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Sample records for progeria syndrome cells

  1. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents

  2. Progeria syndrome: A case report

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    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  3. Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raška, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2010), s. 89-93 ISSN 1337-6853 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : laminopathies * Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome * progerin Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  4. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

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    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mutant lamin A causes progressive changes in nuclear architecture in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Proc Natl Acad ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical ...

  6. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

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    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: review of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare but well known entity characterized by extreme short stature, low body weight, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, and facial features that resemble aged persons. Cardiovascular compromise leads

  8. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

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    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  9. Signaling pathway activation drift during aging: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts are comparable to normal middle-age and old-age cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliper, Alexander M; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin; Buzdin, Anton; Jetka, Tomasz; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Moskalev, Alexy; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, research in understanding the molecular basis of human aging has progressed significantly with the analysis of premature aging syndromes. Progerin, an altered form of lamin A, has been identified as the cause of premature aging in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), and may be a contributing causative factor in normal aging. However, the question of whether HGPS actually recapitulates the normal aging process at the cellular and organismal level, or simply mimics the aging phenotype is widely debated. In the present study we analyzed publicly available microarray datasets for fibroblasts undergoing cellular aging in culture, as well as fibroblasts derived from young, middle-age, and old-age individuals, and patients with HGPS. Using GeroScope pathway analysis and drug discovery platform we analyzed the activation states of 65 major cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis reveals that signaling pathway activation states in cells derived from chronologically young patients with HGPS strongly resemble cells taken from normal middle-aged and old individuals. This clearly indicates that HGPS may truly represent accelerated aging, rather than being just a simulacrum. Our data also points to potential pathways that could be targeted to develop drugs and drug combinations for both HGPS and normal aging.

  10. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  11. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

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    Cleveland, Robert H. [Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Leslie B. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children' s Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Kleinman, Monica E. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Miller, David T. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Genetics, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology and Adolescent Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Snyder, Brian D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Nazarian, Ara [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Giobbie-Hurder, Anita [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Neuberg, Donna [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Kieran, Mark W. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  12. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, Robert H.; Gordon, Leslie B.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Miller, David T.; Gordon, Catherine M.; Snyder, Brian D.; Nazarian, Ara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Neuberg, Donna; Kieran, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  13. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-03-15

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  14. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

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    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  15. Recapitulation of premature ageing with iPSCs from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

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    Liu, Guang-Hui; Barkho, Basam Z; Ruiz, Sergio; Diep, Dinh; Qu, Jing; Yang, Sheng-Lian; Panopoulos, Athanasia D; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Kurian, Leo; Walsh, Christopher; Thompson, James; Boue, Stephanie; Fung, Ho Lim; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Zhang, Kun; Yates, John; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2011-04-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare and fatal human premature ageing disease, characterized by premature arteriosclerosis and degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). HGPS is caused by a single point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene, resulting in the generation of progerin, a truncated splicing mutant of lamin A. Accumulation of progerin leads to various ageing-associated nuclear defects including disorganization of nuclear lamina and loss of heterochromatin. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts obtained from patients with HGPS. HGPS-iPSCs show absence of progerin, and more importantly, lack the nuclear envelope and epigenetic alterations normally associated with premature ageing. Upon differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs, progerin and its ageing-associated phenotypic consequences are restored. Specifically, directed differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs to SMCs leads to the appearance of premature senescence phenotypes associated with vascular ageing. Additionally, our studies identify DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNAPKcs, also known as PRKDC) as a downstream target of progerin. The absence of nuclear DNAPK holoenzyme correlates with premature as well as physiological ageing. Because progerin also accumulates during physiological ageing, our results provide an in vitro iPSC-based model to study the pathogenesis of human premature and physiological vascular ageing.

  16. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

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    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  17. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  19. Progeria 101/FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Progeria, but also may shed light on the phenomenon of aging and cardiovascular disease.” v “Recurrent de ... Statistics Is Progeria passed down from parent to child? HGPS is not usually passed down in families. ...

  20. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

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    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  1. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

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    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

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    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  3. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

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    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  4. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

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    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  5. Abnormal nuclear morphology is independent of longevity in a zmpste24-deficient fish model of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).

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    Tonoyama, Yasuhiro; Shinya, Minori; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kitano, Takeshi; Oga, Atsunori; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Wan, Miles T; Yip, Bill W P; Helen, Mok O L; Chisada, Shinichi; Deguchi, Tomonori; Au, Doris W T; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshihito

    2018-07-01

    Lamin is an intermediate protein underlying the nuclear envelope and it plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of the nucleus. A defect in the processing of its precursor by a metalloprotease, ZMPSTE24, results in the accumulation of farnesylated prelamin in the nucleus and causes various diseases, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). However, the role of lamin processing is unclear in fish species. Here, we generated zmpste24-deficient medaka and evaluated their phenotype. Unlike humans and mice, homozygous mutants did not show growth defects or lifespan shortening, despite lamin precursor accumulation. Gonadosomatic indices, blood glucose levels, and regenerative capacity of fins were similar in 1-year-old mutants and their wild-type (WT) siblings. Histological examination showed that the muscles, subcutaneous fat tissues, and gonads were normal in the mutants at the age of 1 year. However, the mutants showed hypersensitivity to X-ray irradiation, although p53target genes, p21 and mdm2, were induced 6 h after irradiation. Immunostaining of primary cultured cells from caudal fins and visualization of nuclei using H2B-GFP fusion proteins revealed an abnormal nuclear shape in the mutants both in vitro and in vivo. The telomere lengths were significantly shorter in the mutants compared to WT. Taken together, these results suggest that zmpste24-deficient medaka phenocopied HGPS only partially and that abnormal nuclear morphology and lifespan shortening are two independent events in vertebrates. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Labor Market Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  7. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

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    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  9. Sporadic Premature Aging in a Japanese Monkey: A Primate Model for Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Takao; Imai, Hiroo; Go, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Masanori; Hirai, Hirohisa; Takada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged) monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes. PMID:25365557

  10. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

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    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  11. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Zhang, Y.S.; Pitrez, P.R.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Miscuglio, M.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, M.R.; Nissan, X.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2017-01-01

    A progeria-on-a-chip model is engineered to recapitulate the biomechanical dynamics of vascular disease and aging. The model shows an exacerbated injury response to strain and is rescued by pharmacological treatments. The progeria-on-a-chip is expected to drive the discovery of new drugs and to

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  13. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share the DVD Meet the Kids in the Movie Bring LATS to the classroom! Close News/Events ... this could severely affect their research results and interpretation. Through the PRF Diagnostics Program, each cell line ...

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  15. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie B.; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C.; de Zeeuw, Chris I.; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Mitchell, James R.

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a

  16. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W.M. van de Ven (Marieke); J.-O. Andressoo (Jaan-Olle); V.B. Holcomb (Valerie); M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); W.M.C. Jong (Willeke); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); Y. Suh (Yousin); P. Hasty (Paul); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); J.R. Mitchell (James)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHow congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular

  17. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie; Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke; Zeeuw, Chris; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Horst, Gijsbertus; Mitchell, James

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHow congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cul...

  18. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  19. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1988-01-01

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  20. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  1. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, N K; Tilak Raj, T N; Mukunda, K S; Rajashekar Reddy, V

    2012-10-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  2. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Bilir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  3. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Naevoid Basalzellkarzinom-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Heinrich, M.; Heckmann, M.; Kramann, B. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Aliani, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Dill-Mueller, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Hautklinik und Poliklinik; Uder, M. [Erlange-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar/plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and spine and rib anomalies. The combination of clinical, imaging, and histological findings is helpful in identifying NBCCS patients. Imaging plays a crucial role in evaluation of these patients. We present a wide variety of clinical and radiological findings characteristic of this disease. (orig.)

  4. NF-κB activation impairs somatic cell reprogramming in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Osorio, Fernando G; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; De Los Angeles, Alejandro; Bueno, Clara; Menéndez, Pablo; Martín-Subero, José I; Daley, George Q; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Ageing constitutes a critical impediment to somatic cell reprogramming. We have explored the regulatory mechanisms that constitute age-associated barriers, through derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from individuals with premature or physiological ageing. We demonstrate that NF-κB activation blocks the generation of iPSCs in ageing. We also show that NF-κB repression occurs during cell reprogramming towards a pluripotent state. Conversely, ageing-associated NF-κB hyperactivation impairs the generation of iPSCs by eliciting the reprogramming repressor DOT1L, which reinforces senescence signals and downregulates pluripotency genes. Genetic and pharmacological NF-κB inhibitory strategies significantly increase the reprogramming efficiency of fibroblasts from Néstor-Guillermo progeria syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients, as well as from normal aged donors. Finally, we demonstrate that DOT1L inhibition in vivo extends lifespan and ameliorates the accelerated ageing phenotype of progeroid mice, supporting the interest of studying age-associated molecular impairments to identify targets of rejuvenation strategies.

  5. Boosting ATM activity alleviates aging and extends lifespan in a mouse model of progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Minxian; Liu, Zuojun; Peng, Linyuan; Tang, Xiaolong; Meng, Fanbiao; Ao, Ying; Zhou, Mingyan; Wang, Ming; Cao, Xinyue; Qin, Baoming; Wang, Zimei; Zhou, Zhongjun; Wang, Guangming; Gao, Zhengliang; Xu, Jun; Liu, Baohua

    2018-05-02

    DNA damage accumulates with age (Lombard et al., 2005). However, whether and how robust DNA repair machinery promotes longevity is elusive. Here, we demonstrate that ATM-centered DNA damage response (DDR) progressively declines with senescence and age, while low dose of chloroquine (CQ) activates ATM, promotes DNA damage clearance, rescues age-related metabolic shift, and prolongs replicative lifespan. Molecularly, ATM phosphorylates SIRT6 deacetylase and thus prevents MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Extra copies of Sirt6 extend lifespan in Atm-/- mice, with restored metabolic homeostasis. Moreover, the treatment with CQ remarkably extends lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans , but not the ATM-1 mutants. In a progeria mouse model with low DNA repair capacity, long-term administration of CQ ameliorates premature aging features and extends lifespan. Thus, our data highlights a pro-longevity role of ATM, for the first time establishing direct causal links between robust DNA repair machinery and longevity, and providing therapeutic strategy for progeria and age-related metabolic diseases. © 2018, Qian et al.

  6. Basal cell nevus syndrome: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jin Soo

    2008-01-01

    The basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. We experienced two cases that represented several characteristics of BCNS. Case 1: a thirty three year-old man visited CSU hospital. His radiographs showed four cystic lesions at both maxillary sinus and both mandibular angle, with bifid rib and ectopic calcification of falx cerebri. After marsupialization and enucleation, recurrent and newly developing tendency were found on his follow-up radiographs. Case 2: a seventeen year-old man had four large cystic lesions which were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocysts. He had craniofacial anomalies which included ectopic calcification and frontal bossing.

  7. Amniotic Fluid Cells Proliferation in Normal and Down Syndrome Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honcea Adina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome/Trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal anomaly, and it represents the most common congenital cause of infants’ intellectual disability. Subjects with this syndrome are affected by degenerative processes caused by accelerated aging or unknown ethyologies. In recent years, accumulating evidence revealed increased potential of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells to be used in regenerative therapy. Our aim was to assess differences in immunophenotype, cell morphology and proliferation of amniotic fluid cells from normal and Down Syndrome pregnancies using a quantitative cytometry approach. Results revealed the emergence of a population of small sized cells in Down Syndrome derived amniotic fluid cells that are readily visible upon microscopic inspection. Hence, the fluorescence–based quantitative image cytometry determinations showed a tendency of decrease in both cell and nuclei size in trisomy, with no significant modification in nuclei circularity, as measured following actin cytoskeleton and nuclei labeling. The propensity of Ki67 positive cells was found to be increased in Down Syndrome derived cells (48.92% as compared to normal specimens (28.68%. However, cells in S and G2/M cell cycle phases decreased from 32.91% to 4.49% in diseased cells. Further studies are devoted to understanding the molecular basis of the observed differences in the proliferation ability of Down Syndrome amniotic cells, in order to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of amniotic fluid stem cells for tissue regeneration in subjects with trisomy and to find correlations between amniotic cells phenotype and patient prognosis.

  8. T Cells and Pathogenesis of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome and Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Francis A. Ennis; Masanori Terajima

    2011-01-01

    We previously hypothesized that increased capillary permeability observed in both hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) may be caused by hantavirus-specific cytotoxic T cells attacking endothelial cells presenting viral antigens on their surface based on clinical observations and in vitro experiments. In HCPS, hantavirus-specific T cell responses positively correlated with disease severity. In HFRS, in one report, contrary to HCPS, T cell ...

  9. A Classic Case of Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattaprasad Dadhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition characterized mainly by basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratinizing odontogenic tumors, and other systemic anomalies. As these manifestations do not alter the patient′s lifestyle, most of the cases are diagnosed through oral abnormalities. A classic case of basal cell nevus syndrome fulfilling almost all the major and minor criteria has been reported here.

  10. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Associated with Good Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Okui

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and hypogammaglobulinemia are paraneoplastic syndromes that are rarer than myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma. Good syndrome coexisting with PRCA is an extremely rare pathology. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with thymoma and PRCA associated with Good syndrome who achieved complete PRCA remission after thymectomy and postoperative immunosuppressive therapy, and provide a review of the pertinent literature.

  11. Focal giant cell cardiomyopathy with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, S; Kuehl, K S; Midgely, F M; Chandra, R S

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is mostly limited to mild cardiomegaly. Although these patients have visceromegaly, macroglossia, gigantism, and adrenal cytomegaly, no significant myocardial changes have been described. An infant with dysmorphic features of this syndrome had supraventricular tachycardia since birth. Nodular lesions were present in the right atrium. Morphologically these lesions were composed of hypertrophic myocardial fibers admixed with multinucleated giant cells of myogenic origin. The exact nature of these lesions remains undetermined. It is postulated that hypertrophic myocardial cells may represent cardiac cytomegaly as a manifestation of the accelerated growth potential of cells seen with this syndrome.

  12. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (BCNS is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder. Multiple organ systems may be affected in this syndrome including abnormalities of the skin, skeletal system, genitourinary system and central nevus system. In this report, we present a case of Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome in a 26-year-old male patient. The patient had multiple odontogenic keratocyst in the posterior of mandible, syndactyly in both hand and bifid rib. After enucleation and curettage, he was followed for two years. A number of both clinical and radiological criteria are used to diagnose this syndrome. Basal cell carcinoma syndrome is diagnosed with two major criteria or one major and two minor criteria. We must suspect this disorder in young patients with multiple odontogenic keratocyst and dental abnormalities whether related or not with other clinical manifestations or familial history.

  13. Impaired genome maintenance suppresses the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in mice with Cockayne syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid); G.A. Garinis (George); R.M.C. Brandt (Renata); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); S.W.P. Wijnhoven (Susan); K.E.M. Diderich (Karin); J. de Wit (Jan); J.R. Mitchell (James); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); S. Velasco (Susana); E.C. Friedberg (Errol); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji); H. van Steeg (Harry); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractCockayne syndrome (CS) is a photosensitive, DNA repair disorder associated with progeria that is caused by a defect in the transcription-coupled repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here, complete inactivation of NER in Csb(m/m)/Xpa(-/-) mutants causes a phenotype that

  14. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Dijck, H Van

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral g...

  15. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajanikanth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS or Gorlin - Goltz syndrome is an autosomal disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. The major organ systems involved are skin, bones, central nervous system, eyes, gonads and endocrine. This particular syndrome is extensively described in the literature under different names. However, there are only few cases reported in the Indian literature. An unusual case of a 33-year old male with large odontogenic keratocyst involving impacted canine in the mandible, along with multiple cysts and impacted teeth in the maxilla; bifid rib and vertebral anomalies has been described.

  16. Adaptive Stress Response in Segmental Progeria Resembles Long-Lived Dwarfism and Calorie Restriction in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Valerie B; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C; Zeeuw, Chris I. De; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age), including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPDG602D/R722W/XPA−/−) that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80 −/− mouse. Specific (but not all) types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage. PMID:17173483

  17. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie B; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M C; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-12-15

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age), including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPD(G602D/R722W)/XPA(-/-)) that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80(-/-) mouse. Specific (but not all) types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage.

  18. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van de Ven

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age, including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPD(G602D/R722W/XPA(-/- that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80(-/- mouse. Specific (but not all types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage.

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, G; Belli, E; Mici, E; Virciglio, P; Moricca, L M; D'Itri, L; Leonardi, A; Malavenda, M S; Krizzuk, D; Merola, R; Maturo, A; Pasta, V

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies, calcifications of the falx cerebri etc. The diagnosis is made according to clinical criteria (Kimonis Criteria) and genetic ones. We studied one family where father and then his sun resulted affected by each syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare disease diagnosed according to clinical criteria sometimes difficult to integrate. The family case we presented shows how you can get diagnosis even in older age and after numerous surgeries. Patients should be given special attention and therefore should be monitorized and need multidisciplinary treatments continued in time, even a trivial change of signs and symptoms may be an important indicator of a precipitating event which puts the patient's life under threat.

  20. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz

    2008-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. the NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only gen...

  1. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Van Dijck, H

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral giant cell lesion of the right mandible. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and MRI are not specific for the diagnosis of oral giant cell lesions. Nonetheless, intralesional scattered foci of low SI on T2-WI, corresponding to hemosiderin deposits due to hemorrhage, can help the radiologist in narrowing down the differential diagnosis of gnathic lesions in patients with NS.

  2. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g....... frequency and nocturia), as > 28 mast cells/mm(2) is defined as mastocytosis and correlated with clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS The current enzymatic staining method (naphtolesterase) on 10 mu m sections for quantifying mast cells is complicated. In the present study, 61 patients had detrusor...... sections between, respectively. Mast cells were counted according to a well-defined procedure. RESULTS The old and the new methods, on 10 and 3 mu m sections, showed a good correlation between mast cell counts. When using tryptase staining and 3 mu m sections, the mast cell number correlated well...

  3. Multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol

    2003-01-01

    We present two cases of multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 1 : a nine year-old boy visited CNU Hospital for orthodontic treatment and his radiographs showed cystic lesions surrounding the crowns of teeth 13 and 17 respectively, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. Subsequently, two more cysts were found on his follow-up radiographs in 12 and 15 months. The two cysts were determined to be odontogenic keratocysts. The boy had no skeletal abnormalities and no skin lesions associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 2: a fifty-eight year old man had three impacted third molars with pericoronal radiolucencies, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. He had no additional abnormalities associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Multiple jaw cysts can occur at any age, and periodic radiographic surveillance may be needed for any cases of impacted tooth.

  4. Multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    We present two cases of multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 1 : a nine year-old boy visited CNU Hospital for orthodontic treatment and his radiographs showed cystic lesions surrounding the crowns of teeth 13 and 17 respectively, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. Subsequently, two more cysts were found on his follow-up radiographs in 12 and 15 months. The two cysts were determined to be odontogenic keratocysts. The boy had no skeletal abnormalities and no skin lesions associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 2: a fifty-eight year old man had three impacted third molars with pericoronal radiolucencies, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. He had no additional abnormalities associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Multiple jaw cysts can occur at any age, and periodic radiographic surveillance may be needed for any cases of impacted tooth.

  5. T Cells and Pathogenesis of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome and Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A. Ennis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously hypothesized that increased capillary permeability observed in both hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS may be caused by hantavirus-specific cytotoxic T cells attacking endothelial cells presenting viral antigens on their surface based on clinical observations and in vitro experiments. In HCPS, hantavirus-specific T cell responses positively correlated with disease severity. In HFRS, in one report, contrary to HCPS, T cell responses negatively correlated with disease severity, but in another report the number of regulatory T cells, which are thought to suppress T cell responses, negatively correlated with disease severity. In rat experiments, in which hantavirus causes persistent infection, depletion of regulatory T cells helped infected rats clear virus without inducing immunopathology. These seemingly contradictory findings may suggest delicate balance in T cell responses between protection and immunopathogenesis. Both too strong and too weak T cell responses may lead to severe disease. It is important to clarify the role of T cells in these diseases for better treatment (whether to suppress T cell functions and protection (vaccine design which may need to take into account viral factors and the influence of HLA on T cell responses.

  6. Directed Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Qizhou; Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Gao, Fei; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells, also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), possess great potential to generate a wide range of cell types including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, bone, cartilage, and lipid cells. This protocol describes in detail how to perform highly efficient, lineage-specific differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with an MSCs fate. The approach uses a clinically compliant protocol with chemically defined media, feeder-free conditions, and a CD105 positive and CD24 negative selection to achieve a single cell-based MSCs derivation from differentiating human pluripotent cells in approximately 20 days. Cells generated with this protocol express typical MSCs surface markers and undergo adipogenesis, osteogenesis, and chondrogenesis similar to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Nonetheless, compared with adult BM-MSCs, iPSC-MSCs display a higher proliferative capacity, up to 120 passages, without obvious loss of self-renewal potential and constitutively express MSCs surface antigens. MSCs generated with this protocol have numerous applications, including expansion to large scale cell numbers for tissue engineering and the development of cellular therapeutics. This approach has been used to rescue limb ischemia, allergic disorders, and cigarette smoke-induced lung damage and to model mesenchymal and vascular disorders of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).

  7. Cell Phone Use by Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Kevin; Whitehouse, Andrew; Jaquet, Emma; Ziatas, Kathy; Walker, Allan J.

    2010-01-01

    While young people have generally been at the forefront of the adoption and use of new communications technologies, little is known of uses by exceptional youth. This study compares cell phone use by a group of adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (n = 35) with that by a group of adolescents with typical development (n = 35). People with Asperger…

  8. A Stauffer's syndrome variant associated with renal cell carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    İ. Ateş

    2015-10-09

    Oct 9, 2015 ... Stauffer's syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic manifestation of renal cell carcinoma which is characterized by elevated alkaline ... In this case report, we report a patient who was admitted with fever, fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss and ... have a history of chronic disease, smoking, alcohol or drug use.

  9. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome and Leydig cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, U.N.; Jorgensen, N.; Rajpert-De, Meyts E.

    2008-01-01

    Fertility among human beings appear to be on the decline in many Western countries, and part of the explanation may be decreasing male fecundity. A hypothesis has been put forward that decreasing semen quality may be associated with a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), a spectrum of disorders...... originating in early foetal life. TDS comprises various aspects of impaired gonadal development and function, including testicular cancer. A growing body of evidence, including animal models and research in human beings, points to lifestyle factors and endocrine disrupters as risk factors for TDS. We present...

  10. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype–phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects. PMID:18854871

  11. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-04-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects.

  12. Idiopathic Mast Cell Activation Syndrome With Associated Salicylate Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechenauer, Tobias; Raithel, Martin; Götze, Thomas; Siebenlist, Gregor; Rückel, Aline; Baenkler, Hanns-Wolf; Hartmann, Arndt; Haller, Florian; Hoerning, André

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome can be a rare cause for chronic abdominal pain in children. It remains a diagnosis by exclusion that can be particularly challenging due to the vast variety of possible clinical manifestations. We present a 13-year-old boy who suffered from a multitude of unspecific complaints over a long period of time. In this case, an assessment of mast cell-derived metabolites and immunohistochemical analysis of bioptic specimen was worthwhile. After ruling out, primary (oncologic) and secondary causes for mast cell activation, pharmacologic treatment adapted to the patient's salicylate intolerance resulted in a major relief of symptoms.

  13. Stem cell mobilization in idiopathic steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Hélène; Leclerc, Annelaure; Ulinski, Tim; Balu, Laurent; Garnier, Arnaud; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Watier, Hervé; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Deschênes, Georges

    2008-08-01

    Steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) is classically thought to be a T-cell disorder. The aim of this study was to examine whether or not thymus homeostasis was affected in SSNS. Mature and naive T cell recent thymic emigrants were quantified in the peripheral blood of nephrotic patients and controls. Because the generation of new T cells by the thymus ultimately depends on hematopoietic stem cells, CD34+ cells were also included in the study. Nineteen patients with SSNS during relapse, 13 with SSNS during proteinuria remission, and 18 controls were studied. Cell-surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD16, CD56, CD45RA, CD62L, CD34, and CD38) were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. T-cell rearrangement excision circles (TRECs) were quantified in CD2+ cells by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Stroma cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) genotype and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plasma levels were also determined. Mature T cells (CD4+ and CD8+), circulating naive T cells (CD62L+ and CD3+ CD62L+), and recent thymic emigrants (CD45RA+) as well as TRECs, that measure thymus production, had a similar level in the three groups of patients. Conversely, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells displayed a two-fold increase in SSNS patients during relapse either compared with controls or SSNS patients at remission. In addition, compared with controls, SSNS patients at remission displayed (1) a decrease in CD19+ cells (B cells) and (2) an increase in CD16CD56+ cells [natural killer (NK) cells]. In conclusion, thymus homeostasis is not significantly affected in nephrotic patients. Hematopoietic stem-cell mobilization at proteinuria relapse, as well as changes in B and NK cells during remission, suggest that SSNS might be due to a general disturbance of hematopoietic and immune cell trafficking.

  14. Case report: Noonan-like multiple central giant cell granuloma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Natalie; Alexander, Stanley; Ruggiero, Salvatore; Parameswaran, Ashish; Russo, Antonino; Ferguson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to: summarize the care of a child between the ages of 12 to 16 years old born with Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome and unrelated common variable immune deficiency; provide information on the dental management of patients with Noonan's syndrome; and present a brief discussion of the recent associated genetic findings. A review of the common features of Noonan syndrome and Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome is also provided.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  16. Major sickle cell syndromes in children in Kenitra, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hafiani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To highlight the epidemiological characteristics and plot the current mapping of the sickle cell syndromes in children under 15 years old. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted on children with sickle cell disease over a period of 4 years (from January 2011 to December 2015 at the Pediatric Department at El Idrissi Regional Hospital Center in Kenitra, Morocco. Results: The mean age of patients was (8.56 ± 3.97 years and the age group 6–15 years was the most affected. The male gender was the most dominant with 60.94% of cases versus 30.06% for females. The homozygous form SS was the most frequently identified (81.25% of cases while the heterozygous form SC was rarely detected (2.08%. Conclusions: Sickle cell anemia remains a reality in Morocco and may not be perfectly understood yet by health professionals. A screening policy and a sustainable management program can prevent hemoglobinopathies in the studied region. An action plan must be implemented at national level to improve the quality of management of main sickle cell syndromes.

  17. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  18. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Nyeong Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received much attention with the role of mast cells in IBS. Mast cells are abundant in the intestines and function as intestinal gatekeepers at the interface between the luminal environment in the intestine and the internal milieu under the intestinal epithelium. As a gatekeeper at the interface, mast cells communicate with the adjacent cells such as epithelial, neuronal, and other immune cells throughout the mediators released when they themselves are activated. Many studies have suggested that mast cells play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. This review will focus on studies of the role of mast cell in IBS and the limitations of studies and will also consider future directions.

  19. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Awomolo, Agboola O. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Szabo, Sara [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Pathology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  20. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Arthur B; Awomolo, Agboola O; Szabo, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions.

  1. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Awomolo, Agboola O.; Szabo, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  2. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...... and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle...

  3. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome in a black child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J; Johnston, K A; McPhillips, J P; Barnes, S D; Elston, D M

    1998-02-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is rare in black persons. We describe an 11-year-old black boy with NBCCS who presented with exotropia and a painful, expanding, cystic mass in the left posterior alveolar ridge. Further examination revealed odontogenic keratocysts with palmar and plantar pitting. Less than 5% of reported patients with NBCCS are black. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a black patient with NBCCS presenting with exotropia and an impacted molar displaced into the orbit by an odontogenic keratocyst.

  4. Survey of radiosensitivity in a variety of human cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlett, C.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1980-03-01

    Gamma-ray sensitivity for cell killing was assayed in 54 human cell strains, including some derived from individuals suffering from certain hereditary diseases. The overall range of Do values in this study was 38 to 180 rads, indicating a considerable range of variability in humans. The normal sensitivity was described by a range of Do values of 97 to 180 rads. All ten ataxia telangiectasia cell strains tested proved radiosensitive and gave a mean Do value of 57 +- 15 (S.E.) rads, and these represent the most radiosensitive human skin fibroblasts currently available. Representative cell strains from familial retinoblastoma, Fanconi's anemia, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria occupied positions of intermediate sensitivity, as did one of two ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes. Six xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains together with two Cockayne's syndrome cell strains (all known to be sensitive to ultraviolet light) fell into the normal range, indicating an absence of cross-sensitivity between ultraviolet light and gamma-irradiation.

  5. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in ...

  6. Proximal Tubule Cell Hypothesis for Cardiorenal Syndrome in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Saito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is remarkably high among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, even in the early microalbuminuric stages with normal glomerular filtration rates. Proximal tubule cells (PTCs mediate metabolism and urinary excretion of vasculotoxic substances via apical and basolateral receptors and transporters. These cells also retrieve vasculoprotective substances from circulation or synthesize them for release into the circulation. PTCs are also involved in the uptake of sodium and phosphate, which are critical for hemodynamic regulation and maintaining the mineral balance, respectively. Dysregulation of PTC functions in CKD is likely to be associated with the development of CVD and is linked to the progression to end-stage renal disease. In particular, PTC dysfunction occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, a leading cause of CKD. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms of PTC dysfunction to develop therapeutic strategies for treating cardiorenal syndrome in diabetes.

  7. Impact of cell therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena Perez, Rafael; Fernandez Delgado, Norma; Garmendia Garcia, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    We present a small series of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent implantation of autologous mononuclear cells from peripheral blood to assess the feasibility and safety of these in the sixth month after that procedure. We included 6 patients treated at the Department of Orthopedic in The Enrique Cabrera General Teaching Hospital. The improvement in symptoms began one week after the procedure. Pain and cramping were the first to disappear, the improvement increased one month after and it was maintained until the sixth month of evaluation. The clinical-neurological manifestations improved in 80.3 % of patients, as well as in the study of motor and sensory conduction. There was no reaction to the implant. The improvement of the clinical manifestations and conduction studies support the mediation of stem cells in inflammatory action, revascularization and remyelination of the median nerve, which is expressed in the positive responses obtained

  8. Phthalate-induced testicular dysgenesis syndrome: Leydig cell influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guo-Xin; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan; Hardy, Dianne O; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2009-04-01

    Phthalates, the most abundantly produced plasticizers, leach out from polyvinyl chloride plastics and disrupt androgen action. Male rats that are exposed to phthalates in utero develop symptoms characteristic of the human condition referred to as testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Environmental influences have been suspected to contribute to the increasing incidence of TDS in humans (i.e. cryptorchidism and hypospadias in newborn boys and testicular cancer and reduced sperm quality in adult males). In this review, we discuss the recent findings that prenatal exposure to phthalates affects Leydig cell function in the postnatal testis. This review also focuses on the recent progress in our understanding of how Leydig cell factors contribute to phthalate-mediated TDS.

  9. Progerin sequestration of PCNA promotes replication fork collapse and mislocalization of XPA in laminopathy-related progeroid syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Benjamin A; Liu, Ji; Cartwright, Brian M; Liu, Yiyong; Breitman, Maya; Wang, Youjie; Jones, Rowdy; Tang, Hui; Rusinol, Antonio; Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2017-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder that is caused by a point mutation in the LMNA gene, resulting in production of a truncated farnesylated-prelamin A protein (progerin). We previously reported that XPA mislocalized to the progerin-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites, blocking DSB repair, which led to DSB accumulation, DNA damage responses, and early replication arrest in HGPS. In this study, the XPA mislocalization to DSBs occurred at stalled or collapsed replication forks, concurrent with a significant loss of PCNA at the forks, whereas PCNA efficiently bound to progerin. This PCNA sequestration likely exposed ds-ssDNA junctions at replication forks for XPA binding. Depletion of XPA or progerin each significantly restored PCNA at replication forks. Our results suggest that although PCNA is much more competitive than XPA in binding replication forks, PCNA sequestration by progerin may shift the equilibrium to favor XPA binding. Furthermore, we demonstrated that progerin-induced apoptosis could be rescued by XPA, suggesting that XPA-replication fork binding may prevent apoptosis in HGPS cells. Our results propose a mechanism for progerin-induced genome instability and accelerated replicative senescence in HGPS.-Hilton, B. A., Liu, J., Cartwright, B. M., Liu, Y., Breitman, M., Wang, Y., Jones, R., Tang, H., Rusinol, A., Musich, P. R., Zou, Y. Progerin sequestration of PCNA promotes replication fork collapse and mislocalization of XPA in laminopathy-related progeroid syndromes. © FASEB.

  10. Therapeutic approaches of hematopoietic syndrome after serious accidental global irradiation. Ex vivo expansion interest of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.

    1994-01-01

    Aplasia is one of the main syndrome, appearing after one global accidental irradiation by one ionizing radiation source. The hematopoietic syndrome is characterized by a peripheric blood cell number fall; the cell marrow is reduced too

  11. β-cell dysfunction due to increased ER stress in a stem cell model of Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Linshan; Hua, Haiqing; Foo, Kylie; Martinez, Hector; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Zimmer, Matthew; Kahler, David J; Freeby, Matthew; Chung, Wendy; LeDuc, Charles; Goland, Robin; Leibel, Rudolph L; Egli, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in WFS1 and is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. To investigate the cause of β-cell failure, we used induced pluripotent stem cells to create insulin-producing cells from individuals with Wolfram syndrome. WFS1-deficient β-cells showed increased levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress molecules and decreased insulin content. Upon exposure to experimental ER stress, Wolfram β-cells showed impaired insulin processing and failed to increase insulin secretion in response to glucose and other secretagogues. Importantly, 4-phenyl butyric acid, a chemical protein folding and trafficking chaperone, restored normal insulin synthesis and the ability to upregulate insulin secretion. These studies show that ER stress plays a central role in β-cell failure in Wolfram syndrome and indicate that chemical chaperones might have therapeutic relevance under conditions of ER stress in Wolfram syndrome and other forms of diabetes.

  12. Basal Cell Carcinomas in Gorlin Syndrome: A Review of 202 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome (Naevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the PTCH gene with a birth incidence of approximately 1 in 19,000. Patients develop multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin frequently in early life and also have a predisposition to additional malignancies such as medulloblastoma. Gorlin Syndrome patients also have developmental defects such as bifid ribs and other complications such as jaw keratocysts. We studied the incidence and frequency of basal cell carcinomas in 202 Gorlin syndrome patients from 62 families and compared this to their gender and mutation type. Our data suggests that the incidence of basal cell carcinomas is equal between males and females and the mutation type cannot be used to predict disease burden.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinomas in Gorlin Syndrome: A Review of 202 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E. A.; Shenton, A.; Evans, D. G.; Sajid, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome (Naevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the PTCH gene with a birth incidence of approximately 1 in 19,000. Patients develop multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin frequently in early life and also have a predisposition to additional malignancies such as medulloblastoma. Gorlin Syndrome patients also have developmental defects such as bifid ribs and other complications such as jaw keratocysts. We studied the incidence and frequency of basal cell carcinomas in 202 Gorlin syndrome patients from 62 families and compared this to their gender and mutation type. Our data suggests that the incidence of basal cell carcinomas is equal between males and females and the mutation type cannot be used to predict disease burden

  14. Axillary basal cell carcinoma in patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: report of basal cell carcinoma in both axilla of a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2014-08-17

    Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, an area that is not usually exposed to the sun, is rare. Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome, a disorder associated with a mutation in the patch 1 (PTCH1) gene, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas. To describe a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome who developed a pigmented basal cell carcinoma in each of her axilla and to review the features of axillary basal cell carcinoma patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Pubmed was used to search the following terms: axillary basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. The papers and their citations were evaluated. Basal cell nevus syndrome patients with basal cell carcinoma of the axilla were observed in two women; this represents 2.5% (2 of 79) of the patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma. Both women had pigmented tumors that were histologically nonaggressive. The cancers did not recur after curettage or excision. Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla has only been described in 79 individuals; two of the patients were women with pigmented tumors who had basal cell nevus syndrome. Similar to other patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma, the tumors were histologically nonaggressive and did not recur following treatment. Whether PTCH1 gene mutation predisposes basal cell nevus patients to develop axillary basal cell carcinomas remains to be determined.

  15. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Symptomatic Cushing's syndrome and hyperandrogenemia in a steroid cell ovarian neoplasm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedhom, Ramy; Hu, Sophia; Ohri, Anupam; Infantino, Dorian; Lubitz, Sara

    2016-10-12

    Malignant steroid cell tumors of the ovary are rare and frequently associated with hormonal abnormalities. There are no guidelines on how to treat rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome, a medical emergency. A 67-year-old white woman presented to our hospital with rapidly developing signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome secondary to a steroid-secreting tumor. Her physical and biochemical manifestations of Cushing's syndrome progressed, and she was not amenable to undergoing conventional chemotherapy secondary to the debilitating effects of high cortisol. Her rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome ultimately led to her death, despite aggressive medical management with spironolactone, ketoconazole, mitotane, and mifepristone. We report an unusual and rare case of Cushing's syndrome secondary to a malignant steroid cell tumor of the ovary. The case is highlighted to discuss the complications of rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome, an underreported and often unrecognized endocrine emergency, and the best available evidence for treatment.

  17. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. Aged induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) as a new cellular model for studying premature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Stefania; Borghi, Rossella; D'Oria, Valentina; Restaldi, Fabrizia; Moreno, Sandra; Novelli, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Compagnucci, Claudia

    2017-05-31

    Nuclear integrity and mechanical stability of the nuclear envelope (NE) are conferred by the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments composed of A- and B-type lamins, supporting the inner nuclear membrane and playing a pivotal role in chromatin organization and epigenetic regulation. During cell senescence, nuclear alterations also involving NE architecture are widely described. In the present study, we utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) upon prolonged in vitro culture as a model to study aging and investigated the organization and expression pattern of NE major constituents. Confocal and four-dimensional imaging combined with molecular analyses, showed that aged iPSCs are characterized by nuclear dysmorphisms, nucleoskeletal components (lamin A/C-prelamin isoforms, lamin B1, emerin, and nesprin-2) imbalance, leading to impaired nucleo-cytoplasmic MKL1 shuttling, actin polymerization defects, mitochondrial dysfunctions, SIRT7 downregulation and NF-kBp65 hyperactivation. The observed age-related NE features of iPSCs closely resemble those reported for premature aging syndromes (e.g., Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) and for somatic cell senescence. These findings validate the use of aged iPSCs as a suitable cellular model to study senescence and for investigating therapeutic strategies aimed to treat premature aging.

  19. Abnormalities of Gq-mediated cell signaling in Bartter and Gitelman syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calo, L.; Ceolotto, G.; Milani, M.; Pagnin, E.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Sartori, M.; Davis, A.P.; Costa, R.; Semplicini, A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The constitutive endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production are increased in patients with Bartter syndrome (BS) and Gitelman (GS) syndrome and may reduce vascular tone. Moreover, these patients present an abnormal cell signaling [reduced

  20. Primary Sjogren%u2019s Syndrome Associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Kosker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by xerostomia and xerophthalmia, known as the %u2018sicca symptoms%u2019. Patients with Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, characteristically have positive nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, typically Anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB because of lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands. Patients with primary Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, develop systemic complications, non-Hodgkin lymphoma being the most feared of these. We describe here a case of Sjogren%u2019s syndrome with basal cell carcinoma, which presented with an ulcerated lesion on nasal dorsum.

  1. Parametric Response Mapping as an Indicator of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galban, Craig J.; Boes, Jennifer L.; Bule, Maria; Kitko, Carrie L.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Lama, Vihba; Telenga, Eef D.; van den Berge, Maarten; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Ponkowski, Michael J.; Ross, Brian D.; Yanik, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after hematopoietic cell transplantation presents many challenges, both diagnostically and therapeutically. We developed a computed tomography (CT) voxel-wise methodology termed parametric response mapping (PRM) that quantifies normal

  2. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  3. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Minamoto, Toshiko; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ohnishi, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Ono, Ruriko; Sasamori, Hiroki; Razia, Sultana; Hossain, Mohammad Mahmud; Kamrunnahar, Shanta; Ishikawa, Masako; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 (MLH1), MutS Homolog 2 (MSH2), MutS Homolog 6 (MSH6), and PMS1 Homolog 2 (PMS2)). The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers. PMID:29587389

  4. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Nakamura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 (MLH1, MutS Homolog 2 (MSH2, MutS Homolog 6 (MSH6, and PMS1 Homolog 2 (PMS2. The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers.

  5. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Minamoto, Toshiko; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ohnishi, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Ono, Ruriko; Sasamori, Hiroki; Razia, Sultana; Hossain, Mohammad Mahmud; Kamrunnahar, Shanta; Ishikawa, Masako; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2018-03-25

    Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 ( MLH1 ), MutS Homolog 2 ( MSH2 ), MutS Homolog 6 ( MSH6 ), and PMS1 Homolog 2 ( PMS2 )). The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers.

  6. Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome involves multiple organ system. The most common findings include multiple odontogenic keratocysts in the jaws and basal cell nevus on the skin that have an early age onset. These multiple odontogenic keratocysts warrant aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications associated with them. Recurrence in these lesions is the most characteristic feature that has to be taken in consideration while explaining the prognosis to the patient. A case report of a child affected with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome diagnosed, treated and followed at this hospital is presented here.

  7. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with medulloblastoma and meningioma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Yutaka; Oka, Hidehiro; Utsuki, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Kazuhisa; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2004-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a rare case of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or Gorlin's syndrome, associated with both medulloblastoma and meningioma, manifesting as visual field constriction due to multiple parasellar tumors. He had undergone resection of a medulloblastoma at the age of 1 year 9 months, followed by adjunctive irradiation with a total dose of 40 Gy. He presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules on his face and neck. Histological examination of biopsy specimens established the diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Tuberculum sellae meningioma was removed through a craniotomy, and his symptoms improved. Meningioma is known to occur in the field of therapeutic irradiation, so chemotherapy may be a better option for medulloblastoma associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. (author)

  8. Polycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Herlihy, A C

    2012-02-01

    This retrospective cross-sectional study examined if the white cell count (WCC) is increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and if so, is it due to PCOS or to the associated obesity? Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Of the 113 women studied, 36 had PCOS and 77 did not. The mean WCC was higher in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (8.9 x 10(9)\\/l vs 7.4 x 10(9)\\/l p = 0.002). This increase was due to a higher neutrophil count (5.6 x 10(9)\\/l vs 4.3 x 10(9)\\/l; p = 0.003). There was a leucocytosis (WCC >11 x 10(9)\\/l) present in 19% of the PCOS group compared with 1% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). The neutrophil count was abnormally high (>7.7 x 10(9)\\/l) in 14% of the PCOS group compared with 4% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). On regression analysis, however, the only independent variable which explained both the increased WCC and the increased neutrophil count was PCOS. We found that PCOS is associated with an increased WCC due to increased neutrophils, which supports the evidence that PCOS is associated with low-grade inflammation. The increase appears to be due to the underlying PCOS, and not to the increased adiposity associated with PCOS.

  9. Circulating dendritic cells in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    nephrotic syndrome, circulating DCs were measured by flowcytometry. Results: Circulating DC count ... parents or caregivers of each child before enrollment in the study. ..... role in initiating the primary immune response. On the basis of the ...

  10. Autologous stem cell transplantation in refractory Asherman′s syndrome: A novel cell based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is substantial evidence that adult stem cell populations exist in human endometrium, and hence it is suggested that either endogenous endometrial stem/progenitor cells can be activated or bone marrow derived stem cells can be transplanted in the uterine cavity for endometrial regeneration in Asherman′s syndrome (AS. Aims and Objectives : The objective was to evaluate the role of sub-endometrial autologous stem cell implantation in women with refractory AS in attaining menstruation and fertility. Setting : Tertiary care referral center. DESIGN: Prospective case series. Materials and Methods : Six cases of refractory AS with failed standard treatment option of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis in the past were included. Mononuclear stem cells (MNCs were implanted in sub-endometrial zone followed by exogenous oral estrogen therapy. Endometrial thickness (ET was assessed at 3, 6, and 9 months. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis of study variables was carried out using STATA version 9.0. The mean MNC count was 103.3 × 106 (±20.45 with mean CD34+ count being 203,642 (±269,274. Mean of ET (mm at 3 months (4.05 ± 1.40, 6 months (5.46 ± 1.36 and 9 months (5.48 ± 1.14 were significantly (P < 0.05 increased from pretreatment level (1.38 ± 0.39. Five out of six patients resumed menstruation. Conclusion : The autologous stem cell implantation leads to endometrial regeneration reflected by restoration of menstruation in five out of six cases. Autologous stem cell implantation is a promising novel cell based therapy for refractory AS.

  11. Learning about Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Genomic Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for ...

  12. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Million Views – Celebrate with Us! Sam’s talk, "My Philosophy for a Happy Life", has inspired over 25 ... July 11th, 2016 | 0 Comments PRF Continues Aggressive Research Agenda Events November 25, 2017 in Verona, NJ: ...

  13. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Carbone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numb chin syndrome is a rare sensory neuropathy of the mental nerve characterized by numbness, hypoesthesia, paraesthesia, and very rarely pain. Dental causes, especially iatrogenic ones, maxillofacial trauma, or malignant neoplasm are etiologic factors for this rare syndrome. Many malignant and metastatic neoplasms are causing this syndrome, like primary osteosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mandibular metastasis of primary carcinoma of breast, lung, thyroid, kidney, prostate, and nasopharynx. Haematological malignancies like acute lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and myeloma can cause this neuropathy. The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar ridge and lower mandibular cortex. A biopsy of the mass was performed on fragments of tissue collected from the mandibular periosteum, medullary and cortical mandibular bone, and inferior alveolar nerve.

  14. The cell biology of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayflick, L

    1985-02-01

    It is only within the past ten years that biogerontology has become attractive to a sufficient number of biologists so that the field can be regarded as a seriously studied discipline. Cytogerontology, or the study of aging at the cellular level, had its genesis about 20 years ago when the dogma that maintained that cultured normal cells could replicate forever was overturned. Normal human and animal cells have a finite capacity to replicate and function whether they are cultured in vitro or transplanted as grafts in vivo. This phenomenon has been interpreted to be aging at the cellular level. Only abnormal somatic cells are capable of immortality. In recent years it has been found that the number of population doublings of which cultured normal cells are capable is inversely proportional to donor age. There is also good evidence that the number of population doublings of cultured normal fibroblasts is directly proportional to the maximum lifespan of ten species that have been studied. Cultures prepared from patients with accelerated aging syndromes (progeria and Werner's syndrome) undergo far fewer doublings than do those of age-matched controls. The normal human fibroblast cell strain WI-38 was established in 1962 from fetal lung, and several hundred ampules of these cells were frozen in liquid nitrogen at that time. These ampules have been reconstituted periodically and shown to be capable of replication. This represents the longest period of time that a normal human cell has ever been frozen. Normal human fetal cell strains such as WI-38 have the capacity to double only about 50 times. If cultures are frozen at various population doublings, the number of doublings remaining after reconstitution is equal to 50 minus the number of doublings that occurred prior to freezing. The memory of the cells has been found to be accurate after 23 years of preservation in liquid nitrogen. Normal human cells incur many physiologic decrements that herald the approach of their

  15. Modeling the autistic cell: iPSCs recapitulate developmental principles of syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Reuven, Lihi; Reiner, Orly

    2016-06-01

    The opportunity to model autism spectrum disorders (ASD) through generation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is currently an emerging topic. Wide-scale research of altered brain circuits in syndromic ASD, including Rett Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Angelman's Syndrome and sporadic Schizophrenia, was made possible through animal models. However, possibly due to species differences, and to the possible contribution of epigenetics in the pathophysiology of these diseases, animal models fail to recapitulate many aspects of ASD. With the advent of iPSCs technology, 3D cultures of patient-derived cells are being used to study complex neuronal phenotypes, including both syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD. Here, we review recent advances in using iPSCs to study various aspects of the ASD neuropathology, with emphasis on the efforts to create in vitro model systems for syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD. We summarize the main cellular activity phenotypes and aberrant genetic interaction networks that were found in iPSC-derived neurons of syndromic and nonsyndromic autistic patients. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  16. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A

    2017-01-01

    of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig...

