tiron, trolox, resveratrol and MitoQ significantly reduced ROS content in patients and controls' fibroblasts. In addition, changes in the expression of two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, were observed in PA patients-derived fibroblasts after tiron and resveratrol treatment. Our results in PA cellular models establish the proof of concept of the potential of antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for PA and pave the way for future assessment of antioxidant strategies in the murine model of PA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impaired genome maintenance suppresses the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in mice with Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid van der Pluijm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a photosensitive, DNA repair disorder associated with progeria that is caused by a defect in the transcription-coupled repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER. Here, complete inactivation of NER in Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mutants causes a phenotype that reliably mimics the human progeroid CS syndrome. Newborn Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- mice display attenuated growth, progressive neurological dysfunction, retinal degeneration, cachexia, kyphosis, and die before weaning. Mouse liver transcriptome analysis and several physiological endpoints revealed systemic suppression of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1 somatotroph axis and oxidative metabolism, increased antioxidant responses, and hypoglycemia together with hepatic glycogen and fat accumulation. Broad genome-wide parallels between Csb(m/m/Xpa(-/- and naturally aged mouse liver transcriptomes suggested that these changes are intrinsic to natural ageing and the DNA repair-deficient mice. Importantly, wild-type mice exposed to a low dose of chronic genotoxic stress recapitulated this response, thereby pointing to a novel link between genome instability and the age-related decline of the somatotroph axis.

  19. Effect of periodontal dressings on human gingiva fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eber, R.M.; Shuler, C.F.; Buchanan, W.; Beck, F.M.; Horton, J.E. (Ohio State Univ. College of Dentistry, Columbus (USA))

    1989-08-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity studies of periodontal dressings have not generally produced a result consistent with in vivo observations. These prior in vitro studies have not used human intraoral cell lines. We tested the effects of two eugenol containing and two non-eugenol periodontal dressings on cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) (ATCC No. 1292). Replicate HGF cultures grown in microtiter plates were exposed to stock, 1:4 and 1:16 dilutions of extracts made from each of the four periodontal dressings. The HGF cultures were pulse labelled with tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Incorporations of the labelled thymidine were measured using liquid scintillation counting and expressed as counts per minute. The results showed that undiluted extracts from all four periodontal dressings totally inhibited 3HTdR uptake (P less than 0.05). The 1:4 dilution of eugenol dressings inhibited 3HTdR uptake significantly more than non-eugenol dressings (P less than 0.05). Interestingly, at 72 hours the 1:16 dilution of the non-eugenol dressings caused significantly increased 3HTdR uptake which was not observed with the eugenol dressings. The present results suggest that the use of a human fibroblastic cell line for testing the effects of periodontal dressings may provide information about the relative biological effects of these dressings. Using this cell line, we have found that eugenol dressings inhibit fibroblast proliferation to a greater extent than non-eugenol dressings.

  20. Effect of phenytoin and age on gingival fibroblast enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surena Vahabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of cytokine balance is stated to exert greater influence on gingival overgrowth compared to the direct effect of the drug on the regulation of extracellular matrix metabolism. The current study evaluated the effect of phenytoin on the regulation of collagen, lysyl oxidase and elastin in gingival fibroblasts.Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs were obtained from 4 healthy children and 4 adults. Samples were cultured with phenytoin. MTT test was used to evaluate the proliferation and ELISA was performed to determine the level of IL1β and PGE2 production by HGFs. Total RNA of gingival fibroblasts was extracted and RT-PCR was performed on samples. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data with an alpha error level less than 0.05.There was a significant difference in the expression of elastin between the controls and treated samples in both adult and pediatric groups and also in the lysyl oxidase expression of adult controls and treated adults. No significant difference was found between collagen expression in adults.The significant difference in elastin and lysyl oxidase expression between adult and pediatric samples indicates the significant effect of age on their production.

  1. Structural alterations in fibroblast monolayers caused by mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, H; Amira, M; Padawer, J; Davidson, S

    1989-06-01

    Populations of mature, long-lived, nondividing mast cells develop on embryonic fibroblast monolayers after 1 mo growth of lymph node cells taken from mice immunized with horse serum. Total mast cell degranulation with 80-90% histamine release has been obtained by monoclonal anti-2,4-dinitrophenol (anti-DNP) IgE and the antigen. This degranulation process was studied by time-lapse cinematography and scanning electron microscopy. Excitation of the mast cells began as early as 10 s after addition of the antigen and lasted for about 15 s. Consequently, the fibroblast cytoplasm was displaced by short 5-10 s movements. Before degranulation, due to an extracellular film that coated the cells and the extracellular fibers, the monolayer appeared as a continuous, uninterrupted layer. After degranulation and fibroblast cytoplasm displacement, the fibrous network was exposed. Several inhibitors and antagonists of mast cell mediators were introduced to the cultures prior to addition of the antigen. So far, only with soybean trypsin inhibitor was the cytoplasm dislocation inhibited. Histamine H1 and H2 and serotonin receptor antagonists, as well as indomethacin, cortisol, aprotinin, and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, did not inhibit. These results suggest that chymase, which constitutes the greater part of the mast cell granule protein, is the causative agent.

  2. Potensi Terapeutik Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 terhadap Resistensi Insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasari Kurniasari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 merupakan salah satu dari anggota FGF yang berperansebagai faktor endokrin. Hepar dan jaringan adiposa merupakan tempat kerja utama FGF21.Ekspresi FGF21 di hepar diatur oleh peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARαsedangkan di jaringan adiposa diatur oleh peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma(PPARγ. Kedua faktor transkripsi tersebut terlibat dalam metabolisme karbohidrat dan lipid. Padaresistensi insulin terdapat hiperglikemia, hiperinsulinemia, dan dislipidemia. Pemberian FGF21pada berbagai studi in vivo dan in vitro telah menunjukan potensi FGF21 dalam mengatasi kelainanakibat resistensi insulin sekaligus meningkatkan sensitivitas jaringan terhadap insulin. Kata kunci: FGF21, PPARγ, PPARα, resistensi insulin Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21 Potension in InsulinResistance Treatment Abstract Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a member of FGF family that plays a role as endocrinefactor. Liver and adipose tissue are major target of FGF21. The expression of FGF21 in liveris regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα, while peroxisomeproliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ regulate FGF21 expression in adipose tissue.Both transcription factors are involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Hyperglycemia,hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia are observed in insulin resistance. Treatment with FGF21 inin vitro and in vivo study showed that FGF21 have the potential to overcome insulin resistance aswell as increasing tissue’s sensitivity towards insulin. Keywords: FGF21, PPARγ, PPARα, insulin resistance Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of fibrosarcoma and skin fibroblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Ogunc; Uysal, Hamdi

    2015-02-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and cancer cell lines provides for a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of cancer development and is essential for developing more effective strategies for new biomarker or drug target discovery. The purpose of this study is to compare protein expression levels between fibrosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines. In our study, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques were carried out to compare the protein profile between fibrosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines. We prepared cell lysate samples to analyze intracellular proteins and secretome samples to analyze extracellular proteins in both cell lines. Our results revealed 13 upregulated proteins and 1 downregulated protein of which all of them identified in fibrosarcoma cell line after the comparison with fibroblast cell line cell lysates. When comparing secretome profiles of both cell lines, we found and identified 13 proteins only expressed in fibrosarcoma cell line. These identified proteins have common functions such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation, invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis in cancer. The data obtained from this study indicates that these proteins have importance on understanding the molecular mechanism of fibrosarcoma. These proteins may serve as candidate biomarkers and drug targets for future clinical studies.

