WorldWideScience

Sample records for progenitor survey spy

  1. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of ˜115 deg2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its “warm” mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z ≥slant 3 to test various models for “feedback” from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z ≥slant 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5σ depths of 6.13 μJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 μJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (˜98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (˜55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z ≥slant 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.1 million sources, a 4.5 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing ˜5.4 million sources.

  2. SpIES: The Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon; Lacy, Mark; Strauss, Michael; Spergel, David; Anderson, Scott; Bauer, Franz; Bochanski, John; Brandt, Niel; Cushing, Michael; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallagher, Sarah; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Hewett, Paul; Hodge, Jaqueline; Hopkins, Philip; Hughes, Jack; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lupton, Robert; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; McMahon, Richard; Menanteau, Felipe; Myers, Adam; Nichol, Robert; Ross, Nic; Ryan, Erin; Schneider, Donald; Szalay, Alex; Urry, C. Megan; Viero, Marco; Warren, Stephen; Zakamska, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has opened up entirely new realms of astronomy, but unlike ground-based optical and NIR surveys, it has not yet conducted a wide-area survey that samples enough volume to perform investigations of quasar clustering and the quasar luminosity function at z>3. We propose to remedy this situation by performing a moderately deep Spitzer-IRAC survey of 175 sq. deg. along the Celestial Equator (SDSS 'Stripe 82'), complemented with one of the CFHT Legacy Survey wide fields with which it overlaps. With this dataset, we will 1) probe quasar clustering and the luminosity function in order to test different 'feedback' models of galaxy evolution; 2) identify obscured and unobscured AGNs with a combination of mid-IR, optical, and variability selection---taking advantage of ancillary multi-wavelength, multi-epoch data to produce accurate photometric redshifts; 3) identify ~25 6survey of lasting value. At our optimal depth, covering this area (~175 sq. deg.) will require 1270 hours of new observations. Such a survey will complement existing Spitzer Legacy programs and provide crucial input for future missions such as JWST. Reduced images and catalogs will be made available to the public using the existing SDSS, NVO, and IRSA database structures.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SpIES: the Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (Timlin+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, J. D.; Ross, N. P.; Richards, G. T.; Lacy, M.; Ryan, E. L.; Stone, R. B.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, X.; Glikman, E.; Haggard, D.; Jiang, L.; Lamassa, S. M.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; McGehee, P.; Myers, A. D.; Schneider, D. P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, E. J.; Zakamska, N. L.

    2016-09-01

    The observational goal of the SpIES project was to map SDSS Stripe 82 (S82) field located on the Celestial Equator spanning a range of -60°SpIES observations cover approximately one-third of this region centered on δ=0° and spanning the range from -30°SpIES) data were obtained as part of Cycle 9 (2012-2014) of the Spitzer "warm" post-cryogenic mission utilizing the first two channels (3.6 and 4.5um) of IRAC. In total, SpIES is comprised of 154 individual Astronomical Observation Requests (AORs) observed over two epochs separated by no less than five hours in time (77 AORs per epoch), which corresponds to ~70000 IRAC FOVs spanning the full survey area. See section 3 for further explanations. (4 data files).

  4. SPI-ing Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, A.

    2017-10-01

    Star-Planet Interaction (SPI) is a broad phenomenological term which encompasses a variety of physical effects relevant for the evolution of extra-solar planetary systems, in particular those hosting giant gas planets in close orbits around their parent star. While theoretical expectations of SPI are abundant, observational signatures are still elusive with current instrumentation and adopted observing strategies. In particular, recent X-ray observations provided intriguing indications of different SPI-driven effects, including enhanced coronal emission and flaring activity related to the phase of the planetary orbit, but for a few specific planet hosting stars, while results based on statistical studies are controversial. I will review the state of the art on the matter, and possible future developments with Athena and SKA that will help us for a better characterization of exoplanets and their abitability conditions.

  5. The ATLASGAL survey: The sample of young massive cluster progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Megeath, S. T.; Motte, F.; Sanna, A.; Wienen, M.; Menten, K. M.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The progenitors of high-mass stars and clusters are still challenging to recognise. Only unbiased surveys, sensitive to compact regions of high dust column density, can unambiguously reveal such a small population of particularly massive and cold clumps. Aims: Here we use the ATLASGAL survey to identify a sample of candidate progenitors of massive clusters in the inner Galaxy. Methods: We characterise a flux limited sample of compact sources selected from the ATLASGAL survey. Sensitive mid-infrared data at 21-24μm from the WISE and MIPSGAL surveys were explored to search for embedded objects, and complementary spectroscopic data were used to investigate their stability and their star formation activity. Results: We identify an unbiased sample of infrared-quiet massive clumps in the Galaxy that potentially represent the earliest stages of massive cluster formation. An important fraction of this sample consists of sources that have not been studied in detail before. We first find that clumps hosting more evolved embedded objects and infrared-quiet clumps exhibit similar physical properties in terms of mass and size, suggesting that the sources are not only capable of forming high-mass stars, but likely also follow a single evolutionary track leading to the formation of massive clusters. The majority of the clumps are likely not in virial-equilibrium, suggesting collapse on the clump scale. Conclusions: We identify the precursors of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy within our completeness limit, and argue that these objects are undergoing large-scale collapse. This is in line with the low number of infrared-quiet massive clumps and earlier findings that star formation, in particular for high-mass objects is a fast, dynamic process. We propose a scenario in which massive clumps start to fragment and collapse before their final mass is accumulated indicating that strong self-gravity and global collapse is needed to build up rich clusters and the most

  6. Practical SPI Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landaeta, José Francisco; García, Javier; Amescua, Antonio

    This paper presents a practical procedure named P4SPI for planning, monitoring and closing an SPI. Planning activities are performed using PMBOK's process areas as a reference; monitoring activities using Six Sigma tools and techniques and closing activities using gathering qualitative and quantitative information about the SPI Implementation. These activities are supported by office templates.

  7. Exploring Supernova Remnants with the SPIES Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations provide a key window into supernova remnants, providing measurements of a plethora of physical properties that are critical for understanding SNRs, their environments, their progenitors, and the SNe that created them. However, characterizing the entire volume of shocked plasma in a SNR is difficult, due to their complicated three dimensional morphologies and spectra. The SPIES project aims to address this problem by applying a novel X-ray analysis method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI), to XMM observations of 12 SNRs. SPI is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. Emission-weighted distributions and maps of plasma properties, such as abundances and temperatures, are then extracted from the properties of the individual blobs. Additionally, because the collection of blobs is a multi-dimensional representation of the shocked plasma, we can carry out a more detailed exploration of plasma properties by extracting any subset of the blobs (e.g. those with the highest temperatures) and investigating its properties (e.g. map the abundances). Here we present preliminary results from SPI analyses of the first 6 remnants in the SPIES project.

  8. Spies in the minority game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, You-Yang; Xu, Chen; Gu, Guo-Qing; Hui, Pak Ming

    2008-01-01

    We study the effects of the existence of another type of agents, called spies, in the minority game (MG). Unlike the normal agents in the MG, the spies do not carry any strategy. Instead, they decide their action by scouting some normal agents and take the minority action of the spied group. For a few spies and when there is useful information in the normal agents’ actions, the spies can avoid the crowd effect of the normal agents and win more readily. When information becomes less useful and when more spies are present, the spies’ crowd effect hurts the success rate of the spies themselves, and the normal agents could have a higher success rate than the spies. More spies actually assist more normal agents to win, as the spies also provide more winning quotas. This leads to a nonmonotonic behavior in the total success rate of the population as a function of the fraction of spies.

  9. Spying for the enlightenment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    According to Enlightenment ideology, knowledge was shared openly in the international Republic of Letters. In reality, the owners of lucrative new technologies were determined to keep their discoveries hidden from industrial spies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying the progenitors of present-day early-type galaxies in observational surveys: correcting `progenitor bias' using the Horizon-AGN simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Kaviraj, S.; Devriendt, J. E. G.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Laigle, C.

    2018-03-01

    As endpoints of the hierarchical mass-assembly process, the stellar populations of local early-type galaxies encode the assembly history of galaxies over cosmic time. We use Horizon-AGN, a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, to study the merger histories of local early-type galaxies and track how the morphological mix of their progenitors evolves over time. We provide a framework for alleviating `progenitor bias' - the bias that occurs if one uses only early-type galaxies to study the progenitor population. Early types attain their final morphology at relatively early epochs - by z ˜ 1, around 60 per cent of today's early types have had their last significant merger. At all redshifts, the majority of mergers have one late-type progenitor, with late-late mergers dominating at z > 1.5 and early-early mergers becoming significant only at z types is actually in progenitors with early-type morphology, while, at z ˜ 2, studying only early types misses almost all (80 per cent) of the stellar mass that eventually ends up in local early-type systems. At high redshift, almost all massive late-type galaxies, regardless of their local environment or star formation rate, are progenitors of local early-type galaxies, as are lower mass (M⋆ types as long as they reside in high-density environments. In this new era of large observational surveys (e.g. LSST, JWST), this study provides a framework for studying how today's early-type galaxies have been built up over cosmic time.

  11. Engineering Protein Hydrogels Using SpyCatcher-SpyTag Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoye; Fang, Jie; Xue, Bin; Fu, Linglan; Li, Hongbin

    2016-09-12

    Constructing hydrogels from engineered proteins has attracted significant attention within the material sciences, owing to their myriad potential applications in biomedical engineering. Developing efficient methods to cross-link tailored protein building blocks into hydrogels with desirable mechanical, physical, and functional properties is of paramount importance. By making use of the recently developed SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, we successfully engineered protein hydrogels on the basis of engineered tandem modular elastomeric proteins. Our resultant protein hydrogels are soft but stable, and show excellent biocompatibility. As the first step, we tested the use of these hydrogels as a drug carrier, as well as in encapsulating human lung fibroblast cells. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, even when the SpyTag (or SpyCatcher) is flanked by folded globular domains. These results demonstrate that SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry can be used to engineer protein hydrogels from tandem modular elastomeric proteins that can find applications in tissue engineering, in fundamental mechano-biological studies, and as a controlled drug release vehicle.

  12. Android/GUI Controlled Bluetooth Spy Robot (SPY-BOT)

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmal K Thomas; Radhika S; ShyamMohanan.C; Sreelakshmi Rajan; Deepak S Koovackal; Suvarna A

    2017-01-01

    The robotic vehicle can be controlled by a PC or an android device. The GUI interface used to control the robot is developed in MATLAB, and the android app is developed using MIT appinventor 2. The robotic vehicle is equipped with an IP web camera for GUI interface and another wireless camera having night vision capability for remote monitoring/spying purposes. This system can be used in sensitive areas where humans cannot enter directly. The commands provided by android application/GUI inter...

  13. Spying in multi-market oligopolies

    OpenAIRE

    Billand, Pascal; Bravard, Christophe; Chakrabarti, Subhadip; Sarangi, Sudipta

    2010-01-01

    We consider a multimarket framework where a set of firms compete on two interrelated oligopolis- tic markets. Prior to competing in these markets, firms can spy on others in order to increase the quality of their product. We characterize the equilibrium espionage networks and networks that maximize social welfare under the most interesting scenario of diseconomies of scope. We find that in some situations firms may refrain from spying even if it is costless. Moreover, even though spying leads...

  14. InSpiRe - Intelligent Spine Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Kasper Hafstrøm; Helms, Niels Henrik; Kjær, Per

    Rapport on InSpiRe-projektet: InSpiRe er et nationalt netværk, der skal fremme mulighederne for intelligent genoptræning i forhold til ryglidelser. I netværket mødes forskere, virksomheder, kiropraktorer og fysioterapeuter for at udvikle nye genoptrænings og/eller behandlingsteknologier....

  15. The RECONS Census: Spying on Your Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, T. J.; Jao, W. C.; Subasavage, J. P.; Costa, E.; Ianna, P. A.; Mendez, R. A.; RECONS Team

    2002-12-01

    Spying on your neighbors can be an illuminating experience... We present the RECONS (Research Consortium on Nearby Stars) effort to take an accurate census of all objects within 10 pc and outside of the Solar System. The result is an accurate cross-sectional study of your neighbors, who tend to be small and red, and lurk unseen in the night. There are a few brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets as well. We will introduce you to more than a dozen of your newest neighbors, discovered during a large southern sky parallax effort known as CTIOPI (CTIO Parallax Investigation), which has been carried out on the CTIO 0.9m and 1.5m telescopes since 1999 under the auspices of the NOAO Surveys Program. Only by watching your neighbors for several years can you really be sure what they're up to, and we'll show you that some of them have small companions hanging around with them. The first hints of these companions have been revealed via astrometric perturbations found during CTIOPI.