  17. Recurrent odontogenic keratocysts in basal cell nevus syndrome: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Kim, Jin Hoa; Choi, Dong Hoon; Koh, Kwang Soo; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. Our patient represented several characteristics of BCNS, such as, multiple odontogenic keratocysts, facial nevus, calcification of falx cerebri, parietal bossing and mental retardation. The cyst on posterior mandible showed recurrent and newly developing tendency.

  18. Widespread osteolytic lesions of the long bones in basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinder, G.; Barki, Y.; Bar-Ziv, J.; Pezt, M.

    1984-01-01

    Three members of a family, father, daughter, and son, with the basal cell nevus syndrome are presented. A very unusual manifestation of widespread cyst-like osteolytic lesions in all the tubular bones was observed in the father, together with osteoblastic spotty 'osteopoikilotic' lesions in the skull and the mandible of the same patient. Cyst-like osteolytic lesions have been described previously in this syndrome, mainly in the phalanges. We believe that such lesions can occur in any bone. (orig.)

  19. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in a Patient with Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Brzezniak; Bryan Oronsky; Corey A. Carter; Bennett Thilagar; Scott Caroen; Karen Zeman

    2017-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome, a potential oncologic emergency, is closely associated with malignancy and right-sided lung cancer in particular. A case of SVC syndrome presenting with facial swelling, neck distension, and enlarged veins of the upper chest, which developed over a period of 5 weeks in a 46-year-old patient on a clinical trial with small-cell lung cancer, is reported. Computed tomography scan of the chest revealed slight enlargement of a superior conglomerate mediastinal lym...

  20. [Severe Mast Cell Activation Syndrome in a 15-year-old patient with an hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daens, S; Grossin, D; Hermanns-Lê, T; Peeters, D; Manicourt, D

    2018-02-01

    We report the history of a 15-year old patient with a hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) (his mother, his two brothers and his sister have the same phenotype as him). He suffers mainly from a severe mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) with an overreaction of the skin to any kind of contact (water of the shower, clothes, bed sheets) but he has also fatigue, headaches, and rash. This impressive rash is exacerbated after the shower and he has the urge to rest («shower's sign»). We describe the MCAS and its easy, fast and very effective medication management, without any significant side effects as well as its frequent association with the hEDS. We finally introduce the original term of «MASED» to this MCAS, associated, linked or entangled to hEDS.

  1. Nevoid Basal-Cell Syndrome: literature review and case report in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available The Nevoid Basal-Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCC, or as it is also referred to, basal-cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is characterized by multiple early-appearing basal cell carcinomas, keratocytosis of the mandible, and anomalies of the ocular, skeletal reproductive system. We describe four patients in the same family, all of them possessing a large number of skin tumors associated with other typical clinical and X-Ray anomalies of NBCC. The definitive treatment of NBCC has yet to be established, however, early diagnosis is very important as well as the periodical follow-up examination of ten patients, mainly due to the transformations in the skin lesions that may occur.

  2. Nance-Horan syndrome protein, NHS, associates with epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Ang, Sharyn L; Shaw, Marie; Mackey, David A; Gécz, Jozef; McAvoy, John W; Craig, Jamie E

    2006-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome, characterized by congenital cataracts, craniofacial, dental abnormalities and mental disturbances, is an X-linked disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Affected individuals have mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan syndrome) gene typically resulting in premature truncation of the protein. This report underlines the complexity of the regulation of the NHS gene that transcribes several isoforms. We demonstrate the differential expression of the two NHS isoforms, NHS-A and NHS-1A, and differences in the subcellular localization of the proteins encoded by these isoforms. This may in part explain the pleiotropic features of the syndrome. We show that the endogenous and exogenous NHS-A isoform localizes to the cell membrane of mammalian cells in a cell-type-dependent manner and that it co-localizes with the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 in the apical aspect of cell membrane in epithelial cells. We also show that the NHS-1A isoform is a cytoplasmic protein. In the developing mammalian lens, we found continuous expression of NHS that became restricted to the lens epithelium in pre- and postnatal lens. Consistent with the in vitro findings, the NHS-A isoform associates with the apical cell membrane in the lens epithelium. This study suggests that disturbances in intercellular contacts underlie cataractogenesis in the Nance-Horan syndrome. NHS is the first gene localized at TJs that has been implicated in congenital cataracts.

  3. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Profile of genetic and environmental factors in oncogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinomas (NBCCs) are a prototype of a genetic form of basal cell carcinoma. These basal cell cancers, rather than being caused by genetic factors alone, are most likely the product of genetic and environmental factors. The NBCC syndrome provides a model for studying tumors induced by ionizing radiation and for viewing carcinogenesis as a multistage process explainable by a minimum of two steps. The interaction of genetic and environmental factors in producing tumors to which an individual is predisposed can be studied in patients with the NBCC syndrome and childhood medulloblastoma that was treated by radiation therapy. Individuals with the NBCC syndrome represent a special subgroup with a hereditary predisposition to basal cell carcinoma in whom ionizing radiation may supply the subsequent mutation necessary for tumor development. The genetically altered epidermis underlying the palm and sole pits found in patients with the syndrome represents basal cell carcinoma in situ from which basal cell carcinomas develop, albeit infrequently. The restrained biologic behavior of most of these tumors contrasts with the usual destructive behavior of the NBCCs of the head and neck in the same patient

  4. Basal cell naevus syndrome - radiographic findings in the skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, P.; Dueker, J.; Weingart, D.

    1986-09-01

    Besides uni- and multiocular jaw cysts the Gorlin Goltz syndrome shows other characteristic radiographic findings which help to ensure diagnosis. These are particularly calcification of the falx cerebri and a so called ''bridging'' between processus clinoideus anterior and posterior of the sella turcica. The importance of early diagnosis is stressed.

  5. The basal cell naevus syndrome - radiographic findings in the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, P.; Dueker, J.; Weingart, D.

    1986-01-01

    Besides uni- and multiocular jaw cysts the Gorlin Goltz syndrome shows other characteristic radiographic findings which help to ensure diagnosis. These are particularly calcification of the falx cerebri and a so called ''bridging'' between processus clinoideus anterior and posterior of the sella turcica. The importance of early diagnosis is stressed. (orig.) [de

  6. Platelets and white blood cells in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jaap Jan Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the role of leukocytes and platelets as methods to measure platelets aggregation, in the clinical management of presenting with acute coronary syndromes. We have tried to incidence and to identify predictors of adverse cardiac events with function tests or

  7. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received mu...

  8. Lowe Syndrome protein OCRL1 supports maturation of polarized epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Grieve

    Full Text Available Mutations in the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase OCRL1 cause Lowe Syndrome, leading to cataracts, mental retardation and renal failure. We noted that cell types affected in Lowe Syndrome are highly polarized, and therefore we studied OCRL1 in epithelial cells as they mature from isolated individual cells into polarized sheets and cysts with extensive communication between neighbouring cells. We show that a proportion of OCRL1 targets intercellular junctions at the early stages of their formation, co-localizing both with adherens junctional components and with tight junctional components. Correlating with this distribution, OCRL1 forms complexes with junctional components α-catenin and zonula occludens (ZO-1/2/3. Depletion of OCRL1 in epithelial cells growing as a sheet inhibits maturation; cells remain flat, fail to polarize apical markers and also show reduced proliferation. The effect on shape is reverted by re-expressed OCRL1 and requires the 5'-phosphatase domain, indicating that down-regulation of 5-phosphorylated inositides is necessary for epithelial development. The effect of OCRL1 in epithelial maturation is seen more strongly in 3-dimensional cultures, where epithelial cells lacking OCRL1 not only fail to form a central lumen, but also do not have the correct intracellular distribution of ZO-1, suggesting that OCRL1 functions early in the maturation of intercellular junctions when cells grow as cysts. A role of OCRL1 in junctions of polarized cells may explain the pattern of organs affected in Lowe Syndrome.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (part 1): epidemiology, pathology and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia de Sá, Tiago Ribeiro; Silva, Roberto; Lopes, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide with increasing incidence, but difficult to assess due to the current under registration practice. Despite the low mortality rate, BCC is a cause of great morbidity and an economic burden to health services. There are several risk factors that increase the risk of BCC and partly explain its incidence. Low-penetrance susceptibility alleles, as well as genetic alterations in signaling pathways, namely SHH pathway, also contribute to the carcinogenesis. BCC associate with several genetic syndromes, of which basal cell nevus syndrome is the most common.

  10. Giant cell tumor of distal phalanx in an adolescent with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgers, A; Peters, S; Sciot, R; De Smet, L

    2014-01-01

    We report on a unique case of a young female patient with the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome who developed a giant cell tumor of bone in the distal phalanx of the thumb. This case is noteworthy because of the combination of some unusual features. Firstly, it is only the fifth case report on the association of giant cell tumor of bone and the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Also the localization of the lesion in the bones of the hand and the presentation at adolescent age is rarely seen.

  11. [Major sickle cell syndromes and infections associated with this condition in children in Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douamba, Sonia; Nagalo, Kisito; Tamini, Laure; Traoré, Ismaël; Kam, Madibèlè; Kouéta, Fla; Yé, Diarra

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate infections in children with major sickle cell syndrome. We conducted a monocentric descriptive retrospective hospital study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, over a ten-year period. All children with major sickle cell syndrome (homozygous SS and double heterozygous SC, SD Punjab , Sβ thalassemic, SO Arab and SE) hospitalized for microbiologically confirmed infections were enrolled in the study. One hundred and thirty-three patients met our inclusion criteria. The SS phenotype accounted for 63.2% of cases and SC 36.8%. The frequency of infections was 21.8%. In 45.9% of cases, these affected children aged 0-5 years. The most frequent signs were osteoarticular pain (42.1%), cough (25.7%), abdominal pain (23.3%), pallor (43.6%). The major diagnoses were bronchopneumonia (31.6%), malaria (16.5%), osteomyelitis (12.8%) and septicemia (10.5%). The isolated pathogenic organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (35.5%) and Salmonella spp (33.3%). Third generation cephalosporins were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. Gros mortality rate was 7.5%. Bacterial infections and malaria dominate the clinical picture of infections in children with major sickle cell syndrome at the at the Pediatrics University Hospital Center Charles De-Gaulle. This study highlights the importance of establishing a national program for the management of sickle-cell anemia, which could help prevent or reduce the occurrence of infections in children with sickle cell syndrome.

  12. Treatment of radiation syndrome with emphasis on stem cell implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2010-01-01

    Within few years, the possibility that the human body contains cells that can repair and regenerate damaged and diseased tissue has gone from an unlikely proposition to a virtual certainty. Patients who have received doses of radiation in the potentially low to mid-lethal range (2-6 Gy) will have depression in bone-marrow function with cessation of blood-cell production leading to pancytopenia. Selection of cases for stem cell transplantation is based upon clinical signs and symptoms. Hematopoietic stem cell which produces blood cell progeny provides support for hematopoietic and other cells within the marrow, and has also been a focus for possible tissue repair. Another cell type termed mesenchymal or stromal also exists in the marrow. This cell provides support for hematopoietic and other cells within the marrow, and has also been a focus for possible tissue repair. Stem cells are obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood, placental and umbilical cord blood, embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells. These cells have great potential for clinical research due to their potential to regenerate tissue. As well known, the cryo preservation process can store any cell type, particularly blood cells, for an indeterminate time. (author)

  13. Reversal of experimental Laron Syndrome by xenotransplantation of microencapsulated porcine Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Giovanni; Calvitti, Mario; Mancuso, Francesca; Falabella, Giulia; Arato, Iva; Bellucci, Catia; List, Edward O; Bellezza, Enrico; Angeli, Giovanni; Lilli, Cinzia; Bodo, Maria; Becchetti, Ennio; Kopchick, John J; Cameron, Don F; Baroni, Tiziano; Calafiore, Riccardo

    2013-01-10

    Recombinant human IGF-1 currently represents the only available treatment option for the Laron Syndrome, a rare human disorder caused by defects in the gene encoding growth hormone receptor, resulting in irreversibly retarded growth. Unfortunately, this treatment therapy, poorly impacts longitudinal growth (13% in females and 19% in males), while burdening the patients with severe side effects, including hypoglycemia, in association with the unfair chore of taking multiple daily injections that cause local intense pain. In this study, we have demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal graft of microencapsulated pig Sertoli cells, producing pig insulin-like growth factor-1, successfully promoted significant proportional growth in the Laron mouse, a unique animal model of the human Laron Syndrome. These findings indicate a novel, simply, safe and successful method for the cell therapy-based cure of the Laron Syndrome, potentially applicable to humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple giant cell lesions in a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Schreuder, Willem Hans; Jongmans, Marjolijn; van Bommel-Slee, Danielle; Witsenburg, Bart; de Lange, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) and multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) in mandibles and maxillae is described. A mutation p.Thr468Met in the PTPN11-gene was found. This is the second reported NSML patient with MGCL. Our case adds to the assumption that, despite a

  15. Embryonic stem cells as an ectodermal cellular model of human p63-related dysplasia syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rostagno, P.; Wolchinsky, Z.; Vigano, A.M.; Shivtiel, S.; Zhou, Huiqing; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ferone, G.; Missero, C.; Mantovani, R.; Aberdam, D.; Virolle, T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the TP63 transcription factor underlie the molecular basis of several similar autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes. Here we provide a novel cellular model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells that recapitulates in vitro the main steps of embryonic skin

  16. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; Baars, J. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Van Dijk, M. A.; de Glas-Vos, C. W.; Thomas, B. L.; van Oers, R. H.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy intensification may lead to new forms of toxicity such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. METHODS: Three patients are described who developed this complication 4 to 6 months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell support. The literature on this subject is

  17. Reduced cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal brain in Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K.B.; Laursen, H.; Graem, N.

    2008-01-01

    Mental retardation is seen in all individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and different brain abnormalities are reported. The aim of this study was to investigate if mental retardation at least in part is a result of a lower cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal forebrain. We therefore...

  18. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  19. Giant cell lesion of the jaw as a presenting feature of Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Bridget P; Patel, Maya

    2018-05-30

    This is a case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with a left jaw mass which was resected and found to be a giant cell granuloma of the mandible. Her history and physical examination were suggestive for Noonan syndrome which was confirmed with genetic testing and the finding of a PTPN11 gene mutation which has rarely been associated with giant cell lesions of the jaw. Given her particular genetic mutation and the presence of a giant cell lesion, we present a case of Noonan-like/multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Genome-wide expression analysis in fibroblast cell lines from probands with Pallister Killian syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pallister Killian syndrome (OMIM: # 601803 is a rare multisystem disorder typically caused by tissue limited mosaic tetrasomy of chromosome 12p (isochromosome 12p. The clinical manifestations of Pallister Killian syndrome are variable with the most common findings including craniofacial dysmorphia, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, skin pigmentary differences and epilepsy. Isochromosome 12p is identified primarily in skin fibroblast cultures and in chorionic villus and amniotic fluid cell samples and may be identified in blood lymphocytes during the neonatal and early childhood period. We performed genomic expression profiling correlated with interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism array quantification of degree of mosaicism in fibroblasts from 17 Caucasian probands with Pallister Killian syndrome and 9 healthy age, gender and ethnicity matched controls. We identified a characteristic profile of 354 (180 up- and 174 down-regulated differentially expressed genes in Pallister Killian syndrome probands and supportive evidence for a Pallister Killian syndrome critical region on 12p13.31. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for developmentally important genes such as homeobox genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, we identified several genes whose misexpression may be associated with the clinical phenotype of Pallister Killian syndrome such as downregulation of ZFPM2, GATA6 and SOX9, and overexpression of IGFBP2.

  1. Treatment of multiple unresectable basal cell carcinomas from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojevwe, Fidelis O; Ojevwe, Cindy D; Zacny, James P; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Lin, Amy; Kohlitz, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), which is also known by other names, including Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and multiple basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) syndrome, is a rare multi-systemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal manner with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. The main clinical manifestations include multiple BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial calcifications and facial deformities. A 31-year-old male diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with multiple unresectable facial BCCs was treated with the Hedgehog inhibitor vismodegib. After one month of therapy on vismodegib, there were significant reductions in the size of multiple BCCs on the patient's face. The patient remains on this therapy. Hedgehog pathway inhibition is an effective strategy to treat unresectable BCCs from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Although vismodegib shows some promising clinical results in the early phase of its use, there are concerns of possible resistance developing within months. Duration of therapy, role of maintenance treatment and drug modification to reduce resistance need to be explored in future case studies. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Regulatory T cells and immunodeficiency in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn Frej; Ødum, Niels; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the term for diseases characterized by primary accumulation of malignant T cells in the skin. Patients with the two predominant clinical forms of CTCL called mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) characteristically develop severe immunodeficiency duri...... in MF and SS and discuss the potential mechanisms driving the immunodeficiency.Leukemia advance online publication, 9 September 2011; doi:10.1038/leu.2011.237....

  3. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer for the Treatment of Parry-Romberg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yanko Castro-Govea; Oscar De La Garza-Pineda; Jorge Lara-Arias; Hernán Chacón-Martínez; Gabriel Mecott-Rivera; Abel Salazar-Lozano; Everardo Valdes-Flores

    2012-01-01

    Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive and self-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face that creates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year history of progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration using cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL), which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) extracted fro...

  4. Generation of a lentiviral vector producer cell clone for human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Wielgosz

    Full Text Available We have developed a producer cell line that generates lentiviral vector particles of high titer. The vector encodes the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS protein. An insulator element has been added to the long terminal repeats of the integrated vector to limit proto-oncogene activation. The vector provides high-level, stable expression of WAS protein in transduced murine and human hematopoietic cells. We have also developed a monoclonal antibody specific for intracellular WAS protein. This antibody has been used to monitor expression in blood and bone marrow cells after transfer into lineage negative bone marrow cells from WAS mice and in a WAS negative human B-cell line. Persistent expression of the transgene has been observed in transduced murine cells 12–20 weeks following transplantation. The producer cell line and the specific monoclonal antibody will facilitate the development of a clinical protocol for gene transfer into WAS protein deficient stem cells.

  5. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  6. Development of a tree shrew metabolic syndrome model and use of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xing-Hua; Zhu, Lu; Yao, Xiang; Liu, Ju-Fen; Li, Zi-An; Yang, Jian-Yong; Pang, Rong-Qing; Ruan, Guang-Ping

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a tree shrew metabolic syndrome model and demonstrate the utility of MSCs in treating metabolic syndrome. We used tree shrew umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (TS-UC-MSC) transplantation for the treatment of metabolic syndrome to demonstrate the clinical application of these stem cells and to provide a theoretical basis and reference methods for this treatment. Tree shrew metabolic syndrome model showed significant insulin resistance, high blood sugar, lipid metabolism disorders, and hypertension, consistent with the diagnostic criteria. TS-UC-MSC transplantation at 16 weeks significantly reduced blood sugar and lipid levels, improved insulin resistance and the regulation of insulin secretion, and reduced the expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 (P metabolic syndrome model and showed that MSC migrate in diseased organs and can attenuate metabolic syndrome severity in a tree shrew model.

  7. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  8. Confocal and dermoscopic features of basal cell carcinoma in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casari, Alice; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimilios; Longo, Caterina

    2017-05-01

    Gorlin-Goltz (GS) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease linked to a mutation in the PTCH gene. Major criteria include the onset of multiple basal cell carcinoma (BCC), keratocystic odontogenic tumours in the jaws and bifid ribs. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy represent imaging tools that are able to increase the diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer in a totally noninvasive manner, without performing punch biopsies. Here we present a case of a young woman in whom the combined approach of dermoscopy and RCM led to the identification of multiple small inconspicuous lesions as BCC and thus to the diagnosis of GS syndrome. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  9. Two cases of uveitis masquerade syndrome caused by bilateral intraocular large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sometimes it is not easy to clinically recognize subtle differences between intraocular lymphoma and noninfectious uveitis. The most common lymphoma subtype involving the eye is B-cell lymphoma. Case report. We presented two patients aged 59 and 58 years with infiltration of the subretinal space with a large B-cell non-Hodgkin intraocular lymphoma. The patients originally had clinically masked syndrome in the form of intermediate uveitis. As it was a corticosteroid-resistant uveitis, we focused on the possible diagnosis of neoplastic causes of this syndrome. During hospitalization, the neurological symptoms emerged and multiple subretinal changes accompanied by yellowish white patches of retinal pigment epithelium with signs of vitritis, which made us suspect the intraocular lymphoma. Endocranial magnetic resonance imaging established tumorous infiltration in the region of the left hemisphere of the cerebellum. The histopathological finding confirmed the diagnosis of large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of risk moderate degree, immunoblast - centroblast cytological type. The other patient had clinical chronic uveitis accompanied by yellowish shaped white echographic changes of the retina and localized changes in the level of the subretina. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made by brain biopsy. Conclusion. Uveitis masquerade syndrome should be considered in all patients over 40 years with idiopathic steroid-resistant uveitis. Treatment begun on time can affect the course and improve the prognosis of uveitis masquerade syndrome (UMS and systemic disease.

  10. Marathon of eponyms: 7 Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (Naevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2010-01-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  11. Beta-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Fuentes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Blanca G Baez-Duarte1,3, María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén3†, Ricardo Pérez-Fuentes2,3, Irma Zamora-Ginez1,3, Bertha Alicia Leon-Chavez1, Cristina Revilla-Monsalve4, Sergio Islas-Andrade41Posgrado en Ciencias Químicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 2Facultad de Medicina, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 3Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Oriente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Atlixco, Puebla, México; 4Multidiciplinary Research Group on Diabetes (José Sánchez-Corona, Fernando Guerrero-Romero, Martha Rodriguez-Moran, Agustin Madero, Jorge Escobedo-de-la-Peña, Silvia Flores-Martinez, Esperanza, Martinez-Abundis, Manuel Gonzalez-Ortiz, Alberto Rascon-Pacheco, Margarita Torres-Tamayo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, México, Distrito Federal, México; †María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén passed away on 27 November 2009.Aims: The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects.Material and methods: This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1 control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2 group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out.Results: Average age of the

  12. Exceptional bone metastasis of basal cell carcinoma in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon, Tatiana; Gerard, Stephane; Meyer, Nicolas; Losfeld, Benjamin; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Balardy, Laurent; Vellas, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most prevalent form of cancer worldwide, is a malignant skin neoplasm. It is locally invasive, with an exceptional incidence of reported metastasis. It can also be part of the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, which is principally characterized by cutaneous BCC, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and falx cerebri calcification. We report the exceptional clinical observation of a 54-year-old man presenting bone metastasis from BCC in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Less than 300 cases of metastatic BCC have been reported in the literature. The present case is the second associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  14. Stem Cells in the Intestine: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Israsena, Nipan

    2016-07-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders that significantly impair quality of life in patients. Current available treatments are still not effective and the pathophysiology of this condition remains unclearly defined. Recently, research on intestinal stem cells has greatly advanced our understanding of various GI disorders. Alterations in conserved stem cell regulatory pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and bone morphogenic protein/TGF- β have been well documented in diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Interaction between intestinal stem cells and various signals from their environment is important for the control of stem cell self-renewal, regulation of number and function of specific intestinal cell types, and maintenance of the mucosal barrier. Besides their roles in stem cell regulation, these signals are also known to have potent effects on immune cells, enteric nervous system and secretory cells in the gut, and may be responsible for various aspects of pathogenesis of functional GI disorders, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered gut motility and low grade gut inflammation. In this article, we briefly summarize the components of these signaling pathways, how they can be modified by extrinsic factors and novel treatments, and provide evidenced support of their roles in the inflammation processes. Furthermore, we propose how changes in these signals may contribute to the symptom development and pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

  15. Bone scan and red blood cell scan in a patient with epidermal naevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Wolf, F.; Stosiek, N.; Peters, K.P.

    1990-01-01

    A bone scan and red blood cell scan in the rare epidermal naevus syndrome, associated with multiple haemangiomes of the bone and hypophosphataemic osteomalacia in a 20-year-old man are reported. The typical pattern of osteomalacia on the bone scan was associated with lesions of increased bone metabolism in the peripheral bones. The haemangiomas did not pool labelled red blood cells. Thus, the bone scan seems to be suited for diagnosing the complete extent of haemangiomas in bone, but they could not be specifically proven by red blood cell pooling. (orig.)

  16. Modeling Monogenic Human Nephrotic Syndrome in the Drosophila Garland Cell Nephrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermle, Tobias; Braun, Daniela A; Helmstädter, Martin; Huber, Tobias B; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-05-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome is characterized by podocyte dysfunction. Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes are podocyte-like cells and thus provide a potential in vivo model in which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. However, relevant pathomechanisms of nephrotic syndrome have not been studied in nephrocytes. Here, we discovered that two Drosophila slit diaphragm proteins, orthologs of the human genes encoding nephrin and nephrin-like protein 1, colocalize within a fingerprint-like staining pattern that correlates with ultrastructural morphology. Using RNAi and conditional CRISPR/Cas9 in nephrocytes, we found this pattern depends on the expression of both orthologs. Tracer endocytosis by nephrocytes required Cubilin and reflected size selectivity analogous to that of glomerular function. Using RNAi and tracer endocytosis as a functional read-out, we screened Drosophila orthologs of human monogenic causes of nephrotic syndrome and observed conservation of the central pathogenetic alterations. We focused on the coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) biosynthesis gene Coq2 , the silencing of which disrupted slit diaphragm morphology. Restoration of CoQ 10 synthesis by vanillic acid partially rescued the phenotypic and functional alterations induced by Coq2 -RNAi. Notably, Coq2 colocalized with mitochondria, and Coq2 silencing increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Silencing of ND75 , a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that controls ROS formation independently of CoQ 10 , phenocopied the effect of Coq2 -RNAi. Moreover, the ROS scavenger glutathione partially rescued the effects of Coq2 -RNAi. In conclusion, Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes provide a model with which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome, and ROS formation may be a pathomechanism of COQ2 -nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. CXCL12 Promotes Stem Cell Recruitment and Uterine Repair after Injury in Asherman’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Sahin Ersoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Asherman’s syndrome is an acquired condition of uterine fibrosis and adhesions in response to injury that adversely affects fertility and pregnancy. We have previously demonstrated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDSCs contribute to uterine repair after injury and that stem cells supplementation improves fertility. Here, we demonstrate that CXCL12 is the chemokine that mediates stem cell engraftment and functional improvement using a murine model of Asherman’s syndrome. After uterine injury, we demonstrate that CXCL12 augmentation increased BMDSC engraftment and that the CXCL12 receptor (CXCR4 antagonist, ADM3100, blocked stem cell recruitment. CXCL12 reduced, whereas ADM3100 increased fibrosis. CXCL12 treatment led to improved fertility and litter size, whereas ADM3100 treatment reduced fertility and litter size. ADM3100 prevented optimal spontaneous uterine repair mediated by endogenous CXCL12 production, reducing pregnancies after injury in the absence of supplemental CXCL12 administration; however, ADM3100 treatment could be partially rescued by CXCL12 augmentation. CXCL12 or other CXCR4 receptor agonists may be useful in the treatment of infertility or adverse pregnancy outcomes in Asherman’s syndrome and other related uterine disorders.

  18. Cell-assisted lipotransfer for the treatment of parry-romberg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Govea, Yanko; De La Garza-Pineda, Oscar; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Chacón-Martínez, Hernán; Mecott-Rivera, Gabriel; Salazar-Lozano, Abel; Valdes-Flores, Everardo

    2012-11-01

    Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive and self-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face that creates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year history of progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration using cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL), which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) extracted from the same patient. ASCs have the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes. They also promote angiogenesis, release angiogenic growth factors, and some can survive as stem cells. The use of autologous fat as a filler in soft tissue atrophy has been satisfactory in patients with mild and moderate Parry-Romberg syndrome. Currently, CAL has showed promising results in the long term by decreasing the rate of fat reabsorption. The permanence and stability of the graft in all the injected areas has showed that autologous fat grafts enriched with stem cells could be a promising technique for the correction of defects caused by this syndrome.

  19. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer for the Treatment of Parry-Romberg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanko Castro-Govea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive and self-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face that creates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year history of progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration using cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL, which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs extracted from the same patient. ASCs have the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes. They also promote angiogenesis, release angiogenic growth factors, and some can survive as stem cells. The use of autologous fat as a filler in soft tissue atrophy has been satisfactory in patients with mild and moderate Parry-Romberg syndrome. Currently, CAL has showed promising results in the long term by decreasing the rate of fat reabsorption. The permanence and stability of the graft in all the injected areas has showed that autologous fat grafts enriched with stem cells could be a promising technique for the correction of defects caused by this syndrome.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a cellular model for studying Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS, or Trisomy 21 Syndrome, is one of the most common genetic diseases. It is a chromosomal abnormality caused by a duplication of chromosome 21. DS patients show the presence of a third copy (or a partial third copy of chromosome 21 (trisomy, as result of meiotic errors. These patients suffer of many health problems, such as intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, duodenal stenosis, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, immune system deficiencies, muscle hypotonia and motor disorders. About one in 1000 babies born each year are affected by DS. Alterations in the dosage of genes located on chromosome 21 (also called HSA21 are responsible for the DS phenotype. However, the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of DS triggering are still not understood; newest evidences suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. For obvious ethical reasons, studies performed on DS patients, as well as on human trisomic tissues are limited. Some authors have proposed mouse models of this syndrome. However, not all the features of the syndrome are represented. Stem cells are considered the future of molecular and regenerative medicine. Several types of stem cells could provide a valid approach to offer a potential treatment for some untreatable human diseases. Stem cells also represent a valid system to develop new cell-based drugs and/or a model to study molecular disease pathways. Among stem cell types, patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells offer some advantages for cell and tissue replacement, engineering and studying: self-renewal capacity, pluripotency and ease of accessibility to donor tissues. These cells can be reprogrammed into completely different cellular types. They are derived from adult somatic cells via reprogramming with ectopic expression of four transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4; or, Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28. By reprogramming cells from DS patients, it is possible to obtain new tissue with

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Sadanori; Akino, Kozo; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2010-06-01

    Systemic and local radiation injuries caused by nuclear power reactor accidents, therapeutic irradiation, or nuclear terrorism should be prevented or properly treated in order to improve wound management and save lives. Currently, regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with a local angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor, and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Human mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor and an artificial dermis, were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect and were tested for differentiation and local stimulation effects in the radiation-exposed wounds. The perforator flap and artificial dermal template with growth factor were successful for reconstruction in patients who were suffering from complex underlying disease. Patients were uneventfully treated with minimal morbidities. In the experiments, the hMSCs are strongly proliferative even after 20 Gy irradiation in vitro. In vivo, 4 Gy rat whole body irradiation demonstrated that sustained marrow stromal (mesenchymal stem) cells survived in the bone marrow. Immediate artificial dermis application impregnated with cells and the cytokine over the 20 Gy irradiated skin and soft tissues demonstrated the significantly improved fat angiogenesis, architected dermal reconstitution, and less inflammatory epidermal recovery. Detailed understanding of underlying diseases and rational reconstructive procedures brings about good outcomes for difficult irradiated wound healing. Adipose-derived stem cells are also implicated in the limited local injuries for short cell harvesting and processing time in the same subject.

  2. Mucosal Immune Cell Numbers and Visceral Sensitivity in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Is There Any Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Breg; Klooker, Tamira K.; Wouters, Mira M.; Welting, Olaf; van der Loos, Chris M.; Stanisor, Oana I.; van Diest, Sophie; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Repeated exposure to stress leads to mast cell degranulation, microscopic inflammation, and subsequent visceral hypersensitivity in animal models. To what extent this pathophysiological pathway has a role in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not been properly

  3. Cancer antigens are expressed in a carcinogen-transformed Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Yukimasa; Soma, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    The authors have cloned malignant cells carrying specific antigens associated with ovarian cancer (OVC) and malignant lymphoma (ML) from BS-SHI-4M cells, a line derived from a 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine-treated B-lymphoblastoid cell line isolated from a patient with Bloom syndrome. Since BS-SHI-4M cells react with sera from various individual cancer patients at relatively low frequencies (2-9%), as detected by an indirect immunofluorescence technique, cell clones that specifically react with sera from patients with OVC and ML were separated by the panning method in which polystyrene dishes were coated with sera from OVC and ML patients and cells with the corresponding antigens bound to the dishes. Subsequent cloning by limiting dilution provided cell clones highly enriched for OVC- and ML-associated antigens. Karyotype analyses revealed that cell clones with OVC and ML antigens had common marker chromosomes. Interestingly, in cell clones with a strong OVC antigen response, the distal part of the Y chromosome (Yq11) was missing in 100% of the cells. Therefore the cell line BS-SHI-4M appears to be a reservoir of cell clones each of which carries a specific tumor antigen and thus provides a potential tool for rapid serological diagnosis of cancer

  4. Duodenal L cell density correlates with features of metabolic syndrome and plasma metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annieke C G van Baar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteroendocrine cells are essential for the regulation of glucose metabolism, but it is unknown whether they are associated with clinical features of metabolic syndrome (MetS and fasting plasma metabolites. Objective: We aimed to identify fasting plasma metabolites that associate with duodenal L cell, K cell and delta cell densities in subjects with MetS with ranging levels of insulin resistance. Research design and methods: In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated L, K and delta cell density in duodenal biopsies from treatment-naïve males with MetS using machine-learning methodology. Results: We identified specific clinical biomarkers and plasma metabolites associated with L cell and delta cell density. L cell density was associated with increased plasma metabolite levels including symmetrical dimethylarginine, 3-aminoisobutyric acid, kynurenine and glycine. In turn, these L cell-linked fasting plasma metabolites correlated with clinical features of MetS. Conclusions: Our results indicate a link between duodenal L cells, plasma metabolites and clinical characteristics of MetS. We conclude that duodenal L cells associate with plasma metabolites that have been implicated in human glucose metabolism homeostasis. Disentangling the causal relation between L cells and these metabolites might help to improve the (small intestinal-driven pathophysiology behind insulin resistance in human obesity.

  5. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescents: 3 case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Jin Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS is a rare disease characterized by a extracellular volume depletion and hyponatremia induced by marked natriuresis. It is mainly reported in patients who experience a central nervous system insult, such as cerebral hemorrhage or encephalitis. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a main cause of severe hyponatremia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas CSWS is rarely reported. We report 3 patients with childhood acute leukemia who developed CSWS with central nervous system complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of CSW was made on the basis of severe hyponatremia accompanied by increased urine output with clinical signs of dehydration. All patients showed elevated natriuretic peptide and normal antidiuretic hormone. Aggressive water and sodium replacement treatment was instituted in all 3 patients and 2 of them were effectively recovered, the other one was required to add fludrocortisone administration.

  6. SOS1 and PTPN11 mutations in five cases of Noonan syndrome with multiple giant cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneteau, Claire; Cavé, Hélène; Moncla, Anne; Dorison, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain; Leheup, Bruno

    2009-10-01

    We report five cases of multiple giant cell lesions in patients with typical Noonan syndrome. Such association has frequently been referred to as Noonan-like/multiple giant cell (NL/MGCL) syndrome before the molecular definition of Noonan syndrome. Two patients show mutations in PTPN11 (p.Tyr62Asp and p.Asn308Asp) and three in SOS1 (p.Arg552Ser and p.Arg552Thr). The latter are the first SOS1 mutations reported outside PTPN11 in NL/MGCL syndrome. MGCL lesions were observed in jaws ('cherubism') and joints ('pigmented villonodular synovitis'). We show through those patients that both types of MGCL are not PTPN11-specific, but rather represent a low penetrant (or perhaps overlooked) complication of the dysregulated RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. We recommend discarding NL/MGCL syndrome from the nosology, as this presentation is neither gene-nor allele-specific of Noonan syndrome; these patients should be described as Noonan syndrome with MGCL (of the mandible, the long bone...). The term cherubism should be used only when multiple giant cell lesions occur without any other clinical and molecular evidence of Noonan syndrome, with or without mutations of the SH3BP2 gene.

  7. Circulating dendritic cells in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) represent one of the most extensively studied topics in immunology, because of their central role in the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, and because of their therapeutic potential for manipulating immune responses. Objectives: To evaluate circulating DC levels in pediatric ...

  8. Caspase Activation and Aberrant Cell Growth in a p53+/+ Cell Line from a Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki A. Sherif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type p53 is well known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to block aberrant cell growth. However, p53’s unique role in apoptosis and cell proliferation in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study is to characterize the activity of wild-type p53 protein in LFS family dominated by a germline negative mutant p53. As expected, etoposide-treated wild-type p53-containing cell lines, LFS 2852 and control Jurkat, showed a greater rate of caspase- and annexin V-induced apoptotic cell death compared to the p53-mutant LFS 2673 cell line although mitochondrial and nuclear assays could not detect apoptosis in these organelles. The most intriguing part of the observation was the abnormal proliferation rate of the wild-type p53-containing cell line, which grew twice as fast as 2673 and Jurkat cells. This is important because apoptosis inducers acting through the mitochondrial death pathway are emerging as promising drugs against tumors where the role of p53 is not only to target gene regulation but also to block cell proliferation. This study casts a long shadow on the possible dysregulation of p53 mediators that enable cell proliferation. The deregulation of proliferation pathways represents an important anticancer therapeutic strategy for patients with the LFS phenotype.

  9. Skeletal and dermatological manifestations of the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). Results of 8 patients in 12 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupprecht, M.; Barvencik, F.; Amling, M.; Pogoda, P.; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf; Mensing, C.H.; Ittrich, H.; Heiland, M.; Rueger, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In 1960 Gorlin and Goltz defined the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome) as a syndrome comprising multiple basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. NBCCS is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease with an estimated prevalence of 1:150 000 and diagnosis of this syndrome is often an accidental finding of radiological investigations. The purpose of this study was to report the varied radiological and dermatological manifestations of our patients affected with NBCCS and to present this rare syndrome as a differential diagnosis of skeletal anomalies. Materials and Methods: Between 1994 and 2005 the demographic, clinical, radiological and histological data of 8 patients with NBCCS were retrospectively analyzed. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome was diagnosed in the event of two major or one major and two minor criteria. The major criteria are more than 2 basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, three or more palmar pits, and calcification of the falx cerebri. Results: Between 1994 and 2005 8 patients (3 females and 5 males) with NBCCS were treated in our departments. The average age at the time of diagnosis of NBCCS was 49.9 years. All patients had a minimum of two major criteria. The major criteria with the most frequency were the basal cell carcinoma (6 patients) and the odontogenic keratocysts (5 patients), followed by the calcification of the falx cerebri and palmoplantar pits (4 patients). There was no gender-related or age-related predilection and only one patient was affected with pain in his fingers which radiologically correlated to small cystic bone lesions (''flame-shaped lucencies''). (orig.)

  10. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Soares Neto, Herval Ribeiro; Cavalcante, Wagner Cid Palmeira; Martins Filho, Sebastião Nunes; Smid, Jerusa; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma...

  11. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  12. Oral diffuse B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a case report with one year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cláudio M; Lopes, Ana Paula M; Meneghini, Alexandre J; Silva, Alberto F; Botelho, Tessa de L

    2011-01-01

    Nevoid cell carcinoma syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinoma, multiple keratocyst tumors, and skeletal anomalies. The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has been associated with numerous benign and malignant neoplasms. The authors describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in association with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case described in the English literature.

  13. Oral diffuse B-cell non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma associated to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A case report with one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio M Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nevoid cell carcinoma syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinoma, multiple keratocyst tumors, and skeletal anomalies. The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has been associated with numerous benign and malignant neoplasms. The authors describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in association with non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case described in the English literature.

  14. Insights into cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity after CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jordan; Turtle, Cameron J

    2018-04-03

    T-cells engineered to express CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CD19 CAR-T cells) can achieve high response rates in patients with refractory/relapsed (R/R) CD19+ hematologic malignancies. Nonetheless, the efficacy of CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy can be offset by significant toxicities, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. In this report of our presentation at the 2018 Second French International Symposium on CAR-T cells (CAR-T day), we describe the clinical presentations of CRS and neurotoxicity in a cohort of 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and provide insights into the mechanisms contributing to these toxicities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The possible role of gastrointestinal endocrine cells in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    The etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unknown, but several factors appear to play a role in its pathophysiology, including abnormalities of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. The present review illuminates the possible role of gastrointestinal hormones in the pathophysiology of IBS and the possibility of utilizing the current knowledge in treating the disease. Areas covered: Research into the intestinal endocrine cells and their possible role in the pathophysiology of IBS is discussed. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients are revealed. Expert commentary: The abnormalities observed in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients explains their visceral hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal intestinal secretion, as well as the interchangeability of symptoms over time. Clarifying the role of the intestinal stem cells in the pathophysiology of IBS may lead to new treatment methods for IBS.

  16. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer for the Treatment of Parry-Romberg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanko Castro-Govea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive andself-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face thatcreates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year historyof progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration usingcell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL, which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched withadipose-derived stem cells (ASCs extracted from the same patient. ASCs have the capacityto differentiate into adipocytes. They also promote angiogenesis, release angiogenic growthfactors, and some can survive as stem cells. The use of autologous fat as a filler in soft tissueatrophy has been satisfactory in patients with mild and moderate Parry-Romberg syndrome.Currently, CAL has showed promising results in the long term by decreasing the rate of fatreabsorption. The permanence and stability of the graft in all the injected areas has showedthat autologous fat grafts enriched with stem cells could be a promising technique for thecorrection of defects caused by this syndrome.

  17. Evaluation of the Endothelial Cell Density and the Central Corneal Thickness in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pseudoexfoliation Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożydar T. Tomaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Evaluation of central corneal thickness (CCT and endothelial cell density (ECD in patients with senile cataract and coexisting pseudoexfoliation (PEX syndrome with glaucoma (PEXG and without glaucoma using specular microscopy. Participants and Methods. The study included 122 patients (217 eyes. In this group of patients we identified 133 eyes with PEX syndrome (65 with glaucoma, 68 without glaucoma and 84 eyes without PEX syndrome. ECD and CCT were measured in each eye by specular microscopy. Results. ECD in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (2297 ± 359 cell/mm2 and in eyes with PEXG (2241 ± 363 cell/mm2 was lower than in the control group (2503 ± 262 cell/mm2 (P<0.001. CCT in eyes with PEXG (508.2 ± 32.6 μm was thinner than in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (529.7 ± 30.3 μm and control group (527.7 ± 29.4 μm (P<0.001. Conclusions. This research shows that in eyes with PEX syndrome, both with and without glaucoma, ECD was statistically significantly lower than in the control group. In patients with PEXG, CCT was statistically significantly thinner than in the PEX syndrome and control group.

  18. Bromide space, total body water, and sick cell syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, O.; Hundeshagen, H.; Lehr, L.

    1982-01-01

    Displacements of the bromide space (Br-82-C, as a marker for the extracellular fluid compartment) are caused by an enhanced anatomical space and/or increased permeability of cells to bromide. The ratio Br-82-C: total body water (TBW) was evaluated to be 0.83 +- 0.17 in critically ill patients (n = 38) compared with the normal value of 0.46 +- 0.04 (n = 10). Because of normal TBW in critically ill patients (TBW = 505 +- 68 ml/kg), an increased bromide penetration into cells seems to be responsible for the enlarged ratio Br-82-C: TBW. Taking into consideration measurements in patients with malabsorption (Br-82-C: TBW = 0.56 +- 0.13; n = 13) and carcinoma of the rectum and colon (Br-82-C: TBW = 0.66 +- 0.24; n = 18) we think that the bromide space is a good measurement of the effective extracellular water. (orig.)

  19. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis syndrome in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, Julie-An M; Hillery, Cheryl A; Gottschall, Jerome L; Baylerian, Diane M; Scott, J Paul

    2003-06-01

    Alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has a reported incidence of 5% to 36%. One complication of alloimmunization is delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis (DHTR/H) syndrome, which has a reported incidence of 11%. In patients with SCD, clinical findings in DHTR/H syndrome occur approximately 1 week after the red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and include the onset of increased hemolysis associated with pain and profound anemia. The hemoglobin (Hb) often drops below pretransfusion levels. In many reported adult cases, the direct antiglobulin test (DAT) remains negative and no new alloantibody is detected as the cause for these transfusion reactions. To date, few pediatric cases have been reported with this phenomenon. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and laboratory findings of a case series in children who had SCD and experienced a DHTR/H syndrome at our institution. An 11-year retrospective chart review of patients with discharge diagnosis of SCD and transfusion reaction was performed. DHTR/H syndrome was defined as the abrupt onset of signs and symptoms of accelerated hemolysis evidenced by an unexplained fall in Hb, elevated lactic dehydrogenase, elevated bilirubin above baseline, and hemoglobinuria, all occurring between 4 and 10 days after an RBC transfusion. Patient characteristics, time from transfusion, symptoms, reported DAT, new autoantibody or alloantibody formation, laboratory abnormalities, and complications were recorded. Patients with acute transfusion reactions were excluded. We encountered 7 patients who developed 9 episodes of DHTR/H syndrome occurring 6 to 10 days after RBC transfusion. Each presented with fever and hemoglobinuria. All but 1 patient experienced pain initially ascribed to vaso-occlusive crisis. The DAT was positive in only 2 of the 9 episodes. The presenting Hb was lower than pretransfusion levels in 8 of the 9 events. Severe complications were observed after the onset of

  20. GIANT CELL AORTITIS DIAGNOSED WITH PET/CT - PARANEOPLASTIC SYNDROME?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakula, Marija; Cerovec, Mislav; Mayer, Miroslav; Huić, Dražen; Anić, Branimir

    2016-05-01

    Vasculitides are heterogenic group of autoimmune connective tissue diseases which often present difficulties in early diagnosing. Giant cell arteritis is vasculitis of large and medium arteries. It predominantly presents with symptoms of affection of the external carotid artery branches. Furthermore, the only symptoms can be constitutional. In clinical practice, vasculitides are sometimes considered as paraneoplastic, but no definite association with malignancies has been established and the mechanisms are still debated. The gold standard for diagnosing giant cell arteritis is a positive temporal artery biopsy, but the results can often be false negative. Additionally, more than half of the patients have aorta and its main branches affected. Considering aforementioned, imaging studies are essential in confirming large-vessel vasculitis, amongst which is highly sensitive PET/CT. We present the case of a 70-year-old female patient with constitutional symptoms and elevated sedimentation rate. After extensive diagnostic tests, she was admitted to our Rheumatology unit. Aortitis of the abdominal aorta has been confirmed by PET/CT and after the introduction of glucocorticoids the disease soon went into clinical and laboratory remission. Shortly after aortitis has been diagnosed, lung carcinoma was revealed of which the patient died. At the time of the comprehensive diagnostics, there was no reasonable doubt for underlying malignoma. To the best of our knowledge, there are no recent publications concerning giant cell arteritis and neoplastic processes in the context of up-to-date non-invasive diagnostic methods (i.e. PET/CT). In the light of previous research results, we underline that the sensitivity of PET/CT is not satisfactory when estimating cancer dissemination in non-enlarged lymph nodes and that its value can at times be overestimated.