  4. Hierarchical mechanisms for direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapinski, Orly L; Vierbuchen, Thomas; Qu, Kun; Lee, Qian Yi; Chanda, Soham; Fuentes, Daniel R; Giresi, Paul G; Ng, Yi Han; Marro, Samuele; Neff, Norma F; Drechsel, Daniela; Martynoga, Ben; Castro, Diogo S; Webb, Ashley E; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunet, Anne; Guillemot, Francois; Chang, Howard Y; Wernig, Marius

    2013-10-24

    Direct lineage reprogramming is a promising approach for human disease modeling and regenerative medicine, with poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we reveal a hierarchical mechanism in the direct conversion of fibroblasts into induced neuronal (iN) cells mediated by the transcription factors Ascl1, Brn2, and Myt1l. Ascl1 acts as an "on-target" pioneer factor by immediately occupying most cognate genomic sites in fibroblasts. In contrast, Brn2 and Myt1l do not access fibroblast chromatin productively on their own; instead, Ascl1 recruits Brn2 to Ascl1 sites genome wide. A unique trivalent chromatin signature in the host cells predicts the permissiveness for Ascl1 pioneering activity among different cell types. Finally, we identified Zfp238 as a key Ascl1 target gene that can partially substitute for Ascl1 during iN cell reprogramming. Thus, a precise match between pioneer factors and the chromatin context at key target genes is determinative for transdifferentiation to neurons and likely other cell types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HCMV Induces Macropinocytosis for Host Cell Entry in Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzenecker, Stefanie; Helenius, Ari; Krzyzaniak, Magdalena Anna

    2016-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important and widespread pathogen in the human population. While infection by this β-herpesvirus in endothelial, epithelial and dendritic cells depends on endocytosis, its entry into fibroblasts is thought to occur by direct fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane. To characterize individual steps during entry in primary human fibroblasts, we employed quantitative assays as well as electron, fluorescence and live cell microscopy in combination with a variety of inhibitory compounds. Our results showed that while infectious entry was pH- and clathrin-independent, it required multiple, endocytosis-related factors and processes. The virions were found to undergo rapid internalization into large vacuoles containing internalized fluid and endosome markers. The characteristics of the internalization process fulfilled major criteria for macropinocytosis. Moreover, we found that soon after addition to fibroblasts the virus rapidly triggered the formation of circular dorsal ruffles in the host cell followed by the generation of large macropinocytic vacuoles. This distinctive form of macropinocytosis has been observed especially in primary cells but has not previously been reported in response to virus stimulation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of blue light irradiation on human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opländer, Christian; Hidding, Sarah; Werners, Frauke B; Born, Matthias; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2011-05-03

    Previous studies have reported that separately from UV-radiation also blue light influences cellular physiology in different cell types. However, little is known about the blue light action spectrum. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of blue light at distinct wavelengths (410, 420, 453, 480 nm) emitted by well defined light-emitting-diodes on viability, proliferation and antioxidative capacity of human dermal fibroblasts. We found that irradiation with blue light (410, 420 nm) led to intracellular oxidative stress and toxic effects in a dose and wavelength dependent manner. No toxicity was observed using light at 453 nm and 480 nm. Furthermore, blue light (410, 420, 453 nm) at low doses reduced the antioxidative capacity of fibroblasts. At non-toxic doses, irradiations at 410, 420 and 453 nm reduced proliferation indicating a higher susceptibility of proliferating fibroblasts to blue light. Our results show that blue light at different wavelengths may induce varying degrees of intracellular oxidative stress with different physiological outcome, which could contribute to premature skin photoaging. On the other hand, the use of blue light due to its antiproliferative and toxic properties may represent a new approach in treatment and prevention of keloids, hypertrophic scars and fibrotic skin diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Overexpression of p53 but not Rb in the cytoplasm of neurons and small vessels in an autopsy of a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Hiroaki; Itonaga, Tomoyo; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro; Ihara, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Cockayne syndrome presents senescence-like changes starting in early infancy; however, the mechanism of premature aging remains unclear. In an autopsy of a 23-year-old woman with Cockayne syndrome, we evaluated the correlation between Cockayne pathology and the expression patterns of the senescence-associated proteins p53 and Rb. Neuropathological findings in this case revealed basal ganglia calcification, tigroid leukodystrophy, bizarre reactive astrocytes, severe cerebellar atrophy with loss of Purkinje cells, and arteriolar/neuronal calcifications in the hypothalamus. Multiple arteriolar calcifications and sclerotic changes were seen in the central nervous system and kidney, but the endothelium of the aorta and coronary arteries remained intact appropriately for the individual's age without any finding of arteriosclerosis. Overexpression of p53 protein was confirmed in the cytoplasm of neurons in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum, of arteriolar endothelial cells of the cerebrum and renal glomerular capillaries, and of cutaneous epithelial cells. The distribution of p53 overexpression was coincident with that of pathological alteration, such as neuronal loss, calcification and atrophy. High expression of p53 was localized in the cytoplasm, not in the nucleus. In contrast to p53, Rb was not expressed in any senescence lesion. In terms of senescence, distinct differences are found among organs in a patient with Cockayne syndrome. This segmental progeria differs from natural aging, and implicates p53 overexpression in the etiology of CS. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Preserved fertility in a non-mosaic Klinefelter patient with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Aksglaede, L; Lund, A M

    2007-01-01

    receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which is a gain-of-function mutation resulting in achondroplasia. The patient had phenotypic characteristics of achondroplasia (e.g. short limbed dwarfism and frontal bossing). Testicular volume was 8 ml at 27 years of age and repeated semen samples showed sperm concentrations of 0...... a child from a spontaneous pregnancy. The observed testicular size and function in our patient contrast the typical findings in classical Klinefelter syndrome. We speculate that the alteration of FGFR3 protein function in our Klinefelter patient alleviated the destruction of the seminiferous tubules...... and may suggest that the fibroblast growth factor family has a pleiotrophic function in human spermatogonia, which physiologically express FGFR3....

  9. Activity-dependent neuronal control of gap-junctional communication in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shi, Jing

    2009-07-14

    Intercellular communication through gap junctions plays an important role in fibroblast physiology. Here we report an activity-dependent neuronal control of gap-junctional communication (GJC) in rat dermal fibroblasts, which is associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor-mediated elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Both spontaneous and induced activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, manifested by action potentials and TTX-dependent inward currents, significantly reduced fibroblast GJC in Neuron/Fibroblast (N/F) cocultures. Reduced fibroblast GJC by DRG neurons was prevented by blockade of NMDA receptors and decrease of intra- and intercellular Ca(2+). Immunocytochemistry showed that the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor coexisted with CX43 at the plasma membrane of fibroblasts. Moreover, glutamate applied to fibroblast cultures triggered NMDA receptor-dependent intracellular Ca(2+) elevations and decrease of GJC. These data demonstrate that NMDA receptor activation contributes to downregulation of GJC in fibroblasts. Since fibroblasts have been shown to facilitate DRG neurite growth and survival, our findings provide a glimpse at the impact that neuronal activation has on fibroblast networks.

  10. A FTIR imaging characterization of fibroblasts stimulated by various breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available It is well known that the microenvironment plays a major role in breast cancer progression. Yet, the mechanism explaining the transition from normal fibroblasts to cancer-stimulated fibroblasts remains to be elucidated. Here we report a FTIR imaging study of the effects of three different breast cancer cell lines on normal fibroblasts in culture. Fibroblast activation process was monitored by FTIR imaging and spectra compared by multivariate statistical analyses. Principal component analysis evidenced that the fibroblasts stimulated by these cancer cell lines grouped together and remained distinctly separated from normal fibroblasts indicating a modified different chemical composition in the cancer-stimulated fibroblasts. Similar changes in fibroblasts were induced by the various breast cancer cell lines belonging to different sub-types. Most significant changes were observed in the region of 2950 and 1230 cm(-1, possibly related to changes in lipids and in the 1230 cm(-1 area assigned to phosphate vibrations (nucleotides. Interestingly, the cancer-cell induced changes in the fibroblasts also occurred when there was no possible direct contact between the two cell lines in the co-culture. When contact was possible, the spectral changes were similar, suggesting that soluble factors but not direct cell-cell interactions were responsible for fibroblast activation. Overall, the results indicate that IR imaging could be used in the future for analyzing the microenvironment of breast tumors.

