WorldWideScience

Sample records for progeria syndrome cells

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wilson A. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. J Gerontol A ... should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about ...

  2. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  3. A lamin A protein isoform overexpressed in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome interferes with mitosis in progeria and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kan; Capell, Brian C.; Erdos, Michael R.; Djabali, Karima; Collins, Francis S.

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by dramatic premature aging. Classic HGPS is caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 (residue 1824, C → T) of the LMNA gene, activating a cryptic splice donor and resulting in a mutant lamin A (LA) protein termed “progerin/LAΔ50” that lacks the normal cleavage site to remove a C-terminal farnesyl group. During interphase, irreversibly farnesylated progerin/LAΔ50 anchors to the nuclear membrane and causes characteristic nuclear blebbing. Progerin/LAΔ50's localization and behavior during mitosis, however, are completely unknown. Here, we report that progerin/LAΔ50 mislocalizes into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates and membranes during mitosis and causes abnormal chromosome segregation and binucleation. These phenotypes are largely rescued with either farnesyltransferase inhibitors or a farnesylation-incompetent mutant progerin/LAΔ50. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small amounts of progerin/LAΔ50 exist in normal fibroblasts, and a significant percentage of these progerin/LAΔ50-expressing normal cells are binucleated, implicating progerin/LAΔ50 as causing similar mitotic defects in the normal aging process. Our findings present evidence of mitotic abnormality in HGPS and may shed light on the general phenomenon of aging. PMID:17360355

  4. Progeria syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor Hussain Daraz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare genetic disease in which symptoms of aging are manifested at an early age. In the present report, we describe a 9 months old female child presented with a history of progressive coarsening of skin, failure to thrive and irregular bumps over thighs, buttocks and lower limbs for the last 7½ months. In the course of time, she developed alopecia, hyperpigmented spots over the abdomen with thickening and a typical facial profile of HGPS including micrognathia, absent ear lobules, prominent eyes, loss of eyelashes, eyebrows and a bluish hue over the nose.

  6. Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Riyaz S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare, sporadic, autosomal dominant syndrome that involves premature ageing and death at early age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. A 30-year-old male with clinical and radiologic features highly suggestive of HGPS is presented here with description of differential diagnosis, dental considerations and review of literature.

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome associated with a characteristic aged appearance very early in life, generally leading to death in the second decade of life. Apart from premature aging, the other notable characteristics of children with HGPS include extreme short stature, prominent superficial veins, poor weight gain, alopecia, as well as various skeletal and cardiovascular pathologies associated with advanced age. The pattern of inheritance of HGPS is uncertain, though both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes have been described. Recent genetic studies have demonstrated mutations in the LMNA gene in children with HGPS. In this article, we report a 16 years old girl who had the phenotypic features of HGPS and was later confirmed to have LMNA mutation by genetic analysis.

  8. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes are characterised by clinical features of physiological aging at an early age. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a type of progeroid syndrome, characterised by abnormal facies, bone abnormalities, sclerodermatous skin changes and retarded physical development. Average life expectancy of progeria patients is 13 years. Herein we are reporting a case of progeria who is 21 years old.

  9. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Uma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  10. Stem cell aging in adult progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is considered an irreversible biological process and also a major risk factor for a spectrum of geriatric diseases. Advanced age-related decline in physiological functions, such as neurodegeneration, development of cardiovascular disease, endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, and neoplastic transformation, has become the focus in aging research. Natural aging is not regarded as a programmed process. However, accelerated aging due to inherited genetic defects in patients of progeria is programmed and resembles many aspects of natural aging. Among several premature aging syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS are two broadly investigated diseases. In this review, we discuss how stem cell aging in WS helps us understand the biology of aging. We also discuss briefly how the altered epigenetic landscape in aged cells can be reversed to a “juvenile” state. Lastly, we explore the potential application of the latest genomic editing technique for stem cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine in the context of aging.

  11. Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Charandeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of progeria is being reported in a 7-year old boy. He had characteristic facies, short stature, alopecia, high pitched voice, coxa valga and sclerodermatous changes in skin.

  12. Lethal neonatal Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J I; Pérez-Alonso, P; Funes, R; Pérez-Rodríguez, J

    1999-01-29

    We report on a 35-week gestation female fetus with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP). This patient, who is the first reported with neonatal HGP in the English literature but is the fourth, counting three previous French cases, supports the existence of a more severe prenatal form of progeria. She died 7 hours after birth and presented with intrauterine growth retardation, premature aging, absence of subcutaneous fat, brachydactyly, absent nipples, hypoplastic external genitalia, and abnormal ear lobes. The child's combination of clinical and skeletal manifestations differentiates this form of HGP from other progeroid syndromes with neonatal presentation. We also report previously undescribed autopsy findings including premature loss of hair follicles, premature regression of the renal nephrogenic layer, and premature closure of the growth plates in the distal phalanges that may be related to the aging processes in this condition. We could not find any histological data to support acro-osteolysis, which is the radiographic sign of brachydactyly. The terminal phalanges in HGP seem to be underdeveloped rather than osteolytic.

  13. Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval Ranjan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old boy presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had senile looks, scanty scalp hair, stunted growth, and wrinkled skin with loss of subcutaneous fat. Sclerodermatous changes were found on both thighs and pelvic region, which was confirmed by histopathology.

  14. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  15. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: review of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare but well known entity characterized by extreme short stature, low body weight, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, and facial features that resemble aged persons. Cardiovascular compromise leads

  16. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Wenzel

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as “progerin”. Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  17. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  18. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  19. Hutchinson - Gilford progeria syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kashyap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson - Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a three-year-old boy with clinical manifestations characteristic of this syndrome. He had a characteristic "plucked-bird" appearance, prominent eyes and scalp veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, stunted growth, and mottled pigmentation with sclerodermatous changes over the trunk and lower limbs. Radiological changes and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were also characteristic of the syndrome. This interesting case is reported for its rarity.

  20. A case of progeria syndrome treated as VIP patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Mahant, Mahant PD, C.M. Reddy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is rare autosomal recessive genetic disease with an incidence of about one in eight million. He was 16 years old boy lying on the couch. He was short stature thin with minimal subcutaneous tissue, skin was thin and fragile with loss of hair over scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes, and his face was dismorphic with prominent eyes, beaked nose, small jaw and large cranium with visible veins over it. His voice was thin and high pitched. Overall, this gives them an extremely aged nearly 70 -80 years old man look. The patient was a known case of progeria syndrome and he was treated as a VIP patient by all faculty members and staff, though he belongs low socioeconomic status, no political issue with them. But still he was a VIP.

  1. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Rare Genetic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat G. Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare pediatric genetic syndrome with incidence of one per eight million live births. The disorder is characterised by premature aging, generally leading to death at approximately 13.4 years of age. This is a follow-up study of a 9-year-old male with clinical and radiographic features highly suggestive of HGPS and presented here with description of differential diagnosis and dental consideration. This is the first case report of HGPS which showed pectus carinatum structure of chest.

  2. A prospective study of radiographic manifestations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Robert H. [Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Leslie B. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children' s Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Kleinman, Monica E. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Anesthesia, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Miller, David T. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Genetics, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology and Adolescent Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Snyder, Brian D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Nazarian, Ara [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Giobbie-Hurder, Anita [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Neuberg, Donna [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Kieran, Mark W. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Progeria is a rare segmental premature aging disease with significant skeletal abnormalities. Defining the full scope of radiologic abnormalities requires examination of a large proportion of the world's progeria population (estimated at 1 in 4 million). There has been no comprehensive prospective study describing the skeletal abnormalities associated with progeria. To define characteristic radiographic features of this syndrome. Thirty-nine children with classic progeria, ages 2-17 years, from 29 countries were studied at a single site. Comprehensive radiographic imaging studies were performed. Sample included 23 girls and 16 boys - the largest number of patients with progeria evaluated prospectively to date. Eight new and two little known progeria-associated radiologic findings were identified (frequencies of 3-36%). Additionally, 23 commonly reported findings were evaluated. Of these, 2 were not encountered and 21 were present and ranked according to their frequency. Nine abnormalities were associated with increasing patient age (P = 0.02-0.0001). This study considerably expands the radiographic morphological spectrum of progeria. A better understanding of the radiologic abnormalities associated with progeria and improved understanding of the biology of progerin (the molecule responsible for this disease), will improve our ability to treat the spectrum of bony abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  4. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  5. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Broers, Jos L. V.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ramaekers, Frans C. S.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma J. H.; Merckx, Diane; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marcelis, Carlo L. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  6. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  8. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  9. Progeria syndrome with characteristic deformation of proximal radius observed on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, S.; Rao, R.C.K.; Ragav, B.; Berry, M. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Radio-Diagnosis)

    1991-01-01

    The progeria syndrome (Hutchinson-Gilford) is an uncommon disease. A peculiar shape of the proximal radial metaphyseal region caused by an infolding of the cortex was observed on CT in 2 brothers suffering from this disorder, a feature not previously reported. A brief review of the radiologic literature was undertaken. This new observation needs to be further evaluated as it may provide a clinching diagnostic feature of this disease. (orig.).

  10. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphologi...

  11. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. Case presentation A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL, low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL, raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL, raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Conclusion Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  12. Hypoparathyroidism in an Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Kotb Abbass Metwalley; Fargalley, Hekma Saad

    2012-01-17

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is reported to be present in one in eight million and is characterized by severe growth failure, early loss of hair, lipodystrophy, scleroderma, decreased joint mobility, osteolysis, early atherosclerosis and facial features that resemble those of an aged person. Apart from diabetes mellitus, there are no reported abnormalities of thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary or adrenal function. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Egyptian child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and hypoparathyroidism. A 10-year-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for an evaluation of recurrent attacks of muscle cramps, paresthesia of his fingertips and perioral numbness of two months duration. On examination, we found dilated veins present over his scalp with alopecia and frontal bossing, a beaked nose, thin lips, protruding ears, a high pitched voice with sparse hair over his eyebrows and eyelashes and micrognathia but normal dentition. His eyes appeared prominent and our patient appeared to have poor sexual development. A provisional diagnosis of progeria was made, which was confirmed by molecular genetics study. Chvostek's and Trousseau's signs were positive. He had low total calcium (5.4 mg/dL), low ionized calcium (2.3 mg/dL), raised serum phosphate (7.2 mg/dL), raised alkaline phosphatase (118 U/L) and low intact parathyroid hormone (1.2 pg/mL) levels. He was started on oral calcium salt and vitamin D; his symptoms improved with the treatment and his serum calcium, urinary calcium and alkaline phosphates level were monitored every three months to ensure adequacy of therapy and to avoid hypercalcemia. Routine checking of serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone will help in the early detection of hypoparathyrodism among children with progeria.

  13. Simultaneous Shoulder and Hip Dislocation in a 12-Year-Old Girl with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Mardookhpour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature ageing disorder that is characterized by accelerated degenerative changes of the cutaneous, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Mean age at diagnosis is 2.9 years and generally leading to death at approximately 13 years of age due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Orthopedic manifestations of HGPS are multiple and shoulder dislocation is a rare skeletal trauma in progeria syndrome. Our patient had simultaneous shoulder and hip dislocation associated with a low energy trauma. This subject has not been reported. Treatment accomplished as close reduction under general anesthesia and immobilization.

  14. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  15. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  16. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with severe calcific aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesh B Hanumanthappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging syndrome that results from mutation in the Laminin A gene. This case report of a 12-year-old girl with HGPS is presented for the rarity of the syndrome and the classical clinical features that were observed in the patient. All patients with this condition should undergo early and periodic evaluation for cardiovascular diseases. However, the prognosis is poor and management is mainly conservative. There is no proven therapy available. Mortality in this uniformly fatal condition is primarily due to myocardial infarction, strokes or congestive cardiac failure between ages 7 and 21 years due to the rapidly progressive arteriosclerosis involving the large vessels.

  17. A 36 years old woman with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrami S M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a very rare genetic disorder with a frequency of 1 in 8 million live births. It is characterised by premature aging phenotype. The median age at death is 13.4 years. It is an autosomal dominat disease due to a de novo point mutation in the Lamin A gene exon 11 in the majority of cases. More than 100 cases have been reported world wide."nCase report: We describe here an exceptionally long-lived patient with HGPS, who is alive at age 36. She was referred by a cardiologist to our endocrinology clinic to be worked up for presence of a metabolic or genetic disorder before a heart surgery."nResults: Having more attention of clinicians about very rare diseases and referring the patients to geneticist are the main goals of this case report as well as describing the disease.

  18. Hip pathology in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a report of two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, Pouya; Jha, Shilpa; James, Kyle D; Hinves, Barry L; Buchanan, Jamie A F

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder. The estimated incidence is one in 4 million births. Orthopaedic manifestations include abnormality of the hips occurring early in the disease process. Severe coxa valga can be apparent by the age of 2 years. We report two cases of HGPS, one in a 7-year-old girl with avascular necrosis of the left hip and the second in a 13-year-old girl with recurrent traumatic hip dislocations. We demonstrate the pathoanatomical changes in the hip with HGPS using a combination of imaging modalities including radiographic, computed tomographic and MRI scans. These include coxa magna, coxa valga and acetabular dysplasia. We also comment on how these would affect the surgical management of this high-risk group of patients. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  19. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determine...

  20. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  2. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  3. Transient monoparesis following blade plate removal in a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patient. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandow, Suzanne M.; Rimoin, David L.; Grace, Aimee M.; Fillman, Ramona R.; Raney, Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Treating patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) are based on the abnormalities of accelerated aging that affect the healing processes, combined with a fragile cardiovascular status. A classic HGPS case is presented, of Korean ancestry, who was treated for severe coxa valga with bilateral varus osteotomies using blade plate fixation. Complications over the blade plate area required removal of the hardware, after which the patient displayed left-sided hypertonicity--determined to be a cerebrovascular accident. Subsequently, she returned almost completely to her pre-surgical neurologic status. Perioperative planning for HGPS patients should include risks typically considered in the planning for geriatric patient care. PMID:19373113

  4. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  5. Progeria: a new kind of Laminopathy-- report of the First European Symposium on Progeria and creation of EURO-Progeria, a European Consortium on Progeria and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brune, Thomas; Bonne, Gisele; Denecke, Jonas; Elcioglu, Nursel; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Marquardt, Thorsten; Ozgen, Heval; Stamsnijder, Marjet; Steichen, Elisabeth; Steinmann, Beat; Wehnert, Manfred; Levy, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Progeria is a rare, genetically determined condition characterized by accelerated aging in children. Its name is derived from Greek (Geron) and means "prematurely old". The classic type is the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which was first described in England in 1886 by Dr. Jonathan

  6. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A.; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C.; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently,

  7. Could Metabolic Syndrome, Lipodystrophy, and Aging Be Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exhaustion Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mansilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important and complex diseases of modern society is metabolic syndrome. This syndrome has not been completely understood, and therefore an effective treatment is not available yet. We propose a possible stem cell mechanism involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. This way of thinking lets us consider also other significant pathologies that could have similar etiopathogenic pathways, like lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and aging. All these clinical situations could be the consequence of a progressive and persistent stem cell exhaustion syndrome (SCES. The main outcome of this SCES would be an irreversible loss of the effective regenerative mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs pools. In this way, the normal repairing capacities of the organism could become inefficient. Our point of view could open the possibility for a new strategy of treatment in metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and even aging: stem cell therapies.

  8. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  9. Using drug treatments to control genome behaviour in normal and Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome fibroblasts, with and without hTERT immortalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Bikkul, Mehmet Ural

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an exceedingly rare genetic condition with striking features reminiscent of marked premature ageing. HGPS is commonly caused by a ‘classic’ mutation in the A-type lamin gene, LMNA (G608G). This leads to the expression of an aberrant truncated lamin A protein, progerin. The nuclear lamina is known to anchor chromosomes, stabilising and re...

  10. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  11. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyue Zhang

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3. In this study, we explore the potential connection(s between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox, double strand breaks (DSBs are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency.

  13. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  14. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  15. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, bu...

  16. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  17. Progeria: A rare genetic premature ageing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs. As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent ′drug of hope′ for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs.

  18. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  19. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  20. Labor Market Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  1. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria.

  2. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  3. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  4. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yin Lo

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90 iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM, and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM, abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in HGPS

  5. Autophagic degradation of farnesylated prelamin A as a therapeutic approach to lamin-linked progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cenni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Farnesylated prelamin A is a processing intermediate produced in the lamin A maturation pathway. Accumulation of a truncated farnesylated prelamin A form, called progerin, is a hallmark of the severe premature ageing syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Progerin elicits toxic effects in cells, leading to chromatin damage and cellular senescence and ultimately causes skin and endothelial defects, bone resorption, lipodystrophy and accelerated ageing. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying prelamin A turnover is critical for the development of clinically effective protein inhibitors that can avoid accumulation to toxic levels without impairing lamin A/C expression, which is essential for normal biological functions. Little is known about specific molecules that may target farnesylated prelamin A to elicit protein degradation. Here, we report the discovery of rapamycin as a novel inhibitor of progerin, which dramatically and selectively decreases protein levels through a mechanism involving autophagic degradation. Rapamycin treatment of progeria cells lowers progerin, as well as wild-type prelamin A levels, and rescues the chromatin phenotype of cultured fibroblasts, including histone methylation status and BAF and LAP2alpha distribution patterns. Importantly, rapamycin treatment does not affect lamin C protein levels, but increases the relative expression of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24. Thus, rapamycin, an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides, previously found to increase longevity in mouse models, can serve as a therapeutic tool, to eliminate progerin, avoid farnesylated prelamin A accumulation, and restore chromatin dynamics in progeroid laminopathies.

  6. The two-faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2014-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces

  7. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms...

  8. A homozygous ZMPSTE24 null mutation in combination with a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): insights into the pathophysiology of HGPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Jonas; Brune, Thomas; Feldhaus, Tobias; Robenek, Horst; Kranz, Christian; Auchus, Richard J; Agarwal, Anil K; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2006-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder normally caused by a spontaneous heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that codes for the nuclear lamina protein lamin A. Several enzymes are involved in the processing of its precursor, prelamin A, to the mature lamin A. A functional knockout of one of the enzymes involved in prelamin A processing, the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24, causes an even more severe disorder with early neonatal death described as restrictive dermatopathy (RD). This work describes a HGPS patient with a combined defect of a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene and a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that results in a C-terminal elongation of the final lamin A. Whereas the loss of function mutation of ZMPSTE24 normally results in lethal RD, the truncation of LMNA seems to be a salvage alteration alleviating the clinical picture to the HGPS phenotype. The mutations of our patient indicate that farnesylated prelamin A is the deleterious agent leading to the HGPS phenotype, which gives further insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. [Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. A rare case of neonatal occurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A; Bonfiglioli, G; Masignà Ricciardi, M G

    1986-01-01

    A case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is described in which phenotypic and metabolic symptoms were already evident at birth. Both under a clinical and autopsy point of view an early old age of organs and apparatuses was apparent, posing the problem of the reason why an early old aging occurs. The authors mention literature in favour of a genetic control of cellular aging and make the assumption that the genes controlling old age are various and that a greater or lesser presence and incidence of them could justify the earlier or normal appearance of this status.

  10. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  11. Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  12. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Oishi

    Full Text Available In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  13. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientific test to definitively diagnose children with Progeria. What is the Gene for HGPS? The gene responsible for HGPS is called LMNA (pronounced Lamin A). Within this gene there is a change in one element of DNA. This type of gene change is ...

  14. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dominici

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  15. Different prelamin A forms accumulate in human fibroblasts: a study in experimental models and progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lattanzi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina mutated in a group of human inherited disorders known as laminopathies. Among laminopathies, progeroid syndromes and lipodystrophies feature accumulation of prelamin A, the precursor protein which, in normal cells, undergoes a multi-step processing to yield mature lamin A. It is of utmost importance to characterize the prelamin A form accumulated in each laminopathy, since existing evidence shows that drugs acting on protein processing can improve some pathological aspects.We report that two antibodies raised against differently modified prelamin A peptides show a clear specificity to full-length prelamin A or carboxymethylated farnesylated prelamin A, respectively. Using these antibodies, we demonstrated that inhibition of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24 mostly elicits accumulation of full-length prelamin A in its farnesylated form, while loss of the prelamin A cleavage site causes accumulation of carboxymethylated prelamin A in progeria cells. These results suggest a major role of ZMPSTE24 in the first prelamin A cleavage step.

  16. Novel LMNA mutations cause an aggressive atypical neonatal progeria without progerin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Carrero, Dido; Gabau, Elisabeth; Velasco, Gloria; Quesada, Víctor; Bárcena, Clea; Moens, Marleen; Fieggen, Karen; Möhrcken, Silvia; Owens, Martina; Puente, Diana A; Asensio, Óscar; Loeys, Bart; Pérez, Ana; Benoit, Valerie; Wuyts, Wim; Lévy, Nicolas; Hennekam, Raoul C; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-06-22

    Progeroid syndromes are genetic disorders that recapitulate some phenotypes of physiological ageing. Classical progerias, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are generally caused by mutations in LMNA leading to accumulation of the toxic protein progerin and consequently, to nuclear envelope alterations. In this work, we describe a novel phenotypic feature of the progeria spectrum affecting three unrelated newborns and identify its genetic cause. Patients reported herein present an extremely homogeneous phenotype that somewhat recapitulates those of patients with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. However, pathological signs appear earlier, are more aggressive and present distinctive features including episodes of severe upper airway obstruction. Exome and Sanger sequencing allowed the identification of heterozygous de novo c.163G>A, p.E55K and c.164A>G, p.E55G mutations in LMNA as the alterations responsible for this disorder. Functional analyses demonstrated that fibroblasts from these patients suffer important dysfunctions in nuclear lamina, which generate profound nuclear envelope abnormalities but without progerin accumulation. These nuclear alterations found in patients' dermal fibroblasts were also induced by ectopic expression of the corresponding site-specific LMNA mutants in control human fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate the causal role of p.E55K and p.E55G lamin A mutations in a disorder which manifests novel phenotypic features of the progeria spectrum characterised by neonatal presentation and aggressive clinical evolution, despite being caused by lamin A/C missense mutations with effective prelamin A processing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  18. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-11-25

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5-10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  20. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Handa

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65 years old male developed nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, manifesting as multiple basal cell epitheliomas, marked mutilation of the face and characteristic pitting on the palms and soles. Calcification of the falx cerebri and scoliosis of the lumbar spine were also seen.

  1. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor prevents both the onset and late progression of cardiovascular disease in a progeria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Cao, Kan; Faddah, Dina A; Tavarez, Urraca L; Conneely, Karen N; Qu, Xuan; San, Hong; Ganesh, Santhi K; Chen, Xiaoyan; Avallone, Hedwig; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2008-10-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is the most dramatic form of human premature aging. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 years, usually from heart attack or stroke. Almost all cases of HGPS are caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene that results in production of a mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. This protein is permanently modified by a lipid farnesyl group, and acts as a dominant negative, disrupting nuclear structure. Treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) has been shown to prevent and even reverse this nuclear abnormality in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We have previously created a mouse model of HGPS that shows progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media of the large arteries, in a pattern that is strikingly similar to the cardiovascular disease seen in patients with HGPS. Here we show that the dose-dependent administration of the FTI tipifarnib (R115777, Zarnestra) to this HGPS mouse model can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease. These observations provide encouraging evidence for the current clinical trial of FTIs for this rare and devastating disease.

  2. [Cell clonality in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcová, H; Neuwirtová, R; Cermák, J; Belicková, M; Brdicka, R

    2002-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are classified as oncohematologic, clonal diseases. However, some MDS subtypes lack malignant clinical features. Literary data on the clonality of blood cells in MDS are controversial. Therefore we examined the clonality in the group of our own MDS patients. We were especially interested in the comparison of the clonality of myeloid and lymphoid cell line-ages. Using X-chromosome inactivation methods based on polymorphism in human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA), iduronate sulphatase gene (IDS) and protein p55 gene, we assessed the clonality of granulocytes, monocytes and T-lymphocytes of 49 female patients with MDS and 12 control women of various ages. Though the results were heterogeneous, certain trends were observed: most frequently monoclonality of monocytes was found (51%), granulocytes were monoclonal in 33% of cases, monoclonal T lymphocytes only in 8% of cases. There was no case with monoclonal T lymphocytes and simultaneously polyclonal myeloid cell fractions. Results differ in relation to the subtypes of MDS. Among controls we observed monoclonality of myeloid cells in one case of an old lady. WE CONCLUDE: The results confirm the presence of malignant clone of myeloid cells in MDS, which can be of variable size. The examination of the clonality in MDS can be significant for the therapy decision. Monoclonal myeloid cells are found least frequently in refractory anemia, most frequently in RAEB-T. Monoclonality of cells in sideroblastic anemia is interesting. The prevailing polyclonality of T lymphocytes in MDS can be explained by the presence of a long-lived cell population originating from the period before the development of MDS. The role of the polyclonal memory T cells in the antitumor immunity in MDS is discussed.

  3. Early recognition of basal cell naevus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra-Knol, HE; Scheewe, JH; van der Vlist, GJ; van Doorn, ME; Ausems, MGEM

    The basal cell naevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by major manifestations such as basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, and intracranial calcifications. Early recognition is important in order to reduce morbidity due to cutaneous and cerebral

  4. From the rarest to the most common: insights from progeroid syndromes into skin cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Tlougan, Brook E; Orlow, Seth J

    2009-10-01

    Despite their rarity, diseases of premature aging, or "progeroid" syndromes, have provided important insights into basic mechanisms that may underlie cancer and normal aging. In this review, we highlight these recent developments in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy, ataxia-telangiectasia, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. Though they are caused by different mutations in various genes and often result in quite disparate phenotypes, deciphering the molecular bases of these conditions has served to highlight their underlying basic similarities. Studies of progeroid syndromes, particularly HGPS, the most dramatic form of premature aging, have contributed to our knowledge of fundamental processes of importance to skin biology, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, genome instability, cellular senescence, and stem-cell differentiation.

  5. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? ...

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  7. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Bilir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  8. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, J.; Zhang, Y.S.; Pitrez, P.R.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Miscuglio, M.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, M.R.; Nissan, X.; Ferreira, L.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2017-01-01

    A progeria-on-a-chip model is engineered to recapitulate the biomechanical dynamics of vascular disease and aging. The model shows an exacerbated injury response to strain and is rescued by pharmacological treatments. The progeria-on-a-chip is expected to drive the discovery of new drugs and to

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Naevoid Basalzellkarzinom-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Heinrich, M.; Heckmann, M.; Kramann, B. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Aliani, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Dill-Mueller, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Hautklinik und Poliklinik; Uder, M. [Erlange-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar/plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and spine and rib anomalies. The combination of clinical, imaging, and histological findings is helpful in identifying NBCCS patients. Imaging plays a crucial role in evaluation of these patients. We present a wide variety of clinical and radiological findings characteristic of this disease. (orig.)

  10. Sweet Syndrome After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Ali; İdemen, Celal; Okçu Heper, Aylin; Utkan, Güngör

    2016-02-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a rare clinical entity characterized by skin lesions, neutrophilia, fever, and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. It may be a consequence of malignant disease, comorbidities, or drugs. We present a case of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a patient after autologous stem cell transplant.

  11. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Marieke; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Holcomb, Valerie B.; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C.; de Zeeuw, Chris I.; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Mitchell, James R.

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a

  12. Nuclear matrix, nuclear envelope and premature aging syndromes in a translational research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Pierre; Navarro, Claire; Harhouri, Karim; Roll, Patrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; Kaspi, Elise; Perrin, Sophie; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lévy, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Lamin A-related progeroid syndromes are genetically determined, extremely rare and severe. In the past ten years, our knowledge and perspectives for these diseases has widely progressed, through the progressive dissection of their pathophysiological mechanisms leading to precocious and accelerated aging, from the genes mutations discovery until therapeutic trials in affected children. A-type lamins are major actors in several structural and functional activities at the nuclear periphery, as they are major components of the nuclear lamina. However, while this is usually poorly considered, they also play a key role within the rest of the nucleoplasm, whose defects are related to cell senescence. Although nuclear shape and nuclear envelope deformities are obvious and visible events, nuclear matrix disorganization and abnormal composition certainly represent the most important causes of cell defects with dramatic pathological consequences. Therefore, lamin-associated diseases should be better referred as laminopathies instead of envelopathies, this later being too restrictive, considering neither the key structural and functional roles of soluble lamins in the entire nucleoplasm, nor the nuclear matrix contribution to the pathophysiology of lamin-associated disorders and in particular in defective lamin A processing-associated aging diseases. Based on both our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and the biological and clinical consequences of progeria and related diseases, therapeutic trials have been conducted in patients and were terminated less than 10 years after the gene discovery, a quite fast issue for a genetic disease. Pharmacological drugs have been repurposed and used to decrease the toxicity of the accumulated, unprocessed and truncated prelaminA in progeria. To date, none of them may be considered as a cure for progeria and these clinical strategies were essentially designed toward reducing a subset of the most dramatic and morbid features

  13. Mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in accelerated aging syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Brian C; Collins, Francis S; Nabel, Elizabeth G

    2007-07-06

    In the past several years, remarkable progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanisms of premature aging. These rare, genetic conditions offer valuable insights into the normal aging process and the complex biology of cardiovascular disease. Many of these advances have been made in the most dramatic of these disorders, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Although characterized by features of normal aging such as alopecia, skin wrinkling, and osteoporosis, patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are affected by accelerated, premature arteriosclerotic disease that leads to heart attacks and strokes at a mean age of 13 years. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the biology of premature aging uncovered in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and other accelerated aging syndromes, advances that provide insight into the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases ranging from atherosclerosis to arrhythmias.

  14. An unidentified neonatal progeroid syndrome: follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, H R

    1979-01-18

    Two male infants with a pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome with natal teeth are compared with two very similar female cases reported in the literature and interpreted as congenital progeria. All these cases may represent a separate entity, a previously unrecognized genetic progeroid syndrome.

  15. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutations in ERCC1 have not been reported. Here, we describe the first case of human inherited ERCC1 deficiency. Patient cells showed moderate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet rays and mitomycin C, yet the clinical features were very severe and, unexpectedly, were compatible with a diagnosis of cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome. This discovery represents a novel complementation group of patients with defective NER. Further, the clinical severity, coupled with a relatively mild repair defect, suggests novel functions for ERCC1.

  16. Amniotic Fluid Cells Proliferation in Normal and Down Syndrome Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honcea Adina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome/Trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal anomaly, and it represents the most common congenital cause of infants’ intellectual disability. Subjects with this syndrome are affected by degenerative processes caused by accelerated aging or unknown ethyologies. In recent years, accumulating evidence revealed increased potential of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells to be used in regenerative therapy. Our aim was to assess differences in immunophenotype, cell morphology and proliferation of amniotic fluid cells from normal and Down Syndrome pregnancies using a quantitative cytometry approach. Results revealed the emergence of a population of small sized cells in Down Syndrome derived amniotic fluid cells that are readily visible upon microscopic inspection. Hence, the fluorescence–based quantitative image cytometry determinations showed a tendency of decrease in both cell and nuclei size in trisomy, with no significant modification in nuclei circularity, as measured following actin cytoskeleton and nuclei labeling. The propensity of Ki67 positive cells was found to be increased in Down Syndrome derived cells (48.92% as compared to normal specimens (28.68%. However, cells in S and G2/M cell cycle phases decreased from 32.91% to 4.49% in diseased cells. Further studies are devoted to understanding the molecular basis of the observed differences in the proliferation ability of Down Syndrome amniotic cells, in order to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of amniotic fluid stem cells for tissue regeneration in subjects with trisomy and to find correlations between amniotic cells phenotype and patient prognosis.

  17. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan-Olle Andressoo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of "null" alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals.

  18. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  19. A Classic Case of Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattaprasad Dadhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition characterized mainly by basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratinizing odontogenic tumors, and other systemic anomalies. As these manifestations do not alter the patient′s lifestyle, most of the cases are diagnosed through oral abnormalities. A classic case of basal cell nevus syndrome fulfilling almost all the major and minor criteria has been reported here.

  20. Case report: A Stauffer's syndrome variant associated with renal cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case report, we report a patient who was admitted with fever, fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss and pruritus in whom renal cell carcinoma was incidentally found in the right kidney during an initial workup. KEYWORDS: Cholestasis; Paraneoplastic syndrome; RCC; Stauffer's syndrome; Thrombocytopenia ...

  1. The conserved Cockayne syndrome B-piggyBac fusion protein (CSB-PGBD3) affects DNA repair and induces both interferon-like and innate antiviral responses in CSB-null cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Arnold D; Gray, Lucas T; Pavelitz, Thomas; Newman, John C; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Weiner, Alan M

    2012-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a segmental progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF-like ATPase required for transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Over 43Mya before marmosets diverged from humans, a piggyBac3 (PGBD3) transposable element integrated into intron 5 of the CSB gene. As a result, primate CSB genes now generate both CSB protein and a conserved CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in which the first 5 exons of CSB are alternatively spliced to the PGBD3 transposase. Using a host cell reactivation assay, we show that the fusion protein inhibits TCR of oxidative damage but facilitates TCR of UV damage. We also show by microarray analysis that expression of the fusion protein alone in CSB-null UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) cells induces an interferon-like response that resembles both the innate antiviral response and the prolonged interferon response normally maintained by unphosphorylated STAT1 (U-STAT1); moreover, as might be expected based on conservation of the fusion protein, this potentially cytotoxic interferon-like response is largely reversed by coexpression of functional CSB protein. Interestingly, expression of CSB and the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein together, but neither alone, upregulates the insulin growth factor binding protein IGFBP5 and downregulates IGFBP7, suggesting that the fusion protein may also confer a metabolic advantage, perhaps in the presence of DNA damage. Finally, we show that the fusion protein binds in vitro to members of a dispersed family of 900 internally deleted piggyBac elements known as MER85s, providing a potential mechanism by which the fusion protein could exert widespread effects on gene expression. Our data suggest that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein is important in both health and disease, and could play a role in Cockayne syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome and Hairy Skin Patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notay, Manisha; Kamangar, Faranak; Awasthi, Smita; Fazel, Nasim

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of an increasing number of discrete patches of darkly pigmented terminal hair in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This case adds to a small case series of three patients which have previously reported this observation. We report this case to highlight hairy patches as an important clinical feature associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajanikanth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS or Gorlin - Goltz syndrome is an autosomal disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. The major organ systems involved are skin, bones, central nervous system, eyes, gonads and endocrine. This particular syndrome is extensively described in the literature under different names. However, there are only few cases reported in the Indian literature. An unusual case of a 33-year old male with large odontogenic keratocyst involving impacted canine in the mandible, along with multiple cysts and impacted teeth in the maxilla; bifid rib and vertebral anomalies has been described.

  4. Temsirolimus Partially Rescues the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Cellular Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gabriel

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670, a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. Lamins help maintain the shape and stability of the nuclear envelope in addition to regulating DNA replication, DNA transcription, proliferation and differentiation. The LMNA mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal region of prelamin A, producing the truncated, farnesylated protein progerin. The accumulation of progerin in HGPS nuclei causes numerous morphological and functional changes that lead to premature cellular senescence. Attempts to reverse this HGPS phenotype have identified rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, as a drug that is able to rescue the HGPS cellular phenotype by promoting autophagy and reducing progerin accumulation. Rapamycin is an obvious candidate for the treatment of HGPS disease but is difficult to utilize clinically. To further assess rapamycin's efficacy with regard to proteostasis, mitochondrial function and the degree of DNA damage, we tested temsirolimus, a rapamycin analog with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile than rapamycin. We report that temsirolimus decreases progerin levels, increases proliferation, reduces misshapen nuclei, and partially ameliorates DNA damage, but does not improve proteasome activity or mitochondrial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that future therapeutic strategies should identify new drug combinations and treatment regimens that target all the dysfunctional hallmarks that characterize HGPS cells.

  5. Chemical inhibition of NAT10 corrects defects of laminopathic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrieu, Delphine; Britton, Sébastien; Demir, Mukerrem; Rodriguez, Raphaël; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation and mutations of the nuclear-architecture proteins Lamin A and C cause misshapen nuclei and altered chromatin organization associated with cancer and laminopathies, including the premature-aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Here, we identified the small molecule “Remodelin” that improved nuclear architecture, chromatin organization and fitness of both human Lamin A/C depleted cells and HGPS-derived patient cells, and decreased markers of DNA damage in these cells. Using a combination of chemical, cellular and genetic approaches, we identified the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10 as the target of Remodelin that mediated nuclear shape rescue in laminopathic cells via microtubule reorganization. These findings provide insights into how NAT10 affects nuclear architecture, and suggest alternative strategies for treating laminopathies and aging. PMID:24786082

  6. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: a family affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jiasian; Kinnear, Ned; Douglass-Molloy, Hannah; Hennessey, Derek Barrry

    2017-01-25

    A 49-year-old woman with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, flank pain and a family history of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome sought genetic testing. She was found to harbour a fumarate hydratase (FH) genetic mutation and a previously undetected renal tumour. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy, and remains well at follow-up. HLRCC syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease, with patients at increased risk for cutaneous leiomyomas, early-onset uterine leiomyomas and aggressive renal carcinoma. Although the syndrome may manifest life-threatening complications, outcomes may be improved by preventative family screening and surveillance, compelling early diagnosis. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Genome-wide redistribution of BRD4 binding sites in transformation resistant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS patients do not develop cancer despite a significant accumulation of DNA damage in their cells. We have recently reported that HGPS cells are refractory to experimental oncogenic transformation and we identified the bromodomain-containing 4 protein (BRD4 as a mediator of the transformation resistance. ChIP-sequencing experiments revealed distinct genome-wide binding patterns for BRD4 in HGPS cells when compared to control wild type cells. Here we provide a detailed description of the ChIP-seq dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE61325, the specific and common BRD4 binding sites between HGPS and control cells, and the data analysis procedure associated with the publication by Fernandez et al., 2014 in Cell Reports 9, 248-260 [1].

  8. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g....... frequency and nocturia), as > 28 mast cells/mm(2) is defined as mastocytosis and correlated with clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS The current enzymatic staining method (naphtolesterase) on 10 mu m sections for quantifying mast cells is complicated. In the present study, 61 patients had detrusor...... sections between, respectively. Mast cells were counted according to a well-defined procedure. RESULTS The old and the new methods, on 10 and 3 mu m sections, showed a good correlation between mast cell counts. When using tryptase staining and 3 mu m sections, the mast cell number correlated well...

  9. Moyamoya syndrome associated with sickle cell trait in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komur, Mustafa; Unal, Selma; Okuyaz, Cetin; Ozgur, Anil

    2014-06-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is a chronic, progressive occlusion of cerebrovascular arteries that leads to the development of characteristic collateral vessels. It is usually accompanied with sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies. We report a 7-year-old boy, who admitted to our clinic with headache, diagnosed as moyamoya syndrome associated with sickle cell trait. To date, two such cases have been reported in the literature. As far as we know, this patient is the first child reported. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Fraser, Stuart T; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-08-18

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes, including familial long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and Brugada syndrome, can cause life-threatening arrhythmias and are responsible for a significant proportion of sudden deaths in the young. Identification of genetic mutations and pathophysiological changes that underlie disease development can inform clinical practice and guide novel drug development. However, disease mechanisms in a large number of patients remain elusive and pharmacologic treatment is suboptimal, so many patients rely on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of disease facilitate analysis of disease mechanisms in patient-specific cardiomyocytes, overcoming limitations of animal models and human tissue restrictions. This review outlines how studies using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms that underpin disease pathogenesis and their potential to facilitate new pharmacologic therapies and personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric T-cell lymphoma associated with hemophagocytic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanai Yoshiyuki

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (LAHS occurs in mostly extra nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. LAHS arising from gastrointestinal lymphoma has never been reported. Here we report a case of gastric T-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome. Case presentation A 51-year-old woman presented with pain, redness of breasts, fever and hematemesis. Hematological examination revealed anemia. Gastroscopy revealed small bleeding ulcers in the stomach and the computed tomography scan showed liver tumor. She underwent total gastrectomy for gastrointestinal bleeding and the histopathology revealed gastric T-cell lymphoma. She continued to bleed from the anastomosis and died on the 8th postoperative day. Autopsy revealed it to be a LAHS. Conclusions If Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS occurs in lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract, bleeding from the primary lesion might be uncontrollable. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are needed for long-term survival.

  12. Progeria caused by a rare LMNA mutation p.S143F associated with mild myopathy and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kmieć, Tomasz; Fidziańska, Anna; Rekawek, Joanna; Niebrój-Dobosz, Irena; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2008-09-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with premature aging associated with mild myopathy, displaying muscle weakness, joint contractures and hyporeflexia. Genetic analysis revealed rare heterozygous point mutation in lamin A/C gene, g.428C>T. Cardiological evaluation showed atrial fibrillation, but we did not find signs of coronary heart disease, which is life-threatening cardiovascular complication in progeria. Electron microscopy of the muscle revealed abnormalities in nuclear architecture, i.e. blebbing, thick lamina and peripheral distribution of heterochromatin. As some diagnostic criteria characteristic for classic progeria are not fulfilled, this case could be regarded as atypical progeria associated with myopathy and atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the second case of such association described in the literature.

  13. Cell Phone Use by Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Kevin; Whitehouse, Andrew; Jaquet, Emma; Ziatas, Kathy; Walker, Allan J.

    2010-01-01

    While young people have generally been at the forefront of the adoption and use of new communications technologies, little is known of uses by exceptional youth. This study compares cell phone use by a group of adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (n = 35) with that by a group of adolescents with typical development (n = 35). People with Asperger…

  14. Augmented cell death with Bloom syndrome helicase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kasahara, Kimiko; Yamada, Taketo; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by lupus-like erythematous telangi-ectasias of the face, sun sensitivity, infertility, stunted growth, upper respiratory infection, and gastrointestinal infections commonly associated with decreased immuno-globulin levels. The syndrome is associated with immuno-deficiency of a generalized type, ranging from mild and essentially asympto-matic to severe. Chromosomal abnormalities are hallmarks of the disorder, and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and quadriradial configurations in lymphocytes and fibroblasts are diagnostic features. BS is caused by mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family. We determined whether BLM deficiency has any effects on cell growth and death in BLM-deficient cells and mice. BLM-deficient EB-virus-transformed cell lines from BS patients and embryonic fibroblasts from BLM-/- mice showed slower growth than wild-type cells. BLM-deficient cells showed abnormal p53 protein expression after irradiation. In BLM-/- mice, small body size, reduced number of fetal liver cells and increased cell death were observed. BLM deficiency causes the up-regulation of p53, double-strand break and apoptosis, which are likely observed in irradiated control cells. Slow cell growth and increased cell death may be one of the causes of the small body size associated with BS patients.

  15. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans.

  16. Small cell lung cancer associated with multiple paraneoplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Franco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient presenting with multiple severe electrolyte disturbances who was subsequently found to have small cell lung cancer. Upon further evaluation, she demonstrated three distinct paraneoplastic processes, including the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, Fanconi syndrome, and an inappropriate elevation in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23. The patient underwent one round of chemotherapy, but she was found to have progressive disease. After 36 days of hospitalization, the patient made the decision to enter hospice care and later she expired.

  17. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  18. Down Syndrome-Associated Diabetes Is Not Due To a Congenital Deficiency in β Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Alexandra E; Sacks, Wendy; Rizza, Robert A; Butler, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    We sought to establish whether the increased incidence of diabetes associated with Down syndrome was due to a congenital deficit in β cells. The pancreas was obtained at autopsy from nondiabetic subjects with Down syndrome (n = 29) and age-matched nondiabetic control subjects without Down syndrome (n = 28). The pancreas sections were evaluated for the fractional β-cell area. No difference was found in the fractional β-cell area between the subjects with Down syndrome and the control subjects. The increased incidence and prevalence of diabetes in individuals with Down syndrome is not due to an underlying congenital deficiency of β cells.

  19. Autologous stem cell transplantation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, T.J.M. de; Suciu, S.; Brand, R.; Muus, P.; Kroger, N.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the treatment of choice for the majority of young patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) who have a histocompatible donor (sibling or unrelated donor). For some patients lacking a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-compatible donor, chemotherapy followed by

  20. Computational Exploration for Lead Compounds That Can Reverse the Nuclear Morphology in Progeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailima Rampogu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging that eventually leads to death and is noticed globally. Despite alarming conditions, this disease lacks effective medications; however, the farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs are a hope in the dark. Therefore, the objective of the present article is to identify new compounds from the databases employing pharmacophore based virtual screening. Utilizing nine training set compounds along with lonafarnib, a common feature pharmacophore was constructed consisting of four features. The validated Hypo1 was subsequently allowed to screen Maybridge, Chembridge, and Asinex databases to retrieve the novel lead candidates, which were then subjected to Lipinski’s rule of 5 and ADMET for drug-like assessment. The obtained 3,372 compounds were forwarded to docking simulations and were manually examined for the key interactions with the crucial residues. Two compounds that have demonstrated a higher dock score than the reference compounds and showed interactions with the crucial residues were subjected to MD simulations and binding free energy calculations to assess the stability of docked conformation and to investigate the binding interactions in detail. Furthermore, this study suggests that the Hits may be more effective against progeria and further the DFT studies were executed to understand their orbital energies.