  1. Radiosensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, J.; Babini, G.; Mariotti, L.; Baiocco, G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Nacci, L.; Minelli, A.; Danesino, C.; Maccario, C.; Roessler, U.; Savio, M.; Gomolka, M.; Kulka, U.

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterised by bone marrow failure and a cumulative risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) gene, the only gene known to be causative of the pathology, is involved in ribosomal biogenesis, stress responses and DNA repair, and the lack of SBDS sensitises cells to many stressors and leads to mitotic spindle destabilisation. The effect of ionising radiation on SBDS-deficient cells was investigated using immortalised lymphocytes from SDS patients in comparison with positive and negative controls in order to test whether, in response to ionising radiation exposure, any impairment in the DNA repair machinery could be observed. After irradiating cells with different doses of X-rays or gamma-rays, DNA repair kinetics and the residual damages using the alkaline COMET assay and the γ-H2AX assay were assessed, respectively. In this work, preliminary data about the comparison between ionising radiation effects in different patients-derived cells and healthy control cells are presented. (authors)

  2. Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell (BMDSC transplantation improves fertility in a murine model of Asherman's syndrome.

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    Feryal Alawadhi

    Full Text Available Asherman's Syndrome is characterized by intrauterine adhesions or fibrosis resulting as a consequence of damage to the basal layer of endometrium and is associated with infertility due to loss of normal endometrium. We have previously shown that bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDSCs engraft the endometrium in mice and humans and Ischemia/reperfusion injury of uterus promoted BMDSCs migration to the endometrium; however, the role of BMDSCs in Asherman's syndrome has not been characterized. Here a murine model of Asherman's syndrome was created by traumatizing the uterus. We evaluate stem cell recruitment and pregnancy after BMDSCs transplantation in a model of Asherman's syndrome. In the Asheman's syndrome model, after BMDSC transplant, the Y chromosome bearing CD45-cells represented less than 0.1% of total endometrial cells. Twice the number of Y+CD45- cells was identified in the damaged uterus compared to the uninjured controls. There was no significant difference between the damaged and undamaged uterine horns in mice that received injury to a single horn. In the BMDSC transplant group, 9 of the 10 mice conceived, while only 3 of 10 in the non-transplanted group conceived (Chi-Square p = 0.0225; all mice in an uninjured control group conceived. The time to conception and mean litter size were not different between groups. Taken together, BMDSCs are recruited to endometrium in response to injury. Fertility improves after BMDSC transplant in Asherman's Syndrome mice, demonstrating a functional role for these cells in uterine repair. BMDSC transplantation is a potential novel treatment for Asherman's Syndrome and may also be useful to prevent Asherman's syndrome after uterine injury.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells May Ameliorate Nephrotic Syndrome Post-Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation-Case Report

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    Xin Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionBecause of their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for treating immune-related or autoimmune diseases, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Nephrotic syndrome (NS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is an uncommon complication with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. It may be an immune disorder involving immune complex deposition, B cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs, and Th1 cytokines and be a manifestation of chronic GVHD. Corticosteroids and calcium antagonists, alone or in combination, are the most common therapeutic agents in this setting. Rituximab is commonly administered as salvage treatment. However, treatment failure and progressive renal function deterioration has been reported to occur in approximately 20% of patients in a particular cohort.Case presentationWe present a patient who developed NS 10 months after allo-HSCT. After treatment failure with cyclosporine A, prednisone, and rituximab, she achieved a complete response with MSC treatment. The clinical improvement of this patient was accompanied by a decreased B cell population together with an increased frequency of regulatory B cells (Bregs and Tregs after MSC treatment.ConclusionMSCs could modulate NS after allo-HSCT by suppressing B cell proliferation, inducing Tregs and Bregs, and inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production by monocytes and NK cells. Among all these, Bregs might play an important role in ameliorating the NS of this patient.

  4. Biosynthesis of Various Steroids in vitro by Isolated Adrenal Cells in Primary Aldosteronism, Cushing's Syndrome, and Adrenogenital Syndrome due to Adrenocortical Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    MIZUNO, SHIGERU; FUNAHASHI, HIROOMI

    1981-01-01

    To a further understanding of the role of steroid hormones in adrenal disorders, we have prepared free cell system of adrenal cells, using adrenal tissues that had been removed by operation from (i) cases of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenocortical adenoma or adrenocortical hyperplasia, (ii) a case of primary aldosteronism, and (iii) a patient with virilizing adrenal tumor. Twelve important steroid hormones were measured, such as pregnenolone, cortisol and aldosterone, which were produced by ...

  5. The ultraviolet sensitivity of Cockayne syndrome cells is not a consequence of reduced cellular NAD content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, L.V.; Broughton, B.C.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from individuals with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of ultraviolet light (uv) and show a number of abnormal biochemical responses following uv-irradiation. Fujiwara et al. recently reported that the NAD contents of CS fibroblasts were lower than those of normal fibroblasts, and that addition of NAD to the cellular growth medium rectified most of the abnormal responses of CS cells to uv-irradiation. In our experiments, however, the cellular NAD contents of normal and CS fibroblasts were similar, and addition of NAD to the growth medium had no effect on the hypersensitivity of CS cells to uv-irradiation, nor did it restore the inability of CS cells to recover normal rates of DNA or RNA synthesis following uv-irradiation

  6. Decreased UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in peripheral leukocytes from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringborg, U.; Lambert, B.; Landergen, J.; Lewensohn, R.

    1981-01-01

    The uv-induced DNA repair synthesis in peripheral leukocytes from 7 patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome was compared to that in peripheral leukocytes from 5 patients with basal cell carcinomas and 39 healthy subjects. A dose response curve was established for each individual, and maximum DNA repair synthesis was used as a measure of the capacity for DNA repair. The patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome had about 25% lower level of maximum DNA repair synthesis as compared to the patients with basal cell carcinomas and control individuals. The possibility that DNA repair mechanisms may be involved in the etiology to the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is discussed

  7. 'Dancing eyes, dancing feet syndrome' in small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandramohan; Acharya, Mihir; Kumawat, Bansi Lal; Kochar, Abhishek

    2014-04-23

    A 60-year-old man presented with a 25-day history of acute onset instability of gait, tremulousness of limbs and involuntary eye movements. Examination revealed presence of opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia, without any loss of motor power in the limbs. Prompt investigations were directed towards identifying an underlying malignancy which is often associated with this type of clinical scenario. CT of the brain was normal and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. A cavitatory lesion was found in the right lung base on the high-resolution CT of the chest and histopathological examination of this lung mass showed small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was managed symptomatically with levetiracetam and baclofen and referred to oncology department for resection of the lung mass.

  8. Generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (GZHMUi001-A by reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchang Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 47, XXX syndrome is one of several sex-chromosomal aneuploidies, and it has an incidence of approximately 1/1000 in newborn females. Because of heterogeneity in X-inactivation, these patients may exhibit a variety of clinical symptoms. Here, we report the generation of an integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cell line (GZHMUi001-A by using Sendai virus to reprogram peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient with premature ovarian failure. This 47, XXX iPS cell line has characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and is a useful tool for the investigation of this X chromosome aneuploid disease.

  9. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

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    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  10. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Developing After Restart of Sunitinib Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Shinji Fukui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old Japanese man had started molecular-targeted therapy with sunitinib for lymph node metastasis 5 years after nephrectomy for left renal cell carcinoma (clear cell carcinoma, G2, pT2N0M0. He was transported to our emergency department because of generalized tonic-clonic seizure, vision loss, and impaired consciousness with acute hypertension after 8 cycles of treatment (2 years after the initiation of sunitinib therapy, including a drug withdrawal period for one year. MRI of the brain (FLAIR images showed multiple high-intensity lesions in the white matter of the occipital and cerebellar lobes, dorsal brain stem, and left thalamus. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome caused by sunitinib was suspected. In addition to the immediate discontinuation of sunitinib therapy, the administration of antihypertensive agents and anticonvulsants improved the clinical symptoms without neurological damage. Physicians should be aware that sunitinib causes reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. The early recognition of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is critical to avoid irreversible neurological damage.

  11. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  12. Collecting duct renal cell carcinoma with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis: An autopsy case report

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    Emi Yasuda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old Japanese man visited our hospital with a moist cough. Chest radiographic imaging showed a left hilar shadow. Adenocarcinoma cells were found on cytologic screening of fresh sputum. Although multiple metastases including brain were detected, no tumor was observed in the kidneys. The patient underwent whole-brain irradiation and chemotherapy for advanced-stage lung cancer. One month before his death, carcinomatous meningitis was detected. Hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, and hypertonic urine suggested the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis. Restricting water intake improved the hyponatremia; however, he developed fever and hematuria. Despite systemic administration of an antibacterial drug, he died. Primary tumor in the lung was absent, but adenocarcinoma of the right kidney was evident on autopsy. Lectin histochemical analysis of the carcinoma revealed its distal nephron origin, confirming collecting duct carcinoma. Severe carcinomatous meningitis, which is possibly caused the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, was observed, with no cancer involvement of the pituitary gland and hypothalamus.

  13. Recurrence of keratocyst in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: A major diagnostic dilemma for clinicians

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    Anurag Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocysts (OKC usually represent a particular entity that has been of interest primarily due to biological aggressiveness and to its frequent recurrence. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide-range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. There are several possible reasons why OKC recur so frequently and require meticulous surgical planning and execution. This article has attempted to show that there is a lack of published evidence regarding the cause of frequent recurrent of OKC that presented in NBCCS. However, the findings of the study revealed differences in opinion regarding the treatment modalities, which necessitates further long term clinical studies that could precisely document certain reliable guidelines in this point of view.

  14. HPRT Enzyme Activity of Blood Cells From Patients With Downs Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbubber, E.K.; Abdul-Rahman, M.H.; Sultan, A.F.; Hamamy, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) enzyme activity was determined in erythrocytes from 16 children (aged below one year to 11 year) with down s syndrome using 8-C 14 Hypoxanthine and radioeleelrophorsis techniques. Significant (P<0.01) reduction in HPRT enzyme activity was seen in D S children compared to that of 18 (age and sex matched) healthy children. Pure 21 - trisomic erythrocytes expressed lower enzyme activity than mosaic cell. Mothers of D S children showed significantly (P<0.01) lower enzyme activity than mothers of normal children . Reduced activity of HPRT enzyme was also observed in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes of DS children and their mothers. These results indicated that deficiency of HPRT in D S patients may contribute to the abnormal purine metabolism associated with the symptomatology of this syndrome

  15. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7...... weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose...... alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant...

  16. Chromosomal Instability and Molecular Defects in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome Patients

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    Tomer Halevy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs. Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction. Furthermore, NBS-iPSCs display slower growth, mitotic inhibition, a reduced apoptotic response to stress, and abnormal cell-cycle-related gene expression. Importantly, NBS neural progenitor cells (NBS-NPCs show downregulation of neural developmental genes, which seems to be mediated by P53. Our results demonstrate the importance of NBS1 in early human development, shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this severe syndrome, and further expand our knowledge of the genomic stress cells experience during the reprogramming process.

  17. Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 regulates epidermal growth factor-dependent cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögel, Gábor; Gujdár, Annamária; Geiszt, Miklós; Lányi, Árpád; Fekete, Anna; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Downward, Julian; Buday, László

    2012-09-07

    Mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene coding for the Tks4 protein are responsible for the autosomal recessive Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Tks4, a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase, is implicated in the regulation of podosome formation. Here, we report a novel role for Tks4 in the EGF signaling pathway. In EGF-treated cells, Tks4 is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the activated EGF receptor. This association is not direct but requires the presence of Src tyrosine kinase. In addition, treatment of cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, or mutations of the PX domain reduces tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of Tks4. Furthermore, a PX domain mutant (R43W) Tks4 carrying a reported point mutation in a Frank-ter Haar syndrome patient showed aberrant intracellular expression and reduced phosphoinositide binding. Finally, silencing of Tks4 was shown to markedly inhibit HeLa cell migration in a Boyden chamber assay in response to EGF or serum. Our results therefore reveal a new function for Tks4 in the regulation of growth factor-dependent cell migration.

  18. [«Man-in-the-barrel» syndrome: atypical manifestation of giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Lopez, Y; Fernandez-Ramirez, A F; Franco-Dager, E; Gomez-Lopera, J G; Vanegas-Garcia, A L

    2018-06-01

    «Man-in-the-barrel» syndrome refers to diplegia of the upper extremities in which mobility of the head and lower limbs is preserved. Brachial plexitis that presents as «man-in-the-barrel» syndrome is an unusual manifestation of giant cell arteritis. We report a case of C5-C6 plexitis as part of the clinical features of a patient with giant cell arteritis. A 70-year-old male with a two-month history of weight loss, headache, facial pain and jaw claudication, associated with a persistent elevation of acute phase reactants and bilateral brachial plexopathy, with no evidence of neck or brain injuries or occult neoplasm and with negative autoimmunity tests. Results of the biopsy study of the temporal artery were compatible with giant cell arteritis, and the positron emission tomography scan revealed extensive vascular involvement of the aorta and its branches. Although the typical clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis are headache, jaw claudication, loss of sight, constitutional symptoms and polymyalgia rheumatica, its presence must be suspected in patients over the age of 50 who manifest alterations affecting the peripheral nerve, including brachial diplegia with no other demonstrable cause.

  19. Ponticulus posticus is a frequent radiographic finding on lateral cephalograms in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Reinhard E

    2014-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a predisposition to a rare tumor type with a variable phenotype. Besides tumors, skeletal alterations, such as bifid ribs or frontal bossing constitute the phenotype. Recently, a variant of the first cervical vertebra, the ponticulus posticus, was reported to occur in 50% of patients with NBCCS as revealed by analysis of lateral cephalograms. Lateral cephalograms of eight patients with NBCCS were studied for the presence of ponticulus posticus. The ponticulus posticus was present in all patients. In one case, a series of cephalograms performed during a period of 20 years allowed the slow and continuous recording of a ponticulus posticus formation. Besides the predisposition to developing neoplasms, NBCCS also affects bone development. Some diagnostic criteria for NBCCS rely on certain osseous transformations either in hard tissues, e.g. keratocystic odontogenic tumor in jaws, or in soft tissues, e.g. calcification of the falx cerebri. Furthermore, the physiognomy can be affected by skeletal alterations, e.g. frontal bossing or hypertelorism. Given this wide spectrum of osseous involvement in NBCCS, the high prevalence rate of ponticulus posticus should be added to the relevant diagnostic findings of the skull and vertebral column. However, the onset of ponticulus posticus formation in the life of such patients is unclear and thus the relevance of this finding in early diagnosis of NBCCS remains to be elucidated. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Association of RANTES with the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; Wu, N; Yao, H; Bader, A; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Altmeyer, P

    2005-03-29

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a novel infectious disease which is characterized by an overaggressive immune response. Chemokines are important inflammatory mediators and regulate disease due to viral infection. In previous study, we found that SARS-CoV has the ability to replicate in mononuclear cells. In present work, we sought to characterize the replication of SARS-CoV at the presence of RANTES in THP-1 cells. To determine whether RANTES play an role in the process of SARS, THP-1 cells were incubated with heat-inactivated SARS-CoV and ELISA was used to test RANTES levels in the supernatants; Then the effect of dexamethasone on the induced secretion was evaluated. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the effort of RANTES on the replication of SARS-CoV in vitro. Macrophages, induced by THP-1 cells, were used as cell model. Inactive SARS-CoV could induce THP-1 cells secret RANTES and this increase effect could not be suppressed by DXM. RANTES itself could inhibit the replication of SARS-CoV in THP-1 cells when it was added into the culture before or at the same time with the virus; No inhibition effect was shown when RANTES were added into the culture after SARS-CoV infected the cells.

  1. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  2. Basal cell carcinoma arising in association with a maxillary keratocyst in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Maria Nikolaou; Dimitrakopoulos, Ioannis; Tilaveridis, Ioannis; Iliopoulos, Christos; Heva, Antigoni

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder which is characterized by the presence of multiple basal cell carcinomas, maxillary keratocysts, and musculoskeletal anomalies. We present a case of a patient suffering from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome who developed an intraosseous basal cell carcinoma associated with a recurrent maxillary keratocyst. To our knowledge, this is the first case of malignant transformation of a keratocyst into a basal cell carcinoma described in the literature. This case highlights the importance of careful histologic examination of keratocysts excised in patients suffering from Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  3. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from chorionic villi of a Turner syndrome spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shagufta; Panicker, M M; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2017-03-01

    A major cause of spontaneous abortions is chromosomal abnormality of foetal cells. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from the fibroblasts isolated from chorionic villi of an early spontaneously aborted foetus with Turner syndrome. The Turner syndrome villus induced pluripotent stem cell line is transgene free, retains the original XO karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. This pluripotent stem cell model of Turner syndrome should serve as a tool to study the developmental abnormalities of foetus and placenta that lead to early embryo lethality and profound symptoms like infertility in 45 XO survivors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Mwangi, Waithaka; Hernandez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3 + CD25 + T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-α treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3 + CD25 + T cells is dependent on TGF-β but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3 + CD25 + T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3 + CD25 + T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-α treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

  5. Asthma is a risk factor for acute chest syndrome and cerebral vascular accidents in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and sickle cell disease are common conditions that both may result in pulmonary complications. We hypothesized that children with sickle cell disease with concomitant asthma have an increased incidence of vaso-occlusive crises that are complicated by episodes of acute chest syndrome. Methods A 5-year retrospective chart analysis was performed investigating 48 children ages 3–18 years with asthma and sickle cell disease and 48 children with sickle cell disease alone. Children were matched for age, gender, and type of sickle cell defect. Hospital admissions were recorded for acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accident, vaso-occlusive pain crises, and blood transfusions (total, exchange and chronic. Mann-Whitney test and Chi square analysis were used to assess differences between the groups. Results Children with sickle cell disease and asthma had significantly more episodes of acute chest syndrome (p = 0.03 and cerebral vascular accidents (p = 0.05 compared to children with sickle cell disease without asthma. As expected, these children received more total blood transfusions (p = 0.01 and chronic transfusions (p = 0.04. Admissions for vasoocclusive pain crises and exchange transfusions were not statistically different between cases and controls. SS disease is more severe than SC disease. Conclusions Children with concomitant asthma and sickle cell disease have increased episodes of acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accidents and the need for blood transfusions. Whether aggressive asthma therapy can reduce these complications in this subset of children is unknown and requires further studies.

  6. Primary Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Palate with Cushing’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24-year-old woman presenting with a relapsed soy-bean-size tender mass at the junction of the soft and hard palate and a history of palatine tumor of small cell carcinoma. Reexcision surgery was performed and histopathological features were consistent. The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy consisting of etoposide and cisplatin. After one year, the patient developed bone metastases and Cushing's syndrome, and successfully recovered with subsequent chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin plus radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis for more than three years. Small cell carcinoma originating in the head and neck region has been reported to be highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. This is the first case report of a patient with relapsed primary small cell carcinoma of the palate and successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.

  7. A PLK4 mutation causing azoospermia in a man with Sertoli cell-only syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Bando, Y; Koh, E; Tsujimura, A; Miyagawa, Y; Iijima, M; Namiki, M; Shiina, M; Ogata, K; Matsumoto, N; Sengoku, K

    2016-01-01

    About 15% of couples wishing to have children are infertile; approximately half these cases involve a male factor. Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK-4) is a member of the polo protein family and a key regulator of centriole duplication. Male mice with a point mutation in the Plk4 gene show azoospermia associated with germ cell loss. Mutational analysis of 81 patients with azoospermia and Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS) identified one man with a heterozygous 13-bp deletion in the Ser/Thr kinase domain of PLK4. Division of centrioles occurred in wild-type PLK4-transfected cells, but was hampered in PLK-4-mutant transfectants, which also showed abnormal nuclei. Thus, this PLK4 mutation might be a cause of human SCOS and nonobstructive azoospermia. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cells in modeling human disorders: the case of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershkov, Dan; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2017-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) generated from affected blastocysts or from patient-derived somatic cells are an emerging platform for disease modeling and drug discovery. Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, was one of the first disorders modeled in both embryonic stem cells and induced PCSs and can serve as an exemplary case for the utilization of human PSCs in the study of human diseases. Over the past decade, FXS-PSCs have been used to address the fundamental questions regarding the pathophysiology of FXS. In this review we summarize the methodologies for generation of FXS-PSCs, discuss their advantages and disadvantages compared with existing modeling systems and describe their utilization in the study of FXS pathogenesis and in the development of targeted treatment.

  9. Management of a Parturient with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: An Anesthesiologist’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kumaraswami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS is a disorder in which patients experience symptoms and signs attributable to inappropriate mast cell activation and mediator release. Multiorgan involvement in patients can result in significant morbidity and possible mortality. Limited literature exists regarding anesthetic management of patients with MCAS. We report a case of vaginal delivery with neuraxial labor analgesia in a parturient with this condition and highlight the importance of multidisciplinary planning for uneventful outcomes. Stress can trigger life-threatening symptoms, and counseling is important to allay patients’ fears. Optimum medical control, adequate premedication, avoidance of triggers, and preparedness to treat serious mediator effects are key. We review MCAS and discuss anesthetic considerations for patients with this mast cell disorder.

  10. Reduced transcription of TCOF1 in adult cells of Treacher Collins syndrome patients

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    Camargo Anamaria A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder caused by frameshift deletions or duplications in the TCOF1 gene. These mutations cause premature termination codons, which are predicted to lead to mRNA degradation by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD. Haploinsufficiency of the gene product (treacle during embryonic development is the proposed molecular mechanism underlying TCS. However, it is still unknown if TCOF1 expression levels are decreased in post-embryonic human cells. Methods We have estimated TCOF1 transcript levels through real time PCR in mRNA obtained from leucocytes and mesenchymal cells of TCS patients (n = 23 and controls (n = 18. Mutational screening and analysis of NMD were performed by direct sequencing of gDNA and cDNA, respectively. Results All the 23 patients had typical clinical features of the syndrome and pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 of them. We demonstrated that the expression level of TCOF1 is 18-31% lower in patients than in controls (p , even if we exclude the patients in whom we did not detect the pathogenic mutation. We also observed that the mutant allele is usually less abundant than the wild type one in mesenchymal cells. Conclusions This is the first study to report decreased expression levels of TCOF1 in TCS adult human cells, but it is still unknown if this finding is associated to any phenotype in adulthood. In addition, as we demonstrated that alleles harboring the pathogenic mutations have lower expression, we herein corroborate the current hypothesis of NMD of the mutant transcript as the explanation for diminished levels of TCOF1 expression. Further, considering that TCOF1 deficiency in adult cells could be associated to pathologic clinical findings, it will be important to verify if TCS patients have an impairment in adult stem cell properties, as this can reduce the efficiency of plastic surgery results during rehabilitation of these

  11. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  12. Abnormal sensitivity of some Cockayne's syndrome cell strains to UV- and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Chavaudra, N.; Fertil, B.; Malaise, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease. Using a colony assay in vitro, we studied the sensitivity of 5 CS cell strains and two normal ones to UV- and γ-irradiation. The 5 CS strains appear to be UV-hypersensitive but the sensitivity varies widely from one strain to another. Hypersensitivity to γ-rays has been reported for 4 out of the 5 CS cell strains investigated. Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) after UV- and γ-irradiation was investigated by using unfed plateau cell cultures. Under these conditions, control cells show a great capacity to repair PLD. The two CS strains, which are hypersensitive to both UV- and γ-irradiation, exhibit no or only little PLD repair after treatment. The response of CS cell strains after γ-irradiation suggests a genetic heterogeneity. Three complementation groups are described in CS cells when dealing with UV radiosensitivity. However, variations in γ-ray sensitivity are reported for cells within the same UV complementation group. (Auth.)

  13. Sequential fluctuating paraneoplastic ocular flutter-opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in small-cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Simister, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration may occur in association with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), but to our knowledge, the co-occurrence of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and LEMS has not been previously reported. A 67-year-old woman presented with a complex partial seizure and evolving ocular flutter, opsoclonus, myoclonus and \\'cerebellar\\' signs, all of which improved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Approximately 8 weeks after symptom onset, the patient became encephalopathic, she had a further complex partial seizure, and she became areflexic with potentiation of deep tendon reflexes. Radiological, bronchoscopic and histological investigations revealed small-cell lung cancer, and neurophysiological investigations confirmed a diagnosis of LEMS. High-titre anti-P\\/Q-type voltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies were identified in the serum, which increased as the signs of opsoclonus and myoclonus resolved. The encephalopathy and clinical features of LEMS responded dramatically to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Spontaneous improvement of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome may occur, and this syndrome may occur in association with LEMS. Antivoltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies are not implicated in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

  14. Association of mast cell-derived VEGF and proteases in Dengue shock syndrome.

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    Takahisa Furuta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17 between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF, Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS, as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. CONCLUSIONS: As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity.

  15. Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes of progenitor and stem cells: molecular analysis of cytotoxic T cell clones.

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    Ramon Tiu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of the T cell receptor (TCR enables molecular identification of individual T cell clones and provides an unique opportunity for the design of molecular diagnostic tests based on the structure of the rearranged TCR chain e.g., using the TCR CDR3 region. Initially, clonal T cell malignancies, including T cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL, mucosis fungoides and peripheral T cell lymphoma were targets for the TCR-based analytic assays such as detection of clonality by T-gamma rearrangement using y-chain-specific PCR or Southern Blotting. Study of these disorders facilitated further analytic concepts and application of rational methods of TCR analysis to investigations of polyclonal T cell-mediated diseases. In hematology, such conditions include graft versus host disease (GvHD and immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes. In aplastic anemia (AA, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH, cytotoxic T cell responses may be directed against certain antigens located on stem or more lineage-restricted progenitor cells in single lineage cytopenias. The nature of the antigenic targets driving polyclonal CTL responses remains unclear. Novel methods of TCR repertoire analysis, include VB flow cytometry, peptide-specific tetramer staining, in vitro stimulation assays and TCR CDR3-specific PCR. Such PCR assay can be either VB family-specific or multiplexed for all VB families. Amplified products can be characterized and quantitated to facilitate detection of the most immunodominant clonotypes. Such clonotypes may serve as markers for the global polyclonal T cell response. Identification of these clonotypes can be performed in blood and tissue biopsy material by various methods. Once immunodominant clonotypes corresponding to pathogenic CTL clones are identified they can serve as surrogate markers for the activity of the pathophysiologic process or even indicate the presence of specific

  16. Nanostructure of Red Blood Cell Membranes in Premature Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes in premature babies with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS, by applying atomic force microscopy. Subjects and methods. The investigation included 27 newborn infants, of them 13 premature babies with NRDS formed a study group. The mean gestational age was 33.1±2.3 weeks; their birth weight was 1800±299.3 g. A comparison group consisted of 14 full-term babies with favorable pregnancy and term labor. The mean gestational age of the babies was 39.4±0.5 weeks; their birth weight was 3131.7±588.8 g; the infants had a one minute Apgar score of 8±0.4. Their red blood cells were examined using an atomic force microscope. The objects to be examined were residual umbilical cord blood (RUCB from the premature infants; central venous blood after 7 hours of birth and neonatal venous blood taken on day 7 of life. Results. RUCB from full-term babies contained planocytes that were a major morphological type of red blood cells. In physiological pregnancy and acute fetal hypoxia, the morphological composition of red blood cells in premature neonates with NRDS was close to that in full-term babies. The planocytes are also a major morphological type of red blood cells in the premature infants; the frequency of their occurrence varies. Stomatocytes are typical of all the neonates in the NRDS group; their frequency levels vary greatly: from 8 to 65% of the total number of erythrocytes. The examination revealed that the premature infants of 31—36 weeks gestation were characterized by abnormal erythrocyte shapes that showed a high variability. At birth, the premature babies were found to have changes in the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes, which were influenced by intrauterine hypoxia. The first-order value reflecting flickering in the red blood cell membrane varies to the most extent. Conclusion. Atomic force microscopy showed that the greatest changes in the structure of red

  17. Impact of azacitidine on red blood cell alloimmunisation in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sebastián; Orero, Maria T; Javier, Karla; Villegas, Carolina; Luna, Irene; Pérez, Pedro; Roig, Mónica; López, María; Costa, Sofía; Carbonell, Félix; Collado, Rosa; Ivars, David; Linares, Mariano

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of alloimmunisation in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) during the era of supportive treatment ranges from 9 to 56%. However, it is unknown if the widespread use of hypomethylating agents has changed the risk of immunisation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of azacitidine (AZA) therapy on red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation in transfused patients with MDS, myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloproliferative syndromes (MDS/MPS) and secondary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We have analysed retrospectively all patients with MDS, MDS/MPS and secondary AML from MDS, who received their first transfusion in our hospital between January 1995 and December 2014. We have assessed the impact of age, sex, RBC and platelets units transfused, and AZA treatment on developing alloantibodies. In our study, the number of RBC units transfused increased the risk of developing alloantibodies. However aging and the treatment with AZA were associated with a lower rate of alloimmunisation. Patients with MDS, MDS/MPS and secondary AML who received treatment with AZA developed RBC antibodies at a lower rate than control group. We suggest that aging and immunosuppression due to AZA therapy could develop an immunological tolerance with a weak response to allotransfusions.

  18. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function. AIM: To investigate the oral features and dental health of patients with Hurler Syndrome who have undergone successful HSCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients (median age 8.6 years) post-HSCT (mean age 9.4 months) underwent oral assessment (mean of 7.5 years post-HSCT). RESULTS: Dental development was delayed. Numerous occlusal anomalies were noted including: open-bite, class III skeletal base, dental spacing, primary molar infra-occlusion and ectopic tooth eruption. Dental anomalies included hypodontia, microdontia, enamel defects, thin tapering canine crowns, pointed molar cusps, bulbous molar crowns and molar taurodontism. Tooth roots were usually short\\/blunted\\/spindle-like in permanent molars. The prevalence of dental caries was low in the permanent dentition (mean DMFT 0.7) but high in the primary dentition (mean dmft 2.4). Oral hygiene instruction with plaque and or calculus removal was indicated in 71% of those that were dentate. CONCLUSION: Patients with Hurler Syndrome post-HSCT are likely to have delayed dental development, a malocclusion, and dental anomalies, particularly hypodontia and microdontia.

  19. Nutcracker Syndrome and Sickle Cell Trait: A Perfect Storm for Hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Amier; McElwee, Samuel K; Kraemer, Ryan R

    2017-05-01

    We describe the case of a 27-year-old woman with a history of sickle cell trait (SCT) who presented with several months of hematuria and was found to have nutcracker syndrome (NCS). While SCT is a common cause of hematuria resulting from renal papillary necrosis, our patient had concomitant abdominal pain and anemia, prompting further evaluation and the subsequent diagnosis of NCS. Interestingly, the anoxia in the left renal vein from NCS predisposes patients with SCT to sickling. Our case highlights key clinical features of both NCS and SCT and the relationship between the two disease processes.

  20. Simultaneous Presentation of Giant Cell Arteritis and Myelodysplastic Syndrome in an Elderly Japanese Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senjo, Hajime; Higuchi, Takakazu; Morimoto, Masaya; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Yanaoka, Chisun; Okada, Sadamu

    2018-05-18

    An 81-year-old Japanese man presented with constitutional symptoms and anemia and was diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) simultaneously. His symptoms and anemia improved promptly with steroids; however, the MDS rapidly progressed to overt leukemia. While MDS patients are at an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, an association with GCA has rarely been reported. This case illustrates the importance of considering GCA as a cause of anemia in elderly patients if MDS is already diagnosed, even in countries where the prevalence of GCA is very low. The simultaneous development of GCA and MDS suggests a common pathogenetic link between these two diseases.

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  2. Papilledema secondary to a superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Mantle cell lymphoma paraneoplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platas-Moreno, I; Antón-Benito, A; Pérez-Cid-Rebolleda, M T; Rosado Sierra, M B

    2016-01-01

    A 46 year old patient presented with visual loss in the left eye during the previous months. Ophthalmoscopic examination and magnetic resonance angiography found the presence of papilledema due to thrombosis in superior sagittal sinus. The examination findings revealed a mantle cell lymphoma. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an unusual cause of papilledema. This type of thrombosis may be secondary to hyper-viscosity within a context of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Recurrent ovarian Sertoli?Leydig cell tumor in a child with Peutz?Jeghers syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bellfield, Edward J.; Alemzadeh, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    We present a female child with Peutz?Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with a recurrent ovarian Sertoli?Leydig cell tumor (SLCT). SLCTs are relatively rare sex cord neoplasms that can occur in PJS. The patient was an African-American female who first presented at the age of 3 years with precocious puberty, and then at the age of 17 years with abdominal pain and irregular menses. In each case, she had resection of the mass, which included oophorectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in...

  4. Filaggrin 2 deficiency results in abnormal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers and causes peeling skin syndrome type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Janan; Sarig, Ofer; Godsel, Lisa M; Peled, Alon; Malchin, Natalia; Bochner, Ron; Vodo, Dan; Rabinowitz, Tom; Pavlovsky, Mor; Taiber, Shahar; Fried, Maya; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Assi, Siwar; Shomron, Noam; Uitto, Jouni; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bergman, Reuven; Green, Kathleen J; Sprecher, Eli

    2018-05-11

    Peeling skin syndromes form a large and heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by superficial detachment of the epidermal cornified cell layers, often associated with inflammatory features. Here we report on a consanguineous family featuring non-inflammatory peeling of the skin exacerbated by exposure to heat and mechanical stress. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in FLG2, encoding filaggrin 2, which co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. The mutation was found to result in decreased FLG2 RNA levels as well almost total absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient epidermis. Filaggrin 2 was found to be expressed throughout the cornified cell layers and to co-localize with corneodesmosin which plays a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion in this region of the epidermis. Absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient skin was associated with markedly decreased corneodesmosin expression, which may contribute to the peeling phenotype displayed by the patients. Accordingly, using the dispase dissociation assay, we showed that FLG2 down-regulation interferes with keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion. Of particular interest, this effect was aggravated by temperature elevation, consistent with the clinical phenotype. Restoration of CDSN levels by ectopic expression rescued cell-cell adhesion.Taken together, the present data suggest that filaggrin 2 is essential for normal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aging stem cells. A Werner syndrome stem cell model unveils heterochromatin alterations as a driver of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jingyi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Qu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Junzhi; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Ocampo, Alejandro; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jiping; Li, Ying; Shi, Liang; Guan, Dee; Pan, Huize; Duan, Shunlei; Ding, Zhichao; Li, Mo; Yi, Fei; Bai, Ruijun; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Chang; Yang, Fuquan; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zimei; Aizawa, Emi; Goebl, April; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Reddy, Pradeep; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2015-06-05

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1α and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2β. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Dual paraneoplastic syndromes: small cell lung carcinoma-related oncogenic osteomalacia, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Ng, Roland C K

    2011-07-01

    Acquired isolated renal phosphate wasting associated with a tumor, known as oncogenic osteomalacia or tumor-induced osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23. Oncogenic osteomalacia is usually associated with benign mesenchymal tumors. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), on the other hand, is a common paraneoplastic syndrome caused by small cell carcinoma (SCC). Concomitant oncogenic osteomalacia and SIADH associated with SCC is very rare with only 4 other cases reported in the literature. The authors report a case of small cell lung cancer (SCLC)-related renal wasting hypophosphatemia and concurrent SIADH, and review the literature reporting 9 other cases of SCC associated with oncogenic osteomalacia. Almost half of reported cases of renal phosphate wasting associated with SCC concomitantly presented with SIADH. These cases had initial serum phosphorus level lower and survival periods shorter than those without SIADH. This rare combination of a dual paraneoplastic syndrome and low serum phosphorus may be a poor prognostic sign. In addition, both renal phosphate wasting and SIADH usually occur in a short period of time before identification of SCC. Therefore, renal wasting hypophosphatemia with concomitant SIADH/hyponatremia should prompt a search for SCC rather than a benign mesenchymal tumor.

  7. Aging- and Senescence-associated Changes of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiucci, Domenico; Maurizi, Giulia; Leoni, Pietro; Poloni, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells reside within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. By a well-balanced interplay between self-renewal and differentiation, they ensure a lifelong supply of mature blood cells. Physiologically, multiple different cell types contribute to the regulation of stem and progenitor cells in the BM microenvironment by cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic mechanisms. During the last decades, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified as one of the main cellular components of the BM microenvironment holding an indispensable role for normal hematopoiesis. During aging, MSCs diminish their functional and regenerative capacities and in some cases encounter replicative senescence, promoting inflammation and cancer progression. It is now evident that alterations in specific stromal cells that comprise the BM microenvironment can contribute to hematologic malignancies, and there is growing interest regarding the contribution of MSCs to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), a clonal hematological disorder, occurring mostly in the elderly, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and increased tendency to acute myeloid leukemia evolution. The pathogenesis of MDS has been associated with specific genetic and epigenetic events occurring both in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and in the whole BM microenvironment with an aberrant cross talk between hematopoietic elements and stromal compartment. This review highlights the role of MSCs in MDS showing functional and molecular alterations such as altered cell-cycle regulation with impaired proliferative potential, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and an abnormal gene expression profile. Here, the current knowledge of impaired functional properties of both aged MSCs and MSCs in MDS have been described with a special focus on inflammation and senescence induced changes in the BM microenvironment. Furthermore, a better understanding of aberrant BM microenvironment could

  8. Nuclear Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein co-regulates T cell factor 1-mediated transcription in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai V. Kuznetsov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp family of actin-nucleating factors are present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The role of nuclear WASp for T cell development remains incompletely defined. Methods We performed WASp chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells. Results WASp was enriched at genic and intergenic regions and associated with the transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells showed 15 common WASp-interacting genes, including the gene encoding T cell factor (TCF12. WASp KO thymocytes had reduced nuclear TCF12 whereas thymocytes expressing constitutively active WASpL272P and WASpI296T had increased nuclear TCF12, suggesting that regulated WASp activity controlled nuclear TCF12. We identify a putative DNA element enriched in WASp ChIP-seq samples identical to a TCF1-binding site and we show that WASp directly interacted with TCF1 in the nucleus. Conclusions These data place nuclear WASp in proximity with TCF1 and TCF12, essential factors for T cell development.

  9. Th17-lineage cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis and Löfgren's syndrome: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Jelle R; Kaiser, Ylva; Broos, Caroline E; Wijsenbeek, Marlies S; Grunewald, Johan; Kool, Mirjam

    2018-02-01

    Sarcoidosis, a multisystem granulomatous disorder, has historically been classified as Th1-driven disease. However, increasing data demonstrate a key role of Th17-cell plasticity in granuloma formation and maintenance. In Löfgren's syndrome (LS), an acute and distinct phenotype of sarcoidosis with a favorable outcome, differences in Th17-lineage cell subsets, cytokine expression and T-cell suppressive mechanisms may account for differences in clinical presentation as well as prognosis compared to non-LS sarcoidosis. In contrast with LS, up to 20% of non-LS sarcoidosis patients may progress to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. In non-LS sarcoidosis patients, IFN-γ-producing Th17.1-cells appear to be more pathogenic and possibly linked to disease progression, while a broader range of cytokines is found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in LS patients. Differences in Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression on Th17-cells and regulatory T-cells (Treg) could contribute to Th17-cell pathogenicity and consequently to either disease resolution or ongoing inflammation in sarcoidosis. Furthermore, several genes and SNPs are associated with disease susceptibility and outcome in sarcoidosis, the majority of which are involved in antigen presentation, T-cell activation or regulation of T-cell survival. Novel insights into the role of Th17-cells in the pathogenesis of both LS and non-LS sarcoidosis will unravel pathogenic and benign Th17-lineage cell function and drivers of Th17-cell plasticity. This will also help identify new treatment strategies for LS and non-LS sarcoidosis patients by altering Th17-cell activation, suppress conversion into more pathogenic subtypes, or influence cytokine signaling towards a beneficial signature of Th17-lineage cells. In this review, we summarize new insights into Th17-cell plasticity in the complex pathogenesis of sarcoidosis and connect these cells to the different disease phenotypes, discuss the role of genetic

  10. SPAG6 regulates cell apoptosis through the TRAIL signal pathway in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Yang, Bihui; Wang, Li; Chen, Liping; Luo, Xiaohua; Liu, Lin

    2017-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a group of malignant clone hematopoietic stem-cell diseases, and the evolution and progression of MDS depend on the abnormal apoptosis of bone marrow cells. Our previous studies have indicated that sperm-associated antigen 6 (SPAG6), located in the uniparental disomy regions of myeloid cells, is overexpressed in patients with MDS as compared to controls, and SPAG6 can inhibit apoptosis of SKM-1. However, the concrete mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, it was found that the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)signal pathway was activated when the expression of SPAG6 was inhibited by SPAG6-shRNA lentivirus in SKM-1 cells. Additionally, the results of flow cytometry, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and western blot analysis implied that the TRAIL signal pathway could be inhibited by a high expression of SPAG6. However, SPAG6 cannot influence the expression of TRAIL death receptors, except for FADD. Additionally the interaction between FADD and TRAIL death receptors also increased in SKM-1 cells infected with SPAG6-shRNA lentivirus. Thus, our study demonstrates that SPAG6 may regulate apoptosis in SKM-1 through the TRAIL signal pathway, indicating that SPAG6 could be a potential therapeutic target.

  11. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Teofili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs, and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34+ cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b+ and CD41+ cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia.

  12. An intraventricular clear cell meningioma revealed by an inflammatory syndrome in a male adult: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassereau, J; Lavigne, C; Michalak-Provost, S; Ghali, A; Dubas, F; Fournier, H D

    2008-07-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are infrequent intracranial tumors. Clinical symptoms are mainly due to an increased intracranial pressure or a direct pressure on the surrounding brain structures. Inflammatory syndrome was described in some patients with chordoid meningiomas. Here we report a case of right intraventricular clear cell meningioma in a 50-year-old man who presented with fever, headache, and inflammatory syndrome. Clinical and biological normalization was rapidly obtained after tumor removal. Immunohistochemical examination showed tumor cells and lymphocytes positivity for the pyrogenic cytokine interleukin-6, with a same intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first case described in the literature concerning an adult man with an intraventricular clear cell meningioma associated with a systemic inflammatory syndrome.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and its association with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Mohammed; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Saleemi, Sarfraz; Khan, Mohammed Qaseem; Khan, Basha; Ahmed, Shad; Ibrahim, Khalid El Tayeb; Mobeireek, Abdullah; Al Mohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2013-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is a significant postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant problem. Recent data in lung transplant patients suggest an association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We studied posthematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its response to a proton pump inhibitor. Seven postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were studied. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was assessed by 24-hour pH monitoring with a Bravo catheter-free radio pH capsule. Patients with positive gastroesophageal reflux disease were started on omeprazole. Pretreatment and posttreatment pulmonary function tests were done at 3-month intervals. Of 7 patients, 5 had positive results for gastroesophageal reflux disease (71%). Omeprazole had a disease-stabilizing effect on the patients' pulmonary function tests. Our study shows a significant association between bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Use of omeprazole may have a disease-stabilizing effect in short-term follow-up.

  14. Increased chromogranin A cell density in the large intestine of patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzawi, Tarek; Gundersen, Doris Irene; Hausken, Trygve; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and releasing specific hormones. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for the gastrointestinal endocrine cells, and it is abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Most IBS patients relate their symptoms to certain food elements. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the total endocrine cells of the large intestine as detected by CgA i...

  15. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.; Buonomo, C.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs

  16. Evaluating the Role of p38 MAPK in the Accelerated Cell Senescence of Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Davis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes show features of accelerated ageing and are used as models for human ageing, of which Werner syndrome (WS is one of the most widely studied. WS fibroblasts show accelerated senescence that may result from p38 MAP kinase activation since it is prevented by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. Thus, small molecule inhibition of p38-signalling may be a therapeutic strategy for WS. To develop this approach issues such as the in vivo toxicity and kinase selectivity of existing p38 inhibitors need to be addressed, so as to strengthen the evidence that p38 itself plays a critical role in mediating the effect of SB203580, and to find an inhibitor suitable for in vivo use. In this work we used a panel of different p38 inhibitors selected for: (1 having been used successfully in vivo in either animal models or human clinical trials; (2 different modes of binding to p38; and (3 different off-target kinase specificity profiles, in order to critically address the role of p38 in the premature senescence seen in WS cells. Our findings confirmed the involvement of p38 in accelerated cell senescence and identified p38 inhibitors suitable for in vivo use in WS, with BIRB 796 the most effective.

  17. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Deleyto-Seldas, Nerea; Dominguez, Veronica; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Ura, Kiyoe; Rocha, Pedro P; Kim, JungHyun; Aljoufi, Arafat; Esteve-Codina, Anna; Dabad, Marc; Gut, Marta; Heyn, Holger; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Nimura, Keisuke; Skok, Jane A; Martinez-Frias, Maria Luisa; Cobaleda, Cesar

    2017-05-23

    Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1) gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Campos-Sanchez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS, a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1 gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients.

  19. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohi; Ura, Kiyoe; Streit, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohi Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS. The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS.

  1. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Implications for The Genesis of Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsun Kao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the most common endocrine disorder affecting women ofreproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women withPCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and endothelial dysfunction. Themechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulatingendothelial progenitor cells (EPCs derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate anddifferentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair.PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may resultin EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction inPCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects.

  2. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Case of Cushing's Syndrome with Multiple Adrenocortical Adenomas Composed of Compact Cells and Clear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ota, Mitsutane; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Sasahara, Yuriko; Takeuchi, Takato; Nakano, Yujiro; Oohara, Norihiko; Murakami, Masanori; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Hashimoto, Koshi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Kawamura, Naoko; Kihara, Kazunori; Negi, Mariko; Akashi, Takumi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Sasano, Hironobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for Cushingoid features and diagnosed as adrenal Cushing's syndrome due to a right adrenocortical mass (60 × 55 mm). The mass was composed of three different tumors; the first one was homogeneously lipid-poor neoplasm measuring 20 × 13 mm located at the most dorsal region, the second one was heterogeneous and lipid-rich tumor containing multiple foci of calcification measuring 50 × 32 mm located at the central region, and the last one was heterogeneous harboring dilated and tortuous vessels and lipid-poor one measuring 35 × 18 mm at the most ventral region of the adrenal gland. A right adrenalectomy was subsequently performed by open surgery. Macroscopic and microscopic analyses revealed that all three tumors were adrenocortical adenomas; the first one represents a pigmented adrenocortical adenoma, the second one adrenocortical adenoma associated with degeneration, and the third one adrenocortical adenoma harboring extensive degeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis of the steroidogenic enzymes also revealed that all of the tumors had the capacity of synthesizing cortisol. This is a very rare case of Cushing's syndrome caused by multiple adrenocortical adenomas including a pigmented adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes contributed to understanding of steroidogenesis in each of these three different adrenocortical adenomas in this case.