  16. RECONS is Spying on Your Neighbors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Spying on your neighbors can be an revealing experience. We review the 10-year RECONS (Research Consortium on Nearby Stars) effort to take an accurate census of all objects within 10 pc and outside of the Solar System. The result is an accurate cross-sectional study of your neighbors, who tend to be small and red, and lurk unseen in the night. Recent additions to the neighborhood include a few brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. We will also introduce you to more than a dozen of your newest neighbors, discovered during a large southern sky parallax effort known as CTIOPI (CTIO Parallax Investigation). This work has been carried out on the CTIO 0.9m and 1.5m telescopes since 1999 under the auspices of the NOAO Surveys Program, and since February 2003 as a part of the SMARTS Consortium. Only by watching your neighbors for several years can you really be sure what they're up to, and we'll show you that some of them have hidden partners-in-crime. The first hints of these partners have been revealed via astrometric perturbations found during CTIOPI.

  17. Lubiprostone: RU 0211, SPI 0211.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Lubiprostone [RU 0211, SPI 0211] is a bicyclic fatty acid that acts as a chloride channel opener, increasing intestinal water secretion. Lubiprostone, an orally-administered formulation, is one of a series of functional fatty acid compounds discovered by Dr Ryuji Ueno, and is currently undergoing development for the treatment of constipation, constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) and postoperative ileus with Sucampo Pharmaceutical's. Lubiprostone activates a specific chloride channel (CLC2) on cells lining the gut, thereby naturally increasing intestinal fluid secretion. The increased fluid level softens the stool, promotes spontaneous bowel movements, and reduces abdominal discomfort/pain and bloating. The chloride channel is a protein that controls cell membrane transport of chloride ion. Lubiprostone acts on the ClC-2 chloride channel, which is located in the apical intestinal membrane. In November 2004, Takeda Pharmaceuticals entered into a collaboration and licensing agreement for Lubiprostone with Sucampo Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (c-IBS). Under the terms of the agreement, Takeda received the right to market the product in the US and Canada, while Sucampo reserved the co-promotion rights for these countries. Takeda's wholly-owned US subsidiary, Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc., will sell lubiprostone once the product is approved by the US FDA. Takeda will also receive an option for marketing rights in other territories, including Japan and Europe. Takeda and Sucampo agreed on the exclusive manufacturing and supply of Lubiprostone by R-Tech Ueno, Ltd, a member of the Sucampo Group. Sucampo has the potential to receive up to dollar US 210 million in initial and milestone payments, some of which are contingent upon the successful achievement of several milestones. Takeda will fund a major part of development costs not only for chronic constipation

  18. Involvement of SPI-2-encoded SpiC in flagellum synthesis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugita Asami

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SpiC encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium chromosome is required for survival within macrophages and systemic infection in mice. Additionally, SpiC contributes to Salmonella-induced activation of the signal transduction pathways in macrophages by affecting the expression of FliC, a component of flagella filaments. Here, we show the contribution of SpiC in flagellum synthesis. Results Quantitative RT-PCR shows that the expression levels of the class 3 fliD and motA genes that encode for the flagella cap and motor torque proteins, respectively, were lower for a spiC mutant strain than for the wild-type Salmonella. Further, this mutant had lower expression levels of the class 2 genes including the fliA gene encoding the flagellar-specific alternative sigma factor. We also found differences in flagella assembly between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Many flagella filaments were observed on the bacterial surface of the wild-type strain, whereas the spiC mutant had only few flagella. The absence of spiC led to reduced expression of the FlhD protein, which functions as the master regulator in flagella gene expression, although no significant difference at the transcription level of the flhDC operon was observed between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Conclusion The data show that SpiC is involved in flagella assembly by affecting the post-transcription expression of flhDC.

  19. The binary fraction, separation distribution, and merger rate of white dwarfs from SPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Dan; Hallakoun, Na'ama

    2017-05-01

    From a sample of spectra of 439 white dwarfs (WDs) from the ESO-VLT Supernova-Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY), we measure the maximal changes in radial velocity (ΔRVmax) between epochs (generally two epochs, separated by up to 470 d), and model the observed ΔRVmax statistics via Monte Carlo simulations, to constrain the population characteristics of double WDs (DWDs). The DWD fraction among WDs is fbin = 0.10 ± 0.02 (1σ, random) +0.02 (systematic), in the separation range ≲4 au within which the data are sensitive to binarity. Assuming the distribution of binary separation, a, is a power law, dN/da ∝ aα, at the end of the last common-envelope phase and the start of solely gravitational-wave-driven binary evolution, the constraint by the data is α = -1.3 ± 0.2 (1σ) ±0.2 (systematic). If these parameters extend to small separations, the implied Galactic WD merger rate per unit stellar mass is Rmerge = (1-80) × 10-13 yr^{-1} M_{⊙}^{-1} (2σ), with a likelihood-weighted mean of Rmerge = (7 ± 2) × 10-13 yr^{-1} M_{⊙}^{-1} (1σ). The Milky Way's specific Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate is likely RIa ≈ 1.1 × 10-13 yr^{-1} M_{⊙}^{-1} and therefore, in terms of rates, a possibly small fraction of all merging DWDs (e.g. those with massive-enough primary WDs) could suffice to produce most or all SNe Ia.

  20. Lying, spying, sabotaging : procedures and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Chlaß, Nadine; Riener, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Do individuals prefer to compete fairly, or unfairly with an opponent? We study individuals who can choose how to compete for one ex-post nonzero payoff. They can either nudge themselves into a fair set of rules where they have the same information and actions as their opponent, or into unfair rules where they spy, sabotage or fabricate their opponent's action. In an experiment, we observe significant altruism under rules which allow for fabrication ...

  1. InSpiRe - Intelligent Spine Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Kasper Hafstrøm; Helms, Niels Henrik; Kjær, Per

    InSpiRe er et projekt, der har haft omdrejningspunkt i etableringen af et nyt netværk indenfor intelligent genoptræning med særligt fokus på rygsmerter. Projektet er gennemført i perioden 1/3 2011 2011-1/3 2012, med støtte fra Syddansk Vækstforum, og er blevet drevet af projektparterne Knowledge ...

  2. SPIES: Spectropolarimetric Imager for Energetic Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Andrew; Lin, H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar magnetic fields are responsible for the appearance of the solar atmosphere. These magnetic fields are non-uniform, and are strongest over sunspots. Magnetic fields are thought to cause energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can have damaging consequences in the near-Earth space environment and high latitude regions, providing practical in addition to scientific reasons to study them. Current instrumentation for observations of solar magnetic fields use scanning slit spectrograph or tunable filter, which allow us to resolve the time evolution of the fields to the scale of minutes or longer. We are constructing a new instrument, SPIES, based on a large-format (32 x 64) fiber-optic integral field unit (IFU). The fiber-optic IFU allows us to observe over two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension simultaneously rather than in steps, thus allowing for resolution of the time evolution to the level of seconds. Due to fiber modal noise and small thermal drift of the instrument over time, flat-fielding of the intensity spectra from the discrete fiber-optic 'slits' becomes time dependent. An observing scheme that records time-sensitive flat-fields was devised for SPIES. We will present preliminary analysis of the full-Stokes polarization spectra of a sunspot obtained with SPIES over a 90 minute time span. This work was conducted through a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the University of Hawai'i's Institute for Astronomy and was funded by the NSF.

  3. Learning and Organizational Change in SPI Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Marikka

    Explaining how organizations chance has been a central and enduring quest of management scholars and many other disciplines. In order to be successful change requires not only a new process or technology but also the engagement and participation of the people involved. In this vein the change process results in new behavior and is routinized in practical daily business life of the company. Change management provides a framework for managing the human side of these changes. In this article we present a literature review on the change management in the context of Software Process Improvement. The traditional view of learning, as a “lessons learned” or post-mortem reporting activity is often apparent in SPI literature. However, learning can also be viewed as a continuous change process where specific learning cycle starts with creative conflict and ends up in formal norms and systems. Since this perspective has almost no visibility in SPI literature of past it could show a new direction to the future development of change management in SPI.

  4. SPi User Manual V0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab; Newcomer, M.; Dressnandt, N.; /Pennsylvania U.; Villani, G.; Weber, M.; Holt, R.; /Rutherford

    2011-05-01

    This document describes the Serial Powering Interface (SPi) ASIC. SPi is a general purpose ASIC prototype designed for use in serial powering of silicon detector instrumentation. This description is written as a user manual to aid application, not as a design description. SPi is a generic custom ASIC, manufactured in 0.25 {mu}m CMOS by TSMC, to interface between a constant current source and silicon detector read-out chips. There is no SEU (single event upset) protection, but most (not all) components are radiation tolerant design. An operating voltage of 1.2 to 2.5 volts and other design features make the IC suitable for a variety of serial powering architectures and ROICs. It should be noted that the device is likely to be a prototype for demonstration rather than a product for inclusion in a detector. The next design(s), SPin, are likely to be designed for a specific application (eg SLHC). The component includes: (1) Seven bi-directional LVDS-like buffers for high data rate links to/from the read-out chips. These are AC coupled (series capacitor) off-chip for DC level conversion; (2) A programmable internal programmable shunt regulator to provide a defined voltage to readout chips when linked in a serial powering chain; (3) A programmable internal shunt regulator control circuit for external transistor control; (4) Shunt current measurement (for internal shunt regulator); (5) A programmable internal shunt regulator current alarm; and (6) Two programmable linear regulators.

  5. RpoE promotes invasion and intracellular survival by regulating SPI-1 and SPI-2 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifang; Jia, Yanwei; Xie, Xiaofang; Wang, Min; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Shungao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Huang, Xinxiang; Du, Hong

    2016-08-01

    To demonstrate the role of RpoE during the later stage of hyperosmotic stress in Salmonella. Expressions of SPI-1 and SPI-2 under hyperosmotic stress for 120 min were investigated by a microarray, and the invasion and intracellular survival of wild-type and ΔrpoE strains were compared. The global differential expression of bacterial proteins between the wild-type and ΔrpoE strains was examined after 120 min of hyperosmotic stress. SPI-1 and SPI-2 were repressed, and the invasion and intracellular survival were defected in the ΔrpoE strain. Thirteen bacterial-associated proteins and 11 secreted proteins differed significantly between the wild-type and ΔrpoE strains. RpoE may promote invasion and intracellular survival by regulating the expression of SPI-1 and SPI-2.

  6. Polygraph Screening of Physicists and Spies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykken, David

    2000-03-01

    You will be invited to imagine yourself a scientist at the weapons laboratory at Los Alamos. You have just been ordered, pursuant to DOE Secretary Richardson's directive, to submit to a polygraph or ``lie detector" test, the Test for Espionage and Sabotage or TES. This talk will help you to picture yourself being tested and to predict whether you will pass or fail the TES. It will also explain why your passing or failing will have little to do with whether you are in fact a spy or not.

  7. A BRUTUS Logic for a Spi-Calculus Dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnesi, S.; Latella, D.; Lenzini, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    In the field of process algebras, the spi-calculus, a modified version of the π-calculus with encryption primitives, is indicated as an expressive specification language for cryptographic protocols. In spi-calculus basic security properties, such as secrecy and integrity can be formalized as

  8. The Spy VI child : A newly discovered Neandertal infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Helene; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886 Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the

  9. Spying on Our Neighbors 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Todd J.; Boyd, M. R.; Dieterich, S.; Finch, C. T.; Jao, W. C.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J. P.; Winters, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Through stealth, consistency, and endurance, the RECONS group has been spying on our neighbors for the past 10 years. Here we'll present the latest results on efforts to explore our neighborhood, including a comprehensive 2010 census of stars and their companions within 10 pc, and how the neighborhood has changed in the past decade. The large increase in known nearby red dwarfs is arguably more surprising than modest increases in brown dwarfs and planets. Via the SMARTS Consortium, our continuing astrometric effort at CTIO is also revealing a bevy of clandestine companions to many of our known and new neighbors, including red, brown, and white dwarfs ... or is one of those companions a neutron star at only 30 pc? This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation under grant AST-0908402, NASA's Space Interferometry Mission, and Georgia State University.