  11. Fibroblast adhesion and activation onto micro-machined titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem-Marti, J; Delgado, L; Godoy-Gallardo, M; Pegueroles, M; Herrero, M; Gil, F J

    2013-07-01

    Surface modifications performed at the neck of dental implants, in the manner of micro-grooved surfaces, can reduce fibrous tissue encapsulation and prevent bacterial colonization, thereby improving fibrointegration and the formation of a biological seal. However, the applied procedures are technically complex and/or time consuming methods. The aim of this study was to analyse the fibroblast behaviour on modified titanium surfaces obtained, applying a simple and low-cost method. An array of titanium surfaces was obtained using a commercial computerized numerical control lathe, modifying the feed rate and the cutting depth. To elucidate the potential ability of the generated surfaces to activate connective tissue cells, a thorough gene (by real time - qPCR) and protein (by western blot or zymography) expression and cellular response characterization (cell morphology, cell adhesion and cell activation by secreting extracellular matrix (ECM) components and their enzyme regulators) was performed. Micro-grooved surfaces have statistically significant differences in the groove's width (approximately 10, 50 and 100 μm) depending on the applied advancing fixed speed. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that fibroblasts oriented along the generated grooves, but they were only entirely accommodated on the wider grooves (≥50 μm). Micro-grooved surfaces exhibited an earlier cell attachment and activation, as seen by collagen Iα1 and fibronectin deposition and activation of ECM remodelling enzymes, compared with the other surfaces. However, fibroblasts could remain in an activated state on narrower surfaces (micro-grooved surfaces could improve implant integration at the gingival site with respect to polished surfaces. Micro-grooved surfaces enhance early fibroblast adhesion and activation, which could be critical for the formation of a biological seal and finally promote tissue integration. Surfaces with wider grooves (≥50 μm) seem to be more

  12. Human gingival fibroblasts display a non-fibrotic phenotype distinct from skin fibroblasts in three-dimensional cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Mah

    Full Text Available Scar formation following skin injury can be a major psychosocial and physiological problem. However, the mechanisms of scar formation are still not completely understood. Previous studies have shown that wound healing in oral mucosa is faster, associates with a reduced inflammatory response and results to significantly reduced scar formation compared with skin wounds. In the present study, we hypothesized that oral mucosal fibroblasts from human gingiva are inherently distinct from fibroblasts from breast and abdominal skin, two areas prone to excessive scar formation, which may contribute to the preferential wound healing outcome in gingiva. To this end, we compared the phenotype of human gingival and skin fibroblasts cultured in in vivo-like three-dimensional (3D cultures that mimic the cells' natural extracellular matrix (ECM niche. To establish 3D cultures, five parallel fibroblast lines from human gingiva (GFBLs and breast skin (SFBLs were seeded in high density, and cultured for up to 21 days in serum and ascorbic acid containing medium to induce expression of wound-healing transcriptome and ECM deposition. Cell proliferation, morphology, phenotype and expression of wound healing and scar related genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemical methods. The expression of a set of genes was also studied in three parallel lines of human abdominal SFBLs. Findings showed that GFBLs displayed morphologically distinct organization of the 3D cultures and proliferated faster than SFBLs. GFBLs expressed elevated levels of molecules involved in regulation of inflammation and ECM remodeling (MMPs while SFBLs showed significantly higher expression of TGF-β signaling, ECM and myofibroblast and cell contractility-related genes. Thus, GFBLs display an inherent phenotype conducive for fast resolution of inflammation and ECM remodeling, characteristic for scar-free wound healing, while SFBLs have a profibrotic, scar

  13. Small cell lung cancer associated with multiple paraneoplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Franco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient presenting with multiple severe electrolyte disturbances who was subsequently found to have small cell lung cancer. Upon further evaluation, she demonstrated three distinct paraneoplastic processes, including the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, Fanconi syndrome, and an inappropriate elevation in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23. The patient underwent one round of chemotherapy, but she was found to have progressive disease. After 36 days of hospitalization, the patient made the decision to enter hospice care and later she expired.

  14. METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dikanović, Marinko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders that include hyperlipidemia, inadequate insulin resistance, hypertension, and abdominal type obesity. Patients who suffer from this syndrome have an increased risk for heart disease and blood vessel disease, stroke and type II diabetes. The world's leading healthcare institutions also disagree on the exact definition of this organization poremećaja. NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program) defines metabolic syndrome as a situation in which the...

  15. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  16. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  17. [Caroli's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Qiu, Zheng-Qing; Wei, Min

    2009-01-01

    Caroli's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease. Here a case of Caroli's syndrome associated with medullary sponge kidney was reported. The patient was a 2-years and 10 months-old boy. He presented with hepatosplenomegaly. Fever, abdominal pain or jaundice was not found. The imaging examination showed intrahepatic bile duct dilation, splenomegaly, medullary sponge kidney and nephrocalcinosis. After introduction of the case, this paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of Caroli's syndrome.

  18. Clinical characteristics of Crouzon syndrome

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    L Balyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome (CS is an genetic disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance caused by mutation of the gene for fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 was described as one of the varieties of craniosynostosis. In this presented case, premature closure of the sutures had caused restricted skull growth and lack of space for the growing brain resulted to shallowed eyes and cranial and ophthalmic deformities and impairment in tooth development. Management of a patient of CS has two components. First is the release of prematurely fused sutures based on evidence of raised intracranial pressure. Surgery is mainly carried out early after 3–6 months. Second is the craniofacial reconstructive surgery including advancement of the maxilla and frontonasal complex; and other surgeries depending upon the deformities. An increased intracranial pressure impairs brain development and can lead to mental retardation. Because of the delayed diagnosis and treatment in this case, visual and hearing loses and decreased mental capacity and mild retardation.

  19. The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on cardiac fibroblasts grown under altered gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Leder, Annekatrin; Pietsch, Jessica; Flick, Burkhard; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Myocardium is very sensitive to gravitational changes. During a spaceflight cardiovascular atrophy paired with rhythm problems and orthostatic intolerance can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on cardiac fibroblasts (CF) grown under altered gravity conditions. We examined the influence of exposure to a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) on CF, derived from porcine hearts. We focused on growth, extracellular matrix protein (ECMP) synthesis and apoptosis. When cultured on a RPM, CF began to form 3D spheroids within 24h, irrespective of growth factor treatment. Exposure to RPM induced an increased synthesis of ECMP and also resulted in elevated apoptosis in adherent CF as measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and caspase-3 detection. bFGF and VEGF significantly decreased the amount of ECMP (collagen type I, III, chondroitin sulfate) in 1g and RPM cultures, and also significantly reduced the amount of apoptotic CF as well as caspase-3. Altered gravity conditions on a RPM induced 3D growth, elevated ECMP synthesis and apoptosis in cardiac fibroblasts. Growth factor treatment attenuated programmed cell death and ECMP secretion. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 21 and its novel association with oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Gómez-Sámano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is an endocrine-member of the FGF family. It is synthesized mainly in the liver, but it is also expressed in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and many other organs. It has a key role in glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as in energy balance. FGF21 concentration in plasma is increased in patients with obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Recent findings suggest that such increment protects tissue from an increased oxidative stress environment. Different types of physical stress, such as strenuous exercising, lactation, diabetic nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, and critical illnesses, also increase FGF21 circulating concentration. FGF21 is now considered a stress-responsive hormone in humans. The discovery of an essential response element in the FGF21 gene, for the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4, involved in the regulation of oxidative stress, and its relation with genes such as NRF2, TBP-2, UCP3, SOD2, ERK, and p38, places FGF21 as a key regulator of the oxidative stress cell response. Its role in chronic diseases and its involvement in the treatment and follow-up of these diseases has been recently the target of new studies. The diminished oxidative stress through FGF21 pathways observed with anti-diabetic therapy is another clue of the new insights of this hormone.