  1. [A case of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate in a patient with basal cell nevus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mioko; Rikimaru, Fumihide; Higaki, Yuichiro; Masuda, Muneyuki

    2014-06-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the developmental malformations and its carcinogenic nature. This syndrome shows various symptoms of multiple cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, ketatocystic odontogenic tumors, and inborn abnormalities in the bone and skin. Although basal cell nevus syndrome itself is a rare disorder, we experienced a very rare case in which squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity developed, and not cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. Only 4 similar cases have been reported in the English literature. The patient was a 33-year-old woman. She was diagnosed as having squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate, and basal cell nevus syndrome in our hospital. The patient underwent surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate, with postoperative chemoradiothetrapy. Since patients with this syndrome tend to form basal cell carcinoma when exposed to X-ray radiation, we perform radiotherapy with care.

  2. Hyper IgE Syndrome and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel H. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyper IgE Syndrome (HIES is an immunodeficiency disorder characterized by increased serum levels of IgE, eczema, and recurrent cutaneous and pulmonary infections. In this report, we present, to our knowledge, the first documented case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC found in a patient with HIES. The patient received infectious disease clearance prior to obtaining a partial nephrectomy which revealed clear cell histology. Both HIES and RCC have an immunological basis for their pathophysiology and may involve common pathways. Further studies may provide insight into any possible link and clinicians should be mindful of immunocompromised patients who present with risk factors for genitourinary malignancy.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  4. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells...... also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation...... of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues...

  5. Analysis of giant cell tumour of bone cells for Noonan syndrome/cherubism-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovszky, Linda; Idowu, Bernadine; Taylor, Richard; Mertens, Fredrik; Athanasou, Nicholas; Flanagan, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic tumour which contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells and a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells (MSC). Giant cell-rich osteolytic lesions can also develop in the jaw bones in Noonan syndrome, a cherubism-like developmental abnormality that is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, often because of mutation in the PTPN11 or BRAF genes. We screened GCTBs for mutations in PTPN11 and BRAF to determine whether GCTBs develop through alterations of genes involved in Noonan syndrome. MSC were isolated from 10 GCTBs. Chromosome banding analysis of these cells revealed telomeric associations (tas) in 7 of the 10 cases. Thus, the cultured cells expressed a cytogenetic abnormality typically found in short-term cultures from GCTBs. Sequencing of DNA extracted from the seven GCTB-derived MSC cultures displaying tas did not identify any mutation in PTPN11 or in exons 9-15 of BRAF. Our findings indicate that the molecular pathways involved in GCTB development are different from those causing Noonan syndrome. The method for isolating and culturing GCTB stromal cells described in this study generated a population of MSC that contained tas, indicating that it is useful for obtaining stromal cells from GCTB and other giant cell-rich lesions, such as giant cell reparative granuloma, for genetic and other studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. A Novel Lamin A Mutant Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Causes Distinct Abnormalities of the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, Alice; Vadrot, Nathalie; Vicart, Patrick; Ferreiro, Ana; Mayer, Michèle; Héron, Delphine; Vigouroux, Corinne; Buendia, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    A-type lamins, the intermediate filament proteins participating in nuclear structure and function, are encoded by LMNA. LMNA mutations can lead to laminopathies such as lipodystrophies, premature aging syndromes (progeria) and muscular dystrophies. Here, we identified a novel heterozygous LMNA p.R388P de novo mutation in a patient with a non-previously described severe phenotype comprising congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and lipodystrophy. In culture, the patient's skin fibroblasts entered prematurely into senescence, and some nuclei showed a lamina honeycomb pattern. C2C12 myoblasts were transfected with a construct carrying the patient's mutation; R388P-lamin A (LA) predominantly accumulated within the nucleoplasm and was depleted at the nuclear periphery, altering the anchorage of the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin and the nucleoplasmic protein LAP2-alpha. The mutant LA triggered a frequent and severe nuclear dysmorphy that occurred independently of prelamin A processing, as well as increased histone H3K9 acetylation. Nuclear dysmorphy was not significantly improved when transfected cells were treated with drugs disrupting microtubules or actin filaments or modifying the global histone acetylation pattern. Therefore, releasing any force exerted at the nuclear envelope by the cytoskeleton or chromatin did not rescue nuclear shape, in contrast to what was previously shown in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria due to other LMNA mutations. Our results point to the specific cytotoxic effect of the R388P-lamin A mutant, which is clinically related to a rare and severe multisystemic laminopathy phenotype.

  7. Modeling Andersen's Syndrome in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Jonathan; Rouleau, Matthieu; Desnuelle, Claude; Sacconi, Sabrina; Bendahhou, Saïd

    2016-01-15

    Andersen's syndrome (AS) is a rare disorder characterized by a triad of symptoms: periodic paralysis, cardiac arrhythmia, and bone developmental defects. Most of the patients carry mutations on the inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 encoded by the KCNJ2 gene. kcnj2 knockout mice are lethal at birth preventing, hence, thorough investigations of the physiological and pathophysiological events. We have generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from healthy as well as from AS patient muscular biopsies using the four-gene cassette required for cellular reprogramming (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The generated AS-iPS cells exhibited the gold standard requirement for iPS cells: expression of genetics and surface pluripotent markers, strong alkaline phosphatase activity, self-renewal, and could be differentiated by the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) into the three germ layers. Sequencing of the entire coding sequence of the KCNJ2 gene, in AS-iPS cells, revealed that the reprogramming process did not revert the Andersen's syndrome-associated mutation. Moreover, no difference was observed between control and AS-iPS cells in terms of pluripotent markers' expression, self-renewal, and three germ layer differentiation. Interestingly, expression of osteogenic markers are lower in EB-differentiated AS-iPS compared to control iPS cells. Our results showed that the Kir2.1 channel is not important for the reprogramming process and the early step of the development in vitro. However, the osteogenic machinery appears to be hastened in AS-iPS cells, strongly indicating that the generated AS-iPS cells could be a good model to better understand the AS pathophysiology.

  8. The mutant form of lamin A that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle McClintock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and early death, frequently from stroke or coronary artery disease. 90% of HGPS cases carry the LMNA G608G (GGC>GGT mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, activating a splice donor site that results in production of a dominant negative form of lamin A protein, denoted progerin. Screening 150 skin biopsies from unaffected individuals (newborn to 97 years showed that a similar splicing event occurs in vivo at a low level in the skin at all ages. While progerin mRNA remains low, the protein accumulates in the skin with age in a subset of dermal fibroblasts and in a few terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Progerin-positive fibroblasts localize near the basement membrane and in the papillary dermis of young adult skin; however, their numbers increase and their distribution reaches the deep reticular dermis in elderly skin. Our findings demonstrate that progerin expression is a biomarker of normal cellular aging and may potentially be linked to terminal differentiation and senescence in elderly individuals.

  9. Major sickle cell syndromes in children in Kenitra, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hafiani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To highlight the epidemiological characteristics and plot the current mapping of the sickle cell syndromes in children under 15 years old. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted on children with sickle cell disease over a period of 4 years (from January 2011 to December 2015 at the Pediatric Department at El Idrissi Regional Hospital Center in Kenitra, Morocco. Results: The mean age of patients was (8.56 ± 3.97 years and the age group 6–15 years was the most affected. The male gender was the most dominant with 60.94% of cases versus 30.06% for females. The homozygous form SS was the most frequently identified (81.25% of cases while the heterozygous form SC was rarely detected (2.08%. Conclusions: Sickle cell anemia remains a reality in Morocco and may not be perfectly understood yet by health professionals. A screening policy and a sustainable management program can prevent hemoglobinopathies in the studied region. An action plan must be implemented at national level to improve the quality of management of main sickle cell syndromes.

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  12. Disconnection of cerebellar Purkinje cells in Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, K; DiMauro, S; Bonilla, E

    1999-06-15

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a sporadic multisystem disorder due to rearrangements in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of cerebellar dysfunction in KSS, antibodies against synaptophysin (SY) were used to identify presynaptic terminals and antibodies to calbindin D (CB) to identify Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex and in the dentate nucleus from two autopsied cases of KSS. By conventional neuropathology we found marked spongiform degeneration and by immunohistochemistry a disruption of presynaptic terminals and of the terminal arborizations of Purkinje cell axons on multipolar neurons of the dentate nucleus in the KSS patients. We suggest that a disconnection of Purkinje cells at the dentate nucleus may play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebellar ataxia in KSS.

  13. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Nyeong Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received much attention with the role of mast cells in IBS. Mast cells are abundant in the intestines and function as intestinal gatekeepers at the interface between the luminal environment in the intestine and the internal milieu under the intestinal epithelium. As a gatekeeper at the interface, mast cells communicate with the adjacent cells such as epithelial, neuronal, and other immune cells throughout the mediators released when they themselves are activated. Many studies have suggested that mast cells play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. This review will focus on studies of the role of mast cell in IBS and the limitations of studies and will also consider future directions.

  14. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Awomolo, Agboola O. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Szabo, Sara [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Pathology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  15. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...... and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle...

  16. First Reported Patient with Human ERCC1 Deficiency Has Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome with a Mild Defect in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Severe Developmental Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Raams, Anja; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Wijgers, Nils; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Kleijer, Wim J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two progeroid syndromes: Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes. The heterodimer ERCC1-XPF is one of two endonucleases required for NER. Mutations in XPF are associated with mild XP and rarely with progeria. Mutati...

  17. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  18. Proximal Tubule Cell Hypothesis for Cardiorenal Syndrome in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Saito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is remarkably high among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, even in the early microalbuminuric stages with normal glomerular filtration rates. Proximal tubule cells (PTCs mediate metabolism and urinary excretion of vasculotoxic substances via apical and basolateral receptors and transporters. These cells also retrieve vasculoprotective substances from circulation or synthesize them for release into the circulation. PTCs are also involved in the uptake of sodium and phosphate, which are critical for hemodynamic regulation and maintaining the mineral balance, respectively. Dysregulation of PTC functions in CKD is likely to be associated with the development of CVD and is linked to the progression to end-stage renal disease. In particular, PTC dysfunction occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, a leading cause of CKD. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms of PTC dysfunction to develop therapeutic strategies for treating cardiorenal syndrome in diabetes.

  19. Basal Cell nevoid Syndrome - Report of a case with 20 years' folow-up -

    OpenAIRE

    新美, 秦恵; 星名, 由紀子; 鈴木, 一郎; 中島, 民雄; Niimi, Kanae; Hoshina, Yukiko; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakajima, Tamio

    1997-01-01

    Basal cell nevoid syndrome is an autosomal dominant herediatry disease with multiple pits on palmar and plantar skin, bifid rib, ocular hyperterolism, multiple jaw cysts and many other malformations. Most of the jaw cysts found in this syndrome are odontogenic keratocysts. In this paper, 11-year-old boy with basal cell nevoid syndrome who was followed up for 20 years was reported. Clinical examination showed that he had ocular hypertelorism, broad nasal root, temporal and frontal bossings, ma...

  20. Thermosensitivity of red blood cells from Down's syndrome individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, M; Bryszewska, M; K dziora, J

    2000-12-01

    Biochemical disturbances of the reactive oxygen species metabolism revealed in subjects with Down's syndrome (DS), and the findings indicating that heat-induced cell alterations have been, at least, partly mediated by reactive oxygen species, made the elucidation of the response of trisomic cells to elevated temperatures of special interest. Kinetic analysis of cell-survival curves, accompanied by the flow cytometry and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations, and their relationship with the cell membrane fluidity, were undertaken. At each temperature (48-54 degrees C), Dq parameters, representing the ability to accumulate sublethal damages, were similar for both cell groups. D0 parameters (inverse leakage rates; D0 = 1/k) were greater for DS cells at each temperature below 54 degrees C. The haemolysis sensitivity ratio (HSR) showed that DS erythrocytes were, in average, 1.60 times more resistant to heat injury than those from normal subjects. Activation energies of haemolysis, calculated according to the Arrhenius equation, were similar both for normal (290.8 +/- 6.5 [kJ/mol]) and DS erythrocytes (288.0 +/- 5.5 [kJ/mol]). Flow cytometry studies showed that the scattering properties of intact DS erythrocytes (reflecting size, volume, shape and cell membrane surface morphology) were different than those of normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs and scattering diagrams obtained for cells submitted to heat stress (51 degrees C) confirmed that DS erythrocytes were more resistant, to a certain extent, to heat-induced disruption than normal cells. The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH (1-(4-trimethyl-ammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene) showed that untreated DS erythrocytes had substantially lower fluidity (r = 0.356 +/- 0.008) of the outer monolayer of cell membranes as compared to normal cells (r = 0.324 +/- 0.011). The increase of the cell membrane fluidity during exposure to heat was observed. The greatest elevation of cell

  1. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gustavo; Jabado, Omar; Renwick, Neil; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2005-03-20

    Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence. We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.

  2. Skin dendritic cell and T cell activation associated with dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyen, Huynh Thi Le; Cerny, Daniela; Trung, Dinh The; Pang, Jassia; Velumani, Sumathy; Toh, Ying Xiu; Qui, Phan Tu; Hao, Nguyen Van; Simmons, Cameron; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Wills, Bridget; Fink, Katja

    2017-10-27

    The pathogenesis of severe dengue remains unclear, particularly the mechanisms underlying the plasma leakage that results in hypovolaemic shock in a small proportion of individuals. Maximal leakage occurs several days after peak viraemia implicating immunological pathways. Skin is a highly vascular organ and also an important site of immune reactions with a high density of dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. We obtained skin biopsies and contemporaneous blood samples from patients within 24 hours of onset of dengue shock syndrome (DSS), and from healthy controls. We analyzed cell subsets by flow cytometry, and soluble mediators and antibodies by ELISA; the percentage of migratory CD1a+ dermal DCs was significantly decreased in the DSS patients, and skin CD8+ T cells were activated, but there was no accumulation of dengue-specific antibodies. Inflammatory monocytic cells were not observed infiltrating the skin of DSS cases on whole-mount histology, although CD14dim cells disappeared from blood.

  3. Etanercept in Treating Young Patients With Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome After Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pulmonary Complications; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. Molecular mechanisms of disease in hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Henricus Anthonius van

    2004-01-01

    Metabolically defective red blood cells are old before their time, and suffer from metabolic progeria. The focus of this thesis was to identify the molecular mechanisms by which inherited enzymopathies of the red blood cell lead to impaired enzyme function and, consequently, shorten red blood cell

  5. Basal Cell Carcinomas in Gorlin Syndrome: A Review of 202 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome (Naevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the PTCH gene with a birth incidence of approximately 1 in 19,000. Patients develop multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin frequently in early life and also have a predisposition to additional malignancies such as medulloblastoma. Gorlin Syndrome patients also have developmental defects such as bifid ribs and other complications such as jaw keratocysts. We studied the incidence and frequency of basal cell carcinomas in 202 Gorlin syndrome patients from 62 families and compared this to their gender and mutation type. Our data suggests that the incidence of basal cell carcinomas is equal between males and females and the mutation type cannot be used to predict disease burden.

  6. Axillary basal cell carcinoma in patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: report of basal cell carcinoma in both axilla of a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2014-08-17

    Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, an area that is not usually exposed to the sun, is rare. Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome, a disorder associated with a mutation in the patch 1 (PTCH1) gene, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas. To describe a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome who developed a pigmented basal cell carcinoma in each of her axilla and to review the features of axillary basal cell carcinoma patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Pubmed was used to search the following terms: axillary basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. The papers and their citations were evaluated. Basal cell nevus syndrome patients with basal cell carcinoma of the axilla were observed in two women; this represents 2.5% (2 of 79) of the patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma. Both women had pigmented tumors that were histologically nonaggressive. The cancers did not recur after curettage or excision. Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla has only been described in 79 individuals; two of the patients were women with pigmented tumors who had basal cell nevus syndrome. Similar to other patients with axillary basal cell carcinoma, the tumors were histologically nonaggressive and did not recur following treatment. Whether PTCH1 gene mutation predisposes basal cell nevus patients to develop axillary basal cell carcinomas remains to be determined.

  7. Deregulated gene expression pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellagatti, A; Cazzola, M; Giagounidis, A; Perry, J; Malcovati, L; Della Porta, M G; Jädersten, M; Killick, S; Verma, A; Norbury, C J; Hellström-Lindberg, E; Wainscoat, J S; Boultwood, J

    2010-04-01

    To gain insight into the molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we performed global gene expression profiling and pathway analysis on the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of 183 MDS patients as compared with the HSC of 17 healthy controls. The most significantly deregulated pathways in MDS include interferon signaling, thrombopoietin signaling and the Wnt pathways. Among the most significantly deregulated gene pathways in early MDS are immunodeficiency, apoptosis and chemokine signaling, whereas advanced MDS is characterized by deregulation of DNA damage response and checkpoint pathways. We have identified distinct gene expression profiles and deregulated gene pathways in patients with del(5q), trisomy 8 or -7/del(7q). Patients with trisomy 8 are characterized by deregulation of pathways involved in the immune response, patients with -7/del(7q) by pathways involved in cell survival, whereas patients with del(5q) show deregulation of integrin signaling and cell cycle regulation pathways. This is the first study to determine deregulated gene pathways and ontology groups in the HSC of a large group of MDS patients. The deregulated pathways identified are likely to be critical to the MDS HSC phenotype and give new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder, thereby providing new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-03-01

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases. © The

  9. Overexpression of p53 but not Rb in the cytoplasm of neurons and small vessels in an autopsy of a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Hiroaki; Itonaga, Tomoyo; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro; Ihara, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Cockayne syndrome presents senescence-like changes starting in early infancy; however, the mechanism of premature aging remains unclear. In an autopsy of a 23-year-old woman with Cockayne syndrome, we evaluated the correlation between Cockayne pathology and the expression patterns of the senescence-associated proteins p53 and Rb. Neuropathological findings in this case revealed basal ganglia calcification, tigroid leukodystrophy, bizarre reactive astrocytes, severe cerebellar atrophy with loss of Purkinje cells, and arteriolar/neuronal calcifications in the hypothalamus. Multiple arteriolar calcifications and sclerotic changes were seen in the central nervous system and kidney, but the endothelium of the aorta and coronary arteries remained intact appropriately for the individual's age without any finding of arteriosclerosis. Overexpression of p53 protein was confirmed in the cytoplasm of neurons in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum, of arteriolar endothelial cells of the cerebrum and renal glomerular capillaries, and of cutaneous epithelial cells. The distribution of p53 overexpression was coincident with that of pathological alteration, such as neuronal loss, calcification and atrophy. High expression of p53 was localized in the cytoplasm, not in the nucleus. In contrast to p53, Rb was not expressed in any senescence lesion. In terms of senescence, distinct differences are found among organs in a patient with Cockayne syndrome. This segmental progeria differs from natural aging, and implicates p53 overexpression in the etiology of CS. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  11. "Person in the barrel" syndrome: Unusual heralding presentation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS are rare and relatively unusual in day to day clinical practice. Occasionally, PNS may be the heralding manifestation of the malignancy. Paraneoplastic syndromes are most commonly associated with small cell lung carcinoma and are rarely seen with non small cell lung carcinoma. In this case, we report a non-smoker, middle aged lady, who presented with "person in the barrel" syndrome due to myelo radiculoplexopathy as the first clinical manifestation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

  12. The small population of PIG-A mutant cells in myelodysplastic syndromes do not arise from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jeffrey J; Hu, Rong; Mukhina, Galina L; Carraway, Hetty E; McDevitt, Michael A; Brodsky, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria harbor clonal glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells arising from a multipotent hematopoietic stem cell acquiring a PIG-A mutation. Many patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes also harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells. Patients with aplastic anemia often evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; however, myelodysplastic syndromes seldom evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Here, we investigate the origin and clonality of small glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cell populations in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. We used peripheral blood flow cytometry to identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient blood cells, a proaerolysin-resistant colony forming cell assay to select glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient progenitor cells, a novel T-lymphocyte enrichment culture assay with proaerolysin selection to expand glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and PIG-A gene sequencing assays to identify and analyze PIG-A mutations in patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Twelve of 15 aplastic anemia patients were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes; 11 of them were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient erythrocytes, 10 patients were detected to harbor glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and 3 of them were detected only after T-lymphocyte enrichment in proaerolysin selection. PIG-A mutation analyses on 3 patients showed that all of them harbored a matching PIG-A mutation between CFU-GM and enriched T lymphocytes. Two of 26 myelodysplastic syndromes were found to harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes and erythrocytes transiently. Bone marrow derived CD34(+) cells from 4

  13. Primary Sjogren%u2019s Syndrome Associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Kosker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by xerostomia and xerophthalmia, known as the %u2018sicca symptoms%u2019. Patients with Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, characteristically have positive nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, typically Anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB because of lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands. Patients with primary Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, develop systemic complications, non-Hodgkin lymphoma being the most feared of these. We describe here a case of Sjogren%u2019s syndrome with basal cell carcinoma, which presented with an ulcerated lesion on nasal dorsum.

  14. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  15. {gamma}-irradiation deregulates cell cycle control and apoptosis in nevoid basal cell carcinomas syndrome-derived cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masao [National Children' s Medical Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Sugita, Katsuo; Kohno, Yoichi; Nishie, Haruko; Yasumoto, Shin-ichiro; Furue, Masutaka

    1999-12-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nevi, palmar and plantar pits, falx calcification, vertebrate anomalies and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known in NBCCS that {gamma}-irradiation to the skin induces basal cell carcinomas or causes an enlargement of the tumor size, although the details of the mechanism remain unknown. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from three NBCCS patients, and we present here the first evidence of abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulations. A novel mutation (single nucleotide deletion) in the coding region of the human patched gene, PTCH, was identified in two sibling patients, but no apparent abnormalities were detected in the gene of the remaining patient. Nevertheless, the three established cell lines showed similar features in the following analyses. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that the NBCCS-derived cells were accumulated in the G{sub 2}M phase after {gamma}-irradiation, whereas normal cells showed cell cycle arrest both in the G{sub 0}G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}M phases. The fraction of apoptotic cells after {gamma}-irradiation was smaller in the NBCCS cells. The level of p27 expression markedly decreased after {gamma}-irradiation in the NBCCS cells, although the effects of the irradiation on the expression profiles for p53, p21 and Rb did not differ in normal and NBCCS cells. These findings may provide a clue to the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis in NBCCS. (author)

  16. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carbone, Mario; Della Ferrera, Francesco; Carbone, Lucio; Gatti, Gaia; Carrozzo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    .... The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar...

  17. Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christina M; Lueck, Nathan E; Steyers, Curtis M

    2007-01-01

    A 46 year old male developed spontaneous acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the right wrist without any antecedent trauma. Surgical exploration revealed hemorrhage secondary to diffuse giant cell tumor of tendon sheath as the underlying cause. PMID:17907439

  18. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  19. No long-lasting or intermittent mast cell activation in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, PL; Timmer, [No Value; Crijns, HJGM; Kauffman, HF; Gans, ROB; van Doormaal, JJ

    Background: Unstable coronary syndromes, such as acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris are mostly due to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. Recently mast cells were found to participate actively in the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis by excreting proteolytic and

  20. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity in west syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Montelli, Terezinha C. B.; Iwasso, Maria Tereza R.; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha S.; Mota, Norma Gerusa S.

    1981-01-01

    The immunological status of five children with West syndrome consequent to previous cerebral lesions was investigated. Three children had West syndrome and two were in transition from West to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. All of them showed cellular immunological deficiencies in the following tests: sensitization to DNCB, intracutaneous reaction to PHA, inhibition of leucocyte migration, blastic transformation of lymphocytes, T and B lymphocytes in peripheric blood and levels of serum immunoglobul...

  1. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  2. Nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic responses in a patient with Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, N; Yamamoto, S; Hayasaka, S; Fukuo, Y; Koike, T

    1995-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl complained or poor vision in both eyes. The patient showed progeria, physical and mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, cutaneous photosensitivity, hyperopia, poor pupillary dilation, exotropia, salt-and-pepper fundi, nondetectable cone and rod electroretinographic (ERG) responses, cerebral atrophy on computed tomography, and demyelination of periventricular white matter on magnetic resonance imaging. We believe that nondetectable cone and rod ERG responses in Cockayne syndrome, as demonstrated in our patient, may be uncommon.

  3. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition for Locally Advanced Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Omar K; Yin, Vivian; Chou, Eva; Ball, Sharon; Kies, Merrill; William, William N; Migden, Michael; Thuro, Bradley A; Esmaeli, Bita

    2015-08-01

    To review our experience treating patients with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, vismodegib, in patients with orbital or periocular locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or basal cell nevus syndrome. Retrospective interventional case series. We reviewed all patients with locally advanced or metastatic orbital or periocular BCC or basal cell nevus syndrome treated with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, vismodegib, at a comprehensive cancer center from 2009 through 2015. Reviewed data included age; sex; American Joint Commission on Cancer tumor, node, metastasis staging system designation; type and grade of drug-related side effects; response to treatment; duration of follow-up, and status at last follow-up. The study included 10 white men and 2 white women; the median age was 64.5 years. Ten patients had locally advanced BCC; 2 had basal cell nevus syndrome. Among the patients with locally advanced BCC, 5 had T3bN0M0 disease at presentation; 1 each had T3aN0M0, T3bN1M0, T2N1M1, T4N1M1, and T4N2cM1 disease. Overall, 3 patients had a complete response, 6 had a partial response, and 3 had stable disease at last follow-up. Two patients developed progressive disease after a complete response for 38 months and stable disease for 16 months, respectively. All patients developed grade I drug-related adverse effects, most commonly muscle spasms (12 patients), weight loss (10), dysgeusia (9), alopecia (9), decreased appetite (5), and fatigue (4). Five patients developed grade II adverse effects. At last follow-up, none of the 5 patients presenting with T3bN0M0, nor the patient with T3bN1M0 disease, had required orbital exenteration. Hedgehog pathway inhibition produces a significant clinical response in most patients with locally advanced or metastatic orbital or periocular BCC or basal cell nevus syndrome and can obviate orbital exenteration in some patients. Drug-related adverse effects are manageable in most patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Synchronous occurrence of odontogenic myxoma with multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhe; Liu, Bing; Zhang, WenFeng; Chen, XinMing

    2013-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign developmental tumor with many distinguishing clinical and histologic features. Usually, multiple KCOTs occur as a component of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The odontogenic myxoma is a rare benign tumor that represents about 3% of all odontogenic tumors. This article reports the case of mandible odontogenic myxoma with synchronous occurrence of multiple KCOTs, partial expression of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. A review of the international literature is also presented.

  5. Malignant transformation of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines by carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraishi, Y; Yosida, T. H.; Sandberg, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as one derived from a normal person, treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (0.3 micrograms/ml for 24 hr), were studied for tumorigenicity in nude mice, colony formation in soft agar, cytogenetic changes, and immunoglobulin markers. When normal and Bloom syndrome cells with normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels and karyotypes (type I) were treated with carcinogens, no significant...

  6. WU Polyomavirus in Respiratory Epithelial Cells from Lung Transplant Patient with Job Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Siebrasse, Erica A.; Pastrana, Diana V.; Nguyen, Nang L.; Wang, Annie; Roth, Mark J.; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; McDyer, John; Buck, Christopher B.; Wang, David,

    2015-01-01

    We detected WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample from lungs transplanted into a recipient with Job syndrome by using immunoassays specific for the WUPyV viral protein 1. Co-staining for an epithelial cell marker identified most WUPyV viral protein 1?positive cells as respiratory epithelial cells.

  7. Concise Review: Methods and Cell Types Used to Generate Down Syndrome Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Hibaoui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21, is the most common viable chromosomal disorder, with an incidence of 1 in 800 live births. Its phenotypic characteristics include intellectual impairment and several other developmental abnormalities, for the majority of which the pathogenetic mechanisms remain unknown. Several models have been used to investigate the mechanisms by which the extra copy of chromosome 21 leads to the DS phenotype. In the last five years, several laboratories have been successful in reprogramming patient cells carrying the trisomy 21 anomaly into induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., T21-iPSCs. In this review, we summarize the different T21-iPSCs that have been generated with a particular interest in the technical procedures and the somatic cell types used for the reprogramming.

  8. Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome involves multiple organ system. The most common findings include multiple odontogenic keratocysts in the jaws and basal cell nevus on the skin that have an early age onset. These multiple odontogenic keratocysts warrant aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications associated with them. Recurrence in these lesions is the most characteristic feature that has to be taken in consideration while explaining the prognosis to the patient. A case report of a child affected with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome diagnosed, treated and followed at this hospital is presented here.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, S G; Shields, J A; Shields, C L; Eagle, R C; Demirci, H; Mahmood, E Z

    2001-06-01

    To describe the ophthalmic and systemic features in a series of patients initially seen with eyelid basal cell carcinoma associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Retrospective noncomparative case series. Of 105 consecutive patients with eyelid basal cell carcinoma managed at an Ocular Oncology Center between January 1973 and December 1999, four patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome were identified. The ophthalmic and systemic features, management, and outcome of patients with eyelid basal cell carcinoma associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome were analyzed. The published literature on Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, specifically related to genetics, systemic features, ophthalmic associations, and prophylactic management strategies, was reviewed. Response of the eyelid basal cell carcinoma to treatment and the final systemic condition were the main outcome measures. All four patients had a family history of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The systemic manifestations included multiple basal cell carcinomas in all the patients, frontal bossing or increased occipitofrontal circumference in three patients, palmar pits in two patients, odontogenic keratocyst in one patient, ectopic calcification in one patient, and bifid rib in one patient. The mean age at the detection of the first basal cell carcinoma was 30 years (range, 16-38 years). All four patients had multiple basal cell carcinomas on the face and elsewhere. The eyelid basal cell carcinoma was advanced with orbital infiltration in three patients, one of whom opted for palliative radiotherapy, whereas the other two underwent orbital exenteration. The fourth patient, who had localized recurrent basal cell carcinoma in the upper eyelid, was treated with excision and eyelid reconstruction. At the final follow-up (mean, 41 months), eyelid basal cell carcinoma was cured in three patients and stable in one patient. No patient had life-threatening sequelae of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant cancer

  10. Adaptive stress response in segmental progeria resembles long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van de Ven

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age, including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPD(G602D/R722W/XPA(-/- that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80(-/- mouse. Specific (but not all types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage.

  11. BASAL CELL NEVUS SYNDROME PRESENTING AS EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE AND MYELINATED NERVE FIBER LAYER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Nathan D; Sassalos, Thérèse M; Ober, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of epiretinal membrane and myelinated nerve fiber layer, which preceded the diagnosis of basal cell nevus syndrome, in a young girl. Observational case report. A 12-year-old girl was referred for an asymptomatic epiretinal membrane. Examination revealed epiretinal membrane in the right eye without posterior vitreous separation or vitreous abnormality and bilateral myelinated nerve fiber layer. Subsequent workup yielded pathologic diagnosis of multiple skin basal cell carcinoma and odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw. Genetic testing revealed a frameshift mutation in the PTCH1 gene. Basal cell nevus syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that affects multiple organ systems, including the eyes. Recognition of common ocular findings in children with basal cell nevus syndrome can lead to systemic diagnosis. Early diagnosis is critical to initiate early screening for known neoplastic associations and lifelong minimization of sun exposure to reduce the incidence and severity of basal cell carcinoma.

  12. Repression of AKT signaling by ARQ 092 in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Yourick, Miranda R; Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-12-11

    A somatic activating mutation in AKT1, c.49G>A, pGlu17Lys, that results in elevated AKT signaling in mutation-positive cells, is responsible for the mosaic overgrowth condition, Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 is an allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor under development for treatment in cancer. We tested the efficacy of this drug for suppressing AKT signaling in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 reduced phosphorylation of AKT and downstream targets of AKT in a concentration-dependent manner in as little as two hours. While AKT signaling was suppressed with ARQ 092 treatment, cells retained their ability to respond to growth factor stimulation by increasing pAKT levels proportionally to untreated cells. At concentrations sufficient to decrease AKT signaling, little reduction in cell viability was seen. These results indicate that ARQ 092 can suppress AKT signaling and warrants further development as a therapeutic option for patients with Proteus syndrome.

  13. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in extracts of cockayne syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianov, G L; Houle, J F; Iyer, N; Bohr, V A; Friedberg, E C

    1997-09-15

    The hereditary disease Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by arrested post-natal growth as well as neurological and other defects. The CSA and CSB genes are implicated in this disease. The clinical features of CS can also accompany the excision repair-defective hereditary disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) from genetic complementation groups B, D or G. The XPB and XPD proteins are subunits of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription factor IIH (TFIIH). We show here that extracts of CS-A and CS-B cells, as well as those from XP-B/CS cells, support reduced levels of RNAP II transcription in vitro and that this feature is dependent on the state or quality of the template.

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Herlihy, A C

    2012-02-01

    This retrospective cross-sectional study examined if the white cell count (WCC) is increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and if so, is it due to PCOS or to the associated obesity? Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Of the 113 women studied, 36 had PCOS and 77 did not. The mean WCC was higher in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (8.9 x 10(9)\\/l vs 7.4 x 10(9)\\/l p = 0.002). This increase was due to a higher neutrophil count (5.6 x 10(9)\\/l vs 4.3 x 10(9)\\/l; p = 0.003). There was a leucocytosis (WCC >11 x 10(9)\\/l) present in 19% of the PCOS group compared with 1% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). The neutrophil count was abnormally high (>7.7 x 10(9)\\/l) in 14% of the PCOS group compared with 4% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). On regression analysis, however, the only independent variable which explained both the increased WCC and the increased neutrophil count was PCOS. We found that PCOS is associated with an increased WCC due to increased neutrophils, which supports the evidence that PCOS is associated with low-grade inflammation. The increase appears to be due to the underlying PCOS, and not to the increased adiposity associated with PCOS.

  15. A Case Report of Multiple Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ansar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorline syndrome is a familial disorder with autosomal dominant inheritense. This syndrome is combination of multiple BCC that occurs at an early age, characteristic faces with: frontal bossing, broad nasal bridge and hypertelorism, jaw cysts, palmoplanter pitting, macrocephaly, skeletal and spinal anomalies include bifid ribes, cervical rib and kyphoscoliosis, CNS abnormality include corpus callusom disgenesia , falx cerebri calcification(at early age and mental deficiency.Case Report: This case was a 25-years-old female presented with multiple and progressive skin lesions with different size in neck, upper trunk and axilla (multiple BCC, palmoplantar pitting, jaw cyst, cervical rib, bifid rib and liver haemangioma.Conclusion: With combination of clinical feature, histopathological reports of skin lesions and radiological reports of mandibular cyst and ribs anomalies, this case was diagnosed as nevoid BCC syndrome.

  16. Altered Nuclear Functions in Progeroid Syndromes: a Paradigm for Aging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndromes of accelerated aging could provide an entry point for identifying and dissecting the cellular pathways that are involved in the development of age-related pathologies in the general population. However, their usefulness for aging research has been controversial, as it has been argued that these diseases do not faithfully reflect the process of natural aging. Here we review recent findings on the molecular basis of two progeroid diseases, Werner syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, and highlight functional connections to cellular processes that may contribute to normal aging.

  17. Survey of radiosensitivity in a variety of human cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlett, C.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1980-03-01

    Gamma-ray sensitivity for cell killing was assayed in 54 human cell strains, including some derived from individuals suffering from certain hereditary diseases. The overall range of Do values in this study was 38 to 180 rads, indicating a considerable range of variability in humans. The normal sensitivity was described by a range of Do values of 97 to 180 rads. All ten ataxia telangiectasia cell strains tested proved radiosensitive and gave a mean Do value of 57 +- 15 (S.E.) rads, and these represent the most radiosensitive human skin fibroblasts currently available. Representative cell strains from familial retinoblastoma, Fanconi's anemia, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria occupied positions of intermediate sensitivity, as did one of two ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes. Six xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains together with two Cockayne's syndrome cell strains (all known to be sensitive to ultraviolet light) fell into the normal range, indicating an absence of cross-sensitivity between ultraviolet light and gamma-irradiation.

  18. Therapeutic approaches of hematopoietic syndrome after serious accidental global irradiation. Ex vivo expansion interest of hematopoietic cells; Approches therapeutiques du syndrome hematopoietique apres irradiation globale accidentelle grave. Interet de l`expansion ex vivo des cellules hematopoietiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry, D.

    1994-12-31

    Aplasia is one of the main syndrome, appearing after one global accidental irradiation by one ionizing radiation source. The hematopoietic syndrome is characterized by a peripheric blood cell number fall; the cell marrow is reduced too.

  19. Varicella-zoster virus-specific cell-mediated immunity in Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haginomori, Shin-ichi; Ichihara, Takahiro; Mori, Atsuko; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Kawata, Ryo; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (Hunt syndrome) is reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve, leading to neuritis. Although the mechanism of the VZV reactivation is unclear, one possibility is that the reactivation involves a low level of VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristics of the VZV-specific CMI in Hunt syndrome compared to that in Bell's palsy, and to obtain clues to its role in the development of Hunt syndrome. Prospective study. We determined the median spot numbers and examined VZV-specific CMI in patients with Hunt syndrome and with Bell's palsy using interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. We analyzed the relationship between the value of VZV-specific CMI and days from disease onset. The median spot number in Hunt syndrome (87.3 spot-forming cells [SFCs]/4 × 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) was higher than that in Bell's palsy (62.3 SFCs/4 × 10(5) PBMCs). Hunt syndrome showed a strong relationship between the ELISPOT count and days from onset (r = 0.65). Within the first 5 days from onset, no ELISPOT counts higher than 80 SFCs/4 × 10(5) PBMCs were observed. On the other hand, no correlation was observed between the ELISPOT count and days from onset in patients with Bell's palsy (r = -0.19). These results suggest that VZV-specific CMI in Hunt syndrome is low at disease onset and increases rapidly thereafter. Consequently, reduced VZV-specific CMI may play an important role in the reactivation of VZV in the facial nerve, leading to Hunt syndrome. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Carbone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numb chin syndrome is a rare sensory neuropathy of the mental nerve characterized by numbness, hypoesthesia, paraesthesia, and very rarely pain. Dental causes, especially iatrogenic ones, maxillofacial trauma, or malignant neoplasm are etiologic factors for this rare syndrome. Many malignant and metastatic neoplasms are causing this syndrome, like primary osteosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mandibular metastasis of primary carcinoma of breast, lung, thyroid, kidney, prostate, and nasopharynx. Haematological malignancies like acute lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and myeloma can cause this neuropathy. The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar ridge and lower mandibular cortex. A biopsy of the mass was performed on fragments of tissue collected from the mandibular periosteum, medullary and cortical mandibular bone, and inferior alveolar nerve.

  1. Review of Ocular Manifestations of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: What an Ophthalmologist Needs to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Judy J.; Sartori, Juliana; Aakalu, Vinay K.; Setabutr, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Myriad ophthalmologic findings are associated with NBCCS, including periocular BCCs, hypertelorism, strabismus, myelinated nerve fibers, and disorders of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. We performed a literature search in PubMed for articles on the ophthalmologic manifestations of Gorlin syndrome, published between 1984 and 2014. Of 33 papers, 31 were included. Although Gorlin syndrome is due to mutations in a single gene, it displays variable phenotypic expressivity. Therefore, familiarity with this disorder across clinical specialties is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. The ophthalmologist should be included in the multidisciplinary team for the management of Gorlin syndrome in order to prevent visual loss and improve the quality of life of these patients. PMID:26692711

  2. Review of Ocular Manifestations of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: What an Ophthalmologist Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Judy J; Sartori, Juliana; Aakalu, Vinay K; Setabutr, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Myriad ophthalmologic findings are associated with NBCCS, including periocular BCCs, hypertelorism, strabismus, myelinated nerve fibers, and disorders of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. We performed a literature search in PubMed for articles on the ophthalmologic manifestations of Gorlin syndrome, published between 1984 and 2014. Of 33 papers, 31 were included. Although Gorlin syndrome is due to mutations in a single gene, it displays variable phenotypic expressivity. Therefore, familiarity with this disorder across clinical specialties is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. The ophthalmologist should be included in the multidisciplinary team for the management of Gorlin syndrome in order to prevent visual loss and improve the quality of life of these patients.

  3. Severe acute tumor lysis syndrome in patients with germ-cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Alvarenga Feres

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-cell tumors are a high-proliferative type of cancer that may evolve to significant bulky disease. Tumor lysis syndrome is rarely reported in this setting. The reports of three patients with germ-cell tumors who developed severe acute tumor lysis syndrome following the start of their anticancer therapy are presented. All patients developed renal dysfunction and multiorgan failure. Patients with extensive germ-cell tumors should be kept on close clinical and laboratory monitoring. Physicians should be aware of this uncommon but severe complication and consider early admission to the intensive care unit for the institution of measures to prevent acute renal failure.

  4. B-cell hyperactivity in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Franciscus; Abdulahad, Wayel H; Haacke, Erlin; Bos, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Bootsma, Hendrika

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is characterized by mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates and IgG plasma cells in salivary and lacrimal glands which lead to irreversible destruction of the glandular tissue and is accompanied by sensation of dryness of mouth and eyes. B cells play a central role in

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva in a virgin patient with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapisiz, Omer Lutfi; Topcu, Onur; Gungor, Tayfun; Ozdal, Bulent; Sirvan, Levent; Yesilyurt, Ahmet

    2011-09-01

    Two types of gynecologic tumors are commonly described in the Turner syndrome, the first one is gonadoblastoma, which occurs in patients with Y chromosome abnormalities, and the second one is endometrial carcinoma which is mostly related with exogenous estrogen usage. Here, we describe an extremely rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva in a virgin woman with Turner syndrome. A 35-years old single, virgin woman referred to our Oncology Department with warty, necrotized, exophytic 6-7 cm vulvar mass. She had a history of primary amenorrhea and mosaic Turner syndrome was determined in her karyotype analysis. Biopsy specimen of the vulvar mass revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva, and total vulvectomy with inguinal femoral lymphadenectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and there has been no recurrence of the disease up to date. Women with Turner syndrome have streak ovaries that produce very low estrogen and the squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva may have developed at an early age with Turner syndrome because of this low estrogen value similar to postmenopausal women. The current case is a special case due to its age of occurrence, virgin and Turner syndrome status.

  7. Brain morphology in children with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Mizuochi, Hiromi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Shimojo, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Brain morphology is tightly regulated by diverse signaling pathways. Hedgehog signaling is a candidate pathway considered responsible for regulating brain morphology. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), caused by a PTCH1 mutation in the hedgehog signaling pathway, occasionally exhibits macrocephaly and medulloblastoma. Although cerebellar enlargement occurs in ptch1 heterozygous-deficient mice, its impact on human brain development remains unknown. We investigated the brain morphological characteristics of children with NBCCS. We evaluated brain T1-weighted images from nine children with NBCCS and 15 age-matched normal control (NC) children (mean [standard deviation], 12.2 [2.8] vs. 11.6 [2.3] years old). The diameters of the cerebrum, corpus callosum, and brain stem and the cerebellar volume were compared using two-tailed t-tests with Welch's correction. The transverse diameters (150.4 [9.9] vs. 136.0 [5.5] mm, P = 0.002) and longitudinal diameters (165.4 [8.0] vs. 151.3 [8.7] mm, P = 0.0007) of the cerebrum, cross-sectional area of the cerebellar vermis (18.7 [2.6] vs. 11.8 [1.7] cm 2 , P = 0.0001), and total volume of the cerebellar hemispheres (185.1 [13.0] vs. 131.9 [10.4] cm 3 , P = 0.0001) were significantly larger in the children with NBCCS than in NC children. Thinning of the corpus callosum and ventricular enlargement were also confirmed in children with NBCCS. We demonstrate that, on examination of the brain morphology, an increase in the size of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and cerebral ventricles is revealed in children with NBCCS compared to NC children. This suggests that constitutively active hedgehog signaling affects human brain morphology and the PI3K/AKT and RAS/MAPK pathways. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nevoid Basal-Cell Syndrome: literature review and case report in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available The Nevoid Basal-Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCC, or as it is also referred to, basal-cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is characterized by multiple early-appearing basal cell carcinomas, keratocytosis of the mandible, and anomalies of the ocular, skeletal reproductive system. We describe four patients in the same family, all of them possessing a large number of skin tumors associated with other typical clinical and X-Ray anomalies of NBCC. The definitive treatment of NBCC has yet to be established, however, early diagnosis is very important as well as the periodical follow-up examination of ten patients, mainly due to the transformations in the skin lesions that may occur.

  9. Platelets and white blood cells in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jaap Jan Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the role of leukocytes and platelets as methods to measure platelets aggregation, in the clinical management of presenting with acute coronary syndromes. We have tried to incidence and to identify predictors of adverse cardiac events with function tests or

  10. Lowe Syndrome protein OCRL1 supports maturation of polarized epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Grieve

    Full Text Available Mutations in the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase OCRL1 cause Lowe Syndrome, leading to cataracts, mental retardation and renal failure. We noted that cell types affected in Lowe Syndrome are highly polarized, and therefore we studied OCRL1 in epithelial cells as they mature from isolated individual cells into polarized sheets and cysts with extensive communication between neighbouring cells. We show that a proportion of OCRL1 targets intercellular junctions at the early stages of their formation, co-localizing both with adherens junctional components and with tight junctional components. Correlating with this distribution, OCRL1 forms complexes with junctional components α-catenin and zonula occludens (ZO-1/2/3. Depletion of OCRL1 in epithelial cells growing as a sheet inhibits maturation; cells remain flat, fail to polarize apical markers and also show reduced proliferation. The effect on shape is reverted by re-expressed OCRL1 and requires the 5'-phosphatase domain, indicating that down-regulation of 5-phosphorylated inositides is necessary for epithelial development. The effect of OCRL1 in epithelial maturation is seen more strongly in 3-dimensional cultures, where epithelial cells lacking OCRL1 not only fail to form a central lumen, but also do not have the correct intracellular distribution of ZO-1, suggesting that OCRL1 functions early in the maturation of intercellular junctions when cells grow as cysts. A role of OCRL1 in junctions of polarized cells may explain the pattern of organs affected in Lowe Syndrome.