  10. Differential roles for pathogenicity islands SPI-13 and SPI-8 in the interaction of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhi with murine and human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Rodrigo A; Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Amaya, Fernando A; Urrutia, Ítalo M; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2017-02-15

    Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-13 is conserved in many serovars of S. enterica, including S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Gallinarum. However, it is absent in typhoid serovars such as S. Typhi and Paratyphi A, which carry SPI-8 at the same genomic location. Because the interaction with macrophages is a critical step in Salmonella pathogenicity, in this study we investigated the role played by SPI-13 and SPI-8 in the interaction of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhi with cultured murine (RAW264.7) and human (THP-1) macrophages. Our results showed that SPI-13 was required for internalization of S. Enteritidis in murine but not human macrophages. On the other hand, SPI-8 was not required for the interaction of S. Typhi with human or murine macrophages. Of note, the presence of an intact copy of SPI-13 in a S. Typhi mutant carrying a deletion of SPI-8 did not improve its ability to be internalized by, or survive in human or murine macrophages. Altogether, our results point out to different roles for SPI-13 and SPI-8 during Salmonella infection. While SPI-13 contributes to the interaction of S. Enteritidis with murine macrophages, SPI-8 is not required in the interaction of S. Typhi with murine or human macrophages. We hypothesized that typhoid serovars have lost SPI-13 and maintained SPI-8 to improve their fitness during another phase of human infection.

  11. The Birth, Death, and Resurrection of an SPI Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sven; Schönström, Mikael

    Commentators on contemporary themes of strategic management and firm competitiveness stress that a firm's competitive advantage flows from its unique knowledge and how it manages knowledge, and for many firms their ability to create, share, exchange, and use knowledge have a major impact on their competitiveness (Nonaka & Teece 2001). In software development, knowledge management (KM) plays an increasingly important role. It has been argued that the KM-field is an important source for creating new perspectives on the software development process (Iivari 2000). Several Software Process Improvement (SPI) approaches stress the importance of managing knowledge and experiences as a way for improving software processes (Ahem et al. 2001). Another SPI-trend is the use of ideas from process management like in the Capability Maturity Model (CMM). Unfortunately, little research on the effects of the use of process management ideas in SPI exists. Given the influx of process management ideas to SPI, the impact of these ideas should be addressed.

  12. Spying by American Archaeologists in World War I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David L. Browman

    2011-01-01

    .... Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) during the First World War. These spying activities were part of the controversy surrounding the censure of Franz Boas by the American Anthropological Association (AAA...

  13. Application of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Karavitis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The main premise of the current effort is that the use of a drought index, such as Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI, may lead to a more appropriate understanding of drought duration, magnitude and spatial extent in semi-arid areas like Greece. The importance of the Index may be marked in its simplicity and its ability to identify the beginning and end of a drought event. Thus, it may point towards drought contingency planning and through it to drought alert mechanisms. In this context, Greece, as it very often faces the hazardous impacts of droughts, presents an almost ideal case for the SPI application. The present approach examines the SPI drought index application for all of Greece and it is evaluated accordingly by historical precipitation data. Different time series of data from 46 precipitation stations, covering the period 1947–2004, and for time scales of 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months, were used. The computation of the index was achieved by the appropriate usage of a pertinent software tool. Then, spatial representation of the SPI values was carried out with geo-statistical methods using the SURFER 9 software package. The results underline the potential that the SPI usage exhibits in a drought alert and forecasting effort as part of a drought contingency planning posture.

  14. iSpy: A powerful and lightweight event display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alverson, G. [Northeastern U.; Eulisse, G. [Fermilab; McCauley, T. [Fermilab; Taylor, L. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    iSpy is a general-purpose event data and detector visualization program that was developed as an event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC and has seen use by the general public and teachers and students in the context of education and outreach. Central to the iSpy design philosophy is ease of installation, use, and extensibility. The application itself uses the open-access packages Qt4 and Open Inventor and is distributed either as a fully-bound executable or a standard installer package: one can simply download and double-click to begin. Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows are supported. iSpy renders the standard 2D, 3D, and tabular views, and the architecture allows for a generic approach to production of new views and projections. iSpy reads and displays data in the ig format: event information is written in compressed JSON format files designed for distribution over a network. This format is easily extensible and makes the iSpy client indifferent to the original input data source. The ig format is the one used for release of approved CMS data to the public.

  15. iSpy: a powerful and lightweight event display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, G.; Eulisse, G.; McCauley, T.; Taylor, L.

    2012-12-01

    iSpy is a general-purpose event data and detector visualization program that was developed as an event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC and has seen use by the general public and teachers and students in the context of education and outreach. Central to the iSpy design philosophy is ease of installation, use, and extensibility. The application itself uses the open-access packages Qt4 and Open Inventor and is distributed either as a fully-bound executable or a standard installer package: one can simply download and double-click to begin. Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows are supported. iSpy renders the standard 2D, 3D, and tabular views, and the architecture allows for a generic approach to production of new views and projections. iSpy reads and displays data in the ig format: event information is written in compressed JSON format files designed for distribution over a network. This format is easily extensible and makes the iSpy client indifferent to the original input data source. The ig format is the one used for release of approved CMS data to the public.

  16. SPI Analysis of the Supernova Remnant DEM L71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kari A.; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Burrows, David N.; Aisyah Mansoor, Siti; Crum, Ryan M.

    2017-08-01

    Supernova remnants are complex, three-dimensional objects; properly accounting for this complexity when modeling the resulting X-ray emission presents quite a challenge and makes it difficult to accurately characterize the properties of the full SNR volume. The SPIES (Smoothed Particle Inference Exploration of Supernova Remnants) project aims to address this challenge by applying a fundamentally different approach to analyzing X-ray observations of SNRs. Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. We present here the results of an SPI analysis of the Type Ia supernova remnant DEM L71. Among other results, we find that despite its regular appearance, the temperature and other parameter maps exhibit irregular substructure.

  17. Drought analysis of Antalya province by standardized precipitation index (SPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi DİNÇ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought is occurring as a result of global warming in our country and as well as over the world and defined as the precipitation deficit in a certain time period which is lower than that of the normal. It affects negatively all of the living being. Many drought indices have been developed to define the severity and characteristics of drought over time and space. In this study, drought characteristics have been evaluated by using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI in meteorological stations located in Alanya, Antalya, Demre, Elmalı, Finike, Gazipaşa, Korkuteli and Manavgat having long term data (1974-2014. According to 3-, 6-, 12- and 24- months time scales, the trend in SPI values are not decreasing and the SPI values were found to be between 0.99 (normal and ~-0.99 (drought close to normal. It is concluded that drought can occur in summer as well as in winter.

  18. SPI Conformance Gel Applications in Geothermal Zonal Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle [Clean Tech Innovations, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Zonal isolation in geothermal injection and producing wells is important while drilling the wells when highly fractured geothermal zones are encountered and there is a need to keep the fluids from interfering with the drilling operation. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) objectives are to advance technologies to make it more cost effective to develop, produce, and monitor geothermal reservoirs and produce geothermal energy. Thus, zonal isolation is critical to well cost, reservoir evaluation and operations. Traditional cementing off of the lost circulation or thief zones during drilling is often done to stem the drilling mud losses. This is an expensive and generally unsuccessful technique losing the potential of the remaining fracture system. Selective placement of strong SPI gels into only the offending fractures can maintain and even improve operational efficiency and resource life. The SPI gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a promising solution to thief zones and conformance problems with water and CO2 floods and potentially geothermal operations. This gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an initiator (either internal such as an additive or external such as CO2) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current mechanical methods of using packers, plugs, liners and cementing technologies that often severely damage the highly fractured area that is isolated. In the SPI gels, the initiator sets up the fluid into a water-like (not a precipitate) gel and when the isolated zone needs to be reopened, the SPI gel may be removed with an alkaline solution without formation damage occurring. In addition, the SPI gel in commercial quantities is expected to be less expensive than competing mechanical systems and has unique deep placement possibilities. This project seeks to improve upon the SPI gel integrity by modifying the various components to impart temperature stability for use in

  19. US-EU SPYING ALLEGATIONS 2013- A CASE FOR CONSTRUCTIVISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Hincu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show how the revelations about the United States of America (US spying on the European Union (2013 represented an occasion for the latter to reiterate its normative power and the particular importance of the transatlantic partnership. Through observation of “acts of social facts essentialization” by the US and EU and by using a constructivist conceptualization of “agent identity” and “international socialization”, the article concludes that the constructivist framework of analysis explains the unfolding of the spying issue. This deductive approach uses the method of discourse and official documents analysis.

  20. Structural basis of divergent cyclin-dependent kinase activation by Spy1/RINGO proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Denise A.; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Marceau, Aimee H.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Porter, Lisa A.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Windsor)

    2017-06-30

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are principal drivers of cell division and are an important therapeutic target to inhibit aberrant proliferation. Cdk enzymatic activity is tightly controlled through cyclin interactions, posttranslational modifications, and binding of inhibitors such as the p27 tumor suppressor protein. Spy1/RINGO (Spy1) proteins bind and activate Cdk but are resistant to canonical regulatory mechanisms that establish cell-cycle checkpoints. Cancer cells exploit Spy1 to stimulate proliferation through inappropriate activation of Cdks, yet the mechanism is unknown. We have determined crystal structures of the Cdk2-Spy1 and p27-Cdk2-Spy1 complexes that reveal how Spy1 activates Cdk. We find that Spy1 confers structural changes to Cdk2 that obviate the requirement of Cdk activation loop phosphorylation. Spy1 lacks the cyclin-binding site that mediates p27 and substrate affinity, explaining why Cdk-Spy1 is poorly inhibited by p27 and lacks specificity for substrates with cyclin-docking sites. We identify mutations in Spy1 that ablate its ability to activate Cdk2 and to proliferate cells. Our structural description of Spy1 provides important mechanistic insights that may be utilized for targeting upregulated Spy1 in cancer.

  1. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    artifact models to direct process model improvement. We analyzed a process specification, the realized model, and the generated electronic process guide. We used ArSPI v0.9 as our process model and the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) as an external reference to provide a set of overall...

  2. Assessment of meteorological drought using SPI in West Azarbaijan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this research is the assessment of the characteristics such as intensity, frequency and duration of meteorological drought using SPI with 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months time scales in West Azarbaijan Province, Iran. The indices have been computed in various time scales for 38 gauging stations with 32 years record ...

  3. The Sneaky Sneaker Spies and the Mysterious Black Ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savran, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the process of making "The Sneaky Sneaker Spies and the Mysterious Black Ink," a six-minute animation starring five art students who form a detective club. This animation is available online for art teachers to use in their own classrooms. After showing this video in class, art teachers could have students try…

  4. Navy Needs to Establish Effective Metrics to Achieve Desired Outcomes for SPY1 Radar Sustainment (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    did not anticipate and include in fleet’s forecasted contract needs. For example, the Navy had a sparing initiative to increase the number of parts ...a series on SPY-1 radar spare parts . The SPY-1 radar is an advanced, automatic detect and track radar system. The SPY-1 radar is one of 13 major...This is the second in a series of audits related to the management of SPY-1 radar spare parts . The first report focused on the SPY-1 radar spare

  5. Spies - Spectral Polarimetric Imager For The Energetic Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haosheng; Jaeggli, S.

    2012-05-01

    Spectropolarimetric observation with uncompromised spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution simulatneously over a substantial 2D field and multiple spectral lines is the key to the resolution of many important questions in modern solar physics. While 2D imaging spectroscopy based on fiber optics integral field unit and image slicer has a long history nighttime astronomy, adaptation for solar observation occured only recently. This paper will present preliminary results of magnetic field observation in the HeI 1083 nm and FeI 1565 nm lines obtained with SPIES --- a true imaging spectropolarimeter based on a large format (64 x 32 fibers input array) fiber-optic array optimized for the study of evolution of magnetic and thermodynamic properties of energetic and dynamic phenomena of the sun. We will also discuss considerations for the use of fiber-optic array for solar spectropolarimetric applications, as well as the design of SPIES.