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 Concentration in Dogs with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjes, L M; Parker, V J; Dembek, K; Young, G S; Giovaninni, L H; Kogika, M M; Chew, D J; Toribio, R E

    2017-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with hyperphosphatemia, decreased vitamin D metabolite concentrations, and hyperparathyroidism. This syndrome is known as CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Recently, it has been shown that an increase in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) concentration is an early biomarker of CKD in people. It is an independent risk factor for both progression of renal disease and survival time in humans and cats with CKD. Information about FGF-23 in healthy dogs and those with CKD is lacking. To measure FGF-23 concentration in dogs with different stages of CKD and determine its association with factors involved in CKD-MBD, including serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations. A secondary aim was to validate an ELISA for measurement of plasma FGF-23 concentration in dogs. Thirty-two client-owned dogs with naturally occurring CKD and 10 healthy control dogs. Prospective cross-sectional study. An FGF-23 ELISA was used to measure plasma FGF-23 concentration in dogs and their association with serum creatinine, phosphorus, calcium, and PTH concentrations. Plasma FGF-23 concentrations increased with severity of CKD and were significantly different between IRIS stages 1 and 2 versus stages 3 and 4 (P dogs with CKD as disease progresses. Plasma FGF-23 concentrations appear to be useful for further study of the pathophysiology of CKD-MBD in dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Intracellular Oxidant Activity, Antioxidant Enzyme Defense System, and Cell Senescence in Fibroblasts with Trisomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Rodríguez-Sureda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Down’s syndrome (DS is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F, this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS.

  3. Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS Myotonia Congenita Information Page NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Congenital ...

  4. [Cardiorenal syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Késöi, István; Sági, Balázs; Vas, Tibor; Pintér, Tünde; Kovács, Tibor; Wittmann, István; Nagy, Judit

    2011-09-18

    Cardiac and kidney diseases are very common, and increasingly coexist. Classification for cardiorenal syndrome and for its specific subtypes has been developed and published recently by a consensus group of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative. Cardiorenal syndromes have been classified according to whether the impairment of each organ is primary, secondary or whether heart and kidney dysfunction occurs simultaneously as a systemic disease. The different syndromes were classified into five subtypes. Type-1: acute cardiorenal syndrome: an abrupt worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-2: chronic cardiorenal syndrome: chronic abnormalities in cardiac function causing kidney injury and/or dysfunction. Type-3: acute renocardiac syndrome: abrupt worsening of kidney function leading to heart injury and/or dysfunction. Type-4: chronic renocardiac syndrome: chronic kidney diseases leading to heart injury, disease and/or dysfunction. Type-5: secondary cardiorenal syndrome: acute or chronic systemic diseases leading to simultaneous injury and/or dysfunction of heart and kidney. The identification of patients and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying each syndrome subtype will help cardiologists, nephrologists and physicians working on intensive care units to characterize groups of their patients with cardiac and renal impairment and to provide a more accurate treatment for them.

  5. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  6. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  7. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  8. Fibroblasts from patients with hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma are abnormally sensitive to the mutagenic effect of simulated sunlight and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.N.; Greene, M.H.; Corner, R.C.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1984-02-01

    Because of a possible etiologic link between mutations and carcinogenesis, the authors compared fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies of several patients with hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma and the dysplastic nevus syndrome for sensitivity to the mutagenic and/or cytotoxic effect of broad-spectrum simulated sunlight and of a UV mimetic carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO). The genetic marker was resistant to 6-thioguanine; loss of colony-forming ability was the assay for cytotoxicity. All five strains tested were more sensitive than normal to the killing effect of 4NQO (slopes of survival curves were 2- to 3-fold steeper), but only one strain was hypersensitive to killing by Sun Lamp radiation. Two strains were tested for mutagenicity. The response of each to the mutagenic action of these agents corresponded to its response to cell killing. Both strains were hypermutable after exposure to 4NQO, but only one showed a higher than normal frequency of mutants induced by simulated sunlight. The finding that nonmalignant fibroblasts from patients with a hereditary variant of malignant fibroblasts from patients with a hereditary variant of malignant melanoma are abnormally susceptible to carcinogen-induced mutations suggests that hypersensitivity to mutagens contributes to risk of melanoma in patients. It also supports the somatic cell mutation hypothesis for the origin of cancer. 46 references, 3 figures.

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  11. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner; Özge Keleş; Nevzat Uzuner

    2016-01-01

    Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual fie...

  12. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Tejchman, Anna; Zacharski, Maciej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowinska, Katarzyna; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Kieda, Claudine; Ugorski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst) overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first time, that such

  13. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Suchanski

    Full Text Available In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first

  14. Growth properties and growth factor responsiveness in skin fibroblasts from centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, G; Vergelli, M; Grassilli, E; Salomoni, P; Bellesia, E; Sikora, E; Radziszewska, E; Barbieri, D; Latorraca, S; Fagiolo, U; Santacaterina, S; Amaducci, L; Tiozzo, R; Franceschi, C; Sorbi, S

    1998-03-27

    Human fibroblast cultures, which have a finite replicative lifespan in vitro, are the most widely used model for the study of senescence at the cellular level. An inverse relationship between replicative capability and donor age has been reported in human fibroblast strains. We studied the growth capacity of fibroblast primary cultures derived from people whose lifespan was as closer as possible to the expected maximum human lifespan, i.e. people over one hundred. Our data suggest that outgrowth of fibroblasts from biopsies, growth kinetics at different population doubling levels, capability to respond to a classical mitogenic stimulus (such as 20% serum) and a variety of growth factors, were remarkably similar in fibroblasts from centenarians and young controls. On the whole, our data challenge the tenet of a simple and strict relationship between in vivo aging and in vitro proliferative capability of human fibroblasts, at least at the individual level.

  15. Presence of arylsulfatase A (ARS A) in multiple sulfatase deficiency disorder fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluharty, A L; Stevens, R L; Davis, L L; Shapiro, L J; Kihara, H

    1978-05-01

    Multiple deficiency disorder fibroblasts cultured in MEM-CO2 showed deficiencies of arylsulfatase A(ARS A) comparable to the deficiency in metachromatic leukodystrophy fibroblasts. However, the MSDD fibroblasts cultured in MEM-HEPES contained near normal levels of ARS A. Moreover, the enzyme from the latter fibroblasts was indistinguishable from ARS A of control fibroblasts on DEAE-cellulose chromatography, ratio of activity with several substrates, thermal inactivation, sensitivity to inhibitors, and precipitation by antiserum to human ARS A. These data support the conclusion that the ARS A genome is intact in MSDD fibroblasts and, by extension, in MSDD patients. Other sulfatases were present at levels ranging from mildly deficient to near normal but never as low as seen in the corresponding specific sulfatase deficient disorders.

  16. [Clinical and cellular biologic diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C H; Ko, Y M; Chien, C H; Yang, R C; Hung, K L; Hsiao, T J; Lee, C I

    1991-12-01

    We report a case of Cockayne syndrome. A 6-year-old boy presented with a progeroid face, dwarfism, psychomotor retardation, skin photosensitivity and retinal pigmented degeneration. Neurological study disclosed slowed nerve conduction velocities and a brain CT showed calcification in the basal ganglia. Auditory brain stem evoked potential showed prolonged interpeak latency of wave I to wave V. Laboratory evaluation revealed mild liver dysfunction and peripheral eosinophilia. Fibroblast cultures from the patient and his family were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light of 254 nm, ranging from 1 to 10 J/m2. Under 1 J/m2 irradiation, the surviving fraction of the fibroblasts from the patient, his mother, and a control subject were 40%, 50%, 90% respectively. If the fibroblasts of these subjects were exposed to 2 J/m2 and 3 J/m2 irradiation, the surviving fraction changed to 10%, 22%, 80% and 1.5%, 9%, 68%, respectively. However, fibroblasts from his sister and father showed the same surviving fraction as the control. The study showed that fibroblasts from the patient and his mother were extremely sensitive to UV light irradiation. We also study the concentration of the pyrimidine dimer of DNA in the patient and the control subject. Pyrimidine dimer showed no difference between the patient and the normal subject before and after 24-hour UV irradiation. These results suggest that the sensitivity to UV of Cockayne fibroblasts may be due to a ligase deficiency or to a replicon initiation disturbance in Cockayne cells.