  11. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (part 1): epidemiology, pathology and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia de Sá, Tiago Ribeiro; Silva, Roberto; Lopes, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide with increasing incidence, but difficult to assess due to the current under registration practice. Despite the low mortality rate, BCC is a cause of great morbidity and an economic burden to health services. There are several risk factors that increase the risk of BCC and partly explain its incidence. Low-penetrance susceptibility alleles, as well as genetic alterations in signaling pathways, namely SHH pathway, also contribute to the carcinogenesis. BCC associate with several genetic syndromes, of which basal cell nevus syndrome is the most common.

  12. A Novel Lamin A Mutant Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Causes Distinct Abnormalities of the Cell Nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Barateau

    Full Text Available A-type lamins, the intermediate filament proteins participating in nuclear structure and function, are encoded by LMNA. LMNA mutations can lead to laminopathies such as lipodystrophies, premature aging syndromes (progeria and muscular dystrophies. Here, we identified a novel heterozygous LMNA p.R388P de novo mutation in a patient with a non-previously described severe phenotype comprising congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. In culture, the patient's skin fibroblasts entered prematurely into senescence, and some nuclei showed a lamina honeycomb pattern. C2C12 myoblasts were transfected with a construct carrying the patient's mutation; R388P-lamin A (LA predominantly accumulated within the nucleoplasm and was depleted at the nuclear periphery, altering the anchorage of the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin and the nucleoplasmic protein LAP2-alpha. The mutant LA triggered a frequent and severe nuclear dysmorphy that occurred independently of prelamin A processing, as well as increased histone H3K9 acetylation. Nuclear dysmorphy was not significantly improved when transfected cells were treated with drugs disrupting microtubules or actin filaments or modifying the global histone acetylation pattern. Therefore, releasing any force exerted at the nuclear envelope by the cytoskeleton or chromatin did not rescue nuclear shape, in contrast to what was previously shown in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria due to other LMNA mutations. Our results point to the specific cytotoxic effect of the R388P-lamin A mutant, which is clinically related to a rare and severe multisystemic laminopathy phenotype.

  13. Perforin-Positive Dendritic Cells Exhibit an Immuno-regulatory Role in Metabolic Syndrome and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnikov-Klionsky, Yael; Nathansohn-Levi, Bar; Shezen, Elias; Rosen, Chava; Kagan, Sivan; Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen; Shifrut, Eric; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Friedman, Nir; Aharoni, Rina; Arnon, Ruth; Yifa, Oren; Aronovich, Anna; Reisner, Yair

    2015-10-20

    Emerging evidence suggests that immunological mechanisms underlie metabolic control of adipose tissue. Here, we have shown the regulatory impact of a rare subpopulation of dendritic cells, rich in perforin-containing granules (perf-DCs). Using bone marrow transplantation to generate animals selectively lacking perf-DCs, we found that these chimeras progressively gained weight and exhibited features of metabolic syndrome. This phenotype was associated with an altered repertoire of T cells residing in adipose tissue and could be completely prevented by T cell depletion in vivo. A similar impact of perf-DCs on inflammatory T cells was also found in a well-defined model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephlalomyelitis (EAE). Thus, perf-DCs probably represent a regulatory cell subpopulation critical for protection from metabolic syndrome and autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The epidemiology of premature aging and associated comorbidities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Werner syndrome, also known as childhood- and adulthood-progeria, respectively, represent two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases with clinical...

  15. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Long-Term Study in a Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Vajgel, André; Martins-Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete; de Albuquerque Maranhao Filho, Almir Walter; De Holanda Vasconcellos, Ricardo José; Frota, Riedel; Filho, José Rodrigues Laureano

    2015-01-01

    We present a family case series with 10 individuals having nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) with a 10-year follow-up. All articles published in the literature between 1967 and 2011 on familial Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in any language were surveyed to determine the mapping of cases per country of occurrence of this disease. All patients in the present series were presented with calcification of the falx cerebri, mild hypertelorism, and frontal bossing. Odontogenic keratocystic tumors, palmar and plantar pits, and multiple basal cell carcinomas occurred in 90, 40, and 20%, respectively, of the patients. One of the patients died of skin cancer. Diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst tumors was confirmed by histopathological examination. NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome; it is important to recognize it when a patient has multiple odontogenic keratocyst tumors because life-long monitoring is essential for patient management. PMID:26889355

  16. Unusual Cushing’s Syndrome and Hypercalcitoninaemia due to a Small Cell Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Balestrieri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old man was hospitalized because of severe hypokalaemia due to ACTH dependent Cushing’s syndrome. Total body computed tomography (TBCT and 68 Gallium DOTATATE PET/CT localized a voluminous prostate tumour. A subsequent transurethral prostate biopsy documented a small cell carcinoma positive for ACTH and calcitonin and negative for prostatic specific antigen (PSA at immunocytochemical study; serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA was normal. Despite medical treatments, Cushing’s syndrome was not controlled and the patient’s clinical condition progressively worsened. Surgical resection was excluded; the patient underwent a cycle of chemotherapy followed by febrile neutropenia and fatal intestinal perforation. This case report describes a rare case of Cushing’s syndrome and hypercalcitoninaemia due to a small cell carcinoma of the prostate, a rare tumour with very few therapeutic options and negative prognosis.

  17. Unusual Cushing's Syndrome and Hypercalcitoninaemia due to a Small Cell Prostate Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Elena; Nuzzo, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was hospitalized because of severe hypokalaemia due to ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome. Total body computed tomography (TBCT) and 68 Gallium DOTATATE PET/CT localized a voluminous prostate tumour. A subsequent transurethral prostate biopsy documented a small cell carcinoma positive for ACTH and calcitonin and negative for prostatic specific antigen (PSA) at immunocytochemical study; serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA) was normal. Despite medical treatments, Cushing's syndrome was not controlled and the patient's clinical condition progressively worsened. Surgical resection was excluded; the patient underwent a cycle of chemotherapy followed by febrile neutropenia and fatal intestinal perforation. This case report describes a rare case of Cushing's syndrome and hypercalcitoninaemia due to a small cell carcinoma of the prostate, a rare tumour with very few therapeutic options and negative prognosis. PMID:28044110

  18. Malignant transformation of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines by carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y; Yosida, T H; Sandberg, A A

    1985-08-01

    Three types of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as one derived from a normal person, treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (0.3 micrograms/ml for 24 hr), were studied for tumorigenicity in nude mice, colony formation in soft agar, cytogenetic changes, and immunoglobulin markers. When normal and Bloom syndrome cells with normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels and karyotypes (type I) were treated with carcinogens, no significant changes occurred in the immunoglobulin profile and karyotype, only rare colony formation was seen, and no tumors were produced. In contrast, when Bloom syndrome cells with high SCE levels (type II with normal karyotype and type III with an abnormal karyotype) were treated with carcinogens, tumors were produced in 22 of 53 nude mice injected; a high rate of colony formation in soft agar was seen; the cells exhibited virtual loss of immunoglobulin markers; and structural changes in chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 14, and 15 were found in the tumors in addition to the original chromosome abnormalities present in the injected cells. It appears that Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines with high levels of SCE are highly susceptible to the action of carcinogens, as evidenced by tumor formation in nude mice and colony formation in agar. Apparently, the carcinogens were capable of transforming only those cells that had a critical level of SCE (approximately 140 per cell) and not those with only mildly increased levels (approximately 13 per cell).

  19. Modeling abnormal early development with induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xianming; Fan, Wenxia; Zhao, Ping; Chan, Yau-Chi; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Ya; Li, Yanhua; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Li, Xingyan; Yang, Jiayin; Peng, Tianran; Zychlinski, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dirk; Zhang, Ruosi; Deng, Kang; Ng, Kwong-Man; Menten, Bjorn; Zhong, Mei; Wu, Jiayan; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yonglong; Schambach, Axel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases share a developmental origin that manifests during childhood or maturity. Aneuploid syndromes are caused by supernumerary or reduced number of chromosomes and represent an extreme example of developmental disease, as they have devastating consequences before and after birth. Investigating how alterations in gene dosage drive these conditions is relevant because it might help treat some clinical aspects. It may also provide explanations as to how quantitative differences in gene expression determine phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility among natural populations. Here, we aimed to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that can be used to improve our understanding of aneuploid syndromes. We have generated iPSCs from monosomy X [Turner syndrome (TS)], trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and partial trisomy 11;22 (Emanuel syndrome), using either skin fibroblasts from affected individuals or amniocytes from antenatal diagnostic tests. These cell lines stably maintain the karyotype of the donors and behave like embryonic stem cells in all tested assays. TS iPSCs were used for further studies including global gene expression analysis and tissue-specific directed differentiation. Multiple clones displayed lower levels of the pseudoautosomal genes ASMTL and PPP2R3B than the controls. Moreover, they could be transformed into neural-like, hepatocyte-like and heart-like cells, but displayed insufficient up-regulation of the pseudoautosomal placental gene CSF2RA during embryoid body formation. These data support that abnormal organogenesis and early lethality in TS are not caused by a tissue-specific differentiation blockade, but rather involves other abnormalities including impaired placentation.

  20. Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease – a review | Ocheni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early recognition, immediate administration of oxygen therapy, antibiotics, anticoagulation, intravenous fluids, adequate pain control and treatment of the underlying cause are required in ensuring that the patient responds well to therapy. Keywords: acute chest syndrome, sickle cell disease. Journal of College of Medicine ...

  1. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; Baars, J. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Van Dijk, M. A.; de Glas-Vos, C. W.; Thomas, B. L.; van Oers, R. H.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy intensification may lead to new forms of toxicity such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. METHODS: Three patients are described who developed this complication 4 to 6 months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell support. The literature on this subject is

  2. Evaluation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac syndrome X (CSX is a condition characterized by chest pain with normal coronary arteries. However, its pathogenesis has not fully been understood yet. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW has recently been suggested as a marker of acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases, while no data is available in patients with CSX.

  3. Reduced cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal brain in Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K.B.; Laursen, H.; Graem, N.

    2008-01-01

    Mental retardation is seen in all individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and different brain abnormalities are reported. The aim of this study was to investigate if mental retardation at least in part is a result of a lower cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal forebrain. We therefore...

  4. An adult case of Cockayne syndrome without sclerotic angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Sano, N; Ito, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Okauchi, Y; Kondo, H; Horiuchi, N; Nakao, K; Iwata, M

    1997-08-01

    We report an autopsy case of Cockayne syndrome (CS). A 40-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital for cachexia. She had displayed the striking features of CS, including dwarfism, mental retardation, neural deafness, ataxia, intracranial calcifications, and progeria since her childhood. Endocrinological examinations suggested normal pituitary function and a disorder of the hypothalamus or the cerebrum. She died of acute pneumonia at the age of 42. Autopsy findings showed typical abnormalities in the central nervous system compatible with CS; however, no atherosclerotic change was observed in the systemic arteries.

  5. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from chorionic villi of a Turner syndrome spontaneous abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Parveen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A major cause of spontaneous abortions is chromosomal abnormality of foetal cells. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from the fibroblasts isolated from chorionic villi of an early spontaneously aborted foetus with Turner syndrome. The Turner syndrome villus induced pluripotent stem cell line is transgene free, retains the original XO karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. This pluripotent stem cell model of Turner syndrome should serve as a tool to study the developmental abnormalities of foetus and placenta that lead to early embryo lethality and profound symptoms like infertility in 45 XO survivors.

  6. Review of Ocular Manifestations of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: What an Ophthalmologist Needs to Know

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Judy J.; Sartori, Juliana; Aakalu, Vinay K.; Setabutr, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Myriad ophthalmologic findings are associated with NBCCS, including periocular BCCs, hypertelorism, strabismus, myelinated nerve fibers, and disorders of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. We performed a literature search in PubMed for articles on ...

  7. Elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.

    OpenAIRE

    McDaniel, L. D.; Schultz, R A

    1992-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE freq...

  8. Generation of a lentiviral vector producer cell clone for human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Wielgosz

    Full Text Available We have developed a producer cell line that generates lentiviral vector particles of high titer. The vector encodes the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS protein. An insulator element has been added to the long terminal repeats of the integrated vector to limit proto-oncogene activation. The vector provides high-level, stable expression of WAS protein in transduced murine and human hematopoietic cells. We have also developed a monoclonal antibody specific for intracellular WAS protein. This antibody has been used to monitor expression in blood and bone marrow cells after transfer into lineage negative bone marrow cells from WAS mice and in a WAS negative human B-cell line. Persistent expression of the transgene has been observed in transduced murine cells 12–20 weeks following transplantation. The producer cell line and the specific monoclonal antibody will facilitate the development of a clinical protocol for gene transfer into WAS protein deficient stem cells.

  9. Binding of white spot syndrome virus to Artemia sp. cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuying; Li, Guangda; Feng, Wenpo; Huang, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Using differential velocity centrifugation, cell membranes of Artemia sp. were prepared, and their binding to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was analyzed in vitro. The results indicated that WSSV can specifically bind to Artemia cell membranes, and that WSSV receptor very likely existed in this membrane, which suggested that Artemia sp. may be a reservoir of WSSV. This study investigated the specific WSSV binding site by performing competitive inhibition experiments using shrimp gill cell membranes to bind WSSV to Artemia cell membranes. The results showed that shrimp gill cell membranes had a distinct inhibition effect on the specific binding of Artemia cell membranes to WSSV. Thus, potentially similar WSSV receptors or binding sites existed on Artemia sp. cell membranes and shrimp gill cell membranes. Taken together, these findings may provide experimental basis for the development of an effective approach to controlling WSSV, and theoretical basis for the study of WSSV receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Case of Leser-Trélat Syndrome Associated with a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Barth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Seborrheic keratoses can often be found in elderly people. In general, they appear gradually. In cases of a sudden eruption with itching it might be paraneoplastic. Although some authors doubt the existence of the paraneoplastic Leser-Trélat syndrome, we present a case of sudden eruption of seborrheic keratoses connected with a newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma. As far as we know, this is the first case report of a Leser-Trélat syndrome with a malignancy of the kidney.

  11. Small cell carcinoma of prostate presenting with Cushing′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Çaliskan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of prostate (SCPCa was initially described by Wenk et al. in 1977. SCPCa is a very rare cancer that accounts for only 0.5-2% of all prostate carcinomas. Although, this pathology is usually accompanied with prostate adenocarcinomas, there are a few hypotheses about the origin of SCPCa. Poorly differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma must be distinguished from SCPCa in histopathological examination. These patients may present with different paraneoplastic syndromes. Early diagnosis is very important because of the aggressive tumor behavior. Here, we report a patient who presented with Cushing syndrome and thereafter diagnosed with SCPCa.

  12. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  13. Protein farnesylation inhibitors cause donut-shaped cell nuclei attributable to a centrosome separation defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Peckham, Lana A.; Olive, Michelle; Capell, Brian C.; Collins, Francis S.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.; Lammerding, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the success of protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) in the treatment of certain malignancies, their mode of action is incompletely understood. Dissecting the molecular pathways affected by FTIs is important, particularly because this group of drugs is now being tested for the treatment of Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome. In the current study, we show that FTI treatment causes a centrosome separation defect, leading to the formation of donut-shaped nuclei in nontransformed cell lines, tumor cell lines, and tissues of FTI-treated mice. Donut-shaped nuclei arise during chromatin decondensation in late mitosis; subsequently, cells with donut-shaped nuclei exhibit defects in karyokinesis, develop aneuploidy, and are often binucleated. Binucleated cells proliferate slowly. We identified lamin B1 and proteasome-mediated degradation of pericentrin as critical components in FTI-induced “donut formation” and binucleation. Reducing pericentrin expression or ectopic expression of nonfarnesylated lamin B1 was sufficient to elicit donut formation and binucleated cells, whereas blocking proteasomal degradation eliminated FTI-induced donut formation. Our studies have uncovered an important role of FTIs on centrosome separation and define pericentrin as a (indirect) target of FTIs affecting centrosome position and bipolar spindle formation, likely explaining some of the anticancer effects of these drugs. PMID:21383178

  14. Two cases of uveitis masquerade syndrome caused by bilateral intraocular large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sometimes it is not easy to clinically recognize subtle differences between intraocular lymphoma and noninfectious uveitis. The most common lymphoma subtype involving the eye is B-cell lymphoma. Case report. We presented two patients aged 59 and 58 years with infiltration of the subretinal space with a large B-cell non-Hodgkin intraocular lymphoma. The patients originally had clinically masked syndrome in the form of intermediate uveitis. As it was a corticosteroid-resistant uveitis, we focused on the possible diagnosis of neoplastic causes of this syndrome. During hospitalization, the neurological symptoms emerged and multiple subretinal changes accompanied by yellowish white patches of retinal pigment epithelium with signs of vitritis, which made us suspect the intraocular lymphoma. Endocranial magnetic resonance imaging established tumorous infiltration in the region of the left hemisphere of the cerebellum. The histopathological finding confirmed the diagnosis of large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of risk moderate degree, immunoblast - centroblast cytological type. The other patient had clinical chronic uveitis accompanied by yellowish shaped white echographic changes of the retina and localized changes in the level of the subretina. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made by brain biopsy. Conclusion. Uveitis masquerade syndrome should be considered in all patients over 40 years with idiopathic steroid-resistant uveitis. Treatment begun on time can affect the course and improve the prognosis of uveitis masquerade syndrome (UMS and systemic disease.

  15. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome presenting with neck pits and café au lait patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundram, Sathesh; Kovilpillai, Ferdinand Jesudian; Hopper, Colin

    2010-01-01

    A 10- year-old patient presented with a slow growing jaw swelling. The initial general examination did not reveal any significant findings. Conservative enucleation of the cyst confirmed it to be an odontogenic keratocyst. The patient remained asymptomatic for the following 2 years and subsequently presented cystic lesions in jaws with displaced teeth. These cysts were enucleated and were confirmed to be odontogenic keratocysts . The patient has been on regular follow up since then and subsequent scans have shown further occurrence of cysts in the jaws with displacement of the third molars. Clinical examination also revealed macrocephaly, fronto-parietal bossing, pitting on palmar and plantar surfaces, calcification of falx cerebri and splayed ribs, confirming the diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. He also presented with a cafi au lait patch and skin pits on the neck. The family history was negative for features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a condition that can cause significant morbidity if not detected early. Over the years this syndrome has presented with many other non specific phenotype presentation, of which the current finding may be one of This calls for meticulous assessment and examination of patients and a standardized protocol in screening and managing these patients that may facilitate a more beneficial outcome for the patient.

  16. Beta-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca G Baez-Duarte

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Blanca G Baez-Duarte1,3, María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén3†, Ricardo Pérez-Fuentes2,3, Irma Zamora-Ginez1,3, Bertha Alicia Leon-Chavez1, Cristina Revilla-Monsalve4, Sergio Islas-Andrade41Posgrado en Ciencias Químicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 2Facultad de Medicina, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 3Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Oriente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Atlixco, Puebla, México; 4Multidiciplinary Research Group on Diabetes (José Sánchez-Corona, Fernando Guerrero-Romero, Martha Rodriguez-Moran, Agustin Madero, Jorge Escobedo-de-la-Peña, Silvia Flores-Martinez, Esperanza, Martinez-Abundis, Manuel Gonzalez-Ortiz, Alberto Rascon-Pacheco, Margarita Torres-Tamayo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, México, Distrito Federal, México; †María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén passed away on 27 November 2009.Aims: The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects.Material and methods: This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1 control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2 group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out.Results: Average age of the

  17. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: An update and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Viral M; Handler, Marc Z; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that predisposes individuals to multiple cutaneous leiomyomas, renal cell carcinomas, and in women, uterine leiomyomas. Also known as Reed syndrome, it is caused by a germline heterozygous mutation of the fumarate hydratase tumor suppressor gene. HLRCC is associated with significant morbidity because of pain from cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, the cutaneous pain often of unique character. Although genetic testing is currently considered the criterion standard to diagnose HLRCC, newer immunohistochemistry markers may provide rapid and cost effective alternatives to genetic testing. Because of the potentially aggressive nature of renal cell carcinomas that develop as early as in childhood, close annual cancer surveillance is desirable in individuals with HLRCC. In this review, we offer an update and an approach to the diagnosis, management, and renal cancer surveillance in HLRCC. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  19. Small-cell carcinoma of the endometrium presenting as Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruhiro; Kanai, Genta; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Itoh, Johbu; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Small-cell carcinoma (SCC) of neuroendocrine type is an uncommon tumor of the endometrium. No previous report has documented Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH production by SCC of the endometrium. We describe a 56-year-old Japanese woman with SCC of the endometrium and multiple lung metastases presenting as Cushing's syndrome. The patient was referred to our hospital because of general fatigue with facial and leg edema, and multiple nodular lesions in the bilateral lungs on chest X-ray examination. A physical examination revealed that the patient had moon face, buffalo hump, and truncal obesity. Endocrinological examinations confirmed ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Thoracic computed tomography imaging showed multiple nodular lesions in the bilateral lungs. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging suggested a malignant tumor of the uterus. The patient received a lung tumor biopsy and surgical hysterectomy. The endometrial carcinoma was histologically a SCC admixed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The SCC of the endometrium showed immunoreactivity for pro-opiomelanocortin, ACTH, and vimentin, but not for thyroid transcription factor-1. The lung biopsy specimen had the same features. These findings indicated that the SCC originated from the endometrium, and the ectopic ACTH-producing tumor caused Cushing's syndrome. This study provides the evidence that SCC of endometrial origin was an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor causing Cushing's syndrome.

  20. A Kindler syndrome-associated squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ademar; Trinca, William Correia; Flores, Thais Pires; Costa, Andrea Barleze; Brito, Claudio de Sá; Weigert, Karen Loureiro; Matos, Maryana Schwartzhaupt; Nicolini, Carmela; Obst, Fernando Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Kindler syndrome1, 2 is a genetic disorder mainly characterized by increased skin fragility and photosensitivity,3, 4 making the use of treatments based on radiation difficult or even prohibited. Thus, cases reporting Kindler syndrome patients treated with radiotherapy are rare. In this study, we report clinical outcomes and care provided for a rare case of a Kindler syndrome patient submitted to radiotherapy. Diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma involving the buccal mucosa, the patient was exclusively treated with radiotherapy, with 70 Gy delivered on the PTV with the Volumetric Modulated Arc technique. The patient's reaction regarding control of the lesion is relevant compared to patients not affected by the syndrome. We noticed acute reactions of the skin and buccal mucosa after few radiotherapy sessions, followed by a fast reduction in the tumor volume. The efficacy of radiotherapy along with multidisciplinary actions allowed treatment continuity, leading to a complete control of the lesion and life quality improvement and showed that the use of radiotherapy on Kindler syndrome patients is possible.

  1. Gene expression analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruosi; Hao, Lili; Wang, Lingping; Chen, Meili; Li, Wen; Li, Rujiao; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wu, Jiayan

    2013-01-01

    Human aneuploidy is the leading cause of early pregnancy loss, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Due to the high mortality associated with aneuploidy, the pathophysiological mechanisms of aneuploidy syndrome remain largely unknown. Previous studies focused mostly on whether dosage compensation occurs, and the next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq is expected to eventually uncover the mechanisms of gene expression regulation and the related pathological phenotypes in human aneuploidy. Using next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq, we profiled the transcriptomes of four human aneuploid induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines generated from monosomy × (Turner syndrome), trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and partial trisomy 11:22 (Emanuel syndrome) as well as two umbilical cord matrix iPSC lines as euploid controls to examine how phenotypic abnormalities develop with aberrant karyotype. A total of 466 M (50-bp) reads were obtained from the six iPSC lines, and over 13,000 mRNAs were identified by gene annotation. Global analysis of gene expression profiles and functional analysis of differentially expressed (DE) genes were implemented. Over 5000 DE genes are determined between aneuploidy and euploid iPSCs respectively while 9 KEGG pathways are overlapped enriched in four aneuploidy samples. Our results demonstrate that the extra or missing chromosome has extensive effects on the whole transcriptome. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals that the genes most affected in aneuploid individuals are related to central nervous system development and tumorigenesis.

  2. [Paraneoplastic syndromes in three patients with renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffens, M.G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Mulders, P.F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in three male patients, 45, 53 and 52 years of age. In addition, they had paraneoplastic symptoms: hypercalcaemia, hyperglycaemia and elevated hepatic enzyme levels, respectively. All three patients underwent tumour nephrectomy, after which the paraneoplastic

  3. Modeling Monogenic Human Nephrotic Syndrome in the Drosophila Garland Cell Nephrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermle, Tobias; Braun, Daniela A; Helmstädter, Martin; Huber, Tobias B; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-05-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome is characterized by podocyte dysfunction. Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes are podocyte-like cells and thus provide a potential in vivo model in which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. However, relevant pathomechanisms of nephrotic syndrome have not been studied in nephrocytes. Here, we discovered that two Drosophila slit diaphragm proteins, orthologs of the human genes encoding nephrin and nephrin-like protein 1, colocalize within a fingerprint-like staining pattern that correlates with ultrastructural morphology. Using RNAi and conditional CRISPR/Cas9 in nephrocytes, we found this pattern depends on the expression of both orthologs. Tracer endocytosis by nephrocytes required Cubilin and reflected size selectivity analogous to that of glomerular function. Using RNAi and tracer endocytosis as a functional read-out, we screened Drosophila orthologs of human monogenic causes of nephrotic syndrome and observed conservation of the central pathogenetic alterations. We focused on the coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis gene Coq2, the silencing of which disrupted slit diaphragm morphology. Restoration of CoQ10 synthesis by vanillic acid partially rescued the phenotypic and functional alterations induced by Coq2-RNAi. Notably, Coq2 colocalized with mitochondria, and Coq2 silencing increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Silencing of ND75, a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that controls ROS formation independently of CoQ10, phenocopied the effect of Coq2-RNAi. Moreover, the ROS scavenger glutathione partially rescued the effects of Coq2-RNAi. In conclusion, Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes provide a model with which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome, and ROS formation may be a pathomechanism of COQ2-nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Somatic cell mutation frequency at the HPRT, T-cell antigen receptor and glycophorin A loci in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y W; Kubota, M; Hirota, H; Furusho, K; Tomiwa, K; Ochi, J; Kasahara, Y; Sasaki, H; Ohta, S

    1995-07-01

    Skin fibroblasts of patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to the lethal or mutagenic effect of ultraviolet light, which may cause genetic instability. Up to now, however, no systematic study of in vivo somatic cell mutation in CS cells has been reported. This article describes our investigation of the mutation frequencies (Mfs) at three different loci, i.e. hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and glycophorin A (GPA), in six patients with CS. Mfs at the HPRT and TCR loci were found to be within the normal range as determined in age-matched controls. In the GPA locus of two patients, there was a slight increase, but it was much smaller than that reported in other DNA repair deficient syndromes. The frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutation in Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from CS patients was similar to that in cells from normal children. The molecular characterization of the representative HPRT mutant T cell clones from CS patients did not show any structural alterations. These results may explain, at least in part, why CS is not associated with predisposition to cancer.

  5. Co-existence of chronic renal failure, renal clear cell carcinoma, and Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Ipek; Ozguven, Aykan; Canda, Ebru; Yilmaz, Omer; Nese, Nalan; Ozkol, Mine; May, Sandra; Franke, Andre; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2010-05-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare, multisystem, autosomal-dominant, and granulomatous disorder caused by susceptibility variants in the NOD2 gene. We describe here a 14-year-old girl with Blau syndrome with incidentally diagnosed renal carcinoma. The index case presented with growth retardation and recurrent symmetric arthritis. Her clinical symptoms included bilateral cataract due to recurrent uveitis, camptodactyly, and persistent erythematous rash with ichthyosis. Her two sisters and her mother were affected with combinations of these conditions-symmetric polyarthritis, uveitis, and skin involvement-suggesting an autosomal dominant trait. The index case developed a chronic renal insufficiency, and an abdominal computerized tomography scan revealed a 2.5-cm mass in the left kidney. The histopathological examination showed renal clear cell carcinoma, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis,and giant cell granulomas in both the tumor and nonneoplastic renal tissue. Granulomatous inflammation was observed in the skin biopsy specimen. The patient was diagnosed with Blau syndrome based on her family history, uveitis, granulomatous inflammation proved by skin biopsy, and polyarthritis. Sequencing of the NOD2 gene showed a heterozygous p.R334Q mutation in all affected family members. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient with Blau syndrome accompanied by chronic renal failure and renal carcinoma.

  6. Decreased cell proliferation and higher oxidative stress in fibroblasts from Down Syndrome fetuses. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Amparo; García-Giménez, José Luis; Audí, Laura; Toran, Nuria; Andaluz, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease and is also known for its decreased incidence of solid tumors and its progeroid phenotype. Cellular and systemic oxidative stress has been considered as one of the Down Syndrome phenotype causes. We correlated, in a preliminary study, the fibroblast proliferation rate and different cell proliferation key regulators, like Rcan1 and the telomere length from Down Syndrome fetuses, with their oxidative stress profile and the Ribonucleic acid and protein expression of the main antioxidant enzymes together with their activity. Increased oxidized glutathione/glutathione ratio and high peroxide production were found in our cell model. These results correlated with a distorted antioxidant shield. The messenger RNA (SOD1) and protein levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase were increased together with a decreased mRNA expression and protein levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). As a consequence the [Cu/ZnSOD/(catalase+GPx)] activity ratio increases which explains the oxidative stress generated in the cell model. In addition, the expression of thioredoxin 1 and glutaredoxin 1 is decreased. The results obtained show a decreased antioxidant phenotype that correlates with increased levels of Regulator of calcineurin 1 and attrition of telomeres, both related to oxidative stress and cell cycle impairment. Our preliminary results may explain the proneness to a progeroid phenotype. © 2013.

  7. Cell-based neurorestorative therapy for postpoliomyelitis syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi HT

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Haitao Xi,1,2,* Di Chen1,* 1Center of Neurorestoratology, Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 2Center of Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Postpoliomyelitis syndrome refers to the new neuromuscular symptoms that occur in patients, years after their acute poliomyelitis has stabilized. A 64-year-old Danish man presented with lower limb weakness and severe pain for 2 years and 5 months. He had a history of poliomyelitis affecting his limbs 59 years ago. Physical examination revealed atrophy of muscles of both lower limbs. Electromyography revealed that recruitment of maximal voluntary contraction of muscles was decreased in the affected muscles. He received cell-based neurorestorative therapy during admission, and then, his neurological function improved and remained stable during 4-year follow-up. This case report shows that cell therapy could be a treatment option for postpoliomyelitis syndrome. Keywords: postpoliomyelitis syndrome, neuromuscular disease, cell transplantation, cell-based neurorestorative therapy

  8. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer for the Treatment of Parry-Romberg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanko Castro-Govea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive and self-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face that creates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year history of progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration using cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL, which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs extracted from the same patient. ASCs have the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes. They also promote angiogenesis, release angiogenic growth factors, and some can survive as stem cells. The use of autologous fat as a filler in soft tissue atrophy has been satisfactory in patients with mild and moderate Parry-Romberg syndrome. Currently, CAL has showed promising results in the long term by decreasing the rate of fat reabsorption. The permanence and stability of the graft in all the injected areas has showed that autologous fat grafts enriched with stem cells could be a promising technique for the correction of defects caused by this syndrome.

  9. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy restores B cell tolerance in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Francesca; Morbach, Henner; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cassani, Barbara; Glauzy, Salome; Romberg, Neil; Candotti, Fabio; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, and high susceptibility to developing tumors and autoimmunity. Recent evidence suggests that B cells may be key players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in WAS. Here, we assessed whether WAS protein deficiency (WASp deficiency) affects the establishment of B cell tolerance by testing the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells from 4 WAS patients before and after gene therapy (GT). We found that pre-GT WASp-deficient B cells were hyperreactive to B cell receptor stimulation (BCR stimulation). This hyperreactivity correlated with decreased frequency of autoreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells exiting the BM, indicating that the BCR signaling threshold plays a major role in the regulation of central B cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from WAS patients were enriched in self-reactive clones, revealing that peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint dysfunction is associated with impaired suppressive function of WAS regulatory T cells. The introduction of functional WASp by GT corrected the alterations of both central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We conclude that WASp plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of B cell tolerance in humans and that restoration of WASp by GT is able to restore B cell tolerance in WAS patients. PMID:26368308

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a cellular model for studying Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS, or Trisomy 21 Syndrome, is one of the most common genetic diseases. It is a chromosomal abnormality caused by a duplication of chromosome 21. DS patients show the presence of a third copy (or a partial third copy of chromosome 21 (trisomy, as result of meiotic errors. These patients suffer of many health problems, such as intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, duodenal stenosis, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, immune system deficiencies, muscle hypotonia and motor disorders. About one in 1000 babies born each year are affected by DS. Alterations in the dosage of genes located on chromosome 21 (also called HSA21 are responsible for the DS phenotype. However, the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of DS triggering are still not understood; newest evidences suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. For obvious ethical reasons, studies performed on DS patients, as well as on human trisomic tissues are limited. Some authors have proposed mouse models of this syndrome. However, not all the features of the syndrome are represented. Stem cells are considered the future of molecular and regenerative medicine. Several types of stem cells could provide a valid approach to offer a potential treatment for some untreatable human diseases. Stem cells also represent a valid system to develop new cell-based drugs and/or a model to study molecular disease pathways. Among stem cell types, patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells offer some advantages for cell and tissue replacement, engineering and studying: self-renewal capacity, pluripotency and ease of accessibility to donor tissues. These cells can be reprogrammed into completely different cellular types. They are derived from adult somatic cells via reprogramming with ectopic expression of four transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4; or, Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28. By reprogramming cells from DS patients, it is possible to obtain new tissue with

  11. B-cell reconstitution after lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Castiello (Maria Carmina); S. Scaramuzza (Samantha); G. Pala (Gianni); F. Ferrua (Francesca); P. Uva (Paolo); I. Brigida (Immacolata); L. Sereni (Lucia); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); G. Ottaviano (Giorgio); M. Albert (Michael); M. Grazia Roncarolo (Maria); L. Naldini (Luigi); A. Aiuti (Alessandro); A. Anna (Villa); M. Bosticardo (Marita)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and susceptibility to autoimmunity and lymphomas. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice; however,

  12. Surgery results in complete cure of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in a patient with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Richard T K; Morris, Andrew; Karoo, Richard O S

    2014-06-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon associated with neuroendocrine tumours, most frequently small cell lung carcinoma. Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare cause of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. A 70-year old gentleman was referred with metastatic axillary nodal disease from a previously resected Merkel cell carcinoma of the left arm. Pre-operatively, the patient was wheelchair-bound from Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. Level I-III left axillary node clearance was performed and within 6 months, he had experienced full recovery of muscle power and mobility. We describe a case of complete cure of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome following axillary nodal clearance in a patient with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Red Blood Cell as a Gender-Associated Biomarker in Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Straface

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present pilot study (56 patients, some red blood cell parameters in samples from patients with metabolic syndrome and subclinical atherosclerosis, but without any sign of coronary artery disease, have been analyzed. The main goal of this work was to determine, in this preclinical state, new peripheral gender-associated bioindicators of possible diagnostic or prognostic value. In particular, three different “indicators” of red blood cell injury and aging have been evaluated: glycophorin A, CD47, and phosphatidylserine externalization. Interestingly, all these determinants appeared significantly modified and displayed gender differences. These findings could provide novel and useful hints in the research for gender-based real-time bioindicators in the progression of metabolic syndrome towards coronary artery disease. Further, more extensive studies are, however, necessary in order to validate these findings.

  14. Defective inhibition of B-cell proliferation by Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-deficient regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Marsilio; Jones, Krysten A.; Uchiyama, Toru; Kirby, Martha R.; Silvin, Christopher; Anderson, Stacie M.

    2011-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an inherited immunodeficiency characterized by high incidence of autoantibody-mediated autoimmune complications. Such a feature has been associated with defective suppressor activity of WAS protein-deficient, naturally occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells on responder T cells. However, it remains to be established whether the altered B-cell tolerance reported in WAS patients and Was knockout (WKO) mice is secondary to abnormalities in the direct suppression of B-cell function by nTreg cells or to impaired regulation of T-helper function. Because activated nTreg cells are known to induce granzyme B–mediated B-cell killing, we decided to evaluate the regulatory capabilities of WKO nTregs on B lymphocytes. We found that preactivated WKO nTreg cells failed to effectively suppress B-cell proliferation and that such a defect was associated with reduced killing of B cells and significantly decreased degranulation of granzyme B. Altogether, these results provide additional mechanistic insights into the loss of immune tolerance in WAS. PMID:21515824

  15. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Herval Ribeiro Soares Neto; Wagner Cid Palmeira Cavalcante; Sebastião Nunes Martins Filho; Jerusa Smid; Ricardo Nitrini

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma...

  16. Renal cell carcinoma in a patient with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Fukuda, T; Uetani, M; Hayashi, K; Kurosaki, N; Maeda, H; Matsumoto, T; Miyake, H

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) who developed renal cell carcinoma (RCC). At birth, this patient presented with macroglossia, diastasis recti, mild gigantism, hepatomegaly and hypoglycemia, and the diagnosis of BWS was made. At 22 months, an intrapelvic rhabdomyosarcoma was detected and resected. At 37 months, computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a small mass with high attenuation in the right kidney, which was surgically confirmed to be RCC.

  17. An Analysis of microRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    disease  associated  cytogenetic  and  molecular   genetic ...the age-related predisposition for the development of MDS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MicroRNAs, the myelodysplastic syndromes, hematopoietic stem cells...hematopoiesis   in   the   context   of   aging   and   its   likely   implication   in   the   age-­‐related   predisposition

  18. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  19. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup...... of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig...... was higher in TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up, there was no evidence of increased systemic inflammation in patients with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated with MetS, whereas...

  20. The possible role of gastrointestinal endocrine cells in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    The etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unknown, but several factors appear to play a role in its pathophysiology, including abnormalities of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. The present review illuminates the possible role of gastrointestinal hormones in the pathophysiology of IBS and the possibility of utilizing the current knowledge in treating the disease. Areas covered: Research into the intestinal endocrine cells and their possible role in the pathophysiology of IBS is discussed. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients are revealed. Expert commentary: The abnormalities observed in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients explains their visceral hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal intestinal secretion, as well as the interchangeability of symptoms over time. Clarifying the role of the intestinal stem cells in the pathophysiology of IBS may lead to new treatment methods for IBS.

  1. Basal cell nevus syndrome: clinical and molecular review and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Livia Cristina de Melo; Balassiano, Laila Klotz de Almeida; Sessim, Marlene; de Almeida, Ana Paula Moura; Empinotti, Vinicius Dequech; Semenovitch, Ivan; Treu, Curt; Lupi, Omar

    2016-04-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), also referred to as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, was first described by Gorlin and Goltz in 1960 as an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the early appearance of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), keratocysts of the jaw, ectopic calcifications, palmar and plantar pits, and anomalies of the ocular, skeletal, and reproductive systems. The genesis of this cancer's etiology in relation to BCNS was unclear until a few years ago when molecular analysis studies suggested a relationship between BCC and the loss-of-function mutations of the patched gene (PTCH) found on chromosome arm 9q. PTCH inhibits signaling by the membrane protein Smoothened (Smo), and this inhibition is relieved by binding sonic hedgehog (SHH) to PTCH. We describe a patient with multiple BCCs associated with x-ray anomalies of BCNS and review the basis of the SHH signaling pathway and clinical aspects of BCNS. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer for the Treatment of Parry-Romberg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanko Castro-Govea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Progressive facial hemiatrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a progressive andself-limited deformation of the subcutaneous tissue volume on one side of the face thatcreates craniofacial asymmetry. We present the case of a patient with a five-year historyof progressive right facial hemiatrophy, who underwent facial volumetric restoration usingcell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL, which consists of an autologous fat graft enriched withadipose-derived stem cells (ASCs extracted from the same patient. ASCs have the capacityto differentiate into adipocytes. They also promote angiogenesis, release angiogenic growthfactors, and some can survive as stem cells. The use of autologous fat as a filler in soft tissueatrophy has been satisfactory in patients with mild and moderate Parry-Romberg syndrome.Currently, CAL has showed promising results in the long term by decreasing the rate of fatreabsorption. The permanence and stability of the graft in all the injected areas has showedthat autologous fat grafts enriched with stem cells could be a promising technique for thecorrection of defects caused by this syndrome.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF PHAGOCYTIC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA WITH AN INFECTIOUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Plotnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate some characteristics of neutrophils and monocytes in patients with acute leukemia, depending on presence of an infectious syndrome, as based on studying of CD16, CD64, HLA-DR receptors, along with assaying myeloperoxidase (MPO and functional activity of the cells. Infectious syndrome in acute leukemia patients was accompanied by changes in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity against neutrophils (decreased CD16 and increase in CD64 expression, lower phagocytic capacity of the cells, and myeloperoxidase deficiency of neutrophils and monocytes. In patients with inflammatory manifestations of infectious syndrome (i.e., acute tonsillitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, etc., the signs of neutrophilic insussiciency were more pronounced, i.e., CD16+ neutrophils comprised 24.36±7.43%, as compared with 74.21±5.43% in controls, p < 0.001; MPO positivity was detected in 29.15±12.6% of the cells against 96.1±1.94% in controls, p < 0.01; MPO expression: 5.34±3.07 MFI, with 32.9±10.76 in controls, p < 0,05. These data suggest significant disturbances of anti-infectious elimination mechanisms.

  4. The splenic syndrome in individuals with sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jessica; Hassell, Kathryn; Irwin, David; Witkowski, Ewa H; Nuss, Rachelle

    2014-12-01

    The medical records of 25 individuals with sickle cell trait and altitude-associated splenic infarct, reported to two Colorado physicians, were reviewed. Electrospray mass spectroscopy was performed on blood samples from a cohort of 10 of the individuals to rapidly confirm beta hemoglobin phenotype. Only males were identified with a 1.4:1 ratio of non-African Americans to African Americans, and 44% of African Americans and 85% of non-African Americans were unaware they had sickle cell trait. Left upper quadrant pain and an elevated bilirubin were nearly uniformly present. Either abdominal CT or ultrasound was confirmatory. Conservative treatment at a lower altitude generally resulted in a favorable outcome.

  5. Evaluation of the Endothelial Cell Density and the Central Corneal Thickness in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pseudoexfoliation Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożydar T. Tomaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Evaluation of central corneal thickness (CCT and endothelial cell density (ECD in patients with senile cataract and coexisting pseudoexfoliation (PEX syndrome with glaucoma (PEXG and without glaucoma using specular microscopy. Participants and Methods. The study included 122 patients (217 eyes. In this group of patients we identified 133 eyes with PEX syndrome (65 with glaucoma, 68 without glaucoma and 84 eyes without PEX syndrome. ECD and CCT were measured in each eye by specular microscopy. Results. ECD in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (2297 ± 359 cell/mm2 and in eyes with PEXG (2241 ± 363 cell/mm2 was lower than in the control group (2503 ± 262 cell/mm2 (P<0.001. CCT in eyes with PEXG (508.2 ± 32.6 μm was thinner than in eyes with PEX syndrome without glaucoma (529.7 ± 30.3 μm and control group (527.7 ± 29.4 μm (P<0.001. Conclusions. This research shows that in eyes with PEX syndrome, both with and without glaucoma, ECD was statistically significantly lower than in the control group. In patients with PEXG, CCT was statistically significantly thinner than in the PEX syndrome and control group.

  6. Acute tumor lysis syndrome with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseddine, A I; Khalil, A M; Wehbeh, M H

    1993-11-01

    Acute tumor lysis syndrome (ATLS) is a rare metabolic complication in nonhematologic malignancies. We report a unique case of extensive regionally recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva who developed a picture compatible with ATLS 36 hr after the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. The patient suffered acute renal failure with hyperuricemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia as well as a picture suggestive of congestive heart failure. The patient responded well to adequate hydration, alkaline diuresis, and allopurinol. The potential for ATLS should be anticipated when treating metastatic or locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva with chemotherapy.