  6. SPYING FOR THE RIGHT REASONS: CONTESTED NORMS IN CYBERSPACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Section Chief in the Strategic Reconnaissance Command. On his last position, he was responsible for military intelligence doctrine and contributed to...upon and the international community has to interweave these agreements in other mechanisms outside the virtual world to underpin their value . And...to more restraining norms when “verifying” on allies in lieu to spying on adversaries to avoid damage to the unity of alliances and common values

  7. SPIES: the spectropolarimetric imager for the energetic sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2012-09-01

    The SpectroPolarimetric Imager for the Energetic Sun (SPIES) is a project to develop a new class of spectropolarimetric instrument for the study of highly dynamic solar phenomena. Understanding the physics of dynamic solar phenomena requires detailed information about the magnetic, thermal, and dynamic properties of the solar atmosphere at every stage of their evolution. Although these properties can be obtained with existing highperformance spectropolarimeters such as the SpectroPolarimeter onboard the Hinode space solar observatory or the Facility IR Spectropolarimeter of the Dunn Solar Telescope, these instruments cannot observe the required field of view with temporal resolution that can resolve the dynamic timescale of these energetic events. SPIES-2K is an experimental true-imaging spectropolarimeter developed under this program to address this deficiency in our observing capability. It is based on a fiber-optic integral field unit containing 2,048 standard multimode fused silica fibers, and is capable of observing a 64 x 32 pixels field simultaneously with high spatial and spectral resolution. Moreover, it can obtain the full Stokes spectra of the field with a maximum temporal resolution of a few seconds. This paper presents the design and characteristics of the instrument, as well as preliminary results obtained at Fe I 1565 nm wavelength. Additionally, this paper also reports on recent studies of the polarization maintenance optical fiber ribbon constructed from rectangular element fibers for the Birefringence Fiber-Optic Image Slicer, and discusses its application to future generation of SPIES and other astronomical spectropolarimetry projects.

  8. Use of SpyTag/SpyCatcher to construct bispecific antibodies that target two epitopes of a single antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Kyohei; Akiba, Hiroki; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hamakubo, Takao; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2017-09-01

    Bispecific antibody targeting of two different antigens is promising, but when fragment-based antibodies are used, homogeneous production is difficult. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a method using the SpyTag/SpyCatcher system in which a covalent bond is formed between the two polypeptides. Using this method, we constructed a bispecific antibody that simultaneously interacted with two different epitopes of roundabout homologue 1 (ROBO1), a membrane protein associated with cancer progression. A bispecific tetravalent antibody with an additional functional moiety was also constructed by using a dimeric biotin-binding protein. An interaction analysis of ROBO1-expressing cells and the recombinant antigen demonstrated the improved binding ability of the bispecific antibodies through spontaneous binding of the two antibody fragments to their respective epitopes. In addition, multivalency delayed dissociation, which is advantageous in therapy and diagnosis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Test-retest reliability and agreement of the SPI-Questionnaire to detect symptoms of digital ischemia in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Daan; Zacharian, Tigran; Maas, Mario; Kuijer, P Paul F M

    2017-06-01

    The Shoulder posterior circumflex humeral artery Pathology and digital Ischemia - questionnaire (SPI-Q) has been developed to enable periodic surveillance of elite volleyball players, who are at risk for digital ischemia. Prior to implementation, assessing reliability is mandatory. Therefore, the test-retest reliability and agreement of the SPI-Q were evaluated among the population at risk. A questionnaire survey was performed with a 2-week interval among 65 elite male volleyball players assessing symptoms of cold, pale and blue digits in the dominant hand during or after practice or competition using a 4-point Likert scale (never, sometimes, often and always). Kappa (κ) and percentage of agreement (POA) were calculated for individual symptoms, and to distinguish symptomatic and asymptomatic players. For the individual symptoms, κ ranged from "poor" (0.25) to "good" (0.63), and POA ranged from "moderate" (78%) to "good" (97%). To classify symptomatic players, the SPI-Q showed "good" reliability (κ = 0.83; 95%CI 0.69-0.97) and "good" agreement (POA = 92%). The current study has proven the SPI-Q to be reliable for detecting elite male indoor volleyball players with symptoms of digital ischemia.

  10. The Ectromelia Virus SPI-2 Protein Causes Lethal Mousepox by Preventing NK Cell Responses▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Silva, Carolina R.; Tscharke, David C.; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Wong, Yik Chun; Buller, R. Mark; Müllbacher, Arno; Regner, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) is a natural pathogen of mice that causes mousepox, and many of its genes have been implicated in the modulation of host immune responses. Serine protease inhibitor 2 (SPI-2) is one of these putative ECTV host response modifier proteins. SPI-2 is conserved across orthopoxviruses, but results defining its mechanism of action and in vivo function are lacking or contradictory. We studied the role of SPI-2 in mousepox by deleting the SPI-2 gene or its serine protease inhibitor reactive site. We found that SPI-2 does not affect viral replication or cell-intrinsic apoptosis pathways, since mutant viruses replicate in vitro as efficiently as wild-type virus. However, in the absence of SPI-2 protein, ECTV is attenuated in mousepox-susceptible mice, resulting in lower viral loads in the liver, decreased spleen pathology, and substantially improved host survival. This attenuation correlates with more effective immune responses in the absence of SPI-2, including an earlier serum gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response, raised serum interleukin 18 (IL-18), increased numbers of granzyme B+ CD8+ T cells, and, most notably, increased numbers and activation of NK cells. Both virus attenuation and the improved immune responses associated with SPI-2 deletion from ECTV are lost when mice are depleted of NK cells. Consequently, SPI-2 renders mousepox lethal in susceptible strains by preventing protective NK cell defenses. PMID:21849445

  11. SPI Based Meteorological Drought Assessment over a Humid Basin: Effects of Processing Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological drought monitoring is important for drought early warning and disaster prevention. Regional meteorological drought can be evaluated and analyzed with standardized precipitation index (SPI. Two main processing schemes are frequently adopted: (1 mean of all SPI calculated from precipitation at individual stations (SPI-mean; and (2 SPI calculated from all-station averaged precipitation (precipitation-mean. It yet remains unclear if two processing schemes could make difference in drought assessment, which is of significance to reliable drought monitoring. Taking the Poyang Lake Basin with monthly precipitation recorded by 13 national stations for 1957–2014, this study examined two processing schemes. The precipitation mean and SPI mean were respectively calculated with the Thiessen Polygon weighting approach. Our results showed that the two SPI series individually constructed from two schemes had similar features and monitoring trends of regional meteorological droughts. Both SPI series had a significantly positive correlation (p < 0.005 with the number of precipitation stations. The precipitation-mean scheme reduced the extent of precipitation extremes and made the precipitation data more clustered in some certain, it made less precipitation deviate from the precipitation-mean series farther when less precipitation occurred universally, which would probably change the drought levels. Alternatively, the SPI-mean scheme accurately highlighted the extremes especially for those with wide spatial distribution over the region. Therefore, for regional meteorological drought monitoring, the SPI-mean scheme is recommended for its more suitable assessment of historical droughts.

  12. [Nurses and spies during the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halioua, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    During the First World War, some nurses distinguished themselves by playing a significant role in spy networks, using their activity as a cover. They took an active part in the setting up of escape routes for allied prisoners of war and the gathering of intelligence on the positions of German troops, in particular in Belgium and northern France. Among them Edith Cavell, Gabrielle Petit, Louise de Bettignies, Marie-Léonie Vanhoutte, Marthe Cocknaert and Emilienne-Rose Ducimetière are considered as heroines.

  13. Spying by American Archaeologists in World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Browman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available I am interested in detailing two aspects linked to the issue of several archaeologists working for the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI during the First World War. These spying activities were part of the controversy surrounding the censure of Franz Boas by the American Anthropological Association (AAA for his published letter of October 1919, in which Boas claimed that four unnamed researchers were involved in espionage activities using archaeological research as a front. As they were unnamed, who were these four archaeologists?

  14. Understanding surveillance technologies spy devices, their origins & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, JK

    2001-01-01

    From electronic wire taps to baby monitors and long-distance video and listening devices, startling changes occur everyday in how we gather, interpret, and transmit information. An extraordinary range of powerful new technologies has come into existence to meet the requirements of this expanding field.Your search for a comprehensive resource for surveillance devices is over. Understanding Surveillance Technologies: Spy Devices, Their Origins and Applications serves as a provocative, broad-based, and visually appealing reference that introduces and describes the technologies rapidly moving into

  15. Chemical spying in coral reef fish larvae at recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Natacha; Brooker, Rohan M; Lecellier, Gaël; Berthe, Cécile; Frédérich, Bruno; Banaigs, Bernard; Lecchini, David

    2015-10-01

    When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was intentionally produced by juvenile and adult conspecifics already on the reef (communication process) or whether the cues used result from normal biochemical processes with no active involvement by conspecifics ("spying" behavior by larvae). Conspecific chemical cues attracted the majority of larvae (four out of the seven species tested); although while some species were equally attracted to cues from adults and juveniles (Chromis viridis, Apogon novemfasciatus), two exhibited greater sensitivity to adult cues (Pomacentrus pavo, Dascyllus aruanus). Our results indicate also that spying cues are those most commonly used by settling fishes (C. viridis, P. pavo, A. novemfasciatus). Only one species (D. aruanus) preferred the odour of conspecifics that had had visual contact with larvae (communication). Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Interferon induces up-regulation of Spi-1/PU.1 in human leukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, P; Delgado, M D; Richard, C; Moreau-Gachelin, F; León, J

    1997-11-26

    The human K562 cell line is derived from a chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis. Treatment of K562 cells with interferons alpha, beta or gamma resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation. Spi-1/PU.1 is a transcription factor of the Ets family which is required for normal hematopoyesis. We have found that spi-1 mRNA and protein as well as Spi-1-DNA binding activity increase after exposure of K562 cells to interferons. The increase in spi-1 expression ranged from 4- to 8-fold with the different interferons. K562 cells can be differentiated in vitro towards erythroid cells or monocyte-macrophage cells. Interestingly, the regulation of spi-1 by interferon-alpha depended on the differentiated phenotype of K562 cells: interferon-alpha failed to induce spi-1 in erythroid differentiated cells, whereas it induced spi-1 in monocyte-macrophage differentiated cells. The results suggest a role for Spi-1 in the cytostatic response to interferons.

  17. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitorin...

  18. Engine Operating Conditions and Fuel Properties on Pre-Spark Heat Release and SPI Promotion in SI Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splitter, Derek A [ORNL; Kaul, Brian C [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Jatana, Gurneesh S [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This work explores the dependence of fuel ignition delay on stochastic pre-ignition (SPI). Findings are based on bulk gas thermodynamic state, where the effects of kinetically controlled bulk gas pre-spark heat release (PSHR) are correlated to SPI tendency and magnitude. Specifically, residual gas and low temperature PSHR chemistry effects and observations are explored, which are found to be indicative of bulk gas conditions required for strong SPI events. Analyzed events range from non-knocking SPI to knocking SPI and even detonation SPI events in excess of 325 bar peak cylinder pressure. The work illustrates that singular SPI event count and magnitude are found to be proportional to PSHR of the bulk gas mixture and residual gas fraction. Cycle-to-cycle variability in trapped residual mass and temperature are found to impose variability in singular SPI event count and magnitude. However, clusters and short lived bursts of multiple SPI events are found to better correlate with fuel-wall interaction. The results highlight the interplay of bulk gas thermodynamics and SPI ignition source, on SPI event magnitude and cluster tendency. Moreover, the results highlight fundamental fuel reactivity and associated hypersensitivity to operating conditions at SPI prone operating conditions.

  19. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100% visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  20. The progenitor of Nova Cygni 2006 (=V2362 Cyg)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, D.; Greimel, R.; Drew, J.; Irwin, M.; Gaensicke, B.; Groot, P.J.; Knigge, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the detection of the likely progenitor to Nova Cygni 2006 = V2362 Cyg (IAUC #8697, #8698, ATel #792) using images from the INT Photometric H-Alpha Survey (IPHAS; http://www.iphas.org). The field containing the classical nova was observed as part of our galactic plane survey on Aug. 3rd

  1. Finding the Progenitors to Today's Fossil Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lucas Edward; Irwin, Jimmy; White, Raymond; Wong, Ka-Wah; Maksym, Walter Peter; Dupke, Renato; Miller, Eric; Carrasco, Eleazar

    2018-01-01

    Fossil galaxy systems are classically thought to be the end result of galaxy group and cluster evolution, as galaxies experiencing dynamical friction sink to the center of the group potential and merge into a single, giant elliptical that dominates the rest of the members in both mass and luminosity. Most fossil systems discovered lie within z fossil progenitors are expected to be systems with imminent or ongoing major merging near the brightest group galaxy (BGG) that, when concluded, will meet the fossil criteria within the look back time. Since strong gravitational lensing preferentially selects groups merging along the line of sight, or systems with a high mass concentration like fossil systems, we searched the CASSOWARY survey of strong lensing events with the goal of determining if lensing systems have any predisposition to being fossil systems or progenitors. We present an analysis of 53 systems from the CASSOWARY catalog of strong lenses with redshifts ranging from 0.1 fossils while only 3% of non-lensing control groups are. We also find that 23% of the lensing groups are traditional fossil progenitors compared to 17% for the control sample. This suggests that searching for groups that exhibit strong gravitational lensing may be a more efficient way of finding fossil and pre-fossil systems. Cumulative galaxy luminosity functions of the lensing and non-lensing groups also indicate there may be, on average, a fundamental difference between the initial conditions of strong lensing and non-lensing systems for fossils, fossil progenitors, and even normal galaxy systems. This could point to not fossils but lensing systems as possibly having different initial group conditions than non-lensing systems. Future work will involve studying recently obtained Chandra and HST snapshots of eight previously unobserved fossil progenitors in the CASSOWARY catalog to see how the hot gas evolves as a function of time until fossil BGG formation.