  4. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  5. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Yang

    Full Text Available The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2 play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL. We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064 induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Advanced nutritional and stem cells approaches to prevent equine metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Michalak, Izabela; Kornicka, Katarzyna

    2018-01-31

    Horses metabolic disorders have become an important problem of modern veterinary medicine. Pathological obesity, insulin resistance and predisposition toward laminitis are associated with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS). Based on pathogenesis of EMS, dietary and cell therapy management may significantly reduce development of this disorder. Special attention has been paid to the diet supplementation with highly bioavailable minerals and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) which increase insulin sensitivity. In nutrition, there is a great interests in natural algae enriched via biosorption process with micro- and macroelements. In the case of cellular therapy, metabolic condition of engrafted cells may be crucial for the effectiveness of the therapy. Although, recent studies indicated on MSC deterioration in EMS individuals. Here, we described the combined nutritional and stem cells therapy for the EMS treatment. Moreover, we specified in details how EMS affects the adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) population. Presented here, combined kind of therapy- an innovative and cutting edge approach of metabolic disorders treatment may become a new gold standard in personalized veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenotypic characterization of aberrant stem and progenitor cell populations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostendorf, Benjamin N; Flenner, Eva; Flörcken, Anne; Westermann, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    Recent reports have revealed myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to arise from cancer stem cells phenotypically similar to physiological hematopoietic stem cells. Myelodysplastic hematopoiesis maintains a hierarchical organization, but the proportion of several hematopoietic compartments is skewed and multiple surface markers are aberrantly expressed. These aberrant antigen expression patterns hold diagnostic and therapeutic promise. However, eradication of MDS requires targeting of early myelodysplasia propagating stem cells. This warrants an exact assessment of the differentiation stage at which aberrant expression occurs in transformed hematopoiesis. Here, we report results on the prospective and extensive dissection of the hematopoietic hierarchy in 20 patients with either low-risk MDS or MDS with excess blasts and compare it to hematopoiesis in patients with non-malignancy-associated cytopenia or B cell lymphoma without bone marrow infiltration. We found patients with MDS with excess blasts to exhibit characteristic expansions of specific immature progenitor compartments. We also identified the aberrant expression of several markers including ALDH, CLL-1, CD44, and CD47 to be specific features of hematopoiesis in MDS with excess blasts. We show that amongst these, aberrant CLL-1 expression manifested at the early uncommitted hematopoietic stem cell level, suggesting a potential role as a therapeutic target.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of aberrant stem and progenitor cell populations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Ostendorf

    Full Text Available Recent reports have revealed myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS to arise from cancer stem cells phenotypically similar to physiological hematopoietic stem cells. Myelodysplastic hematopoiesis maintains a hierarchical organization, but the proportion of several hematopoietic compartments is skewed and multiple surface markers are aberrantly expressed. These aberrant antigen expression patterns hold diagnostic and therapeutic promise. However, eradication of MDS requires targeting of early myelodysplasia propagating stem cells. This warrants an exact assessment of the differentiation stage at which aberrant expression occurs in transformed hematopoiesis. Here, we report results on the prospective and extensive dissection of the hematopoietic hierarchy in 20 patients with either low-risk MDS or MDS with excess blasts and compare it to hematopoiesis in patients with non-malignancy-associated cytopenia or B cell lymphoma without bone marrow infiltration. We found patients with MDS with excess blasts to exhibit characteristic expansions of specific immature progenitor compartments. We also identified the aberrant expression of several markers including ALDH, CLL-1, CD44, and CD47 to be specific features of hematopoiesis in MDS with excess blasts. We show that amongst these, aberrant CLL-1 expression manifested at the early uncommitted hematopoietic stem cell level, suggesting a potential role as a therapeutic target.

  9. Cytological and molecular studies of chromosomal radiosensitivity in Down Syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLaren, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular, cellular and cytogenetic studies were conducted to determine if altered levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a DNA repair-related enzyme, is responsible for the reported formation of excess X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in cells derived from Down Syndrome (DS) patients. Nonstimulated lymphocytes from normal and DS subjects were pretreated with 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, for 30 minutes before exposure to X-rays and the levels of induced chromosome aberrations were determined in mitotic cells. DS lymphocytes exhibited significantly higher frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide that normal lymphocytes. No difference was observed in the absence of 3-aminobenzamide. Additional studies were done using normal and DS lymphoblastoid cell lines which exhibited a similar response at the DNA level as the lymphocytes. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity based on incorporation of the substrate, NAD + , into acid insoluble materials, revealed that there was no significant difference in the ability to form poly (ADP-ribose) in the DS or normal cells. 3-aminobenzamide effectively inhibited poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in both the normal and DS cells

  10. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weaknes...

  11. Generation of an ICF syndrome model by efficient genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using the CRISPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takuro; Tamura, Daiki; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Hatada, Izuho

    2013-09-30

    Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  12. Generation of an ICF Syndrome Model by Efficient Genome Editing of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the CRISPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  13. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A; Lauritsen, J; Oturai, P S; Mortensen, J; Hojman, P; Helge, J W; Daugaard, G

    2017-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up were eligible for participation in the study. Markers of systemic inflammation and prevalence of MetS were compared between TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and the control group. Of 158 included TC survivors, 28 (18%) had uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction, 59 (37%) had compensated Leydig cell dysfunction and 71 (45%) had normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. MetS and markers of systemic inflammation were evaluated at a median follow-up of 9.7 years (interquartile range 4.1-17.1) after TC treatment. The prevalence of MetS was significantly lower among patients with compensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up (12% versus 27%, p = 0.04), whereas there was no difference between TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction and controls (33% versus 27%, p = 0.5). Apart from high-sensitivity C-reactive protein which was higher in TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up, there was no evidence of increased systemic inflammation in patients with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated with MetS, whereas there was no association between LH and MetS. We did not find evidence that TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up had increased long-term risk of MetS. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated

  14. Generation of Integration-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Urine-Derived Cells Isolated from Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Lee, Young; Zampieri, Bruna L; Scott-McKean, Jonah J; Johnson, Mark W; Costa, Alberto C S

    2017-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by trisomy 21 (T21). Over the past two decades, the use of mouse models has led to significant advances in the understanding of mechanisms underlying various phenotypic features and comorbidities secondary to T21 and even informed the design of clinical trials aimed at enhancing the cognitive abilities of persons with DS. In spite of its success, this approach has been plagued by all the typical limitations of rodent modeling of human disorders and diseases. Recently, several laboratories have succeeded in producing T21 human induced pluripotent stem cells (T21-iPSCs) from individuals with DS, which is emerging as a promising complementary tool for the study of DS. Here, we describe the method by which we generated 10 T21-iPSC lines from epithelial cells in urine samples, presumably from kidney epithelial origin, using nonintegrating episomal vectors. We also show that these iPSCs maintain chromosomal stability for well over 20 passages and are more sensitive to proteotoxic stress than euploid iPSCs. Furthermore, these iPSC lines can be differentiated into glutamatergic neurons and cardiomyocytes. By culturing urine-derived cells and maximizing the efficiency of episomal vector transfection, we have been able to generate iPSCs noninvasively and effectively from participants with DS in an ongoing clinical trial, and thus address most shortcomings of previously generated T21-iPSC lines. These techniques should extend the application of iPSCs in modeling DS and other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and may lead to future human cell-based platforms for high-throughput drug screening. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1465-1476. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Evaluating the use of cell phone messaging for community Ebola syndromic surveillance in high risked settings in Southern Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kangbai; Mohamed, Koroma

    2015-09-01

    Most underdeveloped countries do not meet core disease outbreak surveillance because of the lack of human resources, laboratory and infrastructural facilities. The use of cell phone technology for disease outbreak syndromic surveillance is a new phenomenon in Sierra Leone despite its successes in other developing countries like Sri Lanka. In this study we set to evaluate the effectiveness of using cell phone technology for Ebola hemorrhagic fever syndromic surveillance in a high risked community in Sierra Leone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using cell phone messaging (text and calls) for community Ebola hemorrhagic fever syndromic surveillance in high risked community in southern Sierra Leone. All cell phone syndromic surveillance data used for this study was reported as cell phone alert messages-texts and voice calls; by the Moyamba District Health Management Team for both Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect and mortalities. We conducted a longitudinal data analysis of the monthly cumulative confirmed Ebola hemorrhagic fever cases and mortalities collected by both the traditional sentinel and community cell phone syndromic surveillance from August 2014 to October 2014. A total of 129 and 49 Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect and confirmed cases respectively were recorded using the community Ebola syndromic surveillance cell phone alert system by the Moyamba District Health Management Team in October 2014. The average number of Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspects and confirmed cases for October 2014 were 4.16 (Std.dev 3.76) and 1.58 (Std.dev 1.43) respectively. Thirty-four percent (n=76) of the community Ebola syndromic surveillance cell phone alerts that were followed-up within 24 hours reported Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect cases while 65.92% (n=147) reported mortality. Our study suggests some form of underreporting by the traditional sentinel Ebola hemorrhagic fever disease surveillance system in Moyamba District southern Sierra Leone for August

  16. Chromosomal instability and the abrogated G2/M arrest in x-irradiated myelodysplastic syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, S.; Sudo, H.; Saegusa, K.; Sagara, M.; Imai, T.; Kimura, A.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary epidemiological study demonstrated that myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) has an excess relative risk per sievert of 13 in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima. MDS is the only other radiogenic blood disease apart from leukemia. Clinically, MDS involves dysplastic hematopoiesis and an increased risk of leukemic transformation. Because it is uncertain whether MDS pathogenesis affects lymphoid progenitor cells as well as myeloid progenitor cells, we investigated the karyotypes of bone marrow cells and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in peripheral T lymphocytes of twenty- three atomic bomb survivors with MDS and five normal individuals. Aneuploidy was observed in 10 of 23 patients. Chromosome aberrations were observed in 3 of 12 patients with mild symptoms, and six of 11 patients of severe symptoms. The spontaneous- and X-ray-induced-MN frequencies were significantly higher in MDS patients than in normal individuals. Interestingly, radiation sensitivity increased along with the severity of MDS clinical subtypes. Because many of the patients in this study had not been exposed to chemo- or radiation- therapy, their unusual radiosensitivity may be related to their chromosomal or genomic instability. Immortalized lymphoid cell lines were established from B-lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. The abrogation of radiation-induced-G2/M arrest was observed in 10 of 12 MDS-B lymphoid cell lines, but not in the normal B lymphoid cell lines. Our data suggest that the control of chromosomal stability is impaired in pluripotent stem cells of MDS patients, and that the abrogated G2/M arrest may be involved in the pathophysiology of disease progression and the high radiation sensitivity of patients

  17. Clinical manifestations in 105 persons with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimonis, V.E.; Yang, M.L.; Bale, S.J. [National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCC; Gorlin syndrome), an autosomal dominant disorder linked to 9q22.3-q31, and caused by mutations in PTC, the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene, comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies and calcification of the falx cerebri. We reviewed the findings on 105 affected individuals examined at the NIH since 1985. The data included 48 males and 57 females ranging in age from 4 months to 87 years. Eighty percent of whites (71/90) and 38% (5/13) of African-Americans had at least one basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with the first tumor occurring at a mean age of 23 (median 20) years and 21 (median 20) years, respectively. Excluding individuals exposed to radiation therapy, the number of BCCs ranged from 1 to >1,000 (median 8) and 1 to 3 (median 2), respectively, in the 2 groups. Jaw cysts occurred in 78/105 (74%) with the first tumor occurring in 80% by the age of 20 years. The number of total jaw cysts ranged from 1 to 28 (median 3). Palmar pits and plantar pits were seen in 87%. Ovarian fibromas were diagnosed by ultrasound in 9/52 (17%) at a mean age of 30 years. Medulloblastoma occurred in 4 patients at a mean age of 2.3 years. Three patients had cleft lip or palate. Physical findings include {open_quotes}coarse face{close_quotes} in 54%, relative macrocephaly in 50%, hypertelorism in 42%, frontal bossing in 27%, pectus deformity in 13%, and Sprengel deformity in 11%. This study delineates the frequency of the clinical and radiological anomalies in NBCC in a large population of US patients and discusses guidelines for diagnosis and management. 48 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic changes in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosas-Molist, Eva; Meirelles, Thayna; López-Luque, Judit; Serra-Peinado, Carla; Selva, Javier; Caja, Laia; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Uriarte, Juan José; Bertran, Esther; Mendizábal, Yolanda; Hernández, Vanessa; García-Calero, Carolina; Busnadiego, Oscar; Condom, Enric; Toral, David; Castellà, Manel; Forteza, Alberto; Navajas, Daniel; Sarri, Elisabet; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Dietz, Harry C; Fabregat, Isabel; Egea, Gustavo

    2015-04-01

    Marfan's syndrome is characterized by the formation of ascending aortic aneurysms resulting from altered assembly of extracellular matrix microfibrils and chronic tissue growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. TGF-β is a potent regulator of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype. We hypothesized that as a result of the chronic TGF-β signaling, VSMC would alter their basal differentiation phenotype, which could facilitate the formation of aneurysms. This study explores whether Marfan's syndrome entails phenotypic alterations of VSMC and possible mechanisms at the subcellular level. Immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses of dilated aortas from Marfan patients showed overexpression of contractile protein markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, smooth muscle protein 22 alpha, and calponin-1) and collagen I in comparison with healthy aortas. VSMC explanted from Marfan aortic aneurysms showed increased in vitro expression of these phenotypic markers and also of myocardin, a transcription factor essential for VSMC-specific differentiation. These alterations were generally reduced after pharmacological inhibition of the TGF-β pathway. Marfan VSMC in culture showed more robust actin stress fibers and enhanced RhoA-GTP levels, which was accompanied by increased focal adhesion components and higher nuclear localization of myosin-related transcription factor A. Marfan VSMC and extracellular matrix measured by atomic force microscopy were both stiffer than their respective controls. In Marfan VSMC, both in tissue and in culture, there are variable TGF-β-dependent phenotypic changes affecting contractile proteins and collagen I, leading to greater cellular and extracellular matrix stiffness. Altogether, these alterations may contribute to the known aortic rigidity that precedes or accompanies Marfan's syndrome aneurysm formation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Micronuclei frequencies in lymphocytes and cervical cells of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rengin Karataylı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine micronucleus (MN frequencies in exfoliated cervical cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with PCOS and 11 healthy control patients were included in the study. Cervical smears and peripheral blood were collected from all patients. Specimens were analyzed for MN frequencies and compared between the groups. In addition to MN, other nuclear anomalies connected with both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were evaluated. Results: The MN frequencies in cervical smear and peripheral blood lymphocytes were compared in patients with PCOS and normal controls. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes (p=0.239. The mean MN scores in exfoliated cervical cells of patients with PCOS and normal controls were 1.19±0.57 and 0.74±0.34, respectively. The difference regarding micronucleus frequencies in cervical cells was statistically significant between the groups (p=0.032. Conclusion: Although study group is small, our study results support that there is an increased micronucleus frequency in cervical exfoliated cells of PCOS patients; this is a determinant of genetic hazard in the disease.

  20. Ovarian steroid cell tumor in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarandi F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid cell tumor is one of the rare ovarian tumors and forms 0.1% of all ovarian tumors, divided to three subgroups. Steroid cell tumor that are not otherwise specified (NOS are the most common type and represent 60% of steroid cell tumors. One of the most known signs of this tumor is hormonal function, especially androgenic effects of it. Primary treatment consists of eradication of tumor via surgery.Case presentation: The patient is a 29 years old female with history of poly cystic ovarian syndrome since 10 years ago, who attended to the clinic of General Women Hospital of Tehran in January 2011. In pelvic ultrasonography, there was a 6449mm mass in the right adnexa consisting of homogeneous component. She underwent laparotomy and unilateral salpingoophorectomy was done. Pathological report was steroid cell tumor of ovary.Conclusion: The aim of this study is reporting one of the rare tumors of ovary and assessment of the correct way of diagnosis and treatment of it.

  1. Biomarkers of cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity related to CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Han, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity following chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy can be life-threatening in some cases, and management of those toxicities is still a great challenge for physicians. Researchers hope to understand the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and identify predictive biomarkers that can forecast those toxicities in advance. Some risk factors for severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity including patient and treatment characteristics have been identified in multiple clinical trials of CAR-T cell therapy. Moreover, several groups have identified some predictive biomarkers that are able to determine beforehand which patients may suffer severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity during CAR-T cell therapy, facilitating testing of early intervention strategies for those toxicities. However, further studies are needed to better understand the biology and related risk factors for CRS and/or neurotoxicity, and determine if those identified predictors can be extrapolated to other series. Herein, we review the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and summarize the progress of predictive biomarkers to improve CAR-T cell therapy in cancer.

  2. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Genetic variants in the cell cycle control pathways contribute to early onset colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Etzel, Carol J; Amos, Christopher I; Zhang, Qing; Viscofsky, Nancy; Lindor, Noralane M; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2009-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome of familial malignancies resulting from germ line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Our goal was to take a pathway-based approach to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in cell cycle-related genes on age of onset for Lynch syndrome using a tree model. We evaluated polymorphisms in a panel of cell cycle-related genes (AURKA, CDKN2A, TP53, E2F2, CCND1, TP73, MDM2, IGF1, and CDKN2B) in 220 MMR gene mutation carriers from 129 families. We applied a novel statistical approach, tree modeling (Classification and Regression Tree), to the analysis of data on patients with Lynch syndrome to identify individuals with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer at an early age and explore the gene-gene interactions between polymorphisms in cell cycle genes. We found that the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 variant genotype, AURKA wild-type genotype, and CCND1 variant genotype had the youngest age of onset, with a 45-year median onset age, while the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 wild-type genotype, and AURKA variant genotype had the latest median age of onset, which was 70 years. Furthermore, we found evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction between E2F2 and AURKA genes related to CRC age of onset. Polymorphisms in these cell cycle-related genes work together to modify the age at the onset of CRC in patients with Lynch syndrome. These studies provide an important part of the foundation for development of a model for stratifying age of onset risk among those with Lynch syndrome.

  5. A paracrine mechanism involving renal tubular cells, adipocytes and macrophages promotes kidney stone formation in a simulated metabolic syndrome environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Tozawa, Keiichi; Okada, Atsushi; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Hirose, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yasunori; Zou, Jiangang; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-06-01

    We developed an in vitro system composed of renal tubular cells, adipocytes and macrophages to simulate metabolic syndrome conditions. We investigated the molecular communication mechanism of these cells and their involvement in kidney stone formation. Mouse renal tubular cells (M-1) were cocultured with adipocytes (3T3-L1) and/or macrophages (RAW264.7). Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals were exposed to M-1 cells after 48-hour coculture and the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals adherent to the cells was quantified. The expression of cocultured medium and M-1 cell inflammatory factors was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The inflammatory markers MCP-1, OPN and TNF-α were markedly up-regulated in cocultured M-1 cells. OPN expression increased in M-1 cells cocultured with RAW264.7 cells while MCP-1 and TNF-α were over expressed in M-1 cells cocultured with 3T3-L1 cells. Coculturing M-1 cells simultaneously with 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells resulted in a significant increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal adherence to M-1 cells. Inflammatory cytokine changes were induced by coculturing renal tubular cells with adipocytes and/or macrophages without direct contact, indicating that crosstalk between adipocytes/macrophages and renal tubular cells was mediated by soluble factors. The susceptibility to urolithiasis of patients with metabolic syndrome might be due to aggravated inflammation of renal tubular cells triggered by a paracrine mechanism involving these 3 cell types. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

  7. Promoter methylation patterns in Richter syndrome affect stem-cell maintenance and cell cycle regulation and differ from de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Andrea; Mensah, Afua Adjeiwaa; Kwee, Ivo; Forconi, Francesco; Orlandi, Ester M; Lucioni, Marco; Gattei, Valter; Marasca, Roberto; Berger, Françoise; Cogliatti, Sergio; Cavalli, Franco; Zucca, Emanuele; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rossi, Davide; Bertoni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    In a fraction of patients, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) can transform to Richter syndrome (RS), usually a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We studied genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in RS and clonally related CLL-phases of transformed patients, alongside de novo DLBCL (of non-germinal centre B type), untransformed-CLL and normal B-cells. The greatest differences in global DNA methylation levels were observed between RS and DLBCL, indicating that these two diseases, although histologically similar, are epigenetically distinct. RS was more highly methylated for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. When RS was compared to the preceding CLL-phase and with untransformed-CLL, RS presented a higher degree of methylation for genes possessing the H3K27me3 mark and PRC2 targets, as well as for gene targets of TP53 and RB1. Comparison of the methylation levels of individual genes revealed that OSM, a stem cell regulatory gene, exhibited significantly higher methylation levels in RS compared to CLL-phases. Its transcriptional repression by DNA methylation was confirmed by 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment of DLBCL cells, determining an increased OSM expression. Our results showed that methylation patterns in RS are largely different from de novo DLBCL. Stem cell-related genes and cell cycle regulation genes are targets of DNA methylation in RS. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Studies with muscle cells from controls and a patient with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Barth, P.G.; Roermund, C.W.T. van; Ofman, R.; Wolterman, R.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Tager, J.M.; Bosch, H. van den; Bolhuis, P.A.

    In the present study we investigated peroxisomal functions in cultured human muscle cells from control subjects and from a patient with the Zellweger syndrome, a genetic disease characterized by the absence of morphologically distinguishable peroxisomes in liver and kidney. In homogenates of

  9. Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Patients Post Caesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent painful crisis. Pregnant women who are affected are known to have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Acute chest syndrome (ACS is an uncommon but serious complication in pregnant women with SCD that can lead to death. We present two cases of patients with SCD, both of whom had severe ACS within 24 hours post Caesarean section. By accurate diagnosis and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team, both mothers and fetuses had excellent outcomes. It is suggested that prompt recognition of ACS in a pregnant woman with SCD and collaborative medical and obstetric management are essential to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  10. Generation of Hermansky Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2 induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Ann Maguire

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2 is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from functional mutations in the adaptor-related protein complex 3, beta 1 subunit (AP3B1 gene. This gene plays a role in organelle biogenesis associated with melanosomes, platelet dense granules, and lysosomes. Here we describe the generation of an HPS2 iPS cell line (CHOPHPS2 using a Cre-excisable polycistronic STEMCCA lentivirus. This line was derived from human fibroblasts isolated from a patient carrying two mutations in the AP3B1 gene. The patient presented with severe neutropenia, ocular albinism, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, hemorrhagic diathesis, and an absence of platelet-dense granules.

  11. Tapered oral dexamethasone for the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charles T.; Stuart, Marie J.; Kesler, Karen; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Wang, Winfred C.; Styles, Lori; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Wun, Ted; Raj, Ahsok; Hsu, Lewis L.; Krishnan, Suba; Kuypers, Frans A; Setty, B. N. Yamaja; Rhee, Seungshin; Key, Nigel S.; Buchanan, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tapered oral dexamethasone for acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell anaemia was studied using a novel ACS assessment tool and investigational biomarkers. Twelve participants were randomized (mean age 17.3 years) before early study termination. Dexamethasone decreased duration of hospitalization for ACS by 20.8 h compared to placebo (P=0.024). Rebound pain occurred in both groups (3 dexamethasone vs. 1 placebo). Overall, dexamethasone decreased the leucocyte activation biomarker, sL-selectin; however, participants with rebound pain had higher sL-selectin within 24 h of treatment (dexamethasone or placebo). This ACS assessment tool was feasibly applied, and sL-selectin is a promising biomarker of ACS therapy. PMID:21848879

  12. Isolation and identification of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valícek, L; Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Kubalíková, R; Kosinová, E

    1997-10-01

    Three strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were isolated in porcine lung macrophage (PLM) cultures from three swine herds. This has been the first successful isolation of PRRSV in the Czech Republic and the strains received the designations CAPM V-501, CAPM V-502 and CAPM V-503, respectively. All the three isolates in PLM were identified by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase tests and the strain CAPM V-502 also by electron microscopy using the ultrathin section technique. The strain CAPM V-502 has been adapted to the cell line MARC-145. Viral RNA in PLM cultures infected with any of the isolated PRRSV strains was demonstrated by RT-PCR targeted to the more conserved ORF 7 genomic region encoding the nucleocapsid protein. The assessment of PCR products in agarose gel revealed a uniform size of 394 bp in all the three isolates and the European prototype strain Lelystad used as positive control.

  13. [Defibrotide therapy for patients with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Okamura, Atsuo; Ono, Kanako; Kawano, Yuko; Kawano, Hiroki; Funakoshi, Yohei; Kawamori, Yuriko; Nishikawa, Shinichiro; Minagawa, Kentaro; Sada, Akiko; Shimoyama, Manabu; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Katayama, Yoshio; Matsui, Toshimitsu

    2009-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is one of the life-threatening complications caused by endothelial damage to the hepatic sinusoids after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, a satisfactory treatment for SOS has not yet been established. Defibrotide has anti-thrombotic, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory, and thrombolytic properties without systemic anticoagulant effects. We treated eight post-transplant SOS patients with defibrotide. Three patients responded to the therapy and the initial response was observed within a week. In addition to the improvement of liver function, rapid recovery of response to diuretic drugs followed by the improvement of renal function was observed. All of the five patients with respiratory dysfunction died despite administration of defibrotide, suggesting that early treatment might lead to better outcomes. There were no severe adverse effects directly due to defibrotide administration. Defibrotide seems to be a promising treatment for SOS, and the initiation of a clinical study in Japan would be important.

  14. Production of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus in human and nonhuman cells transfected with an infectious molecular clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, A.; Gendelman, H.E.; Koenig, S.; Folks, T.; Willey, R.; Rabson, A.; Martin, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors considered an infectious molecular clone of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus. Upon transfection, this clone directed the production of infectious virus particles in a wide variety of cells in addition to human T4 cells. The progeny, infectious virions, were synthesized in mouse, mink, monkey, and several human non-T cell lines, indicating the absence of any intracellular obstacle to viral RNA or protein production or assembly. During the course of these studies, a human colon carcinoma cell line, exquisitely sensitive to DNA transfection, was identified

  15. Generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (GZHMUi001-A) by reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuchang; Ou, Zhanhui; Song, Bing; Xian, Yexing; Ouyang, Shuming; Xie, Yuhuan; Xue, Yanting; Sun, Xiaofang

    2017-08-01

    47, XXX syndrome is one of several sex-chromosomal aneuploidies, and it has an incidence of approximately 1/1000 in newborn females. Because of heterogeneity in X-inactivation, these patients may exhibit a variety of clinical symptoms. Here, we report the generation of an integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cell line (GZHMUi001-A) by using Sendai virus to reprogram peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient with premature ovarian failure. This 47, XXX iPS cell line has characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and is a useful tool for the investigation of this X chromosome aneuploid disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Ovarian germ cell tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous components and later development of growing teratoma syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jumaily Usama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Development of a sarcomatous component in a germ cell tumor is an uncommon phenomenon. Most cases reported have a grim prognosis. Growing teratoma syndrome is also an uncommon phenomenon and occurs in approximately 2% to 7% of non seminomatous germ cell tumors and should be treated surgically. Case presentation We report the case of a 12-year-old Asian girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor containing a rhabdomyosarcomatous component. She was treated with a germ cell tumor chemotherapy regimen and rhabdomyosarcoma-specific chemotherapy. Towards the end of her treatment, she developed a retroperitoneal mass that was increasing in size. It was completely resected, revealing a mature teratoma, consistent with growing teratoma syndrome. She is still in complete remission approximately three years after presentation. Conclusion The presence of rhabdomyosarcoma in a germ cell tumor should be treated by a combined chemotherapy regimen (for germ cell tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. In addition, development of a mass during or after therapy with normal serum markers should raise the possibility of growing teratoma syndrome that should be treated surgically.

  17. Telomerase Protects Werner Syndrome Lineage-Specific Stem Cells from Premature Aging

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    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS patients exhibit premature aging predominantly in mesenchyme-derived tissues, but not in neural lineages, a consequence of telomere dysfunction and accelerated senescence. The cause of this lineage-specific aging remains unknown. Here, we document that reprogramming of WS fibroblasts to pluripotency elongated telomere length and prevented telomere dysfunction. To obtain mechanistic insight into the origin of tissue-specific aging, we differentiated iPSCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs. We observed recurrence of premature senescence associated with accelerated telomere attrition and defective synthesis of the lagging strand telomeres in MSCs, but not in NPCs. We postulate this “aging” discrepancy is regulated by telomerase. Expression of hTERT or p53 knockdown ameliorated the accelerated aging phenotypein MSC, whereas inhibition of telomerase sensitized NPCs to DNA damage. Our findings unveil a role for telomerase in the protection of accelerated aging in a specific lineage of stem cells.

  18. Evidence of a generalized defect of acinar cell function in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormon, Michael O; Ip, Wan F; Ellis, Lynda; Schibli, Susanne; Rommens, Johanna M; Durie, Peter R

    2010-07-01

    : Because the acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas in patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) are severely depleted, we hypothesized that a similar deficiency may be present in acinar cells of the parotid gland. : We determined serum pancreatic isoamylase and parotid amylase activities in 16 patients with SDS, 13 healthy controls, and 13 disease controls (cystic fibrosis or fibrosing pancreatitis). Parotid amylase and electrolyte concentrations were measured in stimulated parotid gland secretions. Starch digestion was assessed by breath hydrogen testing in patients with SDS (with and without enzyme supplements) and healthy controls. : Serum pancreatic and parotid isoamylase values were lower in the patients with SDS than in the healthy controls (P gland amylase concentration (units per milligram of protein) in patients with SDS was lower than that in the healthy controls (P = 0.04), whereas the disease controls were comparable to the healthy subjects (P = 0.09). Secreted parotid chloride concentration was inversely correlated with amylase concentration in the patients with SDS (P = 0.01), but no correlation was seen in the healthy controls or disease controls. When patients with SDS ingested starch without enzyme supplementation, their breath hydrogen excretion was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls (P = 0.009). Following starch ingestion with enzymes, breath hydrogen in the patients with SDS was lower (P functional abnormality of exocrine acinar cells.

  19. Signs of impaired immunoregulation and enhanced effector T-cell responses in the primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakiela, B; Iwaniec, T; Plutecka, H; Celinska-Lowenhoff, M; Dziedzina, S; Musial, J

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) is characterized by a deficiency in immunoregulatory pathways, a phenomenon recently implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Serum levels of immunoregulatory (e.g., IL-10 and TGF-β1) and proinflammatory (e.g., IL-17A) cytokines were measured in PAPS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with secondary APS (SAPS), or without APS, and in healthy controls (n = 40 in each group). In a subgroup of PAPS patients we also compared phenotype and function (flow cytometry) of regulatory T-cells (Treg) and cytokine production by effector T-cells. Our major finding was decreased levels of TGF-β1 in PAPS and SAPS as compared to SLE without APS and controls. TGF-β1 was the lowest in PAPS patients showing high levels of aPL IgG with significant negative correlation with the titer. SLE patients were characterized by lower serum levels of IL-2 and increased IL-17A, as compared to the other groups. The numbers of circulating Treg cells and their phenotype (e.g., FoxP3 isoforms) were not disturbed in PAPS. However, surface expression of latency associated peptide (binds TGF-β) in activated FoxP3 + cells and in vitro production of TGF-β1 were decreased in PAPS patients with high titers of aPL IgG. Moreover, frequencies of cytokine producing effector T-helper cells (including Th17) were significantly elevated in this group. PAPS patients with high titers of aPL IgG antibodies were characterized by decreased systemic levels of TGF-β1 and its impaired production in vitro, suggesting impaired immunoregulation and enhanced adaptive autoimmune responses leading to the production of aPL antibodies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation across human polycystic ovary syndrome ovary granulosa cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiawei; Bao, Xiao; Peng, Zhaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Niu, Wenbin; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-05-10

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 7% of the reproductive-age women. A growing body of evidence indicated that epigenetic mechanisms contributed to the development of PCOS. The role of DNA modification in human PCOS ovary granulosa cell is still unknown in PCOS progression. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation were detected between PCOS' and controls' granulosa cell. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled to investigate the putative function of DNA methylaiton. Selected genes expressions were analyzed between PCOS' and controls' granulosa cell. Our results showed that the granulosa cell global DNA methylation of PCOS patients was significant higher than the controls'. The global DNA hydroxymethylation showed low level and no statistical difference between PCOS and control. 6936 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified between control and PCOS-obesity. 12245 differential methylated CpG sites were detected between control and PCOS-nonobesity group. 5202 methylated CpG sites were significantly differential between PCOS-obesity and PCOS-nonobesity group. Our results showed that DNA methylation not hydroxymethylation altered genome-wide in PCOS granulosa cell. The different methylation genes were enriched in development protein, transcription factor activity, alternative splicing, sequence-specific DNA binding and embryonic morphogenesis. YWHAQ, NCF2, DHRS9 and SCNA were up-regulation in PCOS-obesity patients with no significance different between control and PCOS-nonobesity patients, which may be activated by lower DNA methylaiton. Global and genome-wide DNA methylation alteration may contribute to different genes expression and PCOS clinical pathology.

  1. Disease-specific hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

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    Li, Qian; Luo, Changying; Luo, Chengjuan; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Benshang; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using an optimized conditioning regimen is essential for the long-term survival of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). We report HSCT in 24 children with Fanconi anemia (FA, n = 12), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, n = 7), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC, n = 5) from a single HSCT center. The graft source was peripheral blood stem cells (n = 19) or cord blood stem cells (n = 5). FA and DC patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, while DBA patients had myeloablative conditioning. The median numbers of infused mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells were 14.20 × 10 8 /kg and 4.3 × 10 6 /kg, respectively. The median time for neutrophil and platelet recovery was 12 and 18 days, respectively. Complete donor engraftment was achieved in 23 of 24 patients. There was one primary graft failure. During a median follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 2-130 months), the overall survival in all patients was 95.8%. The incidence of grade II-III acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD was 29.2% and 16.7%, respectively. We conclude that HSCT can be a curative option for patients with IBMFS. Modification of the conditioning regimen based on the type of disease may lead to encouraging long-term outcomes.

  2. Serum of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome induces adhesion molecules in endothelial cells.

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    Engel, Bettina; Müller, Gregor; Roch, Beate; Schröder, Hans-Egbert; Aringer, Martin; Bornstein, Stefan R; Morawietz, Henning

    2017-11-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic auto-immune disease with an unclear pathophysiology. The aim of our study was to understand the development of APS on a cellular level. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of human serum of APS patients on endothelial expression of specific genes and proteins in comparison to a control group. In this study, we analyzed the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and annexin V in primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in response to 10% (v/v) serum of control patients (n = 6), patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and no APS (n = 4) or APS patients (n = 9) for 24 h. Total RNA was prepared from confluent endothelial cell layers and mRNA expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein expression was determined by Western blot. Serum protein concentrations of soluble forms of adhesion molecules sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Gene expression data were correlated with clinical parameters. The mRNA expression of ICAM-1 was increased in cells incubated with serum from APS patients (166 ± 22% of control; P = 0.023). Serum of patients with (SLE)/no APS caused a 1.4-fold higher ICAM-1 mRNA level. Western blot analysis showed an increase in protein expression of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 (260 ± 49%; P = 0.011) and VCAM-1 (357 ± 97%; P = 0.023) in cells that were incubated with serum from APS patients. Plasma analysis showed elevated levels of sVCAM-1 in APS patients (189 ± 34%; P = 0.045) compared to the levels measured in the control group. The sVCAM-1 plasma level was correlating with the frequency of abortions. An augmented expression of endothelial adhesion molecules is involved in the pathophysiology of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Are Weak Activators of the FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome Cell Lines

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    Alexander A. Dolskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. It is a result of CGG repeat expansion in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. This gene encodes the FMRP protein that is involved in neuronal development. Repeat expansion leads to heterochromatinization of the promoter, gene silencing, and the subsequent absence of FMRP. To date, there is no specific therapy for the syndrome. All treatments in clinic practice provide symptomatic therapy. The development of drug therapy for Fragile X syndrome treatment is connected with the search for inhibitors of enzymes that are responsible for heterochromatinization. Here, we report a weak transcriptional activity of the FMR1 gene and the absence of FMRP protein after Fragile X syndrome cell lines treatment with two FDA approved inhibitors of histone deacetylases, romidepsin and vorinostat. We demonstrate that romidepsin, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, does not activate FMR1 expression in patient cell cultures, whereas vorinostat, an inhibitor of classes I and II histone deacetylases, activates a low level of FMR1 expression in some patient cell lines.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

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    ... for This Condition basal cell nevus syndrome BCNS Gorlin-Goltz syndrome NBCCS nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome Related Information ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome Health Topic: Skin Cancer Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  5. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell is a potential marker to distinguish fibromyalgia syndrome from arthritis.

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    Chie Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA or spondyloarthritis (SpA, both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients and healthy donors (HD were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed.There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS, CD127 (IL-7 receptor α, CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS.Combined with the currently available

  6. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell is a potential marker to distinguish fibromyalgia syndrome from arthritis.

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    Sugimoto, Chie; Konno, Takahiko; Wakao, Rika; Fujita, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS) or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or spondyloarthritis (SpA), both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and healthy donors (HD) were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed. There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK) receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM) family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS), CD127 (IL-7 receptor α), CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS. Combined with the currently available

  7. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with a long QT syndrome type 2

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    Azra Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the generation of human iPS cell line UKKi009-A from dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying heterozygous mutation c.3035-3045delTCCCTCGATGC, p.Leu1012Pro (fs*55 in KCNH2 gene leading to long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2. We used the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmids expressing OSKM along with microRNAs 307/367 to reprogram the fibroblasts. The iPS cells possess pluripotent stem cell characteristics and differentiate to cell lineages of all three germ layers. This cell line can serve as a source for in vitro modeling of LQT2. This cell line is distributed by the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC.

  8. Pluripotent stem cell models of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome reveal a common mechanism for pancreatic and hematopoietic dysfunction

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    Tulpule, Asmin; Kelley, James M.; Lensch, M. William; McPherson, Jade; Park, In Hyun; Hartung, Odelya; Nakamura, Tomoka; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Shimamura, Akiko; Daley, George Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and hematopoietic dysfunction, is caused by mutations in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) gene. We created human pluripotent stem cell models of SDS by knock-down of SBDS in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from two SDS patients. SBDS-deficient hESCs and iPSCs manifest deficits in exocrine pancreatic and hematopoietic differentiation in vitro, enhanced apoptosis and elevated protease levels in culture supernatants, which could be reversed by restoring SBDS protein expression through transgene rescue or by supplementing culture media with protease inhibitors. Protease-mediated auto-digestion provides a mechanistic link between the pancreatic and hematopoietic phenotypes in SDS, highlighting the utility of hESCs and iPSCs in obtaining novel insights into human disease. PMID:23602541

  9. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome

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    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J.; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the ICK (intestinal cell kinase) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation, but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. PMID:28380258

  10. Constitutive phosphorylation of ATM in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with ICF syndrome without downstream kinase activity.

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    Goldstine, Jimena V; Nahas, Shareef; Gamo, Kristin; Gartler, Stanley M; Hansen, R Scott; Roelfsema, Jeroen H; Gatti, Richard A; Marahrens, York

    2006-04-08

    Double strand DNA breaks in the genome lead to the activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase in a process that requires ATM autophosphorylation at serine-1981. ATM autophosphorylation only occurs if ATM is previously acetylated by Tip60. The activated ATM kinase phosphorylates proteins involved in arresting the cell cycle, including p53, and in repairing the DNA breaks. Chloroquine treatment and other manipulations that produce chromatin defects in the absence of detectable double strand breaks also trigger ATM phosphorylation and the phosphorylation of p53 in primary human fibroblasts, while other downstream substrates of ATM that are involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks remain unphosphorylated. This raises the issue of whether ATM is constitutively activated in patients with genetic diseases that display chromatin defects. We examined lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from patients with different types of chromatin disorders: Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, Coffin Lowry syndrome, Rubinstein Taybi syndrome and Fascioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy. We show that ATM is phosphorylated on serine-1981 in LCLs derived from ICF patients but not from the other syndromes. The phosphorylated ATM in ICF cells did not phosphorylate the downstream targets NBS1, SMC1 and H2AX, all of which require the presence of double strand breaks. We demonstrate that ICF cells respond normally to ionizing radiation, ruling out the possibility that genetic deficiency in ICF cells renders activated ATM incapable of phosphorylating its downstream substrates. Surprisingly, p53 was also not phosphorylated in ICF cells or in chloroquine-treated wild type LCLs. In this regard the response to chromatin-altering agents differs between primary fibroblasts and LCLs. Our findings indicate that although phosphorylation at serine-1981 is essential in the activation of the ATM kinase, serine-1981 phosphorylation is

  11. Significantly lengthened telomere in granulosa cells from women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

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    Wei, Duo; Xie, Juanke; Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Song, Xiaobing; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Cuilian; Sun, Yingpu

    2017-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy among women at reproductive age. However, its etiology remains poorly understood. Recent studies indicated that telomere length was related to PCOS. However, the association between telomere length and PCOS has only been shown in leucocytes and remained controversial across different studies. To clarify the association between telomere length and PCOS, the current study interrogated telomere length not only in leucocytes, but also in follicular granulosa cells, which is essential for folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis. Seventy-five patients with PCOS and 81 controls with mechanical infertility undergoing their first in vitro fertilization cycle were enrolled. Their peripheral blood and granulosa cells were collected on the oocyte retrieval day. Telomere length of both leucocytes in the blood and granulosa cells was assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No significant difference was found in the leucocyte telomere length between controls and PCOS patients (0.99 ± 0.44 vs. 1.00 ± 0.38, p = 0.93). Interestingly, when comparing telomere length in granulosa cells between controls and PCOS subjects, significantly lengthened telomere length was found in PCOS subjects (1.00 ± 0.37 vs. 1.57±0.67, p < 0.0001). After adjustments for age and body mass index, the p value remained significant (p < 0.0001). This finding reinforced the association between telomere abnormalities and PCOS. Given the importance of telomere length in cellular proliferation, our findings provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of PCOS that abnormalities in telomere length possibly disturb folliculogenesis and subsequently result in PCOS.

  12. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

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    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  13. The role of nibrin in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and cell senescence in Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome patients lymphocytes.

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    Olga Alster

    Full Text Available Nibrin plays an important role in the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. DDR is a crucial signaling pathway in apoptosis and senescence. To verify whether truncated nibrin (p70, causing Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS, is involved in DDR and cell fate upon DNA damage, we used two (S4 and S3R spontaneously immortalized T cell lines from NBS patients, with the founding mutation and a control cell line (L5. S4 and S3R cells have the same level of p70 nibrin, however p70 from S4 cells was able to form more complexes with ATM and BRCA1. Doxorubicin-induced DDR followed by cell senescence could only be observed in L5 and S4 cells, but not in the S3R ones. Furthermore the S3R cells only underwent cell death, but not senescence after doxorubicin treatment. In contrary to doxorubicin treatment, cells from all three cell lines were able to activate the DDR pathway after being exposed to γ-radiation. Downregulation of nibrin in normal human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs did not prevent the activation of DDR and induction of senescence. Our results indicate that a substantially reduced level of nibrin or its truncated p70 form is sufficient to induce DNA-damage dependent senescence in VSMCs and S4 cells, respectively. In doxorubicin-treated S3R cells DDR activation was severely impaired, thus preventing the induction of senescence.

  14. Autologous adipocyte derived stem cells favour healing in a minipig model of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

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    Fabien Forcheron

    Full Text Available Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Here we examined for the first time in a large animal model the therapeutic potential of autologous adipose tissue-derived stroma cells (ASCs. For experiments, Göttingen minipigs were locally gamma irradiated using a (60Co source at the dose of 50 Gy and grafted (n = 5 or not (n = 8. ASCs were cultured in MEM-alpha with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL(-1 and post irradiation were intradermally injected on days 25, 46, 67 and finally between days 95 and 115 (50 × 10(6 ASCs each time into the exposed area. All controls exhibited a clinical evolution with final necrosis (day 91. In grafted pigs an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 +/- 28. Immunohistological analysis of cytokeratin expression showed a complete epidermis recovery. Grafted ASCs accumulated at the dermis/subcutis barrier in which they attracted numerous immune cells, and even an increased vasculature in one pig. Globally this study suggests that local injection of ASCs may represent a useful strategy to mitigate CRS.

  15. Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: a case report.

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    Sakamoto, Kei; Morita, Kei-Ichi; Shimada, Yasuyuki; Omura, Ken; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst (POKC) is a rare gingival cyst showing histologic features identical to those of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A rare case of POKC associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is presented. A 24-year-old woman with NBCCS presented with a pigmented papule, 3 mm in size, involving the lingual gingiva of the right canine area of the mandible. Based on a clinical diagnosis of benign pigmentation, an excisional biopsy was performed, and a histopathologic diagnosis of POKC was rendered. The lining cells were positive for the proteins GLI2, BCL2, keratin 8, keratin 17, and mTOR. TP53 and Ber-EP4 were also weakly positive. Gene mutational analysis on a buccal swab sample revealed 2 missense mutations in the PTCH1 gene. This case is a distinctive example of a genuine soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor, in which an aberrant PTCH1-GLI pathway played a considerable role in the pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cell Death Biomarkers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications in the Acute Coronary Syndrome.

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    Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; de la Peña, Mónica; Pierola, Javier; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada-Nuño, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Teran-Santos, Joaquin; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Masa, Juan Fernando; Abad, Jorge; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran; Barceló, Antònia

    2017-05-01

    Nucleosomes and cell-free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) have been suggested as promising biomarkers in cell death-related diseases, such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with ACS is unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between OSA, dsDNA, and nucleosomes and to assess their potential implication in the development of ACS. Up to 549 patients were included in the study and divided into four groups (145 ACS; 290 ACS + OSA; 62 OSA; 52 controls). All patients underwent a sleep study, and serum concentrations of dsDNA and nucleosomes were measured. Nucleosome and dsDNA levels were higher in patients with OSA than in controls (nucleosomes: 1.47 ± 0.88 arbitary units [AU] vs. 1.00 ± 0.33 AU; p Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

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    Vadim Gorodetskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS.