  17. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-?B Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Li; Zhou Wu; Junjun Ni; Yicong Liu; Jie Meng; Weixian Yu; Hiroshi Nakanishi; Yanmin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased a...

  18. Allogeneic human dermal fibroblasts are viable in peripheral blood mononuclear co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Syamsul Hadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Transplanted allogeneic dermal fibroblasts retain stem cell subpopulations, and are easily isolated, expanded and stored using standard techniques. Their potential for regenerative therapy of chronic wounds should be evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine allogeneic fibroblast viability in the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Methods In this experimental study, fibroblasts were isolated from foreskin explants, expanded in the presence of serum, and stored using slow-freezing. We used one intervention group of allogeneic fibroblasts co-cultured with PBMC and 2 control groups of separate fibroblast and PBMC cultures.Fibroblasts were characterized by their collagen secretion and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 expression. Viability was evaluated using water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1 proliferation assay. Absorbances were measured at 450 nm. Data analysis was performed by student’s paired t-test. Results Dermal fibroblasts were shown to secrete collagen, express OCT4, be recoverable after cryopreservation, and become attached to the culture dish in a co-culture with PBMC. Co-cultured and control fibroblasts had no significantly different cell viabilities (p>0.05. Calculated viable cell numbers increased 1.8 and 5.1-fold, respectively, at days 2 and 4 in vitro. Both groups showed comparable doubling times at days 2 and 4 in vitro. PBMC did not interfere with allogeneic fibroblast viability and proliferative capacity Conclusions Allogeneic fibroblasts remain viable and proliferate in the presence of host PBMC. Future research should evaluate allogeneic human dermal fibroblast competency in clinical settings. Dermal fibroblasts are a potential source for cell therapy in chronic wound management.

  19. Allogeneic human dermal fibroblasts are viable in peripheral blood mononuclear co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Syamsul Hadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Transplanted allogeneic dermal fibroblasts retain stem cell subpopulations, and are easily isolated, expanded and stored using standard techniques. Their potential for regenerative therapy of chronic wounds should be evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine allogeneic fibroblast viability in the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. METHODS In this experimental study, fibroblasts were isolated from foreskin explants, expanded in the presence of serum, and stored using slow-freezing. We used one intervention group of allogeneic fibroblasts co-cultured with PBMC and 2 control groups of separate fibroblast and PBMC cultures.Fibroblasts were characterized by their collagen secretion and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 expression. Viability was evaluated using water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1 proliferation assay. Absorbances were measured at 450 nm. Data analysis was performed by student’s paired t-test. RESULTS Dermal fibroblasts were shown to secrete collagen, express OCT4, be recoverable after cryopreservation, and become attached to the culture dish in a co-culture with PBMC. Co-cultured and control fibroblasts had no significantly different cell viabilities (p>0.05. Calculated viable cell numbers increased 1.8 and 5.1- fold, respectively, at days 2 and 4 in vitro. Both groups showed comparable doubling times at days 2 and 4 in vitro. PBMC did not interfere with allogeneic fibroblast viability and proliferative capacity CONCLUSIONS Allogeneic fibroblasts remain viable and proliferate in the presence of host PBMC. Future research should evaluate allogeneic human dermal fibroblast competency in clinical settings. Dermal fibroblasts are a potential source for cell therapy in chronic wound management.

  20. Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, E D; Zimmerman, A W; Grunnet, M L; Lewis, R A; Spackman, T J

    1982-12-01

    The diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome was established with the aid of cranial computed tomography (CT) in a child with growth deficiency, mental retardation, and neurologic findings which are typical for this rare childhood disorder. Calcification of basal ganglia and hydrocephalus ex vacuo are neuropathologic characteristics of Cockayne syndrome which may be present on CT as early as 3 years of age.

  1. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  2. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  4. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or nonvasospastic angina secondary ... to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral ... a likely diagnosis and blood was sent for.

  5. Cardiorenal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schetz, Miet

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials.

  6. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  7. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  8. Marshall's syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Elisa; de Almeida, Ana Paula Moura; Souza, Gabriela Maria Assis de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Marshall´s syndrome is a form of acquired cutis laxa without systemic involvement, which is preceded by an inflammatory dermatitis with a neutrophilic component. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy with clinical and histopathological features of this syndrome. The etiology remains unknown and there is no definitive treatment. PMID:23739715

  9. Lack of Spartin Protein in Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowska, Joanna C.; Wang, Heng; Xin, Baozhong; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Blackstone, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Background Hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG1-SPG33) are characterized by progressive spastic weakness of the lower limbs. A nucleotide deletion (1110delA) in the (SPG20; OMIM 275900) spartin gene is the origin of autosomal recessive Troyer syndrome. This mutation is predicted to cause premature termination of the spartin protein. However, it remains unknown whether this truncated spartin protein is absent or is present and partially functional in patients. Objective To determine whether the truncated spartin protein is present or absent in cells derived from patients with Troyer syndrome. Design Case report. Setting Academic research. Patients We describe a new family with Troyer syndrome due to the 1110delA mutation. Main Outcome Measures We cultured primary fibroblasts and generated lymphoblasts from affected individuals, carriers, and control subjects and subjected these cells to immunoblot analyses. Results Spartin protein is undetectable in several cell lines derived from patients with Troyer syndrome. Conclusions Our data suggest that Troyer syndrome results from complete loss of spartin protein rather than from the predicted partly functional fragment. This may reflect increased protein degradation or impaired translation. PMID:18413476

  10. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Olivier

    2002-05-01

    CREST syndrome has been described as a form of progressive systemic sclerosis in which there is relatively limited involvement of the skin, prominence of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction and telangiectasia. The acronym CREST was coined in 1964 by Winterbauer in the USA but the very first case report was by French physicians Thibierge and Weissenbach in 1910. Antinuclear antibodies recognizing chromosomal centromere proteins are characteristic of CREST syndrome and are present in more than 50% of the cases. The prognosis of CREST syndrome is relatively good with a long lasting disease duration (>10 years). Two complications are seldom associated with CREST syndrome: digital gangrene with finger losses and pulmonary hypertension (3 to 14% of CREST syndrome). Pulmonary hypertension is a very late event and the prognosis is very severe (mortality rate of 50% after 2 years).

  12. Differential expression of wound fibrotic factors between facial and trunk dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Masakazu; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Kaminishi-Tanikawa, Akiko; Niikura, Mamoru; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    Clinically, wounds on the face tend to heal with less scarring than those on the trunk, but the causes of this difference have not been clarified. Fibroblasts obtained from different parts of the body are known to show different properties. To investigate whether the characteristic properties of facial and trunk wound healing are caused by differences in local fibroblasts, we comparatively analyzed the functional properties of superficial and deep dermal fibroblasts obtained from the facial and trunk skin of seven individuals, with an emphasis on tendency for fibrosis. Proliferation kinetics and mRNA and protein expression of 11 fibrosis-associated factors were investigated. The proliferation kinetics of facial and trunk fibroblasts were identical, but the expression and production levels of profibrotic factors, such as extracellular matrix, transforming growth factor-β1, and connective tissue growth factor mRNA, were lower in facial fibroblasts when compared with trunk fibroblasts, while the expression of antifibrotic factors, such as collagenase, basic fibroblast growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor, showed no clear trends. The differences in functional properties of facial and trunk dermal fibroblasts were consistent with the clinical tendencies of healing of facial and trunk wounds. Thus, the differences between facial and trunk scarring are at least partly related to the intrinsic nature of the local dermal fibroblasts.