  2. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-17

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitoring the transcription of 36 genes related to immune response. All the mutants and the wild type strain induced inflammatory signaling in the HD11 cell line though the response to SPI1 mutant infection was different from the rest of the mutants. When newly hatched chickens were inoculated, the phoP as well as the SPI1 mutant did not induce an expression of any of the tested genes in the cecum. Despite this, such chickens were protected against challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis. On the other hand, inoculation of chickens with the aroA or SPI2 mutant induced expression of 27 and 18 genes, respectively, including genes encoding immunoglobulins. Challenge of chickens inoculated with these two mutants resulted in repeated induction of 11 and 13 tested genes, respectively, including the genes encoding immunoglobulins. In conclusion, SPI1 and phoP mutants induced protective immunity without inducing an inflammatory response and antibody production. Inoculation of chickens with the SPI2 and aroA mutants also led to protective immunity but was associated with inflammation and antibody production. The differences in interaction between the mutants and chicken host can be used for a more detailed understanding of the chicken immune system.

  3. Phage-like Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal islands (SpyCI and mutator phenotypes: control by growth state and rescue by a SpyCI-encoded promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eScott

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that a prophage-like Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island (SpyCI controls DNA mismatch repair (MMR and other repair functions in M1 genome strain SF370 by dynamic excision and reintegration into the 5’ end of mutL in response to growth, causing the cell to alternate between a wild type and mutator phenotype. Nine of the sixteen completed S. pyogenes genomes contain related SpyCI integrated into the identical attachment site in mutL, and in this study we examined a number of these strains to determine whether they also had a mutator phenotype as in SF370. With the exception of M5 genome strain Manfredo, all demonstrated a mutator phenotype as compared to SpyCI-free strain NZ131. The integrase gene (int in the SpyCIM5 contains a deletion that rendered it inactive, and this deletion predicts that Manfredo would have a pronounced mutator phenotype. Remarkably, this was found not to be the case, but rather a cryptic promoter within the int ORF was identified that ensured constitutive expression of mutL and the downstream genes encoded on the same mRNA, providing a striking example of rescue of gene function following decay of a mobile genetic element. The frequent occurrence of SpyCI in the group A streptococci may facilitate bacterial survival by conferring an inducible mutator phenotype that promotes adaptation in the face of environmental challenges or host immunity.

  4. Phage-Like Streptococcus pyogenes Chromosomal Islands (SpyCI) and Mutator Phenotypes: Control by Growth State and Rescue by a SpyCI-Encoded Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julie; Nguyen, Scott V; King, Catherine J; Hendrickson, Christina; McShan, W Michael

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that a prophage-like Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island (SpyCI) controls DNA mismatch repair and other repair functions in M1 genome strain SF370 by dynamic excision and reintegration into the 5' end of mutL in response to growth, causing the cell to alternate between a wild type and mutator phenotype. Nine of the 16 completed S. pyogenes genomes contain related SpyCI integrated into the identical attachment site in mutL, and in this study we examined a number of these strains to determine whether they also had a mutator phenotype as in SF370. With the exception of M5 genome strain Manfredo, all demonstrated a mutator phenotype as compared to SpyCI-free strain NZ131. The integrase gene (int) in the SpyCIM5 contains a deletion that rendered it inactive, and this deletion predicts that Manfredo would have a pronounced mutator phenotype. Remarkably, this was found not to be the case, but rather a cryptic promoter within the int ORF was identified that ensured constitutive expression of mutL and the downstream genes encoded on the same mRNA, providing a striking example of rescue of gene function following decay of a mobile genetic element. The frequent occurrence of SpyCI in the group A streptococci may facilitate bacterial survival by conferring an inducible mutator phenotype that promotes adaptation in the face of environmental challenges or host immunity.

  5. Perfusion Assessment with the SPY System after Arterial Venous Reversal for Upper Extremity Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Brooks, MD

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: AVR effectively reestablished blood flow in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia. ICG angiography with SPY technology revealed that, in most cases, kinetic curves, timing, and patterns of perfusion gradually normalized over several PODs.

  6. A novel approach for modelling the cluster detector and the SPI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-30

    background (PB) ratios of the cluster and spectrometer for integral satellite (SPI) for the first time considering up to four-fold events. Instead of using an empirical method or simulation, we present a novel approach for calculating ...

  7. The SPI-1-like Type III secretion system: more roles than you think.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eEgan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS is a protein delivery system which is involved in a wide spectrum of interactions, from mutualism to pathogenesis, between Gram negative bacteria and various eukaryotes, including plants, fungi, protozoa and mammals. Various phylogenetic families of the T3SS have been described, including the Salmonella Pathogenecity Island 1 family (SPI-1. The SPI-1 T3SS was initially associated with the virulence of enteric pathogens, but is actually found in a diverse array of bacterial species, where it can play roles in processes as different as symbiotic interactions with insects and colonisation of plants. We review the multiple roles of the SPI-1 T3SS and discuss both how these discoveries are changing our perception of the SPI-1 family and what impacts this has on our understanding of the specialisation of the T3SS in general.

  8. Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels And The Making Of Modern Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossandón, José

    2016-01-01

    Book review of: Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels and the Making of Modern Societies. By Luc Boltanski (trans. C Porter). Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014. xviii+340 pp. £18.99/€23.80. ISBN: 9780745664057.......Book review of: Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels and the Making of Modern Societies. By Luc Boltanski (trans. C Porter). Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014. xviii+340 pp. £18.99/€23.80. ISBN: 9780745664057....

  9. Molecular characterization of serine protease inhibitor isoform 3, SmSPI, from Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakchotanon, Pattarakul; Molee, Patamaporn; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Limpanont, Yanin; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Limsomboon, Jareemate; Chusongsang, Yupa; Maneewatchararangsri, Santi; Chaisri, Urai; Adisakwattana, Poom

    2016-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors, known as serpins, are pleiotropic regulators of endogenous and exogenous proteases, and molecule transporters. They have been documented in animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and viruses; here, we characterize a serpin from the trematode platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. At least eight serpins have been found in the genome of S. mansoni, but only two have characterized molecular properties and functions. Here, the function of S. mansoni serpin isoform 3 (SmSPI) was analyzed, using both computational and molecular biological approaches. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SmSPI was closely related to Schistosoma haematobium serpin and Schistosoma japonicum serpin B10. Structure determined in silico confirmed that SmSPI belonged to the serpin superfamily, containing nine α-helices, three β-sheets, and a reactive central loop. SmSPI was highly expressed in schistosomules, predominantly in the head gland, and in adult male and female with intensive accumulation on the spines, which suggests that it may have a role in facilitating intradermal and intravenous survival. Recombinant SmSPI was overexpressed in Escherichia coli; the recombinant protein was of the same size (46 kDa) as the native protein. Immunological analysis suggested that mice infected with S. mansoni responded to rSmSPI at 8 weeks postinfection (wpi) but not earlier. The inhibitory activity of rSmSPI was specific to chymotrypsin but not trypsin, neutrophil elastase, and porcine pancreatic elastase. Elucidating the biological and physiological functions of SmSPI as well as other serpins will lead to further understanding of host-parasite interaction machinery that may provide novel strategies to prevent and control schistosomiasis in the future.

  10. Growth response of oaks, beech and pine to Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Dejan; Levanič, Tom; Matović, Bratislav; Orlović, Saša

    2017-04-01

    Climate change may have various consequences on forests, from more frequent forest fires and windstorms to pest and disease outbreaks. Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was chosen for the evaluation of climate change impact to radial forest growth, after comprehensive testing of different climate parameters from CARPATCLIM database. SPI was calculated for periods between 3 and 36 months for different forest stands (lowland and mountainous parts of Serbia, Southeast Europe). Observed were following tree species: Quercus robur, Q. cerris, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris. Bootstrapped Pearson's correlation between SPI monthly indices and tree-ring widths was calculated and ranked for all species. We found that 12-month SPI for summer months may be a good predictor for growth of different species at different sites. The strongest positive correlation between tree-ring width indices and SPI was particularly from the year of growth, since the strongest negative correlation for all four species was exclusively from the year prior to growth. The strongest positive correlation were between 12 and 14-month SPI from June to September, which suggests that the high growth rates are expected when autumn of previous-year, winter, spring and summer of the current year are with high precipitation rates.

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Parys Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  12. Spy and Counterspy as a “Cultural Hero” in the Soviet Cinema of the Cold War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Sukovataya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aim to analyze the evolution of the Soviet spy cinema of the Cold War in the context of the cultural history and the social changes in the USA and the Soviet Union, and the relations with the political opponents. The public reception of the Soviet spy and spying was evolved in the Soviet Union and it was reflected in the cinema plots and characters transformations.

  13. Structure and activity of the Streptococcus pyogenes family GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidase SPy1599.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepper, Judith; Dabin, Jerome; Eklof, Jens M; Thongpoo, Preeyanuch; Kongsaeree, Prachumporn; Taylor, Edward J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Brumer, Harry; Davies, Gideon J

    2013-01-01

    The group A streptococcus Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent of a wide spectrum of invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis, scarlet fever and toxic shock syndrome. In the context of its carbohydrate chemistry, it is interesting that S. pyogenes (in this work strain M1 GAS SF370) displays a spectrum of oligosaccharide-processing enzymes that are located in close proximity on the genome but that the in vivo function of these proteins remains unknown. These proteins include different sugar transporters (SPy1593 and SPy1595), both GH125 α-1,6- and GH38 α-1,3-mannosidases (SPy1603 and SPy1604), a GH84 β-hexosaminidase (SPy1600) and a putative GH2 β-galactosidase (SPy1586), as well as SPy1599, a family GH1 `putative β-glucosidase'. Here, the solution of the three-dimensional structure of SPy1599 in a number of crystal forms complicated by unusual crystallographic twinning is reported. The structure is a classical (β/α)(8)-barrel, consistent with CAZy family GH1 and other members of the GH-A clan. SPy1599 has been annotated in sequence depositions as a β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21), but no such activity could be found; instead, three-dimensional structural overlaps with other enzymes of known function suggested that SPy1599 contains a phosphate-binding pocket in the active site and has possible 6-phospho-β-glycosidase activity. Subsequent kinetic analysis indeed showed that SPy1599 has 6-phospho-β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.86) activity. These data suggest that SPy1599 is involved in the intracellular degradation of 6-phosphoglycosides, which are likely to originate from import through one of the organism's many phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransfer systems (PEP-PTSs).

  14. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Goldman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors.

  15. SpyB, a Small Heme-Binding Protein, Affects the Composition of the Cell Wall in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rebecca J; Chen, Jing; Kant, Sashi; Rechkina, Elena; Rush, Jeffrey S; Forsberg, Lennart S; Jaehrig, Bernhard; Azadi, Parastoo; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Zhu, Haining; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Pancholi, Vijay; Korotkova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a hemolytic human pathogen associated with a wide variety of infections ranging from minor skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. The cell wall of GAS consists of peptidoglycan sacculus decorated with a carbohydrate comprising a polyrhamnose backbone with immunodominant N-acetylglucosamine side-chains. All GAS genomes contain the spyBA operon, which encodes a 35-amino-acid membrane protein SpyB, and a membrane-bound C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferase SpyA. In this study, we addressed the function of SpyB in GAS. Phenotypic analysis of a spyB deletion mutant revealed increased bacterial aggregation, and reduced sensitivity to β-lactams of the cephalosporin class and peptidoglycan hydrolase PlyC. Glycosyl composition analysis of cell wall isolated from the spyB mutant suggested an altered carbohydrate structure compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that SpyB associates with heme and protoporphyrin IX. Heme binding induces SpyB dimerization, which involves disulfide bond formation between the subunits. Thus, our data suggest the possibility that SpyB activity is regulated by heme.