  18. Implications of Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome and Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Kenan Ashouri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHLS is a rare hereditary neoplastic disorder caused by mutations in the vhl gene leading to the development of tumors in several organs including the central nervous system, pancreas, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Manifestations of VHLS can present at different ages based on the affected organ and subclass of disease. In the subclasses of VHLS that cause renal disease, renal involvement typically begins closer to the end of the second decade of life and can present in different ways ranging from simple cystic lesions to solid tumors. Mutations in vhl are most often associated with clear cell renal carcinoma, the most common type of renal cancer, and also play a major role in sporadic cases of clear cell renal carcinoma. The recurrent, multifocal nature of this disease presents difficult challenges in the long-term management of patients with VHLS. Optimization of renal function warrants the use of several different approaches common to the management of renal carcinoma such as nephron sparing surgery, enucleation, ablation, and targeted therapies. In VHLS, renal lesions of 3 cm or bigger are considered to have metastatic potential and even small lesions often harbor malignancy. Many of the aspects of management revolve around optimizing both oncologic outcome and long-term renal function. As new surgical strategies and targeted therapies develop, the management of this complex disease evolves.  This review will discuss the key aspects of the current management of VHLS.

  19. Cholesterol Transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

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    Zahra Tavoosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes encode the cholesterol transporter proteins that play a key role in cholesterol and phospholipids homeostasis. This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes expression in metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals. This case-control study was performed on 36 patients with metabolic syndrome and the same number of healthy individuals in Hamadan (west of Iran during 2013-2014. Total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells and purified using RNeasy Mini Kit column. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Lipid profile and fasting blood glucose were measured using colorimetric procedures. ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients was significantly lower (about 75% compared to that of control group, while for ABCA1 expression, there was no significant difference between the two studied groups. Comparison of other parameters such as HDL-C, FBS, BMI, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals showed significant differences (P<0.05. Decrease in ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients compared to healthy individuals suggests that hyperglycemia, related metabolites, and hyperlipidemia over the transporter capacity resulted in decreased expression of ABCG1. Absence of a significant change in ABCA1 gene expression between two groups can indicate a different regulation mechanism for ABCA1 expression.

  20. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

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    Mariane de Montalembert

    Full Text Available The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA, iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15% patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16% with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29. Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001. Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001. Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation.

  1. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanir, Yair; Shimoni, Avichai; Ezra-Nimni, Orit; Barequet, Irina S

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, severity, and effect of dry eye in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) and to correlate the findings to the duration after transplantation. A total of 222 eyes of 111 patients after aHSCT at the Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Sheba Medical Center, Israel in a consecutive 3-year period. All patients underwent a full ophthalmic examination and filled the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) questionnaire to assess ocular involvement in the form of dry eye syndrome or any other ocular manifestation. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity, tear break-up time, corneal fluorescein staining, Schirmer test, and OSDI questionnaire. A total of 111 patients were recruited. In 37%, a diagnosis of ocular graft versus host disease was previously made and 46% had no previous ocular examination. Schirmer test was less than 5 mm in 50% of all patients, and in 30% of patients with undiagnosed ocular involvement. The mean OSDI score was 13, and in 28% it was above 20. Correlation was found between visual acuity decrease and high OSDI score to the diagnosis of ocular graft versus host disease and signs of dry eye syndrome. A trend of worsening dry eye was observed up to the second half of the second year posttransplantation. Although many patients are either asymptomatic or do not seek ophthalmic examination, severe dry eye is a common finding after aHSCT. Mandatory follow-up, patient education, and early treatment may improve the quality of life.

  2. A case of Fanconi syndrome accompanied by crystal depositions in tubular cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Hee Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi syndrome (FS is a rare condition that is characterized by defects in the proximal tubular function. A 48-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of proteinuria. The patient showed normal anion gap acidosis, normoglycemic glycosuria, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia. Thus, her condition was compatible with FS. The M peak was found behind the beta globulin region in urine protein electrophoresis. Upon bone marrow examination, we found that 24% of cells were CD138+ plasma cells with kappa restriction. From a kidney biopsy, we found crystalline inclusions within proximal tubular epithelial cells. Thereafter, she was diagnosed with FS accompanied by multiple myeloma. The patient received chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and obtained very good partial hematologic response. However, proximal tubular dysfunction was persistent until 1 year after autologous stem cell transplantation. In short, we report a case of FS accompanied by multiple myeloma, demonstrating crystalline inclusion in proximal tubular cells on kidney biopsy.

  3. PTCH1 Germline Mutations and the Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma Values in the Tumor Spectrum of Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Marco; Pastorino, Lorenza; Maccaferri, Monia; Tomasi, Aldo; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCC), odontogenic tumors and various skeletal anomalies. Basaloid follicular hamartomas (BFHs) constitute rare neoplasms that can be detected in sporadic and familial settings as in the Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma Syndrome (BFHS). Although BFHS shares clinical, histopathological and genetic overlapping with the NBCCS, they are still considered two distinctive entities. The aim of our single-institution study was the analysis of a cohort of PTCH1-mutated patients in order to define clinical and biomolecular relationship between NBCCS and BFHs. In our study we evaluated PTCH1 gene-carrier probands affected by NBCCS to detect the incidence of BFHs and their correlation with this rare syndrome. Among probands we recognized 4 patients with BFHs. We found 15 germline PTCH1 mutations, uniformly distributed across the PTCH1 gene. Six of them had familial history of NBCCS, two of them were novel and have not been described previously. NBCCS and BFHS may be the same genetic entity and not two distinctive syndromes. The inclusion of BFH in the NBCCS cutaneous tumor spectrum might be useful for the recognition of misdiagnosed NBCCS cases that could benefit from tailored surveillance strategies. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Immunological studies in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. II. Active suppression or intrinsic defect--investigated by mixing AIDS cells with HLA-DR identical normal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Ødum, Niels; Jakobsen, B K

    1986-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation responses to mitogens (phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)), allogeneic cells, and the antigen-purified protein derivative (PPD) were studied in six acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and in six healthy controls...... with the strong mitogens PHA and Con A or with allogeneic cells, but suppression may be involved in the decreased responses in cultures stimulated with PWM or PPD. Addition of supernatants from macrocultures of AIDS cells did not suppress responses of control PBMC. Thus, suppression by any lymphocyte subset...

  5. When does germ cell loss and fibrosis occur in patients with Klinefelter syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Saen, D; Vloeberghs, V; Gies, I; Mateizel, I; Sermon, K; De Schepper, Jean; Tournaye, H; Goossens, E

    2018-06-01

    When does germ cell loss and fibrosis occur in patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? In KS, germ cell loss is not observed in testicular tissue from fetuses in the second semester of pregnancy but present at a prepubertal age when the testicular architecture is still normal, while fibrosis is highly present at an adolescent age. Most KS patients are azoospermic at adult age because of a massive germ cell loss. However, the timing when this germ cell loss starts is not known. It is assumed that germ cell loss increases at puberty. Therefore, testicular sperm extraction (TESE) at an adolescent age has been suggested to increase the chances of sperm retrieval at onset of spermatogenesis. However, recent data indicate that testicular biopsies from peripubertal KS patients contain only a few germ cells. In this study, we give an update on fertility preservation in adolescent KS patients and evaluate whether fertility preservation would be beneficial at prepubertal age. The possibility of retrieving testicular spermatozoa by TESE was evaluated in adolescent and adult KS men. The presence of spermatogonia and the degree of fibrosis were also analysed in testicular biopsies from KS patients at different ages. The patients were divided into four age groups: foetal (n = 5), prepubertal (aged 4-7 years; n = 4), peripubertal (aged 12-16 years; n = 20) and adult (aged 18-41 years; n = 27) KS patients. In peripubertal and adult KS patients, retrieval of spermatozoa was attempted by semen analysis after masturbation, vibrostimulation, electroejaculation or by TESE. MAGE-A4 immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the presence of germ cells in testicular biopsies from foetal, prepubertal, peripubertal and adult KS patients. Tissue morphology was evaluated by haematoxylin-periodic acid Schiff (H/PAS) staining. Testicular spermatozoa were collected by TESE in 48.1% of the adult KS patients, while spermatozoa were recovered after TESE in only one peripubertal patient (5

  6. Comparison of telomere length and association with progenitor cell markers in lacrimal gland between Sjögren syndrome and non-Sjögren syndrome dry eye patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Maida, Yoshiko; Kamoi, Mizuka; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Masutomi, Kenkichi; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Indicators of aging such as disruption of telomeric function due to shortening may be more frequent in dysfunctional lacrimal gland. The aims of this study were to 1) determine the viability of quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization of telomeres (telo-FISH) for the assessment of telomere length in lacrimal gland in Sjögren and non- Sjögren syndrome patients; and 2) investigate the relationship between progenitor cell markers and telomere length in both groups. Methods Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization with a peptide nucleic acid probe complementary to the telomere repeat sequence was performed on frozen sections from human lacrimal gland tissues. The mean fluorescence intensity of telomere spots was automatically quantified by image analysis as relative telomere length in lacrimal gland epithelial cells. Immunostaining for p63, nucleostemin, ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2), and nestin was also performed. Results Telomere intensity in the Sjögren syndrome group (6,785.0±455) was significantly lower than that in the non-Sjögren syndrome group (7,494.7±477; p=0.02). Among the samples from the non-Sjögren syndrome group, immunostaining revealed that p63 was expressed in 1–3 acinar cells in each acinar unit and continuously in the basal layer of duct cells. In contrast, in the Sjögren syndrome group, p63 and nucleostemin showed a lower level of expression. ABCG2 was expressed in acinar cells in both sjogren and non-Sjogren syndrome. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that 1) telo-FISH is a viable method of assessing telomere length in lacrimal gland, and 2) telomere length in Sjögren syndrome is shorter and associated with lower levels of expression of p63 and nucleostemin than in non-Sjögren syndrome. PMID:21655359

  7. Comparison of telomere length and association with progenitor cell markers in lacrimal gland between Sjögren syndrome and non-Sjögren syndrome dry eye patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Maida, Yoshiko; Kamoi, Mizuka; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Masutomi, Kenkichi; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Indicators of aging such as disruption of telomeric function due to shortening may be more frequent in dysfunctional lacrimal gland. The aims of this study were to 1) determine the viability of quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization of telomeres (telo-FISH) for the assessment of telomere length in lacrimal gland in Sjögren and non- Sjögren syndrome patients; and 2) investigate the relationship between progenitor cell markers and telomere length in both groups. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization with a peptide nucleic acid probe complementary to the telomere repeat sequence was performed on frozen sections from human lacrimal gland tissues. The mean fluorescence intensity of telomere spots was automatically quantified by image analysis as relative telomere length in lacrimal gland epithelial cells. Immunostaining for p63, nucleostemin, ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2), and nestin was also performed. Telomere intensity in the Sjögren syndrome group (6,785.0±455) was significantly lower than that in the non-Sjögren syndrome group (7,494.7±477; p=0.02). Among the samples from the non-Sjögren syndrome group, immunostaining revealed that p63 was expressed in 1-3 acinar cells in each acinar unit and continuously in the basal layer of duct cells. In contrast, in the Sjögren syndrome group, p63 and nucleostemin showed a lower level of expression. ABCG2 was expressed in acinar cells in both sjogren and non-Sjogren syndrome. The results of this study indicate that 1) telo-FISH is a viable method of assessing telomere length in lacrimal gland, and 2) telomere length in Sjögren syndrome is shorter and associated with lower levels of expression of p63 and nucleostemin than in non-Sjögren syndrome.

  8. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Salman, M.; Mansoor, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple jaw cysts are a characteristic manifestation of basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by symptoms primarily involving the skin, central nervous system, and skeletal system. In 90% of the patients, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is associated with recurring odontogenic keratocysts. This patient showed recurrent jaw and maxillary cysts, for which he was followed for 2 years. (author)

  9. Sezary syndrome cells unlike normal circulating T lymphocytes fail to migrate following engagement of NT1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magazin, Marilyn; Poszepczynska-Guigné, Ewa; Bagot, Martine; Boumsell, Laurence; Pruvost, Christelle; Chalon, Pascale; Culouscou, Jean-Michel; Ferrara, Pascual; Bensussan, Armand

    2004-01-01

    Circulating malignant Sezary cells are a clonal proliferation of CD4+CD45RO+ T lymphocytes primarily involving the skin. To study the biology of these malignant T lymphocytes, we tested their ability to migrate in chemotaxis assays. Previously, we had shown that the neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) binds to freshly isolated Sezary malignant cells and induces through NT1 receptors the cell migration of the cutaneous T cell lymphoma cell line Cou-L. Here, we report that peripheral blood Sezary cells as well as the Sezary cell line Pno fail to migrate in response to neurotensin although they are capable of migrating to the chemokine stromal-cell-derived factor 1 alpha. This is in contrast with normal circulating CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes, which respond to both types of chemoattractants except after ex vivo short-time anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody activation, which abrogates the neurotensin-induced lymphocyte migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that neurotensin-responsive T lymphocytes express the functional NT1 receptor responsible for chemotaxis. In these cells, but not in Sezary cells, neurotensin induces recruitment of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, and redistribution of phosphorylated cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase and filamentous actin. Taken together, these results, which show functional distinctions between normal circulating lymphocytes and Sezary syndrome cells, contribute to further understanding of the physiopathology of these atypical cells.

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-containing T-cell lymphoma presents with hemophagocytic syndrome mimicking malignant histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, I J; Hsu, Y H; Lin, M T; Cheng, A L; Wang, C H; Weiss, L M

    1993-09-15

    The previously designated malignant histiocytosis (MH) may include lymphoid neoplasms of T-cell lineage as well as patients with benign virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS). In this study, the association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with T cell lymphomas which present with clinicopathologic features indistinguishable from malignant histiocytosis (MH) was investigated further. Four adult patients, three women and one man, were admitted because of fever, cutaneous lesions, hepatosplenomegaly, and jaundice. Laboratory examinations revealed pancytopenia, abnormal liver functions and coagulopathy. All patients ran a fulminant course terminating in a hemophagocytic syndrome within 1 month. Immunophenotypic study, Southern blot analysis, and in situ hybridization were performed on the specimens obtained from the four patients. The biopsy-necropsy specimens from skin, liver, spleen, and bone marrow showed infiltration of atypical large cells with reactive histiocytosis and florid hemophagocytosis activity. Based on the clinical and histologic findings, these cases would have been designated as MH by previous criteria. Immunophenotypic, Southern blot, and in situ hybridization studies, however, showed clonotypic proliferation of EBV genomes in the nuclei of the large atypical cells that expressed T-cell antigens. Therefore, these patients should be diagnosed as a recently described EBV-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma (EBV-PTCL). EBV-PTCL may present with a fulminant hemophagocytic syndrome indistinguishable from the previously designated MH. This finding represents a step forward in our changing concept regarding MH, some of which only recently has been suggested to be of T-cell lymphoma origin. Differentiation from benign VAHS is clinically important. Features useful in this distinction are tabulated and discussed.

  12. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) product localizes to secretory granules and determines granule acidification in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Masayuki; Tanabe, Katsuya; Yanai, Akie; Ohta, Yasuharu; Kondo, Manabu; Akiyama, Masaru; Shinoda, Koh; Oka, Yoshitomo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident transmembrane protein. The Wfs1-null mouse exhibits progressive insulin deficiency causing diabetes. Previous work suggested that the function of the WFS1 protein is connected to unfolded protein response and to intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. However, its precise molecular function in pancreatic β-cells remains elusive. In our present study, immunofluorescent and electron-microscopic analyses revealed that WFS1 localizes not only to ER but also to secretory granules in pancreatic β-cells. Intragranular acidification was assessed by measuring intracellular fluorescence intensity raised by the acidotrophic agent, 3-[2,4-dinitroanilino]-3'-amino-N-methyldipropyramine. Compared with wild-type β-cells, there was a 32% reduction in the intensity in WFS1-deficient β-cells, indicating the impairment of granular acidification. This phenotype may, at least partly, account for the evidence that Wfs1-null islets have impaired proinsulin processing, resulting in an increased circulating proinsulin level. Morphometric analysis using electron microscopy evidenced that the density of secretory granules attached to the plasma membrane was significantly reduced in Wfs1-null β-cells relative to that in wild-type β-cells. This may be relevant to the recent finding that granular acidification is required for the priming of secretory granules preceding exocytosis and may partly explain the fact that glucose-induced insulin secretion is profoundly impaired in young prediabetic Wfs1-null mice. These results thus provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of β-cell dysfunction in patients with Wolfram syndrome.

  13. Longitudinal investigation of natural killer cells and cytokines in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenu Ekua W

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME is an etiologically unexplained disorder characterised by irregularities in various aspects of the immunological function. Presently, it is unknown whether these immunological changes remain consistent over time. This study investigates Natural Killer (NK cell cytotoxic activity, NK cell subsets (CD56brightCD16- and CD56dimCD16+ and cytokines, over the course of a12 month period in patients with CFS/ME. Methods The participants in the study comprised 65 (47.2 ± 11.5 years CFS/ME participants and 21 (45.2 ±9.3 years non-fatigued controls. Flow cytometry protocols were used to assess NK subsets and NK cytotoxic activity at various time points that included baseline (T1, 6 (T2 and 12 months (T3. Cytokine secretions were measured following mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results NK cytotoxic activity was significantly decreased in the CFS/ME patients at T1, T2 and T3 compared to the non-fatigued group. Additionally, in comparison to the non-fatigued controls, the CFS/ME group had significantly lower numbers of CD56brightCD16- NK cells at both T1 and T2. Interestingly, following mitogenic stimulation, cytokine secretion revealed significant increases in IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α at T1 in the CFS/ME group. A significant decrease was observed at T2 in the CFS/ME group for IL-10 and IL-17A while at T3, IL-2 was increased in the CFS/ME group in comparison to the non-fatigued controls. Overall cytotoxic activity was significantly decreased at T3 compared to T1 and T2. CD56brightCD16- NK cells were much lower at T2 compared to T1 and T3. IL-10 and IL-17A secretion was elevated at T2 in comparison to T1 and T3. Conclusion These results confirm decreases in immune function in CFS/ME patients, suggesting an increased susceptibility to viral and other infections. Furthermore, NK cytotoxic activity may be a suitable biomarker for diagnosing CFS

  14. Chromatid repulsion associated with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome is reduced in malignant cells and not expressed in interspecies somatic-cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassikoff, N E; Cowan, J M; Parry, D M; Francke, U

    1986-01-01

    Different cell types from a female patient with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome were evaluated quantitatively for the presence of repulsion of heterochromatin and satellite regions of mitotic chromosomes. Whereas EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from an established cell line revealed these phenomena at frequencies equal to those in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts, aneuploid cells from a metastatic melanoma displayed them at 50% lower frequency. Cocultivation of the patient's fibroblasts with either an immortal Chinese hamster cell line or with a human male fibroblast strain carrying a t(4;6)(p14;q21) translocation showed that the phenomenon was not corrected or induced by a diffusible factor or by cell-to-cell contact. In each experiment, only the patient's metaphase spreads revealed chromatid repulsion. In fusion hybrids between the patient's fibroblasts and an established Chinese hamster cell line, the human chromosomes behaved perfectly normally, suggesting that the gene product which is missing or mutant in Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome is supplied by the Chinese hamster genome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3788975

  15. Thoracic air-leakage syndrome in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients as a late complication of chronic graft-versus-host disease: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Wook; Kim, Song Soo; Jo, Daeg Yeon; Yun, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin Hwan [Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Air-leakage syndrome associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a rare complication, but it is also reported as an independent predictor of a worse survival rate after stem cell transplantation. We report two cases of air-leakage syndrome associated with GVHD after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute leukemia patients who presented with spontaneous pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, and finally death due to respiratory failure seven to eight months later.

  16. The Ptch1DL mouse: a new model to study lambdoid craniosynostosis and basal cell nevus syndrome associated skeletal defects

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Weiguo; Choi, Irene; Clouthier, David E.; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models provide valuable opportunities for probing the underlying pathology of human birth defects. Employing an ENU-based screen for recessive mutations affecting craniofacial anatomy we isolated a mouse strain, Dogface-like (DL), with abnormal skull and snout morphology. Examination of the skull indicated that these mice developed craniosynostosis of the lambdoid suture. Further analysis revealed skeletal defects related to the pathology of basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) including de...

  17. Should elderly patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Amer M; Gore, Steven D

    2013-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include a group of hematopoietic malignancies characterized by dysplastic changes, ineffective hematopoiesis and variable risk of leukemic progression. At diagnosis, 86% of MDS patients are ≥60 years. Azacitidine, the only drug that prolongs life in high-risk (HR)-MDS patients, adds a median of only 9.5 months to life. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) remains the only potentially curative approach. Despite recent improvements including use of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) that decrease transplant-related mortality, alloSCT continues to be used rarely in elderly MDS. There is paucity of data regarding outcomes of RIC alloSCT in elderly MDS patients, especially in direct comparison with azanucleosides. In this paper, the authors discuss the recent Markov decision analysis by Koreth et al. in which investigators demonstrated superior survival of patients with HR-MDS aged 60-70 years who underwent RIC alloSCT in comparison with those who were treated with azanucleosides.

  18. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  19. Influence of depression and anxiety on circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Pini, Stefano; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco M; Bertoli, Daniele; Abelli, Marianna; Borelli, Lucia; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Gesi, Camilla; Michi, Paola; Morrone, Doralisa; Gnudi, Luigi; Balbarini, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are related to endothelial function and progression of coronary artery disease. There is evidence of decreased numbers of circulating EPCs in patients with a current episode of major depression. We investigated the relationships between the level of circulating EPCs and depression and anxiety in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients with ACS admitted to three Cardiology Intensive Care Units were evaluated by the SCID-I to determine the presence of lifetime and/or current mood and anxiety disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. The EPCs were defined as CD133(+) CD34(+) KDR(+) and evaluated by flow cytometry. All patients underwent standardized cardiological and psychopathological evaluations. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed where appropriate. Out of 111 ACS patients, 57 were found to have a DSM-IV lifetime or current mood or anxiety disorder at the time of the inclusion in the study. The ACS group with mood or anxiety disorders showed a significant decrease in circulating EPC number compared with ACS patients without affective disorders. In addition, EPC levels correlated negatively with severity of depression and anxiety at index ACS episode. The current study indicates that EPCs circulate in decreased numbers in ACS patients with depression or anxiety and, therefore, contribute to explore new perspectives in the pathophysiology of the association between cardiovascular disorders and affective disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Impaired Circulating Angiogenic Cells Mobilization and Metalloproteinase-9 Activity after Dynamic Exercise in Early Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Natalia G; Sales, Allan R K; Penedo, Leticia A; Pereira, Felipe S; Silva, Mayra S; Miranda, Renan L; Silva, Jemima F R; Silva, Bruno M; Santos, Aline A; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of adhesion molecules or metalloproteinases (MMPs) may indicate endothelial dysfunction. Exercise mobilizes circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) from bone marrow in healthy subjects, improving vascular function. However, it is unclear whether this mechanism is preserved in the early stages of metabolic syndrome (early MetS). We aimed to evaluate the acute effects of exercise on adhesion molecules, angiogenic factors, MMPs, and CACs in early MetS. Fifteen subjects with early MetS and nine healthy controls underwent an exercise session and a nonexercise session, randomly. Adhesion molecules, angiogenic factors, CACs, and MMPs were evaluated before and after exercise or nonexercise sessions. At baseline, levels of sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and MMP-9 were higher in early MetS than in controls (P ≤ 0.03). After exercise, sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and MMP-9 levels were still higher in early MetS (P exercise. There was no difference between moments in nonexercise session (P > 0.05). In conclusion, subjects with early MetS already presented impaired endothelial function at rest along with a decrease in CACs and an increase in MMP-9 activity in response to exercise.

  1. Acute coronary syndrome patients with depression have low blood cell membrane omega-3 fatty acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alpesh A; Menon, Rishi A; Reid, Kimberly J; Harris, William S; Spertus, John A

    2008-10-01

    To determine the extent to which levels of membrane eicosapentaenoic (EPA)+docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) (the omega-3 index) were associated with depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Depression is associated with worse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients with ACS. Reduced levels of blood cell membrane omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs), an emerging risk factor for both CV disease and depression, may help to explain the link between depression and adverse CV outcomes. We measured membrane FA composition in 759 patients with confirmed ACS. The analysis included not only EPA and DHA but also the n-6 FAs linoleic and arachidonic acids (LA and AA). Depressive symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ). Multivariable linear regression was used to adjust for demographic and clinical characteristics. There was a significant inverse relationship between the n-3 index and depressive symptoms (PHQ) in the fully adjusted model (p = .034). For every 4.54% point rise in the n-3 index, there was a 1-point decline in depressive symptoms. In contrast to the n-3 FAs, membrane levels of the n-6 FAs LA and AA were not different between depressed and nondepressed ACS patients. We found an inverse relationship between the n-3 index and the prevalence of depressive symptoms in patients with ACS. Therefore, this study supports the hypothesis that reduced n-3 FA tissue levels are a common and potentially modifiable link between depression and adverse CV outcomes.

  2. Detection of dendritic cells and related cytokines in follicular fluid of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Fuying; Huo, Ran; Tang, Aifa; Zeng, Yong; Duan, Yong-Gang

    2017-09-01

    The presence of dendritic cells (DCs) and associated cytokines in follicular fluid (FF) from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remains unknown. FF was collected from PCOS patients and patients with severe male factor infertility (control) at the day of transvaginal oocyte retrieval. Phenotypes of DC were detected by flow cytometry, and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-23 were assessed by ELISA. A significant decrease in the percentage of DC was found in patients with PCOS (16.22±5.5%) compared with control (21.27±5.5%, P<.01). E 2 on the day of hCG administration was correlated positively with the mean fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR (r=.75, P<.01) and reversely correlated with the concentration of TNF-α in FF (r=-.69, P<.01). The level of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 increased significantly but IL-23 decreased in FF from patients with PCOS. The decrease of DC and disturbance of associated cytokines in FF from PCOS patients indicates a disorder of immunological microenvironment of the ovarian follicle, which might be involved in the dysfunction of folliculogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Treatment of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome with defibrotide, a proposed vascular endothelial cell modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcoglu-O'Ral, Arsinur; Erkan, Doruk; Asherson, Ronald

    2002-09-01

    To define at the molecular level the vascular endothelial cell (VEC) injury characteristics of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) and to report successful therapeutic use of a VEC modulator, defibrotide. We describe a 55-year-old man with primary APS with an intractable prothrombotic state (CAPS) resistant to combined therapy with heparin, warfarin, aspirin, and dipyridamole. Treatment with defibrotide was conducted in the context of an investigational phase II protocol where the dose was regulated and individualized by disease/patient-specific molecular and clinical markers. The patient entered complete remission with defibrotide treatment. During treatment, dose dependent pharmacological actions of defibrotide and key stress markers for VEC injury were identified. Evidence of defibrotide's polypharmacology included downregulation of cytokines, notably tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as the earliest effect, cellular differentiation of VEC, possibly with direct regulatory effect over cellular genes, and the reversal of platelet consumption and prothrombotic state. Von Willebrand antigen levels were used as the sole marker to guide therapy. This case demonstrates effective remission of CAPS with defibrotide treatment. In contrast to theories that CAPS is triggered by ischemic and thrombotic tissue damage, these data present VEC injury as the primary and representative lesion of CAPS. The pathogenesis may involve concurrent impairment of different VEC functions. Achieving remission may require a polypharmacologic approach, represented here by use of defibrotide.

  4. Safety and effects of prophylactic defibrotide for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Meerim; Park, Hyeon Jin; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kwon, Young Joo; Park, Jeong A; Lim, Yeon Jung; Yoon, Jong Hyung; Kong, Sun-Young; Ghim, Thad T; Lee, Hye Won; Yun, Tak; Park, Byung-Kiu

    2013-01-28

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a serious complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with a mortality rate of up to 90%. We report our experience on the use of defibrotide for SOS prophylaxis in HSCT. We retrospectively reviewed data of 49 patients who received defibrotide as SOS prophylaxis during the course of HSCT at the National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea, between August 2005 and July 2008. Thirty-four patients (69.4%) were classified as a high-risk group for developing SOS. Defibrotide was well-tolerated, without any grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The median value of maximum total bilirubin within 100 days after HSCT was within the normal range. SOS was diagnosed in only 1 patient, who underwent autologous HSCT due to relapsed medulloblastoma. There was no day 100 treatment-related mortality in our study. Defibrotide appears to be a safe prophylaxis for SOS. This study suggests that it could be effective to use prophylactic defibrotide in advance to improve HSCT outcomes in patients at risk of SOS.

  5. Successful treatment with defibrotide for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Okamura, Atsuo; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Chihara, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) (formerly known as hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD)) is a life-threatening complication subsequent to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, no completely satisfactory strategies for the treatment of SOS have been established yet. Defibrotide is a single-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide with anti-thrombotic, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory and thrombolytic properties, but without systemic anticoagulant effects, and some encouraging results have been reported in western countries. We treated four patients with defibrotide for SOS, since there seemed to be no possibility to cure the patients with conventionally available treatments in Japan. All patients showed evidence of multiple organ failure at the start of the treatment. Defibrotide was administered intravenously in normal saline in four divided doses for 14 to 27 days. Three patients (75%) responded to the therapy, while one died of SOS and cytomegalovirus infection despite intensive therapy. None of the patients suffered from significant adverse effects such as severe hemorrhage. This is the first report dealing with the treatment with defibrotide of Japanese patients with SOS. Because defibrotide is considered to be promising for the treatment of SOS, it is important to start a phase II study as soon as possible.

  6. Study of beta-cell function (by HOMA model) in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M K; Dutta, M K; Mahalle, Namita

    2011-07-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (MS), which strongly predict risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Many studies implicate insulin resistance (IR) in the development of diabetes, but ignore the contribution of beta-cell dysfunction. Hence, we studied beta-cell function, as assessed by HOMA model, in subjects with MS. We studied 50 subjects with MS diagnosed by IDF criteria and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Clinical evaluation included anthropometry, body fat analysis by bioimpedance, biochemical, and insulin measurement. IR and secretion were calculated by HOMA model. Subjects with MS had more IR (HOMA-IR) than controls (3.35 ± 3.14 vs. 1.76 ± 0.53, P = 0.029) and secreted less insulin (HOMA-S) than controls (66.80 ± 69.66 vs. 144.27 ± 101.61, P = 0.0003), although plasma insulin levels were comparable in both groups (10.7 ± 10.2 vs. 8.2 ± 2.38, P = 0.44). HOMA-IR and HOMA-S were related with number of metabolic abnormalities. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body mass index, waist hip ratio, body fat mass, and percent body fat. HOMA-S was negatively associated with waist hip ratio, fasting plasma glucose and total cholesterol and positively with basal metabolic rate. Percent body fat was an independent predictor of HOMA-IR and waist hip ratio of HOMA-S in multiple regression analysis. Subjects with MS have increased IR and decreased insulin secretion compared with healthy controls. Lifestyle measures have been shown to improve IR, insulin secretion, and various components and effects of MS. Hence, there is an urgent need for public health measures to prevent ongoing epidemic of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  7. EPA and DHA in blood cell membranes from acute coronary syndrome patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Harris, William S; Reid, Kimberly J; Sands, Scott A; Spertus, John A

    2008-04-01

    Increased blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids (FA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been inversely associated with risk for sudden cardiac death, but their relationship with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is unclear. We hypothesized that the EPA+DHA content of blood cell membranes, as a percent of total FAs, is reduced in ACS patients relative to matched controls. We measured the content of EPA+DHA in 768 ACS patients and 768 age-, sex- and race-matched controls. The association with ACS case status of blood cell EPA+DHA [both by a 1 unit change and by category (low, or =8%)] was assessed using multivariate conditional logistic regression models adjusting for matching variables and smoking status, alcohol use, diabetes, body mass index, serum lipids, education, family history of coronary artery disease, personal histories of myocardial infarction and hypertension, and statin, aspirin, and other antiplatelet drug use. The combined groups had a mean age of 61+/-12 years, 66% were male, and 92% were Caucasian. The EPA+DHA content was 20% lower in cases than controls (3.4+/-1.6 vs. 4.25+/-2.0%, pACS event was 0.58 (95% CI 0.42-0.80), in the intermediate EPA+DHA group and was 0.31 (95% CI 0.14-0.67; p for trend ACS case status increased incrementally as the EPA+DHA content decreased suggesting that low EPA+DHA may be associated with increased risk for ACS.

  8. Defibrotide for the management of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in patients who undergo haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsouvelis, John; Avery, Sharon; Dooley, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Carl; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, previously known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD/SOS), is a complication in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Severe VOD/SOS, including progression to multi-organ failure, has resulted in a mortality of greater than 80%. Defibrotide's varying pharmacological actions, particularly on endothelial cells, make it is a useful agent to consider for prophylaxis and treatment of VOD/SOS. Barriers to its routine use include the high acquisition cost and the fact that neither the oral or parenteral formulations are licensed products in many countries at this time. This review summarises available literature on the use of defibrotide in the management of VOD/SOS. Publications consist predominantly of single centre cohort studies and case series. Available evidence indicates that defibrotide is effective in the management of VOD/SOS. Using defibrotide prophylaxis should also be considered, especially in the paediatric setting, where there are available results from a large, open label, randomized controlled trial. Patient outcome data from the larger studies and compassionate programs can inform consensus recommendations on dosing regimen and criteria for the treatment of VOD/SOS with defibrotide in the adult population. The reviewed literature indicates an effective and safe dose for treatment is 25mg/kg/day, continued for at least 14days or until complete response is achieved. Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose and duration of treatment in both paediatric patients and adults. Recent recommendations and a phase 3 trial using historical controls indicate that defibrotide should be included as a pharmacotherapy option in protocols guiding management of VOD/SOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation

  10. [Molecular diagnosis and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 17 children with inherited bone marrow failure syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Benshang; Luo, Changying; Wang, Jianmin; Luo, Chengjuan; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To enrich our national database with data of rare diseases by analyzing molecular diagnosis and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). Next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based genetic diagnosis panel was applied for the clinical diagnosis and management of IBMFS. Retrospective analysis was performed on clinical and genetic data of 17 consecutive children who received HSCT over a long time interval (November. 2005-June 2015). Three patients were diagnosed only by clinical manifestation before 2012. After that NGS-based genetic diagnosis panel was used to identify IBMFS-related genes in 12/14.IBMFS patients (except two Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) patients). Two Fanconi anemia (FA) patients were confirmed to be new variations through family-genotype-analysis and 3 families accepted prenatal diagnosis to avoid birth of affected fetuses. Seventeen IBMFS patients (10 FA,5 DBA and 2 dyskeratosis congenital (DKC)) were treated with HSCT from matched sibling donors (n=2), matched unrelated donors (n=8) or mismatched unrelated donors (n=7). The source of stem cells for transplantation included peripheral blood (n=12) and cord blood (n=5). With regard to the conditioning regimens, FA and DKC patients received fludarabine-based reduced intensity conditioning, while DBA patients received classical busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning. Median age at the time of HSCT was 36 months (7-156 months). The number of infused mononuclear cells and CD34⁺ cells was (10.6 ± 6.7) × 10⁸ and (5.9 ± 7.0) × 10⁶ per kilogram of recipient body weight, respectively. The median number of days to neutrophil recovery was 13 days after HSCT (range: 10-19 days). Platelet recovery was faster in the PBSCT group than in the CBT group ((16.3 ± 6.0) days vs. (30.0 ± 17.1) days,t=-2.487,P=0.026). During a median follow-up of 17 months (range: 2-114 months), except one FA patient who was transplanted with HLA

  11. Delayed ß-cell response and glucose intolerance in young women with Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Britta Eilersen; Holst, Jens Juul; Juhl, Claus

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate glucose homeostasis in detail in Turner syndrome (TS), where impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes are frequent. METHODS: Cross sectional study of women with Turner syndrome (TS)(n = 13) and age and body mass index matched controls (C) (n = 13), evaluated...

  12. Establishment of a PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome disease model and mechanism study using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yongkun; Sun, Xiaolei; Li, Bin; Cai, Huanhuan; Xu, Chen; Liang, Qianqian; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Chen, Sifeng; Yin, Lianhua; Sheng, Wei; Huang, Guoying; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo; Sun, Ning

    2018-04-01

    PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome is a distinct form of human cardiomyopathy characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, ventricular pre-excitation and progressive cardiac conduction disorder. However, it remains unclear how mutations in the PRKAG2 gene give rise to such a complicated disease. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we generated disease-specific hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from two brothers both carrying a heterozygous missense mutation c.905G>A (R302Q) in the PRKAG2 gene and further corrected the R302Q mutation with CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing. Disease-specific hiPSC-cardiomyocytes recapitulated many phenotypes of PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome including cellular enlargement, electrophysiological irregularities and glycogen storage. In addition, we found that the PRKAG2-R302Q mutation led to increased AMPK activities, resulting in extensive glycogen deposition and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Finally we confirmed that disrupted phenotypes of PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome caused by the specific PRKAG2-R302Q mutation can be alleviated by small molecules inhibiting AMPK activity and be rescued with CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome correction. Our results showed that disease-specific hiPSC-CMs and genetically-corrected hiPSC-cardiomyocytes would be a very useful platform for understanding the pathogenesis of, and testing autologous cell-based therapies for, PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Impaired circulating CD4+ LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome and its mechanistic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CD4(+ latency-associated peptide (LAP(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs are defective in ACS. METHODS: One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA and chest pain syndrome (CPS. The frequencies of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP on CD4(+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4(+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4(+LAP(+ T cells is defective in ACS patients.

  14. Fifty Years of Research in ARDS. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Biology and Potential Therapeutic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, John G; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of several preclinical studies, cell-based therapy has emerged as a potential new therapeutic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Of the various cell-based therapy options, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord have the most experimental data to support their potential efficacy for lung injury from both infectious and noninfectious causes. Mechanistically, MSCs exert their beneficial effects by release of paracrine factors, microvesicles, and transfer of mitochondria, all of which have antiinflammatory and pro-resolving effects on injured lung endothelium and alveolar epithelium, including enhancing the resolution of pulmonary edema by up-regulating sodium-dependent alveolar fluid clearance. MSCs also have antimicrobial effects mediated by release of antimicrobial factors and by up-regulating monocyte/macrophage phagocytosis. Phase 2a clinical trials to establish safety in ARDS are in progress, and two phase 1 trials did not report any serious adverse events. Several issues need further study, including: determining the optimal methods for large-scale production, reconstitution of cryopreserved cells for clinical use, defining cell potency assays, and determining the therapeutic potential of conditioned media derived from MSCs. Because ARDS is a heterogeneous syndrome, targeting MSCs to patients with ARDS with a more hyperinflammatory endotype may further enhance their potential for efficacy.

  15. Failure-to-thrive syndrome associated with tumor formation by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in newborn nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinster, Lauren R; Omeir, Romelda L; Foseh, Gideon S; Macauley, Juliete N; Snoy, Philip J; Beren, Joel J; Teferedegne, Belete; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M

    2013-08-01

    Tumors that formed in newborn nude mice that were inoculated with 10(7) Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were associated with a failure-to-thrive (FTT) syndrome consisting of growth retardation, lethargy, weakness, and dehydration. Scoliosis developed in 41% of affected pups. Pups were symptomatic by week 2; severely affected pups became moribund and required euthanasia within 3 to 4 wk. Mice with FTT were classified into categories of mild, moderate, and severe disease by comparing their weight with that of age-matched normal nude mice. The MDCK-induced tumors were adenocarcinomas that invaded adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and bone; 6 of the 26 pups examined had lung metastases. The induction of FTT did not correlate with cell-line aggressiveness as estimated by histopathology or the efficiency of tumor formation (tumor-forming dose 50% endpoint range = 10(2.8) to 10(7.5)); however, tumor invasion of the paravertebral muscles likely contributed to the scoliosis noted. In contrast to the effect of MDCK cells, tumor formation observed in newborn mice inoculated with highly tumorigenic, human-tumor-derived cell lines was not associated with FTT development. We suggest that tumor formation and FTT are characteristics of these MDCK cell inocula and that FTT represents a new syndrome that may be similar to the cachexia that develops in humans with cancer or other diseases.

  16. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  17. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  18. The effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic beta cell requirement in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thozhukat Sathyapalan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increased risk of developing T2DM in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, and there is evidence that statins improve metabolic parameters in these patients. However, there are some data to show that statins increase the risk of incipient diabetes. Materials and methods: We have previously shown that 12 weeks of atorvastatin improves insulin resistance when measured using HOMA-IR. This post hoc analysis was designed to look at the effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic β cell function using HOMA-β in the same study. In this randomised, double-blind placebo controlled study, 40 medication-naïve patients with PCOS were randomised to either atorvastatin 20 mg daily or placebo for 3 months. A 3-month extension study for both groups of patients was undertaken with metformin 1500 mg daily after completing initial 3 months of atorvastatin or placebo. Results: There was a significant reduction in HOMA-β (240 ± 3.2 vs 177 ± 2.3; P value <0.01 after 12 weeks of atorvastatin treatment, which was maintained by metformin in the subsequent 12 weeks. There were no changes in HOMA-β after the placebo or after subsequent metformin treatment. There was no linear correlation between reduction in HOMA-β with improvement of free androgen index (FAI (r2 = 0.02; P = 0.72, testosterone (r2 = 0.13; P = 0.49, SHBG (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.48, hsCRP (r2 = 0.19; P = 0.64, triglycerides (r2 = 0.09; P = 0.12, total cholesterol (r2 = 0.11; P = 0.32 or LDL-C (r2 = 0.19; P = 0.38. Conclusion: Treatment with atorvastatin for 12 weeks in women with PCOS significantly reduced HOMA-β. This could be potentially due to fall in β-cell requirement with improvement of insulin resistance rather than a reduction of β-cell function.

  19. The effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic beta cell requirement in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Coady, Anne-Marie; Kilpatrick, Eric S; Atkin, Stephen L

    2017-11-01

    There is an increased risk of developing T2DM in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and there is evidence that statins improve metabolic parameters in these patients. However, there are some data to show that statins increase the risk of incipient diabetes. We have previously shown that 12 weeks of atorvastatin improves insulin resistance when measured using HOMA-IR. This post hoc analysis was designed to look at the effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic β cell function using HOMA-β in the same study. In this randomised, double-blind placebo controlled study, 40 medication-naïve patients with PCOS were randomised to either atorvastatin 20 mg daily or placebo for 3 months. A 3-month extension study for both groups of patients was undertaken with metformin 1500 mg daily after completing initial 3 months of atorvastatin or placebo. There was a significant reduction in HOMA-β (240 ± 3.2 vs 177 ± 2.3; P value <0.01) after 12 weeks of atorvastatin treatment, which was maintained by metformin in the subsequent 12 weeks. There were no changes in HOMA-β after the placebo or after subsequent metformin treatment.There was no linear correlation between reduction in HOMA-β with improvement of free androgen index (FAI) ( r 2  = 0.02; P  = 0.72), testosterone ( r 2  = 0.13; P  = 0.49), SHBG ( r 2  = 0.22; P  = 0.48), hsCRP ( r 2  = 0.19; P  = 0.64), triglycerides ( r 2  = 0.09; P  = 0.12), total cholesterol ( r 2  = 0.11; P  = 0.32) or LDL-C ( r 2  = 0.19; P  = 0.38). Treatment with atorvastatin for 12 weeks in women with PCOS significantly reduced HOMA-β. This could be potentially due to fall in β-cell requirement with improvement of insulin resistance rather than a reduction of β-cell function. © 2017 The authors.

  20. Defective IL-10 signaling in hyper-IgE syndrome results in impaired generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells and induced regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masako; Nagasawa, Masayuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yamada, Masafumi; Kawamura, Nobuaki; Ariga, Tadashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent staphylococcal infections and atopic dermatitis associated with elevated serum IgE levels. Although defective differentiation of IL-17–producing CD4+ T cells (Th17) partly accounts for the susceptibility to staphylococcal skin abscesses and pneumonia, the pathogenesis of atopic manifestations in HIES still remains an enigma. In this study, we examined the differentiation and function of Th1, Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and dendritic cells (DCs) in HIES patients carrying either STAT3 or TYK2 mutations. Although the in vitro differentiation of Th1 and Th2 cells and the number and function of Treg cells in the peripheral blood were normal in HIES patients with STAT3 mutations, primary and monocyte-derived DCs showed defective responses to IL-10 and thus failed to become tolerogenic. When treated with IL-10, patient DCs showed impaired up-regulation of inhibitory molecules on their surface, including PD-L1 and ILT-4, compared with control DCs. Moreover, IL-10–treated DCs from patients displayed impaired ability to induce the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells to FOXP3+ induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). These results suggest that the defective generation of IL-10–induced tolerogenic DCs and iTreg cells may contribute to inflammatory changes in HIES. PMID:21300911

  1. The Sertoli Cell Only Syndrome and Glaucoma in a Sex - Determining Region Y (SRY) Positive XX Infertile Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manish; V, Veeramohan; Chaudhary, Isha; Halder, Ashutosh

    2013-07-01

    The XX male syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. The phenotype is variable; it ranges from a severe impairment of the external genitalia to a normal male phenotype with infertility. It generally results from an unequal crossing over between the short arms of the sex chromosomes (X and Y). We are reporting a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with infertility and the features of hypogonadism and glaucoma. The examinations revealed normal external male genitalia, soft small testes, gynaecomastia and glaucoma. The semen analysis showed azoospermia. The serum gonadotropins were high, with low Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) and Inhibin B levels. The chromosomal analysis demonstrated a 46, XX karyotype. Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) revealed the presence of a Sex-determining Region Y (SRY). Testicular Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) revealed the Sertoli Cell Only Syndrome (SCOS). The presence of only Sertoli Cells in the testes, with glaucoma in the XX male syndrome, to our knowledge, has not been reported in the literature.