  7. Sertoli cell tumors associated with feminizing syndrome and spermatic cord torsion in two cryptorchid dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartuccio, Marco; Garufi, Giuseppe; Cristarella, Santo; Zanghì, Antonina

    2012-01-01

    The association of cryptorchidism, functional Sertoli cell tumors, and spermatic cord torsion has been rarely reported in the literature. Two dogs were admitted for bilateral skin alopecia and weight loss. Both animals were cryptorchid and displayed a pendulous preputial sheath, prostate hypertrophy, and increased levels of circulating oestrogen. Transabdominal palpation and ultrasonography revealed the presence of neoplastic retained gonads. During surgery, spermatic cord torsion was also detected in the enlarged neoplastic testes of both dogs. Histologic examination confirmed the presence of Sertoli cell tumors that were primarily responsible for the feminizing syndrome. Complete remission of all symptoms occurred within 3 months after orchiectomy. PMID:22705745

  8. An Analysis of MicroRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    predisposition for the development of MDS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MicroRNAs, the myelodysplastic syndromes, hematopoietic stem cells...hematopoietic  stem  cells  (HSCs),  demonstrating   the  presence  of  disease  associated  cytogenetic  and  molecular   genetic ...hematopoiesis   in   the   context   of   aging   and   its   likely   implication   in   the   age-­‐related   predisposition

  9. Paraneoplastic Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Ho Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is defined as an acute, autoimmune polyradiculoneuropathy. It is a rare disease that occurs at a rate of 1.11 cases per 100,000 person-years. However, once infected, up to 20% of patients develop severe disability, and approximately 5% die. There have been reports of GBS in different cancers. Among them, there are 6 previous reports of GBS in small cell lung cancer. Here, we report a case of a 52-year-old man who was diagnosed with GBS in the setting of small cell lung cancer with chemotherapy.

  10. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Herval Ribeiro; Cavalcante, Wagner Cid Palmeira; Martins, Sebastião Nunes; Smid, Jerusa; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  11. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herval Ribeiro Soares Neto

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  12. From shape to cells: mouse models reveal mechanisms altering palate development in Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Martínez-Abadías

    2013-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by severe skull malformations and caused by one of two missense mutations, S252W and P253R, on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2. The molecular bases underlying differential Apert syndrome phenotypes are still poorly understood and it is unclear why cleft palate is more frequent in patients carrying the S252W mutation. Taking advantage of Apert syndrome mouse models, we performed a novel combination of morphometric, histological and immunohistochemical analyses to precisely quantify distinct palatal phenotypes in Fgfr2+/S252W and Fgfr2+/P253R mice. We localized regions of differentially altered FGF signaling and assessed local cell patterns to establish a baseline for understanding the differential effects of these two Fgfr2 mutations. Palatal suture scoring and comparative 3D shape analysis from high resolution μCT images of 120 newborn mouse skulls showed that Fgfr2+/S252W mice display relatively more severe palate dysmorphologies, with contracted and more separated palatal shelves, a greater tendency to fuse the maxillary-palatine sutures and aberrant development of the inter-premaxillary suture. These palatal defects are associated with suture-specific patterns of abnormal cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The posterior region of the developing palate emerges as a potential target for therapeutic strategies in clinical management of cleft palate in Apert syndrome patients.

  13. [Morphometric changes of corneal endothelial cells in pseudoexfoliation syndrome and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Marcos, L; Cabrillo-Estévez, L; Escudero-Domínguez, F A; Sánchez-Jara, A; Hernández-Galilea, E

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the corneal endothelial morphometry and central corneal thickness (CCT) in pseudoexfoliative (PEX) eyes with and without glaucoma and to compare with normal eyes and eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A total of 166 patients were included in this study: 36 eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS), 30 eyes with pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG), 40 eyes with POAG, and 60 normal eyes. Corneal endothelial cell density (ECD), coefficient of variation (CV) in cell size, and percentage of hexagonal cells, were measured using a non-contact specular microscope, whereas CCT was measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter. ECD and percentage of hexagonal cells were lower in PEX groups and in the POAG group compared with normal eyes, while the CV in cell size was greater. There was a tendency for greater cell loss and morphological abnormalities of the corneal endothelial cells in PXG eyes compared to PXS eyes, when all pseudoexfoliative eyes were analyzed together. Changes in endothelial cells increased with age. There were no significant differences in mean CCT between the four groups. Endothelial cell density is significantly decreased, and pleomorphism and polymegathism of cells are increased in PEX eyes, particularly when intraocular pressure is high. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in intact and permeabilized Cockayne syndrome group B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajee, A S; May, A; Dianov, G L; Friedberg, E C; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-29

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is characterized by increased photosensitivity, growth retardation, and neurological and skeletal abnormalities. The recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells after exposure to UV radiation. Gene-specific repair studies have shown a defect in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes in CS cells from genetic complementation groups A and B (CS-A and CS-B). We have analyzed transcription in vivo in intact and permeabilized CS-B cells. Uridine pulse labeling in intact CS-B fibroblasts and lymphoblasts shows a reduction of approximately 50% compared with various normal cells and with cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A. In permeabilized CS-B cells transcription in chromatin isolated under physiological conditions is reduced to about 50% of that in normal chromatin and there is a marked reduction in fluorescence intensity in transcription sites in interphase nuclei. Transcription in CS-B cells is sensitive to alpha-amanitin, suggesting that it is RNA polymerase II-dependent. The reduced transcription in CS-B cells is complemented in chromatin by the addition of normal cell extract, and in intact cells by transfection with the CSB gene. CS-B may be a primary transcription deficiency.

  15. Superoxide dismutase activity and chromosome damage in cultured chromosome instability syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Abe, S; Yanabe, Y; Matsuda, I; Yoshida, M C

    1990-07-01

    The basal levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and chromosome aberration (CA) and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies were examined in cultured fibroblasts or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). These cells were derived from patients with chromosome instability syndromes (CISs) including Bloom's syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Embryonal fibroblasts and LCLs from normal subjects served as controls. Although LCLs tended to exhibit a higher SOD level than fibroblasts due to an elevation of Cu/Zn-SOD activity, BS and FA fibroblasts with increased frequencies of CAs and/or SCEs showed abnormally elevated SOD activity due to the manifold increase of Mn-SOD levels compared with control cells. However, BS and AT LCLs with almost control levels of CA and SCE frequencies showed no, or a slightly elevated, SOD activity, suggesting a possible selection of such cells during EBV transformation. The observed parallelism between the SOD activity and the cytogenetic manifestation may imply an involvement of active oxygen species, especially superoxide radicals, in the increased chromosome damage of CIS cells.

  16. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with Merkel cell carcinoma: A case series of eight patients highlighting different clinical manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Jayasri; Parvathaneni, Kaushik; Bhatia, Shailender; Shantha, Erica; Blom, Astrid; Doumani, Ryan; McKenzie, Jill; Asgari, Maryam M.; Nghiem, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Paraneoplastic syndromes are commonly associated with neuroendocrine cancers, such as small cell lung cancer. Objectives We examined the association of paraneoplastic syndromes in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare neuroendocrine skin cancer. Methods We identified paraneoplastic syndromes associated with MCC based on chart review of a Seattle-based repository and also examined the incidence of MCC-associated hyponatremia in an independent cohort within Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). Results Eight paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) cases were identified from the Seattle repository. Three distinct PNS types were observed: cerebellar degeneration (one case), Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (two cases), and malignancy-associated hyponatremia (five cases). Moreover, the incidence of severe hyponatremia (serum sodium <125 mmol/L) coincident with MCC was identified among 4.3% (9 of 211) MCC patients in the KPNC cohort. Limitations We did not have access to complete medical records on all patients so it was not possible to determine the prevalence of paraneoplastic syndromes in MCC. Conclusions MCC can be associated with paraneoplastic syndromes similar to those found in other neuroendocrine cancers. Clinicians should be aware of these presentations as paraneoplastic syndromes often precede the identification of the underlying malignancy and usually resolve with appropriate treatment of the cancer. PMID:27177440

  17. Red cell alloimmunization is associated with development of autoantibodies and increased red cell transfusion requirements in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Deepak; Kutyna, Monika M; Chhetri, Rakchha; Wee, Li Yan A; Hague, Sophia; Nath, Lakshmi; Nath, Shriram V; Sinha, Romi; Wickham, Nicholas; Lewis, Ian D; Ross, David M; Bardy, Peter G; To, Luen Bik; Reynolds, John; Wood, Erica M; Roxby, David J; Hiwase, Devendra K

    2017-12-01

    Up to 90% of patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome require red blood cell transfusion; nevertheless, comprehensive data on red cell alloimmunization in such patients are limited. This study evaluates the incidence and clinical impact of red cell alloimmunization in a large cohort of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome registered in the statewide South Australian-MDS registry. The median age of the 817 patients studied was 73 years, and 66% were male. The cumulative incidence of alloimmunization was 11%. Disease-modifying therapy was associated with a lower risk of alloimmunization while alloimmunization was significantly higher in patients with a revised International Prognostic Scoring System classification of Very Low, Low or Intermediate risk compared to those with a High or Very High risk (P=0.03). Alloantibodies were most commonly directed against antigens in the Rh (54%) and Kell (24%) systems. Multiple alloantibodies were present in 49% of alloimmunized patients. Although 73% of alloimmunized patients developed alloantibodies during the period in which they received their first 20 red cell units, the total number of units transfused was significantly higher in alloimmunized patients than in non-alloimmunized patients (90±100 versus 30±52; Pred cell transfusion intensity increased significantly following alloimmunization (2.8±1.3 versus 4.1±2.0; Pred cell transfusion requirements following alloimmunization, most probably due to development of additional alloantibodies and autoantibodies, resulting in subclinical/clinical hemolysis. Strategies to mitigate alloimmunization risk are critical for optimizing red cell transfusion support. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells May Ameliorate Nephrotic Syndrome Post-Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation-Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionBecause of their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for treating immune-related or autoimmune diseases, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Nephrotic syndrome (NS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is an uncommon complication with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. It may be an immune disorder involving immune complex deposition, B cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs, and Th1 cytokines and be a manifestation of chronic GVHD. Corticosteroids and calcium antagonists, alone or in combination, are the most common therapeutic agents in this setting. Rituximab is commonly administered as salvage treatment. However, treatment failure and progressive renal function deterioration has been reported to occur in approximately 20% of patients in a particular cohort.Case presentationWe present a patient who developed NS 10 months after allo-HSCT. After treatment failure with cyclosporine A, prednisone, and rituximab, she achieved a complete response with MSC treatment. The clinical improvement of this patient was accompanied by a decreased B cell population together with an increased frequency of regulatory B cells (Bregs and Tregs after MSC treatment.ConclusionMSCs could modulate NS after allo-HSCT by suppressing B cell proliferation, inducing Tregs and Bregs, and inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production by monocytes and NK cells. Among all these, Bregs might play an important role in ameliorating the NS of this patient.

  19. The ultraviolet sensitivity of Cockayne syndrome cells is not a consequence of reduced cellular NAD content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayne, L.V.; Broughton, B.C.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1984-03-01

    Cells from individuals with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of ultraviolet light (uv) and show a number of abnormal biochemical responses following uv-irradiation. Fujiwara et al. recently reported that the NAD contents of CS fibroblasts were lower than those of normal fibroblasts, and that addition of NAD to the cellular growth medium rectified most of the abnormal responses of CS cells to uv-irradiation. In our experiments, however, the cellular NAD contents of normal and CS fibroblasts were similar, and addition of NAD to the growth medium had no effect on the hypersensitivity of CS cells to uv-irradiation, nor did it restore the inability of CS cells to recover normal rates of DNA or RNA synthesis following uv-irradiation.

  20. Generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (GZHMUi001-A by reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchang Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 47, XXX syndrome is one of several sex-chromosomal aneuploidies, and it has an incidence of approximately 1/1000 in newborn females. Because of heterogeneity in X-inactivation, these patients may exhibit a variety of clinical symptoms. Here, we report the generation of an integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cell line (GZHMUi001-A by using Sendai virus to reprogram peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient with premature ovarian failure. This 47, XXX iPS cell line has characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and is a useful tool for the investigation of this X chromosome aneuploid disease.

  1. Usp16 contributes to somatic stem-cell defects in Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Maddalena; Sikandar, Shaheen; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Kuo, Angera; Nicolis Di Robilant, Benedetta; Haro-Acosta, Veronica; Ouadah, Youcef; Quarta, Marco; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Qian, Dalong; Reddy, Vadiyala M; Cheshier, Samuel; Garner, Craig C; Clarke, Michael F

    2013-09-19

    Down's syndrome results from full or partial trisomy of chromosome 21. However, the consequences of the underlying gene-dosage imbalance on adult tissues remain poorly understood. Here we show that in Ts65Dn mice, which are trisomic for 132 genes homologous to genes on human chromosome 21, triplication of Usp16 reduces the self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells and the expansion of mammary epithelial cells, neural progenitors and fibroblasts. In addition, Usp16 is associated with decreased ubiquitination of Cdkn2a and accelerated senescence in Ts65Dn fibroblasts. Usp16 can remove ubiquitin from histone H2A on lysine 119, a critical mark for the maintenance of multiple somatic tissues. Downregulation of Usp16, either by mutation of a single normal Usp16 allele or by short interfering RNAs, largely rescues all of these defects. Furthermore, in human tissues overexpression of USP16 reduces the expansion of normal fibroblasts and postnatal neural progenitors, whereas downregulation of USP16 partially rescues the proliferation defects of Down's syndrome fibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that USP16 has an important role in antagonizing the self-renewal and/or senescence pathways in Down's syndrome and could serve as an attractive target to ameliorate some of the associated pathologies.

  2. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  3. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Developing After Restart of Sunitinib Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old Japanese man had started molecular-targeted therapy with sunitinib for lymph node metastasis 5 years after nephrectomy for left renal cell carcinoma (clear cell carcinoma, G2, pT2N0M0. He was transported to our emergency department because of generalized tonic-clonic seizure, vision loss, and impaired consciousness with acute hypertension after 8 cycles of treatment (2 years after the initiation of sunitinib therapy, including a drug withdrawal period for one year. MRI of the brain (FLAIR images showed multiple high-intensity lesions in the white matter of the occipital and cerebellar lobes, dorsal brain stem, and left thalamus. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome caused by sunitinib was suspected. In addition to the immediate discontinuation of sunitinib therapy, the administration of antihypertensive agents and anticonvulsants improved the clinical symptoms without neurological damage. Physicians should be aware that sunitinib causes reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. The early recognition of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is critical to avoid irreversible neurological damage.

  4. Gene expression analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid chromosomal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human aneuploidy is the leading cause of early pregnancy loss, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Due to the high mortality associated with aneuploidy, the pathophysiological mechanisms of aneuploidy syndrome remain largely unknown. Previous studies focused mostly on whether dosage compensation occurs, and the next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq is expected to eventually uncover the mechanisms of gene expression regulation and the related pathological phenotypes in human aneuploidy. Results Using next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq, we profiled the transcriptomes of four human aneuploid induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines generated from monosomy × (Turner syndrome), trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and partial trisomy 11:22 (Emanuel syndrome) as well as two umbilical cord matrix iPSC lines as euploid controls to examine how phenotypic abnormalities develop with aberrant karyotype. A total of 466 M (50-bp) reads were obtained from the six iPSC lines, and over 13,000 mRNAs were identified by gene annotation. Global analysis of gene expression profiles and functional analysis of differentially expressed (DE) genes were implemented. Over 5000 DE genes are determined between aneuploidy and euploid iPSCs respectively while 9 KEGG pathways are overlapped enriched in four aneuploidy samples. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the extra or missing chromosome has extensive effects on the whole transcriptome. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals that the genes most affected in aneuploid individuals are related to central nervous system development and tumorigenesis. PMID:24564826

  5. Recurrence of keratocyst in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: A major diagnostic dilemma for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocysts (OKC usually represent a particular entity that has been of interest primarily due to biological aggressiveness and to its frequent recurrence. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide-range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. There are several possible reasons why OKC recur so frequently and require meticulous surgical planning and execution. This article has attempted to show that there is a lack of published evidence regarding the cause of frequent recurrent of OKC that presented in NBCCS. However, the findings of the study revealed differences in opinion regarding the treatment modalities, which necessitates further long term clinical studies that could precisely document certain reliable guidelines in this point of view.

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cells in Marfan syndrome aneurysm: the broken bricks in the aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrucci, Gianluca L; Rurali, Erica; Gowran, Aoife; Pini, Alessandro; Antona, Carlo; Chiesa, Roberto; Pompilio, Giulio; Nigro, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder with multiple organ manifestations. The genetic cause of this syndrome is the mutation of the FBN1 gene, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. This genetic alteration leads to the degeneration of microfibril structures and ECM integrity in the tunica media of the aorta. Indeed, thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection represent the leading cause of death in MFS patients. To date, the most effective treatment option for this pathology is the surgical substitution of the damaged aorta. To highlight novel therapeutic targets, we review the molecular mechanisms related to MFS etiology in vascular smooth muscle cells, the foremost cellular type involved in MFS pathogenesis.

  7. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  8. RETINAL AND CHOROIDAL VASCULAR OCCLUSION FOLLOWING AQUEOUS MISDIRECTION SYNDROME IN A PATIENT WITH SICKLE CELL TRAIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewundara, Samantha; Nassiri, Nariman; Kim, Johnstone M; Kadikoy, Huseyin; Amde, Wendewessen; Tannir, Justin; Hughes, Bret A; Abrams, Gary W

    2017-05-09

    To report a patient with retinal and choroidal vascular occlusion as a presenting sign of sickle cell trait following the development of aqueous misdirection syndrome. Retrospective chart review. A patient treated for bilateral chronic angle-closure glaucoma with sequential EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device surgery developed sequential bilateral aqueous misdirection syndrome. The left eye developed retinal arterial and localized choroidal vascular occlusions subsequent to an acute elevation in intraocular pressure and possibly the use of oral acetazolamide. The patient was subsequently found to have sickle cell trait. The right eye developed aqueous misdirection with acute elevation of intraocular pressure as well, but the patient was not treated with oral acetazolamide and did not develop vascular occlusion. Retinal and choroidal vascular occlusions can be the presenting sign of a patient with sickle cell trait. Sickle cell screening may be beneficial in African American or Middle Eastern patients after an acute rise in intraocular pressure, particularly before initiation of treatment with oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

  9. Chromosomal Instability and Molecular Defects in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs. Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction. Furthermore, NBS-iPSCs display slower growth, mitotic inhibition, a reduced apoptotic response to stress, and abnormal cell-cycle-related gene expression. Importantly, NBS neural progenitor cells (NBS-NPCs show downregulation of neural developmental genes, which seems to be mediated by P53. Our results demonstrate the importance of NBS1 in early human development, shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this severe syndrome, and further expand our knowledge of the genomic stress cells experience during the reprogramming process.

  10. Severe Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Smoldering Plasma Cell Myeloma: An Autopsy Case of POEMS Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Chinen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The POEMS syndrome (coined to refer to polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, and skin changes is a rare variant of plasma cell disorders with multiple systemic manifestations. Recently, pulmonary hypertension (PH has become established as a complication, but pathological studies of this condition are scarce and the detailed pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. We present herein a case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having idiopathic PH and was treated in accordance. However, she eventually died of respiratory failure and an autopsy revealed the presence of smoldering plasma cell myeloma and multiple organomegaly in addition to severe PH. The latter was attributed to stenosis and occlusion of the arterioles of the lungs due to marked plasma cell proliferation, quite different from the histology of idiopathic PH. From these findings, together with the clinical details, we concluded that the patient’s PH was a complication of the POEMS syndrome. This case showed a unique pulmonary vascular pathology featuring plasma cell proliferation and it provides clues towards understanding the pathogenesis with this background.

  11. Loss of the Arabidopsis Protein Kinases ANPs Affects Root Cell Wall Composition, and Triggers the Cell Wall Damage Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Gigli Bisceglia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis NPK1-related Protein kinases ANP1, ANP2 and ANP3 belong to the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK superfamily and were previously described to be crucial for cytokinesis, elicitor-induced immunity and development. Here we investigate the basis of their role in development by using conditional β-estradiol-inducible triple mutants to overcome lethality. In seedlings, lack of ANPs causes root cell bulging, with the transition zone being the most sensitive region. We uncover a role of ANPs in the regulation of cell wall composition and suggest that developmental defects of the triple mutants, observed at the cellular level, might be a consequence of the alterations of the pectic and cellulosic cell wall components. Lack of ANPs also induced a typical cell wall damage syndrome (CWDS similar to that observed in plants treated with the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben (ISX. Moreover, anp double mutants and plants overexpressing single ANPs (ANP1 or ANP3 respectively showed increased and reduced accumulation of jasmonic acid and PDF1.2 transcripts upon ISX treatment, suggesting that ANPs are part of the pathway targeted by this inhibitor and play a role in cell wall integrity surveillance.Highlights: The loss of ANP function affects cell wall composition and leads to typical cell wall damage-induced phenotypes, such as ectopic lignification and jasmonic acid accumulation.

  12. Somatic GNAQ Mutation is Enriched in Brain Endothelial Cells in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Couto, Javier A; Pinto, Anna; Alexandrescu, Sanda; Madsen, Joseph R; Greene, Arin K; Sahin, Mustafa; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital neurocutaneous disorder characterized by facial and extracraniofacial capillary malformations and capillary-venule malformations in the leptomeninges. A somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ (c.548G>A; p.R183Q) was found in SWS brain and skin capillary malformations. Our laboratory showed endothelial cells in skin capillary malformations are enriched for the GNAQ mutation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the GNAQ mutation is also enriched in endothelial cells in affected SWS brain. Two human SWS brain specimens were fractionated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting into hematopoietic (CD45), endothelial (CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2), and perivascular (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) cells and cells negative for all markers. The sorted cell populations were analyzed for GNAQ p.R183Q mutation by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells were selected by anti-CD31-coated magnetic beads and cultured in endothelial growth medium in vitro. The GNAQ p.R183Q mutation was present in brain endothelial cells in two SWS specimens, with mutant allelic frequencies of 34.7% and 24.0%. Cells negative for all markers also harbored the GNAQ mutation. The mutant allelic frequencies in these unidentified cells were 9.2% and 8.4%. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells with mutant allelic frequencies of 14.7% and 21% survived and proliferated in vitro. Our study provides evidence that GNAQ p.R183Q mutation is enriched in endothelial cells in SWS brain lesions and thereby reveals endothelial cells as a source of aberrant Gαq signaling. This will help to understand the pathophysiology of SWS, to discover biomarkers for predicting cerebral involvement, and to develop therapeutic targets to prevent neurological impairments in SWS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative Pathogenicity of Liver Homogenate and Cell Culture Propagated Hydropericardium Syndrome Virus in Broiler Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmad, S. Zaman1, M. H. Mushtaq*, A. A. Anjum1 and M. Akram1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative pathogenicity of liver homogenate and cell culture propagated agents of hydropericardium syndrome was studied in broiler birds. In Experiment I, 25-day-old while in experiment II, broiler birds at different ages were inoculated through different routes. In Experiment I, liver homogenate caused 64% mortality through intramuscular route and 33.33% mortality through oral route. The cell culture propagated HPS virus caused 60 and 13.33% mortality in broiler birds through intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. In Experiment II, none of the day-old-chicks died when challenged with liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus through S/C and oral route. The liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus caused higher mortality in different age groups of broiler birds through s/c route compared to oral route. The values of hemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV showed highly significant (P<0.05 reduction indicating anemia. The values of Hb and PCV of the broiler birds inoculated with infectious liver homogenate were significantly lower as compared to birds inoculated with cell culture propagated HPS virus. The results indicated that the liver homogenate is more pathogenic than cell culture propagated HPS virus. These changes may be due to adoptability of the original FAdVs (fowl adenovirus after continued passages in the culture of chicken embryo liver cells. Importance of this study in vaccine production is also discussed.

  14. Establishment of B-lymphoid cell lines retaining cytogenetic characteristics of Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y; Kubonishi, I; Sandberg, A A

    1983-06-01

    The present study describes the establishment of and chromosomal changes in B-lymphoid cell lines from cells of Bloom syndrome (BS) patients using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Even though PHA-stimulated BS lymphocytes from all five patients studied showed high levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE), three EBV-transformed BS-B-lymphoid cell lines had normal levels of SCE and two yielded two types of cell populations, i.e., one with increased SCE and chromosome instability (including breaks and quadriradials) and another with normal levels of SCE and without structural aberrations. The karyotypic abnormalities, as observed in the BS lines have not been seen in the cells of any established normal B-lymphoid lines transformed by EBV and strongly suggest that the chromosome abnormalities in the BS--B-cell lines with abnormal karyotypes originated in vivo and not through an in vitro effect of EBV. Furthermore, in the EBV-transformed B-cell lines, we found quadriradial formation between sister chromosomes during endomitoses instead of between homologous chromosomes, strongly suggesting that quadriradial formation may be closely related to SCE. The coexistence in BS subjects of abnormal and normal populations of cells with respect to the number of SCE awaits explanation.

  15. Elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, L D; Schultz, R A

    1992-09-01

    Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE frequency and neoplasia have been complicated by reports that BSx cell lines exhibit defects in the structure and/or activity of a number of different enzymes. The rare occurrence of the disorder and lack of informative families have precluded mapping of the primary defect by standard linkage analysis. We have utilized BSx cells as recipients for microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to map a locus that renders complementation of the elevated SCE phenotype. Studies with the BSx cell line GM08505 demonstrated a stable frequency of SCEs 10-fold higher than control values, offering a phenotype suitable for complementation studies. Transfer of different independent human chromosomes from somatic cell hybrids into BSx cells permitted identification of a single chromosome that dramatically reduced the SCE frequency to a level near that seen in control cells. Detailed characterization revealed this complementing element to be human chromosome 15.

  16. Mobilization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in acute coronary syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Wojakowski

    2005-12-01

    cells. The maximum number of stem cells was found early in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (<12 hours with subsequent decrease through the 7-day follow-up and with concomitant changes in the levels of cytokines involved in the inflammatory response and stem cell recruitment. Moreover, peak expression of cardiac muscle and endothelial markers occurred at the same time as the most significant increase in CD34/CXCR4+ stem cell number. The SDF-1/CXCR-4 axis seems particularly important in stem/muscle progenitor cell homing, chemotaxis, engraftment and retention in ischaemic myocardium. The significance of autologous stem cells mobilization in terms of cardiac salvage and regeneration needs to be proved in humans but it seems to be a reparative mechanism triggered early in the course of acute coronary syndromes.

  17. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  18. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  19. [Cockayne syndrome and epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (Hallopeau-Siemens). Simultaneous occurrence in a family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubach, D; Riechers, U

    1982-09-01

    A Turkish family with four children is described, two boys suffering from Cockayne's syndrome and a girl from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (Hallopeau-Siemens). The outstanding features in the brothers are a pronounced delay in growth which began in both children at the age of about 1.5 years, progeria-like facial features, and a high degree of light sensitivity noticed very soon after birth. The daughter died of septicemia at the age of 4 years. Both diseases are rare and probably the consequence of extremely high consanguinity.

  20. [Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch). A follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenstrauch, T; Snigula, F; Wiedemann, H R

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS) are: intrauterine and postnatal growth failure, hydrocephalic appearance, prominent scalp veins, old-looking face, absence of subcutaneous fat and neonatal teeth. Until now altogether nine cases have been reported, which were predominant diagnosed in infant age. The NPS is in general assigned to the autosomal recessive trait. With increasing age the outward appearance stays unchanged. The in 1977 under diagnose progeria presented patient is now 16 years old. With her a considerable atactic movement disturbance developed next to a psychomotoric retardation. The change in metabolism of proteoglycane that was remarkable in infant age is now no longer provable.

  1. IL-23 actived γδ T cells affect Th17 cells and regulatory T cells by secreting IL-21 in children with primary nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yan, Junli; Yang, Baohui; Zhang, Gaofu; Wang, Mo; Dong, Shifang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Haiping; Li, Qiu

    2017-11-09

    This study (1) analyzed the percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells, and regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and (2) determined the role of IL-23 in primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) patients with active disease and in remission. Eighty-four PNS patients and 51 healthy age-matched controls were included in this study. The percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells, and Treg cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMBCs from PNS patients with active disease were cultured in the presence of IL-23, IL-23 and an IL-23 antagonist, or IL23 and an anti-IL-21 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The percentage of γδT cells, IL-23R+ γδ T cells, and IL-17+ γδ T cells were significantly increased in PNS patients with active disease. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of γδ T cells, IL-23R+ γδ T cells, IL-17+ γδ T cells, and the Th17/Treg ratio. IL-23 increased the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells and decreased the percentage of Treg cells in PBMCs isolated from PNS patients with active disease. Anti-IL-21 mAb reduced the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells, but increased the percentage of Treg cells. γδ T cells, IL-17+ γδ T cells, and IL-23R+ γδ T cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of pediatric PNS by modulating the balance of Th17/Treg cells. γδT cells may cause an imbalance in Th17/Treg cells by secreting IL-21 in the presence of IL-23. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from chorionic villi of a Turner syndrome spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shagufta; Panicker, M M; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2017-03-01

    A major cause of spontaneous abortions is chromosomal abnormality of foetal cells. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from the fibroblasts isolated from chorionic villi of an early spontaneously aborted foetus with Turner syndrome. The Turner syndrome villus induced pluripotent stem cell line is transgene free, retains the original XO karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. This pluripotent stem cell model of Turner syndrome should serve as a tool to study the developmental abnormalities of foetus and placenta that lead to early embryo lethality and profound symptoms like infertility in 45 XO survivors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancement of XPG mRNA expression by human interferon-beta in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, K; Suzuki, N; Higuchi, Y; Kita, K; Suzuki, Y; Lehmann, A

    1998-07-01

    Using PCR-differential display, we have searched for genes expressed specially in human interferon (HuIFn)-beta-treated Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblast cells. Eighteen expressed genes induced by HuIFN-beta were identified, the sequences of seven of which were highly homologous to previously cloned sequences. The cDNAs of six of these seven clones were similar to expression tagged sequences from unknown genes in databases and the remaining one was identical to the cDNA of the xeroderma pigmentosum XPG gene. These results, together with our previous finding of increased resistance to ultraviolet (UV) cell-killing of CS cells pretreated with HuIFN-beta prior to UV irradiation suggest that XPG might be one of the genes possibly involved in the HuIFN-beta-induced UV-resistance.

  4. Evolution of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma into Tall Cell Variant and TENIS Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Avik; Kane, S V; Pawer, Yogita; Basu, Sandip

    2016-12-01

    We herein report an unusual case of a 55-y-old woman with papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, who presented with multiple recurrences, with its subsequent evolution to tall cell variant and thyroglobulin-elevated negative iodine scintigraphy (TENIS) syndrome. During the course of the disease the lesions became non-iodine-concentrating with an increased proportion of tall cells and evidence of local and distant metastasis. Molecular analysis of the tissue specimen demonstrated BRAF(V600E) and I582 M mutations along with upregulation of tumor markers in metastatic tissue. The presence of BRAF(V600E) mutation and other markers warrants further investigation in future studies to define their precise implications for determining the aggressiveness and development into tall cell variant and TENIS. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Primary Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Palate with Cushing’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24-year-old woman presenting with a relapsed soy-bean-size tender mass at the junction of the soft and hard palate and a history of palatine tumor of small cell carcinoma. Reexcision surgery was performed and histopathological features were consistent. The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy consisting of etoposide and cisplatin. After one year, the patient developed bone metastases and Cushing's syndrome, and successfully recovered with subsequent chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin plus radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis for more than three years. Small cell carcinoma originating in the head and neck region has been reported to be highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. This is the first case report of a patient with relapsed primary small cell carcinoma of the palate and successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.

  6. A PLK4 mutation causing azoospermia in a man with Sertoli cell-only syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Bando, Y; Koh, E; Tsujimura, A; Miyagawa, Y; Iijima, M; Namiki, M; Shiina, M; Ogata, K; Matsumoto, N; Sengoku, K

    2016-01-01

    About 15% of couples wishing to have children are infertile; approximately half these cases involve a male factor. Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK-4) is a member of the polo protein family and a key regulator of centriole duplication. Male mice with a point mutation in the Plk4 gene show azoospermia associated with germ cell loss. Mutational analysis of 81 patients with azoospermia and Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS) identified one man with a heterozygous 13-bp deletion in the Ser/Thr kinase domain of PLK4. Division of centrioles occurred in wild-type PLK4-transfected cells, but was hampered in PLK-4-mutant transfectants, which also showed abnormal nuclei. Thus, this PLK4 mutation might be a cause of human SCOS and nonobstructive azoospermia. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Bone marrow dendritic cells are reduced in patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saft, Leonie; Björklund, Elisabet; Berg, Elisabeth; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Porwit, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in coordinating functions of the immune system. Previous studies suggest that bone marrow (BM) failure in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) may be in part immune-mediated, and that the high propensity for relapse may reflect decreased immune surveillance. This study aimed to assess the frequency of DC in BM samples from well-annotated untreated MDS patients by using 4-colour flow cytometry. DC levels were markedly reduced in all subtypes of MDS. The clinical impact of this finding on therapy response and relapse after, e.g. allogeneic stem cell transplantation warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The mast cell stabiliser ketotifen decreases visceral hypersensitivity and improves intestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooker, T.K.; Braak, B.; Koopman, K.E.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M.M.; van der Heide, S.; Schemann, M.; Bischoff, S.C.; van den Wijngaard, R.M.; Boeckxstaens, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mast cell activation is thought to be involved in visceral hypersensitivity, one of the main characteristics of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A study was therefore undertaken to investigate the effect of the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen on rectal sensitivity and symptoms in

  9. Asthma is a risk factor for acute chest syndrome and cerebral vascular accidents in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and sickle cell disease are common conditions that both may result in pulmonary complications. We hypothesized that children with sickle cell disease with concomitant asthma have an increased incidence of vaso-occlusive crises that are complicated by episodes of acute chest syndrome. Methods A 5-year retrospective chart analysis was performed investigating 48 children ages 3–18 years with asthma and sickle cell disease and 48 children with sickle cell disease alone. Children were matched for age, gender, and type of sickle cell defect. Hospital admissions were recorded for acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accident, vaso-occlusive pain crises, and blood transfusions (total, exchange and chronic. Mann-Whitney test and Chi square analysis were used to assess differences between the groups. Results Children with sickle cell disease and asthma had significantly more episodes of acute chest syndrome (p = 0.03 and cerebral vascular accidents (p = 0.05 compared to children with sickle cell disease without asthma. As expected, these children received more total blood transfusions (p = 0.01 and chronic transfusions (p = 0.04. Admissions for vasoocclusive pain crises and exchange transfusions were not statistically different between cases and controls. SS disease is more severe than SC disease. Conclusions Children with concomitant asthma and sickle cell disease have increased episodes of acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accidents and the need for blood transfusions. Whether aggressive asthma therapy can reduce these complications in this subset of children is unknown and requires further studies.

  10. Mast cells: a possible link between psychological stress, enteric infection, food allergy and gut hypersensitivity in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, X Y

    1998-10-01

    Intestinal mast cell activation (degranulation), which results from previous enteric infection and/or intestinal allergy, may play a central role in the gut hypersensitivity in both motor response and visceral perception in the Irritable Bowel syndrome. This occurs through various mediators acting on enteric neurons and smooth muscle cells. Psychological stress may trigger this sensitive alarm system via the brain-gut axis.

  11. EPHRIN-B1 Mosaicism Drives Cell Segregation in Craniofrontonasal Syndrome hiPSC-Derived Neuroepithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethamer, Terren K; Larson, Andrew R; O'Neill, Audrey K; Bershteyn, Marina; Hsiao, Edward C; Klein, Ophir D; Pomerantz, Jason H; Bush, Jeffrey O

    2017-03-14

    Although human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great potential for the study of human diseases affecting disparate cell types, they have been underutilized in seeking mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of congenital craniofacial disorders. Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS) is a rare X-linked disorder caused by mutations in EFNB1 and characterized by craniofacial, skeletal, and neurological anomalies. Heterozygous females are more severely affected than hemizygous males, a phenomenon termed cellular interference that involves mosaicism for EPHRIN-B1 function. Although the mechanistic basis for cellular interference in CFNS has been hypothesized to involve Eph/ephrin-mediated cell segregation, no direct evidence for this has been demonstrated. Here, by generating hiPSCs from CFNS patients, we demonstrate that mosaicism for EPHRIN-B1 expression induced by random X inactivation in heterozygous females results in robust cell segregation in human neuroepithelial cells, thus supplying experimental evidence that Eph/ephrin-mediated cell segregation is relevant to pathogenesis in human CFNS patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced transcription of TCOF1 in adult cells of Treacher Collins syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camargo Anamaria A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder caused by frameshift deletions or duplications in the TCOF1 gene. These mutations cause premature termination codons, which are predicted to lead to mRNA degradation by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD. Haploinsufficiency of the gene product (treacle during embryonic development is the proposed molecular mechanism underlying TCS. However, it is still unknown if TCOF1 expression levels are decreased in post-embryonic human cells. Methods We have estimated TCOF1 transcript levels through real time PCR in mRNA obtained from leucocytes and mesenchymal cells of TCS patients (n = 23 and controls (n = 18. Mutational screening and analysis of NMD were performed by direct sequencing of gDNA and cDNA, respectively. Results All the 23 patients had typical clinical features of the syndrome and pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 of them. We demonstrated that the expression level of TCOF1 is 18-31% lower in patients than in controls (p , even if we exclude the patients in whom we did not detect the pathogenic mutation. We also observed that the mutant allele is usually less abundant than the wild type one in mesenchymal cells. Conclusions This is the first study to report decreased expression levels of TCOF1 in TCS adult human cells, but it is still unknown if this finding is associated to any phenotype in adulthood. In addition, as we demonstrated that alleles harboring the pathogenic mutations have lower expression, we herein corroborate the current hypothesis of NMD of the mutant transcript as the explanation for diminished levels of TCOF1 expression. Further, considering that TCOF1 deficiency in adult cells could be associated to pathologic clinical findings, it will be important to verify if TCS patients have an impairment in adult stem cell properties, as this can reduce the efficiency of plastic surgery results during rehabilitation of these

  13. Detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma for Down syndrome, Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome of high risk fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to validate the efficacy of detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma of trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in a clinical setting. A total of 2340 women at high risk for Down syndrome based on maternal age, prenatal history or a positive sesum or sonographic screening test were offered prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test. According to the prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test, the pregnant women at high risk were offered amniocentesis karyotype analysis and the pregnant at low risk were followed up to make sure the newborn outcome. The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test was positive for trisomy 21 in 17 cases, for trisomy 18 in 6 cases and for trisomy 13 in 1 case, which of all were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Newborns of low risk gestational woman detected by prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy for trisomy 21, 18, 13 were followed up and no one was found with trisomy. The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test is highly accurate for detection of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, which can be considered as a practical alternative for traditional invasive diagnostic procedures.

  14. Effects of cardioactive drugs on human induced pluripotent stem cell derived long QT syndrome cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Jukka; Kujala, Ville J; Kiviaho, Anna; Ojala, Marisa; Swan, Heikki; Kontula, Kimmo; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) have enabled a major step forward in pathophysiologic studies of inherited diseases and may also prove to be valuable in in vitro drug testing. Long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolonged cardiac repolarization and risk of sudden death, may be inherited or result from adverse drug effects. Using a microelectrode array platform, we investigated the effects of six different drugs on the electrophysiological characteristics of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as well as hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from control subjects and from patients with type 1 (LQT1) and type 2 (LQT2) of LQTS. At baseline the repolarization time was significantly longer in LQTS cells compared to controls. Isoprenaline increased the beating rate of all cell lines by 10-73 % but did not show any arrhythmic effects in any cell type. Different QT-interval prolonging drugs caused prolongation of cardiac repolarization by 3-13 % (cisapride), 10-20 % (erythromycin), 8-23 % (sotalol), 16-42 % (quinidine) and 12-27 % (E-4031), but we did not find any systematic differences in sensitivity between the control, LQT1 and LQT2 cell lines. Sotalol, quinidine and E-4031 also caused arrhythmic beats and beating arrests in some cases. In summary, the drug effects on these patient-specific cardiomyocytes appear to recapitulate clinical observations and provide further evidence that these cells can be applied for in vitro drug testing to probe their vulnerability to arrhythmia.

  15. Impaired in vitro regulatory T cell function associated with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Marsilio; Aoki, Joseph; Horai, Reiko; Thornton, Angela M.; Konno, Akihiro; Kirby, Martha; Anderson, Stacie M.; Siegel, Richard M.; Candotti, Fabio; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by the contradictory coexistence of impaired T-cell function and exaggerated T-cell-mediated pathology, including autoimmunity and eczema. WAS protein (WASp)-deficient mice are also immunodeficient and can develop autoimmune disease. Since defects in regulatory T-cells (Treg) are associated with autoimmunity, we examined the presence and function of these cells in WAS patients and WASp-deficient mice. We found that CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells can develop in the absence of WASp expression. However, Treg cells both from WASp-deficient mice and from four out of five WAS patients studied showed impaired in vitro suppressor function. In WASp-deficient mice, this defect could be partially rescued by pre-activation with IL-2, suggesting that inadequate cell activation may play a role in WASp-deficient Treg dysfunction. These findings may provide insights into the complex pathophysiology and paradoxical phenotypes of WAS and suggest new therapeutic modalities for autoimmunity in these patients. PMID:17512803

  16. Chromosomal instability in B-lymphoblasotoid cell lines from Werner and Bloom syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Masamitsu; Tadokoro, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Masanobu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Takatomo; Sofuni, Toshio; Goto, Makoto; Hayashi, Makoto

    2002-09-26

    Werner's syndrome (WS) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are rare autosomal genetic diseases that predispose to cancer and are associated with genomic instability. To characterize the genomic instability of WS and BS, we analyzed and compared the cytogenetics of B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from WS and BS patients and healthy donors. Although, similar spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were observed in LCLs from WS patients and healthy donors, they were much higher in BS-LCLs. We also examined the cells' cytotoxic and cytogenetic formation (MN) response to camptothecin (CAM), etoposide (ETO), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), and mitomycin C (MMC). Compared to healthy donor LCLs, BS-LCLs but not WS-LCLs tended to be resistant to cytotoxicity and sensitive to MN induction by 4NQO and MMC. Spectrum karyotyping analysis revealed that most WS- and BS-LCLs generated "variegated translocation mosaicism" at high frequencies during cell culture. These findings support the idea that the basis of genomic instability in WS is different from that in BS.

  17. Sequential fluctuating paraneoplastic ocular flutter-opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in small-cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Simister, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration may occur in association with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), but to our knowledge, the co-occurrence of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and LEMS has not been previously reported. A 67-year-old woman presented with a complex partial seizure and evolving ocular flutter, opsoclonus, myoclonus and \\'cerebellar\\' signs, all of which improved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Approximately 8 weeks after symptom onset, the patient became encephalopathic, she had a further complex partial seizure, and she became areflexic with potentiation of deep tendon reflexes. Radiological, bronchoscopic and histological investigations revealed small-cell lung cancer, and neurophysiological investigations confirmed a diagnosis of LEMS. High-titre anti-P\\/Q-type voltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies were identified in the serum, which increased as the signs of opsoclonus and myoclonus resolved. The encephalopathy and clinical features of LEMS responded dramatically to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Spontaneous improvement of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome may occur, and this syndrome may occur in association with LEMS. Antivoltage-gated calcium-channel antibodies are not implicated in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

  18. Association of mast cell-derived VEGF and proteases in Dengue shock syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Furuta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17 between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF, Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS, as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. CONCLUSIONS: As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity.

  19. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function. AIM: To investigate the oral features and dental health of patients with Hurler Syndrome who have undergone successful HSCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients (median age 8.6 years) post-HSCT (mean age 9.4 months) underwent oral assessment (mean of 7.5 years post-HSCT). RESULTS: Dental development was delayed. Numerous occlusal anomalies were noted including: open-bite, class III skeletal base, dental spacing, primary molar infra-occlusion and ectopic tooth eruption. Dental anomalies included hypodontia, microdontia, enamel defects, thin tapering canine crowns, pointed molar cusps, bulbous molar crowns and molar taurodontism. Tooth roots were usually short\\/blunted\\/spindle-like in permanent molars. The prevalence of dental caries was low in the permanent dentition (mean DMFT 0.7) but high in the primary dentition (mean dmft 2.4). Oral hygiene instruction with plaque and or calculus removal was indicated in 71% of those that were dentate. CONCLUSION: Patients with Hurler Syndrome post-HSCT are likely to have delayed dental development, a malocclusion, and dental anomalies, particularly hypodontia and microdontia.