  16. The poster as modernist progenitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-01-01

    Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film...

  17. Reliability and validity of the Korean standard pattern identification for stroke (K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Byoung-Kab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to examine the reliability and validity of the ‘Korean Standard Pattern Identification for Stroke (K-SPI-Stroke’, which was developed and evaluated within the context of traditional Korean medicine (TKM. Methods Between September 2006 and December 2010, 2,905 patients from 11 Korean medical hospitals were asked to complete the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire as a part of project ' Fundamental study for the standardization and objectification of pattern identification in traditional Korean medicine for stroke (SOPI-Stroke. Each patient was independently diagnosed by two TKM physicians from the same site according to one of four patterns, as suggested by the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine: 1 a Qi deficiency pattern, 2 a Dampness-phlegm pattern, 3 a Yin deficiency pattern, or 4 a Fire-heat pattern. We estimated the internal consistency using Cronbach’s α coefficient, the discriminant validity using the means score of patterns, and the predictive validity using the classification accuracy of the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire. Results The K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire had satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.700 and validity, with significant differences in the mean of scores among the four patterns. The overall classification accuracy of this questionnaire was 65.2 %. Conclusion These results suggest that the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for estimating the severity of the four patterns.

  18. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  19. First Observation of the Decay B0->psi(2S)pi0

    CERN Document Server

    Chobanova, V; Kiesling, C; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Behera, P; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dash, N; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grzymkowska, O; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Jeon, H B; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, I S; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Paul, S; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yelton, J; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the $B^0\\rightarrow\\psi(2S)\\pi^0$ branching fraction based on the full $\\Upsilon(4S)$ data set of $772\\times10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. We obtain $B(B^0\\rightarrow\\psi(2S)\\pi^0) = (1.17\\pm0.17\\text{(stat)}\\pm0.08\\text{(syst)})\\times10^{-5}$. The result has a significance of 7.2 standard deviations and is the first observation of the decay $B^0\\rightarrow\\psi(2S)\\pi^0$.

  20. Collaboration across vertical boundaries: lessons learned from the US DOE`s SPI programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olk, P. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Graduate School of Management; Merrifield, D.B.; Evan, W.M. [Pennsylvania Univ., Dep. of Management, Philadelphia (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has launched three vertically-integrated alliances to promote the development of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) energy products. These alliances, part of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) programme, are novel to the US in that they integrate R+D, manufacturing and marketing. Each SPI arrangement focuses on a specific HTS-related product (fault current limiter, generator and motor, respectively) with assistance from DOE laboratories. These arrangements present unique challenges to managers and offer insights into collaboration and commercialization of publicly-developed energy technology. (author) 4 figs., 7 refs.

  1. When High Group Status Becomes a Burden Requesting Outgroup Help and Spying by Members of High and Low Status Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; van Leeuwen, Esther

    2012-01-01

    The present paper investigates the strategic motives that guide the quest for outgroup resources. Resources can be retrieved through spying and requesting help. Whereas both methods are means of obtaining valued resources from the outgroup, spying secures the ingroup's public image, while requesting

  2. The IL-8 protease SpyCEP/ScpC of group A Streptococcus promotes resistance to neutrophil killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Timmer, Anjuli M; Pence, Morgan A; Locke, Jeffrey B; Buchanan, John T; Turner, Claire E; Mishalian, Inbal; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Hanski, Emanuel; Nizet, Victor

    2008-08-14

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) promotes neutrophil-mediated host defense through its chemoattractant and immunostimulatory activities. The Group A Streptococcus (GAS) protease SpyCEP (also called ScpC) cleaves IL-8, and SpyCEP expression is strongly upregulated in vivo in the M1T1 GAS strains associated with life-threatening systemic disease including necrotizing fasciitis. Coupling allelic replacement with heterologous gene expression, we show that SpyCEP is necessary and sufficient for IL-8 degradation. SpyCEP decreased IL-8-dependent neutrophil endothelial transmigration and bacterial killing, the latter by reducing neutrophil extracellular trap formation. The knockout mutant lacking SpyCEP was attenuated for virulence in murine infection models, and SpyCEP expression conferred protection to coinfecting bacteria. We also show that the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus iniae possesses a functional homolog of SpyCEP (CepI) that cleaves IL-8, promotes neutrophil resistance, and contributes to virulence. By inactivating the multifunctional host defense peptide IL-8, the SpyCEP protease impairs neutrophil clearance mechanisms, contributing to the pathogenesis of invasive streptococcal infection.

  3. The CXC Chemokine-degrading Protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes Promotes Its Uptake into Endothelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.; Talay, Susanne R.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells. PMID:20562101

  4. The CXC chemokine-degrading protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes its uptake into endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Talay, Susanne R

    2010-09-03

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells.

  5. The IL-8 Protease SpyCEP/ScpC of Group A Streptococcus Promotes Resistance to Neutrophil Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Pence, Morgan A.; Locke, Jeffrey B.; Buchanan, John T.; Turner, Claire E.; Mishalian, Inbal; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Hanski, Emanuel; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Interleukin-8 (IL-8) promotes neutrophil-mediated host defense through its chemoattractant and immunostimulatory activities. The Group A Streptococcus (GAS) protease SpyCEP (also called ScpC) cleaves IL-8, and SpyCEP expression is strongly upregulated in vivo in the M1T1 GAS strains associated with life-threatening systemic disease including necrotizing fasciitis. Coupling allelic replacement with heterologous gene expression, we show that SpyCEP is necessary and sufficient for IL-8 degradation. SpyCEP decreased IL-8-dependent neutrophil endothelial transmigration and bacterial killing, the latter by reducing neutrophil extracellular trap formation. The knockout mutant lacking SpyCEP was attenuated for virulence in murine infection models, and SpyCEP expression conferred protection to coinfecting bacteria. We also show that the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus iniae possesses a functional homolog of SpyCEP (Cepl) that cleaves IL-8, promotes neutrophil resistance, and contributes to virulence. By inactivating the multifunctional host defense peptide IL-8, the SpyCEP protease impairs neutrophil clearance mechanisms, contributing to the pathogenesis of invasive streptococcal infection. PMID:18692776

  6. Malware Memory Analysis for Non specialists: Investigating Publicly Available Memory Images for Prolaco and SpyEye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    trojan - horse -New-PC- virus -steals-money-creates-fake-online-bank-statements.html. [17] Mieres, Jorge. SpyEye Bot: Analysis of a new alternative...SpyEye; Trojan horse ; Virus scanner; Volatility; Windows; Worm ...examines various Windows-based malware infected memory images. The first report in this series, TM 2013-018, examined the Zeus Trojan horse . It is

  7. Impact of immunization against SpyCEP during invasive disease with two streptococcal species: Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Claire E; Kurupati, Prathiba; Wiles, Siouxsie; Edwards, Robert J; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2009-08-06

    Currently there is no licensed vaccine against the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. The highly conserved IL-8 cleaving S. pyogenes cell envelope proteinase SpyCEP is surface expressed and is a potential vaccine candidate. A recombinant N-terminal part of SpyCEP (CEP) was expressed and purified. AntiCEP antibodies were found to neutralize the IL-8 cleaving activity of SpyCEP. CEP-immunized mice had reduced bacterial dissemination from focal S. pyogenes intramuscular infection and intranasal infection. We also identified a functional SpyCEP-homolog protease SeCEP, expressed by the equine pathogen Streptococcus equi, which was able to cleave both human and equine IL-8. CEP-immunized mice also demonstrated reduced bacterial dissemination from S. equi intramuscular infection. Therefore immunization against SpyCEP may provide protection against other streptococci species with homologous proteases.

  8. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  9. The evaluation of scientific monograph and publisher's role: the spanish project Scholarly Publishers Indicators (SPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Capaccioni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the issue about the quality assessment of scientific monograph and the role of publishers in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences, focusing on the Spanish project Scholarly Publishers Indicators (SPI. This project was born to identify and explore specific quality indicators for scientific books, starting from the opinion of SSH Spanish experts.

  10. Temporal spying and concealing process in fibre-optic data transmission systems through polarization bypass

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bony, P Y; Guasoni, M; Morin, P; Sugny, D; Picozzi, A; Jauslin, H R; Pitois, S; Fatome, J

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we report the first experimental demonstration of perpetual temporal spying and blinding process of optical data in fibre-optic transmission line based on polarization bypass. We successfully characterize the performance of our system by alternatively copying and then concealing 100% of a 10-Gb s(-1) transmitted signal.

  11. klanke, voëlgeluide en musiek in die digkuns van Lina Spies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    27 Jan 2006 ... Tydens die verloop van die gedig vermeld sy die woord “Jupiter”, verwysend na Mozart se laaste simfonie (nr. 41) met die bynaam “Jupiter”, en sy onvoltooide Requiem, geskryf op sy doodsbed: “Jy het geduur verby jou onvoltooide. Lacrymosa”. Spies verklaar: “Die wonder van musiek is vir my soms die ...

  12. Use of Indocyanine Green-SPY Angiography for Tracking Lymphatic Recovery After Lymphaticovenous Anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hubert B; Shakir, Afaaf; Nguyen, Dung H

    2016-05-01

    Lymphaticovenous anastomosis (LVA) is a surgical treatment option for patients with early stage lymphedema. To date, no ideal imaging modality exists for tracking patency of the LVA postoperatively. We hypothesize that laser angiography utilizing indocyanine green (ICG) via the SPY system (Lifecell Corp.) would be a useful methodology for assessing the patency of the LVA and lymphatic recovery postoperatively. A prospective trial was performed on patients with stage II lymphedema who underwent LVA from 2013 to 2014 by a single surgeon. All candidates underwent preoperative and postoperative lymphatic mapping using ICG-SPY angiography. Postoperative analyses were performed at 1 month and at 9 months after surgery and assessed for patency at the site of the LVAs and for changes in lymphatic pattern. Five patients underwent LVA, 3 for upper extremity and 2 for lower extremity stage II lymphedema. The number of LVAs per extremity was 1 to 3 (total, 11). One month postoperative ICG-SPY angiography demonstrated flow through 9 of 11 anastomoses. Evaluation at 9 months postoperative showed improvement in lymphatic drainage. Indocyanine green-SPY angiography may be used to objectively evaluate the surgical outcome of LVA.

  13. CWI cryptanalyst discovers new cryptographic attack variant in Flame spy malware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Stevens (Marc); R.J.F. Cramer (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractCryptanalyst Marc Stevens from the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam, known for breaking the https security in 2008 using a cryptanalytic attack on MD5, analyzed the recent Flame virus this week. He discovered that for this spy malware an as yet unknown cryptographic

  14. Multispecies dendroclimatic reconstruction of drought index (SPI) in the eastern Iberian Range (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Ernesto; Saz, Miguel Angel; María Cuadrat, José; De Luis, Martín; Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Barriendos, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays there is a high consensus on the possible increase of the average temperature of the planet in the upcoming decades. However, this consensus is not so evident regarding the precipitation signal. A probable decline and an increase in the frequency and magnitude of droughts have been largely described for the Mediterranean basin. Although there are several works concerning droughts over the last decades in Spain, there is, in fact, a lack of droughts data of the last centuries. Besides, droughts reconstructions may have an important role for the validation of climate models. In this communication, we present the first results obtained for the potential reconstruction of drought indexes along the eastern sector of the Iberian Cordillera with a broad set of multi-species dendrochronological series. In the framework of the projects 'CGL2011-28255' and 'CGL2012-31668' 294 new cores from 10 locations were extracted. In addition, 126 series available in the ITRDB and 84 series available from the project 'CLI96-1862' project were added as well to this database. Therefore, we generate the greatest dendrochronological database for the Iberian Range. We developed a 314 long tree-ring width chronology for the eastern Iberian range which presents a high significant correlation with the SPI series calculated from a regional series in the period of calibration: 0.634 with the August SPI4, 0.629 with the July SPI3 and 0,60 with the July SPI12. The multi-species chronologies developed with samples obtained between 1400 - 1600 meters above sea level present a correlation with the August SPI12 of 0,729. Nevertheless, the chronology developed with trees located at lower altitude, presents greater sensitivity with the SPI between 2 and 4 months. These results emphasize the need to improve the instrumental climatic database in height, as long as improvement in the standardization of growth series in order to develop the first SPI reconstruction of the Iberian Peninsula and the

  15. TargetSpy: a supervised machine learning approach for microRNA target prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Martin; Hackenberg, Michael; Langenberger, David; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2010-05-28