  2. Comparison of radiosensitivity between human hematopoietic cell lines derived from patients with Down's syndrome and from normal persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.C.; Banerjee, A.; Tan, J.C.; Hou, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Seven hematopoietic cell lines, four derived from the peripheral blood of patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and three from normal persons, were irradiated with 100, 150, 300, and 500 rads from a 60 Co source and harvested for cell count and chromosome aberration studies every 12 hours for 72 hours post irradiation. Cell growth inhibition and an increase in chromosome aberration were observed in all the cell lines at each dose level and time interval. No significant difference was observed in the effects between DS and normal cell lines. The most common types of aberrations in the 12-hour samples were chromosome and/or chromatid breaks. In the later samples, chromatid exchanges were predominant. The results of the variance analyses on the induced chromosome aberrations in six lines (three DS and three normal lines) showed radiation dosage to be the largest component of total variance, following postirradiation duration and cell lines. The samples harvested 24 and 36 hours post irradiation generally showed greater effects than the samples of other harvest durations. The cell line variance could only be attributed to the differences among and between individual cell lines rather than the difference between DS and normal cell lines

  3. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Moncla, A. [Hopital d`Enfants de la Timone, Marseillas (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Bernd; Aran, Begoña; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ars, Elisabet; Bullich, Gemma; Furlano, Monica; Torra, Roser; Marti, Merce; Veiga, Anna; Raya, Angel

    2017-12-01

    A skin biopsy was obtained from a 25-year-old female patient with autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) with the homozygous COL4A3 mutation c.345delG, p.(P166Lfs*37). Dermal fibroblasts were derived and reprogrammed by nucleofection with episomal plasmids carrying OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 LIN28, L-MYC and p53shRNA. The generated induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) clone AS FiPS1 Ep6F-2 was free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific homozygous mutation, a stable karyotype, expressed pluripotency markers and generated embryoid bodies which were differentiated towards the three germ layers in vitro. This iPSC line offers a useful resource to study Alport syndrome pathomechanisms and drug testing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Age-related changes in humoral and cell-mediated immunity in Down syndrome children living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockitch, G; Singh, V K; Puterman, M L; Godolphin, W J; Sheps, S; Tingle, A J; Wong, F; Quigley, G

    1987-11-01

    Abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been described in Down syndrome but reported findings have been inconsistent. Confounding factors have included age, institutional versus home life, hepatitis B antigenemia, and zinc deficiency. To clarify this problem, we studied 64 children with Down syndrome (DS) compared with an age-matched control group. All children had always lived at home. All the DS children were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen. Serum zinc concentration in the DS group was on average 12 micrograms/dl lower than age-matched control children. They also had significantly lower levels of immunoglobulin M, total lymphocyte count, T and B lymphocytes, and T helper and suppressor cells. In vitro lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A was significantly reduced at all ages in the DS group. Lymphocyte response to pokeweed mitogen increased with age in control children but decreased in the DS children. By 18 yr, the mean response for DS was 60000 cpm lower than controls. The DS group had significantly higher concentrations of immunoglobulins A and G than controls and the difference increased with age. Complement fractions C3 and C4 were also higher in the DS group at all ages. The number of HNK-1 positive cells was higher in the DS group than controls at all ages. When hepatitis and institutionalization are excluded as confounding factors, DS children still differ in both humoral and cell-mediated immunity from an age-matched control group.

  6. Non-invasive prenatal cell-free fetal DNA testing for down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities

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    Darija Strah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis as definitive diagnostic procedures represent a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods are invasive and lead to a miscarriage and fetal loss in approximately 0.5–1 %. Non-invasive prenatal DNA testing (NIPT is based on the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from maternal blood. It represents a highly accurate screening test for detecting the most common fetal chromosomal abnormalities. In our study we present the results of NIPT testing in the Diagnostic Center Strah, Slovenia, over the last 3 years.Methods: In our study, 123 pregnant women from 11th to 18th week of pregnancy were included. All of them had First trimester assessment of risk for trisomy 21, done before NIPT testing.Results: 5 of total 6 high-risk NIPT cases (including 3 cases of Down syndrome and 2 cases of Klinefelter’s syndrome were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. One case–Edwards syndrome was false positive. Patau syndrome, triple X syndrome or Turner syndrome were not observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, there were no false negative cases reported. In general, NIPT testing had 100 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 46.29 %–100.00 % and 98.95 % specificity (95 % confidence interval: 93.44 %–99.95 %. In determining Down syndrome alone, specificity (95 % confidence interval: 95.25 %- 100.00 % and sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 31.00 %–100.00 % turned out to be 100 %. In 2015, the average turnaround time for analysis was 8.3 days from the day when the sample was taken. Repeated blood sampling was required in 2 cases (redraw rate = 1.6 %.Conclusions: Our results confirm that NIPT represents a fast, safe and highly accurate advanced screening test for most common chromosomal abnormalities. In current clinical practice, NIPT would significantly decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures and the rate of fetal

  7. Targeted exome sequencing and chromosomal microarray for the molecular diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudate, Yoshihiro; Naruto, Takuya; Hayashi, Yumiko; Minami, Mitsuyoshi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Yokota, Kenji; Yamada, Daisuke; Imoto, Issei; Kubo, Yoshiaki

    2017-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder mainly caused by heterozygous mutations of PTCH1. In addition to characteristic clinical features, detection of a mutation in causative genes is reliable for the diagnosis of NBCCS; however, no mutations have been identified in some patients using conventional methods. To improve the method for the molecular diagnosis of NBCCS. We performed targeted exome sequencing (TES) analysis using a multi-gene panel, including PTCH1, PTCH2, SUFU, and other sonic hedgehog signaling pathway-related genes, based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in 8 cases in whom possible causative mutations were not detected by previously performed conventional analysis and 2 recent cases of NBCCS. Subsequent analysis of gross deletion within or around PTCH1 detected by TES was performed using chromosomal microarray (CMA). Through TES analysis, specific single nucleotide variants or small indels of PTCH1 causing inferred amino acid changes were identified in 2 novel cases and 2 undiagnosed cases, whereas gross deletions within or around PTCH1, which are validated by CMA, were found in 3 undiagnosed cases. However, no mutations were detected even by TES in 3 cases. Among 3 cases with gross deletions of PTCH1, deletions containing the entire PTCH1 and additional neighboring genes were detected in 2 cases, one of which exhibited atypical clinical features, such as severe mental retardation, likely associated with genes located within the 4.3Mb deleted region, especially. TES-based simultaneous evaluation of sequences and copy number status in all targeted coding exons by NGS is likely to be more useful for the molecular diagnosis of NBCCS than conventional methods. CMA is recommended as a subsequent analysis for validation and detailed mapping of deleted regions, which may explain the atypical clinical features of NBCCS cases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by

  8. Down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression in association with DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Sugita, Katsuo; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast cells derived from nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients show increased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Genes, whose expression is modulated in association with the DNA synthesis induction, were searched by using PCR-based mRNA differential display analysis in one of the NBCCS cell lines, NBCCS1 cells. Decreased levels of SMT3A gene expression were found in X-ray-irradiated NBCCS1 cells. This decrease was also shown by RT-PCR analysis in another cell line, NBCCS3 cells. In addition to NBCCS cells, normal fibroblast cells showed the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation when they were treated with antisense oligonucleotides (AO) for SMT3A. However, treatment of normal fibroblasts with the random oligonucleotides (RO) resulted in decreased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Thus, down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression may be involved in the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in the NBCCS cells at least tested

  9. Down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression in association with DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugaya, Shigeru [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Tanzawa, Hideki [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Sugita, Katsuo [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Education, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kita, Kazuko [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Suzuki, Nobuo [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)]. E-mail: nobuo@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2005-10-15

    Fibroblast cells derived from nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients show increased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Genes, whose expression is modulated in association with the DNA synthesis induction, were searched by using PCR-based mRNA differential display analysis in one of the NBCCS cell lines, NBCCS1 cells. Decreased levels of SMT3A gene expression were found in X-ray-irradiated NBCCS1 cells. This decrease was also shown by RT-PCR analysis in another cell line, NBCCS3 cells. In addition to NBCCS cells, normal fibroblast cells showed the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation when they were treated with antisense oligonucleotides (AO) for SMT3A. However, treatment of normal fibroblasts with the random oligonucleotides (RO) resulted in decreased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Thus, down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression may be involved in the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in the NBCCS cells at least tested.

  10. Identification of a new cell line permissive to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection and replication which is phenotypically distinct from MARC-145 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Provost Chantale

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airborne transmitted pathogens, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, need to interact with host cells of the respiratory tract in order to be able to enter and disseminate in the host organism. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM and MA104 derived monkey kidney MARC-145 cells are known to be permissive to PRRSV infection and replication and are the most studied cells in the literature. More recently, new cell lines developed to study PRRSV have been genetically modified to make them permissive to the virus. The SJPL cell line origin was initially reported to be epithelial cells of the respiratory tract of swine. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine if SJPL cells could support PRRSV infection and replication in vitro. Results The SJPL cell growth was significantly slower than MARC-145 cell growth. The SJPL cells were found to express the CD151 protein but not the CD163 and neither the sialoadhesin PRRSV receptors. During the course of the present study, the SJPL cells have been reported to be of monkey origin. Nevertheless, SJPL cells were found to be permissive to PRRSV infection and replication even if the development of the cytopathic effect was delayed compared to PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells. Following PRRSV replication, the amount of infectious viral particles produced in SJPL and MARC-145 infected cells was similar. The SJPL cells allowed the replication of several PRRSV North American strains and were almost efficient as MARC-145 cells for virus isolation. Interestingly, PRRSV is 8 to 16 times more sensitive to IFNα antiviral effect in SJPL cell in comparison to that in MARC-145 cells. PRRSV induced an increase in IFNβ mRNA and no up regulation of IFNα mRNA in both infected cell types. In addition, PRRSV induced an up regulation of IFNγ and TNF-α mRNAs only in infected MARC-145 cells. Conclusions In conclusion, the SJPL cells are permissive to PRRSV. In addition, they are

  11. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Sarah; Reedy, Stephanie; Barker, Virginia D; Chambers, Thomas M; Adams, Amanda A

    2018-05-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem in the equine population with recent reports indicating that the percentage of overweight horses may range anywhere from 20.6-51%. Obesity in horses has been linked to more serious health concerns such as equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). EMS is a serious problem in the equine industry given its defining characteristics of insulin dysregualtion and obesity, as well as the involvement of laminitis. Little research however has been conducted to determine the effects of EMS on routine healthcare of these horses, in particular how they respond to vaccination. It has been shown that obese humans and mice have decreased immune responses to vaccination. EMS may have similar effects on vaccine responses in horses. If this is the case, these animals may be more susceptible to disease, acting as unknown disease reservoirs. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EMS on immune responses to routine influenza vaccination. Twenty-five adult horses of mixed-sex and mixed-breed (8-21 years old) horses; 13 EMS and 12 non-EMS were selected. Within each group, 4 horses served as non-vaccinate saline controls and the remaining horses were vaccinated with a commercially available equine influenza vaccine. Vaccination (influenza or saline) was administered on weeks 0 and 3, and peripheral blood samples taken on week 0 prior to vaccination and on weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 post vaccination. Blood samples were used to measure hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers and equine influenza specific IgGa, IgGb, and IgGT levels. Blood samples were also used to isolate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for analysis of cell mediated immune (CMI) responses via real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All horses receiving influenza vaccination responded with significant increases (P equine influenza specific antibodies following vaccination compared to saline controls. EMS did not significantly affect (P > 0.05) humoral immune responses as measured

  12. High sensitivity but normal DNA-repair activity after UV irradiation in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Orii, T.

    1980-01-01

    We established lymphoblastoid cell lines from 2 children with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), 2 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients and control donors after transformation of peripheral lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We used these lymphoblastoid cell lines to investigate repair activity after ultraviolet irradiation. Cell survival of both CHS lymphoblastoid cell lines after irradiation by UV and treatment by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) fell between those of the XP and control cells lines. Unscheduled DNA synthesis of CHS cells after UV irradiation occured at rates similar to those of control cells. (orig.)

  13. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome and membranous glomerulonephritis

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    Kim Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sjögren’s syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease in which lymphatic cells destroy the salivary and lacrimal glands. Glomerulonephritis is thought to be a rare occurrence in primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Furthermore, concurrent glomerular involvement and lymphoma in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome has seldom been reported. Case presentation A 52-year-old woman with primary Sjögren’s syndrome developed membranous glomerulonephritis and Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. She was diagnosed with Sjögren’s syndrome based on the dry eyes, dry mouth, positive anti-nuclear antibody test, anti-Ro (SS-A antibody, salivary gland biopsy, and salivary scintigraphy. Moreover, renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of membranous glomerulonephritis. Three months later, her small bowel was perforated with pneumoperitoneum, and the biopsy revealed Epstein-Barr virus-positive DLBCL. Conclusions We observed the first case of primary Sjögren’s syndrome associated with Epstein-Barr Virus-positive DLBCL and membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the possibility of malignancy-associated membranous glomerulonephritis in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome, we should be careful and examine such patients for hidden malignancy.

  14. Endothelial cell study in a case of Werner′s syndrome undergoing phacoemulsification and Yettrium-Aluminum-Garnet laser capsulotomy

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    Vasudha Kemmanu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Werner′s syndrome (WS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with multisystem manifestations of premature aging from the second decade of life. Cataract is one of the features of WS. Cataract surgery is complicated with postoperative wound dehiscence and bullous keratopathy when the surgery is done by intracapsular or conventional extracapsular method. We report the short-term result of phacoemulsification and Neodymimum Yettrium-Aluminum-Garnet laser (Nd YAG capsulotomy in a case of WS with bilateral cataracts. Postoperatively and post capsulotomy, there was no change in the endothelial cell morphology. There was an 8.6% decrease in endothelial cell count at the end of 15 months postoperatively and 11 months post YAG capsulotomy. This decrease is within the acceptable range of cell loss after phacoemulsification and YAG capsulotomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of YAG laser capsulotomy in WS.

  15. Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome Associated to Secondary IgM MGUS Emerging after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for AL Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Hina; Lee, Adrienne; Valentine, Karen; Skeith, Leslie; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare hemorrhagic disorder that occurs in patients with no prior personal or family history of bleeding. Here, we describe a case of AVWS occurring after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Interestingly, AVWS developed after bortezomib-based induction and conditioning regimens. Recent evidence suggests that the proximity of the bortezomib therapy to the collection of stem cells with consequent depletion of regulatory T cells after the conditioning regimen could explain some of the unusual autoimmune complications reported in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT. In addition, this patient developed a secondary MGUS post-ASCT, which may have also contributed to the AVWS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of post-ASCT AVWS reported. Prospective data is needed to better elucidate the mechanisms by which these unusual complications occur in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT.

  16. Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome associated to secondary IgM MGUS emerging after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for AL Amyloidosis

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    Victor H Jimenez-Zepeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS is a rare hemorrhagic disorder that occurs in patients with no prior personal or family history of bleeding. Here, we describe a case of AVWS occurring after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. Interestingly, AVWS developed after bortezomib-based induction and conditioning regimens. Recent evidence suggests that the proximity of the bortezomib therapy to the collection of stem cells with consequent depletion of regulatory T cells after the conditioning regimen could explain some of the unusual autoimmune complications reported in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT. In addition, this patient developed a secondary MGUS post-ASCT, which may have also contributed to the AVWS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of post-ASCT AVWS reported. Prospective data is needed to better elucidate the mechanisms by which these unusual complications occur in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT.

  17. B cell subsets and dysfunction of regulatory B cells in IgG4-related diseases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome: the similarities and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a multisystem-involved autoimmune disease. Abnormally activated and differentiated B cells may play important roles. Regulatory B cells (Breg) are newly defined B cell subgroups with immunosuppressive functions. In this study, we investigated the differences of B cell subsets, the expressions of co-stimulatory molecules on B cells, and the function of Breg cells in patients with IgG4-RD, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Methods Newly diagnosed IgG4-RD patients (n = 48) were enrolled, 38 untreated pSS patients and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited as disease and healthy controls. To analyze B cell subsets and B cell activity, PBMCs were surface stained and detected by flow cytometry. The function of Breg cells was tested by coculturing isolated CD19 + CD24hiCD38hi Breg cells with purified CD4 + CD25- T cells. Serum cytokines were measured by ELISA and cytometric bead array. Relationship between clinical data and laboratory findings were analyzed as well. Results Compared with pSS patients and HC, IgG4-RD patients had a lower frequency of peripheral Breg cells. Interestingly, CD19 + CD24-CD38hi B cell subsets were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from IgG4-RD patients than in pSS patients and HC, which correlated with serum IgG4 levels. The expression of BAFF-R and CD40 on B cells was significantly lower in IgG4-RD patients compared with those in pSS patients and HC. Unlike HC, Breg cells from pSS patients lacked suppressive functions. Conclusions B cells in patients with IgG4-RD and pSS display a variety of abnormalities, including disturbed B cell subpopulations, abnormal expression of key signaling molecules, co-stimulatory molecules, and inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a significantly increased B cell subset, CD19 + CD24-CD38hi B cells, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD. PMID:24887143

  18. The effect of RO3201195 and a pyrazolyl ketone P38 MAPK inhibitor library on the proliferation of Werner syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Mark C; Dwyer, Jessica E; Baashen, Mohammed; Dix, Matthew C; Murziani, Paola G S; Rokicki, Michal J; Kipling, David; Davis, Terence

    2016-01-21

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of the pyrazolyl ketone p38 MAPK inhibitor RO3201195 in 7 steps and 15% overall yield, and the comparison of its effect upon the proliferation of Werner Syndrome cells with a library of pyrazolyl ketones, strengthens the evidence that p38 MAPK inhibition plays a critical role in modulating premature cellular senescence in this progeroid syndrome and the reversal of accelerated ageing observed in vitro on treatment with SB203580.

  19. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  20. Increased Chromogranin A Cell Density in the Large Intestine of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome after Receiving Dietary Guidance

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    Tarek Mazzawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and releasing specific hormones. Chromogranin A (CgA is a common marker for the gastrointestinal endocrine cells, and it is abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS patients. Most IBS patients relate their symptoms to certain food elements. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the total endocrine cells of the large intestine as detected by CgA in 13 IBS patients. Thirteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received three sessions of dietary guidance. Colonoscopies were performed on controls and patients (at baseline and at 3–9 months after receiving guidance. Biopsy samples from the colon and rectum were immunostained for CgA and quantified by computerized image analysis. The densities of CgA cells in the total colon (mean ± SEM among the controls and the IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance were 83.3±10.1, 38.6±3.7, and 64.7±4.2 cells/mm2, respectively (P=0.0004, and were unchanged in the rectum. In conclusion, the increase in CgA cell density after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the large intestinal endocrine cells causing an improvement in the IBS symptoms.

  1. Next generation sequencing reveals skewing of the T and B cell receptor repertoires in patients with Wiskott Aldrich syndrome

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    Amy E O'Connell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS is due to mutations of the WAS gene encoding for the cytoskeletal WAS protein (WASp, leading to abnormal downstream signaling from the T cell and B cell antigen receptors (TCR, BCR. We hypothesized that the impaired signaling through the TCR and BCR in WAS would subsequently lead to aberrations in the immune repertoire of WAS patients. Using next generation sequencing, the T cell receptor beta (TRB and B cell immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH repertoires of 8 patients with WAS and 6 controls were sequenced. Clonal expansions were identified within memory CD4+ cells, as well as in total, naïve and memory CD8+ cells from WAS patients. In the B cell compartment, WAS patient IGH repertoires were also clonally expanded and showed skewed usage of IGHV and IGHJ genes, and increased usage of IGHG constant genes, compared with controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates significant abnormalities of the immune repertoire in WAS patients using next generation sequencing.

  2. Evolving Identification of Blood Cells Associated with Clinically Isolated Syndrome: Importance of Time since Clinical Presentation and Diagnostic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; Jones, Anderson P; Geldenhuys, Sian; Byrne, Scott N; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Nolan, David; Booth, David R; Carroll, William M; Lucas, Robyn M; Kermode, Allan G; Hart, Prue H

    2017-06-15

    It is not clear how the profile of immune cells in peripheral blood differs between patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy controls (HC). This study aimed to identify a CIS peripheral blood signature that may provide clues for potential immunomodulatory approaches early in disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 18 people with CIS, 19 HC and 13 individuals with other demyelinating conditions (ODC) including multiple sclerosis (MS). Individuals with CIS separated into two groups, namely those with early (≤14 days post-diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); n = 6) and late (≥27 days; n = 12) blood sampling. Transitional B cells were increased in the blood of CIS patients independently of when blood was taken. However, there were two time-dependent effects found in the late CIS group relative to HC, including decreased CD56bright NK cells, which correlated significantly with time since MRI, and increased CD141+ myeloid dendritic cell (mDC2) frequencies. Higher CD1c+ B cells and lower non-classical monocyte frequencies were characteristic of more recent demyelinating disease activity (ODC and early CIS). Analysing cell populations by time since symptoms (subjective) and diagnostic MRI (objective) may contribute to understanding CIS.

  3. Sexual dimorphism in an animal model of Sjögren's syndrome: a potential role for Th17 cells

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    Alexandria Voigt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome is a complex autoimmune disease with an array of diverse immunological, genetic and environmental etiologies, making identification of the precise autoimmune mechanism difficult to define. One of the most distinctive aspects of Sjögren's syndrome is the high sexual dimorphism with women affected 10-20 times more than men. It is nearly impossible to study the sexual dimorphic development of Sjögren's syndrome in human patients; therefore it is pertinent to develop an appropriate animal model which resembles human disease. The data indicated that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier onset of sialadenitis with a higher composition of CD3+ T cells and a 10-fold increase in glandular infiltration of Th17 cells at the onset of clinical disease compared to male mice. Inflammatory Th17 cells of female mice exhibited a stronger proliferation in response to disease-specific antigen than their male counterpart. At the clinical disease stage, altered autoantibody patterns can be detected in females whereas they are seldom observed in male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice. Interestingly, male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier loss of secretory function, despite the fact that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice exhibited a more rapid secretory loss. This data indicates the strong sexual dimorphism in the SjS-susceptible C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 animal model, making it an appropriate animal model to examine human disease.

  4. Novel cell-based assay reveals associations of circulating serum AhR-ligands with metabolic syndrome and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wook-Ha; Jun, Dae Won; Kim, Jin Taek; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Park, Hyokeun; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Serum concentrations of environmental pollutants have been positively correlated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome in epidemiologic studies. In turn, abnormal mitochondrial function has been associated with the diseases. The relationships between these variables, however, have not been studied. We developed novel cell-based aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist bioassay system without solvent extraction process and analyzed whether low-dose circulating AhR ligands in human serum are associated with parameters of metabolic syndrome and mitochondrial function. Serum AhR ligand activities were measured as serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalent (sTCDDeq) in pM using 10 μL human sera from 97 Korean participants (47 with glucose intolerance and 50 matched controls, average age of 46.6 ± 9.9 years, 53 male and 45 female). sTCDDeq were higher in participants with glucose intolerance than normal controls and were positively associated (P fasting glucose, but not with HDL-cholesterol. Body mass index was in a positive linear relationship with serum AhR ligands in healthy participants. When myoblast cells were incubated with human sera, ATP generating power of mitochondria became impaired in an AhR ligand concentration-dependent manner. Our results support that circulating AhR ligands may directly reduce mitochondrial function in tissues, leading to weight gain, glucose intolerance, and metabolic syndrome. Our rapid cell-based assay using minute volume of human serum may provide one of the best monitoring systems for circulating AhR ligands, good clinical biomarkers for the progress of disease and therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Modulation of steroidogenesis by vitamin D3 in granulosa cells of the mouse model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshalizadeh, Shabnam; Amidi, Fardin; Alleyassin, Ashraf; Soleimani, Masoud; Shirazi, Reza; Shabani Nashtaei, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive age characterized by polycystic ovarian morphology, anovulation or oligomenorrhea, and hyperandrogenism. It is shown that disruption in the steroidogenesis pathway caused by excess androgen in PCOS is a critical element of abnormal folliculogenesis and failure in dominant follicle selection. Vitamin D plays an important role in the regulation of ovulatory dysfunction and can influence genes involved in steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of vitamin D3 on steroidogenic enzyme expression and activities in granulosa cell using a PCOS mouse model. In our study, the PCOS mouse model was developed by the injection of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for 20 days. The mRNA and protein expression levels of genes involved in steroidogenesis in granulosa cells were compared between polycystic and normal ovaries using real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. Granulosa cells of DHEA-induced PCOS mice were then cultured with and without vitamin D3 and mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes and serum 17beta-estradiol and progesterone levels were investigated using qRT-PCR, western blot, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Steroidogenic enzymes including Cyp11a1, StAR, Cyp19a1, and 3β-HSD were upregulated in granulosa cells of PCOS mice when compared to normal mice. Treatment with vitamin D3 decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes in cultured granulosa cells. Vitamin D3 also decreased aromatase and 3β-HSD activity that leads to decreased 17beta-estradiol and progesterone release. This study suggests that vitamin D3 could modulate the steroidogenesis pathway in granulosa cells of PCOS mice that may lead to improving follicular development and maturation. This is a step towards a possible conceivable treatment for PCOS. AMHR-II: anti-müllerian hormone receptor-II; 3β-HSD: 3

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Lung Tissue Differentially Mitigate Lung and Distal Organ Damage in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Johnatas D; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Paz, Ana H R; Cruz, Fernanda F; Melo, Elga B; de Oliveira, Milena V; Xisto, Débora G; Capelozzi, Vera L; Morales, Marcelo M; Pelosi, Paolo; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2018-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells-based therapies have shown promising effects in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome. Different mesenchymal stem cells sources may result in diverse effects in respiratory diseases; however, there is no information regarding the best source of mesenchymal stem cells to treat pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and lung tissue would lead to different beneficial effects on lung and distal organ damage in experimental pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome. Animal study and primary cell culture. Laboratory investigation. Seventy-five Wistar rats. Wistar rats received saline (control) or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (acute respiratory distress syndrome) intratracheally. On day 2, acute respiratory distress syndrome animals were further randomized to receive saline or bone marrow, adipose tissue, or lung tissue mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 10 cells) IV. Lung mechanics, histology, and protein levels of inflammatory mediators and growth factors were analyzed 5 days after mesenchymal stem cells administration. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with lipopolysaccharide followed by coculture or not with bone marrow, adipose tissue, and lung tissue mesenchymal stem cells (10 cells/mL medium). Regardless of mesenchymal stem cells source, cells administration improved lung function and reduced alveolar collapse, tissue cellularity, collagen, and elastic fiber content in lung tissue, as well as decreased apoptotic cell counts in liver. Bone marrow and adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells administration also reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, transforming growth factor-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as apoptotic cell counts in lung and kidney, while increasing expression of keratinocyte growth factor in lung tissue

  7. Two Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Syndromes: Limbic Encephalitis and Palmar Fasciitis in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer.

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    Lazarev, Irina; Shelef, Ilan; Refaely, Yael; Ariad, Samuel; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-09-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  8. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

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    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  9. Managing Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated Paraneoplastic Syndrome with Nephron-sparing Surgery in a Patient with von Hippel-Lindau

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    John M. DiBianco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A patient with germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene alteration and history of multiple tumors present with classical paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. She underwent open nephron sparing surgery with resolution of symptoms. She remained without recurrence of RCC for the initial 2 years of her follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first in which PNS was specifically resolved using a partial nephrectomy in a patient with VHL. This case report provides initial evidence for the potential role of nephron sparing surgery in the management of paraneoplastic symptoms associated with hereditary RCC.

  10. Production and characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from Joubert Syndrome: CSSi001-A (2850

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    Jessica Rosati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Joubert Syndrome (JS is a rare autosomal recessive or X-linked condition characterized by a peculiar cerebellar malformation, known as the molar tooth sign (MTS, associated with other neurological phenotypes and multiorgan involvement. JS is a ciliopathy, a spectrum of disorders whose causative genes encode proteins involved in the primary cilium apparatus. In order to elucidate ciliopathy-associated molecular mechanisms, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs were derived from a patient affected by JS carrying a homozygous missense mutation in the AHI1 gene (p.H896R that encodes a protein named Jouberin.

  11. Advances in the understanding and clinical management of mastocytosis and clonal mast cell activation syndromes [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    David González-de-Olano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clonal mast cell activation syndromes and indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin involvement are two emerging entities that sometimes might be clinically difficult to distinguish, and they involve a great challenge for the physician from both a diagnostic and a therapeutic point of view. Furthermore, final diagnosis of both entities requires a bone marrow study; it is recommended that this be done in reference centers. In this article, we address the current consensus and guidelines for the suspicion, diagnosis, classification, treatment, and management of these two entities.

  12. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

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    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  13. The Ratio of Blood T Follicular Regulatory Cells to T Follicular Helper Cells Marks Ectopic Lymphoid Structure Formation While Activated Follicular Helper T Cells Indicate Disease Activity in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Valter R; Romão, Vasco C; Agua-Doce, Ana; Santos, Mara; López-Presa, Dolores; Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Fonseca, João Eurico; Graca, Luis

    2018-05-01

    To investigate whether the balance of blood follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells can provide information about ectopic lymphoid neogenesis and disease activity in primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). We prospectively recruited 56 patients clinically suspected of having SS. Sixteen of these patients subsequently fulfilled the American-European Consensus Group criteria for SS and were compared to 16 patients with non-SS sicca syndrome. Paired blood and minor salivary gland (MSG) biopsy samples were analyzed to study Tfr cells and subsets of Tfh cells in both compartments. Patients with primary SS had normal Tfh cell counts in peripheral blood; however, activated programmed death 1-positive (PD-1+) inducible costimulator-positive (ICOS+) Tfh cells in peripheral blood were strongly associated with disease activity assessed by the European League Against Rheumatism Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (r = 0.8547, P = 0.0008). Conversely, the blood Tfr cell:Tfh cell ratio indicated ectopic lymphoid structure formation in MSGs, being strongly associated with B cell, CD4+ T cell, and PD-1+ICOS+ T cell infiltration in MSGs, and was especially increased in patients with focal sialadenitis. Further analysis showed that the blood Tfr cell:Tfh cell ratio allowed discrimination between SS patients and healthy donors with excellent accuracy and was a strong predictor of SS diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] 12.96, P = 0.028) and the presence of focal sialadenitis (OR 10, P = 0.022) in patients investigated for sicca symptoms, thus highlighting the potential clinical value of this marker. The blood Tfr cell:Tfh cell ratio and PD-1+ICOS+ Tfh cells constitute potential novel biomarkers for different features of primary SS. While the blood Tfr cell:Tfh cell ratio is associated with ectopic lymphoid neogenesis, activated Tfh cells indicate disease activity. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  15. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  16. [Characteristic and function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells-induced macrophages in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Wang, H Q; Fu, R; Qu, W; Ruan, E B; Wang, X M; Wang, G J; Wu, Y H; Liu, H; Song, J; Guan, J; Xing, L M; Li, L J; Jiang, H J; Liu, H; Wang, Y H; Liu, C Y; Zhang, W; Shao, Z H

    2017-08-14

    Objective: To explore characteristic and function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) -induced macrophages in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to couple with its progression. Methods: A total of 24 MDS patients (11 low-risk patients and 13 high-risk group patients) referred to Department of Hematology of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital and normal controls were enrolled from September 2014 to December 2015. PBMNC was stimulated with GM-CSF to transform to macrophages. The morphology of macrophages was observed by microscope. The quantity of macrophages, CD206 and SIRPα on surface of macrophages were detected by flow cytometry. The phagocytic function of macrophages was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Results: The morphology of macrophages from MDS patients was abnormal. The percentage of transformed macrophages was (5.17±3.47) % in patients with MDS, which was lower than that in controls significantly[ (66.18±13.43) %, t =3.529, P =0.001]. The expression of CD206 on macrophages from MDS patients was significantly lower than that of controls[ (9.73±2.59) % vs (51.15±10.82) %, t =4.551, P patients was significantly lower than that of controls [ (0.51±0.09) % vs (0.77±0.06) %, t =2.102, P =0.043]. The phagocytic index and the percentage of phagocytic of macrophages from MDS patients were significantly lower than those of macrophages from normal controls[0.45±0.08 vs 0.92±0.07, t =-6.253, P =0.008; (23.69±3.22) % vs (42.75±2.13) %, t =-6.982, P =0.006 respectively]by flow cytometry. The phagocytic index of MDS patients was significantly lower than that of controls (0.24±0.04 vs 0.48±0.96, t =3.464, P =0.001) by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusion: The quantity, recognization receptors and phagocytosis of PBMNC-induced macrophages decreased in MDS patients.

  17. [Expression and significance of respiratory chain enzyme of cells in urine sediment in MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-rong; Ma, Yi-nan; Qi, Yu; Liu, Hong-gang

    2013-04-23

    To explore the expression and significance of respiratory chain enzyme of cells in urine sediment in mitochondrial encephalopathy myopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Through enzyme histochemistry, the authors analyzed the changes of respiratory chain enzyme in urine sediment in 20 MELAS patients due to mitochondrial A3243G mutation (MELAS group) and 20 health peoples (control group). And the impact on the expression of protein encoded by nuclear DNA (A21347) and mitochondrial DNA (A6404) was detected by immunochemistry. Image pro Plus 6.0 software was used for analysis of absorbance (A) of staining images as staining intensity. The data were expressed as M (Q1, Q3) and analyzed through statistical software. The staining intensity of complexes Iin the MELAS group was lower than that in the control group (0.06(0.01, 0.12) vs 0.12(0.01, 0.62), P = 0.010). The intergroup staining intensity of complex II showed no marked difference. Increased density of blue particle and cytoplasmic gathering was found in 13 cased (65%) of the MELAS group under light microscope. The staining intensity of complexes IV was expressed at a low level in the MELAS group (0.14(0.03, 0.32) vs 0.23(0.06, 0.43), P = 0.038). The expression of protein encoded by nuclear DNA (A21347) was lower than that in the control group (0.05(0.02, 0.45) vs 0.17(0.03, 0.70), P = 0.000). The expression of protein encoded by mitochondrial DNA (A6404) was also lower than that in the control group (0.03(0.01, 0.07) vs 0.15 (0.09, 0.23), P = 0.000). Abnormal change of respiratory chain enzyme in urine sediment in MELAS due to mitochondrial A3243G mutation and a low expression of proteins encoded by two kinds of DNA in complexes IV can help to confirm the genetic diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies so that different subtypes may be classified and its pathogenesis elucidated.

  18. Reduced Number of CD8+ Cells in Tonsillar Germinal Centres in Children with the Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førsvoll, J; Janssen, E A M; Møller, I; Wathne, N; Skaland, I; Klos, J; Kristoffersen, E K; Øymar, K

    2015-07-01

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Tonsillectomy may cause a prompt resolution of the syndrome. The aim was to study the histologic and immunological aspects of the palatine tonsils in PFAPA, to help understand the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Tonsils from children with PFAPA (n = 11) and children with tonsillar hypertrophy (n = 16) were evaluated histologically after haematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of different cell types was identified immunohistochemically by cluster of differentiation (CD) markers: CD3 (T cells), CD4 (T helper cells), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CD15 (neutrophils), CD20 (B cells), CD45 (all leucocytes), CD57 (NK cells) and CD163 (monocytes and macrophages). Tonsils from children with PFAPA showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia dominated by well-developed germinal centres with many tingible body macrophages. The histologic findings were unspecific, and a similar morphologic appearance was also found in the tonsils from controls. The number of CD8+ cells in germinal centres differed between children with PFAPA [median 9 cells (quartiles: 5, 15)] and controls [18 cells (12, 33) (P = 0.001)] and between children with PFAPA with (median 14 cells; 9, 16) and without (4 cells; 3, 8) aphthous stomatitis (P = 0.015). For the other cell types, no differences in germinal centres were found between children with PFAPA and controls. In conclusion, a lower number of CD8+ cells were found in germinal centres of tonsils in children with PFAPA compared to controls, which may be a feature linked to the aetiology of the syndrome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The mechanosensory structure of the hair cell requires clarin-1, a protein encoded by Usher syndrome III causative gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ruishuang; Melki, Sami; Chen, Daniel H-C; Tian, Guilian; Furness, David N; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Neef, Jakob; Moser, Tobias; Askew, Charles; Horwitz, Geoff; Holt, Jeffrey R; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2012-07-11

    Mutation in the clarin-1 gene (Clrn1) results in loss of hearing and vision in humans (Usher syndrome III), but the role of clarin-1 in the sensory hair cells is unknown. Clarin-1 is predicted to be a four transmembrane domain protein similar to members of the tetraspanin family. Mice carrying null mutation in the clarin-1 gene (Clrn1(-/-)) show loss of hair cell function and a possible defect in ribbon synapse. We investigated the role of clarin-1 using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. We show by immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings of Ca(2+) currents and membrane capacitance from inner hair cells that clarin-1 is not essential for formation or function of ribbon synapse. However, reduced cochlear microphonic potentials, FM1-43 [N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl) pyridinium dibromide] loading, and transduction currents pointed to diminished cochlear hair bundle function in Clrn1(-/-) mice. Electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells revealed loss of some tall stereocilia and gaps in the v-shaped bundle, although tip links and staircase arrangement of stereocilia were not primarily affected by Clrn1(-/-) mutation. Human clarin-1 protein expressed in transfected mouse cochlear hair cells localized to the bundle; however, the pathogenic variant p.N48K failed to localize to the bundle. The mouse model generated to study the in vivo consequence of p.N48K in clarin-1 (Clrn1(N48K)) supports our in vitro and Clrn1(-/-) mouse data and the conclusion that CLRN1 is an essential hair bundle protein. Furthermore, the ear phenotype in the Clrn1(N48K) mouse suggests that it is a valuable model for ear disease in CLRN1(N48K), the most prevalent Usher syndrome III mutation in North America.

  20. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

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    Akira Shimamoto

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  1. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Akira; Kagawa, Harunobu; Zensho, Kazumasa; Sera, Yukihiro; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Hamasaki, Kanya; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Fukuda, Keiichi; Hirashima, Kyotaro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Takahiko; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro; Goto, Makoto; Tahara, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  2. Endometrial regeneration using autologous adult stem cells followed by conception by in vitro fertilization in a patient of severe Asherman′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya B Nagori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a woman with severe Asherman′s syndrome, curettage followed by placement of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD (IUCD with cyclical hormonal therapy was tried for 6 months, for development of the endometrium. When this failed, autologous stem cells were tried as an alternative therapy. From adult autologous stem cells isolated from patient′s own bone marrow, endometrial angiogenic stem cells were separated using immunomagnetic isolation. These cells were placed in the endometrial cavity under ultrasound guidance after curettage. Patient was then given cyclical hormonal therapy. Endometrium was assessed intermittently on ultrasound. On development of endometrium with a thickness of 8 mm and good vascularity, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer was done. This resulted in positive biochemical pregnancy followed by confirmation of gestational sac, yolk sac, and embryonic pole with cardiac activity on ultrasound. Endometrial angiogenic stem cells isolated from autologous adult stem cells could regenerate injured endometrium not responding to conventional treatment for Asherman′s syndrome.

  3. Protective Role of R-spondin1, an Intestinal Stem Cell Growth Factor, against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Kabarriti, Rafi; Liu, Laibin; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Sellers, Rani S.; Alfieri, Alan A.; Guha, Chandan

    2009-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS) results from a combination of direct cytocidal effects on intestinal crypt and endothelial cells and subsequent loss of the mucosal barrier, resulting in electrolyte imbalance, diarrhea, weight loss, infection and mortality. Because R-spondin1 (Rspo1) acts as a mitogenic factor for intestinal stem cells, we hypothesized that systemic administration of Rspo1 would amplify the intestinal crypt cells and accelerate the regeneration of...

  4. Exercise training improves in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early endothelial progenitor cells in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Kristina; Horváth, Tibor; Mueller, Maja; Markowski, Andrea; Siegmund, Tina; Jacob, Christian; Drexler, Helmut; Landmesser, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and injury are considered to contribute considerably to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. It has been suggested that intense exercise training can increase the number and angiogenic properties of early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). However, whether exercise training stimulates the capacity of early EPCs to promote repair of endothelial damage and potential underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of moderate exercise training on in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs, and their nitric oxide and superoxide production as characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy analysis in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Twenty-four subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to an 8 weeks exercise training or a control group. Superoxide production and nitric oxide (NO) availability of early EPCs were characterized by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy analysis. In vivo endothelial repair capacity of EPCs was examined by transplantation into nude mice with defined carotid endothelial injury. Endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation was analysed using high-resolution ultrasound. Importantly, exercise training resulted in a substantially improved in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs (24.0 vs 12.7%; p exercise training, but not in the control group. Moreover, exercise training reduced superoxide production of EPCs, which was not observed in the control group. The present study suggests for the first time that moderate exercise training increases nitric oxide production of early endothelial progenitor cells and reduces their superoxide production. Importantly, this is associated with a marked beneficial effect on the in vivo endothelial repair capacity of early EPCs in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  5. Different response to hypoxia of adipose-derived multipotent cells from obese subjects with and without metabolic syndrome.

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    Wilfredo Oliva-Olivera

    Full Text Available Multiple studies suggest that hypoxia, together with inflammation, could be one of the phenomena involved in the onset and progression of obesity-related insulin resistance. In addition, dysfunction of adipose tissue in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased angiogenesis. However, some subjects with a high body mass index do not develop metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. The aim of the current study was to examine the neovascular properties of visceral adipose tissue-derived multipotent mesenchymal cells subjected to hypoxia (hypox-visASCs from normal-weight subjects (Nw and obese patients with metabolic syndrome (MS and without metabolic syndrome (NonMS.This was a 2-year study to enroll subjects who underwent bariatric surgery or cholecystectomy. Eight patients who underwent either bariatric surgery or cholecystectomy (27 patients participated in the study. Visceral adipose tissue samples from Nw, MS and NonMS subjects were processed by enzymatic digestion. VisASCs cultured under hypoxic conditions were characterized by tubule formation assay, ELISA, flow cytometry, migration rate, and qRT-PCR, and the effects of visASCs-conditioned medium on survival and endothelial cell tubule formation were evaluated.Hypox-visASCs from NonMS subjects showed a greater capacity for tubule formation than hypox-visASCs from Nw and MS subjects. The lower percentage of CD140b+/CD44+ and CD140b+/CD184+ cells observed in hypox-visASCs from NonMS subjects compared to MS subjects was accompanied not only by a lower migration rate from the chemotactic effects of stromal cell derived factor 1α, but also by lower levels of NOX5 mRNA expression. While the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 mRNA expressed by hypox-visASCs correlated positively with the body mass index and waist circumference of the subjects, the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor present in hypox-visASC-conditioned culture medium

  6. Different response to hypoxia of adipose-derived multipotent cells from obese subjects with and without metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Coín-Aragüez, Leticia; Lhamyani, Said; Alcaide Torres, Juan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Vendrell, Joan; Camargo, Antonio; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives Multiple studies suggest that hypoxia, together with inflammation, could be one of the phenomena involved in the onset and progression of obesity-related insulin resistance. In addition, dysfunction of adipose tissue in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased angiogenesis. However, some subjects with a high body mass index do not develop metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. The aim of the current study was to examine the neovascular properties of visceral adipose tissue-derived multipotent mesenchymal cells subjected to hypoxia (hypox-visASCs) from normal-weight subjects (Nw) and obese patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) and without metabolic syndrome (NonMS). Methods This was a 2-year study to enroll subjects who underwent bariatric surgery or cholecystectomy. Eight patients who underwent either bariatric surgery or cholecystectomy (27 patients) participated in the study. Visceral adipose tissue samples from Nw, MS and NonMS subjects were processed by enzymatic digestion. VisASCs cultured under hypoxic conditions were characterized by tubule formation assay, ELISA, flow cytometry, migration rate, and qRT-PCR, and the effects of visASCs-conditioned medium on survival and endothelial cell tubule formation were evaluated. Results Hypox-visASCs from NonMS subjects showed a greater capacity for tubule formation than hypox-visASCs from Nw and MS subjects. The lower percentage of CD140b+/CD44+ and CD140b+/CD184+ cells observed in hypox-visASCs from NonMS subjects compared to MS subjects was accompanied not only by a lower migration rate from the chemotactic effects of stromal cell derived factor 1α, but also by lower levels of NOX5 mRNA expression. While the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 mRNA expressed by hypox-visASCs correlated positively with the body mass index and waist circumference of the subjects, the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor present in hypox

  7. Requirement for CD40 ligand, CD4(+) T cells, and B cells in an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, J W; Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, J P

    1999-01-01

    (+) CD8(+) population that is found in mice with different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Aspects of the CD8(+)-T-cell response are substantially modified in mice that lack B cells, CD4(+) T cells, or the CD40 ligand (CD40L). The B-cell-deficient mice show no increase in Vbeta4(+) CD8......(+) T cells. Similar abrogation of the Vbeta4(+) CD8(+) response is seen following antibody-mediated depletion of the CD4(+) subset, through the numbers of CD8(+) CD62L(lo) cells are still significantly elevated. Virus-specific CD4(+)-T-cell frequencies are minimal in the CD40L(-/-) mice, and the Vbeta4......(+) CD8(+) population remains unexpanded. Apparently B-cell-CD4(+)-T-cell interactions play a part in the gammaHV-68 induction of both splenomegaly and non-MHC-restricted Vbeta4(+) CD8(+)-T-cell expansion....

  8. Diagnostic and pathogenetic role of café-au-lait macules in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponti Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Café au lait spots (CALS are common dermatologic findings that can at the same time arise in a variety of pathologic conditions such as Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, together with numerous hereditary syndromes for which they represent either diagnostic criteria or associated elements (McCune Albright, Silver-Russell, LEOPARD, Ataxia-Telangiectasia. A review of the literature also revealed two cases of association with NBCCS. We report here the case of a female proband with CALS associated to Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS with known PTCH1 germline mutation (C.1348-2A>G who had been misdiagnosed with NF1 in her childhood because of 5 CALS and cutaneous nodules. The patient presented a giant cell tumor of the skin, palmar and calcaneal epidermoidal cystic nodules, odontogenic keratocystic tumors and deformity of the jaw profile. Her family history brought both her brother and father to our attention because of the presence of KCOTs diagnosed at early age: after genetic testing, the same PTCH1 germline mutation was identified in the three family members. Clinical criteria are used for discerning NF1 diagnosis (size, number and onset age, while there are no definite guidelines concerning CALS except for their presence. In our experience, we have noted an association of CALS with NBCCS; this seems interesting because we already know clinical criteria are a dynamic entity and can be modified by epidemiologic evidences.

  9. Extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma: An unexpected complication in children with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Paz; Kelada, Aml; Cámara, Maria; Zeft, Andrew; Flagg, Aron

    2017-03-08

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the infiltration of lymphocytes into exocrine glands, resulting in the typical sicca symptoms. Unlike adults, primary SS is a very rare condition in childhood, and the risk of malignancy in juvenile SS (JSS) has not been defined. We report the detection of extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (EMZL) occurring in two children with SS. Fine needle aspiration of the salivary glands (SG) showed nonspecific findings that led to delayed diagnosis of SS. The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma associated with JSS was based on morphologic and immunohistochemical staining done during the biopsy. To highlight awareness of EMZL as a timely and appropriate update of an unusual complication in children with SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of a MK2 Inhibitor by Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling for Study in Werner Syndrome Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. Bagley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions have been employed towards the synthesis of three different MAPKAPK2 (MK2 inhibitors to study accelerated aging in Werner syndrome (WS cells, including the cross-coupling of a 2-chloroquinoline with a 3-pyridinylboronic acid, the coupling of an aryl bromide with an indolylboronic acid and the reaction of a 3-amino-4-bromopyrazole with 4-carbamoylphenylboronic acid. In all of these processes, the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction was fast and relatively efficient using a palladium catalyst under microwave irradiation. The process was incorporated into a rapid 3-step microwave-assisted method for the synthesis of a MK2 inhibitor involving 3-aminopyrazole formation, pyrazole C-4 bromination using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS, and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of the pyrazolyl bromide with 4-carbamoylphenylboronic acid to give the target 4-arylpyrazole in 35% overall yield, suitable for study in WS cells.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Down Syndrome Embryonic Stem Cells Reveals a Role for RUNX1 in Neural Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is the leading genetic cause of mental retardation and is caused by a third copy of human chromosome 21. The different pathologies of DS involve many tissues with a distinct array of neural phenotypes. Here we characterize embryonic stem cell lines with DS (DS-ESCs, and focus on the neural aspects of the disease. Our results show that neural progenitor cells (NPCs differentiated from five independent DS-ESC lines display increased apoptosis and downregulation of forehead developmental genes. Analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested RUNX1 as a key transcription regulator in DS-NPCs. Using genome editing we were able to disrupt all three copies of RUNX1 in DS-ESCs, leading to downregulation of several RUNX1 target developmental genes accompanied by reduced apoptosis and neuron migration. Our work sheds light on the role of RUNX1 and the importance of dosage balance in the development of neural phenotypes in DS.