  20. The "domestication syndrome" in mammals: a unified explanation based on neural crest cell behavior and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Adam S; Wrangham, Richard W; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-07-01

    Charles Darwin, while trying to devise a general theory of heredity from the observations of animal and plant breeders, discovered that domesticated mammals possess a distinctive and unusual suite of heritable traits not seen in their wild progenitors. Some of these traits also appear in domesticated birds and fish. The origin of Darwin's "domestication syndrome" has remained a conundrum for more than 140 years. Most explanations focus on particular traits, while neglecting others, or on the possible selective factors involved in domestication rather than the underlying developmental and genetic causes of these traits. Here, we propose that the domestication syndrome results predominantly from mild neural crest cell deficits during embryonic development. Most of the modified traits, both morphological and physiological, can be readily explained as direct consequences of such deficiencies, while other traits are explicable as indirect consequences. We first show how the hypothesis can account for the multiple, apparently unrelated traits of the syndrome and then explore its genetic dimensions and predictions, reviewing the available genetic evidence. The article concludes with a brief discussion of some genetic and developmental questions raised by the idea, along with specific predictions and experimental tests. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Multiple co morbid conditions in patient with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    conditions in patient \\\\·ith Mast Cell Activation Syndron1e Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM.ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Maj Sofia...Activation Syndrome Maj Sofia M. Szari, MD and James M. Quinn, MD Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, Joint Base San Antonio - Lackland AFB, TX...Ameri’*’ COiiege of Allergy, Allhmo & lmmW1ology; 3. FitleeA. AklMR, Gnll\\ameR, Hn! mAJ , Morris.A<, Kn- CH,AmO. 2015 Func:llOMI geSlrolnteSllnol

  2. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  3. Papilledema secondary to a superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Mantle cell lymphoma paraneoplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platas-Moreno, I; Antón-Benito, A; Pérez-Cid-Rebolleda, M T; Rosado Sierra, M B

    2016-01-01

    A 46 year old patient presented with visual loss in the left eye during the previous months. Ophthalmoscopic examination and magnetic resonance angiography found the presence of papilledema due to thrombosis in superior sagittal sinus. The examination findings revealed a mantle cell lymphoma. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an unusual cause of papilledema. This type of thrombosis may be secondary to hyper-viscosity within a context of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. YKL-40 in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after AML and myelodysplastic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Wang, T; Lee, S J

    2016-01-01

    YKL-40, also called chitinase-3-like-1 protein, is an inflammatory biomarker that has been associated with disease severity in inflammatory and malignant diseases, including AML, multiple myeloma and lymphomas. The objective of the current study was to assess the prognostic value of pretransplant...... recipient and donor plasma YKL-40 concentrations in patients with AML (n=624) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n=157) treated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In recipients, the plasma YKL-40 concentrations were increased when the HCT-comorbidity index was ⩾5 (P=0.028). There were...

  5. Persistence of immunoglobulin-producing cells in parotid salivary glands of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome after B cell depletion therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, Nishath; Bootsma, Hendrika; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Haacke, Erlin A.; Pollard, Rodney P. E.; Visser, Annie; Vissink, Arjan; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the persistence of immunoglobulin-producing cell populations in the parotid salivary glands of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) after B cell depletion therapy with rituximab. Methods Thirteen patients with pSS and four control patients were included in this study.

  6. Discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics in a patient with Cockayne syndrome during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Hitosugi, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a kind of progeria with autosomal chromosome recessiveness described first by Cockayne in 1936. Patients with this syndrome were characterized by retarded growth, cerebral atrophy, and mental retardation. We experienced an anesthetic management of a patient with Cockayne syndrome, who underwent dental treatment twice. The primary concern was discrepancy between electroencephalography and hemodynamics. The values of bispectral index showed a sharp fall to 1 digit and suppression ratio more than 40, while hemodynamics was stable during induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane 8%. We should pay attention to anesthetic depth in the central nervous system in patients with Cockayne syndrome. Titration of anesthetics should be performed by the information from electroencephalography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra syndrome in bitches: identification of hemodynamic, inflammatory, and cell proliferation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Gisele Almeida Lima; Miziara, Ricardo Henrique; Angrimani, Daniel Souza Ramos; Papa, Paula Carvalho; Cogliati, Bruno; Vannucchi, Camila Infantosi

    2017-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH)-pyometra syndrome is one of the most common diseases of noncastrated female dogs. However, determination of etiological mechanisms and differential diagnosis of CEH-pyometra syndrome are undefined. The aim of this study is to compare immunohistochemically the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inflammatory mediator, Ki-67 antigen proliferation marker, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) angiogenesis mediator and its FLT-1 and KDR receptors, and correlate with Doppler velocimetry of uterine artery and endometrial vascularization in bitches with CEH-pyometra syndrome. Bitches were allocated into CEH-mucometra Group (n = 13), Pyometra Group (n = 11), and Control Group (n = 8). Pyometra Group presented cytoplasmatic staining intensity for COX-2, VEGF-A, and FLT-1 and KDR receptors in luminal epithelium cells significantly higher compared to CEH-mucometra and Control groups. For the glandular epithelium, Pyometra Group had higher immunostaining score for VEGF-A and its receptors (FLT-1 and KDR). Hemodynamic indexes showed negative correlation with VEGF-A and its receptors as well as with COX-2. On the other hand, uterine vascularization score showed positive correlation in relation to immunostaining of COX-2, VEGF-A, and receptors in the endometrium luminal epithelium. In conclusion, uterus of bitches with CEH-pyometra syndrome show inflammatory process characterized by COX-2 expression, resulting in greater expression of proliferative Ki-67 marker as tissue response against the infectious agent. Furthermore, the increased VEGF-A expression and its receptors in CEH-pyometra reflect the increased blood flow and lower vascular resistance. Therefore, canine pyometra is characterized by an inflammatory, proliferative, and vascular disorder. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein regulates cell stress response and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta L DeDiego

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS-CoV that lacks the envelope (E gene (rSARS-CoV-ΔE is attenuated in vivo. To identify factors that contribute to rSARS-CoV-ΔE attenuation, gene expression in cells infected by SARS-CoV with or without E gene was compared. Twenty-five stress response genes were preferentially upregulated during infection in the absence of the E gene. In addition, genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, cell metabolism, immunoregulation, inflammation, apoptosis and cell cycle and differentiation were differentially regulated in cells infected with rSARS-CoV with or without the E gene. Administration of E protein in trans reduced the stress response in cells infected with rSARS-CoV-ΔE or with respiratory syncytial virus, or treated with drugs, such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin that elicit cell stress by different mechanisms. In addition, SARS-CoV E protein down-regulated the signaling pathway inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1 of the unfolded protein response, but not the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK or activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6 pathways, and reduced cell apoptosis. Overall, the activation of the IRE-1 pathway was not able to restore cell homeostasis, and apoptosis was induced probably as a measure to protect the host by limiting virus production and dissemination. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines was reduced in rSARS-CoV-ΔE-infected cells compared to rSARS-CoV-infected cells, suggesting that the increase in stress responses and the reduction of inflammation in the absence of the E gene contributed to the attenuation of rSARS-CoV-ΔE.

  9. Nuclear Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein co-regulates T cell factor 1-mediated transcription in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai V. Kuznetsov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp family of actin-nucleating factors are present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The role of nuclear WASp for T cell development remains incompletely defined. Methods We performed WASp chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells. Results WASp was enriched at genic and intergenic regions and associated with the transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Thymocytes and spleen CD4+ T cells showed 15 common WASp-interacting genes, including the gene encoding T cell factor (TCF12. WASp KO thymocytes had reduced nuclear TCF12 whereas thymocytes expressing constitutively active WASpL272P and WASpI296T had increased nuclear TCF12, suggesting that regulated WASp activity controlled nuclear TCF12. We identify a putative DNA element enriched in WASp ChIP-seq samples identical to a TCF1-binding site and we show that WASp directly interacted with TCF1 in the nucleus. Conclusions These data place nuclear WASp in proximity with TCF1 and TCF12, essential factors for T cell development.

  10. Sequence-specific and domain-specific DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Y; Bates, S; Pfeifer, G P

    1997-08-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells have specific DNA repair defects. We had previously analyzed repair rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers at nucleotide resolution along the human JUN gene in normal fibroblasts and found very efficient repair of sequences near the transcription initiation site but slow repair along the promoter. To investigate sequence-specific repair rate patterns in XP and CS cells, we conducted a similar analysis in XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, and CSB fibroblasts. XPA cells were almost completely repair-deficient at all sequences analyzed. XPC cells repaired only the transcribed DNA strand beginning at position -20 relative to the transcription start site. Both XBP and XPD cells were deficient in repair of nontranscribed DNA and also very inefficiently repaired the transcribed strand including sequences near the transcription start site. CSB cells exhibited rapid repair near the transcription initiation site but were deficient in repair of sequences encountered by RNA polymerase during elongation (beginning at position +20). Since transcription of the JUN gene was UV-induced in all fibroblast strains, including CSB, the defective repair of the transcribed strand in CSB cannot be explained by a lack of transcription; rather, it appears to be a true DNA repair defect.

  11. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadafumi Yokoyama

    Full Text Available The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS.

  12. Bromodeoxyuridine does not contribute to sister chromatid exchange events in normal or Bloom syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wietmarschen, Niek; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2016-08-19

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) are considered sensitive indicators of genome instability. Detection of SCEs typically requires cells to incorporate bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) during two rounds of DNA synthesis. Previous studies have suggested that SCEs are induced by DNA replication over BrdU-substituted DNA and that BrdU incorporation alone could be responsible for the high number of SCE events observed in cells from patients with Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare genetic disorder characterized by marked genome instability and high SCE frequency. Here we show using Strand-seq, a single cell DNA template strand sequencing technique, that the presence of variable BrdU concentrations in the cell culture medium and in DNA template strands has no effect on SCE frequency in either normal or BS cells. We conclude that BrdU does not induce SCEs and that SCEs detected in either normal or BS cells reflect DNA repair events that occur spontaneously. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Teofili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs, and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34+ cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b+ and CD41+ cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia.

  14. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Simon, Karen L.; Kirby, Martha R.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg) obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO) mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS. PMID:26448644

  15. An Abundant Evolutionarily Conserved CSB-PiggyBac Fusion Protein Expressed in Cockayne Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John C.; Bailey, Arnold D.; Fan, Hua-Ying; Pavelitz, Thomas; Weiner, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3′ terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1–5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein. PMID:18369450

  16. An abundant evolutionarily conserved CSB-PiggyBac fusion protein expressed in Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Newman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3' terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1-5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein.

  17. Production of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus in human and nonhuman cells transfected with an infectious molecular clone.

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, A; Gendelman, H E; Koenig, S.; Folks, T; Willey, R; Rabson, A; Martin, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    We constructed an infectious molecular clone of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus. Upon transfection, this clone directed the production of infectious virus particles in a wide variety of cells in addition to human T4 cells. The progeny, infectious virions, were synthesized in mouse, mink, monkey, and several human non-T cell lines, indicating the absence of any intracellular obstacle to viral RNA or protein production or assembly. During the course of these studies, a ...

  18. Usp16 contributes to somatic stem cell defects in Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Maddalena; Sikandar, Shaheen; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Kuo, Angera; Di Robilant, Benedetta Nicolis; Haro-Acosta, Veronica; Ouadah, Youcef; Quarta, Marco; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Qian, Dalong; Reddy, Vadiyala M.; Cheshier, Samuel; Garner, Craig C.; Clarke, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Down syndrome (DS) results from full or partial trisomy of chromosome 21. However, the consequences of the underlying gene-dosage imbalance on adult tissues remain poorly understood. Here we show that in Ts65Dn mice, trisomic for 132 genes homologous to HSA21, triplication of Usp16 reduces self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and expansion of mammary epithelial cells, neural progenitors, and fibroblasts. Moreover, Usp16 is associated with decreased ubiquitination of Cdkn2a and accelerated senescence in Ts65Dn fibroblasts. Usp16 can remove ubiquitin from H2AK119, a critical mark for the maintenance of multiple somatic tissues. Downregulation of Usp16, either by mutation of a single normal USP16 allele or by shRNAs, largely rescues all these defects. Furthermore, in human tissues overexpression of USP16 reduces the expansion of normal fibroblasts and post-natal neural progenitors while downregulation of USP16 partially rescues the proliferation defects of DS fibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that USP16 plays an important role in antagonizing the self-renewal and/or senescence pathways in Down syndrome and could serve as an attractive target to ameliorate some of the associated pathologies. PMID:24025767

  19. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  20. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Campos-Sanchez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS, a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1 gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients.

  1. Bilateral Entry and Release of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Induces Profound Apoptosis of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xinrong; Hill, Terence E.; Morimoto, Chikao; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infects human bronchial epithelial Calu-3 cells. Unlike severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV, which exclusively infects and releases through the apical route, this virus can do so through either side of polarized Calu-3 cells. Infection results in profound apoptosis within 24 h irrespective of its production of titers that are lower than those of SARS-CoV. Together, our results provide new insights into the dissemination and pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and may indicate that the virus differs markedly from SARS-CoV. PMID:23824802

  2. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Yang

    Full Text Available The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2 play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL. We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064 induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  3. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  4. Rett syndrome induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons reveal novel neurophysiological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, N; Zhang, W-B; Pasceri, P; Eubanks, J H; Salter, M W; Ellis, J

    2012-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental autism spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Here, we describe the first characterization and neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from Mecp2-deficient mice. Fully reprogrammed wild-type (WT) and heterozygous female iPS cells express endogenous pluripotency markers, reactivate the X-chromosome and differentiate into the three germ layers. We directed iPS cells to produce glutamatergic neurons, which generated action potentials and formed functional excitatory synapses. iPS cell-derived neurons from heterozygous Mecp2(308) mice showed defects in the generation of evoked action potentials and glutamatergic synaptic transmission, as previously reported in brain slices. Further, we examined electrophysiology features not yet studied with the RTT iPS cell system and discovered that MeCP2-deficient neurons fired fewer action potentials, and displayed decreased action potential amplitude, diminished peak inward currents and higher input resistance relative to WT iPS-derived neurons. Deficiencies in action potential firing and inward currents suggest that disturbed Na(+) channel function may contribute to the dysfunctional RTT neuronal network. These phenotypes were additionally confirmed in neurons derived from independent WT and hemizygous mutant iPS cell lines, indicating that these reproducible deficits are attributable to MeCP2 deficiency. Taken together, these results demonstrate that neuronally differentiated MeCP2-deficient iPS cells recapitulate deficits observed previously in primary neurons, and these identified phenotypes further illustrate the requirement of MeCP2 in neuronal development and/or in the maintenance of normal function. By validating the use of iPS cells to delineate mechanisms underlying RTT pathogenesis, we identify deficiencies that can be targeted for in vitro translational screens.

  5. Detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma for Down syndrome, Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome of high risk fetus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ke, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    .... A total of 2340 women at high risk for Down syndrome based on maternal age, prenatal history or a positive sesum or sonographic screening test were offered prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test...

  6. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...

  7. Leydig cell clustering and Reinke crystal distribution in relation to hormonal function in adult patients with testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) including cryptorchidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Rikke R; Johannsen, Trine H; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) comprises testicular germ cell cancer, cryptorchidism and some cases of male infertility and hypospadias, which can be linked to impairment of intrauterine gonadal development. Among histological signs of TDS, large Leydig cell (LC) clusters (micron...

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  9. Generation of an ICF Syndrome Model by Efficient Genome Editing of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the CRISPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  10. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A; Lauritsen, J; Oturai, P S; Mortensen, J; Hojman, P; Helge, J W; Daugaard, G

    2017-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up were eligible for participation in the study. Markers of systemic inflammation and prevalence of MetS were compared between TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and the control group. Of 158 included TC survivors, 28 (18%) had uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction, 59 (37%) had compensated Leydig cell dysfunction and 71 (45%) had normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. MetS and markers of systemic inflammation were evaluated at a median follow-up of 9.7 years (interquartile range 4.1-17.1) after TC treatment. The prevalence of MetS was significantly lower among patients with compensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up (12% versus 27%, p = 0.04), whereas there was no difference between TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction and controls (33% versus 27%, p = 0.5). Apart from high-sensitivity C-reactive protein which was higher in TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up, there was no evidence of increased systemic inflammation in patients with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated with MetS, whereas there was no association between LH and MetS. We did not find evidence that TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up had increased long-term risk of MetS. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated

  11. Overexpression of DYRK1A, a Down Syndrome Candidate gene, Impairs Primordial Germ Cells Maintenance and Migration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Lin, Ziyuan; Liu, Mingfeng; Wang, He; Sun, Huaqin

    2017-11-10

    DYRK1A, located on chromosome 21, is a major candidate gene of Down syndrome (DS, trisomy21), and its overexpression is associated with abnormal phenotype of Down syndrome patients. The defects of gonads and germ cells in Down Syndrome suggest that overexpression of DYRK1A has potential effect on primordial germ cells (PGCs) development. Human and zebrafish DYRK1A protein sequence possess 75.6% similarity and same function domains, suggesting the evolutional conservation. Here, we used zebrafish model to detect the definite role of excessive expression of DYRK1A in PGCs development during embryogenesis. We injected DYRK1A mRNA into embryos and detected the PGCs marker gene vasa and nanos1. Results showed depletion in numbers and disordering migration of PGCs in human or zebrafish DYRK1A overexpressed zebrafish embryos. Quantitative proteome analysis indicated that embryonic proteins were significantly altered in DYRK1A overexpressed embryos. Of note, ca15b and piwil1, two identified critical factors for PGCs development, showed ectopic expression induced by overexpressed DYRK1A. In brief, we demonstrate that overexpression of DYRK1A, a candidate gene of Down's syndrome, impairs PGCs development during early embryogenesis by altering key factors in embryos. Importantly, our work may provide a conceivable mechanism for the gonads and germ cells defects of Down syndrome patients.

  12. Evaluating the use of cell phone messaging for community Ebola syndromic surveillance in high risked settings in Southern Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kangbai; Mohamed, Koroma

    2015-09-01

    Most underdeveloped countries do not meet core disease outbreak surveillance because of the lack of human resources, laboratory and infrastructural facilities. The use of cell phone technology for disease outbreak syndromic surveillance is a new phenomenon in Sierra Leone despite its successes in other developing countries like Sri Lanka. In this study we set to evaluate the effectiveness of using cell phone technology for Ebola hemorrhagic fever syndromic surveillance in a high risked community in Sierra Leone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using cell phone messaging (text and calls) for community Ebola hemorrhagic fever syndromic surveillance in high risked community in southern Sierra Leone. All cell phone syndromic surveillance data used for this study was reported as cell phone alert messages-texts and voice calls; by the Moyamba District Health Management Team for both Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect and mortalities. We conducted a longitudinal data analysis of the monthly cumulative confirmed Ebola hemorrhagic fever cases and mortalities collected by both the traditional sentinel and community cell phone syndromic surveillance from August 2014 to October 2014. A total of 129 and 49 Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect and confirmed cases respectively were recorded using the community Ebola syndromic surveillance cell phone alert system by the Moyamba District Health Management Team in October 2014. The average number of Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspects and confirmed cases for October 2014 were 4.16 (Std.dev 3.76) and 1.58 (Std.dev 1.43) respectively. Thirty-four percent (n=76) of the community Ebola syndromic surveillance cell phone alerts that were followed-up within 24 hours reported Ebola hemorrhagic fever suspect cases while 65.92% (n=147) reported mortality. Our study suggests some form of underreporting by the traditional sentinel Ebola hemorrhagic fever disease surveillance system in Moyamba District southern Sierra Leone for August

  13. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Koellikerstrasse 6, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany); Wehnert, Manfred [Institute of Human Genetics, University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Huebner, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.huebner@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Koellikerstrasse 6, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  14. Pluripotent stem cell models of Blau syndrome reveal an IFN-γ-dependent inflammatory response in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Sanami; Kambe, Naotomo; Kawasaki, Yuri; Niwa, Akira; Honda-Ozaki, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Nagahashi, Ayako; Semi, Katsunori; Hotta, Akitsu; Asaka, Isao; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Matsue, Hiroyuki; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Saito, Megumu K

    2017-06-03

    Blau syndrome, or early-onset sarcoidosis, is a juvenile-onset systemic granulomatosis associated with a mutation in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2). The underlying mechanisms of Blau syndrome leading to autoinflammation are still unclear, and there is currently no effective specific treatment for Blau syndrome. To elucidate the mechanisms of autoinflammation in patients with Blau syndrome, we sought to clarify the relation between disease-associated mutant NOD2 and the inflammatory response in human samples. Blau syndrome-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines were established. The disease-associated NOD2 mutation of iPSCs was corrected by using a CRISPR-Cas9 system to precisely evaluate the in vitro phenotype of iPSC-derived cells. We also introduced the same NOD2 mutation into a control iPSC line. These isogenic iPSCs were then differentiated into monocytic cell lineages, and the statuses of nuclear factor κB pathway and proinflammatory cytokine secretion were investigated. IFN-γ acted as a priming signal through upregulation of NOD2. In iPSC-derived macrophages with mutant NOD2, IFN-γ treatment induced ligand-independent nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. RNA sequencing analysis revealed distinct transcriptional profiles of mutant macrophages both before and after IFN-γ treatment. Patient-derived macrophages demonstrated a similar IFN-γ-dependent inflammatory response. Our data support the significance of ligand-independent autoinflammation in the pathophysiology of Blau syndrome. Our comprehensive isogenic disease-specific iPSC panel provides a useful platform for probing therapeutic and diagnostic clues for the treatment of patients with Blau syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical manifestations in 105 persons with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimonis, V.E.; Yang, M.L.; Bale, S.J. [National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCC; Gorlin syndrome), an autosomal dominant disorder linked to 9q22.3-q31, and caused by mutations in PTC, the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene, comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies and calcification of the falx cerebri. We reviewed the findings on 105 affected individuals examined at the NIH since 1985. The data included 48 males and 57 females ranging in age from 4 months to 87 years. Eighty percent of whites (71/90) and 38% (5/13) of African-Americans had at least one basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with the first tumor occurring at a mean age of 23 (median 20) years and 21 (median 20) years, respectively. Excluding individuals exposed to radiation therapy, the number of BCCs ranged from 1 to >1,000 (median 8) and 1 to 3 (median 2), respectively, in the 2 groups. Jaw cysts occurred in 78/105 (74%) with the first tumor occurring in 80% by the age of 20 years. The number of total jaw cysts ranged from 1 to 28 (median 3). Palmar pits and plantar pits were seen in 87%. Ovarian fibromas were diagnosed by ultrasound in 9/52 (17%) at a mean age of 30 years. Medulloblastoma occurred in 4 patients at a mean age of 2.3 years. Three patients had cleft lip or palate. Physical findings include {open_quotes}coarse face{close_quotes} in 54%, relative macrocephaly in 50%, hypertelorism in 42%, frontal bossing in 27%, pectus deformity in 13%, and Sprengel deformity in 11%. This study delineates the frequency of the clinical and radiological anomalies in NBCC in a large population of US patients and discusses guidelines for diagnosis and management. 48 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. “Dancing Eye Syndrome” Secondary to Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laroumagne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND, opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, so-called “dancing eye syndrome,” is a rare disorder combining multivectorial eye movements, involuntary multifocal myoclonus, and cerebellar ataxia. Although several paraneoplastic antibodies against postsynaptic or cell-surface antigens have been reported, usually most patients are serum antibody negative. We report a 65-year-old patient with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome revealing a small-cell lung carcinoma. If serologic antineuronal anti-body screening was negative, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD were positive. Despite the specific anticancer treatment and high dose corticosteroids, the patient developed a severe and progressive encephalopathy and died 10 days later.

  17. Vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic changes in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosas-Molist, Eva; Meirelles, Thayna; López-Luque, Judit; Serra-Peinado, Carla; Selva, Javier; Caja, Laia; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Uriarte, Juan José; Bertran, Esther; Mendizábal, Yolanda; Hernández, Vanessa; García-Calero, Carolina; Busnadiego, Oscar; Condom, Enric; Toral, David; Castellà, Manel; Forteza, Alberto; Navajas, Daniel; Sarri, Elisabet; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Dietz, Harry C; Fabregat, Isabel; Egea, Gustavo

    2015-04-01

    Marfan's syndrome is characterized by the formation of ascending aortic aneurysms resulting from altered assembly of extracellular matrix microfibrils and chronic tissue growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. TGF-β is a potent regulator of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype. We hypothesized that as a result of the chronic TGF-β signaling, VSMC would alter their basal differentiation phenotype, which could facilitate the formation of aneurysms. This study explores whether Marfan's syndrome entails phenotypic alterations of VSMC and possible mechanisms at the subcellular level. Immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses of dilated aortas from Marfan patients showed overexpression of contractile protein markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, smooth muscle protein 22 alpha, and calponin-1) and collagen I in comparison with healthy aortas. VSMC explanted from Marfan aortic aneurysms showed increased in vitro expression of these phenotypic markers and also of myocardin, a transcription factor essential for VSMC-specific differentiation. These alterations were generally reduced after pharmacological inhibition of the TGF-β pathway. Marfan VSMC in culture showed more robust actin stress fibers and enhanced RhoA-GTP levels, which was accompanied by increased focal adhesion components and higher nuclear localization of myosin-related transcription factor A. Marfan VSMC and extracellular matrix measured by atomic force microscopy were both stiffer than their respective controls. In Marfan VSMC, both in tissue and in culture, there are variable TGF-β-dependent phenotypic changes affecting contractile proteins and collagen I, leading to greater cellular and extracellular matrix stiffness. Altogether, these alterations may contribute to the known aortic rigidity that precedes or accompanies Marfan's syndrome aneurysm formation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Restless legs syndrome and sleep quality among adult sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Siraj Omar; AlQassas, Ibrahim; Merdad, Roah; Alsaggaf, Rajaa; Al-Sayes, Fatin

    2017-11-19

    The purpose of this study is to determine and compare the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) between adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and non-SCD anemia. This cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2013 to July 2014. Patients with SCD and non-SCD anemia were recruited from a hematology clinic at a large university hospital. Patients with secondary RLS were excluded. Data were collected on demographic features, clinical evaluations, laboratory tests, sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, RLS symptoms using the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Criteria, severity of RLS using the International Restless Leg Syndrome Rating Scale, and daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The study sample consisted of 44 patients with SCD and 45 with non-SCD anemia. The two groups were comparable in age, gender, body mass index, smoking habit, and comorbidities. Poor sleep quality was found in 63% of the SCD group compared to 53% of the non-SCD group. The prevalence of RLS among SCD group and non-SCD group was 13.6% (6/44) and 8.8% (4/45), respectively. These differences, however, were not statistically significant, p > 0.05. Excessive daytime sleepiness was also similar in both groups, with the rate being 20.5 and 17.8% in the SCD and non-SCD groups, respectively. Our study revealed that poor sleep quality and RLS were both common among adult patients with SCD; however, they did not differ significantly from patients with non-SCD anemia.

  19. Successful Reduced Intensity Conditioning Alternate Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Dhwanee; Katewa, Satyendra; Rastogi, Neha; Kohli, Shruti; Nivargi, Sagar; Yadav, Satya P

    2017-11-01

    There are very few reports of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) with alternate donor for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and there is no report of RIC with posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) in WAS. There is only 1 report of T cell receptor αβ and CD19-depleted haploidentical HSCT for WAS. Here we report successful outcome in 3 children with WAS who underwent successful RIC alternate donor HSCT of whom 2 (matched unrelated donor and T-cell replete haploidentical) received PTCy and 1 underwent T cell receptor αβ and CD19-depleted haploidentical HSCT. We modified conditioning used by Luznik for haploidentical HSCT by adding thiotepa 8 mg/kg and Campath or rabbit antithymoglobulin for 2 cases who received PTCy. In third case we gave fludarabine, thiotepa, and treosulfan-based conditioning. The mean duration of follow-up for these patients was 23.6 months posttransplant (range, 21 to 26 mo). All 3 patients are transfusion independent. Acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) grade I occurred in 1 and none had chronic GVHD. Chimerism of all 3 was fully donor (>95% donor) at D+30 and D+100 posttransplant. All are alive, healthy, and doing well. Our 3 cases highlight that with newer conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis approach alternate donor HSCT in WAS can become a safe and effective treatment option.

  20. Significantly lengthened telomere in granulosa cells from women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Duo; Xie, Juanke; Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Song, Xiaobing; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Cuilian; Sun, Yingpu

    2017-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy among women at reproductive age. However, its etiology remains poorly understood. Recent studies indicated that telomere length was related to PCOS. However, the association between telomere length and PCOS has only been shown in leucocytes and remained controversial across different studies. To clarify the association between telomere length and PCOS, the current study interrogated telomere length not only in leucocytes, but also in follicular granulosa cells, which is essential for folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis. Seventy-five patients with PCOS and 81 controls with mechanical infertility undergoing their first in vitro fertilization cycle were enrolled. Their peripheral blood and granulosa cells were collected on the oocyte retrieval day. Telomere length of both leucocytes in the blood and granulosa cells was assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No significant difference was found in the leucocyte telomere length between controls and PCOS patients (0.99 ± 0.44 vs. 1.00 ± 0.38, p = 0.93). Interestingly, when comparing telomere length in granulosa cells between controls and PCOS subjects, significantly lengthened telomere length was found in PCOS subjects (1.00 ± 0.37 vs. 1.57±0.67, p PCOS. Given the importance of telomere length in cellular proliferation, our findings provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of PCOS that abnormalities in telomere length possibly disturb folliculogenesis and subsequently result in PCOS.

  1. Altered cytokine profiles of mononuclear cells after stimulation in a patient with Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, SangWook; Lee, JangHoon; Woo, Chan-Wook; Kim, IlHwan; Kye, YoungChul; Lee, KwangChul; Lee, JungHwa

    2010-06-01

    Autoinflammatory Blau syndrome (BS) is associated with NOD2 gene mutations that lead to constitutive NFkappaB activation. NOD2 functions as an intracellular receptor for the muramyl dipeptide (MDP) component of peptidoglycan (PGN). The objectives of this study are to analyse whether NFkappaB activation in BS affects immune cell functions, and whether NOD2 and toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways interact. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) from a BS patient and three normal donors were analyzed for their ability to produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the presence and absence of MDP, PGN, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The results obtained showed that the basal TNF-alpha and IL-10 production by MNCs over 24 h of incubation was very low for both the patient and the normal donors. However, upon stimulation with MDP, LPS, and PGN, the cells from the BS patient produced much lower levels of TNF-alpha, IL-10, G-CSF, and IFN-gamma than the normal donor cells. We conclude that the pathogenic mechanism responsible for the chronic inflammation that characterizes BS may relate to the impaired production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to stimuli. The NOD2 pathway possibly interacts with either the TLR2 or TLR4 pathways.

  2. Ovarian steroid cell tumor in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarandi F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid cell tumor is one of the rare ovarian tumors and forms 0.1% of all ovarian tumors, divided to three subgroups. Steroid cell tumor that are not otherwise specified (NOS are the most common type and represent 60% of steroid cell tumors. One of the most known signs of this tumor is hormonal function, especially androgenic effects of it. Primary treatment consists of eradication of tumor via surgery.Case presentation: The patient is a 29 years old female with history of poly cystic ovarian syndrome since 10 years ago, who attended to the clinic of General Women Hospital of Tehran in January 2011. In pelvic ultrasonography, there was a 6449mm mass in the right adnexa consisting of homogeneous component. She underwent laparotomy and unilateral salpingoophorectomy was done. Pathological report was steroid cell tumor of ovary.Conclusion: The aim of this study is reporting one of the rare tumors of ovary and assessment of the correct way of diagnosis and treatment of it.

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5: In Vitro Cytotoxicity Effects on Renal Tubular Cells and Inflammatory Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Brocca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 (CRS Type 5 reflects concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunctions in the setting of a wide spectrum of systemic disorders. Our aim was to study in vitro effects of CRS Type 5 plasma on renal tubular cells (RTCs, in terms of cellular death and the characterization of inflammatory plasma profile in these patients. Material and Methods. We enrolled 11 CRS Type 5 patients from ICU and 16 healthy controls. Plasma from patients and controls was incubated with renal tubular cells (RTCs and cell death was evaluated. Plasma cytokines were detected. Results. RTCs incubated with CRS Type 5 plasma showed significantly higher apoptosis and necrosis with respect to controls. Plasma cytokine profile of CRS Type 5 patients was significantly different from controls: we observed the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in these patients. Caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were activated in cells treated with CRS Type 5 plasma compared to controls. Conclusions. Our results underline the cytotoxic effect of CRS Type 5 mediators on RTC viability, probably due to the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis and to the deregulation of cytokine release. The consequence may be the damage of distant organs which lead to the worsening of condition of patients.

  4. Epigenetic modifications in human fragile X pluripotent stem cells; Implications in fragile X syndrome modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine

    2017-02-01

    Patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS) exhibit moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. In addition, one-third of FXS patients show characteristics of autism spectrum disorder. FXS is caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion, which leads to silencing of the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene. The absence of the FMR1 gene product, FMRP, is the reason for the disease symptoms. It has been suggested that repeat instability and transcription of the FMR1 gene occur during early embryonic development, while after cell differentiation repeats become stable and the FMR1 gene is silent. Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, are associated with gene silencing and repeat stability at the FMR1 locus. However, the mechanisms leading to gene silencing and repeat expansion are still ambiguous, because studies at the human genomic locus were limited until now. The FXS pluripotent stem cells, recently derived from FXS adult cells and FXS blastocysts, are new useful tools to examine these mechanisms at the human endogenous FMR1 locus. This review summarizes the epigenetic features and experimental studies of FXS human embryonic and FXS induced pluripotent stem cells, generated so far. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Genetic variants in the cell cycle control pathways contribute to early onset colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Etzel, Carol J; Amos, Christopher I; Zhang, Qing; Viscofsky, Nancy; Lindor, Noralane M; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2009-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome of familial malignancies resulting from germ line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Our goal was to take a pathway-based approach to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in cell cycle-related genes on age of onset for Lynch syndrome using a tree model. We evaluated polymorphisms in a panel of cell cycle-related genes (AURKA, CDKN2A, TP53, E2F2, CCND1, TP73, MDM2, IGF1, and CDKN2B) in 220 MMR gene mutation carriers from 129 families. We applied a novel statistical approach, tree modeling (Classification and Regression Tree), to the analysis of data on patients with Lynch syndrome to identify individuals with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer at an early age and explore the gene-gene interactions between polymorphisms in cell cycle genes. We found that the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 variant genotype, AURKA wild-type genotype, and CCND1 variant genotype had the youngest age of onset, with a 45-year median onset age, while the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 wild-type genotype, and AURKA variant genotype had the latest median age of onset, which was 70 years. Furthermore, we found evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction between E2F2 and AURKA genes related to CRC age of onset. Polymorphisms in these cell cycle-related genes work together to modify the age at the onset of CRC in patients with Lynch syndrome. These studies provide an important part of the foundation for development of a model for stratifying age of onset risk among those with Lynch syndrome.

  7. Synchronous malignant B-cell lymphoma and gastric tubular adenocarcinoma associated with paraneoplastic cutaneous vasculitis: hypereosinophilic syndrome with mixed cryoglobulinemia is an important sign of paraneoplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Takamori

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastric adenocarcinoma developing concomitantly with a lymphoma is rare. Furthermore, B-cell lymphoma, originating from lymph nodes, with eosinophilia is extremely rare. We report here a case with a synchronous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL and an early adenocarcinoma of the stomach. In addition, this case seemed to be associated with paraneoplastic cutaneous vasculitis caused by hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES with mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC. Many neoplastic diseases that affect internal organs display cutaneous manifestations, which may be the presenting signs and symptoms of the underlying malignancy. In particular, the association between cutaneous vasculitis and malignancy has been widely reviewed, and recently neoplasms have been suggested to produce antigens and the resultant immune complex formations, activating the serum complement, thus cause paraneoplastic vasculitis. In this case, severe eosinophilia and cryoglobulinemia with low complements were observed in a laboratory test. A biopsy specimen from a skin lesion revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with severe perivascular infiltration of eosinophils. The cutaneous vasuculitis was considered to be a manifestation of HES with MC, although there were no etiological factors of HES and MC. Therefore, the vasculitis seems to be a symptom of paraneoplastic syndrome in this case. Our finding suggests that the potential presence of malignancies should be kept in mind as a possible underlying disorder especially in the presence of HES with MC; this possibility is interesting also as regards at least part of the pathogenesis for paraneplastic syndrome.

  8. Studying early lethality of 45,XO (Turner's syndrome embryos using human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achia Urbach

    Full Text Available Turner's syndrome (caused by monosomy of chromosome X is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities in females. Although 3% of all pregnancies start with XO embryos, 99% of these pregnancies terminate spontaneously during the first trimester. The common genetic explanation for the early lethality of monosomy X embryos, as well as the phenotype of surviving individuals is haploinsufficiency of pseudoautosomal genes on the X chromosome. Another possible mechanism is null expression of imprinted genes on the X chromosome due to the loss of the expressed allele. In contrast to humans, XO mice are viable, and fertile. Thus, neither cells from patients nor mouse models can be used in order to study the cause of early lethality in XO embryos. Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs can differentiate in culture into cells from the three embryonic germ layers as well as into extraembryonic cells. These cells have been shown to have great value in modeling human developmental genetic disorders. In order to study the reasons for the early lethality of 45,XO embryos we have isolated HESCs that have spontaneously lost one of their sex chromosomes. To examine the possibility that imprinted genes on the X chromosome play a role in the phenotype of XO embryos, we have identified genes that were no longer expressed in the mutant cells. None of these genes showed a monoallelic expression in XX cells, implying that imprinting is not playing a major role in the phenotype of XO embryos. To suggest an explanation for the embryonic lethality caused by monosomy X, we have differentiated the XO HESCs in vitro an in vivo. DNA microarray analysis of the differentiated cells enabled us to compare the expression of tissue specific genes in XO and XX cells. The tissue that showed the most significant differences between the clones was the placenta. Many placental genes are expressed at much higher levels in XX cells in compare to XO cells. Thus, we suggest that abnormal

  9. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Makwana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Moyamoya disease is a disorder of blood vessels in the brain, specifically the internal carotid arteries and the arteries that branch from them. The primary idiopathic form “moyamoya disease” has been distinguished from an associated form of “moyamoya syndrome,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease, fibromuscular dysplasia, activated protein C resistance, or head trauma. There have been only 47 previous cases of moyamoya syndrome in association with Down syndrome reported in the world literature. Recently, we have come across a Case of Downs’ Syndrome with Moyamoya Syndrome. Because of its rarity we want to report our case.

  10. Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

  11. Increased frequency of CD16+monocytes and the presence of activated dendritic cells in salivary glands in primary Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, M. E.; Welzen-Coppens, J. M. C.; van Helden-Meeuwsen, C. G.; Bootsma, H.; Vissink, A.; van Rooijen, N.; de Merwe, J. P. van; Drexhage, H. A.; Versnel, M. A.

    Objectives: In the salivary glands of patients with primary Sjogren Syndrome (pSjS) an accumulation of dendritic cells (DCs) is seen, which is thought to play a role in stimulating local inflammation. Aberrancies in subsets of monocytes, generally considered the blood precursors for DCs, may play a

  12. Studies with muscle cells from controls and a patient with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Barth, P.G.; Roermund, C.W.T. van; Ofman, R.; Wolterman, R.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Tager, J.M.; Bosch, H. van den; Bolhuis, P.A.

    In the present study we investigated peroxisomal functions in cultured human muscle cells from control subjects and from a patient with the Zellweger syndrome, a genetic disease characterized by the absence of morphologically distinguishable peroxisomes in liver and kidney. In homogenates of

  13. Campylobacter DNA Is Present in Circulating Myelomonocytic Cells of Healthy Persons and in Persons with Guillain-Barre´ Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rhijn, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/238098680; Bleumink-Pluym, N.M.C.; van Putten, J.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069916527; van den Berg, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the prime cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis. An important complication of C. jejuni enteritis is Guillain-Barre´ syndrome (GBS), an immune-mediated disorder of the peripheral nerve. The presence of C. jejuni DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of

  14. Increased frequency of CD16+monocytes and the presence of activated dendritic cells in salivary glands in primary Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, M.E.; Welzen-Coppens, J.M.C.; Helden-Meeuwsen, van C.G.; Bootsma, H.; Vissink, A.; Rooijen, van N.; Merwe, de J.P.V.; Drexhage, H.A.; Versnel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: In the salivary glands of patients with primary Sjogren Syndrome (pSjS) an accumulation of dendritic cells (DCs) is seen, which is thought to play a role in stimulating local inflammation. Aberrancies in subsets of monocytes, generally considered the blood precursors for DCs, may play a

  15. Comment on "Detection of an infectious retrovirus, XMRV, in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.; Galama, J.M.D.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Lombardi et al. (Reports, 23 October 2009, p. 585) reported detection of the human gammaretrovirus XMRV in the blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). However, the patient description provided was incomplete. The inclusion of patients from a "CFS outbreak" previously linked with

  16. Generation of rat-induced pluripotent stem cells from a new model of metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Takenaka-Ninagawa

    Full Text Available We recently characterized DahlS.Z-Leprfa/Leprfa (DS/obese rats, derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive rats and Zucker rats, as a new animal model of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Although the phenotype of DS/obese rats is similar to that of humans with MetS, the pathophysiological and metabolic characteristics in each cell type remain to be clarified. Hence, the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from MetS rats is essential for investigations of MetS in vitro. Reports of rat iPSCs (riPSCs, however, are few because of the difficulty of comparing to other rodents such as mouse. Recently, the advantage of using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs as a cell source for generating iPSCs was described. We aimed to establish riPSCs from MSCs in adipose tissues of both DS/obese rats and their lean littermates, DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+ (DS/lean rats using lentivirus vectors with only three factors Oct4, Klf4, and Sox2 without c-Myc. The morphology, gene expression profiles, and protein expression of established colonies showed embryonic stem cell (ESCs-like properties, and the differentiation potential into cells from all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo (teratomas. Both riPSCs became adipocytes after induction of adipogenesis by insulin, T3, and dexamethasone. Real-time PCR analysis also revealed that both riPSCs and the adipose tissue from DS/obese and DS/lean rats possess similar expression patterns of adipocyte differentiation-related genes. We succeeded in generating riPSCs effectively from MSCs of both DS/obese and DS/lean rats. These riPSCs may well serve as highly effective tools for the investigation of MetS pathophysiology in vitro.

  17. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome: new case with normal telomere length in skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniszewski, L; Nowak, R; Oknińska-Hoffmann, E; Skórka, A; Gieruszczak-Białek, D; Sawadro-Rochowska, M

    2001-10-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch (neonatal progeroid) syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition with characteristic appearance of premature aging present at birth (aged face, natal teeth, and wrinkled skin). Other features of the syndrome are generalized lipoatrophy with specific fat accumulation in the lateral suprabuttock region, hypotrichosis, macrocephaly (pseudohydrocephalus), and mental retardation. We report on a new case that demonstrates all typical features of the syndrome. The girl is now 16 years and 10 months old and has had follow-up from birth. We measured terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length to evaluate whether the patient's premature aging process is accompanied by shortening of telomere length in her cultured fibroblasts. Mean TRF of 13.5 kb found in our patient's fibroblasts is not shortened as compared to that of normal fibroblasts. Our results differ from those observed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. [Impacts on chronic fatigue syndrome of qi deficiency syndrome and T cell subgroups in patients treated with acupuncture at selective time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jia-Yan; Shen, Lin; Liu, Qing; Wang, Ling-Yun

    2013-12-01

    To verify the clinical efficacy on chronic fatigue syndrome of qi deficiency syndrome treated with acupuncture at selective time and explore the effect mechanism. Eighty patients were randomized into a selective-time-acupuncture group and an acupuncture group, 40 cases in each one. Qihai (CV 6), Guanyuan (CV 4), Hegu (LI 4), Taichong (LR 3), Sanyinjiao (SP 6) and Zusanli (ST 36) were selected in the two groups. In the selective-time-acupuncture group, acupuncture was used at 9:00am to 11:00am. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was used at any time except in the range from 9:00am to 11:00am. No any manipulation was applied after the arrival of needling sensation. The treatment was given once every day, 10 day treatment made one session and two sessions of treatment were required. The fatigue scale was adopted to evaluate the efficacy before and after treatment in the patients of the two groups. The ratios among CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood were detected before ad b a after treatment. In the acupuncture group, the total score of fatigue and the score of physical fatigue were reduced after treatment as compared with those before treatment (all Pfatigue, the s core of physical fatigue and the score of mental fatigue after treatment were reduced obviously as compared with those hefore treatment (all Ptreatment in the two groups (all Ptreatment of chronic fatigue syndrome of qi deficiency syndrome, which is especially better at relieving mental fatigue. The effect of this therapy is achieved probably by improving the immune function via the regulation of the ratios among CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  20. Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Patients Post Caesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent painful crisis. Pregnant women who are affected are known to have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Acute chest syndrome (ACS is an uncommon but serious complication in pregnant women with SCD that can lead to death. We present two cases of patients with SCD, both of whom had severe ACS within 24 hours post Caesarean section. By accurate diagnosis and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team, both mothers and fetuses had excellent outcomes. It is suggested that prompt recognition of ACS in a pregnant woman with SCD and collaborative medical and obstetric management are essential to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  1. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Diabetic Neuropathy in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common and serious complications of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. The current therapy strategies, including glucose control and pain management, are not effective for most patients. Growing evidence suggests that infiltration of inflammation factors and deficiency of local neurotrophic and angiogenic factors contribute significantly to the pathologies of diabetic neuropathy. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMCs therapy represents a novel and promising strategy for tissue repair through paracrine secretion of multiple cytokines, which has a potential to inhibit inflammation and promote angiogenesis and neurotrophy in diabetic neuropathy. In this review, we discuss the clinical practice in diabetic neuropathy and the therapeutic effect of BMC. We subsequently illustrate the functional impairment of autologous BMCs due to the interrupted bone marrow niche in diabetic neuropathy. We anticipate that the functional restoration of BMCs could improve their therapeutic effect and enable their wide applications in diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni DNA-binding protein from starved cells in Guillain-Barré syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Piao, Hua; Minohara, Motozumi; Matsushita, Takuya; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2011-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni enteritis is frequently associated with an axonal form of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and C. jejuni DNA-binding protein from starved cells (C-Dps) induces paranodal myelin detachment and axonal degeneration through binding with sulfatide in vivo. Here we investigated the invasion of C-Dps into hosts with C. jejuni-related GBS. Our analyses of patient sera found that both C-Dps and anti-C-Dps antibodies were most commonly detected in sera from C. jejuni-related GBS patients (5/27, 14.8% and 15/24, 62.5%; respectively). These findings suggest that C-Dps invades the host and may potentially contribute to the peripheral nerve damage in C. jejuni-related GBS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Generation of Hermansky Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2 induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Ann Maguire

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2 is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from functional mutations in the adaptor-related protein complex 3, beta 1 subunit (AP3B1 gene. This gene plays a role in organelle biogenesis associated with melanosomes, platelet dense granules, and lysosomes. Here we describe the generation of an HPS2 iPS cell line (CHOPHPS2 using a Cre-excisable polycistronic STEMCCA lentivirus. This line was derived from human fibroblasts isolated from a patient carrying two mutations in the AP3B1 gene. The patient presented with severe neutropenia, ocular albinism, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, hemorrhagic diathesis, and an absence of platelet-dense granules.