    Virtually all currently available microRNA target site prediction algorithms require the presence of a (conserved) seed match to the 5' end of the microRNA. Recently however, it has been shown that this requirement might be too stringent, leading to a substantial number of missed target sites. We developed TargetSpy, a novel computational approach for predicting target sites regardless of the presence of a seed match. It is based on machine learning and automatic feature selection using a wide spectrum of compositional, structural, and base pairing features covering current biological knowledge. Our model does not rely on evolutionary conservation, which allows the detection of species-specific interactions and makes TargetSpy suitable for analyzing unconserved genomic sequences.In order to allow for an unbiased comparison of TargetSpy to other methods, we classified all algorithms into three groups: I) no seed match requirement, II) seed match requirement, and III) conserved seed match requirement. TargetSpy predictions for classes II and III are generated by appropriate postfiltering. On a human dataset revealing fold-change in protein production for five selected microRNAs our method shows superior performance in all classes. In Drosophila melanogaster not only our class II and III predictions are on par with other algorithms, but notably the class I (no-seed) predictions are just marginally less accurate. We estimate that TargetSpy predicts between 26 and 112 functional target sites without a seed match per microRNA that are missed by all other currently available algorithms. Only a few algorithms can predict target sites without demanding a seed match and TargetSpy demonstrates a substantial improvement in prediction accuracy in that class. Furthermore, when conservation and the presence of a seed match are required, the performance is comparable with state-of-the-art algorithms. TargetSpy was trained on mouse and performs well in human and drosophila

  16. TargetSpy: a supervised machine learning approach for microRNA target prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langenberger David

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtually all currently available microRNA target site prediction algorithms require the presence of a (conserved seed match to the 5' end of the microRNA. Recently however, it has been shown that this requirement might be too stringent, leading to a substantial number of missed target sites. Results We developed TargetSpy, a novel computational approach for predicting target sites regardless of the presence of a seed match. It is based on machine learning and automatic feature selection using a wide spectrum of compositional, structural, and base pairing features covering current biological knowledge. Our model does not rely on evolutionary conservation, which allows the detection of species-specific interactions and makes TargetSpy suitable for analyzing unconserved genomic sequences. In order to allow for an unbiased comparison of TargetSpy to other methods, we classified all algorithms into three groups: I no seed match requirement, II seed match requirement, and III conserved seed match requirement. TargetSpy predictions for classes II and III are generated by appropriate postfiltering. On a human dataset revealing fold-change in protein production for five selected microRNAs our method shows superior performance in all classes. In Drosophila melanogaster not only our class II and III predictions are on par with other algorithms, but notably the class I (no-seed predictions are just marginally less accurate. We estimate that TargetSpy predicts between 26 and 112 functional target sites without a seed match per microRNA that are missed by all other currently available algorithms. Conclusion Only a few algorithms can predict target sites without demanding a seed match and TargetSpy demonstrates a substantial improvement in prediction accuracy in that class. Furthermore, when conservation and the presence of a seed match are required, the performance is comparable with state-of-the-art algorithms. TargetSpy was trained on

  17. Circulating Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Vascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, O.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have altered levels and function of (bone marrow-derived) vascular progenitor cells (endothelial progenitor cells-EPC, smooth muscle progenitor cells-SPC) which may contribute to their accelerated atherosclerosis. The results from clinical and experimental studies in this

  18. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Peroral pancreatoscopy using the SpyGlass system for the assessment of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Yosuke; Aso, Teppei; Ohtsuka, Takao; Kono, Hiroshi; Ideno, Noboru; Igarashi, Hisato; Takahata, Shunichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Ito, Tetsuhide; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-06-01

    Peroral pancreatoscopy (POPS) using a mother-baby endoscope system is often useful for assessment of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas with main pancreatic duct (MPD) involvement, but is not widely used for several reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the SpyGlass Direct Visualization System for assessment of IPMN. Seventeen patients diagnosed with possible IPMN with MPD dilation underwent peroral pancreatoscopy using the SpyGlass system at our institution. The quality of visualization and the sensitivities of cytological and pathological investigations for diagnosing malignant lesions were evaluated. Peroral pancreatoscopy was performed using the SpyScope in 12 patients and an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) catheter in five patients. Sufficient visualization was achieved in 92% of cases using the SpyScope and 40% of cases using the ERCP catheter. Biopsy under direct visualization was successful in seven patients. Biopsy specimens showed adenocarcinoma in one patient, benign neoplastic epithelium in five patients, and regenerative changes in one patient; and had 25% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting malignancy. SpyGlass pancreatoscopy with irrigation cytology had 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting malignancy. SpyGlass pancreatoscopy was useful for determining the operative excision line in three patients. There were no severe procedure-related adverse events. Peroral pancreatoscopy using the SpyGlass system seems to be feasible and useful for assessment of IPMN with a dilated MPD. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  20. The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Saini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common food-borne pathogen that induces inflammatory diarrhea and invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type three secretion system (T3SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1. The genes encoding the SPI1 T3SS are tightly regulated by a network of interacting transcriptional regulators involving three coupled positive feedback loops. While the core architecture of the SPI1 gene circuit has been determined, the relative roles of these interacting regulators and associated feedback loops are still unknown. To determine the function of this circuit, we measured gene expression dynamics at both population and single-cell resolution in a number of SPI1 regulatory mutants. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model of the SPI1 gene circuit. Analysis of the model predicted that the circuit serves two functions. The first is to place a threshold on SPI1 activation, ensuring that the genes encoding the T3SS are expressed only in response to the appropriate combination of environmental and cellular cues. The second is to amplify SPI1 gene expression. To experimentally test these predictions, we rewired the SPI1 genetic circuit by changing its regulatory architecture. This enabled us to directly test our predictions regarding the function of the circuit by varying the strength and dynamics of the activating signal. Collectively, our experimental and computational results enable us to deconstruct this complex circuit and determine the role of its individual components in regulating SPI1 gene expression dynamics.

  1. Correction: The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Saini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common food-borne pathogen that induces inflammatory diarrhea and invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type three secretion system (T3SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1. The genes encoding the SPI1 T3SS are tightly regulated by a network of interacting transcriptional regulators involving three coupled positive feedback loops. While the core architecture of the SPI1 gene circuit has been determined, the relative roles of these interacting regulators and associated feedback loops are still unknown. To determine the function of this circuit, we measured gene expression dynamics at both population and single-cell resolution in a number of SPI1 regulatory mutants. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model of the SPI1 gene circuit. Analysis of the model predicted that the circuit serves two functions. The first is to place a threshold on SPI1 activation, ensuring that the genes encoding the T3SS are expressed only in response to the appropriate combination of environmental and cellular cues. The second is to amplify SPI1 gene expression. To experimentally test these predictions, we rewired the SPI1 genetic circuit by changing its regulatory architecture. This enabled us to directly test our predictions regarding the function of the circuit by varying the strength and dynamics of the activating signal. Collectively, our experimental and computational results enable us to deconstruct this complex circuit and determine the role of its individual components in regulating SPI1 gene expression dynamics.

  2. A Spiking Neural Network Model of the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus on the SpiNNaker Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen-Bhattacharya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a spiking neural network model of the thalamic Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN developed on SpiNNaker, which is a state-of-the-art digital neuromorphic hardware built with very-low-power ARM processors. The parallel, event-based data processing in SpiNNaker makes it viable for building massively parallel neuro-computational frameworks. The LGN model has 140 neurons representing a “basic building block” for larger modular architectures. The motivation of this work is to simulate biologically plausible LGN dynamics on SpiNNaker. Synaptic layout of the model is consistent with biology. The model response is validated with existing literature reporting entrainment in steady state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP—brain oscillations corresponding to periodic visual stimuli recorded via electroencephalography (EEG. Periodic stimulus to the model is provided by: a synthetic spike-train with inter-spike-intervals in the range 10–50 Hz at a resolution of 1 Hz; and spike-train output from a state-of-the-art electronic retina subjected to a light emitting diode flashing at 10, 20, and 40 Hz, simulating real-world visual stimulus to the model. The resolution of simulation is 0.1 ms to ensure solution accuracy for the underlying differential equations defining Izhikevichs neuron model. Under this constraint, 1 s of model simulation time is executed in 10 s real time on SpiNNaker; this is because simulations on SpiNNaker work in real time for time-steps dt ⩾ 1 ms. The model output shows entrainment with both sets of input and contains harmonic components of the fundamental frequency. However, suppressing the feed-forward inhibition in the circuit produces subharmonics within the gamma band (>30 Hz implying a reduced information transmission fidelity. These model predictions agree with recent lumped-parameter computational model-based predictions, using conventional computers. Scalability of the framework is demonstrated by a multi

  3. The poster as modernist progenitor

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-01-01

    Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film. Modernist biases separating high art from mass culture account for scholars ignoring posters, however the poster ushered in an innovative reductive graphic style as well as pioneered the notion of multiple originals.

  4. The poster as modernist progenitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film. Modernist biases separating high art from mass culture account for scholars ignoring posters, however the poster ushered in an innovative reductive graphic style as well as pioneered the notion of multiple originals.

  5. Areal-Time Spying Software for the Driving System in the 25m Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lan-Feng; Aili, Yusupu; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Yu, Yun

    2008-06-01

    The Spying software, which is running on Windows platform, is showing the working state of the driving system in the 25m radio telescope in real time. It is programmed in the MFC method. This software achieves the serial communication between the host-computer and the client-computer by using the MSComm control and the network communication between the server and the client by using the WinSock control, both provided by Microsoft. It also has additional functions, such as recording the information history, browsing history, alarming when an error occured and so on. Users can search data and generate charts in information history by using Excel which has been linked to the spying software. The timer message ensures all the parameters from different machines shown in the digital format simultaneously. Friendly user interface and simple operation reach the initial aims.

  6. SPY: a new scission-point model based on microscopic inputs to predict fission fragment properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Lemaître, Jean-Francois; Sida, Jean-Luc [CEA Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Dubray, Noëel [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, Stephane [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophisique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Despite the difficulty in describing the whole fission dynamics, the main fragment characteristics can be determined in a static approach based on a so-called scission-point model. Within this framework, a new Scission-Point model for the calculations of fission fragment Yields (SPY) has been developed. This model, initially based on the approach developed by Wilkins in the late seventies, consists in performing a static energy balance at scission, where the two fragments are supposed to be completely separated so that their macroscopic properties (mass and charge) can be considered as fixed. Given the knowledge of the system state density, averaged quantities such as mass and charge yields, mean kinetic and excitation energy can then be extracted in the framework of a microcanonical statistical description. The main advantage of the SPY model is the introduction of one of the most up-to-date microscopic descriptions of the nucleus for the individual energy of each fragment and, in the future, for their state density. These quantities are obtained in the framework of HFB calculations using the Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction, ensuring an overall coherence of the model. Starting from a description of the SPY model and its main features, a comparison between the SPY predictions and experimental data will be discussed for some specific cases, from light nuclei around mercury to major actinides. Moreover, extensive predictions over the whole chart of nuclides will be discussed, with particular attention to their implication in stellar nucleosynthesis. Finally, future developments, mainly concerning the introduction of microscopic state densities, will be briefly discussed. (author)

  7. A framework for plasticity implementation on the SpiNNaker neural architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eGalluppi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the precise biological mechanisms of synaptic plasticity remain elusive, but simulations of neural networks have greatly enhanced our understanding of how specific global functions arise from the massively parallel computation of neurons and local Hebbian or spike-timing dependent plasticity rules. For simulating large portions of neural tissue, this has created an increasingly strong need for large scale simulations of plastic neural networks on special purpose hardware platforms, because synaptic transmissions and updates are badly matched to computing style supported by current architectures. Because of the great diversity of biological plasticity phenomena and the corresponding diversity of models, there is a great need for testing various hypotheses about plasticity before committing to one hardware implementation. Here we present a novel framework for investigating different plasticity approaches on the SpiNNaker distributed digital neural simulation platform.The key innovation of the proposed architecture is to exploit the reconfigurability of the ARM processors inside SpiNNaker, dedicating a subset of them exclusively to process synaptic plasticity updates, while the rest perform the usual neural and synaptic simulations. We demonstrate the flexibility of the proposed approach by showing the implementation of a variety of spike- and rate-based learning rules, including standard Spike-Timing dependent plasticity (STDP, voltage-dependent STDP, and the rate-based BCM rule.We analyze their performance and validate them by running classical learning experiments in real time on a 4-chip SpiNNaker board. The result is an efficient, modular, flexible and scalable framework, which provides a valuable tool for the fast and easy exploration of learning models of very different kinds on the parallel and reconfigurable SpiNNaker system.