  13. Platelets stimulate fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundahl Joachim

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are thought to play a role in a variety of inflammatory conditions in the lung, some of which may lead to fibrosis. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that whole platelets and platelet lysate can mediate remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro by affecting fibroblast-mediated contraction of a collagen gel. We also sought to determine to what extent platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β contribute to this effect. Methods Washed platelets, isolated from healthy blood donors, and platelet lysate (freezing and thawing, were cast together with human lung fibroblasts in three-dimensional collagen gels. The gels were then released and cultured for four days. PDGF and TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in culture supernatants by ELISA. Results Both platelets and platelet lysate augmented fibroblast-mediated gel contraction in a time and concentration dependent manner (19.9% ± 0.1 (mean ± SEM of initial area vs. 48.0% ± 0.4 at 48 hours; P 1 and PDGF-AA/AB were released in co-culture. PDGF-AA/AB had a maximum release at 24 hours whereas TGF-β1 release increased with longer culture periods. Neutralising antibodies to these mediators partially inhibited platelet-induced gel contraction. Conclusion We conclude that platelets may promote remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro and that PDGF and TGF-β partially mediate this effect, also indicating a role for other mediators. The findings may be an important mechanism in regulating repair processes after injury.

  14. Reprogramming mouse embryo fibroblasts to functional islets without genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Bhawna; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2018-02-01

    The constant quest for generation of large number of islets aimed us to explore the differentiation potential of mouse embryo fibroblast cells. Mouse embryo fibroblast cells isolated from 12- to 14-day-old pregnant mice were characterized for their surface markers and tri-lineage differentiation potential. They were subjected to serum-free media containing a cocktail of islet differentiating reagents and analyzed for the expression of pancreatic lineage transcripts. The islet-like cell aggregates (ICAs) was confirmed for their pancreatic properties via immunofluorecence for C-peptide, glucagon, and somatostain. They were positive for CD markers-Sca1, CD44, CD73, and CD90 and negative for hematopoietic markers-CD34 and CD45 at both transcription and translational levels. The transcriptional analysis of the ICAs at different day points exhibited up-regulation of islet markers (Insulin, PDX1, HNF3, Glucagon, and Somatostatin) and down-regulation of MSC-markers (Vimentin and Nestin). They positively stained for dithizone, C-peptide, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin indicating intact insulin producing machinery. In vitro glucose stimulation assay revealed three-fold increase in insulin secretion as compared to basal glucose with insulin content being the same in both the conditions. The preliminary in vivo data on ICA transplantation showed reversal of diabetes in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that mouse embryo fibroblast cells contain a population of MSC-like cells which could differentiate into insulin producing cell aggregates. Hence, our study could be extrapolated for isolation of MSC-like cells from human, medically terminated pregnancies to generate ICAs for treating type 1 diabetic patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The synthetic pathway for glucosylsphingosine in cultured fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Sasagasako, N; Goto, I; Kobayashi, T

    1994-09-01

    The synthesis of glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph), a glucosylceramide (GlcCer) analogue devoid of fatty acids, in cultured fibroblasts was studied by using conduritol beta epoxide (CBE), an inhibitor of beta-glucosidase, and 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), an inhibitor of glucosylceramide (GlcCer) synthase (glucosyltransferase). When CBE was added to the culture medium, the intracellular beta-glucosidase activity decreased, and both GlcCer and GlcSph accumulated in the cells. After the addition of PDMP, the concentration of GlcCer decreased, while the content of GlcSph increased. When CBE and PDMP were added together, the intracellular accumulation of GlcSph to decreased to less than when CBE alone was added. Based on these results, the synthetic pathway for GlcSph was thus considered to not only be through the glucosylation of sphingosine, but also through the deacylation of GlcCer. When GlcCer (d18:1, C12:0) was added to the culture medium, the intracellular accumulation of GlcSph (d18:1) was evident, and it was also more pronounced in the presence of CBE. In addition, when GlcCer (d18:0, C12:0) was used, apparent accumulation of GlcSph (d18:0) was also observed. In order to determine whether or not the deacylase of GlcCer is identical to acid ceramidase, a deacylase of ceramide, the same experiments were carried out using fibroblasts from two patients with Farber disease, in which acid ceramidase is genetically deficient. The accumulation of GlcSph in the Farber disease fibroblasts after the loading of GlcCer for 7 days was found to be one-fifth of the control level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Metallic nanoparticles reduce the migration of human fibroblasts in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Larissa Fernanda de Araújo; Lins, Marvin Paulo; Viana, Iana Mayane Mendes Nicácio; dos Santos, Jeniffer Estevão; Smaniotto, Salete; Reis, Maria Danielma dos Santos

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles have extremely wide applications in the medical and biological fields. They are being used in biosensors, local drug delivery, diagnostics, and medical therapy. However, the potential effects of nanoparticles on target cell and tissue function, apart from cytotoxicity, are not completely understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human fibroblasts with respect to their interaction with the extracellular matrix and in cell migration. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that treatment with AgNPs or AuNPs decreased collagen and laminin production at all the concentrations tested (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL). Furthermore, cytofluorometric analysis showed that treatment with AgNPs reduced the percentage of cells expressing the collagen receptor very late antigen 2, α2β1 integrin (VLA-2) and the laminin receptor very late antigen 6, α6β1 integrin (VLA-6). In contrast, AuNP treatment increased and decreased the percentages of VLA-2-positive and VLA-6-positive cells, respectively, as compared to the findings for the controls. Analysis of cytoskeletal reorganization showed that treatment with both types of nanoparticles increased the formation of stress fibres and number of cell protrusions and impaired cell polarity. Fibroblasts exposed to different concentrations of AuNPs and AgNPs showed reduced migration through transwell chambers in the functional chemotaxis assay. These results demonstrated that metal nanoparticles may influence fibroblast function by negatively modulating the deposition of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) and altering the expression of ECM receptors, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell migration.

  17. Proteus syndrome: emphasis on the pulmonary manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, B. (Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh and the Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Urbach, A.H. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States) Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Orenstein, D. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States) Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dickman, P.S. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States) Dept. of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Published articles on the radiologic aspects of Proteus syndrome are sparse. This report highlights the features of this disease with specific attention to the serious pulmonary manifestations that may occur at an early age. Two cases of Proteus syndrome and severe lung disease are presented, with complete autopsy in one case and correlative surgical pathologic data in the other. Multiple superficial and visceral vascular abnormalities were present in both cases. Both patients developed rapidly progressive diffuse cystic emphysematous pulmonary disease leading to the death of one patient at age 18 years and a heart-lung transplant in the other at age 8 1/2 years. Extensive gross pulmonary cysts were evident pathologically with diffuse panlobar emphysema microscopically. Studies of collagen and cultured fibroblasts in one patient revealed no abnormality. The early presentation, rapid progression and potentially lethal nature of lung involvement has not previously been emphasized. (orig.)

  18. Usp16 contributes to somatic stem-cell defects in Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Maddalena; Sikandar, Shaheen; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Kuo, Angera; Nicolis Di Robilant, Benedetta; Haro-Acosta, Veronica; Ouadah, Youcef; Quarta, Marco; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Qian, Dalong; Reddy, Vadiyala M; Cheshier, Samuel; Garner, Craig C; Clarke, Michael F

    2013-09-19

    Down's syndrome results from full or partial trisomy of chromosome 21. However, the consequences of the underlying gene-dosage imbalance on adult tissues remain poorly understood. Here we show that in Ts65Dn mice, which are trisomic for 132 genes homologous to genes on human chromosome 21, triplication of Usp16 reduces the self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells and the expansion of mammary epithelial cells, neural progenitors and fibroblasts. In addition, Usp16 is associated with decreased ubiquitination of Cdkn2a and accelerated senescence in Ts65Dn fibroblasts. Usp16 can remove ubiquitin from histone H2A on lysine 119, a critical mark for the maintenance of multiple somatic tissues. Downregulation of Usp16, either by mutation of a single normal Usp16 allele or by short interfering RNAs, largely rescues all of these defects. Furthermore, in human tissues overexpression of USP16 reduces the expansion of normal fibroblasts and postnatal neural progenitors, whereas downregulation of USP16 partially rescues the proliferation defects of Down's syndrome fibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that USP16 has an important role in antagonizing the self-renewal and/or senescence pathways in Down's syndrome and could serve as an attractive target to ameliorate some of the associated pathologies.