  4. Clinical relevance of bone marrow fibrosis and CD34-positive cell clusters in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Malcovati, Luca; Boveri, Emanuela; Travaglino, Erica; Pietra, Daniela; Pascutto, Cristiana; Passamonti, Francesco; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Castello, Alessandro; Magrini, Umberto; Lazzarino, Mario; Cazzola, Mario

    2009-02-10

    We studied bone marrow (BM) histologic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) classified according to WHO criteria to determine their clinical correlates and prognostic value. Three hundred one consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated for BM fibrosis and CD34 immunoreactivity. Marrow fibrosis was assessed following the European consensus guidelines. Moderate to severe BM fibrosis was detected in 17% of cases and was associated with multilineage dysplasia (P = .001), high transfusion requirement (P WHO categories with excess of blasts (P according to International Prognostic Scoring System and WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System categories, BM fibrosis involved a shift to a one-step more advanced risk group. BM fibrosis identifies a distinct subgroup of MDS with multilineage dysplasia, high transfusion requirement, and poor prognosis and represents an independent prognostic factor that may be useful in clinical decision making. Furthermore, the presence of CD34+ cell clusters is an independent risk factor for progression to acute leukemia.

  5. The thymus in "bare lymphocyte" syndrome : Significance of expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on thymic epithelial cells in intrathymic T-cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wijngaert, Frank P. van de; Huber, Jonne; Schuurman, R.K.B.; Zegers, Ben J.M.; Roord, John J.; Kater, L.

    1985-01-01

    Thymic biopsies from two patients with combined immunodeficiency and defective expression of HLA class I and class II antigens on blood mononuclear cells (“bare lymphocyte” syndrome) were investigated. This made possible an evaluation of the significance of HLA antigen expression in a detailed

  6. Generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (GZHMUi001-A) by reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuchang; Ou, Zhanhui; Song, Bing; Xian, Yexing; Ouyang, Shuming; Xie, Yuhuan; Xue, Yanting; Sun, Xiaofang

    2017-08-01

    47, XXX syndrome is one of several sex-chromosomal aneuploidies, and it has an incidence of approximately 1/1000 in newborn females. Because of heterogeneity in X-inactivation, these patients may exhibit a variety of clinical symptoms. Here, we report the generation of an integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cell line (GZHMUi001-A) by using Sendai virus to reprogram peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a 47, XXX syndrome patient with premature ovarian failure. This 47, XXX iPS cell line has characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and is a useful tool for the investigation of this X chromosome aneuploid disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie da Costa Eiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Huntchinson-Gilford (Progeria é uma rara doença autossômica dominante, caracterizada pelo envelhecimento precoce. Relata-se caso de uma criança, que aos 6 meses iniciou alopecia na região occipital e placas esclerodermiformes no abdome. Esta síndrome apresenta alterações em vários órgãos e sistemas como a pele, esquelético e sistema cardiovascular. O diagnóstico é clínico e não possui tratamento, porém seu reconhecimento é necessário para minimizar a aterosclerose precoce através do controle da dislipidemia.Huntchinson-Gilford Syndrome (Progeria is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by premature aging. It is reported the case of child whose alopecia started at the age of 6 months on the occipital region. The child also presented scleroderma plaques on the abdomen. This syndrome presents alterations in many organs and systems such as the skin and the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. The diagnosis is clinical and there is no treatment for it but recognition is necessary to minimize early atherosclerosis through the control of dyslipidemia.

  8. Ovarian germ cell tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous components and later development of growing teratoma syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jumaily Usama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Development of a sarcomatous component in a germ cell tumor is an uncommon phenomenon. Most cases reported have a grim prognosis. Growing teratoma syndrome is also an uncommon phenomenon and occurs in approximately 2% to 7% of non seminomatous germ cell tumors and should be treated surgically. Case presentation We report the case of a 12-year-old Asian girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor containing a rhabdomyosarcomatous component. She was treated with a germ cell tumor chemotherapy regimen and rhabdomyosarcoma-specific chemotherapy. Towards the end of her treatment, she developed a retroperitoneal mass that was increasing in size. It was completely resected, revealing a mature teratoma, consistent with growing teratoma syndrome. She is still in complete remission approximately three years after presentation. Conclusion The presence of rhabdomyosarcoma in a germ cell tumor should be treated by a combined chemotherapy regimen (for germ cell tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. In addition, development of a mass during or after therapy with normal serum markers should raise the possibility of growing teratoma syndrome that should be treated surgically.

  9. Sodium channel current loss of function in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from a Brugada syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selga, Elisabet; Sendfeld, Franziska; Martinez-Moreno, Rebecca; Medine, Claire N; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Wilmut, Sir Ian; Pérez, Guillermo J; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon; Mills, Nicholas L

    2017-10-09

    Brugada syndrome predisposes to sudden death due to disruption of normal cardiac ion channel function, yet our understanding of the underlying cellular mechanisms is incomplete. Commonly used heterologous expression models lack many characteristics of native cardiomyocytes and, in particular, the individual genetic background of a patient. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM) may uncover cellular phenotypical characteristics not observed in heterologous models. Our objective was to determine the properties of the sodium current in iPS-CM with a mutation in SCN5A associated with Brugada syndrome. Dermal fibroblasts from a Brugada syndrome patient with a mutation in SCN5A (c.1100G>A, leading to Nav1.5_p.R367H) were reprogrammed to iPS cells. Clones were characterized and differentiated to form beating clusters and sheets. Patient and control iPS-CM were structurally indistinguishable. Sodium current properties of patient and control iPS-CM were compared. These results were contrasted with those obtained in tsA201 cells heterologously expressing sodium channels with the same mutation. Patient-derived iPS-CM showed a 33.1-45.5% reduction in INa density, a shift in both activation and inactivation voltage-dependence curves, and faster recovery from inactivation. Co-expression of wild-type and mutant channels in tsA201 cells did not compromise channel trafficking to the membrane, but resulted in a reduction of 49.8% in sodium current density without affecting any other parameters. Cardiomyocytes derived from iPS cells from a Brugada syndrome patient with a mutation in SCN5A recapitulate the loss of function of sodium channel current associated with this syndrome; including pro-arrhythmic changes in channel function not detected using conventional heterologous expression systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Repair of some active genes in Cockayne syndrome cells is at the genome overall rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, G J; Bastin, S A

    1995-05-01

    Repair of UV (254 nm)-induced DNA damage in cells from patients with the genetic disease Cockayne syndrome (CS; CS3BE, CS2BE) has been examined in several different genomic regions. These regions include those that contain the actively transcribed beta-actin and adenosine deaminase (ADA) genes and the inactive insulin and 754 loci. The beta-actin, ADA and insulin regions are repaired at about the same rate, one which is equal to the genome overall repair rate. The 754 locus is repaired considerably more slowly. The insulin region is repaired at the same rate in both CS and normal cells as is the 754 locus. The only difference from normal is that the active genes, while repaired well, are not preferentially repaired relative to the genome overall. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the repair defect in CS is due to an inactive transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF). However, the results also indicate that factors other than TRCF and active transcription must also promote repair of some regions relative to others in both normal and CS cells.

  11. Telomerase Protects Werner Syndrome Lineage-Specific Stem Cells from Premature Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS patients exhibit premature aging predominantly in mesenchyme-derived tissues, but not in neural lineages, a consequence of telomere dysfunction and accelerated senescence. The cause of this lineage-specific aging remains unknown. Here, we document that reprogramming of WS fibroblasts to pluripotency elongated telomere length and prevented telomere dysfunction. To obtain mechanistic insight into the origin of tissue-specific aging, we differentiated iPSCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs. We observed recurrence of premature senescence associated with accelerated telomere attrition and defective synthesis of the lagging strand telomeres in MSCs, but not in NPCs. We postulate this “aging” discrepancy is regulated by telomerase. Expression of hTERT or p53 knockdown ameliorated the accelerated aging phenotypein MSC, whereas inhibition of telomerase sensitized NPCs to DNA damage. Our findings unveil a role for telomerase in the protection of accelerated aging in a specific lineage of stem cells.

  12. Decreased Helios Expression in Regulatory T Cells in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an essential role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, there is debate about which Treg subsets are truly critical to ACS. Helios, a transcription factor, was recently reported to be a bona fide marker for natural Tregs or activated Tregs with a suppression function, but little is known about its role in ACS. We therefore examined Helios+ Tregs in patients with ACS, patients with stable angina, and control subjects. 73 patients with ACS, 30 patients with stable angina, and 48 control subjects were enrolled. The frequencies and estimated absolute numbers of different Treg subsets in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine level was measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios in purified CD4+ T cells was determined by RT-PCR. Helios+ Tregs was decreased significantly in patients with ACS. The frequency and estimated absolute numbers of CD4+Foxp3+Helios+ Tregs were negatively correlated with IL-6 and positively correlated with circulating level of TGF-beta1 and HDL-C. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios was decreased in CD4+ T cells from patients with ACS. In summary, Helios+ Tregs was downregulated in patients with ACS and may play a role in ACS.

  13. Interaction between ingested nutrients and gut endocrine cells in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; GILJA, ODD HELGE; GUNDERSEN, DORIS; HATLEBAKK, JAN G.; HAUSKEN, TRYGVE

    2014-01-01

    Several endocrine cell abnormalities have been reported in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These cells have specialized microvilli that project into the lumen; they function as sensors for the gut contents and respond to luminal stimuli (mostly ingested nutrients) by releasing hormones into the lamina propria, where they exert their effects via a paracrine/endocrine mode of action. Certain food items trigger the symptoms experienced by IBS patients, including those rich in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). In this review, we present the argument that the effects of both FODMAPs and the proportional intake of proteins, fats and carbohydrates on IBS symptoms may be caused by an interaction with the gut endocrine cells. Since the gut hormones control and regulate gastrointestinal motility and sensation, this interaction may be responsible for abnormal gastrointestinal motility and the visceral hypersensitivity observed in these patients. There is no consistent evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy. The role of gluten intolerance in the development of IBS symptoms in these patients remains a matter of controversy. Individual guidance on food management, which includes restrictions in the intake of FODMAP-rich foods and testing diets with different proportions of proteins, fats and carbohydrates has been found to reduce the symptoms, improve the quality of life, and make the habitual diet of IBS patients more healthy. PMID:24939595

  14. Oxidative Burst Intensity of Peripheral Phagocytic Cells and Periodontitis In Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khocht, Ahmed; Russell, Barbara; Cannon, Joseph G; Turner, Bobby; Janal, Malvin

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the oxidative burst function of peripheral phagocytic cells (granulocytes and monocytes) and assessed the relation between oxidative burst and periodontal status in adult individuals with Down syndrome (DS) versus other groups. Methods 55 DS individuals (18–56 years old), 74 mentally retarded (MR) individuals and 88 medically healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. The MR and HC groups were age, race and gender matched with the DS group. Gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, attachment level (AL) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded for each subject. Whole blood was collected for granulocyte/monocyte oxidative burst tests. Oxidative burst was determined by flow cytometry in terms of percentage of cells actively involved in oxidative burst, and oxidative intensity (magnitude of reactive oxygen intermediates per cell). Results the basal oxidative burst intensity of DS granulocytes was higher than that of HC and MR granulocytes, p=0.05. The Escherichia coli (E. coli) stimulated oxidative burst intensity of DS monocytes was higher than that of HC and MR monocytes, p=0.05. Regression analysis controlling for age, sex race and plaque levels showed a significant association between monocyte oxidative burst intensity and loss of periodontal attachment in the DS subjects, pperiodontal tissue inflammation and loss of periodontal attachment in this susceptible group. PMID:23488730

  15. Model for long QT syndrome type 2 using human iPS cells demonstrates arrhythmogenic characteristics in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L. Lahti

    2012-03-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS is caused by functional alterations in cardiac ion channels and is associated with prolonged cardiac repolarization time and increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Inherited type 2 LQTS (LQT2 and drug-induced LQTS both result from altered function of the hERG channel. We investigated whether the electrophysiological characteristics of LQT2 can be recapitulated in vitro using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes were differentiated from two iPSC lines derived from an individual with LQT2 carrying the R176W mutation in the KCNH2 (HERG gene. The individual had been asymptomatic except for occasional palpitations, but his sister and father had died suddenly at an early age. Electrophysiological properties of LQT2-specific cardiomyocytes were studied using microelectrode array and patch-clamp, and were compared with those of cardiomyocytes derived from control cells. The action potential duration of LQT2-specific cardiomyocytes was significantly longer than that of control cardiomyocytes, and the rapid delayed potassium channel (IKr density of the LQT2 cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced. Additionally, LQT2-derived cardiac cells were more sensitive than controls to potentially arrhythmogenic drugs, including sotalol, and demonstrated arrhythmogenic electrical activity. Consistent with clinical observations, the LQT2 cardiomyocytes demonstrated a more pronounced inverse correlation between the beating rate and repolarization time compared with control cells. Prolonged action potential is present in LQT2-specific cardiomyocytes derived from a mutation carrier and arrhythmias can be triggered by a commonly used drug. Thus, the iPSC-derived, disease-specific cardiomyocytes could serve as an important platform to study pathophysiological mechanisms and drug sensitivity in LQT2.

  16. Disease-specific hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Luo, Changying; Luo, Chengjuan; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Benshang; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using an optimized conditioning regimen is essential for the long-term survival of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). We report HSCT in 24 children with Fanconi anemia (FA, n = 12), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, n = 7), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC, n = 5) from a single HSCT center. The graft source was peripheral blood stem cells (n = 19) or cord blood stem cells (n = 5). FA and DC patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, while DBA patients had myeloablative conditioning. The median numbers of infused mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells were 14.20 × 108/kg and 4.3 × 106/kg, respectively. The median time for neutrophil and platelet recovery was 12 and 18 days, respectively. Complete donor engraftment was achieved in 23 of 24 patients. There was one primary graft failure. During a median follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 2-130 months), the overall survival in all patients was 95.8%. The incidence of grade II-III acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD was 29.2% and 16.7%, respectively. We conclude that HSCT can be a curative option for patients with IBMFS. Modification of the conditioning regimen based on the type of disease may lead to encouraging long-term outcomes.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation across human polycystic ovary syndrome ovary granulosa cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiawei; Bao, Xiao; Peng, Zhaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Niu, Wenbin; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-05-10

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 7% of the reproductive-age women. A growing body of evidence indicated that epigenetic mechanisms contributed to the development of PCOS. The role of DNA modification in human PCOS ovary granulosa cell is still unknown in PCOS progression. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation were detected between PCOS' and controls' granulosa cell. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled to investigate the putative function of DNA methylaiton. Selected genes expressions were analyzed between PCOS' and controls' granulosa cell. Our results showed that the granulosa cell global DNA methylation of PCOS patients was significant higher than the controls'. The global DNA hydroxymethylation showed low level and no statistical difference between PCOS and control. 6936 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified between control and PCOS-obesity. 12245 differential methylated CpG sites were detected between control and PCOS-nonobesity group. 5202 methylated CpG sites were significantly differential between PCOS-obesity and PCOS-nonobesity group. Our results showed that DNA methylation not hydroxymethylation altered genome-wide in PCOS granulosa cell. The different methylation genes were enriched in development protein, transcription factor activity, alternative splicing, sequence-specific DNA binding and embryonic morphogenesis. YWHAQ, NCF2, DHRS9 and SCNA were up-regulation in PCOS-obesity patients with no significance different between control and PCOS-nonobesity patients, which may be activated by lower DNA methylaiton. Global and genome-wide DNA methylation alteration may contribute to different genes expression and PCOS clinical pathology.

  18. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 in Sepsis: Role of Endotoxin in Cell Death Pathways and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Maria Virzì

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 (CRS Type 5 is characterized by concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction in the setting of different systemic disorders, such as sepsis. In this study, we investigated the possible relationship between endotoxin levels, renal cell death and inflammation in septic patients with CRS Type 5. Methods: We enrolled 11 patients with CRS Type 5. CRS Type 5 was defined according to the current classification system. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN criteria. Acute cardiac dysfunction was documented by echocardiography as acute left and/or right ventricular dysfunction leading to decreased ejection fraction. Endotoxin activity was measured by the Endotoxin Activity Assay (EAA. Plasma from CRS Type 5 patients was incubated with renal tubular cells (RTCs and cell death levels were evaluated. Plasma cytokines levels were measured as well. Results: Accordingly to EAA levels, patients were divided into two groups: 45.4% of patients had low endotoxin activity level (negative EAA, while 54.5% of patients showed high endotoxin activity (positive EAA. RTCs incubated with plasma from EAA positive patients showed significantly higher apoptosis levels and higher caspase-3 activation compared to cells incubated with plasma from EAA negative patients, and a significant positive correlation was observed between EAA levels and RTC apoptosis levels. Furthermore, IL-6 and IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in CRS Type 5 patients with positive EAA. Conclusion: Our data suggest a possible relationship between endotoxin levels and renal cell death in septic patients with CRS Type 5. Furthermore, this study highlights the presence of renal apoptosis, the immune deregulation and the strong inflammation in CRS Type 5 patients, especially in those with high endotoxin activity.

  19. Growing Teratoma Syndrome After Treatment of a Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumor: A Case Report and a Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Boukettaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing teratoma syndrome is a rare condition among patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors who present with enlarging metastatic masses during appropriate systemic chemotherapy and normalized serum markers. Retroperitoneal residual masses are a common finding after chemotherapy for the nonseminomatous tumors of the testis. These might contain mature teratoma, fibrotic tissue, or tumor. Mature teratoma, which is unresponsive to chemotherapy, might result from evolution of a malignant lesion during treatment or it might represent a metastasis from a focus of mature teratoma in the primary testicular tumor. This article reviews a case of a growing teratoma syndrome.

  20. Dimorphism of sister chromatid exchange in Bloom's syndrome B- and T-cell lines transformed with Epstein-Barr and adult T-cell leukemia viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y; Yoshimoto, S; Miyoshi, I; Kondo, N; Orii, T; Sandberg, A A

    1983-08-01

    The present study describes the establishment of both B- and T-cell lines from the peripheral blood cells of two Bloom's syndrome (BS) patients and one healthy female by using Epstein-Barr (EBV) and adult T-cell leukemia viruses (ATLV). The cell lines from normal and BS subjects exhibited cell surface markers compatible with B- and T-cell origin; in addition, the BS B- and T-cell lines retained the original cytogenetic characteristics of the syndrome. Even though phytohemagglutinin-stimulated BS lymphocytes from the two BS patients studied all showed high levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE), the established BS B-lines with EBV yielded two separate lines each, i.e., one with increased SCE and another with normal levels of SCE; also, one of the BS T-lines retained high SCE levels in 100% of the cells, whereas the other BS T-line contained two populations, one with high SCE (70%) and the other with normal SCE levels (30%), at a relatively constant frequency over a period of 6 months. Neither EBV nor ATLV caused a significant increase in chromosome instability in the established lines compared to fresh lymphocytes. Reinfection of the BS B- and T-cell lines with EBV or ATLV did not alter the SCE or karyotypes. These results strongly suggest that BS patients have two populations in vivo, one with high and another with normal levels of SCE, at least in the lymphoid cell system.

  1. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Are Weak Activators of the FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Dolskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. It is a result of CGG repeat expansion in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. This gene encodes the FMRP protein that is involved in neuronal development. Repeat expansion leads to heterochromatinization of the promoter, gene silencing, and the subsequent absence of FMRP. To date, there is no specific therapy for the syndrome. All treatments in clinic practice provide symptomatic therapy. The development of drug therapy for Fragile X syndrome treatment is connected with the search for inhibitors of enzymes that are responsible for heterochromatinization. Here, we report a weak transcriptional activity of the FMR1 gene and the absence of FMRP protein after Fragile X syndrome cell lines treatment with two FDA approved inhibitors of histone deacetylases, romidepsin and vorinostat. We demonstrate that romidepsin, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, does not activate FMR1 expression in patient cell cultures, whereas vorinostat, an inhibitor of classes I and II histone deacetylases, activates a low level of FMR1 expression in some patient cell lines.

  2. Crowned dens syndrome misdiagnosed as polymyalgia rheumatica, giant cell arteritis, meningitis or spondylitis: an analysis of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouba, A; Vuillemin-Bodaghi, V; Mutschler, C; De Bandt, M

    2004-12-01

    The crowned dens syndrome, related to microcrystalline deposition in the peri-odontoid articular and abarticular structures, is mainly responsible for acute or chronic cervical pain. We report eight cases of crowned dens syndrome with atypical presentations mimicking giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, meningitis or discitis. The clinical and radiological aspects of these cases are presented and discussed. For all patients, fever, cervical stiffness, headaches and biological inflammatory syndrome were reported. For three patients, impairment of general condition, occipito-temporal or mandible pain and weakness with inflammatory pain of the shoulder girdle was suggestive of giant cell arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica, leading to temporal artery biopsy and/or long-term steroid treatment. Recurrence of clinical symptoms when tapering steroids was noted. In two cases, previous breast carcinoma led to the initial diagnosis of metastatic spondylitis. For three patients with vomiting, nausea and Kernig's and/or Brudzinski's sign, the first diagnosis was meningitis, leading to unhelpful lumbar puncture. In all cases, diagnosis of crowned dens syndrome once evoked, was confirmed by cervical CT scanning and dramatic improvement with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or colchicine. This under-recognized entity must be considered as a differential diagnosis of meningitis and discitis, but also of giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica, as well as a possible aetiology for fevers of unknown origin. CT scanning is necessary for diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware of such misleading clinical presentations.

  3. CHARGE syndrome modeling using patient-iPSCs reveals defective migration of neural crest cells harboring CHD7 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Hironobu; Renault Mihara, Francois; Ohta, Shigeki; Fukuda, Kimiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Akamatsu, Wado; Sanosaka, Tsukasa; Kohyama, Jun; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Takahashi, Takao; Wysocka, Joanna; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-11-28

    CHARGE syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the chromatin remodeler, CHD7, and is characterized by a set of malformations that, on clinical grounds, were historically postulated to arise from defects in neural crest formation during embryogenesis. To better delineate neural crest defects in CHARGE syndrome, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two patients with typical syndrome manifestations, and characterized neural crest cells differentiated in vitro from these iPSCs (iPSC-NCCs). We found that expression of genes associated with cell migration was altered in CHARGE iPSC-NCCs compared to control iPSC-NCCs. Consistently, CHARGE iPSC-NCCs showed defective delamination, migration and motility in vitro, and their transplantation in ovo revealed overall defective migratory activity in the chick embryo. These results support the historical inference that CHARGE syndrome patients exhibit defects in neural crest migration, and provide the first successful application of patient-derived iPSCs in modeling craniofacial disorders.

  4. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell is a potential marker to distinguish fibromyalgia syndrome from arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA or spondyloarthritis (SpA, both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients and healthy donors (HD were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed.There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS, CD127 (IL-7 receptor α, CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS.Combined with the currently available

  6. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with a long QT syndrome type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the generation of human iPS cell line UKKi009-A from dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying heterozygous mutation c.3035-3045delTCCCTCGATGC, p.Leu1012Pro (fs*55 in KCNH2 gene leading to long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2. We used the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmids expressing OSKM along with microRNAs 307/367 to reprogram the fibroblasts. The iPS cells possess pluripotent stem cell characteristics and differentiate to cell lineages of all three germ layers. This cell line can serve as a source for in vitro modeling of LQT2. This cell line is distributed by the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC.

  7. Exploring the developmental mechanisms underlying Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: Evidence for defects in neural crest cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Erin L; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2016-12-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome (WHS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, craniofacial malformation, and defects in skeletal and heart development. The syndrome is associated with irregularities on the short arm of chromosome 4, including deletions of varying sizes and microduplications. Many of these genotypic aberrations in humans have been correlated with the classic WHS phenotype, and animal models have provided a context for mapping these genetic irregularities to specific phenotypes; however, there remains a significant knowledge gap concerning the cell biological mechanisms underlying these phenotypes. This review summarizes literature that has made recent contributions to this topic, drawing from the vast body of knowledge detailing the genetic particularities of the disorder and the more limited pool of information on its cell biology. Finally, we propose a novel characterization for WHS as a pathophysiology owing in part to defects in neural crest cell motility and migration during development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome associated renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamane, Shraddha; Desai, Sangeeta; Menon, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a recently described entity with unknown exact prevalence. The affected individuals are predisposed to have multiple leiomyomas and renal cancer due to germline mutation in fumarate hydratase gene on chromosome 1. The knowledge of this rare tumour is essential for early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy, since they have a grave prognosis. Herein, we present the first case from India of HLRCC in a 42 year old lady who presented with a renal mass and metastasis with consequent fulminant course of disease. We discuss the detailed histomorphologic features and iunique immunohistochemical signature of this unusual renal tumour with discussion of differential diagnosis.

  9. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Clinical testing for the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome in a DNA diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Roger D; Dykas, Daniel J; Bale, Allen E

    2005-01-01

    This study determines which clinical features predict positive test results among samples submitted for DNA-based diagnostic nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) testing, and further defines the mutational spectrum of the PTCH gene. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and polymerase chain reaction products from exons 1 to 23 of the PTCH gene were directly sequenced. Pedigree phenotypic information was obtained by written questionnaire. Among 106 presumably unrelated pedigrees, 44 independent mutations were found in 47 families. There were 11 nonsense mutations; 1 in-frame deletion; 17 deletions, 6 insertions, and 1 deletion-insertion that generated frameshifts; 5 splice-site mutations; 1 in-frame duplication; and 2 presumptive missense mutations. Twenty-seven of 46 pedigrees (58.7%) with two or more typical radiographic or pathologic features of NBCCS tested positive for PTCH mutations. Of these, 26 had jaw cysts in combination with other characteristics or neoplasms including basal cell carcinomas, palmar pits, skeletal abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, medulloblastomas, cardiac or ovarian fibromas, calcification of the falx cerebri, polydactyly, cleft lip and/or palate, and agenesis of the corpus callosum or other central nervous system malformations. None of the 13 pedigrees solely affected by multiple or early-onset basal cell carcinomas and none of the four pedigrees with jaw cysts alone had PTCH mutations. Pedigrees with multiple features of NBCCS were most likely to test positive for PTCH mutations. Pedigrees with multiple or early-onset basal cell carcinomas without other features of the disease did not test positive for PTCH mutations.

  11. Non-neuronal cell responses differ between normal and Down syndrome developing brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaumi, Takeshi; Milenkovic, Ivan; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2013-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic cause of mental retardation, is characterized by reduced number of neurons and delayed myelination. Though non-neuronal cells in the brain are vital for the development, survival, and function of neurons, there is a paucity of comparative studies of normal development and DS, in particular in the temporal lobe, a region of interest for cognitive decline. We evaluated immunoreactivity for CD68 (macrophage), HLA-DR (microglia), Olig2 and TPPP/p25 (oligodendroglia), and GFAP (astroglia) in the germinal matrix (GM), temporal lobe white matter (TeWM) and hippocampus from 14 weeks of gestations to newborn in 28 DS patients and 30 age-matched controls. The rate of increase of CD68 positive cells in the GM, CA1 hippocampal subregion and subiculum was significantly higher in DS. The density of Olig2 positive cells in the GM was lower in DS brains at early stages, then showed a transient increase contrasting controls. Olig2 expression increased more in the TeWM in DS, suggesting an altered pattern of oligodendrocyte progenitor generation. GFAP-immunoreactivity in DS was significantly lower in the middle pregnancy period in the TeWM and did not increase between early and middle periods in the GM compared to controls, likely reflecting a defect in astrocyte production. The altered expression of non-neuronal cell markers during normal development and DS may play a role in, or reflect, defective neurogenesis, leading to reduced number of neurons and delayed myelination in the developing DS brain. This has implications for the understanding of the mental retardation in DS patients. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metformin modulates human leukocyte/endothelial cell interactions and proinflammatory cytokines in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Victor M; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Lopez-Domenech, Sandra; Escribano-López, Irene; Rios-Navarro, Cesar; Alvarez, Angeles; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    We aim to assess the effect of metformin treatment on metabolic parameters, endothelial function and inflammatory markers in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) subjects. The study population consisted of 40 reproductive-age women with PCOS, who underwent treatment with metformin during a 12-week period, and their corresponding matched controls (n = 44). We evaluated endocrinological parameters, adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin) and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) in serum. In addition, interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells were assessed by flow chamber microscopy. In addition, a group of type 2 diabetes patients who underwent treatment with metformin during a 12-week period was incorporated into the study. Metformin produced beneficial effects on PCOS patients by decreasing polymorphonuclear (PMN) rolling flux and adhesion. It also decreased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, IL-6 and ΤΝFα. In addition, metformin induced an improvement of endocrine and anthropometric parameters in PCOS subjects by reducing glucose, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and androstendione, and by increasing dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S). Metformin also had beneficial effects in type 2 diabetic subjects by reducing body weight, waist circumference and PMN adhesion, and by increasing PMN rolling velocity. Our results highlight the modulating effect of metformin on leukocyte/endothelium interactions. These findings may explain the potential beneficial effect of metformin in reducing the risk of vascular events in PCOS patients and in insulin resistance conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [High sensitivity to cell death and low repair activity of DNA damages after exposure to oxidative stress in Cockayne syndrome (CS) patient-derived cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kazuko; Sugita, Katsuo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the protective function of Cockayne syndrome (CS) patient-derived cells against oxidative stress, we examined the sensitivity to cell death and the repair activity of DNA damages after exposure to oxidative stress in CS cells. We used two CS cell lines, CS3BES (CSA defective) and CSIANS (CSB defective), the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells, and the human fibroblastic cell line RSa. Cells were exposed to oxidative stresses, such as X-ray irradiation and hydrogen peroxide treatment, and the sensitivity to cell death was examined using the colony survival assay and MTT assay. DNA lesions were analyzed using the comet assay. CS3BES and CS1ANS cells showed higher sensitivity to cell death induced by X ray and hydrogen peroxide than HeLa and RSa cells. Furthermore, after exposure to the stresses the levels of DNA damage were higher, or repair activity was lower in CS3BES cells when compared with HeLa cells. The present results clearly show that the two CS cell lines are vulnerable to oxidative stress and suggest that both CSA and CSB proteins are involved in the protective response against oxidative injury.

  14. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  15. The role of nibrin in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and cell senescence in Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome patients lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Alster

    Full Text Available Nibrin plays an important role in the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. DDR is a crucial signaling pathway in apoptosis and senescence. To verify whether truncated nibrin (p70, causing Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS, is involved in DDR and cell fate upon DNA damage, we used two (S4 and S3R spontaneously immortalized T cell lines from NBS patients, with the founding mutation and a control cell line (L5. S4 and S3R cells have the same level of p70 nibrin, however p70 from S4 cells was able to form more complexes with ATM and BRCA1. Doxorubicin-induced DDR followed by cell senescence could only be observed in L5 and S4 cells, but not in the S3R ones. Furthermore the S3R cells only underwent cell death, but not senescence after doxorubicin treatment. In contrary to doxorubicin treatment, cells from all three cell lines were able to activate the DDR pathway after being exposed to γ-radiation. Downregulation of nibrin in normal human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs did not prevent the activation of DDR and induction of senescence. Our results indicate that a substantially reduced level of nibrin or its truncated p70 form is sufficient to induce DNA-damage dependent senescence in VSMCs and S4 cells, respectively. In doxorubicin-treated S3R cells DDR activation was severely impaired, thus preventing the induction of senescence.

  16. Novel therapeutic approaches: Rett syndrome and human induced pluripotent stem cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology target screening and discovering of therapeutic agents for the possible cure of human diseases. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) are the right kind of platform for testing potency of specific active compounds. Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine developed between 2,500 and 500 BC, is a science involving the intelligent formulations of herbs and minerals. It can serve as a “goldmine” for novel neuroprotective agents used for centuries to treat neurological disorders. This review discusses limitations in screening drugs for neurological disorders and the advantages offered by hiPSC integrated with Indian traditional system of medicine. We begin by describing the current state of hiPSC technology in research on Rett syndrome (RTT) followed by the current controversies in RTT research combined with the emergence of patient-specific hiPSC that indicate an urgent need for researchers to understand the etiology and drug mechanism. We conclude by offering recommendations to reinforce the screening of active compounds present in the ayurvedic medicines using the human induced pluripotent neural model system for research involving drug discovery for RTT. This integrative approach will fill the current knowledge gap in the traditional medicines and drug discovery. PMID:28447035

  17. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-10-15

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription.

  18. [Growing teratoma syndrome in a patient with intracranial germ cell tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludkova, O G; Shishkina, L V; Konovalov, A N; Ryzhova, M V; Kislyakov, A N; Ozerov, S S; Trunin, Yu Yu; Mazerkina, N A; Klimchuk, O V; Tarasova, E M

    2015-01-01

    A six-year-old patient with non-germinomatous germ cell tumor of the chiasmatic-sellar area developed polyuria and polydipsia as the first symptoms of the disease. Then there were signs of precocious puberty and vision impairment. MRI examination revealed a shiasmatic sellar tumor and occlusive hydrocephalus. Tumor marker levels in blood serum were elevated. The alpha-fetoprotein level was increased 5-fold; human chorionic gonadotropin 20-fold. These levels increased over time. The patient received 2 cycles of PEI multiagent chemotherapy (Ifosfamide 1.5 g/m(2), Cisplatin 20 mg/m(2), Etoposide 100 mg/m(2)) during 5 days and 1 cycle of second-line multiagent chemotherapy (Cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) for 1 day and Endoxan 1500 mg/m(2) for 2 days). Despite the decrease in tumor marker levels to normal values, the patient's vision still deteriorated. MRI examination revealed that tumor size increased and its structure changed. Total tumor resection led to vision improvement and regression of intracranial hypertension. Histological analysis of tumor tissue only revealed a mature teratoma. This phenomenon, known as growing teratoma syndrome, is very rare among patients with intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumors.

  19. Elevated white cell count in acute coronary syndromes: relationship to variants in inflammatory and thrombotic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannon Christopher P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated white blood cell counts (WBC in acute coronary syndromes (ACS increase the risk of recurrent events, but it is not known if this is exacerbated by pro-inflammatory factors. We sought to identify whether pro-inflammatory genetic variants contributed to alterations in WBC and C-reactive protein (CRP in an ACS population. Methods WBC and genotype of interleukin 6 (IL-6 G-174C and of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN intronic repeat polymorphism were investigated in 732 Caucasian patients with ACS in the OPUS-TIMI-16 trial. Samples for measurement of WBC and inflammatory factors were taken at baseline, i.e. Within 72 hours of an acute myocardial infarction or an unstable angina event. Results An increased white blood cell count (WBC was associated with an increased C-reactive protein (r = 0.23, p 3 (95% CI = -0.41, 0.77, and -0.03/mm3 (95% CI = -0.55, 0.86 for IL1RN. Moreover, the composite endpoint was not significantly affected by an interaction between WBC and the IL1 (p = 0.61 or IL6 (p = 0.48 genotype. Conclusions Cytokine pro-inflammatory genetic variants do not influence the increased inflammatory profile of ACS patients.

  20. Anesthesia for cerebral revascularization for adult moyamoya syndrome associated with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chin Ted; Manninen, Pirjo H

    2011-12-01

    We report the anesthetic management of an adult patient undergoing cerebral revascularization surgery for moyamoya syndrome complicating sickle-cell disease (SCD). We present a 25 year-old male of African ethnicity with homozygous SCD who was experiencing worsening ischemic neurologic symptoms culminating in intraventricular hemorrhage from rupture of moyamoya vessels. Despite an extracranial-intracranial superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass that was angiographically patent postoperatively, he subsequently required an intracranial omental transplant to improve cerebral blood flow to the anterior cerebral artery territory. Prior to both cerebral revascularization procedures, the patient had continued with his regularly scheduled red blood cell exchange transfusion. The importance of normothermia, normocarbia, normotension, and normovolemia is emphasized in the neuroanesthetic management. We conclude that the safe and efficacious operative treatment of moyamoya disease, using both direct and indirect revascularization procedures, is being increasingly described, and therefore anesthesiologists are likely to encounter similar cases in the future and need to be aware of the surgical procedures and perioperative implications. The overall principles of safe anesthesia (normotension, normocarbia, good oxygenation, normothermia, normovolemia) for patients with SCD also applies to patients with moyamoya. During a craniotomy, certain deviations from these are needed (hyperventilation and mannitol diuresis for brain volume reduction, induced hypothermia or manipulations of arterial blood pressures) but they can be safely used with careful monitoring of the patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The association between Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome and small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs SEW

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sarah EW Briggs,1 Paul Gozzard,2 Denis C Talbot31Department of Oncology, Oxford University Hospitals Trust, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK; 2Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford UK; 3Department of Oncology, Oxford University Hospitals Trust, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UKAbstract: Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS is an autoimmune disorder mediated by autoantibodies to voltage-gated calcium channels. The disorder is diagnosed clinically on the basis of a triad of symptoms (proximal muscle weakness, hyporeflexia, and autonomic disturbance, supported by electrophysiological findings and the presence of autoantibodies. Between 40% and 62% of patients diagnosed with LEMS are found to have small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, almost all of whom develop neurological symptoms before their cancer is diagnosed. Prompt identification of LEMS and appropriate screening for SCLC is key to improving the outcome of both conditions. Here we review the pathophysiology and clinical management of LEMS, focusing particularly on the relationship with SCLC.Keywords: Lambert–Eaton, small-cell lung cancer, autoimmune

  2. Autologous adipocyte derived stem cells favour healing in a minipig model of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Forcheron

    Full Text Available Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Here we examined for the first time in a large animal model the therapeutic potential of autologous adipose tissue-derived stroma cells (ASCs. For experiments, Göttingen minipigs were locally gamma irradiated using a (60Co source at the dose of 50 Gy and grafted (n = 5 or not (n = 8. ASCs were cultured in MEM-alpha with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL(-1 and post irradiation were intradermally injected on days 25, 46, 67 and finally between days 95 and 115 (50 × 10(6 ASCs each time into the exposed area. All controls exhibited a clinical evolution with final necrosis (day 91. In grafted pigs an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 +/- 28. Immunohistological analysis of cytokeratin expression showed a complete epidermis recovery. Grafted ASCs accumulated at the dermis/subcutis barrier in which they attracted numerous immune cells, and even an increased vasculature in one pig. Globally this study suggests that local injection of ASCs may represent a useful strategy to mitigate CRS.

  3. Implications of Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Ashouri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHLS is a rare hereditary neoplastic disorder caused by mutations in the vhl gene leading to the development of tumors in several organs including the central nervous system, pancreas, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Manifestations of VHLS can present at different ages based on the affected organ and subclass of disease. In the subclasses of VHLS that cause renal disease, renal involvement typically begins closer to the end of the second decade of life and can present in different ways ranging from simple cystic lesions to solid tumors. Mutations in vhl are most often associated with clear cell renal carcinoma, the most common type of renal cancer, and also play a major role in sporadic cases of clear cell renal carcinoma. The recurrent, multifocal nature of this disease presents difficult challenges in the long-term management of patients with VHLS. Optimization of renal function warrants the use of several different approaches common to the management of renal carcinoma such as nephron sparing surgery, enucleation, ablation, and targeted therapies. In VHLS, renal lesions of 3 cm or bigger are considered to have metastatic potential and even small lesions often harbor malignancy. Many of the aspects of management revolve around optimizing both oncologic outcome and long-term renal function. As new surgical strategies and targeted therapies develop, the management of this complex disease evolves.  This review will discuss the key aspects of the current management of VHLS.

  4. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane de Montalembert

    Full Text Available The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA, iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15% patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16% with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29. Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001. Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001. Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation.

  5. Budd-Chiari syndrome in urology: Impact on nephrectomy for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir P Shirodkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS is a poorly understood entity in urology. It results from obstruction of the hepatic veins and the subsequent complications. It has been infrequently reported to be secondary to hepatic venous obstruction from invasion by an inferior vena cava (IVC tumor thrombus in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. We report the largest known series of patients with RCC and BCS. Patients and Methods : Ten patients presented to a tertiary hospital with locally advanced RCC with IVC tumor thrombus. All were evaluated and had clinical or radiographic evidence of BCS. All underwent nephrectomy, IVC thrombectomy or ligation, and tumor removal from the hepatic veins. The perioperative and pathological factors were measured. These included estimated blood loss (EBL and transfusions. Inpatient factors including duration of intubation, length of intensive care unit (ICU stay, and overall length of stay (LOS were recorded. The tumor-free status was evaluated. Results : The average age was 59 years. No intraoperative deaths occurred. Two intraoperative complications were noted. The mean EBL was 4244 cc; mean surgery length was 8 hours 12 minutes; and the mean ICU stay was nine days. The overall LOS averaged 13.25 days. One patient died postoperatively of sepsis and multisystem organ failure. One patient required reoperation for an abdominal wall hematoma caused by subcutaneous enoxaparin administration. Average follow-up was 28 months. Five patients are alive with no evidence of disease. Conclusions : Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare entity in urology, with a potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Surgical excision of the primary tumor along with thrombectomy results in alleviation of BCS and improvement in the patient.

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapies reduce obesity and metabolic syndromes induced by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Hsiao, Wei-Ting; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is an alarming global health problem that results in multiaspect metabolic syndromes in both genders and most age groups. The lack of effective therapies for obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome is an urgent societal issue. To elucidate whether mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies can ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity and compare the effectiveness of several methodological approaches, we transplanted human MSCs, MSC-derived brown adipocytes (M-BA), and MSC lysateinto obese mice. All 3 MSC-based treatments improved obesity-associated metabolic syndromes including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, glucose intolerance, and inflammation in obese mice after repeated administration for 10 weeks. MSC-based treatments altered the ratio of adiponectin to leptin and regulated the expression of Pparα and Pparγ, which are involved in maintaining energy homeostasis, in major metabolic tissues. Among treatments, M-BA showed the strongest beneficial effect. Importantly, M-BA administration not only reduced obesity-associated metabolic syndromes but also reduced body weight and hyperlipidemia, indicating that it is an effective therapy for obesity. Together, our findings revealed the therapeutic potential of MSCs for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Platelet-vascular and red cell components of hemostasis in hemodialyzed patients suffering from sever hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, I M; Parshina, T A

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate effect of hemodialysis on functional state of platelet-vascular and red cell components of hemostasis in patients suffering from severe hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (SHFRS). Parameters of platelet-vascular and red cell hemostasis were studied in 51 patients with SHFRS who were divided into two groups. 27 patients of group 1 received conservative treatment, 24 patients of group 2 were put on dialysis. In oliguria, red cell deformity, spontaneous and induced aggregation was similar in both groups. There was a statistically significant anemia, platelet hyperreaction. The detected disorders in hemostasis are attributed to severity of the disease but not effects of hemodialysis.

  8. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayaki, Hitoshi; Hara, Ryujiro; Ikenaga, Mituo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center

    1996-06-01

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of {sup 3}H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes. (author)

  9. Recovery from ultraviolet tight-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaki, H; Hara, R; Ikenaga, M

    1996-06-01

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of 3H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24 h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24 h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes.

  10. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  11. Decreased tonic inhibition in cerebellar granule cells causes motor dysfunction in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Kiyoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Inoue, Koichi; Takayama, Masakazu; Takayama, Chitoshi; Saitoh, Shinji; Kishino, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2012-12-05

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the UBE3A gene encoding a ubiquitin E3 ligase. Motor dysfunction is a characteristic feature of Angelman syndrome, but neither the mechanisms of action nor effective therapeutic strategies have yet been elucidated. We report that tonic inhibition is specifically decreased in cerebellar granule cells of Ube3a-deficient mice, a model of Angelman syndrome. As a mechanism underlying this decrease in tonic inhibition, we show that Ube3a controls degradation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) and that deficiency of Ube3a induces a surplus of GAT1 that results in a decrease in GABA concentrations in the extrasynaptic space. Administering low doses of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a selective extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist, improves the abnormal firing properties of a population of Purkinje cells in cerebellar brain slices and reduces cerebellar ataxia in Ube3a-deficient mice in vivo. These results suggest that pharmacologically increasing tonic inhibition may be a useful strategy for alleviating motor dysfunction in Angelman syndrome.