  12. Oxidative DNA damage in bone marrow cells of patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Božena; Bagryantseva, Yana; Šišková, M.; Neuwirtová, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2009), s. 340-343 ISSN 0145-2126 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8265 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Myelodysplastic syndrome * Refractory anemia * Oxidative DNA damage Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2009

  13. Nivolumab-associated Nephrotic Syndrome in a Patient With Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, R.A.; Maas, R.J.H.; Koornstra, R.H.; Steenbergen, E.J.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Willemsen, A.E.C.A.B.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Immune checkpoint inhibitors have taken an important place in the treatment of different types of malignancies. These drugs are known to have specific immune-mediated adverse events. We describe a case of severe nephrotic syndrome secondary to treatment with nivolumab in a patient with

  14. Adenosine triphosphate and diphosphoglycerate levels in red blood cells from patients with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knull, H R; Bronstein, W W; Porter, P J

    1978-09-15

    The levels of ATP and ATP plus DPG were significantly elevated in erythrocytes from Down's syndrome patients when compared to erythrocytes from age matched controls. The hemoglobin content and hematocrit values were significantly reduced. The resultant tendency towards anemia probably explains the elevation in metabolite levels.

  15. Acetate mediates a microbiome-brain-β-cell axis to promote metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Peng, Liang; Barry, Natasha A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome are associated with changes to the gut microbiota; however, the mechanism by which modifications to the gut microbiota might lead to these conditions is unknown. Here we show that increased production of acetate by an altered gut microbiota i...

  16. Constitutional Mosaic Trisomy 13 in Two Germ Cell Layers is Different from Patau Syndrome? A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunwar, Fulesh; Pandya, Vidhi; Bakshi, Sonal R

    2016-03-01

    The heterogeneous phenotype of known syndromes is a clinical challenge, and harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is desirable. This report attempts phenotypic analysis in a patient of constitutional mosaic trisomy 13 in mesoderm and ectoderm to make globally comparable clinical description. Phenotypic features (minor/major abnormalities) were recorded and matched with the Human Phenotype Ontology terms that were used to query web-based tool Phenomizer. We report here a case of 24-year-old girl born to non consanguineous parents with history of one abortion. Her phenotypic evaluation included short columella, low-set ears, seizures, enlarged naris, bifid tongue, infra-orbital fold, smooth philtrum, microtia, microcephaly, carious teeth, downslanted palpebral fissures, proportionate short stature, high palate, thin upper lip vermilion, small for gestational age, broad fingertip, broad hallux, mandibular prognathia and dental malocclusion. Karyotype and interphase FISH (Fluorescence in situ hybridization) was done in blood cells. Interphase FISH was also performed on buccal epithelial cells. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated trisomy 13 mosaicism in 25% cells i.e. 47, XX,+13(9)/46,XX(27). The interphase FISH in blood cells showed trisomy 13 in 15%, whereas in buccal mucosa cells showed nearly 6%. Mosaic aneuploidy in constitutional karyotype can be responsible for variation in clinical and morphological presentation of patient with genetic disorder.

  17. Activation of IFN pathways and plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment in target organs of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Cagnard, Nicolas; Lucchesi, Carlo; Letourneur, Franck; Mistou, Sylvie; Lazure, Thierry; Jacques, Sebastien; Ba, Nathalie; Ittah, Marc; Lepajolec, Christine; Labetoulle, Marc; Ardizzone, Marc; Sibilia, Jean; Fournier, Catherine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Mariette, Xavier

    2006-02-21

    Gene expression analysis of target organs might help provide new insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We used global gene expression profiling of minor salivary glands to identify patterns of gene expression in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), a common and prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. Gene expression analysis allowed for differentiating most patients with pSS from controls. The expression of 23 genes in the IFN pathways, including two Toll-like receptors (TLR8 and TLR9), was significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, the increased expression of IFN-inducible genes, BAFF and IFN-induced transmembrane protein 1, was also demonstrated in ocular epithelial cells by quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro activation showed that these genes were effectively modulated by IFNs in salivary gland epithelial cells, the target cells of autoimmunity in pSS. The activation of IFN pathways led us to investigate whether plasmacytoid dendritic cells were recruited in salivary glands. These IFN-producing cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in all patients with pSS, whereas none was observed in controls. In conclusion, our results support the pathogenic interaction between the innate and adaptive immune system in pSS. The persistence of the IFN signature might be related to a vicious circle, in which the environment interacts with genetic factors to drive the stimulation of salivary TLRs.

  18. Activation of IFN pathways and plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment in target organs of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Cagnard, Nicolas; Lucchesi, Carlo; Letourneur, Franck; Mistou, Sylvie; Lazure, Thierry; Jacques, Sebastien; Ba, Nathalie; Ittah, Marc; Lepajolec, Christine; Labetoulle, Marc; Ardizzone, Marc; Sibilia, Jean; Fournier, Catherine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Mariette, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression analysis of target organs might help provide new insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We used global gene expression profiling of minor salivary glands to identify patterns of gene expression in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), a common and prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. Gene expression analysis allowed for differentiating most patients with pSS from controls. The expression of 23 genes in the IFN pathways, including two Toll-like receptors (TLR8 and TLR9), was significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, the increased expression of IFN-inducible genes, BAFF and IFN-induced transmembrane protein 1, was also demonstrated in ocular epithelial cells by quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro activation showed that these genes were effectively modulated by IFNs in salivary gland epithelial cells, the target cells of autoimmunity in pSS. The activation of IFN pathways led us to investigate whether plasmacytoid dendritic cells were recruited in salivary glands. These IFN-producing cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in all patients with pSS, whereas none was observed in controls. In conclusion, our results support the pathogenic interaction between the innate and adaptive immune system in pSS. The persistence of the IFN signature might be related to a vicious circle, in which the environment interacts with genetic factors to drive the stimulation of salivary TLRs. PMID:16477017

  19. Dynamic innate immune responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Yoshikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human lung epithelial cells are likely among the first targets to encounter invading severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV. Not only can these cells support the growth of SARS-CoV infection, but they are also capable of secreting inflammatory cytokines to initiate and, eventually, aggravate host innate inflammatory responses, causing detrimental immune-mediated pathology within the lungs. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of the complex epithelial signaling to SARS-CoV is crucial for paving the way to better understand SARS pathogenesis. Based on microarray-based functional genomics, we report here the global gene response of 2B4 cells, a cloned bronchial epithelial cell line derived from Calu-3 cells. Specifically, we found a temporal and spatial activation of nuclear factor (NFkappaB, activator protein (AP-1, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3/7 in infected 2B4 cells at 12-, 24-, and 48-hrs post infection (p.i., resulting in the activation of many antiviral genes, including interferon (IFN-beta, -lambdas, inflammatory mediators, and many IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We also showed, for the first time, that IFN-beta and IFN-lambdas were capable of exerting previously unrecognized, non-redundant, and complementary abilities to limit SARS-CoV replication, even though their expression could not be detected in infected 2B4 bronchial epithelial cells until 48 hrs p.i. Collectively, our results highlight the mechanics of the sequential events of antiviral signaling pathway/s triggered by SARS-CoV in bronchial epithelial cells and identify novel cellular targets for future studies, aiming at advancing strategies against SARS.

  20. Association of T and NK Cell Phenotype With the Diagnosis of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Rivas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS is a pathological condition characterized by incapacitating fatigue and a combination of neurologic, immunologic, and endocrine symptoms. At present its diagnosis is based exclusively on clinical criteria. Several studies have described altered immunologic profiles; therefore, we proposed to further examine the more significant differences, particularly T and NK cell subpopulations that could be conditioned by viral infections, to discern their utility in improving the diagnosis and characterization of the patients. The study included 76 patients that fulfilled the revised Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC 2010 for ME/CFS and 73 healthy controls, matched for age and gender. Immunophenotyping of different T cell and natural killer cell subpopulations in peripheral blood was determined by flow cytometry. ME/CFS patients showed significantly lower values of T regulatory cells (CD4+CD25++(highFOXP3+ and higher NKT-like cells (CD3+CD16+/−CD56+ than the healthy individuals. Regarding NK phenotypes, NKG2C was significantly lower and NKCD69 and NKCD56 bright were significantly higher in the patients group. A classification model was generated using the more relevant cell phenotype differences (NKG2C and T regulatory cells that was able to classify the individuals as ME/CFS patients or healthy in a 70% of cases. The observed differences in some of the subpopulations of T and NK cells between patients and healthy controls could define a distinct immunological profile that can help in the diagnostic process of ME/CFS patients, contribute to the recognition of the disease and to the search of more specific treatments. However, more studies are needed to corroborate these findings and to contribute to establish a consensus in diagnosis.

  1. Single cell analysis demonstrating somatic mosaicism involving 11p in a patient with paternal isodisomy and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, F.Z.; McCaskill, C.; Subramanian, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) is characterized by numerous growth abnormalities including exomphalos, macroglossia, gigantism, and hemihypertrophy or hemihyperplasia. The {open_quotes}BWS gene{close_quotes} appears to be maternally repressed and is suspected to function as a growth factor or regulator of somatic growth, since activation of this gene through a variety of mechanisms appears to result in somatic overgrowth and tumor development. Mosaic paternal isodisomy of 11p has been observed previously by others in patients with BWS by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. The interpretation of these results was primarily based on the intensities of the hybridization signals for the different alleles. In our study, we demonstrate somatic mosaicism directly through PCR and single cell analysis. Peripheral blood was obtained from a patient with BWS and initial genomic DNA analysis by PCR was suggestive of somatic mosaicism for paternal isodisomy of 11p. Through micromanipulation, single cells were isolated and subjected to primer extention preamplification. Locus-specific microsatellite marker analyses by PCR were performed to determine the chromosome 11 origins in the preamplified individual cells. Two populations of cells were detected, a population of cells with normal biparental inheritance and a population of cells with paternal isodisomy of 11p and biparental disomy of 11q. Using the powerful approach of single cell analysis, the detected somatic mosaicism provides evidence for a mitotic recombinational event that has resulted in loss of the maternal 11p region and gain of a second copy of paternal 11p in some cells. The direct demonstration of mosaicism may explain the variable phenotypes and hemihypertrophy often observed in BWS.

  2. GLP-1-RA Corrects Mitochondrial Labile Iron Accumulation and Improves β-Cell Function in Type 2 Wolfram Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielpur, Liron; Sohn, Yang-Sung; Karmi, Ola; Fogel, Chen; Zinger, Adar; Abu-Libdeh, Abdulsalam; Israeli, Tal; Riahi, Yael; Pappo, Orit; Birk, Ruth; Zangen, David H; Mittler, Ron; Cabantchik, Zvi-Ioav; Cerasi, Erol; Nechushtai, Rachel; Leibowitz, Gil

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 Wolfram syndrome (T2-WFS) is a neuronal and β-cell degenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CISD2 gene. The mechanisms underlying β-cell dysfunction in T2-WFS are not known, and treatments that effectively improve diabetes in this context are lacking. Unraveling the mechanisms of β-cell dysfunction in T2-WFS and the effects of treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1-RA). A case report and in vitro mechanistic studies. We treated an insulin-dependent T2-WFS patient with the GLP-1-RA exenatide for 9 weeks. An iv glucose/glucagon/arginine stimulation test was performed off-drug before and after intervention. We generated a cellular model of T2-WFS by shRNA knockdown of CISD2 (nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 [NAF-1]) in rat insulinoma cells and studied the mechanisms of β-cell dysfunction and the effects of GLP-1-RA. Treatment with exenatide resulted in a 70% reduction in daily insulin dose with improved glycemic control, as well as an off-drug 7-fold increase in maximal insulin secretion. NAF-1 repression in INS-1 cells decreased insulin content and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, while maintaining the response to cAMP, and enhanced the accumulation of labile iron and reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Remarkably, treatment with GLP-1-RA and/or the iron chelator deferiprone reversed these defects. NAF-1 deficiency leads to mitochondrial labile iron accumulation and oxidative stress, which may contribute to β-cell dysfunction in T2-WFS. Treatment with GLP-1-RA and/or iron chelation improves mitochondrial function and restores β-cell function. Treatment with GLP-1-RA, probably aided by iron chelation, should be considered in WFS and other forms of diabetes associated with iron dysregulation.

  3. Chromogranin A cell density in the large intestine of Asian and European patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Asia show distinctive differences from those in the western world. The gastrointestinal endocrine cells appear to play an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. The present study aimed at studying the density of chromogranin A (CgA) cells in the large intestine of Thai and Norwegian IBS patients. Thirty Thai IBS patients and 20 control subjects, and 47 Norwegian IBS patients and 20 control subjects were included. A standard colonoscopy was performed in both the patients and controls, and biopsy samples were taken from the colon and the rectum. The biopsy samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for CgA. The density of CgA cells was determined by computerized image analysis. In the colon and rectum, the CgA cell densities were far higher in both IBS and healthy Thai subjects than in Norwegians. The colonic CgA cell density was lower in Norwegian IBS patients than in controls, but did not differ between Thai IBS patients and controls. In the rectum, the CgA cell densities in both Thai and Norwegian patients did not differ from those of controls. The higher densities of CgA cells in Thai subjects than Norwegians may be explained by a higher exposure to infections at childhood and the development of a broad immune tolerance, by differences in the intestinal microbiota, and/or differing diet habits. The normal CgA cell density in Thai IBS patients in contrast to that of Norwegians may be due to differences in pathophysiology.

  4. The effect of small-molecule inhibition of MAPKAPK2 on cell ageing phenotypes of fibroblasts from human Werner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Terence

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome (WS show reduced replicative lifespan and a “stressed” morphology, both phenotypes being alleviated by using the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. Because p38 is a major hub for the control of stress-signalling pathways we were interested in examining the possible role for downstream kinases in order to refine our understanding of the role of p38 signalling in regulation of WS cell growth. To this end we treated WS and normal fibroblasts with MK2 inhibitors to determine whether MK2 inhibition would affect either the growth or morphology of WS cells. The first inhibitor, 7,8-dihydroxy-2,4-diamino-3-cyanobenzopyranopyridine (inhibitor 2, resulted in inhibition of WS cell growth and had no effect on morphology, effects that occurred below the level needed to inhibit MK2 and thus suggestive of inhibitor toxicity. The second inhibitor, 2-(2-quinolin-3-ylpyridin-4-yl-1,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4H-pyrrolo-[3,2-c]pyridin-4-one (CMPD16, resulted in a significant extension of WS fibroblast replicative capacity compared to normal cells. In addition, CMPD16 reverted the WS cellular morphology to that seen in normal dermal fibroblasts. These data suggest that MK2 activity plays a substantial role in proliferation control in WS cells. CMPD16 was not as effective in cellular lifespan extension as SB203580, however, suggesting that, although MK2 is a downstream kinase involved in cell cycle arrest, other p38 targets may play a role. Alternatively, as CMPD16 is toxic to cell growth at levels just above those that extend lifespan, it is possible that the therapeutic window is too small. However, as CMPD16 does show significant effects in WS fibroblasts, this acts as proof-of-principle for the efforts to design and synthesise improved MK2 inhibitors. As MK2 is involved in inflammatory processes and inflammation plays a major role in WS phenotypes, these data suggest MK2 as a potential therapeutic target

  5. Analysis of CTCL cell lines reveals important differences between mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome vs. HTLV-1+ leukemic cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netchiporouk, Elena; Gantchev, Jennifer; Tsang, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1 is estimated to affect ~20 million people worldwide and in ~5% of carriers it produces Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), which can often masquerade and present with classic erythematous pruritic patches and plaques that are typically seen in Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome...... (SS), the most recognized variants of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL). For many years the role of HTLV- 1 in the pathogenesis of MF/SS has been hotly debated. In this study we analyzed CTCL vs. HTLV-1+ leukemic cells. We performed G-banding/spectral karyotyping, extensive gene expression analysis......, TP53 sequencing in the 11 patient-derived HTLV- 1+ (MJ and Hut102) vs. HTLV-1- (Myla, Mac2a, PB2B, HH, H9, Hut78, SZ4, Sez4 and SeAx) CTCL cell lines. We further tested drug sensitivities to commonly used CTCL therapies and studied the ability of these cells to produce subcutaneous xenograft tumors...

  6. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  7. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  8. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  9. Abnormalities of AMPK activation and glucose uptake in cultured skeletal muscle cells from individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E Brown

    Full Text Available Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects.Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise.In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16 h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16 h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured.EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Syndrome is Expressed in Amniotic Fluid Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Julian C.; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Morris, Andrew M. M.; Gray, R. George F.; Cooper, J. Mark; McKiernan, Patrick J.; Leonard, James V.; Schapira, Anthony H. V.

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an autosomal inherited disease associated with grossly reduced cellular levels of mitochondrial DNA in infancy. Most patients are born after a full and uncomplicated pregnancy, are normal at birth, but develop symptoms in the early neonatal period. These observations have led to the suggestion that the patients have a defect affecting the control of mitochondrial DNA copy number after birth. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we demonstrated that the ...

  11. Mosaic Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic B cell-leukemia. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra-Baltazar, Isabel Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS or trisomy 21 is a constitutional chromosomal abnormality, which may be mosaic in 1 % to 4 % of cases. DS mosaic diagnosis is difficult because most patients have a normal phenotype and show no significant clinical abnormalities. Patients with DS have a higher risk of developing acute leukemia such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We report the case of a 19-year old woman with mosaic trisomy 21 and ALL.

  12. Successful treatment of severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome despite multiple organ failure with defibrotide after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behre Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, a typical and life-threatening complication after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, successfully treated with defibrotide despite massive multiple organ failure. Case presentation A 64-year-old Caucasian woman underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation from her human leukocyte antigen-identical sister against aggressive lymphoplasmocytoid immunocytoma. Seven days later, the patient developed severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome according to the modified Seattle criteria. We initiated treatment with defibrotide. Despite early treatment, multiple organ failure with kidney failure requiring dialysis and ventilator-dependent lung failure aggravated the clinical course. Furthermore, central nervous dysfunction occurred as well as transfusion refractory thrombocytopenia. Conclusion As highlighted in our report, defibrotide is the most promising drug in the treatment of the formerly, almost lethal, severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome to date. This is demonstrated very clearly in our patient. She improved completely, even after renal, cerebral and respiratory failure.

  13. Successful treatment of severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome despite multiple organ failure with defibrotide after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behre, Gerhard; Theurich, Sebastian; Christopeit, Maximilian; Weber, Thomas

    2009-03-10

    We report a case of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, a typical and life-threatening complication after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, successfully treated with defibrotide despite massive multiple organ failure. A 64-year-old Caucasian woman underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation from her human leukocyte antigen-identical sister against aggressive lymphoplasmocytoid immunocytoma. Seven days later, the patient developed severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome according to the modified Seattle criteria. We initiated treatment with defibrotide. Despite early treatment, multiple organ failure with kidney failure requiring dialysis and ventilator-dependent lung failure aggravated the clinical course. Furthermore, central nervous dysfunction occurred as well as transfusion refractory thrombocytopenia. As highlighted in our report, defibrotide is the most promising drug in the treatment of the formerly, almost lethal, severe sinusoidal obstruction syndrome to date. This is demonstrated very clearly in our patient. She improved completely, even after renal, cerebral and respiratory failure.

  14. Ectopic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH syndrome from metastatic small cell carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani Sadeka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cushing's Syndrome (CS which is caused by isolated Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH production, rather than adrenocorticotropin (ACTH production, is extremely rare. Methods We describe the clinical presentation, course, laboratory values and pathologic findings of a patient with isolated ectopic CRH causing CS. We review the literature of the types of tumors associated with this unusual syndrome and the behavior of these tumors by endocrine testing. Results A 56 year old woman presented with clinical and laboratory features consistent with ACTH-dependent CS. Pituitary imaging was normal and cortisol did not suppress with a high dose dexamethasone test, consistent with a diagnosis of ectopic ACTH. CT imaging did not reveal any discrete lung lesions but there were mediastinal and abdominal lymphadenopathy and multiple liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease. Laboratory testing was positive for elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen and the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A. Serum markers of carcinoid, medullary thyroid carcinoma, and pheochromocytoma were in the normal range. Because the primary tumor could not be identified by imaging, biopsy of the presumed metastatic liver lesions was performed. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with a neuroendocrine tumor, specifically small cell carcinoma. Immunostaining for ACTH was negative but was strongly positive for CRH and laboratory testing revealed a plasma CRH of 10 pg/ml (normal 0 to 10 pg/ml which should have been suppressed in the presence of high cortisol. Conclusions This case illustrates the importance of considering the ectopic production of CRH in the differential diagnosis for presentations of ACTH-dependent Cushing's Syndrome.

  15. Sensitivity of cultured lymphocytes from patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome to ultraviolet light and phytohemagglutinin stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, P.; Celotti, L.; Furlan, D.; Pattarello, I.; Peserico, A.

    1990-01-01

    DNA repair and replication after in vitro UV irradiation were determined in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from 6 patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and from a group of control donors. DNA repair synthesis (UDS) was measured in unstimulated lymphocytes by incubation with 3H-TdR in the presence of hydroxyurea for 3 and 6 h after UV irradiation (6-48 J/m2). DNA replication was measured in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, UV-irradiated or mock-irradiated, by incubation with 3H-TdR for 24 h. The effect of the mitogen was followed during 5 days after stimulation by determining the incorporation of 3H-TdR, the increase of cell number, and the mitotic index. NBCCS and control lymphocytes showed equal sensitivity to UV light in terms of UDS and reduced response to PHA. On the contrary, the mitotic index and the number of cells in stimulated cultures were significantly lower in the affected subjects. These data suggest an altered progression along the cell cycle, which could be characteristic of stimulated NBCCS lymphocytes

  16. VEGF selectively induces Down syndrome critical region 1 gene expression in endothelial cells: a mechanism for feedback regulation of angiogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.-G; Duh, Elia J.

    2004-01-01

    The Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) gene (also known as MCIP1, Adapt78) encodes a regulatory protein that binds to calcineurin catalytic A subunit and acts as a regulator of the calcineurin-mediated signaling pathway. We show in this study that DSCR1 is greatly induced in endothelial cells in response to VEGF, TNF-α, and A23187 treatment, and that this up-regulation is inhibited by inhibitors of the calcineurin-NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) signaling pathway as well as by PKC inhibition and a Ca 2+ chelator. We hypothesized that the up-regulation of DSCR1 gene expression in endothelial cells could act as an endogenous feedback inhibitor for angiogenesis by regulating the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway. Our transient transfection analyses confirm that the overexpression of DSCR1 abrogates the up-regulation of reporter gene expression driven by both the cyclooxygenase 2 and DSCR1 promoters in response to stimulators. Our results indicate that DSCR1 up-regulation may represent a potential molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of angiogenic genes activated by the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway in endothelial cells

  17. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9 ± 31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9 ± 9.8 and 103.7 ± 16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4 ± 8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4 ± 8.1 and 17.9 ± 4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms.

  18. Inhibitory effect of Cyclosporin A and corticosteroids on the production of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by T cells in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.L.; Yang, P.Z.; Lin, X.M.; Ren, X.R.; Zhou, H.Y.; Huang, X.K.; Chi, W.; Kijlstra, A.; Chen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and corticosteroids are extensively used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases including Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. The exact immunosuppressive mechanisms of these drugs are not exactly known. Th1 and Th17 cells are important populations involved in autoimmune

  19. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome: differential diagnosis of septic arthritis by regular detection of exceedingly high synovial cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, W; Lohse, P; Weihmayr, T; Widenmayer, W

    2017-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne syndrome was diagnosed in a 42-year-old patient, after an unusual persistency of high synovial cell counts had been noticed. Clinical peculiarities and problems with diagnosing septic versus non-septic arthritis are discussed.

  20. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome

  1. Erlotinib plus parenteral nutrition: an opportunity to get through the hardest days of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yuan-Sheng; Fang, Zheng; Li, Bing

    2013-03-01

    This case study details the poor performance status of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer and cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome got through the hardest days of high tumor burden and malnutrition, by using a combined therapy of lung cancer-targeted therapy drug and parenteral nutrition. The related literatures were reviewed.

  2. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Functional Defects in Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells and Classical Monocytes in a Patient with Hyper-IgE Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuna; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Jihyun; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Hye Young

    2017-10-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a very rare primary immune deficiency characterized by elevated serum IgE levels, recurrent bacterial infections, chronic dermatitis, and connective tissue abnormalities. Autosomal dominant (AD) HIES involves a mutation in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that leads to an impaired T H 17 response. STAT3 signaling is also involved in the function of RORγt + type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) and RORγt + T H 17 cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), granulocytes, and monocytes in a patient with HIES. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a patient with HIES and three age-matched healthy controls were obtained for the analysis of the innate and adaptive immune cells. The frequencies of ILCs in PBMCs were lower in the patient with HIES than in the controls. Moreover, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-17A produced by ILC3s in PBMCs were lower in the patient with HIES than the controls. Compared with the controls, classical monocytes (CD14 + CD16 low ), which have a high antimicrobial capability, were also lower in the patient with HIES, while non-classical monocytes (CD14 low CD16 + ) as well as intermediate monocytes (CD14 + CD16 intermediate ) were higher. Taken together, these results indicate that the impaired immune defense against pathogenic microbes in the patient with HIES might be partially explained by functional defects in ILC3s and inflammatory monocytes.

  4. Natural killer cell biology illuminated by primary immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Matthias; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cytotoxic effector cells well known for their role in antiviral immunity and tumor immunosurveillance. In parts, this knowledge stems from rare inherited immunodeficiency disorders in humans that abrogate NK cell function leading to immune impairments, most notably associated with a high susceptibility to viral infections. Phenotypically, these disorders range from deficiencies selectively affecting NK cells to complex general immune defects that affect NK cells but also other immune cell subsets. Moreover, deficiencies may be associated with reduced NK cell numbers or rather impair specific NK cell effector functions. In recent years, genetic defects underlying the various NK cell deficiencies have been uncovered and have triggered investigative efforts to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we review the associations between inherited human diseases and NK cell development as well as function, with a particular focus on defects in NK cell exocytosis and cytotoxicity. Furthermore we outline how reports of diverse genetic defects have shaped our understanding of NK cell biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Biomarkers in chronic fatigue syndrome: evaluation of natural killer cell function and dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A Fletcher

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS studies from our laboratory and others described decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC and elevated proportion of lymphocytes expressing the activation marker, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV also known as CD26. However, neither these assays nor other laboratory tests are widely accepted for the diagnosis or prognosis of CFS. This study sought to determine if NKCC or DPPIV/CD26 have diagnostic accuracy for CFS.Subjects included female and male CFS cases and healthy controls. NK cell function was measured with a bioassay, using K562 cells and (51Cr release. Lymphocyte associated DPPIV/CD26 was assayed by qualitative and quantitative flow cytometry. Serum DPPIV/CD26 was measured by ELISA. Analysis by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve assessed biomarker potential. Cytotoxic function of NK cells for 176 CFS subjects was significantly lower than in the 230 controls. According to ROC analysis, NKCC was a good predictor of CFS status. There was no significant difference in NK cell counts between cases and controls. Percent CD2+ lymphocytes (T cells and NK cells positive for DPPIV/C26 was elevated in CFS cases, but there was a decrease in the number of molecules (rMol of DPPIV/C26 expressed on T cells and NK cells and a decrease in the soluble form of the enzyme in serum. Analyses by ROC curves indicated that all three measurements of DPPIV/CD26 demonstrated potential as biomarkers for CFS. None of the DPPIV/C26 assays were significantly correlated with NKCC.By ROC analysis, NKCC and three methods of measuring DPPIV/C26 examined in this study had potential as biomarkers for CFS. Of these, NKCC, %CD2+CD26+ lymphocytes and rMol CD26/CD2+ lymphocyte, required flow cytometry, fresh blood and access to a high complexity laboratory. Soluble DPPIV/C26 in serum is done with a standard ELISA assay, or with other soluble factors in a multiplex type of ELISA. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV on lymphocytes or in serum was

  6. Failure of anti-T-cell receptor V beta antibodies to consistently identify a malignant T-cell clone in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, R D; Boselli, C M; Foley, B; Vonderheid, E C

    1996-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacting with the human T cell receptor (TCR) V beta or V alpha region have been shown to be almost as specific as a private idiotypic MAb in identifying T cell clones. When available, V beta-specific MAbs offer the ease of immunofluorescence analysis to identify and quantitate expanded malignant or nonmalignant T cell populations without requiring polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to evaluate expression of V beta gene families. The V beta expression of peripheral blood lymphocytes from twenty-three consecutive patients with Sézary syndrome has been analyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Ten patients had malignant T cell clones that expressed a TCR V beta corresponding to a commercially available anti-V beta antibody. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-V beta MAbs showed a direct correlation with RT-PCR results in seven of ten patients. No false positive reactivity was noted on immunofluorescence staining with any MAb. Cells from three patients, however, did not react with the corresponding anti-V beta MAb. These three cases expressed a TCR V beta from gene families containing a single member, ie, V beta 14, V beta 18, and V beta 20, yet MAbs reported to be specific for these regions failed to react with the T cell clone from these patients. Sequencing of the PCR product in these cases confirmed the RT-PCR results. Cells from two patients expressed a TCR using V beta 5.1-D beta 1.1 genes with different J-C segments. One patient's cells reacted with an anti-V beta 5.1 MAb (LC4) whereas the other patient's cells bound one-tenth the amount of this same MAb. These results indicate that currently available anti-TCR V region MAbs may not react consistently with T cell clones expressing the corresponding V region or may react with a low affinity making detection difficult. Differences in the J-C junction or in CDR3 may influence the binding of these MAbs. Until the false negative rate is reduced and the fine specificity and

  7. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink,1 David J Kopsky21Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Bosch en Duin, The Netherlands; 2Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients.Keywords: palmitoylethanolamide, ketamine, cream, CRPS, endocannabinoid, sudeck, mast cells

  8. Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome in a Miniature Schnauzer dog with signs of feminization and a Sertoli cell tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegter, A R; Kooistra, H S; van Sluijs, F J; van Bruggen, L W L; Ijzer, J; Zijlstra, C; Okkens, A C

    2010-06-01

    A 5-year-old male Miniature Schnauzer was presented with unilateral cryptorchidism and signs of feminization. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an enlarged right testis and a large, fluid-filled cavity that appeared to arise from the prostate. Computed tomography revealed the cavity to be consistent with an enlarged uterine body, arising from the prostate, and showed two structures resembling uterine horns that terminated close to the adjacent testes. The dog had a normal male karyotype, 78 XY. Gonadohysterectomy was performed and both the surgical and the histological findings confirmed the presence of a uterus in this male animal, resulting in a diagnosis of persistent Mullerian duct syndrome (PMDS). The enlarged intra-abdominal testis contained a Sertoli cell tumour. Computed tomography proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool for PMDS.

  9. A case of persistent Müllerian duct syndrome with sertoli cell tumor and hydrometra in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuu, Aya; Hashizume, Takuya; Kanda, Teppei; Nagano, Masashi; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2009-03-01

    A 10-year-old Miniature Schnauzer with bilateral cryptorchidism and male external genitalia was referred with a history of abdominal enlargement. Upon exploratory laparotomy, two tumors and a connecting structure similar to fluid-filled uterus were recognized. After cytological and bacterial examinations of the fluid and histological examination, this dog was diagnosed with bilateral Sertoli cell tumor with hydrometra. The karyotype of this dog was 78, XY and the sry gene was detected positive by PCR. We diagnosed this dog as a case of persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS), which is male pseudohermaphroditism. This is the first report regarding the incidence of PMDS in Miniature Schnauzers in Japan, and it suggests the involvement of a gene carrier.

  10. Mediastinal mixed germ cell tumor in an infertile male with Klinefelter syndrome:A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS is a well-documented abnormality of the sex chromosome, with an incidence of 1 in 600 newborn males. It is characterized by a 47, XXY or a mosaic karyotype, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, infertility, reduced body hair, gynecomastia, and tall stature. Different neoplasms such as breast, testicular, and lymphoreticular malignancies may occur in 1% to2% of the cases with KS. Herein we describe a case of mediastinal mixed germ cell tumor (GCT in a 40-year-old male with KS. Interestingly, this case also had mitral valve prolapse, and an incidental papillary microcarcinoma of the thyroid gland. In view of the presence of pulmonary nodules, antemortem differential diagnoses considered were mycobacterial infection, lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and a primary/metastatic neoplasm of the lung. As GCT was not considered, the serum markers of a GCT were not performed. The diagnosis of this rare mediastinal mixed GCT with KS was made at autopsy.

  11. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focused on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralizing antibody responses...... proposed that T cell-mediated immunity plays a key role. Therefore, we hypothesized that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered...... attractive vaccine candidate T cell antigens, which should be evaluated further in the context of PRRSV vaccine development....

  12. Nuclear donor cell lines considerably influence cloning efficiency and the incidence of large offspring syndrome in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Su, J; Luo, Y; Quan, F; Zhang, Y

    2013-08-01

    Total five ear skin fibroblast lines (named F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5) from different newborn Holstein cows have been used as nuclear donor cells for producing cloned cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The effects of these cell lines on both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates of cloned embryos, post-natal survivability and incidence of large offspring syndrome (LOS) were examined in this study. We found that the different cell lines possessed the same capacity to support pre-implantation development of cloned embryos, the cleavage and blastocyst formation rates ranged from 80.2 ± 0.9 to 84.5 ± 2.5% and 28.5 ± 0.9 to 33.3 ± 1.4%, respectively. However, their capacities to support the in vivo development of SCNT embryos showed significant differences (p cloning efficiency was significantly higher in group F5 than those in group F1, F2, F3 and F4 (9.3% vs 4.1%, 1.2%, 2.0% and 5.0%, respectively, p cloned offspring from cell line F1, F2, F3 and F4 showed LOS and gestation length delay, while all cloned offspring from F5 showed normal birthweight and gestation length. We concluded that the nuclear donor cell lines have significant impact on the in vivo development of cloned embryos and the incidence of LOS in cloned calves. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Site-Specific Gene Editing of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells for X-Linked Hyper-IgM Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Y. Kuo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M (hyper-IgM syndrome (XHIM is a primary immunodeficiency due to mutations in CD40 ligand that affect immunoglobulin class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. The disease is amenable to gene therapy using retroviral vectors, but dysregulated gene expression results in abnormal lymphoproliferation in mouse models, highlighting the need for alternative strategies. Here, we demonstrate the ability of both the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 platforms to efficiently drive integration of a normal copy of the CD40L cDNA delivered by Adeno-Associated Virus. Site-specific insertion of the donor sequence downstream of the endogenous CD40L promoter maintained physiologic expression of CD40L while overriding all reported downstream mutations. High levels of gene modification were achieved in primary human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, as well as in cell lines and XHIM-patient-derived T cells. Notably, gene-corrected HSCs engrafted in immunodeficient mice at clinically relevant frequencies. These studies provide the foundation for a permanent curative therapy in XHIM.

  14. Destructive, multifocal squamous-cell carcinoma nodules on the cheecks and neck of an elderly woman with a dementia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Marigliano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Squamous-cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer. It can develop on normal skin, actinic keratoses, leukoplakia, and burn scars. The tumor is characterized by remarkable variability at the macroscopic and histopathologic levels. Case report: A 93-year-old woman was admitted to nursing home with a diagnosis of dementia syndrome and squamous cell nodular carcinoma on cheeks and neck region. The physical examination revealed firm, black excrescences with irregular surfaces over both cheekbones, which were roughly the size of hazelnuts. Similar nodules were present with ulcers on other areas of the face. The patient was admitted to the day hospital twice for wide excision of the tumors in the zygomatic region. Later, the neck tumors were removed, and the wound was repaired with a rotation flap after careful control of bleeding. For the latter surgery, the patient was hospitalized for a few days in a geriatric ward to ensure optimal medical care and psychological support. The histological examination revealed ulcerated, well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma that extended down to the subcutaneous layer. Shortly after surgery, she returned to the nursing home to resume rehabilitation and group therapy.

  15. Aerobic exercise modulation of mental stress-induced responses in cultured endothelial progenitor cells from healthy and metabolic syndrome subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Natalia G; Sales, Allan R K; Miranda, Renan L; Silva, Mayra S; Silva, Jemima F R; Silva, Bruno M; Santos, Aline A; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2015-02-15

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that exercise acutely prevents the reduction in flow-mediated dilation induced by mental stress in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, it is unknown whether a similar effect occurs in endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs). This study investigated whether exercise protects from the deleterious effect of mental stress on cultured EPCs in healthy subjects and those with MetS. Ten healthy subjects (aged 31±2) and ten subjects with MetS (aged 36±2) were enrolled. Subjects underwent a mental stress test, followed immediately by either 40 min of leg cycling or rest across two randomized sessions: mental stress+non-exercise control (MS) and mental stress+exercise (MS+EXE). The Stroop Color-Word Test was used to elicit mental stress. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and following sessions to isolate mononuclear cells. These cells were cultured in fibronectin-coated plates for seven days, and EPCs were identified by immunofluorescence (acLDL(+)/ UEA-I Lectin(+)). All subjects presented similar increases in mean blood pressure and heart rate during the mental stress test (P0.05). The EPC response to MS and MS+EXE was increased in healthy subjects, whereas it was decreased in subjects with MetS (Pexercise session increased EPCs in healthy subjects but did not prevent the EPC reduction induced by mental stress among subjects with MetS. © 2015.

  16. Skeletal and dermatological manifestations of the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). Results of 8 patients in 12 years; Skelettale und kutane Charakteristika des naevoiden Basalzellkarzinomsyndroms (Gorlin-Goltz-Syndrom) Ergebnisse von 8 Patienten aus 12 Jahren. Ergebnisse von 8 Patienten aus 12 Jahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupprecht, M.; Barvencik, F.; Amling, M.; Pogoda, P. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Biomechanik und Skelettbiologie; Mensing, C.H. [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany). Eduard-Arning-Klinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie; Ittrich, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Heiland, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Zahn-, Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie; Rueger, J.M. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: In 1960 Gorlin and Goltz defined the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome) as a syndrome comprising multiple basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. NBCCS is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease with an estimated prevalence of 1:150 000 and diagnosis of this syndrome is often an accidental finding of radiological investigations. The purpose of this study was to report the varied radiological and dermatological manifestations of our patients affected with NBCCS and to present this rare syndrome as a differential diagnosis of skeletal anomalies. Materials and Methods: Between 1994 and 2005 the demographic, clinical, radiological and histological data of 8 patients with NBCCS were retrospectively analyzed. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome was diagnosed in the event of two major or one major and two minor criteria. The major criteria are more than 2 basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, three or more palmar pits, and calcification of the falx cerebri. Results: Between 1994 and 2005 8 patients (3 females and 5 males) with NBCCS were treated in our departments. The average age at the time of diagnosis of NBCCS was 49.9 years. All patients had a minimum of two major criteria. The major criteria with the most frequency were the basal cell carcinoma (6 patients) and the odontogenic keratocysts (5 patients), followed by the calcification of the falx cerebri and palmoplantar pits (4 patients). There was no gender-related or age-related predilection and only one patient was affected with pain in his fingers which radiologically correlated to small cystic bone lesions (''flame-shaped lucencies''). (orig.)

  17. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  18. Insulin resistance according to β-cell function in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Do Kyeong; Hong, Young Sun; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Hyejin

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and compensatory hyperinsulinemia. IR is recognized as a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, few studies have investigated IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. The objective of this study was to evaluate IR and β-cell function in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. Additionally, we sought to evaluate the usefulness of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived IR indices in lean women with PCOS. We recruited 100 women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance and 100 age- and BMI-matched women as controls. IR and insulin secretory indices, including the homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA)-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and the Stumvoll index, were calculated from an OGTT. Increased β-cell function was defined as>75th percentile for the HOMA-F in control women. Women with PCOS had higher values for post-load 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin, post-load 2-hour insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and lower values for the Stumvoll index than the controls (all PsWomen with PCOS and increased β-cell function showed lower Stumvoll index values than the matched controls (Plean women with PCOS (all PsWomen with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance showed higher IR than controls matched for age, BMI, and β-cell function. β-cell function was increased in women with PCOS when compared to the matched controls, but not when the lean subjects were compared to the matched controls separately. Therefore, early evaluation of IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance may be needed.

  19. Th1 and Th17 Cells and Associated Cytokines Discriminate among Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Gabriel; Acuña, Eric; Reyes, Lilian I; Ottum, Payton A; De Sarno, Patrizia; Villarroel, Luis; Ciampi, Ethel; Uribe-San Martín, Reinaldo; Cárcamo, Claudia; Naves, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It is a heterogeneous pathology that can follow different clinical courses, and the mechanisms that underlie the progression of the immune response across MS subtypes remain incompletely understood. Here, we aimed to determine differences in the immunological status among different MS clinical subtypes. Blood samples from untreated patients diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) ( n  = 21), different clinical forms of MS ( n  = 62) [relapsing-remitting (RRMS), secondary progressive, and primary progressive], and healthy controls (HCs) ( n  = 17) were tested for plasma levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-10, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F by immunoanalysis. Th1 and Th17 lymphocyte frequencies were determined by flow cytometry. Our results showed that IFN-γ levels and the IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio were higher in CIS patients than in RRMS patients and HC. Th1 cell frequencies were higher in CIS and RRMS than in progressive MS, and RRMS had a higher Th17 frequency than CIS. The Th1/Th17 cell ratio was skewed toward Th1 in CIS compared to MS phenotypes and HC. Receiver operating characteristic statistical analysis determined that IFN-γ, the IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio, Th1 cell frequency, and the Th1/Th17 cell ratio discriminated among CIS and MS subtypes. A subanalysis among patients expressing high IL-17F levels showed that IL-17F and the IFN-γ/IL-17F ratio discriminated between disease subtypes. Overall, our data showed that CIS and MS phenotypes displayed distinct Th1- and Th17-related cytokines and cell profiles and that these immune parameters discriminated between clinical forms. Upon validation, these parameters might be useful as biomarkers to predict disease progression.

  20. Predominant cerebral cytokine release syndrome in CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxian Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR T cells targeting CD19 (CART19 have shown therapeutical activities in CD19+ malignancies. However, the etiological nature of neurologic complications remains a conundrum. In our study, the evidence of blood-brain barrier (BBB-penetrating CAR T cells as a culprit was revealed. A patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia developed sustained pyrexia with tremors about 6 h after CART19 infusion, followed by a grade 2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS and neurological symptoms in the next 3 days. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance showed signs of intracranial edema. Lumbar puncture on day 5 showed an over 400-mmH2O cerebrospinal pressure. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained 20 WBCs/μL with predominant CD3+ T cells. qPCR analysis for CAR constructs showed 3,032,265 copies/μg DNA in CSF and 988,747 copies/μg DNA in blood. Cytokine levels including IFN-γ and IL-6 in CSF were extremely higher than those in the serum. Methyprednisone was administrated and the symptoms relieved gradually. The predominance of CART19 in CSF and the huge discrepancies in cytokine distributions indicated the development of a cerebral CRS, presumably featured as CSF cytokines largely in situ produced by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. For the first time, we reported the development of cerebral CRS triggered by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. Trial registration: ChiCTR-OCC-15007008 .

  1. Cytokine expression patterns and mesenchymal stem cell karyotypes from the bone marrow microenvironment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, H.; Yang, X.Y.; Han, J.; Wang, Q.; Zou, Z.L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore cytokine expression patterns and cytogenetic abnormalities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow microenvironment of Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Bone marrow samples were obtained from 30 cases of MDS (MDS group) and 30 healthy donors (control group). The expression pattern of cytokines was detected by customized protein array. The karyotypes of MSCs were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Compared with the control group, leukemia inhibitory factor, stem cell factor (SCF), stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1), bone morphogenetic protein 4, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor-β in the MDS group were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and programmed death ligand (B7-H1) were significantly upregulated (P<0.05). For chromosome abnormality analysis, the detection rate of abnormal karyotypes (+8, -8, -20, 20q-, -Y, -7, 5q-) was 30% in the MDS group and 0% in the control group. In conclusion, the up- and downregulated expression of these cytokines might play a key role in the pathogenesis of MDS. Among them, SCF and SDF-1 may play roles in the apoptosis of HSCs in MDS; and IFN-γ, TNF-α, and B7-H1 may be associated with apoptosis of bone marrow cells in MDS. In addition, the abnormal karyotypes might be actively involved in the pathogenesis of MDS. Further studies are required to determine the role of abnormal karyotypes in the occurrence and development of MDS

  2. Cytokine expression patterns and mesenchymal stem cell karyotypes from the bone marrow microenvironment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, H.; Yang, X.Y.; Han, J.; Wang, Q.; Zou, Z.L. [Department of Hematology, Shanghai Clinical Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Xuhui District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2015-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to explore cytokine expression patterns and cytogenetic abnormalities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow microenvironment of Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Bone marrow samples were obtained from 30 cases of MDS (MDS group) and 30 healthy donors (control group). The expression pattern of cytokines was detected by customized protein array. The karyotypes of MSCs were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Compared with the control group, leukemia inhibitory factor, stem cell factor (SCF), stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1), bone morphogenetic protein 4, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor-β in the MDS group were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and programmed death ligand (B7-H1) were significantly upregulated (P<0.05). For chromosome abnormality analysis, the detection rate of abnormal karyotypes (+8, -8, -20, 20q-, -Y, -7, 5q-) was 30% in the MDS group and 0% in the control group. In conclusion, the up- and downregulated expression of these cytokines might play a key role in the pathogenesis of MDS. Among them, SCF and SDF-1 may play roles in the apoptosis of HSCs in MDS; and IFN-γ, TNF-α, and B7-H1 may be associated with apoptosis of bone marrow cells in MDS. In addition, the abnormal karyotypes might be actively involved in the pathogenesis of MDS. Further studies are required to determine the role of abnormal karyotypes in the occurrence and development of MDS.