  19. EPAC expression and function in cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Muñoz, Claudia; Guzmán, Nancy; Catalán, Mabel; Vivar, Raúl; Ayala, Pedro; Humeres, Claudio; Aránguiz, Pablo [Departamento de Química Farmacológica y Toxicológica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile); García, Lorena [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Velarde, Victoria [Departamento de Ciencias Fisiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (Chile); Díaz-Araya, Guillermo, E-mail: gadiaz@ciq.uchile.cl [Departamento de Química Farmacológica y Toxicológica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CF) and cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF) are the main cells responsible for wound healing after cardiac insult. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a downstream effector of cAMP, and it has been not completely studied on CF. Moreover, in CMF, which are the main cells responsible for cardiac healing, EPAC expression and function are unknown. We evaluated in both CF and CMF the effect of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on EPAC-1 expression. We also studied the EPAC involvement on collagen synthesis, adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction. Method: Rat neonatal CF and CMF were treated with TGF-β1 at different times and concentrations. EPAC-1 protein levels and Rap1 activation were measured by western blot and pull down assay respectively. EPAC cellular functions were determined by adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction assay; and collagen expression was determined by western blot. Results: TGF-β1 through Smad and JNK significantly reduced EPAC-1 expression in CF, while in CMF this cytokine increased EPAC-1 expression through ERK1/2, JNK, p38, AKT and Smad3. EPAC activation was able to induce higher Rap1-GTP levels in CMF than in CF. EPAC and PKA, both cAMP effectors, promoted CF and CMF adhesion on fibronectin, as well as CF migration; however, this effect was not observed in CMF. EPAC but not PKA activation mediated collagen gel contraction in CF, while in CMF both PKA and EPAC mediated collagen gel contraction. Finally, the EPAC and PKA activation reduced collagen synthesis in CF and CMF. Conclusion: TGF-β1 differentially regulates the expression of EPAC in CF and CMF; and EPAC regulates differentially CF and CMF functions associated with cardiac remodeling. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 regulates EPAC-1 expression in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast. • Rap-1GTP levels are higher in cardiac myofibroblast than fibroblast. • EPAC-1 controls adhesion, migration and collagen synthesis in cardiac

  20. Quercetin inhibits hexose transport in a human diploid fibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, D.W.; Custead-Jones, S.; Cook, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The flavonol quercetin, a phloretin analog, inhibits transport of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose in a cultured human diploid fibroblast. This inhibition is related to transport itself and not to the reported effects of flavonoids on membrane-bound ATPases. From concentration-inhibition curves at several pH's we conclude that uncharged (acid) quercetin (pH = 7.65) is the inhibitory form of the molecule (K/sub I/ = 10 ..mu..m). Quercetin, unlike phloretin, is rapidly degraded in 0.1 N NaOH; the degradation products are weakly inhibitory to hexose transport.

  1. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Veirman, Kim, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Rao, Luigia [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Stem Cell Laboratory, Division of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Frassanito, Maria Antonia [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General Pathology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Vanderkerken, Karin, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium)

    2014-06-27

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease.

  2. Protective effects of naringenin in cardiorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; An, Wenjun; Gao, Aibao

    2016-06-15

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a complicated and bidirectional interrelationship between the heart and kidneys. Naringenin (NG) is a naturally occurring flavonoid possessing various biological and pharmacological properties. We tested whether NG could improve cardiac and renal function in a rat model of cardiorenal syndrome. The results showed that NG-attenuated cardiac remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in rats with cardiorenal syndrome, as evidenced by decrease of left ventricle weight (LVW), increase of body weight (BW), decrease of LVW/BW, decrease of concentrations of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, type-B natriuretic peptide, aldosterone, angiotensin (Ang) II, C-reactive protein, and urine protein, increase of left ventricular systolic pressure and falling rates of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax), and decrease of left ventricular diastolic pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and -dp/dtmax. NG significantly inhibited the increase of lipid profiles including low-density lipoprotein, TC, and TG in rats. In addition, NG significantly inhibited the increase of cardiac expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and interferon γ. Moreover, NG decreased malonaldehyde level, increased superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content in rats, and increased the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and catalytic subunit of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCLc) in rats and Ang II-treated cardiac fibroblasts. Inhibition of Nrf2 and glutathione synthesis significantly suppressed NG-induced decrease of ROS level. Inhibition of Nrf2 markedly suppressed NG-induced increase of GCLc expression in Ang II-treated cardiac fibroblasts. The data provide novel options for therapy of patients and new insights into the cardioprotective effects of NG in cardiorenal syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-15

    In this study we report on the different genetic syndromes in which autism has been described as one of the possible manifestations. Certain genetic syndromes are providing us with extremely valuable information about the role played by genetics in autism. This is the case of the following syndromes: Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, 15q11-q13 duplication, fragile X syndrome, fragile X premutation, deletion of chromosome 2q, XYY syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Apert syndrome, mutations in the ARX gene, De Lange syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome, Williams syndrome, Rett syndrome, Noonan syndrome, Down syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Steinert disease, tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Lujan-Fryns syndrome, Moebius syndrome, hypomelanosis of Ito, neurofibromatosis type 1, CHARGE syndrome and HEADD syndrome.

  4. Deficiency of acyl-CoA: Dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase in patients with Zellweger (cerebro-hepato-renal) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H. van den; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Romeyn, G.J.; Wanders, R.J.A.; Schrakamp, G.; Heymans, H.S.A.

    1984-01-01

    We have recently reported on plasmalogen deficiency in tissues and fibroblasts from patients with Zellweger syndrome. In this paper we have analyzed the activity of the first enzyme in the pathway leading to plasmalogen biosynthesis, i.e. acyl-CoA: dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase in

  5. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress...

  6. Respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to NDUFA12 mutations as a new cause of Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Rodenburg, Richard J; van den Brand, Mariël

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated a girl with Leigh syndrome born to first-cousin parents of Pakistani descent with an isolated respiratory chain complex I deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts. Her early development was delayed, and from age 2 years she started losing motor abilities. Cerebral MRI showed b...

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 regulates tumor invasion by coupling fibroblast growth factor signaling to extracellular matrix degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Nami; Varjosalo, Markku; Meller, Pipsa

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression and polymorphism of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) has been linked to tumor progression and anticancer drug resistance. We describe here a novel mechanism of tumor progression by matrix degradation involving epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response...... substantiated by reduced MT1-MMP content and in vivo growth of prostate carcinoma cells after the FGFR4-R388 gene silencing. In contrast, knockdown of the alternative FGFR4-G388 allele enhanced MT1-MMP and invasive tumor cell growth in vivo and within three-dimensional collagen. These results will help...

  8. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  9. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...... a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  10. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  11. Encapsulation of fibroblasts causes accelerated alginate hydrogel degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, N C; Smith, A M; Gbureck, U; Shelton, R M; Grover, L M

    2010-09-01

    Calcium-alginate hydrogel has been widely studied as a material for cell encapsulation for tissue engineering. At present, the effect that cells have on the degradation of alginate hydrogel is largely unknown. We have shown that fibroblasts encapsulated at a density of 7.5 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) in both 2% and 5% w/v alginate remain viable for at least 60 days. Rheological analysis was used to study how the mechanical properties exhibited by alginate hydrogel changed during 28 days in vitro culture. Alginate degradation was shown to occur throughout the study but was greatest within the first 7 days of culture for all samples, which correlated with a sharp release of calcium ions from the construct. Fibroblasts were shown to increase the rate of degradation during the first 7 days when compared with acellular samples in both 2% and 5% w/v gels, but after 28 days both acellular and cell-encapsulating samples retained disc-shaped morphologies and gel-like spectra. The results demonstrate that although at an early stage cells influence the mechanical properties of encapsulating alginate, over a longer period of culture, the hydrogels retain sufficient mechanical integrity to exhibit gel-like properties. This allows sustained immobilization of the cells at the desired location in vivo where they can produce extracellular matrix and growth factors to expedite the healing process. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Expandable, Inducible Hemangioblast State Regulated by Fibroblast Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Vereide

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that “trap” murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These “expandable” hemangioblasts (eHBs are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines.