  12. Carcinoma de pequenas células na síndrome de Pancoast Small cell carcinoma in Pancoast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Fontinele e Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Pancoast consiste de sinais e sintomas decorrentes do acometimento do ápice pulmonar e estruturas adjacentes por um tumor. Na maioria das vezes, o processo causal é uma neoplasia. O carcinoma broncogênico é a principal neoplasia causadora da síndrome. Os subtipos histológicos mais encontrados são o adenocarcinoma e o carcinoma epidermoide. A ocorrência de carcinoma de pequenas células de pulmão como gênese da síndrome de Pancoast é rara, com poucos relatos na literatura. Descrevemos o caso de um doente com síndrome de Pancoast causado por um carcinoma de pequenas células de pulmão, discutindo aspectos referentes ao diagnóstico e à terapêutica.Pancoast syndrome consists of signs and symptoms resulting from a tumor affecting the pulmonary apex and adjacent structures. The process is typically caused by a neoplasm. The majority of cases of Pancoast syndrome are caused by bronchogenic carcinoma. The most commonly found histologic subtypes are adenocarcinoma and epidermoid carcinoma. There have been very few reports of small cell lung carcinoma in the genesis of Pancoast syndrome. We describe the case of a patient with Pancoast syndrome caused by small cell lung carcinoma and discuss the aspects related to the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Schwann cells are activated by ATP released from neurons in an in vitro cellular model of Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Umberto; Negro, Samuele; Scorzeto, Michele; Bergamin, Elisanna; Jalink, Kees; Montecucco, Cesare; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Rigoni, Michela

    2017-05-01

    The neuromuscular junction is exposed to different types of insult, including mechanical trauma, toxins and autoimmune antibodies and, accordingly, has retained through evolution a remarkable ability to regenerate. Regeneration is driven by multiple signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of the junction. These signals are largely unknown. Miller Fisher syndrome is a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome caused by autoimmune antibodies specific for epitopes of peripheral axon terminals. Using an animal model of Miller Fisher syndrome, we recently reported that a monoclonal anti-polysialoganglioside GQ1b antibody plus complement damages nerve terminals with production of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, which activates Schwann cells. Several additional signaling molecules are likely to be involved in the activation of the regeneration program in these cells. Using an in vitro cellular model consisting of co-cultured primary neurons and Schwann cells, we found that ATP is released by neurons injured by the anti-GQ1b antibody plus complement. Neuron-derived ATP acts as an alarm messenger for Schwann cells, where it induces the activation of intracellular pathways, including calcium signaling, cAMP and CREB, which, in turn, produce signals that promote nerve regeneration. These results contribute to defining the cross-talk taking place at the neuromuscular junction when it is attacked by anti-gangliosides autoantibodies plus complement, which is crucial for nerve regeneration and is also likely to be important in other peripheral neuropathies. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Schwann cells are activated by ATP released from neurons in an in vitro cellular model of Miller Fisher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rodella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular junction is exposed to different types of insult, including mechanical trauma, toxins and autoimmune antibodies and, accordingly, has retained through evolution a remarkable ability to regenerate. Regeneration is driven by multiple signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of the junction. These signals are largely unknown. Miller Fisher syndrome is a variant of Guillain–Barré syndrome caused by autoimmune antibodies specific for epitopes of peripheral axon terminals. Using an animal model of Miller Fisher syndrome, we recently reported that a monoclonal anti-polysialoganglioside GQ1b antibody plus complement damages nerve terminals with production of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, which activates Schwann cells. Several additional signaling molecules are likely to be involved in the activation of the regeneration program in these cells. Using an in vitro cellular model consisting of co-cultured primary neurons and Schwann cells, we found that ATP is released by neurons injured by the anti-GQ1b antibody plus complement. Neuron-derived ATP acts as an alarm messenger for Schwann cells, where it induces the activation of intracellular pathways, including calcium signaling, cAMP and CREB, which, in turn, produce signals that promote nerve regeneration. These results contribute to defining the cross-talk taking place at the neuromuscular junction when it is attacked by anti-gangliosides autoantibodies plus complement, which is crucial for nerve regeneration and is also likely to be important in other peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Clonal Analysis of Regulatory T Cell Defect in Patients with Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1 Suggests Intrathymic Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivula, T-T; Laakso, S M; Niemi, H J; Kekäläinen, E; Laine, P; Paulin, L; Auvinen, P; Arstila, T P

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene disrupt thymic T cell development and negative selection, leading to the recessively inherited polyendocrine autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1). The patients also have a functional defect in the FOXP3+ regulatory T cell population, but its origin is unclear. Here, we have used T cell receptor sequencing to analyse the clonal relationship of major CD4+ T cell subsets in three patients and three healthy controls. The naive regulatory T cells showed little overlap with helper T cell subsets, supporting divergence in the thymus. The activated/memory regulatory T cell subset displayed more sharing with helper T cells, but was mainly recruited from the naive regulatory T cell population. These clonal patterns were very similar in both patients and controls. However, naive regulatory T cells isolated from the patients had a significantly longer T cell receptor complementarity-determining region 3 than any other population, suggesting failure of thymic selection. These data indicate that the peripheral differentiation of regulatory T cells in APS-1 patients is not different from that in healthy controls. Rather, the patients' naive regulatory T cells may have an intrinsic defect imprinted already in the thymus. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  16. Mass Cytometry Identifies Distinct Lung CD4+ T Cell Patterns in Löfgren’s Syndrome and Non-Löfgren’s Syndrome Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Kaiser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in the lungs. Disease phenotypes Löfgren’s syndrome (LS and “non-LS” differ in terms of clinical manifestations, genetic background, HLA association, and prognosis, but the underlying inflammatory mechanisms largely remain unknown. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells from four HLA-DRB1*03+ LS and four HLA-DRB1*03− non-LS patients were analyzed by mass cytometry, using a panel of 33 unique markers. Differentially regulated CD4+ T cell populations were identified using the Citrus algorithm, and t-stochastic neighborhood embedding was applied for dimensionality reduction and single-cell data visualization. We identified 19 individual CD4+ T cell clusters differing significantly in abundance between LS and non-LS patients. Seven clusters more frequent in LS patients were characterized by significantly higher expression of regulatory receptors CTLA-4, PD-1, and ICOS, along with low expression of adhesion marker CD44. In contrast, 12 clusters primarily found in non-LS displayed elevated expression of activation and effector markers HLA-DR, CD127, CD39, as well as CD44. Hierarchical clustering further indicated functional heterogeneity and diverse origins of T cell receptor Vα2.3/Vβ22-restricted cells in LS. Finally, a near-complete overlap of CD8 and Ki-67 expression suggested larger influence of CD8+ T cell activity on sarcoid inflammation than previously appreciated. In this study, we provide detailed characterization of pulmonary T cells and immunological parameters that define separate disease pathways in LS and non-LS. With direct association to clinical parameters, such as granuloma persistence, resolution, or chronic inflammation, these results provide a valuable foundation for further exploration and potential clinical application.

  17. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find The Other 150 Kids Video Gallery In Memory Of Life According To Sam Awards & Reviews Buy & ... 2018 in Boston MA: Night of Wonder 2018: Music to your ears! Learn More College Diabetes Network ...

  18. Progeria 101/FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth failure, loss of body fat and hair, aged-looking skin and stiffness of joints. As children get older, they suffer from osteoporosis, generalized atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (heart) disease and stroke. The ...

  19. Learning about Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Projects Grant Information NIH Common Fund NIH RePORTER Research at NHGRI An Overview Branches Clinical Research ... use of high-throughput screening technology to identify chemical compounds that might reverse nuclear membrane abnormalities of ...

  20. Decreased levels of the goblet cell mucin MUC5AC in tears of patients with Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüeso, Pablo; Balaram, Mini; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Keutmann, Henry T; Dana, M Reza; Gipson, Ilene K

    2002-04-01

    To determine whether the relative amounts of mucin mRNA in the conjunctival epithelium and mucin protein in the tears are altered in patients with Sjögren syndrome compared with healthy individuals. Tear fluid was collected from the inferior fornix of normal subjects (n = 17) and patients with Sjögren syndrome (n = 11) after instillation of 60 microL sterile water onto the ocular surface. Immediately after tear fluid collection, conjunctival epithelium was obtained by filter paper-stripping from the bulbar temporal region for mRNA isolation. Primers to nontandem repeat sequences of the gel-forming mucin MUC5AC and the membrane-spanning mucins MUC1 and MUC4 were used in real-time RT-PCR to determine relative abundance of MUC mRNA in patients with Sjögren syndrome in relation to that of normal subjects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on neuraminidase-treated tears, using a polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide mimicking the deduced amino acid sequence from the D3 region of MUC5AC. The number of RNA transcripts for the goblet cell-specific mucin MUC5AC in the conjunctival epithelium of patients with Sjögren syndrome was significantly lower than in normal individuals. No significant changes were detected when analyzing the mRNA levels of the mucins expressed by the stratified epithelium of the conjunctiva, MUC1 and MUC4. Protein levels of the goblet cell mucin MUC5AC were significantly reduced in the tear fluid of patients with Sjögren syndrome, corroborating mRNA data obtained using real-time RT-PCR. The tear fluid of patients with Sjögren syndrome has reduced levels of the goblet cell-specific mucin MUC5AC, which correlates to decreased levels of conjunctival MUC5AC mRNA. The authors propose that deficiency of MUC5AC mucin in tears constitutes one of the mechanisms responsible for tear film instability in Sjögren syndrome.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  2. Neovascular deterioration, impaired NADPH oxidase and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose-derived multipotent cells from subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Olivera, Wilfredo; Lhamyani, Said; Coín-Aragüez, Leticia; Castellano-Castillo, Daniel; Alcaide-Torres, Juan; Yubero-Serrano, Elena María; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2017-06-01

    Expansion of adipose tissue depends on the growth of its vascular network and it has been shown that adipose tissue dysfunction in obese subjects with the metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased angiogenesis. However, some subjects with a high body mass index do not develop metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. In this study we examined the neovascular properties, expression levels of proteins involved in cellular redox balance and inflammatory cytokines in adipose-derived multipotent mesenchymal cells (ASCs) of subjects with different metabolic profiles. We applied cell culture, flow cytometry, RT-qPCR and ELISA techniques to characterize the ASCs isolated from paired biopsies of visceral (visASCs) and subcutaneous (subASCs) adipose tissue from 39 subjects grouped into normal weight (Nw), obese without metabolic syndrome (NonMS) and with metabolic syndrome (MS). VisASCs and subASCs from MS subjects showed a decrease in tubules formation capacity compared to ASCs from NonMS subjects as well as changes in the expression levels of proteins involved in cell redox balance and secretion levels of proteins linked to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Deterioration in the neovascular properties of subASCs from the MS subjects was also evident in the decreased levels of VEGF secretion during adipogenesis and in the effects of the conditioned medium on endothelial cell tubule formation. Our findings suggest a redox imbalance status in ASCs from subjects with metabolic syndrome and decreased their neovascular function that probably contributes to the vascular insufficiency of adipose depots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive Factors of Successful Microdissection Testicular Sperm Extraction in Patients with Presumed Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Modarresi; Hani Hosseinifar; Ali Daliri Hampa; Mohammad Chehrazi; Jalil Hosseini; Faramarz Farrahi; Farid Dadkhah; Marjan Sabbaghian; Mohammad Ali Sadighi Gilani

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate predictive factors of successful microdissection-testicular sperm extraction (MD-TESE) in patients with presumed Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis, 874 men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), among whom 148 individuals with diagnosis of SCOS in prior biopsy, underwent MD-TESE at Department of Andrology, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. The predictive values of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH),...

  4. Thoracic air-leakage syndrome in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients as a late complication of chronic graft-versus-host disease: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Wook; Kim, Song Soo; Jo, Daeg Yeon; Yun, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin Hwan [Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Air-leakage syndrome associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a rare complication, but it is also reported as an independent predictor of a worse survival rate after stem cell transplantation. We report two cases of air-leakage syndrome associated with GVHD after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute leukemia patients who presented with spontaneous pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, and finally death due to respiratory failure seven to eight months later.

  5. Reversal of mitochondrial defects with CSB-dependent serine protease inhibitors in patient cells of the progeroid Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatre, Laurent; Biard, Denis S F; Sarasin, Alain; Ricchetti, Miria

    2015-06-02

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are human disorders caused by CSA or CSB gene mutations; both conditions cause defective transcription-coupled repair and photosensitivity. Patients with CS also display neurological and developmental abnormalities and dramatic premature aging, and their cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress. We report CSA/CSB-dependent depletion of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ catalytic subunit (POLG1), due to HTRA3 serine protease accumulation in CS, but not in UV(s)S or control fibroblasts. Inhibition of serine proteases restored physiological POLG1 levels in either CS fibroblasts and in CSB-silenced cells. Moreover, patient-derived CS cells displayed greater nitroso-redox imbalance than UV(S)S cells. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite normalized HTRA3 and POLG1 levels in CS cells, and notably, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was altered in CS cells. These data reveal critical deregulation of proteases potentially linked to progeroid phenotypes in CS, and our results suggest rescue strategies as a therapeutic option.

  6. Differences in Granule Morphology yet Equally Impaired Exocytosis among Cytotoxic T Cells and NK Cells from Chediak–Higashi Syndrome Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Tesi, Bianca; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ammann, Sandra; Belen, Fatma Burcu; Caliskan, Umran; Kaya, Zühre; Lehmberg, Kai; Patiroglu, Turkan; Tokgoz, Huseyin; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Introne, Wendy J.; Henter, Jan-Inge; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Meeths, Marie; Ehl, Stephan; Krzewski, Konrad; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in LYST, resulting in enlarged lysosomal compartments in multiple cell types. CHS patients display oculocutaneous albinism and may develop life-threatening hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). While NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been reported to be uniformly defective, variable defects in T cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been observed. The latter has been linked to the degree of HLH susceptibility. Since the discrepancies in NK cell- and T cell-mediated cellular cytotoxicity might result from differences in regulation of cytotoxic granule release, we here evaluated perforin-containing secretory lysosome size and number in freshly isolated lymphocytes from CHS patients and furthermore compared their exocytic capacities. Whereas NK cells from CHS patients generally contained a single, gigantic perforin-containing granule, cytotoxic T cells predominantly contained several smaller granules. Nonetheless, in a cohort of 21 CHS patients, cytotoxic T cell and NK cell granule exocytosis were similarly impaired upon activating receptor stimulation. Mechanistically, polarization of cytotoxic granules was defective in cytotoxic lymphocytes from CHS patients, with EEA1, a marker of early endosomes, mislocalizing to lysosomal structures. The results leads to the conclusion that lysosome enlargement corresponds to loss of distinct organelle identity in the endocytic pathway, which on a subcellular level more adversely affects NK cells than T cells. Hence, vesicular size or numbers do not per se dictate the impairment of lysosomal exocytosis in the two cell types studied. PMID:28458669

  7. Differences in Granule Morphology yet Equally Impaired Exocytosis among Cytotoxic T Cells and NK Cells from Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Samuel C C; Wood, Stephanie M; Tesi, Bianca; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ammann, Sandra; Belen, Fatma Burcu; Caliskan, Umran; Kaya, Zühre; Lehmberg, Kai; Patiroglu, Turkan; Tokgoz, Huseyin; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Introne, Wendy J; Henter, Jan-Inge; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Meeths, Marie; Ehl, Stephan; Krzewski, Konrad; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in LYST, resulting in enlarged lysosomal compartments in multiple cell types. CHS patients display oculocutaneous albinism and may develop life-threatening hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). While NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been reported to be uniformly defective, variable defects in T cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been observed. The latter has been linked to the degree of HLH susceptibility. Since the discrepancies in NK cell- and T cell-mediated cellular cytotoxicity might result from differences in regulation of cytotoxic granule release, we here evaluated perforin-containing secretory lysosome size and number in freshly isolated lymphocytes from CHS patients and furthermore compared their exocytic capacities. Whereas NK cells from CHS patients generally contained a single, gigantic perforin-containing granule, cytotoxic T cells predominantly contained several smaller granules. Nonetheless, in a cohort of 21 CHS patients, cytotoxic T cell and NK cell granule exocytosis were similarly impaired upon activating receptor stimulation. Mechanistically, polarization of cytotoxic granules was defective in cytotoxic lymphocytes from CHS patients, with EEA1, a marker of early endosomes, mislocalizing to lysosomal structures. The results leads to the conclusion that lysosome enlargement corresponds to loss of distinct organelle identity in the endocytic pathway, which on a subcellular level more adversely affects NK cells than T cells. Hence, vesicular size or numbers do not per se dictate the impairment of lysosomal exocytosis in the two cell types studied.

  8. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome-like episode following nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoto; Miura, Ikuo; Kume, Masaaki; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Hirokawa, Makoto; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2003-06-01

    We report on a 61-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who developed a hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)-like episode following nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Macrohematuria, hypertension, hemolytic anemia with red cell fragmentation, thrombocytopenia, and progressive renal insufficiency were observed after thawed peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) infusion. Although transient systemic hemolysis is known to occur during dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-cryopreserved stem cell infusion, HUS caused by DMSO has not been described in the literature. We speculate that one of the triggers of the HUS-like episode could have been renal microangiopathy caused by the long-term administration of interferon-alpha before the stem cell transplantation.

  9. Infectious Keratitis in Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Versus Chemical Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong Soo; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, clinical and microbiological characteristics, risk factors, and therapeutic outcome of infectious keratitis in patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) related to Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and corneal chemical burn. Medical records of 90 eyes of 59 patients who were diagnosed with LSCD resulting from SJS (52 eyes of 29 patients) or corneal chemical burn (38 eyes of 30 patients) were reviewed. Infectious keratitis developed in 35% of LSCD patients with SJS (18 eyes, 14 patients) and in 18% of those with chemical burn (7 eyes, 7 patients). The development of infectious keratitis in SJS was significantly associated with the severity of chronic ocular surface complications in the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelids and with the use of topical corticosteroids during the disease course. All cases of infectious keratitis following chemical burn occurred in patients with grade III or IV burn by Roper-Hall classification. Approximately 83% of culture-proven cases of infectious keratitis were bacterial infection, most of which (80%) were caused by Gram-positive bacteria. For resolution of infection, 17 eyes (68%) received surgery in addition to medical treatment, whereas 8 eyes (32%) received medical treatment alone. After infection resolution, the final visual acuity was decreased in 10 eyes (40%) compared with before infection. Infectious keratitis is a common complication of LSCD associated with SJS or severe chemical burn to the cornea. Despite medical and surgical treatments, the visual outcome is poor.

  10. Number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with primary Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Zhang, Qingqiao; Huang, Qianxin; Zu, Maoheng; Xu, Hao; Zeng, Lingyu

    2017-03-01

    Primary Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is associated with vascular endothelial injury. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provide an endogenous mechanism to repair endothelial injury. This study investigated the levels and functionality of EPCs in patients with primary BCS. EPCs (CD34+/CD133+/KDR+) were quantified in 82 patients with primary BCS (inferior vena cava type: n=19; hepatic vein type: n=22; and mixed type: n=41), 10 cirrhosis controls (CC group) and 10 age-matched healthy controls (HC group), using flow cytometry. EPCs proliferation was detected by MTT assay, adhesion by adhesion activity assay, and migration capacity by Transwell assay. EPCs levels were significantly lower in the BCS group (0.020±0.005%) than in the CC and HC groups (0.260±0.201%, 0.038±0.007%; PRMF), each PRMF, each P<0.001) than in the HC group. EPCs functionality did not significantly differ between the BCS and CC groups. The numbers and functions of EPCs did not significantly differ among patients with inferior vena cava type, hepatic vein type and mixed type of BCS. Patients with primary BCS had lower EPCs levels, with less proliferation, adhesion and migration activities. These findings suggest that lower levels of less functional EPCs may be associated with venous occlusion in primary BCS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of depression and anxiety on circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Pini, Stefano; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco M; Bertoli, Daniele; Abelli, Marianna; Borelli, Lucia; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Gesi, Camilla; Michi, Paola; Morrone, Doralisa; Gnudi, Luigi; Balbarini, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are related to endothelial function and progression of coronary artery disease. There is evidence of decreased numbers of circulating EPCs in patients with a current episode of major depression. We investigated the relationships between the level of circulating EPCs and depression and anxiety in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients with ACS admitted to three Cardiology Intensive Care Units were evaluated by the SCID-I to determine the presence of lifetime and/or current mood and anxiety disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. The EPCs were defined as CD133(+) CD34(+) KDR(+) and evaluated by flow cytometry. All patients underwent standardized cardiological and psychopathological evaluations. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed where appropriate. Out of 111 ACS patients, 57 were found to have a DSM-IV lifetime or current mood or anxiety disorder at the time of the inclusion in the study. The ACS group with mood or anxiety disorders showed a significant decrease in circulating EPC number compared with ACS patients without affective disorders. In addition, EPC levels correlated negatively with severity of depression and anxiety at index ACS episode. The current study indicates that EPCs circulate in decreased numbers in ACS patients with depression or anxiety and, therefore, contribute to explore new perspectives in the pathophysiology of the association between cardiovascular disorders and affective disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Disrupted neuronal maturation in Angelman syndrome-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, James J.; Robinson, Tiwanna M.; Germain, Noelle D.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Bolduc, Kaitlyn A.; Ward, Amanda J.; Rigo, Frank; Chamberlain, Stormy J.; Levine, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deletion of the maternally inherited UBE3A allele and is characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, ataxia, seizures and a happy affect. Here, we explored the underlying pathophysiology using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from AS patients and unaffected controls. AS-derived neurons showed impaired maturation of resting membrane potential and action potential firing, decreased synaptic activity and reduced synaptic plasticity. These patient-specific differences were mimicked by knocking out UBE3A using CRISPR/Cas9 or by knocking down UBE3A using antisense oligonucleotides. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued by pharmacologically unsilencing paternal UBE3A expression. Moreover, selective effects of UBE3A disruption at late stages of in vitro development suggest that changes in action potential firing and synaptic activity may be secondary to altered resting membrane potential. Our findings provide a cellular phenotype for investigating pathogenic mechanisms underlying AS and identifying novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28436452

  13. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation: evidence of occult infectious etiologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sachiko; Renaud, Christian; Kuypers, Jane M.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Huang, Meei-Li; Samayoa, Erik; Xie, Hu; Yu, Guixia; Fisher, Cynthia E.; Gooley, Ted A.; Miller, Steven; Hackman, Robert C.; Myerson, David; Sedlak, Ruth H.; Kim, Yae-Jean; Fukuda, Takahiro; Fredricks, David N.; Madtes, David K.; Jerome, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    Newer diagnostic methods may link more idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) cases to an infectious agent. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 69 hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients with IPS diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 were tested for 28 pathogens (3 bacteria and 25 viruses) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and for Aspergillus by galactomannan assay. Research BALs from 21 asymptomatic HCT patients served as controls. Among 69 HCT patients with IPS, 39 (56.5%) had a pathogen detected. The most frequent pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) (N = 20 [29%]) followed by human rhinovirus (HRV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Aspergillus (N = 8 [12%] in each). HHV-6 and HRV were rarely detected in controls, whereas CMV and Aspergillus were occasionally detected with low pathogen load. Patients with pathogens had worse day-100 survival than those without (hazard ratio, 1.88; P = .03). Mortality in patients with only pathogens of “uncertain” significance in lung was similar to that in patients with pathogens of “established” significance. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing did not reveal additional significant pathogens. Our study demonstrated that approximately half of patients with IPS had pathogens detected in BAL, and pathogen detection was associated with increased mortality. Thus, an expanded infection detection panel can significantly increase the diagnostic precision for idiopathic pneumonia. PMID:25918347

  14. Association study between the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) gene and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Kenji; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla D; Hattori, Eiji; Toyota, Tomoko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Defects of neurodevelopmental processes are suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM), a member of neural immunoglobulin superfamily playing a diverse role for neural development, is mapped to chromosome 21q22, a linkage locus for bipolar disorder, and is, therefore, an interesting candidate for the disease. We performed a variation screening of the gene and association studies in 22 multiplex bipolar pedigrees of Caucasian descent and 119 Japanese patients with bipolar disorder and 140 controls. Expression levels of DSCAM were also examined in postmortem brains from the Stanley Medical Research Institute. We found 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms in DSCAM. Possible associations of SNP DC141 (IVS27-15A>G; P=0.042) and DC142 (IVS29+328C>A; P=0.036) were observed in pedigree samples, and G allele of DC141 was correlated with increased expression levels of DSCAM (P=0.038) in postmortem brains. Possible association of DC136 (4749C>T), which is in the same haplotype block with DC141 and DC142, was detected in Japanese populations (P=0.049). These results suggest the possible contribution of DSCAM gene in bipolar disorder, and warrant further investigations.

  15. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  16. Impaired Circulating Angiogenic Cells Mobilization and Metalloproteinase-9 Activity after Dynamic Exercise in Early Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Natalia G.; Sales, Allan R. K.; Penedo, Leticia A.; Pereira, Felipe S.; Silva, Mayra S.; Miranda, Renan L.; Silva, Jemima F. R.; Silva, Bruno M.; Santos, Aline A.; Nobrega, Antonio C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of adhesion molecules or metalloproteinases (MMPs) may indicate endothelial dysfunction. Exercise mobilizes circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) from bone marrow in healthy subjects, improving vascular function. However, it is unclear whether this mechanism is preserved in the early stages of metabolic syndrome (early MetS). We aimed to evaluate the acute effects of exercise on adhesion molecules, angiogenic factors, MMPs, and CACs in early MetS. Fifteen subjects with early MetS and nine healthy controls underwent an exercise session and a nonexercise session, randomly. Adhesion molecules, angiogenic factors, CACs, and MMPs were evaluated before and after exercise or nonexercise sessions. At baseline, levels of sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and MMP-9 were higher in early MetS than in controls (P ≤ 0.03). After exercise, sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and MMP-9 levels were still higher in early MetS (P exercise. There was no difference between moments in nonexercise session (P > 0.05). In conclusion, subjects with early MetS already presented impaired endothelial function at rest along with a decrease in CACs and an increase in MMP-9 activity in response to exercise. PMID:26557715

  17. Tolvaptan Treatment in Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH Secretion due to Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucahit Gur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experience of ADH receptor antagonist (-vaptanes treatment in hyponatremia in malign patient is very limited. 68 years old male patient admitted to our department with a complain of nause, vomitting and epigastric pain. He has advanced stage of small cell lung cancer. He had treated with cisplatin and etoposide regimen 10 days ago as a first cure. We diagnosed inapropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone syndrome (SIADH with low sodium level (118 meq/dl. Although the treatment with water restriction and 3% NaCl infusion, sodium level was not in normal. So we ordered 30 mg tolvaptan tablet. And then sodium levels were reached normal. After one month of discharge from hospital, he has hospitilized with same symptom and diagnosis. And again we ordered same treatment procedure and tolvaptane treatment. He had normal sodium (136 mEq/dl level during his follow up. This case demostrate that tolvaptane treatment is suitable aproaches in hyponatremia due to SIADH in oncologic patient.

  18. Defibrotide for the management of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in patients who undergo haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsouvelis, John; Avery, Sharon; Dooley, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Carl; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, previously known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD/SOS), is a complication in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Severe VOD/SOS, including progression to multi-organ failure, has resulted in a mortality of greater than 80%. Defibrotide's varying pharmacological actions, particularly on endothelial cells, make it is a useful agent to consider for prophylaxis and treatment of VOD/SOS. Barriers to its routine use include the high acquisition cost and the fact that neither the oral or parenteral formulations are licensed products in many countries at this time. This review summarises available literature on the use of defibrotide in the management of VOD/SOS. Publications consist predominantly of single centre cohort studies and case series. Available evidence indicates that defibrotide is effective in the management of VOD/SOS. Using defibrotide prophylaxis should also be considered, especially in the paediatric setting, where there are available results from a large, open label, randomized controlled trial. Patient outcome data from the larger studies and compassionate programs can inform consensus recommendations on dosing regimen and criteria for the treatment of VOD/SOS with defibrotide in the adult population. The reviewed literature indicates an effective and safe dose for treatment is 25mg/kg/day, continued for at least 14days or until complete response is achieved. Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose and duration of treatment in both paediatric patients and adults. Recent recommendations and a phase 3 trial using historical controls indicate that defibrotide should be included as a pharmacotherapy option in protocols guiding management of VOD/SOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  20. H1-antihistamines for primary mast cell activation syndromes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmatov, U B; Rhatigan, E; Simons, F E R; Sheikh, A

    2015-09-01

    Primary mast cell activation syndromes (MCAS) are a group of disorders presenting with symptoms of mast cell mediator release. To assess the effectiveness and safety of orally administered H1 -antihistamines in the treatment of primary MCAS compared with placebo and other pharmacologic treatments. We systematically searched five databases and three trial repositories and contacted an international panel of experts to identify published and unpublished trials. A total of 36 potentially relevant studies were identified. Of these, five crossover trials, enrolling a total of 71 patients (63 adults), met the eligibility criteria. All five of these studies were judged to be at moderate or high risk of bias. Two studies compared an H1 -antihistamine with placebo, two compared two different H1 -antihistamines, and one study compared H1 - and H2 -antihistamines with oral cromolyn sodium. Four of the five randomized controlled trials were historic (reported from 1983-1993), small (enrolling 8-15 patients), and used agents and/or dosing regimens that are now less commonly used in clinical practice (i.e. azelastine, chlorpheniramine, hydroxyzine, and ketotifen). The fifth trial, which enrolled 33 adults with cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis found 4 weeks of treatment with the second-generation H1 -antihistamine rupatadine, compared with placebo, resulted in significant improvements in quality of life, symptom control (itching, wheals and flares, flushing, tachycardia, and headache, but not gastrointestinal symptoms), and reduction in itching and whealing after standardized skin provocation to elicit Darier's sign. There is an urgent need for large, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials investigating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and safety of second-generation H1 -antihistamines in treatment of primary MCAS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, N; Fear, D; Richards, S C M; McDermott, C R; Nuwaysir, E F; Kellam, P; Harrison, T J; Wilkinson, R J; Tyrrell, D A J; Holgate, S T; Kerr, J R

    2005-08-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a multisystem disease, the pathogenesis of which remains undetermined. To test the hypothesis that there are reproducible abnormalities of gene expression in patients with CFS compared with normal healthy persons. To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of this disease, gene expression was analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 25 patients with CFS diagnosed according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria and 25 normal blood donors matched for age, sex, and geographical location, using a single colour microarray representing 9522 human genes. After normalisation, average difference values for each gene were compared between test and control groups using a cutoff fold difference of expression > or = 1.5 and a p value of 0.001. Genes showing differential expression were further analysed using Taqman real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in fresh samples. Analysis of microarray data revealed differential expression of 35 genes. Real time PCR confirmed differential expression in the same direction as array results for 16 of these genes, 15 of which were upregulated (ABCD4, PRKCL1, MRPL23, CD2BP2, GSN, NTE, POLR2G, PEX16, EIF2B4, EIF4G1, ANAPC11, PDCD2, KHSRP, BRMS1, and GABARAPL1) and one of which was downregulated (IL-10RA). This profile suggests T cell activation and perturbation of neuronal and mitochondrial function. Upregulation of neuropathy target esterase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G1 may suggest links with organophosphate exposure and virus infection, respectively. These results suggest that patients with CFS have reproducible alterations in gene regulation.

  2. Study of beta-cell function (by HOMA model in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (MS, which strongly predict risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Many studies implicate insulin resistance (IR in the development of diabetes, but ignore the contribution of beta-cell dysfunction. Hence, we studied beta-cell function, as assessed by HOMA model, in subjects with MS. Materials and Methods: We studied 50 subjects with MS diagnosed by IDF criteria and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Clinical evaluation included anthropometry, body fat analysis by bioimpedance, biochemical, and insulin measurement. IR and secretion were calculated by HOMA model. Results: Subjects with MS had more IR (HOMA-IR than controls (3.35 ± 3.14 vs. 1.76 ± 0.53, P = 0.029 and secreted less insulin (HOMA-S than controls (66.80 ± 69.66 vs. 144.27 ± 101.61, P = 0.0003, although plasma insulin levels were comparable in both groups (10.7 ± 10.2 vs. 8.2 ± 2.38, P = 0.44. HOMA-IR and HOMA-S were related with number of metabolic abnormalities. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body mass index, waist hip ratio, body fat mass, and percent body fat. HOMA-S was negatively associated with waist hip ratio, fasting plasma glucose and total cholesterol and positively with basal metabolic rate. Percent body fat was an independent predictor of HOMA-IR and waist hip ratio of HOMA-S in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: Subjects with MS have increased IR and decreased insulin secretion compared with healthy controls. Lifestyle measures have been shown to improve IR, insulin secretion, and various components and effects of MS. Hence, there is an urgent need for public health measures to prevent ongoing epidemic of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  3. [IL-32 mRNA Expression of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Its Correlation with Cell Apoptosis in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Yu; Xu, Li; Li, Da-Qi; Shao, Jian-Hua; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Dong, Xue-Bin; Gu, Lin-Ping; Wu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells and its correlation with apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Bone marrow samples from 26 MDS patients and 10 iron deficiency anemia (IDA, as control) patients were collected, RT-PCR was used to detect the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells, and the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells was detected by flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/PI dowble staining. The born marrow lymphocytes and NK cells were detected by means of direct immunofluorescence labeling whole blood hemolysis and flow cytometry. IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells in the MDS patients was significantly higher than that of control group, the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells in patients with RA, RAS and RCMD was significantly higher than that in patients with RAEB. There was no obvious difference between RAEB and the control groups. The apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in MDS group was significantly higher than that in the control group, the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with RA, RAS and RCMD was significantly higher than that in RAEB. There was no significant difference between RAEB group and control group. The IL-32 mRNA expression in bone marrow stromal cells significantly correlated with the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in MDS patients. The NK cell number in born marrow of MDS patients and the control group had no significant difference. The expression of IL-32 mRNA in bone marrow stromal cells significantly relates with the apoptosis of MDS cells, and the secretion of IL-32 by bone marrow stromal cells may be one of the reasons for the apoptosis of MDS bone marrow cells. It is speculated that the abnormal MDS bone marrow microenvironment is involved in the apoptosis of bone marrow cells.

  4. Successful treatment of mature B-cell lymphoma with rituximab-based chemotherapy in a patient with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastaniah, Wasil

    2017-07-01

    This report presents a case of Bloom syndrome (BS) in a consanguineous Saudi family. The patient, an 11-year-old male with mature B-cell lymphoma, had minimal therapeutic response and significant dose-limiting toxicity with standard chemotherapy treatment. He later responded successfully to a rituximab-based chemotherapy protocol. This case highlights that the rituximab-based chemotherapy protocol is an effective and safe treatment alternative for mature B-cell lymphoma in patients with BS. Further trials are warranted to investigate this modality of treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Small cell carcinoma: arising in Lynch syndrome: a previously undocumented occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Sarah A; Ballinger, Lori; Cerilli, Lisa A

    2009-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is a genetic cancer predisposition syndrome caused by an inherited defect in 1 of 4 DNA mismatch repair genes (mutL homolog 1, mutS homolog 2, mutS homolog 6, and postmeiotic segregation 2). Despite the theoretically increased risk in all tissues, Lynch syndrome exhibits tissue specificity, with a particular tendency among affected individuals to develop colorectal and endometrial cancer at a young age. A number of other malignancies, including those derived from the ovary, stomach, small bowel, and urothelium, have also been linked to this syndrome. A growing body of evidence exists to support an association between mismatch repair mutations and a growing spectrum of hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer-associated neoplasms. In this article, a previously undocumented mismatch repair-related malignancy in a patient with Lynch syndrome is reported.

  6. Impaired circulating CD4+ LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome and its mechanistic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CD4(+ latency-associated peptide (LAP(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs are defective in ACS. METHODS: One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA and chest pain syndrome (CPS. The frequencies of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP on CD4(+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4(+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4(+LAP(+ T cells is defective in ACS patients.

  7. Normal reconstruction of DNA supercoiling and chromatin structure in cockayne syndrome cells during repair of damage from ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, J E

    1982-07-01

    The chromatin of human cells undergoes structural rearrangements during excision repair of ultraviolet damage in DNA that were detected by transient relaxation of DNA supercoiling and increased staphylococcal nuclease digestibility of repaired sites. Inhibition of polymerization and/or ligation of repaired regions with inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha (cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin) resulted in the accumulation of single-strand breaks, delayed reconstruction of DNA supercoiling, and maintenance of the staphylococcal nuclease digestibility. These observations suggest that reconstruction of the native chromatin state requires completion of repaired regions with covalent ligation into the DNA strands. Although previous claims have been made that a late stage associated with ligation of repaired regions may be defective in cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome, complete reconstruction of the native chromatin occurred in cells from three unrelated patients after ultraviolet irradiation. No abnormality in repair was therefore detected in Cockayne syndrome cells. The hypersensitivity of cell survival and semiconservative DNA replication to damage by ultraviolet light in this human disorder must therefore be regarded as features of a primary defect in DNA metabolism unrelated to DNA repair.

  8. Salivary glands of primary Sjögren's syndrome patients express factors vital for plasma cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence of circulating Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantibodies has become an important marker in the classification criteria for primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Plasma cells producing these autoantibodies are mainly high affinity plasma cells originating from germinal centre reactions. When exposed to the right microenvironment these autoimmune plasma cells become long-lived and resistant to immunosuppressive treatment. Since autoimmune plasma cells have been detected in the salivary glands of SS patients, we wanted to investigate if the glandular microenvironment is suitable for plasma cell survival and if glandular residing plasma cells are the long-lived plasma cell subset. Methods Single, double and triple immunohistochemistry as well as immunofluorescence staining was performed on minor salivary gland tissue retrieved from pSS, chronically inflamed and normal subjects. Results We detected significant numbers of CD138+, non-proliferating, Bcl-2 expressing plasma cells in the salivary glands of pSS patients with high focus score (FS). Furthermore, we demonstrated that CXCL12 and interleukin (IL)-6 survival factors were highly expressed in pSS salivary gland epithelium and by focal mononuclear infiltrating cells. Notably, adipocytes when present in the salivary gland tissue were an important source of CXCL12. We clearly demonstrate that plasma cells are localised in close proximity to CXCL12 and IL-6 expressing cells and thus that the environment of salivary glands with high FS provide factors vital for plasma cell survival. Conclusions Plasma cells residing in the salivary glands of pSS patients with high FS showed phenotypic characteristics of the long-lived plasma cell subtype. Furthermore, the pSS salivary gland microenvironment provided niches rich in factors vital for plasma cell survival. PMID:21214903

  9. The effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic beta cell requirement in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thozhukat Sathyapalan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increased risk of developing T2DM in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, and there is evidence that statins improve metabolic parameters in these patients. However, there are some data to show that statins increase the risk of incipient diabetes. Materials and methods: We have previously shown that 12 weeks of atorvastatin improves insulin resistance when measured using HOMA-IR. This post hoc analysis was designed to look at the effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic β cell function using HOMA-β in the same study. In this randomised, double-blind placebo controlled study, 40 medication-naïve patients with PCOS were randomised to either atorvastatin 20 mg daily or placebo for 3 months. A 3-month extension study for both groups of patients was undertaken with metformin 1500 mg daily after completing initial 3 months of atorvastatin or placebo. Results: There was a significant reduction in HOMA-β (240 ± 3.2 vs 177 ± 2.3; P value <0.01 after 12 weeks of atorvastatin treatment, which was maintained by metformin in the subsequent 12 weeks. There were no changes in HOMA-β after the placebo or after subsequent metformin treatment. There was no linear correlation between reduction in HOMA-β with improvement of free androgen index (FAI (r2 = 0.02; P = 0.72, testosterone (r2 = 0.13; P = 0.49, SHBG (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.48, hsCRP (r2 = 0.19; P = 0.64, triglycerides (r2 = 0.09; P = 0.12, total cholesterol (r2 = 0.11; P = 0.32 or LDL-C (r2 = 0.19; P = 0.38. Conclusion: Treatment with atorvastatin for 12 weeks in women with PCOS significantly reduced HOMA-β. This could be potentially due to fall in β-cell requirement with improvement of insulin resistance rather than a reduction of β-cell function.

  10. Circulating vascular progenitor cells and central arterial stiffness in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Dessapt-Baradez

    Full Text Available Subjects with Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS are at increased risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The mechanism of this enhanced risk is unclear. Circulating vascular progenitor cells (VPC are immature bone marrow derived cells capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells. VPC number/function and central arterial stiffness predict cardio-metabolic disease in at-risk populations.We studied VPC and arterial stiffness measures in non-obese PCOS subjects as compared to age and body mass index (BMI matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional study.Fourteen subjects with PCOS and 12 controls of similar age, BMI (all <30 kg/m(2 and metabolic profile were studied. VPC number and in vitro function were studied by flow cytometry and tube formation assays respectively. Augmentation index (AIx, a measure of central arterial stiffness, and central (aortic blood pressures (BP were measured by applanation tonometry.Subjects with PCOS had a reduced number, mean±SEM, of circulating CD34(+133(+ VPCs (317.5±51.0 vs. 558.3±101.2, p = 0.03 and impaired in vitro tube formation (completed tube area 1.0±0.06 vs. 1.2±0.05×10(6 µm(2 p = 0.02. PCOS subjects had significantly higher AIx (18.4±1.9% vs. 4.9±2.0% and this difference remained significant even after adjustments for age, BMI and smoking (p = 0.003 in multivariate analyses. Central systolic and pulse pressure were higher in PCOS subjects but these differences were not statistically significant after adjustment for age. Brachial systolic and pulse pressures were similar. VPC number/function and arterial stiffness or BP measures were not correlated.Non-obese PCOS is characterized by a reduced VPC number, impaired VPC function and increased central arterial stiffness. These changes in novel vascular risk markers may explain the enhanced risk of T2DM and CVD in PCOS.

  11. Absence of p53 enhances growth defects and etoposide sensitivity of human cells lacking the Bloom syndrome helicase BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Sairei; Adachi, Noritaka; Koyama, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and the tumor-suppressor protein p53 play important roles in preserving genome integrity. Here, we knock out the genes for BLM and p53 in a human pre-B-cell line, Nalm-6. We show that p53 plays an important role in cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, when BLM is absent. Intriguingly, despite the apoptotic function of p53, BLM(/)TP53(/) cells were more sensitive than either single mutant to etoposide, an anticancer agent that poisons DNA topoisomerase II. Our results suggest a direct, BLM-independent role for p53 in etoposide-induced, topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in human cells.

  12. Functional Analysis of Dendritic Cells Generated from T-iPSCs from CD4+ T Cell Clones of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana Iizuka-Koga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although it is important to clarify the pathogenic functions of T cells in human samples, their examination is often limited due to difficulty in obtaining sufficient numbers of dendritic cells (DCs, used as antigen-presenting cells, especially in autoimmune diseases. We describe the generation of DCs from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from T cells (T-iPSCs. We reprogrammed CD4+ T cell clones from a patient with Sjögren's syndrome (SS into iPSCs, which were differentiated into DCs (T-iPS-DCs. T-iPS-DCs had dendritic cell-like morphology, and expressed CD11c, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86, and also BDCA-3. Compared with monocyte-derived DCs, the capacity for antigen processing was similar, and T-iPS-DCs induced the proliferative response of autoreactive CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we could evaluate T cell functions of the patient with SS. In conclusion, we obtained adequate numbers of DCs from T-iPSCs, which could be used to characterize pathogenic T cells in autoimmune diseases such as SS.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung associated with anti-Jo1 antisynthetase syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleto, G; Perotin, J-M; Eschard, J-P; Salmon, J-H

    2017-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a heterogeneous idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. Anti-Jo1 is the most common antibody found in this condition. Dermatomyositis is known to be associated with malignancy, but the association between antisynthetase syndrome and malignancy is not clearly established. We report a case of an association of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and anti-Jo1 antisynthetase syndrome. A 67-year-old man presented with polyarthritis, muscle weakness of the pelvic girdle, "mechanic's hands," and weight loss. A diagnosis of antisynthetase syndrome was considered based on the clinical features and the presence of anti-Jo1 antibodies. Positron emission tomography was performed because of weight loss and revealed a pulmonary hypermetabolic lesion. Histological findings revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent lobectomy and is currently free of symptoms with regular monitoring. This unusual presentation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung illustrates the need of a systematic approach to the diagnosis of antisynthetase syndrome. Positron emission tomography can be a useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with antisynthetase syndrome especially in the presence of warning signs/symptoms.

  14. Modelling and rescuing neurodevelopmental defect of Down syndrome using induced pluripotent stem cells from monozygotic twins discordant for trisomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Grad, Iwona; Letourneau, Audrey; Sailani, M Reza; Dahoun, Sophie; Santoni, Federico A; Gimelli, Stefania; Guipponi, Michel; Pelte, Marie Francoise; Béna, Frédérique; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Feki, Anis

    2014-02-01

    Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is the most common viable chromosomal disorder with intellectual impairment and several other developmental abnormalities. Here, we report the generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from monozygotic twins discordant for trisomy 21 in order to eliminate the effects of the variability of genomic background. The alterations observed by genetic analysis at the iPSC level and at first approximation in early development illustrate the developmental disease transcriptional signature of Down syndrome. Moreover, we observed an abnormal neural differentiation of Down syndrome iPSCs in vivo when formed teratoma in NOD-SCID mice, and in vitro when differentiated into neuroprogenitors and neurons. These defects were associated with changes in the architecture and density of neurons, astroglial and oligodendroglial cells together with misexpression of genes involved in neurogenesis, lineage specification and differentiation. Furthermore, we provide novel evidence that dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on chromosome 21 likely contributes to these defects. Importantly, we found that targeting DYRK1A pharmacologically or by shRNA results in a considerable correction of these defects.