  3. Single TCR-Vβ2 evaluation discloses the circulating T cell clone in Sezary syndrome: one family fits all!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Enrico; Abeni, Damiano; Pomponi, Debora; Russo, Nicoletta; Russo, Giandomenico; Narducci, Maria Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Sézary Syndrome (SS/L-CTCL) is a rare but aggressive variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), characterized by erythroderma, lymphadenopathy, and the presence of a circulating memory CD4(+) T cell malignant clone with a skin homing behavior, lacking CD26 and CD49d and over-expressing CD60. The availability of a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct TCR-Vβ families, allows to typify the clone by flow cytometry in about 70 % of cases. The TCR-Vβ repertoire of 533 individuals, comprising 308 patients affected by CTCL, 50 healthy donors, and subjects affected by various non-neoplastic dermatological affections was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package for Microsoft Windows (SPSS, version 21, Chicago, IL). TCR-Vβ2 levels below 5.4 % or above 39.5 %, within total CD4(+) T cells, showed the best balance between sensitivity (98.1 %) and specificity (96 %) to identify the presence of a clone in the peripheral blood of patients affected by SS. Based on this observation, a "two-step" procedure in the detection of the malignant T cell clone in CTCLs is herein suggested. TCR-Vβ2 assessment in all cases (first step). In the case of TCR-Vβ2 levels above 39.5 %, the presence of a clonal expansion of this family is suggested, deserving further confirmation by means of T cell gene rearrangement evaluation. In patients having a TCR-Vβ2 reactivity below 5.4 % (second step), the entire TCR-Vβ repertoire should be evaluated to typify the expanded clone. In conclusion, the single TCR-Vβ2 expression check, instead of the entire repertoire assessment, represents an easy and cost-effective method for the recognition of CTCL aggressive leukemic variant.

  4. Doege–Potter Syndrome, cause of nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia: the first case report from Nepal

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    Pant V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Pant,1 Suman Baral,2 Gita Sayami,3 Prakash Sayami4 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Endocrinology Unit, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Manmohan Cardiothoracic vascular and transplant Center, Institute of Medicine (IOM, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH, Kathmandu, Nepal Abstract: Doege–Potter syndrome (DPS, a paraneoplastic syndrome, presents as a hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia from the ectopic secretion of insulin-like growth factor II from a solitary fibrous tumor which may be intrapleural or extrapleural in origin. We report a case of severe hypoglycemia in a 70-year old female initially admitted for resection of left sided solitary fibrous tumor of pleura. Investigation revealed true hypoglycemia, and DPS was diagnosed. The tumor was completely resected, after which no further hypoglycemic episodes were seen in 2 years follow-up. This is the first case of solitary fibrous tumor of pleura with DPS reported from Nepal. Keywords: insulin-like growth factor II, IGF-II, solitary fibrous tumor, hypoglycemia

  5. CELSR2, encoding a planar cell polarity protein, is a putative gene in Joubert syndrome with cortical heterotopia, microophthalmia, and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Malicdan, May Christine V; Roney, Joseph C; Cullinane, Andrew R; Stephen, Joshi; Yildirimli, Deniz; Bryant, Joy; Fischer, Roxanne; Vemulapalli, Meghana; Mullikin, James C; Steinbach, Peter J; Gahl, William A; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2017-03-01

    Joubert syndrome is a ciliopathy characterized by a specific constellation of central nervous system malformations that result in the pathognomonic "molar tooth sign" on imaging. More than 27 genes are associated with Joubert syndrome, but some patients do not have mutations in any of these genes. Celsr1, Celsr2, and Celsr3 are the mammalian orthologues of the drosophila planar cell polarity protein, flamingo; they play important roles in neural development, including axon guidance, neuronal migration, and cilium polarity. Here, we report bi-allelic mutations in CELSR2 in a Joubert patient with cortical heterotopia, microophthalmia, and growth hormone deficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  7. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  8. Multiple co morbid conditions in patient with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    conditions in patient \\\\·ith Mast Cell Activation Syndron1e Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM.ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Maj Sofia...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Multiple co-n1orhid conditions in patient \\Vith Mast Cell Activation Syndrotne Sofia M. Szari.MD. and James...Defense. !NTR()D{JCT!ON: Mast cell activation disorders {MCAD) have been associated \\Vilh Connective Tissue Disorders (CTD) and orthostatic

  9. Somatic mosaicism containing double mutations in PTCH1 revealed by generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Yu; Takayama, Yoshinaga; Fujii, Katsunori; Masuda, Mokuri; Kato, Chise; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Fujitani, Kazuko; Nagao, Kazuaki; Kameyama, Kohzoh; Ikehara, Hajime; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2017-08-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by developmental defects and tumorigenesis, such as medulloblastomas and basal cell carcinomas, caused by mutations of the patched-1 ( PTCH1 ) gene. In this article, we seek to demonstrate a mosaicism containing double mutations in PTCH1 in an individual with NBCCS. A de novo germline mutation of PTCH1 (c.272delG) was detected in a 31-year-old woman with NBCCS. Gene analysis of two out of four induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones established from the patient unexpectedly revealed an additional mutation, c.274delT. Deep sequencing confirmed a low-prevalence somatic mutation (5.5%-15.6% depending on the tissue) identical to the one found in iPSC clones. This is the first case of mosaicism unequivocally demonstrated in NBCCS. Furthermore, the mosaicism is unique in that the patient carries one normal and two mutant alleles. Because these mutations are located in close proximity, reversion error is likely to be involved in this event rather than a spontaneous mutation. In addition, this study indicates that gene analysis of iPSC clones can contribute to the detection of mosaicism containing a minor population carrying a second mutation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Loss of Asxl1 Alters Self-Renewal and Cell Fate of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell, Leading to Bohring-Opitz-like Syndrome in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available De novo ASXL1 mutations are found in patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome, a disease with severe developmental defects and early childhood mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using Asxl1-targeted murine models, we found that Asxl1 global loss as well as conditional deletion in osteoblasts and their progenitors led to significant bone loss and a markedly decreased number of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs compared with wild-type littermates. Asxl1−/− BMSCs displayed impaired self-renewal and skewed differentiation, away from osteoblasts and favoring adipocytes. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed altered expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, skeletal development, and morphogenesis. Furthermore, gene set enrichment analysis showed decreased expression of stem cell self-renewal gene signature, suggesting a role of Asxl1 in regulating the stemness of BMSCs. Importantly, re-introduction of Asxl1 normalized NANOG and OCT4 expression and restored the self-renewal capacity of Asxl1−/− BMSCs. Our study unveils a pivotal role of ASXL1 in the maintenance of BMSC functions and skeletal development.

  11. Loss of Asxl1 Alters Self-Renewal and Cell Fate of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell, Leading to Bohring-Opitz-like Syndrome in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Caihong; Rhodes, Steven D; He, Yongzheng; Deng, Kai; Li, Zhaomin; He, Fuhong; Zhu, Caiying; Nguyen, Lihn; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Xu, Mingjiang; Wang, Qian-Fei; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2016-06-14

    De novo ASXL1 mutations are found in patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome, a disease with severe developmental defects and early childhood mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using Asxl1-targeted murine models, we found that Asxl1 global loss as well as conditional deletion in osteoblasts and their progenitors led to significant bone loss and a markedly decreased number of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) compared with wild-type littermates. Asxl1(-/-) BMSCs displayed impaired self-renewal and skewed differentiation, away from osteoblasts and favoring adipocytes. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed altered expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, skeletal development, and morphogenesis. Furthermore, gene set enrichment analysis showed decreased expression of stem cell self-renewal gene signature, suggesting a role of Asxl1 in regulating the stemness of BMSCs. Importantly, re-introduction of Asxl1 normalized NANOG and OCT4 expression and restored the self-renewal capacity of Asxl1(-/-) BMSCs. Our study unveils a pivotal role of ASXL1 in the maintenance of BMSC functions and skeletal development. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  13. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  14. Down syndrome critical region 2 protein inhibits the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β in HEK293 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hae Jin; Park, Joongkyu; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Jongsun; Paik, Seung R.; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2008-01-01

    Down syndrome is mainly caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21. The Down syndrome critical region 2 (DSCR2) gene is located within a part of chromosome 21, the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR). To investigate the function of DSCR2, we sought to identify DSCR2-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid assays. A human fetal brain cDNA library was screened, and DSCR2 was found to interact with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β, (PPARβ). A co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that DSCR2 physically interacts with PPARβ in mammalian HEK293 cells. DSCR2 also inhibited the ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPARβ. Furthermore, PPARβ also decreased the solubility of DSCR2, which increased levels of insoluble DSCR2

  15. The Mechanosensory Structure of the Hair Cell Requires Clarin-1, a Protein Encoded by Usher Syndrome III Causative Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ruishuang; Melki, Sami; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Tian, Guilian; Furness, David; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Neef, Jakob; Moser, Tobias; Askew, Charles; Horwitz, Geoff; Holt, Jeffrey; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Alagramam, Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in the clarin-1 gene results in loss of hearing and vision in humans (Usher syndrome III), but the role of clarin-1 in the sensory hair cells is unknown. Clarin-1 is predicted to be a four transmembrane domain protein similar to members of the tetraspanin family. Mice carrying null mutation in the clarin-1 (Clrn1−/−) gene show loss of hair cell function and a possible defect in ribbon synapse. We investigated the role of clarin-1 using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. We show by immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings of Ca2+ currents and membrane capacitance from IHCs that clarin-1 is not essential for formation or function of ribbon synapse. However, reduced cochlear microphonic potentials, FM1-43 loading and transduction currents pointed to diminished cochlear hair bundle function in Clrn1−/− mice. Electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells revealed loss of some tall stereocilia and gaps in the v-shaped bundle, although tip-links and staircase arrangement of stereocilia were not primarily affected by Clrn1−/− mutation. Human clarin-1 protein expressed in transfected mouse cochlear hair cells localized to the bundle; however, the pathogenic variant, p.N48K, failed to localize to the bundle. The mouse model generated to study the in vivo consequence of p. N48K in clarin-1 (Clrn1N48K) supports our in vitro and Clrn1−/− mouse data and the conclusion that CLRN1 is an essential hair bundle protein. Further, the ear phenotype in the Clrn1N48K mouse suggests that it is a valuable model for ear disease in CLRN1N48K, the most prevalent Usher III mutation in North America. PMID:22787034

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis antigens in enteroendocrine cells and macrophages of the small bowel in patients with severe irritable bowel syndrome

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    Sandström Gunnar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and immune activation have repeatedly been suggested as pathogentic factors in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The driving force for immune activation in IBS remains unknown. The aim of our study was to find out if the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS. Methods We studied 65 patients (61 females with IBS and 42 (29 females healthy controls in which IBS had been excluded. Full thickness biopsies from the jejunum and mucosa biopsies from the duodenum and the jejunum were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Chlamydia lipopolysaccharide (LPS and species-specific monoclonal antibodies to C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. We used polyclonal antibodies to chromogranin A, CD68, CD11c, and CD117 to identify enteroendocrine cells, macrophages, dendritic, and mast cells, respectively. Results Chlamydia LPS was present in 89% of patients with IBS, but in only 14% of healthy controls (p C. trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP. Staining for C. pneumoniae was negative in both patients and controls. Chlamydia LPS was detected in enteroendocrine cells of the mucosa in 90% of positive biopsies and in subepithelial macrophages in 69% of biopsies. Biopsies taken at different time points in 19 patients revealed persistence of Chlamydia LPS up to 11 years. The odds ratio for the association of Chlamydia LPS with presence of IBS (43.1; 95% CI: 13.2-140.7 is much higher than any previously described pathogenetic marker in IBS. Conclusions We found C. trachomatis antigens in enteroendocrine cells and macrophages in the small bowel mucosa of patients with IBS. Further studies are required to clarify if the presence of such antigens has a role in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  17. Cytokine Expression in CD3+ Cells in an Infant with Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy characterized by severe vomiting, diarrhea, and often failure to thrive in infants. Symptoms typically resolve after the triggering food-derived protein is removed from the diet and recur within few hours after the re-exposure to the causal protein. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and a positive food challenge. In this study, we report a case of FPIES to rice in an 8-month-old boy. We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC to rice and we measured the intracellular T cell expression of interleukin-4 (IL-4; IL-10, and interferon (IFN- pre-and post-challenge during an acute FPIES reaction and when tolerance to rice had been achieved. For the first time we describe an increase in T cell IL-4 and decrease in IFN- expression after a positive challenge with rice (i.e. rice triggered a FPIES attack and an increase in T cell IL-10 expression after rice challenge 6 months later after a negative challenge (i.e., the child had acquired tolerance to rice in an 8 month old with documented FPIES to rice. A Th2 activation associated with high IL-4 levels may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease. On the other hand, T cell-derived IL-10 may play a role in the acquisition of immunotolerance by regulating the Th1 and Th2 responses.

  18. Immunophenotypic and Ultrastructural Analysis of Mast Cells in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type-1: A Possible Connection to Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold S Kirshenbaum

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 (HPS-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in HPS1 which result in reduced expression of the HPS-1 protein, defective lysosome-related organelle (LRO transport and absence of platelet delta granules. Patients with HPS-1 exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, colitis, bleeding and pulmonary fibrosis postulated to result from a dysregulated immune response. The effect of the HPS1 mutation on human mast cells (HuMCs is unknown. Since HuMC granules classify as LROs along with platelet granules and melanosomes, we set out to determine if HPS-1 cutaneous and CD34+ culture-derived HuMCs have distinct granular and cellular characteristics. Cutaneous and cultured CD34+-derived HuMCs from HPS-1 patients were compared with normal cutaneous and control HuMCs, respectively, for any morphological and functional differences. One cytokine-independent HPS-1 culture was expanded, cloned, designated the HP proMastocyte (HPM cell line and characterized. HPS-1 and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF alveolar interstitium showed numerous HuMCs; HPS-1 dermal mast cells exhibited abnormal granules when compared to healthy controls. HPS-1 HuMCs showed increased CD63, CD203c and reduced mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation when compared with normal HuMCs. HPM cells also had the duplication defect, expressed FcɛRI and intracytoplasmic proteases and exhibited less mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation. HPM cells constitutively released IL-6, which was elevated in patients' serum, in addition to IL-8, fibronectin-1 (FN-1 and galectin-3 (LGALS3. Transduction with HPS1 rescued the abnormal HPM morphology, cytokine and matrix secretion. Microarray analysis of HPS-1 HuMCs and non-transduced HPM cells confirmed upregulation of differentially expressed genes involved in fibrogenesis and degranulation. Cultured HPS-1 HuMCs appear activated as evidenced by surface activation marker expression, a decrease in mediator

  19. Concise Review: Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for the Treatment of Ischemic Syndromes: Medicinal Product or Cell Transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-01-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues. PMID:23197819

  20. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  1. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  2. Mutation-Specific Mechanisms of Hyperactivation of Noonan Syndrome SOS Molecules Detected with Single-molecule Imaging in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2017-10-26

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a congenital hereditary disorder associated with developmental and cardiac defects. Some patients with NS carry mutations in SOS, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase RAS. NS mutations have been identified not only in the GEF domain, but also in various domains of SOS, suggesting that multiple mechanisms disrupt SOS function. In this study, we examined three NS mutations in different domains of SOS to clarify the abnormality in its translocation to the plasma membrane, where SOS activates RAS. The association and dissociation kinetics between SOS tagged with a fluorescent protein and the living cell surface were observed in single molecules. All three mutants showed increased affinity for the plasma membrane, inducing excessive RAS signalling. However, the mechanisms by which their affinity was increased were specific to each mutant. Conformational disorder in the resting state, increased probability of a conformational change on the plasma membrane, and an increased association rate constant with the membrane receptor are the suggested mechanisms. These different properties cause the specific phenotypes of the mutants, which should be rescuable with different therapeutic strategies. Therefore, single-molecule kinetic analyses of living cells are useful for the pathological analysis of genetic diseases.

  3. The Prader-Willi syndrome proteins MAGEL2 and necdin regulate leptin receptor cell surface abundance through ubiquitination pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, Tishani Methsala; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Masschaele, Delphine; Sanderson, Matthea R; Carias, Karin Vanessa; Tavernier, Jan; Wevrick, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    In Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), obesity is caused by the disruption of appetite-controlling pathways in the brain. Two PWS candidate genes encode MAGEL2 and necdin, related melanoma antigen proteins that assemble into ubiquitination complexes. Mice lacking Magel2 are obese and lack leptin sensitivity in hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin neurons, suggesting dysregulation of leptin receptor (LepR) activity. Hypothalamus from Magel2-null mice had less LepR and altered levels of ubiquitin pathway proteins that regulate LepR processing (Rnf41, Usp8, and Stam1). MAGEL2 increased the cell surface abundance of LepR and decreased their degradation. LepR interacts with necdin, which interacts with MAGEL2, which complexes with RNF41 and USP8. Mutations in the MAGE homology domain of MAGEL2 suppress RNF41 stabilization and prevent the MAGEL2-mediated increase of cell surface LepR. Thus, MAGEL2 and necdin together control LepR sorting and degradation through a dynamic ubiquitin-dependent pathway. Loss of MAGEL2 and necdin may uncouple LepR from ubiquitination pathways, providing a cellular mechanism for obesity in PWS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A study of the changes of Th17 cells and IL-23 in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-ping HE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute autoimmune-mediated inflammatory neuropathy. In this paper, the percentage of Th17 in peripheral blood lymphocyte and the level of IL-23 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with GBS were detected. Twenty-five patients with GBS and 20 controls were analyzed. The percentage of Th17 cells in patients with GBS was (4.86 ± 0.60%, which was higher than that in controls [(2.71 ± 0.54%; t = 2.616, P = 0.012]. Serum IL-23 increased in patients with GBS [(111.80 ± 13.84 pg/ml vs (72.55 ± 8.19 pg/ml; t = 2.300, P = 0.026]. The level of IL-23 in serum and CSF from patients with GBS before therapy [(110.50 ± 15.66 and (102.30 ± 7.52 pg/ml] declined to normal after therapy [(74.13 ± 6.18 and (72.92 ± 12.09 pg/ml], and the difference was statistically significant (t = 2.557, P = 0.022; t = 1.422, P = 0.046. Th17 cells and IL-23 increased in patients with GBS, indicating that they may involve in the pathogenesis of GBS. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.012

  5. Impaired Expression of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Low-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuenv Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS development and progression has been investigated by numerous studies, yet, it remains controversial in some aspects (1, 2. In the present study, we found distinct features of MSCs from low-risk (LR-MDS stromal microenvironment as compared to those from healthy subjects. At the molecular level, focal adhesion kinase, a key tyrosine kinase in control of cell proliferation, survival, and adhesion process, was found profoundly suppressed in expression and activation in LR-MDS MSC. At a functional level, LR-MDS MSCs showed impaired growth and clonogenic capacity, which were independent of cellular senescence and apoptosis. The pro-adipogenic differentiation and attenuated osteogenic capacity along with reduced SDF-1 expression could be involved in creating an unfavorable microenvironment for hematopoiesis. In conclusion, our experiments support the theory that the stromal microenvironment is fundamentally altered in LR-MDS, and these preliminary data offer a new perspective on LR-MDS pathophysiology.

  6. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor overexpressed in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome ovaries is functionally active.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Gordon, Uma D; López Bernal, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with anovulatory infertility. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR), which is critical for ovulation, has been suggested to be expressed prematurely in the ovarian follicles of women with PCOS. This study aimed to analyse the expression and activity of LHCGR in ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS patients and the involvement of ARF6 small GTPase in LHCGR internalization. Granulosa cells (GC) isolated from follicular fluid collected during oocyte retrieval from normal women (n = 19) and women with PCOS (n = 17) were used to study differences in LHCGR protein expression and activity between normal and PCOS patients. LHCGR expression is up-regulated in GC from PCOS women. LHCGR in PCOS GC is functionally active, as shown by increased cAMP production upon human gonadotrophin (HCG)-stimulation. Moreover, ARF6 is highly expressed in GC from PCOS patients and HCG-stimulation increases the concentrations of active ARF6. The inhibition of ARF6 activation attenuates HCG-induced LHCGR internalization in both normal and PCOS GC, indicating that there are no alterations in LHCGR internalisation in GC from PCOS. In conclusion, the expression and activation of LHCGR and ARF6 are up-regulated in GC from PCOS women but the mechanism of agonist-induced LHCGR internalization is unaltered. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unusual Turner syndrome mosaic with a triple x cell line (47,X/49,XXX) in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Carol M; Tupa, Lynn; Wiese, Debbie; Hurley, Timothy J; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    A 29-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated for low fertility and a midterm abortion. Laboratory testing included karyotyping, which revealed an unusual mosaicism for Turner syndrome with Triple X (47,X/49,XXX). This appears to be the first report of Turner syndrome in a great ape. In humans, Turner syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 3,000 females, with half of those monosomic for the X chromosome. A small proportion is mosaic for a triple X cell line (3-4%). In humans, Turner syndrome is associated with characteristic phenotype including short stature, obesity, a broad chest with widely spaced nipples, webbing of the neck, and anteverted ears. This individual gorilla is significantly shorter in stature than conspecifics and is obese despite normal caloric intake. Individuals with Turner syndrome should also be screened for common health issues, including congenital heart defects, obesity, kidney abnormalities, hypertension, hypothyroidism, and diabetes mellitus. Animals with decreased fertility, multiple miscarriages, fetal losses, unusual phenotypes, or a combination of these symptoms should be evaluated for genetic abnormalities.

  8. Low thymic output in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome measured by CCR9+CD45RA+ T cell counts and T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, K; Abrahamsen, Gitte Meldgaard; Foelling, I

    2010-01-01

    Thymic hypoplasia is a frequent feature of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, but we know little about patients' age-related thymic output and long-term consequences for their immune system. We measured the expression of T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (TREC) and used flow cytometry...

  9. Mast cell stabilizers as a potential treatment for Irritable bowel syndrome: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ebrahimi Daryani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mast cells are believed to play a role in irritable bowel syndrome pathogenesis and symptom genesis due to their close neighborhood to gastrointestinal innervations. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of orally administered cromolyn for reduction of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Material and Methods s: A randomized placebo-controlled double-blinded 6×6 weeks cross-over study was performed in a private gastrointestinal clinic. 10 patients were allocated to group A and 6 patients to group B. Patients in group A received 150 mg cromolyn divided in three equal doses for the first 6 weeks and placebo for the next 6 weeks but patients in group B received placebo for the first 6 weeks and cromolyn in the next 6 weeks. Weekly evaluation was performed and visual analogue scale was used to determine severity of symptoms. Results: Sixteen patients completed the study. Mean age of the patients was 40.3 ± 10.9 years old [range: 24-57]. Eight patients had D-IBS (Diarrhea dominant and other 8 had C-IBS (Constipation dominant. Both cromolyn sodium and the placebo decreased the severity of bloating (Freidman test, p 0.001 and 0.006 respectively. The severity of the main symptom (diarrhea or constipation did not decrease in patients of group A and B who were treated with different sequences of the drug or placebo. The severity of pain decreased drastically after 6th week of treatment with cromolyn. Freidman test showed a significant difference between the pain levels of the former defined treatment spots (p 0.01, and 0.02 for patients in group A and B, respectively. No adverse drug reactions were observed during the study. Conclusion: In conclusion, long term administration of cromolyn seems to be partially effective for treatment of abdominal pain in patients with IBS while main symptoms (diarrhea or constipation might not decrease during this treatment.

  10. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as basal cell nevus syndrome, is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformation. It is occasionally associated with aggressive basal cell carcinoma and internal malignancies. It is about a muttisystemic process characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falxcerebri. Hence, present a case report and a review of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  11. Cell cycle–related genes as modifiers of age of onset of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: a large-scale study in non-Hispanic white patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in age of onset of colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) suggests the influence of other lifestyle and genetic modifiers. We hypothesized that genes regulating the cell cycle influence the observed heterogeneity as cell cycle–related genes respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and induce transcription of genes that facilitate repair. We examined the association of 1456 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 128 cell cycle–related genes and 31 DNA repair–related genes in 485 non-Hispanic white participants with Lynch syndrome to determine whether there are SNPs associated with age of onset of colorectal cancer. Genotyping was performed on an Illumina GoldenGate platform, and data were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree (CART) methods. Ten SNPs were independently significant in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model after correcting for multiple comparisons (P Lynch syndrome. PMID:23125224

  12. Cell cycle-related genes as modifiers of age of onset of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: a large-scale study in non-Hispanic white patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala; Huang, Yu-Jing; Wei, Chongjuan; Amos, Christopher I; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Meldrum, Cliff J; Chen, Wei V; Gorlov, Ivan P; Lynch, Patrick M; Scott, Rodney J; Frazier, Marsha L

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneity in age of onset of colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) suggests the influence of other lifestyle and genetic modifiers. We hypothesized that genes regulating the cell cycle influence the observed heterogeneity as cell cycle-related genes respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and induce transcription of genes that facilitate repair. We examined the association of 1456 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 128 cell cycle-related genes and 31 DNA repair-related genes in 485 non-Hispanic white participants with Lynch syndrome to determine whether there are SNPs associated with age of onset of colorectal cancer. Genotyping was performed on an Illumina GoldenGate platform, and data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree (CART) methods. Ten SNPs were independently significant in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model after correcting for multiple comparisons (P Lynch syndrome.

  13. Macroautophagy and Selective Mitophagy Ameliorate Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential in Adipose Stem Cells of Equine Metabolic Syndrome: New Findings in the Field of Progenitor Cells Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Grzesiak, Jakub; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Szłapka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is mainly characterized by insulin resistance, obesity, and local or systemic inflammation. That unfriendly environment of adipose tissue has huge impact on stem cells population (ASC) residing within. In the present study, using molecular biology techniques and multiple imaging techniques (SEM, FIB-SEM, and confocal microscopy), we evaluated the impact of EMS on ASC viability and chondrogenic differentiation. Moreover, we visualized the mitochondrial network and dynamics in ASC CTRL and ASC EMS during control and chondrogenic conditions. In control conditions, ASC EMS were characterized by increased mitochondrial fission in comparison to ASC CTRL . We found that extensive remodeling of mitochondrial network including fusion and fission occurs during early step of differentiation. Moreover, we observed mitochondria morphology deterioration in ASC EMS . These conditions seem to cause autophagic shift in ASC EMS , as we observed increased accumulation of LAMP2 and formation of multiple autophagosomes in those cells, some of which contained dysfunctional mitochondria. "Autophagic" switch may be a rescue mechanism allowing ASC EMS to clear impaired by ROS proteins and mitochondria. Moreover it provides a precursors-to-macromolecules synthesis, especially during chondrogenesis. Our data indicates that autophagy in ASC EMS would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis ASC EMS allowing them to be in "stemness" status.

  14. Macroautophagy and Selective Mitophagy Ameliorate Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential in Adipose Stem Cells of Equine Metabolic Syndrome: New Findings in the Field of Progenitor Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS is mainly characterized by insulin resistance, obesity, and local or systemic inflammation. That unfriendly environment of adipose tissue has huge impact on stem cells population (ASC residing within. In the present study, using molecular biology techniques and multiple imaging techniques (SEM, FIB-SEM, and confocal microscopy, we evaluated the impact of EMS on ASC viability and chondrogenic differentiation. Moreover, we visualized the mitochondrial network and dynamics in ASCCTRL and ASCEMS during control and chondrogenic conditions. In control conditions, ASCEMS were characterized by increased mitochondrial fission in comparison to ASCCTRL. We found that extensive remodeling of mitochondrial network including fusion and fission occurs during early step of differentiation. Moreover, we observed mitochondria morphology deterioration in ASCEMS. These conditions seem to cause autophagic shift in ASCEMS, as we observed increased accumulation of LAMP2 and formation of multiple autophagosomes in those cells, some of which contained dysfunctional mitochondria. “Autophagic” switch may be a rescue mechanism allowing ASCEMS to clear impaired by ROS proteins and mitochondria. Moreover it provides a precursors-to-macromolecules synthesis, especially during chondrogenesis. Our data indicates that autophagy in ASCEMS would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis ASCEMS allowing them to be in “stemness” status.

  15. Immunotherapeutical role of Flt3 ligand amplification of pulmonary dendritic cells in murine multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wei WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the therapeutic effect of Flt3 ligand (Flt3L on multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS model via amplification of lung dendritic cells. Methods Animal model of MODS was replicated by injecting zymosan into the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice, and then the mice were randomly divided into Flt3L treatment group, MODS group, Flt3L group and control group. Mortality rate was observed. After 12 days, lung mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and analyzed with flow cytometry. Blood AST, ALT, creatinine, lipase, amylase and glucose were determined by automatic biochemical analyzer. Pathological changes in lung tissue were observed under light microscope. Results Mortality in Flt3L treatment group decreased dramatically compared with MODS group. The proportions of myeloid, plasmacytoid and I-Ad+ DCs in Flt3L group were remarkably increased compared with control group, and the proportion of the three DC subsets in MODS group was much lower than that in control group. Howerver, Flt3L treatment dramatically increased the proportion of them in MODS group. In MODS group, the level of ALT, AST, lipase, amylase and creatinine remarkably increased and blood glucose decreased compared with that of Flt3L and control groups; but in Flt3L treatment group, the level of ALT, AST, lipase, amylase and creatinine decreased and blood glucose increased dramatically, and lung injury mitigated obviously compared with MODS group. Conclusion Flt3L could attenuate lung tissue injury in MODS model, improve organ function, and lower the mortality of experimental animals, thus exerting its immunotherapeutic effects by in vivo amplification of lung dendritic cells.

  16. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Stage-dependent alterations of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Klintsova, Anna; Savage, Lisa M

    2011-05-19

    Alcohol-induced Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) culminates in bilateral diencephalic lesion and severe amnesia. Using the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) animal paradigm of WKS, our laboratory has demonstrated hippocampal dysfunction in the absence of gross anatomical pathology. Extensive literature has revealed reduced hippocampal neurogenesis following a neuropathological insult, which might contribute to hippocampus-based learning and memory impairments. Thus, the current investigation was conducted to determine whether PTD treatment altered hippocampal neurogenesis in a stage-dependent fashion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of 4 stages of thiamine deficiency based on behavioral symptoms: pre-symptomatic stage, ataxic stage, early post-opisthotonus stage, or the late post-opisthotonus stage. The S-phase mitotic marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered at the conclusion of each stage following thiamine restoration and subjects were perfused 24 hours or 28 days after BrdU to assess cellular proliferation or neurogenesis and survival, respectively. Dorsal hippocampal sections were immunostained for BrdU (proliferating cell marker), NeuN (neurons), GFAP (astrocytes), Iba-1 (microglia), and O4 (oligodendrocytes). The PTD treatment increased progenitor cell proliferation and survival during the early post-opisthotonus stage. However, levels of neurogenesis were reduced during this stage as well as the late post-opisthotonus stage where there was also an increase in astrocytogenesis. The diminished numbers of newly generated neurons (BrdU/NeuN co-localization) was paralleled by increased BrdU cells that did not co-localize with any of the phenotypic markers during these later stages. These data demonstrate that long-term alterations in neurogenesis and gliogenesis might contribute to the observed hippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model and human WKS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Chimerism and tolerance without GVHD or engraftment syndrome in HLA-mismatched combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Joseph; Abecassis, Michael; Miller, Joshua; Gallon, Lorenzo; Ravindra, Kadiyala; Tollerud, David J; King, Bradley; Elliott, Mary Jane; Herzig, Geoffrey; Herzig, Roger; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2012-03-07

    The toxicity of chronic immunosuppressive agents required for organ transplant maintenance has prompted investigators to pursue approaches to induce immune tolerance. We developed an approach using a bioengineered mobilized cellular product enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and tolerogenic graft facilitating cells (FCs) combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning; this approach resulted in engraftment, durable chimerism, and tolerance induction in recipients with highly mismatched related and unrelated donors. Eight recipients of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched kidney and FC/HSC transplants underwent conditioning with fludarabine, 200-centigray total body irradiation, and cyclophosphamide followed by posttransplant immunosuppression with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Subjects ranged in age from 29 to 56 years. HLA match ranged from five of six loci with related donors to one of six loci with unrelated donors. The absolute neutrophil counts reached a nadir about 1 week after transplant, with recovery by 2 weeks. Multilineage chimerism at 1 month ranged from 6 to 100%. The conditioning was well tolerated, with outpatient management after postoperative day 2. Two subjects exhibited transient chimerism and were maintained on low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy. One subject developed viral sepsis 2 months after transplant and experienced renal artery thrombosis. Five subjects experienced durable chimerism, demonstrated immunocompetence and donor-specific tolerance by in vitro proliferative assays, and were successfully weaned off all immunosuppression 1 year after transplant. None of the recipients produced anti-donor antibody or exhibited engraftment syndrome or graft-versus-host disease. These results suggest that manipulation of a mobilized stem cell graft and nonmyeloablative conditioning represents a safe, practical, and reproducible means of inducing durable chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplant recipients.

  19. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  20. Involvement of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Receptors in Immune Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanand Chatoo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder defined by ROME IV criteria as pain in the lower abdominal region, which is associated with altered bowel habit or defecation. The underlying mechanism of IBS is not completely understood. IBS seems to be a product of interactions between various factors with genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and stress playing a key role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The crosstalk between the immune system and stress in IBS mechanism is increasingly recognized. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, a major mediator in the stress response, is involved in altered function in GI, including inflammatory processes, colonic transit time, contractile activity, defecation pattern, pain threshold, mucosal secretory function, and barrier functions. This mini review focuses on the recently establish local GI-CRF system, its involvement in modulating the immune response in IBS, and summarizes current IBS animal models and mapping of CRF, CRFR1, and CRFR2 expression in colon tissues. CRF and receptors might be a key molecule involving the immune and movement function via brain–gut axis in IBS.

  1. Cell-Type-Specific Translation Profiling Reveals a Novel Strategy for Treating Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Sophie R; Seo, Sang S; Barnes, Stephanie A; Louros, Susana R; Muscas, Melania; Dando, Owen; Kirby, Caoimhe; Wyllie, David J A; Hardingham, Giles E; Kind, Peter C; Osterweil, Emily K

    2017-08-02

    Excessive mRNA translation downstream of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu 1/5 ) is a core pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome (FX); however, the differentially translating mRNAs that contribute to altered neural function are not known. We used translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) and RNA-seq to identify mistranslating mRNAs in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the FX mouse model (Fmr1 -/y ) hippocampus, which exhibit exaggerated mGlu 1/5 -induced long-term synaptic depression (LTD). In these neurons, we find that the Chrm4 transcript encoding muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 4 (M 4 ) is excessively translated, and synthesis of M 4 downstream of mGlu 5 activation is mimicked and occluded. Surprisingly, enhancement rather than inhibition of M 4 activity normalizes core phenotypes in the Fmr1 -/y , including excessive protein synthesis, exaggerated mGluR-LTD, and audiogenic seizures. These results suggest that not all excessively translated mRNAs in the Fmr1 -/y brain are detrimental, and some may be candidates for enhancement to correct pathological changes in the FX brain. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual Paraneoplastic Endocrine Syndromes Heralding Onset of Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B. Feffer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveExtrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC is rare and frequent metastases at presentation can complicate efforts to identify a site of origin. In particular, SCC comprises <1% of prostate cancers and has been implicated in castration resistance.MethodsClinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathology data are presented.ResultsA 56-year-old man with locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma on androgen deprivation therapy presented with a clogged nephrostomy tube. Laboratory results included calcium 13.8 mg/dL (8.5–10.5 mg/dL, albumin 3.6 g/dL (3.5–5 mg/dL, and potassium 2.8 mmol/L (3.5–5.2 mmol/L. Hypercalcemia investigation revealed intact PTH 19 pg/mL (16–87 pg/mL, 25-OH vitamin D 15.7 ng/mL (>30 ng/mL, and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP 63.4 pmol/L (<2.3 pmol/L. Workup for hypokalemia yielded aldosterone 5.3 ng/dL (<31 ng/dL, renin 0.6 ng/mL/h (0.5–4 ng/mL/h, and 6:00 a.m. cortisol 82 µg/dL (6.7–22.6 µg/dL with ACTH 147 pg/mL (no ref. range. High-dose Dexamethasone suppression testing suggested ACTH-dependent ectopic hypercortisolism. Contrast-enhanced CT findings included masses in the liver and right renal pelvis, a heterogeneous enlarged mass in the region of the prostate invading the bladder, bilateral adrenal thickening, and lytic lesions in the pelvis and spine. Liver biopsy identified epithelioid malignancy with Ki proliferation index 98% and immunohistochemical staining positive for synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase, compatible with high-grade small cell carcinoma. Staining for ACTH was negative; no stain for CRH was available. Two weeks after chemotherapy, 6:00 a.m. cortisol normalized and CT scans showed universal improvement.ConclusionExtensive literature details paraneoplastic syndromes associated with SCC, but we report the first case of EPSCC diagnosed due to onset of dual paraneoplastic syndromes.

  3. Nivolumab-Induced Encephalitis in Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Chaucer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of cancer is a rapidly evolving field. As more chemotherapeutic agents become available, reporting the side effects of these agents in clinical practice becomes increasingly important. Nivolumab is one of the chemotherapeutic agents commonly used for treatment of renal cell carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. While common side effects are known and well documented, encephalitis is documented as an extremely rare side effect. We present the case of an extremely rare side effect to a common chemotherapeutic agent.

  4. Hypotension due to Chemotherapy in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome Undergoing Hemodialysis: A First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Kuwata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first case of small cell lung cancer with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome during hemodialysis (HD. A 72-year-old male patient receiving HD experienced progressive muscle weakness. He was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome due to an increased serum level of anti-voltage-gated calcium channel antibody and aspiration cytology on endobronchial ultrasonography for the swelling of a subcarinal lymph node. He received chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin (300 mg/m2 and etoposide (50 mg/m2, to which he had a partial response. However, the second therapy course could not be administered because of the unexpected development of severe hematological adverse events, which also prevented him from undergoing further HD. This case indicates that caution should be taken when using chemotherapy for such patients because of hypotension due to chemotherapy, with which it is impossible to undergo HD.

  5. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with multiple extranodal locations in a patient with Sjögren’s syndrome – a diagnostic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Domżalska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in exocrine glands, mainly salivary and lacrimal glands, which result in xerophthalmia and xerostomia. About half of the patients develop systemic complications, including lymphoproliferative disorders. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Sjögren’s syndrome and a suspicion of respiratory system involvement in the course of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Histopathological examination of a skin lesion suggested marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. After pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of all available previous biopsy samples and the medical documentation the diagnosis of extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma stage IV according to the Ann Arbor classification was rendered. The patient was referred to the Department of Haematology and was treated with R-CVP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, rituximab.

  6. Endocan, a putative endothelial cell marker, is elevated in preeclampsia, decreased in acute pyelonephritis, and unchanged in other obstetrical syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekola, Henry; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Dong, Zhong; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Endocan, a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan produced by endothelial cells, is considered a biomarker for endothelial cell activation/dysfunction. Preeclampsia is characterized by systemic vascular inflammation, and endothelial cell activation/dysfunction. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine whether: (1) plasma endocan concentrations in preeclampsia differ from those in uncomplicated pregnancies; (2) changes in plasma endocan concentration relate to the severity of preeclampsia, and whether these changes are specific or observed in other obstetrical syndromes such as small-for-gestational age (SGA), fetal death (FD), preterm labor (PTL) or preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM); (3) a correlation exists between plasma concentration of endocan and angiogenic (placental growth factor or PlGF)/anti-angiogenic factors (soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor or sVEGFR-1, and soluble endoglin or sEng) among pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia; and (4) plasma endocan concentrations in patients with preeclampsia and acute pyelonephritis (both conditions in which there is endothelial cell activation) differ. Method: This cross-sectional study included the following groups: (1) uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 130); (2) preeclampsia (n = 102); (3) pregnant women without preeclampsia who delivered an SGA neonate (n = 51); (4) FD (n = 49); (5) acute pyelonephritis (AP; n = 35); (6) spontaneous PTL (n = 75); and (7) preterm PROM (n = 64). Plasma endocan concentrations were determined in all groups, and PIGF, sEng and VEGFR-1 plasma concentrations were measured by ELISA in the preeclampsia group. Results: (1) Women with preeclampsia had a significantly higher median plasma endocan concentration than those with uncomplicated pregnancies (p = 0.004); (2) among women with preeclampsia, the median plasma endocan concentration did not differ significantly according to disease severity (p = 0

  7. Insulin resistance according to β-cell function in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal glucose tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Kyeong Song

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is associated with insulin resistance (IR and compensatory hyperinsulinemia. IR is recognized as a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, few studies have investigated IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. The objective of this study was to evaluate IR and β-cell function in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. Additionally, we sought to evaluate the usefulness of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT-derived IR indices in lean women with PCOS.We recruited 100 women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance and 100 age- and BMI-matched women as controls. IR and insulin secretory indices, including the homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and the Stumvoll index, were calculated from an OGTT. Increased β-cell function was defined as>75th percentile for the HOMA-F in control women.Women with PCOS had higher values for post-load 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin, post-load 2-hour insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and lower values for the Stumvoll index than the controls (all Ps<0.05. Women with PCOS and increased β-cell function showed lower Stumvoll index values than the matched controls (P<0.05. The HOMA-F was significantly associated with the HOMA-M120 and Stumvoll index when adjusted for age and BMI in a multiple regression analysis (all Ps<0.05. The HOMA-M120 was positively correlated with triglycerides and free testosterone, and the Stumvoll index was negatively correlated with triglycerides and free testosterone in lean women with PCOS (all Ps<0.05.Women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance showed higher IR than controls matched for age, BMI, and β-cell function. β-cell function was increased in women with PCOS when compared to the matched controls, but not when the lean subjects were compared to the matched controls separately. Therefore, early evaluation of IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance may be needed.

  8. Clinical and Immunological Features of Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome in the Era of Neuronal Cell Surface Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armangué, Thaís; Sabater, Lidia; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Ariño, Helena; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Planagumà, Jesús; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) in adults are based on small case series before the era of neuronal cell surface antibody discovery. To report the clinical and immunological features of idiopathic OMS (I-OMS) and paraneoplastic OMS (P-OMS), the occurrence of antibodies to cell surface antigens, and the discovery of a novel cell surface epitope. Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations of 114 adult patients with OMS at a center for autoimmune neurological disorders done between January 2013 and September 2015. Review of clinical records. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain and cultured neurons as well as cell-based assays were used to identify known autoantibodies. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to characterize novel antigens. Of the 114 patients (62 [54%] female; median age, 45 years; interquartile range, 32-60 years), 45 (39%) had P-OMS and 69 (61%) had I-OMS. In patients with P-OMS, the associated tumors included lung cancer (n = 19), breast cancer (n = 10), other cancers (n = 5), and ovarian teratoma (n = 8); 3 additional patients without detectable cancer were considered to have P-OMS because they had positive results for onconeuronal antibodies. Patients with I-OMS, compared with those who had P-OMS, were younger (median age, 38 [interquartile range, 31-50] vs 54 [interquartile range, 45-65] years; P OMS with lung cancer (21% vs 5% in patients with OMS without lung cancer; P = .02); however, a similar frequency of glycine receptor antibodies was found in patients with lung cancer without OMS (13 of 65 patients [20%]). A novel cell surface epitope, human natural killer 1 (HNK-1), was the target of the antibodies in 3 patients with lung cancer and P-OMS. Patients with I-OMS responded better to treatment and had fewer relapses than those with P-OMS. Older age and encephalopathy, significantly associated with P-OMS, are clinical clues suggesting an underlying tumor. Glycine receptor antibodies occur

  9. Cell-free placental DNA beyond Down syndrome: Lessons learned from fetal RHD genotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurik, F.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis research is presented on cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA), which is present in plasma and serum of pregnant women. This fetal DNA can be used for fetal genotyping, but may also give indirect information on pregnancy and pregnancy outcome. The research consists of two sections. In the

  10. Intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cell preparations in parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Alexander; Csoti, Ilona; Eggert, Karla

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of patients is treated with intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cells (aBMCs), but clinical data are completely lacking in movement disorders. We provide first clinical data on efficacy and safety of this highly experimental treatment approach in parkinsonian...

  11. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart cells are dying. An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) can diagnose an acute coronary syndrome by measuring ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  13. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  14. Definitions, Criteria and Global Classification of Mast Cell Disorders with Special Reference to Mast Cell Activation Syndromes: A Consensus Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem; Arock, Michel; Brockow, Knut; Butterfield, Joseph H.; Carter, Melody C.; Castells, Mariana; Escribano, Luis; Hartmann, Karin; Lieberman, Philip; Nedoszytko, Boguslaw; Orfao, Alberto; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Sotlar, Karl; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Triggiani, Massimo; Valenta, Rudolf; Horny, Hans-Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of tissue mast cells (MCs) and their abnormal growth and accumulation in various organs are typically found in primary MC disorders also referred to as mastocytosis. However, increasing numbers of patients are now being informed that their clinical findings are due to MC activation (MCA) that is neither associated with mastocytosis nor with a defined allergic or inflammatory reaction. In other patients with MCA, MCs appear to be clonal cells, but criteria for diagnosing mastocytosis are not met. A working conference was organized in 2010 with the aim to define criteria for diagnosing MCA and related disorders, and to propose a global unifying classification of all MC disorders and pathologic MC reactions. This classification includes three types of ‘MCA syndromes’ (MCASs), namely primary MCAS, secondary MCAS and idiopathic MCAS. MCA is now defined by robust and generally applicable criteria, including (1) typical clinical symptoms, (2) a substantial transient increase in serum total tryptase level or an increase in other MC-derived mediators, such as histamine or prostaglandin D2, or their urinary metabolites, and (3) a response of clinical symptoms to agents that attenuate the production or activities of MC mediators. These criteria should assist in the identification and diagnosis of patients with MCAS, and in avoiding misdiagnoses or overinterpretation of clinical symptoms in daily practice. Moreover, the MCAS concept should stimulate research in order to identify and exploit new molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:22041891

  15. Spirulina platensis Improves Mitochondrial Function Impaired by Elevated Oxidative Stress in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (ASCs) and Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IECs), and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Daria; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-08-03

    Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is a steadily growing life-threatening endocrine disorder linked to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Inflammatory microenvironment of adipose tissue constitutes the direct tissue milieu for various cell populations, including adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs), widely considered as a potential therapeutic cell source in the course of the treatment of metabolic disorders. Moreover, elevated oxidative stress induces inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs)-the first-line cells exposed to dietary compounds. In the conducted research, we showed that in vitro application of Spirulina platensis contributes to the restoration of ASCs' and IECs' morphology and function through the reduction of cellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Enhanced viability, suppressed senescence, and improved proliferation of ASCs and IECs isolated from metabolic syndrome-affected individuals were evident following exposition to Spirulina. A protective effect of the investigated extract against mitochondrial dysfunction and degeneration was also observed. Moreover, our data demonstrate that Spirulina extract effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. In vivo studies showed that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and their insulin sensitivity improved. Thus, our results indicate the engagement of Spirulina platensis nourishing as an interesting alternative approach for supporting the conventional treatment of equine metabolic syndrome.

  16. Normal inhibition of DNA synthesis following γ-irradiation of radiosensitive cell lines from patients with Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.; Le poidevin, P.; Chen, P.C.; Bates, P.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA synthesis was studied in γ-iradiated lymphoblastoid cells from patients with Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. A normal biphasic pattern of inhibition was observed over a dose range of 0-4 krad of γ-rays in all of the cell lines 3 out of 4 Down's and all the Alzheimer's cell lines were shown to be hypersensitive to ionizing radiation based on induced chro