  13. CEMP1 Induces Transformation in Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Bermúdez

    Full Text Available Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1 is a key regulator of cementogenesis. CEMP1 promotes cell attachment, differentiation, deposition rate, composition, and morphology of hydroxyapatite crystals formed by human cementoblastic cells. Its expression is restricted to cementoblasts and progenitor cell subpopulations present in the periodontal ligament. CEMP1 transfection into non-osteogenic cells such as adult human gingival fibroblasts results in differentiation of these cells into a "mineralizing" cell phenotype. Other studies have shown evidence that CEMP1 could have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of bone defects and regeneration of other mineralized tissues. To better understand CEMP1's biological effects in vitro we investigated the consequences of its expression in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF growing in non-mineralizing media by comparing gene expression profiles. We identified several mRNAs whose expression is modified by CEMP1 induction in HGF cells. Enrichment analysis showed that several of these newly expressed genes are involved in oncogenesis. Our results suggest that CEMP1 causes the transformation of HGF and NIH3T3 cells. CEMP1 is overexpressed in cancer cell lines. We also determined that the region spanning the CEMP1 locus is commonly amplified in a variety of cancers, and finally we found significant overexpression of CEMP1 in leukemia, cervix, breast, prostate and lung cancer. Our findings suggest that CEMP1 exerts modulation of a number of cellular genes, cellular development, cellular growth, cell death, and cell cycle, and molecules associated with cancer.

  14. Capturing the Regenerative Potential of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Springstead Scanlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell population within the periodontal ligament (PDL tissue is remarkably heterogeneous1. Fibroblasts, a mixed population of cells, are the main cellular component of the PDL and the cell type most often studied for periodontal regeneration. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are found on the bone side, while fibroblasts, macrophages, undifferentiated adult/mesenchymal stem cells, neural elements, and endothelial cells are found throughout the PDL. Epithelial rests of Malassez cells and cementoblasts are focused near the root surface. PDL tissue also includes loose connective tissue between dense fiber bundles that contain branches of the periodontal blood vessels and nerves2. The complexity of the PDL tissue, with its various cell types and cell progenitor components, explains the challenges involved in therapies to restore tissue following periodontal disease. Cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and endothelial cells must migrate, differentiate, and coordinately interact with a variety of soluble mediators to regenerate the periodontium3. Stem cells located in the PDL tissue are key contributors to this process4. Stem cells in the PDL are important not only for formation and maintenance of the tissue but also for repair, remodeling, and regeneration of adjacent alveolar bone and cementum5. Our laboratory has shown that progenitor cells isolated from PDL tissue by selection with cell surface markers STRO-1+ and CD146+ are capable of differentiating into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic phenotypes under appropriate culture conditions6.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of nickel nanowires in human fibroblasts

    KAUST Repository

    Felix Servin, Laura P.

    2016-03-09

    The increasing interest in the use of magnetic nanostructures for biomedical applications necessitates rigorous studies to be carried out in order to determine their potential toxicity. This work attempts to elucidate the cytotoxic effects of nickel nanowires (NWs) in human fibroblasts WI-38 by a colorimetric assay (MTT) under two different parameters: NW concentration and exposure time. This was complemented with TEM and confocal images to assess the NWs internalization and to identify any changes in the cell morphology. Ni NWs were fabricated by electrodeposition using porous alumina templates. Energy dispersive X-Ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy imaging were used for NW characterization. The results showed decreased cell metabolic activity for incubation times longer than 24 hours and no negative effects for exposure times shorter than that. The cytotoxicity effects for human fibroblasts were then compared with those reported for HCT 116 cells, and the findings point out that it is relevant to consider the cellular size. In addition, the present study compares the toxic effects of equivalent amounts of nickel in the form of its salt to those of NWs and shows that the NWs are more toxic than the salts. Internalized NWs were found in vesicles inside of the cells where their presence induced inflammation of the endoplasmic reticulum.

  16. Aromatase activity in human skin fibroblasts grown in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Brown, T R; Fujimoto, M

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies in this laboratory have described an unusual kindred in which gynecomastia resulted from abnormally elevated levels of extraglandular aromatase activity. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the abnormal aromatase activity in these and other patients, we explored the aromatase activity of genital skin fibroblasts. Our studies demonstrate that the kinetic parameters for aromatase in skin are similar to those of other cultured cells and suggest that skin is an important site of extraglandular aromatase activity. These cells also contain 5 alpha-reductase activity and androgen receptors and are, therefore, a model for androgen action and metabolism. For example, they provided a system for the study of the potency and specificity of the aromatase inhibitors 4-OHA and MDL 18,962. Finally, the influence of DEX on aromatase in genital skin fibroblasts differs in some important respects from the pattern of control observed in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells. These findings suggest that investigating the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of aromatase in skin may provide unique information about the control of the enzyme.

  17. Differential Gene Expression of Fibroblasts: Keloid versus Normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Angel

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study investigated gene regulation and unique gene products in both keloid (KDF and normal (NDF dermal fibroblasts in established cell lines. For gene regulation, NDF versus KDF were compared using Clontech's Atlas™ Human cDNA Expression Array while unique gene products were studied using RNA Fingerprinting Kit. RNA from each sample was converted to cDNA using oligo-dT primers. Down-regulated genes using Atlas Array in KDF were 1 60 S ribosomal protein, 2 Thioredoxin dependent peroxidase, 3 Nuclease sensitive element DNA binding protein, 4 c-myc purine-binding transcription factor, 5 c-AMP dependent protein kinase, and, 6 Heat Shock Protein 90 kDa. Genes that are up regulated in KDF were 1 Tubulin and 2 Heat Shock Protein 27 kDa. With the differential display, we found 17 bands unique to both KDF and NDF. The specific gene and the manner in which they were differentially regulated have direct implications to understanding keloid fibroblast proliferation.

  18. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  19. Effect of Arctium lappa (burdock) extract on canine dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomari, Elena; Stefanon, Bruno; Colitti, Monica

    2013-12-15

    Although the biological activities of Arctium lappa (burdock) have been already investigated in human and other species, data evaluating the molecular mechanisms have not been reported in the dog. In this study we analyzed for the first time the effect of a root extract of burdock on molecular responses in canine dermal fibroblasts with H2O2 stimulation (H group), with burdock treatment (B group) and with H2O2 stimulation and burdock treatment (BH group), using RNAseq technology. Differentially expressed genes (P<0.05) of H, B and BH groups in comparison to the untreated sample (negative control, C group) were identified with MeV software and were functional annotated and monitored for signaling pathways and candidate biomarkers using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). The expression profile of canine dermal fibroblasts treated with burdock extract with or without H2O2 stimulation, showed an up-regulation of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disheveled 3 (DVL3) and chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (CSGALNACT2). The data suggested that burdock has implications in cell adhesion and gene expression with the modulation of Wnt/β catenin signaling and Chondroitin Sulphate Biosynthesis that are particularly important for the wound healing process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transdifferentiation of mouse fibroblasts and hepatocytes to functional neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Samuele; Yang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming by defined transcription factors became of broad interest in 2006 with the work of Takahashi and Yamanaka (Cell 126:663-676, 2006), but the first example of cell fate reshaping via ectopic expression of transcription factor was provided back in 1987 when Davis and colleagues induced features of a muscle cell in fibroblast using the muscle transcription factor MyoD (Davis et al., Cell 51:987-1000, 1987). In 2010 our laboratory described how forced expression of the three neuronal transcription factors Ascl1, Brn2, and Myt1l rapidly converts mouse fibroblasts into neuronal cells that exhibit biochemical and electrophysiological properties of neurons. We named these cells induced neuronal cells (iN cells) (Vierbuchen et al., Nature 463:1035-1041, 2010; Vierbuchen and Wernig, Nat Biotechnol 29:892-907, 2011). Interestingly, iN cells can also be derived from defined endodermal cells such as primary hepatocytes, suggesting the existence of a more general reprogramming paradigm (Marro et al., Cell Stem Cell 9:374-382, 2011). In this chapter we describe the detailed methods used to attain the direct conversion.