  15. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by an antioxidant chlorophyllin through increased stem cell activity and modulation of hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Thoh, Maikho; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells (HSPC) are low in abundance and exhibit high radiosensitivity and their ability to divide dramatically decreases following exposure to ionizing radiation. Our earlier studies have shown antiapoptotic, immune-stimulatory, and antioxidant effects of chlorophyllin, a constituent of the over the counter drug derifil. Here we describe the beneficial effects of chlorophyllin against radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome. Chlorophyllin administration significantly enhanced the abundance of HSPC in vivo. It induced a transient cell cycle arrest in lineage-negative cells in the bone marrow. However, the chlorophyllin-treated mice exposed to whole body irradiation (WBI) had a significantly higher proportion of actively dividing HSPC in the bone marrow as compared to only WBI-exposed mice. It significantly increased the number of colony forming units (CFUs) by bone marrow cells in vitro and spleen CFUs in irradiated mice in vivo. Pharmacokinetic study showed that chlorophyllin had a serum half-life of 141.8 min in mice. Chlorophyllin upregulated antiapoptotic genes and antioxidant machinery via activation of prosurvival transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB and increased the survival and recovery of bone marrow cells in mice exposed to WBI. Chlorophyllin stimulated granulocyte production in bone marrow and increased the abundance of peripheral blood neutrophils by enhancing serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulation factor (GCSF). Most importantly, prophylactic treatment of mice with chlorophyllin significantly abrogated radiation-induced mortality. Chlorophyllin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, enhancing granulopoiesis, and stimulating prosurvival pathways in bone marrow cells and lymphocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy mosaicism in a woman with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and ovarian steroid cell tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogiel, Magdalena; Begemann, Matthias; Spengler, Sabrina; Soellner, Lukas; Göretzlehner, Ulf; Eggermann, Thomas; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud

    2013-07-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of single chromosomes is a well-known molecular aberration in a group of congenital diseases commonly known as imprinting disorders (IDs). Whereas maternal and/or paternal UPD of chromosomes 6, 7, 11, 14 and 15 are associated with specific IDs (Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, Silver-Russell syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), upd(14)-syndromes, Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelman Syndrome), the other autosomes are not. UPD of the whole genome is not consistent with life, in case of non-mosaic genome-wide paternal UPD (patUPD) it leads to hydatidiform mole. In contrast, mosaic genome-wide patUPD might be compatible with life. Here we present a 19-year-old woman with BWS features and initially diagnosed to be carrier of a mosaic patUPD of chromosome 11p15. However, the patient presented further clinical findings not typically associated with BWS, including nesidioblastosis, fibroadenoma, hamartoma of the liver, hypoglycaemia and ovarian steroid cell tumour. Additional molecular investigations revealed a mosaic genome-wide patUPD. So far, only nine cases with mosaic genome-wide patUPD and similar clinical findings have been reported, but these patients were nearly almost diagnosed in early childhood. Summarising the data from the literature and those from our patient, it can be concluded that the mosaic genome-wide patUPD (also known as androgenic/biparental mosaicism) might explain unusual BWS phenotypes. Thus, these findings emphasise the need for multilocus testing in IDs to efficiently detect cases with disturbances affecting more than one chromosome.

  17. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Moncla, A. [Hopital d`Enfants de la Timone, Marseillas (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Bernard-Soulier Syndrome patient's peripheral blood cells with a p.Phe55Ser mutation in the GPIX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lopez-Onieva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Soulier Syndrome (BSS is a rare autosomal platelet disorder characterized by mutations in the von Willebrand factor platelet receptor complex GPIb-V-IX. In this work we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (BSS3-PBMC-iPS4F8 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a BSS patient with a p.Phe55Ser mutation in the GPIX gene. Characterization of BSS3-PBMC-iPS4F8 showed that these cells maintained the original mutation present in the BSS patient, expressed pluripotent stem cell markers and were able to differentiate into the three germline layers. This new iPSC line will contribute to better understand the biology of BSS disease.

  19. Non-invasive prenatal cell-free fetal DNA testing for down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Strah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis as definitive diagnostic procedures represent a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods are invasive and lead to a miscarriage and fetal loss in approximately 0.5–1 %. Non-invasive prenatal DNA testing (NIPT is based on the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from maternal blood. It represents a highly accurate screening test for detecting the most common fetal chromosomal abnormalities. In our study we present the results of NIPT testing in the Diagnostic Center Strah, Slovenia, over the last 3 years.Methods: In our study, 123 pregnant women from 11th to 18th week of pregnancy were included. All of them had First trimester assessment of risk for trisomy 21, done before NIPT testing.Results: 5 of total 6 high-risk NIPT cases (including 3 cases of Down syndrome and 2 cases of Klinefelter’s syndrome were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. One case–Edwards syndrome was false positive. Patau syndrome, triple X syndrome or Turner syndrome were not observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, there were no false negative cases reported. In general, NIPT testing had 100 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 46.29 %–100.00 % and 98.95 % specificity (95 % confidence interval: 93.44 %–99.95 %. In determining Down syndrome alone, specificity (95 % confidence interval: 95.25 %- 100.00 % and sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 31.00 %–100.00 % turned out to be 100 %. In 2015, the average turnaround time for analysis was 8.3 days from the day when the sample was taken. Repeated blood sampling was required in 2 cases (redraw rate = 1.6 %.Conclusions: Our results confirm that NIPT represents a fast, safe and highly accurate advanced screening test for most common chromosomal abnormalities. In current clinical practice, NIPT would significantly decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures and the rate of fetal

  20. Down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression in association with DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugaya, Shigeru [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Tanzawa, Hideki [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Sugita, Katsuo [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Education, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kita, Kazuko [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Suzuki, Nobuo [Department of Environmental Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)]. E-mail: nobuo@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2005-10-15

    Fibroblast cells derived from nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients show increased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Genes, whose expression is modulated in association with the DNA synthesis induction, were searched by using PCR-based mRNA differential display analysis in one of the NBCCS cell lines, NBCCS1 cells. Decreased levels of SMT3A gene expression were found in X-ray-irradiated NBCCS1 cells. This decrease was also shown by RT-PCR analysis in another cell line, NBCCS3 cells. In addition to NBCCS cells, normal fibroblast cells showed the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation when they were treated with antisense oligonucleotides (AO) for SMT3A. However, treatment of normal fibroblasts with the random oligonucleotides (RO) resulted in decreased levels of DNA synthesis after X-ray irradiation. Thus, down-regulation of SMT3A gene expression may be involved in the DNA synthesis induction after X-ray irradiation in the NBCCS cells at least tested.

  1. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children with Hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziev, Javid; Marziali, Simone; Paciaroni, Katia; Isgrò, Antonella; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Rossi, Giorgia; Marziali, Marco; De Angelis, Gioia; Alfieri, Cecilia; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Placidi, Fabio; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Floris, Roberto; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio

    2017-09-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious adverse event associated with calcineurin inhibitors used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. We compared the incidence of PRES in children with thalassemia (n = 222, 1.4 to 17.8 years old) versus sickle cell disease (SCD; n = 59, 2 to 17 years old) who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA-matched siblings or alternative donors and analyzed the risk factors for PRES. Overall, 31 children developed calcineurin inhibitor-related PRES (11%), including 30 patients with seizures and 1 patient without seizures. PRES incidence was significantly higher in SCD patients (22%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 10% to 32%) than in thalassemia patients (8%; 95% CI, 5% to 12%;P = .002). In multivariate analysis, factors associated with PRES were hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 5.87; 95% CI, 2.57 to 13.43; P = .0001), SCD (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.25 to 4.99; P = .009), and acute GVHD (HR 2.27; 95% CI, 1.06 to 4.85; P= .031). In the entire cohort overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in patients without versus with PRES (90% versus 77%; P = .02). In a subgroup analysis that including matched sibling transplants, OS and disease-free survival (DFS) were similar in thalassemia patients without PRES (92% and 88%, respectively) and with PRES (82% and 73%, respectively), whereas SCD patients with PRES had significantly lower OS (67%) and DFS (67%) than patients without PRES (94% and 94%, respectively; P = .008). Thus, SCD patients had a significantly higher incidence of PRES than thalassemia patients, and hypertension and GVHD were the 2 main risk factors for PRES in patients with hemoglobinopathies. Although PRES did not significantly influence survival in patients with thalassemia, patients with SCD had significantly lower survival after PRES. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Different mutations are responsible for the elevated sister-chromatid exchange frequencies characteristic of Bloom's syndrome and hamster EM9 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J H; Louie, E; German, J

    1987-01-01

    Experimental hybridization of cultured cells was employed to determine whether the strikingly elevated rates of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) exhibited by Bloom's syndrome (BS) and hamster cell line EM9 have the same or different bases. Seventeen cell lines were developed from polyethylene glycol-treated mixtures of BS and EM9 cells. Cytogenetic analysis proved the hybrid nature of 12 of the lines; 9 of those 12 exhibited low (normal) numbers of SCEs, signifying complementation. The parenta...

  3. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Early infectious acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by activation and proliferation of alveolar T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, K; Kumar, G; Ticchioni, M; Sanfiorenzo, C; Dellamonica, J; Guillouet-de Salvador, F; Bernardin, G; Marquette, C-H; Roger, P-M

    2015-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in humans is characterized by the infiltration of polymorphonuclears in the alveolar spaces. However, the role of T-cells in ARDS is unknown. Our aim was to characterize the T-cell phenotype in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) during the early phase of acute lung infection(ALI)/ARDS-infected patients in comparison to a control group (CG). BAL lymphocyte phenotypes of two ALI, 16 ARDS, and eight CG were examined by flow cytometry. ALI/ARDS showed a significant increase in CD4 and CD8 T-cell activation as compared to CG. Moreover, a significant level of proliferation was observed using the Ki67 marker in ARDS patients as compared to controls (median): 37 versus 6 % for CD4 T-cells (p = 0.022) and 34 versus 2 % for CD8 T-cells (p = 0.009). In contrast, the percentage of T-regulatory cells and apoptotic T-cells were similar in both groups. Among costimulatory molecules, we observed an overexpression of CTLA-4/CD152 on CD4 T-cells in ALI/ARDS as compared to CG: 30 versus 7 %, respectively (p = 0.063). In further characterizing T-cell subsets expressing high levels of CD152, we found the presence of IL-17 secreting CD4 T-cells in ALI/ARDS. In humans, ALI/ARDS due to infection is associated with a high level of T-cell activation and proliferation, along with the presence of Th17 cells, which are known to attract polymorphonuclears.

  5. Endothelial cell study in a case of Werner′s syndrome undergoing phacoemulsification and Yettrium-Aluminum-Garnet laser capsulotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudha Kemmanu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Werner′s syndrome (WS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with multisystem manifestations of premature aging from the second decade of life. Cataract is one of the features of WS. Cataract surgery is complicated with postoperative wound dehiscence and bullous keratopathy when the surgery is done by intracapsular or conventional extracapsular method. We report the short-term result of phacoemulsification and Neodymimum Yettrium-Aluminum-Garnet laser (Nd YAG capsulotomy in a case of WS with bilateral cataracts. Postoperatively and post capsulotomy, there was no change in the endothelial cell morphology. There was an 8.6% decrease in endothelial cell count at the end of 15 months postoperatively and 11 months post YAG capsulotomy. This decrease is within the acceptable range of cell loss after phacoemulsification and YAG capsulotomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of YAG laser capsulotomy in WS.

  6. Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome associated to secondary IgM MGUS emerging after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Jimenez-Zepeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS is a rare hemorrhagic disorder that occurs in patients with no prior personal or family history of bleeding. Here, we describe a case of AVWS occurring after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. Interestingly, AVWS developed after bortezomib-based induction and conditioning regimens. Recent evidence suggests that the proximity of the bortezomib therapy to the collection of stem cells with consequent depletion of regulatory T cells after the conditioning regimen could explain some of the unusual autoimmune complications reported in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT. In addition, this patient developed a secondary MGUS post-ASCT, which may have also contributed to the AVWS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of post-ASCT AVWS reported. Prospective data is needed to better elucidate the mechanisms by which these unusual complications occur in patients receiving bortezomib prior to ASCT.

  7. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome and membranous glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sjögren’s syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease in which lymphatic cells destroy the salivary and lacrimal glands. Glomerulonephritis is thought to be a rare occurrence in primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Furthermore, concurrent glomerular involvement and lymphoma in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome has seldom been reported. Case presentation A 52-year-old woman with primary Sjögren’s syndrome developed membranous glomerulonephritis and Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. She was diagnosed with Sjögren’s syndrome based on the dry eyes, dry mouth, positive anti-nuclear antibody test, anti-Ro (SS-A antibody, salivary gland biopsy, and salivary scintigraphy. Moreover, renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of membranous glomerulonephritis. Three months later, her small bowel was perforated with pneumoperitoneum, and the biopsy revealed Epstein-Barr virus-positive DLBCL. Conclusions We observed the first case of primary Sjögren’s syndrome associated with Epstein-Barr Virus-positive DLBCL and membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the possibility of malignancy-associated membranous glomerulonephritis in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome, we should be careful and examine such patients for hidden malignancy.

  8. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  9. [Cerebellar syndrome and peripheral neuropathy as manifestations of infection by HTLV-1 human T-cell lymphotropic virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J; del Negro, M C; Vargas, A P; Rizzo, I

    Type I human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I) is a retrovirus with affinity for CD4 cells. This infection may give rise to a broad spectrum of disorders including T-cell leucemia/lymphoma, the myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis complex (M/TSP), and to a lesser extent, uveitis, arthritis, polymyositis and peripheral neuropathy. M/TSP is a progressive, chronic myelopathy characterized by spasticity, hypereflexia, muscle weakness and sphincter disorders. Much less frequently it may precede, or give rise to, a cerebellar syndrome with ataxia and intention tremor. We describe the case of a 13 year old adolescent girl who presented with a neurological syndrome which had started with tremor of the head and limbs, ataxia, dysmetria, frequent falls and sphincter disorders. During the two and a half years that she had had this illness she had developed spastic paraparesis of the legs and had repeated urinary infections. Serology of blood and CSF was positive for HTLV-I using the ELISA technique and confirmed by Western-blot. EMG showed predominantly axonal sensomotor neuropathy. A neurogenic bladder was detected on functional urodynamic studies. On MR there was moderate atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord and slight alterations of the subcortical white matter. The presence of a cerebellar syndrome or neuropathy of uncertain origin, in endemic areas, should lead to the inclusion of HTLV-I infection in the differential diagnosis, even in the absence of pyramidal symptoms or defined M/TSP. Maternal seropositivity supports the hypothesis of mother-daughter transmission during lactation.

  10. Sexual dimorphism in an animal model of Sjögren's syndrome: a potential role for Th17 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Voigt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome is a complex autoimmune disease with an array of diverse immunological, genetic and environmental etiologies, making identification of the precise autoimmune mechanism difficult to define. One of the most distinctive aspects of Sjögren's syndrome is the high sexual dimorphism with women affected 10-20 times more than men. It is nearly impossible to study the sexual dimorphic development of Sjögren's syndrome in human patients; therefore it is pertinent to develop an appropriate animal model which resembles human disease. The data indicated that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier onset of sialadenitis with a higher composition of CD3+ T cells and a 10-fold increase in glandular infiltration of Th17 cells at the onset of clinical disease compared to male mice. Inflammatory Th17 cells of female mice exhibited a stronger proliferation in response to disease-specific antigen than their male counterpart. At the clinical disease stage, altered autoantibody patterns can be detected in females whereas they are seldom observed in male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice. Interestingly, male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier loss of secretory function, despite the fact that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice exhibited a more rapid secretory loss. This data indicates the strong sexual dimorphism in the SjS-susceptible C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 animal model, making it an appropriate animal model to examine human disease.

  11. Interhomolog recombination and loss of heterozygosity in wild-type and Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM)-deficient mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocque, Jeannine R; Stark, Jeremy M; Oh, Jin; Bojilova, Ekaterina; Yusa, Kosuke; Horie, Kyoji; Takeda, Junji; Jasin, Maria

    2011-07-19

    Genomic integrity often is compromised in tumor cells, as illustrated by genetic alterations leading to loss of heterozygosity (LOH). One mechanism of LOH is mitotic crossover recombination between homologous chromosomes, potentially initiated by a double-strand break (DSB). To examine LOH associated with DSB-induced interhomolog recombination, we analyzed recombination events using a reporter in mouse embryonic stem cells derived from F1 hybrid embryos. In this study, we were able to identify LOH events although they occur only rarely in wild-type cells (≤2.5%). The low frequency of LOH during interhomolog recombination suggests that crossing over is rare in wild-type cells. Candidate factors that may suppress crossovers include the RecQ helicase deficient in Bloom syndrome cells (BLM), which is part of a complex that dissolves recombination intermediates. We analyzed interhomolog recombination in BLM-deficient cells and found that, although interhomolog recombination is slightly decreased in the absence of BLM, LOH is increased by fivefold or more, implying significantly increased interhomolog crossing over. These events frequently are associated with a second homologous recombination event, which may be related to the mitotic bivalent structure and/or the cell-cycle stage at which the initiating DSB occurs.

  12. Next generation sequencing reveals skewing of the T and B cell receptor repertoires in patients with Wiskott Aldrich syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E O'Connell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS is due to mutations of the WAS gene encoding for the cytoskeletal WAS protein (WASp, leading to abnormal downstream signaling from the T cell and B cell antigen receptors (TCR, BCR. We hypothesized that the impaired signaling through the TCR and BCR in WAS would subsequently lead to aberrations in the immune repertoire of WAS patients. Using next generation sequencing, the T cell receptor beta (TRB and B cell immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH repertoires of 8 patients with WAS and 6 controls were sequenced. Clonal expansions were identified within memory CD4+ cells, as well as in total, naïve and memory CD8+ cells from WAS patients. In the B cell compartment, WAS patient IGH repertoires were also clonally expanded and showed skewed usage of IGHV and IGHJ genes, and increased usage of IGHG constant genes, compared with controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates significant abnormalities of the immune repertoire in WAS patients using next generation sequencing.

  13. Weight reduction and pioglitazone ameliorate polycystic ovary syndrome after removal of a Sertoli-stromal cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsuyoshi Baba,1 Toshiaki Endo,1 Keiko Ikeda,1 Ayumi Shimizu,1 Miyuki Morishita,1 Yoshika Kuno,1 Hiroyuki Honnma,2 Tamotsu Kiya,3 Shin-ichi Ishioka,1 Tsuyoshi Saito11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, 2Asada Ladies Clinic, Kasugai, Aichi, 3Ena Ladies Clinic, Ishikari, Hokkaido, JapanAbstract: This report presents an unusual case of Sertoli-stromal cell tumor and polycystic ovary syndrome successfully treated with weight reduction and an insulin-sensitizing agent. A 22-year-old woman, gravida 0, para 0, visited our hospital for the first time with a 12-year history of secondary amenorrhea and hypertrichosis. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed a solid tumor in the right ovary. Right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and pathological examination confirmed a Sertoli-stromal cell tumor. The patient's serum androgen levels declined postoperatively, but remained above normal. Pioglitazone treatment for 6 months also significantly reduced serum androgen levels, but they still remained above normal. However, after losing 12 kg of body weight, the patient's serum androgen levels declined to normal, and spontaneous menstruation became regular. Weight reduction with pioglitazone is an effective means of treating hyperandrogenism.Keywords: etiology, hyperandrogenism, pioglitazone, polycystic ovary syndrome, Sertoli-stromal cell tumor, weight reduction

  14. Characterization of Human Vaginal Mucosa Cells for Autologous In Vitro Cultured Vaginal Tissue Transplantation in Patients with MRKH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nodale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty.

  15. Hemolytic anemia due to passenger lymphocyte syndrome in solid malignancy patients treated with allogeneic natural killer cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Robert; Singh, Charanjeet; Cooley, Sarah; Geller, Melissa; Northouse, Joan; Welbig, Julie; Slungaard, Arne; Miller, Jeff; McKenna, David

    2013-02-01

    Allogeneic natural killer (NK) cell products for treatment of solid organ malignancies were prepared by performing T (CD3+)-cell depletion on nonmobilized apheresis mononuclear cell collections. The products were not B-cell depleted. This report details two cases of passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) after NK-cell infusion. Patient 1 is a blood group A+ 56-year-old female with Stage IV ovarian carcinoma who received NK cells from an O+ donor. On day +7 she developed new hemolytic anemia. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT) was positive for immunoglobulin G and C3, and the eluate contained anti-A. Subsequently, anti-A was identified on reverse typing. She was transfused with group O red blood cells (RBCs). By day +12 she forward typed as O with anti-A and B on reverse typing. By day +42, DAT was negative with only weak anti-A on reverse typing. Patient 2 is a blood group B+ 51-year-old female with metastatic lobular breast carcinoma who received NK cells from an O+ donor. On day +7 she developed new hemolytic anemia. DAT was positive, and the eluate contained anti-A and -B. Anti-A reactivity was due to anti-A,B. The next day she developed new anti-B on reverse typing. She was transfused with O RBCs. Anti-B titer increased to a maximum of 512 on day +12. At discharge on Day +29 her anti-B titer was still 32. These patients developed PLS after infusion of NK cells. Because of these cases NK-cell products are now B (CD19+)-cell depleted at our institution, and this approach is recommended for other centers. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Decreased host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated adenovirus 5 by fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.S. III; Ziolkowski, C.H.J.; DiMattina, M. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1981-11-01

    Over a period of 5 years, 29 experiments were performed in which survival curves of UV-irradiated adenovirus were determined using fibroblast strains from 10 normal persons and from 7 persons having Cockayne's syndrome. In all of these, the survival of UV-irradiated adenovirus 5 was less when assayed using monolayers of fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome patients than from normal persons. Survival curves using normal fibroblasts were, within error, straight lines on a log survival vs. linear fluence plot. Survival curves obtained using Cockayne's syndrome fibroblasts showed 2 components: an initial sensitive component, reflecting the behavior of approx. 75% of the infected cells, followed by a component having normal sensitivity. In the 28 experiments that were considered reliable, 58 curves were done using Cockayne's fibroblasts, 41 using normal human fibroblasts. Although experimental variation was encountered, there was no individual case in which sensitivity as measured using Cockayne's was equal to (or less than) the sensitivity measured using normal fibroblasts.

  17. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  18. Expression of ghrelin gene in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma ghrelin concentrations in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Ursula; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; de Mello, Vanessa D F; Schwab, Ursula; Laaksonen, David E; Rauramaa, Rainer; Gylling, Helena; Atalay, Mustafa; Pulkkinen, Leena; Uusitupa, Matti

    2008-04-01

    We examined the expression of ghrelin and ghrelin receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and evaluated the effect of weight loss or exercise on plasma ghrelin concentrations in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Data from 75 overweight/obese subjects randomized to a weight loss, aerobic exercise, resistance exercise or control group for a 33-week intervention period were analysed. The plasma ghrelin concentrations and indices of insulin and glucose metabolism were assessed, and mRNA expression of ghrelin, its receptors and various cytokines in PBMCs was studied using real-time PCR. Ghrelin and GH secretagogue receptor 1b were expressed in PBMCs of subjects with metabolic syndrome. Ghrelin gene expression correlated positively with the expressions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (Presponse in i.v. glucose tolerance test were stronger predictors of the ghrelin concentration. Plasma ghrelin did not change over the study period in the weight reduction group, but it tended to decrease in the control group (P=0.050). Ghrelin mRNA expression in PBMCs suggests an autocrine role for ghrelin within an immune microenvironment. Moderate long-term weight loss may prevent a decline in ghrelin concentration over time in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

  19. Early diagnosis followed by front-line autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for patients affected by POEMS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenti, Luca; De Matteis, Silvia; Sabatelli, Mario; Conte, Amelia; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Sorà, Federica; Piccirillo, Nicola; Za, Tommaso; Tarnani, Michela; Rossi, Elena; Leone, Giuseppe; Sica, Simona

    2008-08-01

    The acronym POEMS refers to polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes. This disease is progressive and weakening for patients and lead to death generally for neurological problem without therapy. We treated four patients affected by POEMS syndrome with front-line chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (aPBSCT). After a median follow-up of 40.5 months (range 12-52), all patients are alive with slow but progressive improvement in neurological disease, skin changes, performance status and without evidence of clonal plasmacytosis and organomegaly. In conclusion early diagnosis is crucial to obtain best response and improve clinical outcome.

  20. Intracranial Aneurysms in Sickle-Cell Disease Are Associated With the Hemoglobin SS Genotype But Not With Moyamoya Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Gardner, Kate; Kesse-Adu, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial aneurysms and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may occur more frequently in sickle-cell disease (SCD), and this could be related to the sickle genotype and moyamoya syndrome seen in SCD. METHODS: Records from a total of 1002 patients with SCD attending 2...... had imaging data; the prevalence was significantly higher in patients with HbSS genotype compared with other sickle genotypes with the highest prevalence (15%) observed in women in the age group 30 to 39 years. Fifty-one HbSS patients had a moyamoya vasculopathy, but only 3 of these had concomitant...

  1. Managing Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated Paraneoplastic Syndrome with Nephron-sparing Surgery in a Patient with von Hippel-Lindau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. DiBianco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A patient with germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene alteration and history of multiple tumors present with classical paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. She underwent open nephron sparing surgery with resolution of symptoms. She remained without recurrence of RCC for the initial 2 years of her follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first in which PNS was specifically resolved using a partial nephrectomy in a patient with VHL. This case report provides initial evidence for the potential role of nephron sparing surgery in the management of paraneoplastic symptoms associated with hereditary RCC.

  2. Nutrition challenges in a patient with sinusoidal obstructive syndrome following an allogeneic stem cell transplant: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringo, Kristin; Chen, Louise

    2012-10-01

    Nutrition management of patients undergoing a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) can be challenging. Fluid, macronutrient, and micronutrient needs are often altered due to a variety of therapy-associated complications and changes in metabolism. Sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication characterized by fluid retention, ascites, and painful hepatomegaly that may complicate provision of adequate nutrition to HSCT patients. The nutrition implications and interventions in a patient who developed SOS following an allogeneic matched unrelated donor (Allo/MUD) HSCT are reviewed in the case report.

  3. Advances in the understanding and clinical management of mastocytosis and clonal mast cell activation syndromes [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González-de-Olano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clonal mast cell activation syndromes and indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin involvement are two emerging entities that sometimes might be clinically difficult to distinguish, and they involve a great challenge for the physician from both a diagnostic and a therapeutic point of view. Furthermore, final diagnosis of both entities requires a bone marrow study; it is recommended that this be done in reference centers. In this article, we address the current consensus and guidelines for the suspicion, diagnosis, classification, treatment, and management of these two entities.

  4. Orbital compression syndrome complicated by epidural hematoma and wide cephalohematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Nilufer; Acipayam, Can; Aydogan, Fusun; Atci, Nesrin; Ilhan, Ozgur; Coskun, Mesut; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan

    2014-04-01

    Orbital wall infarctions resulting in orbital and epidural hematomas are rare manifestations of sickle cell disease (SCD). We report orbital compression syndrome associated with an epidural hematoma and wide cephalohematoma in a 15-year-old boy with SCD. An infarcted orbital bone was observed on magnetic resonance imaging and three-phase bone scintigraphy with Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate. The patient recovered completely without surgical intervention at the end of the fourth week. Prompt diagnosis and proper management are critical for complete recovery. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  6. Long-term outcomes of adaptive functions for children with mucopolysaccharidosis I (Hurler syndrome) treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoraker, Kendra J; Delaney, Kathleen; Peters, Charles; Krivit, William; Shapiro, Elsa G

    2006-08-01

    Advances in medical treatment have prolonged the lives of children with Hurler syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis I requiring increased attention to the assessment of their long-term outcomes and functional abilities. Adaptive functions are critical for understanding functional outcomes after treatment and developing focused interventions. We investigated the development of various adaptive functions in children who have had hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for Hurler syndrome and risk factors that are associated with the development of these functions. We examined the development of 41 children who had 3 or more Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales records assessed before and after transplant. Communication, daily living skills, socialization, and motor functions were measured. While standard scores decline over time, development of skills continue with a slower than average rate compared with peers. A cross-sectional nontransplanted comparison group showed more deficits after age 2 years than the transplanted group. In contrast to cognitive ability, age at transplant was not significantly associated with ultimate adaptive level. Baseline cognitive level before HSCT and growth of cognition after HSCT were associated with adaptive functions especially for communication and daily living skills. Socialization was predicted by cumulative medical risk factors, likely due to restricted social exposure in children with complicated transplant courses. Overall, measurement of adaptive behaviors demonstrated that HSCT allows long-term slow improvement of functional outcomes for children with Hurler syndrome. Children with Hurler syndrome with good cognitive levels before HSCT and continued growth of cognition after HSCT show good adaptive functions. Although cognitive and orthopedic problems as well as medical complications limit adaptive ability, identifying these problems early allow beneficial targeted interventions.

  7. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Underutilized in Older Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getta, Bartlomiej M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hilden, Patrick; Tallman, Martin S; Maloy, Molly; Gonzales, Patrick; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio; Tamari, Roni; Klimek, Virginia

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The proportion of MDS patients referred for transplantation evaluation, those undergoing transplantation, and the reasons for not undergoing transplantation are unknown. In this retrospective analysis, predefined HCT eligibility and indications criteria were applied to 362 unselected patients with newly diagnosed MDS seen by leukemia faculty between 2008 and 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Two hundred ninety-four patients (81%) were deemed eligible for transplantation and among these, transplantation was considered indicated in 244 (83%). Of these, 158 of 244 (65%) were referred for transplantation evaluation at a median of 3.9 months from diagnosis. Overall 120 of 362 (33%) underwent transplantation at a median of 7.7 months from diagnosis. Metastatic solid-organ malignancy was the major reason for transplantation ineligibility (54%), and death due to MDS, which occurred in 41% of candidates who did not undergo transplantation, was the major reason for not undergoing transplantation. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplantation evaluation included age ≥65 (P < .001), ≥2 comorbidities (P = .008), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (P < .001), <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall P < .001), having Medicare/Medicaid health insurance (P < .001), not being married (P = .017), and diagnosis between 2008 and 2011 (P = .035). On multivariate analysis adjusting for all of the previous factors, diagnosis between 2008 and 2011 (P < .001), age ≥65 (P = .001), and <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall P = .031) were associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplantation evaluation. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of undergoing transplantation included age ≥65 (P < .001), ≥2 comorbidities (P = .003), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (P < .001), <5% blasts (overall P

  8. DNA repair and ultraviolet mutagenesis in cells from a new patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group G and cockayne syndrome resemble xeroderma pigmentosum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, S; Stefanini, M; Lehmann, A R; Hoeijmakers, J H; Robbins, J H; Rapin, I; Botta, E; Tanganelli, B; Vermeulen, W; Broughton, B C; Kraemer, K H

    1996-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)/Cockayne syndrome (CS) complex is a combination of clinical features of two rare genetic disorders in one individual. A sun-sensitive boy (XP20BE) who had severe symptoms of CS, with dwarfism, microcephaly, retinal degeneration, and mental impairment, had XP-type pigmentation and died at 6 y with marked cachexia (weight 14.5 lb) without skin cancers. We evaluated his cultured cells for characteristic CS or XP DNA-repair abnormalities. The level of ultraviolet (UV)-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was less than 5% of normal, characteristic of the excision-repair defect of XP. Cell fusion studies indicated that his cells were in XP complementation group G. His cells were hypersensitive to killing by UV, and their post-UV recovery of RNA synthesis was abnormally low, features of both CS and XP. Post-UV survival of plasmid pSP189 in his cells was markedly reduced, and post-UV plasmid mutation frequency was higher than with normal cells, as in both CS and XP. Sequence analysis of the mutated plasmid marker gene showed normal frequency of plasmids with multiple base substitutions, as in CS, and an abnormally increased frequency of G:C-->A:T mutations, a feature of XP. Transfection of UV-treated pRSVcat with or without photoreactivation revealed that his cells, like XP cells, could not repair either cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or non-dimer photoproducts. These results indicate that the DNA-repair features of the XP20BE (XP-G/CS) cells are phenotypically more like XP cells than CS cells, whereas clinically the CS phenotype is more prominent than XP.

  9. Lamin B1 depletion in senescent cells triggers large-scale changes in gene expression and the chromatin landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parisha P; Donahue, Greg; Otte, Gabriel L; Capell, Brian C; Nelson, David M; Cao, Kajia; Aggarwala, Varun; Cruickshanks, Hazel A; Rai, Taranjit Singh; McBryan, Tony; Gregory, Brian D; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2013-08-15

    Senescence is a stable proliferation arrest, associated with an altered secretory pathway, thought to promote tumor suppression and tissue aging. While chromatin regulation and lamin B1 down-regulation have been implicated as senescence effectors, functional interactions between them are poorly understood. We compared genome-wide Lys4 trimethylation on histone H3 (H3K4me3) and H3K27me3 distributions between proliferating and senescent human cells and found dramatic differences in senescence, including large-scale domains of H3K4me3- and H3K27me3-enriched "mesas" and H3K27me3-depleted "canyons." Mesas form at lamin B1-associated domains (LADs) in replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence and overlap DNA hypomethylation regions in cancer, suggesting that pre-malignant senescent chromatin changes foreshadow epigenetic cancer changes. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts (mutant lamin A) also show evidence of H3K4me3 mesas, suggesting a link between premature chromatin changes and accelerated cell senescence. Canyons mostly form between LADs and are enriched in genes and enhancers. H3K27me3 loss is correlated with up-regulation of key senescence genes, indicating a link between global chromatin changes and local gene expression regulation. Lamin B1 reduction in proliferating cells triggers senescence and formation of mesas and canyons. Our data illustrate profound chromatin reorganization during senescence and suggest that lamin B1 down-regulation in senescence is a key trigger of global and local chromatin changes that impact gene expression, aging, and cancer.

  10. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  11. Characteristics and Outcome of Patients After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Treated With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Philipp; Beutel, Gernot; Lebiedz, Pia; Stemmler, Hans-Joachim; Staudinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Matthieu; Kochanek, Matthias; Liebregts, Tobias; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Azoulay, Elie; Demoule, Alexandre; Kluge, Stefan; Svalebjørg, Morten; Lueck, Catherina; Tischer, Johanna; Combes, Alain; Böll, Boris; Rabitsch, Werner; Schellongowski, Peter

    2017-05-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is a frequent condition following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may serve as rescue therapy in refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome but has not been assessed in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Multicenter, retrospective, observational study. ICUs in 12 European tertiary care centers (Austria, Germany, France, and Belgium). All allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients treated with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory distress syndrome between 2010 and 2015. None. Thirty-seven patients, nine of whom underwent noninvasive ventilation at the time of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation, were analyzed. ICU admission occurred at a median of 146 (interquartile range, 27-321) days after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The main reason for acute respiratory distress syndrome was pneumonia in 81% of patients. All but one patient undergoing noninvasive ventilation at extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation had to be intubated thereafter. Overall, seven patients (19%) survived to hospital discharge and were alive and in remission of their hematologic disease after a follow-up of 18 (range, 5-30) months. Only one of 24 patients (4%) initiated on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation within 240 days after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation survived compared to six of 13 (46%) of those treated thereafter (p stem cell transplantation do not support the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory distress syndrome in this group. On the contrary, long-term allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients otherwise eligible for full-code ICU management may be potential candidates for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome failing conventional measures.

  12. Reduced Number of CD8+ Cells in Tonsillar Germinal Centres in Children with the Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førsvoll, J; Janssen, E A M; Møller, I; Wathne, N; Skaland, I; Klos, J; Kristoffersen, E K; Øymar, K

    2015-07-01

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Tonsillectomy may cause a prompt resolution of the syndrome. The aim was to study the histologic and immunological aspects of the palatine tonsils in PFAPA, to help understand the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Tonsils from children with PFAPA (n = 11) and children with tonsillar hypertrophy (n = 16) were evaluated histologically after haematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of different cell types was identified immunohistochemically by cluster of differentiation (CD) markers: CD3 (T cells), CD4 (T helper cells), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CD15 (neutrophils), CD20 (B cells), CD45 (all leucocytes), CD57 (NK cells) and CD163 (monocytes and macrophages). Tonsils from children with PFAPA showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia dominated by well-developed germinal centres with many tingible body macrophages. The histologic findings were unspecific, and a similar morphologic appearance was also found in the tonsils from controls. The number of CD8+ cells in germinal centres differed between children with PFAPA [median 9 cells (quartiles: 5, 15)] and controls [18 cells (12, 33) (P = 0.001)] and between children with PFAPA with (median 14 cells; 9, 16) and without (4 cells; 3, 8) aphthous stomatitis (P = 0.015). For the other cell types, no differences in germinal centres were found between children with PFAPA and controls. In conclusion, a lower number of CD8+ cells were found in germinal centres of tonsils in children with PFAPA compared to controls, which may be a feature linked to the aetiology of the syndrome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  14. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Shimamoto

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  15. [Dynamics of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and natural killer cells in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing-Ming; He, Zhong-Ping; Zhuang, Hui; Song, Shu-Jing; Dai, Wang-Su; Zhang, Si-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Jing-Yuan

    2004-08-01

    To study the dynamics of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells in 602 serial samples from 240 patients with SARS were counted, using flow cytometry, and compared with that of normal population. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells in SARS patients were significantly lower than that of the normal population (P < 0.001) and were much lower in SARS patients with severe or extremely severe types, as compared with that of moderate or mild type cases (P < 0.001). The amount of B lymphocytes in recovery SARS patients increased at the 2nd week after onset, and gradually becoming normal at the 5th week of the disease onset. The number of NK cells was in the low level at onset, and keep decreasing at the 2nd week. However, it was increasing with the recovery of the disease, but did not reach to normal level at the 5th week after onset. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes and NK cells were associated with the severity of the disease, and detection of these two kinds of cells was useful for predicting the prognosis of SARS.

  16. Dysregulation of Protein Kinase Gene Expression in NK Cells from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Anu; Staines, Donald R; Johnston, Samantha C; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M

    2016-01-01

    The etiology and pathomechanism of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) are unknown. However, natural killer (NK) cell dysfunction, in particular reduced NK cytotoxic activity, is a consistent finding in CFS/ME patients. Previous research has reported significant changes in intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways from isolated NK cells. The purpose of this present investigation was to examine whether protein kinase genes have a role in abnormal NK cell intracellular signaling in CFS/ME. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of 528 protein kinase genes in isolated NK cells was analyzed (nCounter GX Human Kinase Kit v2 (XT); NanoString Technologies) from moderate (n = 11; age, 54.9 ± 10.3 years) and severe (n = 12; age, 47.5 ± 8.0 years) CFS/ME patients (classified by the 2011 International Consensus Criteria) and nonfatigued controls (n = 11; age, 50.0 ± 12.3 years). The expression of 92 protein kinase genes was significantly different in the severe CFS/ME group compared with nonfatigued controls. Among these, 37 genes were significantly upregulated and 55 genes were significantly downregulated in severe CFS/ME patients compared with nonfatigued controls. In severe CFS/ME patients, dysfunction in protein kinase genes may contribute to impairments in NK cell intracellular signaling and effector function. Similar changes in protein kinase genes may be present in other cells, potentially contributing to the pathomechanism of this illness.

  17. Interleukin-1 receptor mediates the interplay between CD4+ T cells and ocular resident cells to promote keratinizing squamous metaplasia in Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Ting; Lazarev, Stanislav; Bahrami, Ahmad F; Noble, Lisa B; Chen, Feeling Y T; Zhou, Delu; Gallup, Marianne; Yadav, Mahesh; McNamara, Nancy A

    2012-04-01

    Keratinizing squamous metaplasia (SQM) of the ocular mucosal epithelium is a blinding corneal disease characterized by the loss of conjunctival goblet cells (GCs), pathological ocular surface keratinization and tissue recruitment of immune cells. Using the autoimmune regulator (Aire)-deficient mouse as a model for Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-associated SQM, we identified CD4(+) T lymphocytes as the main immune effectors driving SQM and uncovered a pathogenic role for interleukin-1 (IL-1). IL-1, a pleiotropic cytokine family enriched in ocular epithelia, governs tissue homeostasis and mucosal immunity. Here, we used adoptive transfer of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells to dissect the mechanism whereby IL-1 promotes SQM. CD4(+) T cells adoptively transferred from both Aire knockout (KO) and Aire/IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) double KO donors conferred SQM to severe-combined immunodeficiency (scid) recipients with functional IL-1R1, but not scid recipients lacking IL-1R1. In the lacrimal gland, IL-1R1 was primarily immunolocalized to ductal epithelium surrounded by CD4(+) T cells. In the eye, IL-1R1 was expressed on local mucosal epithelial and stromal cells, but not on resident antigen-presenting cells or infiltrating immune cells. In both tissues, autoreactive CD4(+) T-cell infiltration was only observed in the presence of IL-1R1-postive resident cells. Moreover, persistent activation of IL-1R1 signaling led to chronic immune-mediated inflammation by retaining CD4(+) T cells in the local microenvironment. Following IL-1R1-dependent infiltration of CD4(+) T cells, we observed SQM hallmarks in local tissues-corneal keratinization, conjunctival GC mucin acidification and epithelial cell hyperplasia throughout the ocular surface mucosa. Proinflammatory IL-1 expression in ocular epithelial cells significantly correlated with reduced tear secretion, while CD4(+) T-cell infiltration of the lacrimal gland predicted the development of ocular SQM. Collectively, data in this study

  18. Cardiorenal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) have been subclassified as five defined entities which represent clinical circumstances in which both the heart and the kidney are involved in a bidirectional injury and dysfunction via a final common pathway of cell-to-cell death and accelerated apoptosis mediated by oxidative stress. Types 1 and 2 involve acute and chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) scenarios leading to acute kidney injury or accelerated chronic kidney disease. Types 2 and 3 describe acute and chronic kidney disease leading primarily to heart failure, although it is possible that acute coronary syndromes, stroke, and arrhythmias could be CVD outcomes in these forms of CRS. Finally, CRS type 5 describes a simultaneous insult to both heart and kidneys, such as sepsis, where both organs are injured simultaneously. Both blood and urine biomarkers are reviewed in this paper and offer a considerable opportunity to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiology and known epidemiology of these recently defined syndromes. PMID:21286212

  19. Extended B cell phenotype in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a cross‐sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, F.; Bansal, A.; Berkovitz, S.; Sharma, A.; Reddy, V.; Leandro, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a heterogeneous condition of unknown aetiology characterized by multiple symptoms including fatigue, post‐exertional malaise and cognitive impairment, lasting for at least 6 months. Recently, two clinical trials of B cell depletion therapy with rituximab (anti‐CD20) reported convincing improvement in symptoms. A possible but undefined role for B cells has therefore been proposed. Studies of the relative percentages of B cell subsets in patients with ME/CFS have not revealed any reproducible differences from healthy controls (HC). In order to explore whether more subtle alterations in B cell subsets related to B cell differentiation exist in ME/CFS patients we used flow cytometry to immunophenotype CD19+ B cells. The panel utilized immunoglobulin (Ig)D, CD27 and CD38 (classical B cell subsets) together with additional markers. A total of 38 patients fulfilling Canadian, Centre for Disease Control and Fukuda ME/CFS criteria and 32 age‐ and sex‐matched HC were included. We found no difference in percentages of classical subsets between ME/CFS patients and HC. However, we observed an increase in frequency (P 20%) was associated with the presence of ME/CFS [odds ratio: 3·47 (1·15–10·46); P = 0·03] compared with HC, and there was a negative correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, we identified possible changes in B cell phenotype in patients with ME/CFS. These may reflect altered B cell function and, if confirmed in other patient cohorts, could provide a platform for studies based on clinical course or responsiveness to rituximab therapy. PMID:26646713

  20. Extended B cell phenotype in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, F; Bansal, A; Berkovitz, S; Sharma, A; Reddy, V; Leandro, M J; Cambridge, G

    2016-05-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a heterogeneous condition of unknown aetiology characterized by multiple symptoms including fatigue, post-exertional malaise and cognitive impairment, lasting for at least 6 months. Recently, two clinical trials of B cell depletion therapy with rituximab (anti-CD20) reported convincing improvement in symptoms. A possible but undefined role for B cells has therefore been proposed. Studies of the relative percentages of B cell subsets in patients with ME/CFS have not revealed any reproducible differences from healthy controls (HC). In order to explore whether more subtle alterations in B cell subsets related to B cell differentiation exist in ME/CFS patients we used flow cytometry to immunophenotype CD19⁺ B cells. The panel utilized immunoglobulin (Ig)D, CD27 and CD38 (classical B cell subsets) together with additional markers. A total of 38 patients fulfilling Canadian, Centre for Disease Control and Fukuda ME/CFS criteria and 32 age- and sex-matched HC were included. We found no difference in percentages of classical subsets between ME/CFS patients and HC. However, we observed an increase in frequency (P 20%) was associated with the presence of ME/CFS [odds ratio: 3·47 (1·15-10·46); P = 0·03] compared with HC, and there was a negative correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, we identified possible changes in B cell phenotype in patients with ME/CFS. These may reflect altered B cell function and, if confirmed in other patient cohorts, could provide a platform for studies based on clinical course or responsiveness to rituximab therapy. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.