  8. Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) over the Mediterranean region based on high resolution gridded data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychroni, Iliana; Nastos, Panagiotis

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean water resource system is heavily influenced by changes in climate conditions, which in turns affect significantly the socioeconomic development, specifically over coastal areas. Taking into consideration that the surface temperature is projected to rise over the 21st century and the mean precipitation is likely to decrease in mid-latitude dry regions, according to IPCC 2014, we confronted the challenge to study the drought over the Mediterranean region by means of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), defined as the difference from the mean for a specified time period divided by the standard deviation, where the mean and standard deviation are determined from past records. Drought is a long-range phenomenon that affects the Mediterranean. The drought not only affects food production but also has severe environmental, economic and social impacts. The objective of this study is to assess and analyze the spatio-temporal evolution of the SPI for 3-, 6-, 9-, 12- month timescales, during the period 1950-2015. For this purpose, we processed high resolution gridded daily precipitation datasets (0.25° x 0.25°), based on the E-OBS dataset from ECA&D. Mean SPI patterns and trends for the whole examined period, as well as successive 30-year periods, were assessed by using R-project. Moreover, the influence of the well-known atmospheric circulation index of the wider region of Europe, namely the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI), on the SPI over the Mediterranean was considered necessary to evaluate, because NAOI strongly modulates precipitation over Europe and the Mediterranean.

  9. A framework for plasticity implementation on the SpiNNaker neural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluppi, Francesco; Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Pfeiffer, Michael; Plana, Luis A; Furber, Steve B; Benosman, Ryad B

    2014-01-01

    Many of the precise biological mechanisms of synaptic plasticity remain elusive, but simulations of neural networks have greatly enhanced our understanding of how specific global functions arise from the massively parallel computation of neurons and local Hebbian or spike-timing dependent plasticity rules. For simulating large portions of neural tissue, this has created an increasingly strong need for large scale simulations of plastic neural networks on special purpose hardware platforms, because synaptic transmissions and updates are badly matched to computing style supported by current architectures. Because of the great diversity of biological plasticity phenomena and the corresponding diversity of models, there is a great need for testing various hypotheses about plasticity before committing to one hardware implementation. Here we present a novel framework for investigating different plasticity approaches on the SpiNNaker distributed digital neural simulation platform. The key innovation of the proposed architecture is to exploit the reconfigurability of the ARM processors inside SpiNNaker, dedicating a subset of them exclusively to process synaptic plasticity updates, while the rest perform the usual neural and synaptic simulations. We demonstrate the flexibility of the proposed approach by showing the implementation of a variety of spike- and rate-based learning rules, including standard Spike-Timing dependent plasticity (STDP), voltage-dependent STDP, and the rate-based BCM rule. We analyze their performance and validate them by running classical learning experiments in real time on a 4-chip SpiNNaker board. The result is an efficient, modular, flexible and scalable framework, which provides a valuable tool for the fast and easy exploration of learning models of very different kinds on the parallel and reconfigurable SpiNNaker system.

  10. Development of SPIES (Space Intelligent Eyeing System) for smart vehicle tracing and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Suzanah; Ariffin Osoman, Muhammad; Guan Liyong, Chua; Zulfadhli Mohd Noor, Mohd; Mohamed, Ikhwan

    2016-06-01

    SPIES or Space-based Intelligent Eyeing System is an intelligent technology which can be utilized for various applications such as gathering spatial information of features on Earth, tracking system for the movement of an object, tracing system to trace the history information, monitoring driving behavior, security and alarm system as an observer in real time and many more. SPIES as will be developed and supplied modularly will encourage the usage based on needs and affordability of users. SPIES are a complete system with camera, GSM, GPS/GNSS and G-Sensor modules with intelligent function and capabilities. Mainly the camera is used to capture pictures and video and sometimes with audio of an event. Its usage is not limited to normal use for nostalgic purpose but can be used as a reference for security and material of evidence when an undesirable event such as crime occurs. When integrated with space based technology of the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS), photos and videos can be recorded together with positioning information. A product of the integration of these technologies when integrated with Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) and Geographic Information System (GIS) will produce innovation in the form of information gathering methods in still picture or video with positioning information that can be conveyed in real time via the web to display location on the map hence creating an intelligent eyeing system based on space technology. The importance of providing global positioning information is a challenge but overcome by SPIES even in areas without GNSS signal reception for the purpose of continuous tracking and tracing capability

  11. The hard X-ray continuum of Cen a observed with INTEGRAL SPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Mark J.; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Avenue Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Evans, Daniel A., E-mail: mburke@irap.omp.eu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We revisit the average hard X-ray spectrum from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of Centaurus A (Cen A) using 10 yr worth of observations with INTEGRAL SPI. This source has the highest flux observed from any AGNs in the SPI bandpass (23 keV-8 MeV). The 10 year light curve of Cen A is presented, and hardness ratios confirm that the spectral shape changes very little despite the luminosity varying by a factor of a few. Primarily, we establish the presence of a reflection component in the average spectrum by demonstrating an excess between 20 and 60 keV, from extending the spectral shape observed at low energy to the SPI regime. The excess in Chandra HETGS and INTEGRAL SPI data is well described by reflection of the dominant power-law spectrum from a neutral, optically thick atmosphere. We find that the reprocessed emission contributes 20%-25% of the 23-100 keV flux. The existence of a cutoff at tens to hundreds of kiloelectron volts remains controversial. Using simulated spectra, we demonstrate that a high energy cutoff reproduces the observed spectral properties of Cen A more readily than a simple power law. However, we also show that such a cutoff is probably underestimated when neglecting (even modest) reflection, and for Cen A would be at energies >700 keV, with a confidence of >95%. This is atypically high for thermal Comptonizing plasmas observed in AGNs, and we propose that we are in fact modeling the more gradual change in spectral shape expected of synchrotron self-Compton spectra.

  12. Pan-European comparison of candidate distributions for climatological drought indices, SPI and SPEI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagge, James; Tallaksen, Lena; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Van Loon, Anne; Stahl, Kerstin

    2013-04-01

    Drought indices are vital to objectively quantify and compare drought severity, duration, and extent across regions with varied climatic and hydrologic regimes. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), a well-reviewed meterological drought index recommended by the WMO, and its more recent water balance variant, the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) both rely on selection of univariate probability distributions to normalize the index, allowing for comparisons across climates. The SPI, considered a universal meteorological drought index, measures anomalies in precipitation, whereas the SPEI measures anomalies in climatic water balance (precipitation minus potential evapotranspiration), a more comprehensive measure of water availability that incorporates temperature. Many reviewers recommend use of the gamma (Pearson Type III) distribution for SPI normalization, while developers of the SPEI recommend use of the three parameter log-logistic distribution, based on point observation validation. Before the SPEI can be implemented at the pan-European scale, it is necessary to further validate the index using a range of candidate distributions to determine sensitivity to distribution selection, identify recommended distributions, and highlight those instances where a given distribution may not be valid. This study rigorously compares a suite of candidate probability distributions using WATCH Forcing Data, a global, historical (1958-2001) climate dataset based on ERA40 reanalysis with 0.5 x 0.5 degree resolution and bias-correction based on CRU-TS2.1 observations. Using maximum likelihood estimation, alternative candidate distributions are fit for the SPI and SPEI across the range of European climate zones. When evaluated at this scale, the gamma distribution for the SPI results in negatively skewed values, exaggerating the index severity of extreme dry conditions, while decreasing the index severity of extreme high precipitation. This bias is

  13. The application of SpyScope® technology in evaluation of pre and post liver transplant biliary problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürakar, Ahmet; Wright, Harlan; Camci, Cemalettin; Jaboour, Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    Peroral cholangioscopy with its limitations led to further research regarding development of SpyScope® technology. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of a new device and the application of this device in our Liver Transplant Center. Charts of patients who had undergone evaluation with SpyScope® were retrospectively reviewed. Indications included pre-transplant as well as post-transplant evaluation of biliary strictures. If strictures or filling defects were noted by cholangiogram, SpyScope® was performed. Biopsy was obtained under direct visualization if necessary with SpyBite® biopsy forceps. Demographic features, indications for SpyScope® evaluation, results, and histopathological diagnoses were recorded. Ten patients (6 male, 4 female; median age: 55) had undergone SpyScope® procedure between August 2007 and January 2008. Six out of 10 cases were in the pre-transplant work-up period, referred to as Group I, while the remaining four were post-transplant patients, referred to as Group II. In Group I, 4 of 6 cases had undergone the procedure for work-up of primary sclerosing cholangitis prior to orthotopic liver transplantation. In Group II, indications were either strictures noted during the previous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (n=2) or common bile duct stones with elevated total bilirubin levels and stones with long segment biliary stricture (n=2). In the patient with anastomotic stricture, the biliary lithiasis was eventually exposed just above the anastomotic stricture, after abundant lavage was applied at that level. All SpyBite® biopsy specimens were reported to be adequate samples for histopathological examination. No malignancy was detected among 4 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and patients with elevated CA 19-9. SpyScope® allows direct visualization of biliary strictures and SpyScope®/SpyBite® were found to be technically superior to conventional cholangiogram with better sampling

  14. Improved Mobility Control for Carbon Dioxide (CO{sub 2}) Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Silica-Polymer-Initiator (SPI) Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oglesby, Kenneth

    2014-01-31

    SPI gels are multi-component silicate based gels for improving (areal and vertical) conformance in oilfield enhanced recovery operations, including water-floods and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) floods, as well as other applications. SPI mixtures are like-water when pumped, but form light up to very thick, paste-like gels in contact with CO{sub 2}. When formed they are 3 to 10 times stronger than any gelled polyacrylamide gel now available, however, they are not as strong as cement or epoxy, allowing them to be washed / jetted out of the wellbore without drilling. This DOE funded project allowed 8 SPI field treatments to be performed in 6 wells (5 injection wells and 1 production well) in 2 different fields with different operators, in 2 different basins (Gulf Coast and Permian) and in 2 different rock types (sandstone and dolomite). Field A was in a central Mississippi sandstone that injected CO{sub 2} as an immiscible process. Field B was in the west Texas San Andres dolomite formation with a mature water-alternating-gas miscible CO{sub 2} flood. Field A treatments are now over 1 year old while Field B treatments have only 4 months data available under variable WAG conditions. Both fields had other operational events and well work occurring before/ during / after the treatments making definitive evaluation difficult. Laboratory static beaker and dynamic sand pack tests were performed with Ottawa sand and both fields’ core material, brines and crude oils to improve SPI chemistry, optimize SPI formulations, ensure SPI mix compatibility with field rocks and fluids, optimize SPI treatment field treatment volumes and methods, and ensure that strong gels set in the reservoir. Field quality control procedures were designed and utilized. Pre-treatment well (surface) injectivities ranged from 0.39 to 7.9 MMCF/psi. The SPI treatment volumes ranged from 20.7 cubic meters (m{sup 3}, 5460 gallons/ 130 bbls) to 691 m{sup 3} (182,658 gallons/ 4349 bbls). Various size and types

  15. Subtle distinct regulations of late erythroid molecular events by PI3K/AKT-mediated activation of Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene autoregulation loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breig, O; Théoleyre, O; Douablin, A; Baklouti, F

    2010-05-13

    Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene is downregulated as proerythroblasts undergo terminal differentiation. Insertion of the Friend virus upstream of the Spi-1/PU.1 locus leads to the constitutive upregulation of Spi-1/PU.1, and a subsequent block in the differentiation of the affected erythroblasts. We have shown that sustained overexpression of Spi-1/PU.1 also inhibits the erythroid splicing of protein 4.1R exon 16, irrespective of chemical induction of differentiation. Here, we show a positive feedback loop that couples constitutive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling to high expression of Spi-1/PU.1 in Friend erythroleukemia cells. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT results in Spi-1/PU.1 downregulation in a stepwise manner and induces cell differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further supported the positive autoregulatory effect of Spi-1/PU.1. Mutational analysis indicated that Ser41, but not Ser148, is necessary for Spi-1/PU.1-mediated repression of hemoglobin expression, whereas both Ser residues are required for Spi-1/PU.1 inhibition of the erythroid splicing event. We further show that inhibition of the erythroid transcriptional and splicing events are strictly dependent on distinct Spi-1/PU.1 phosphorylation modifications rather than Spi-1/PU.1 expression level per se. Our data further support the fact that Spi-1/PU.1 inhibits 4.1R erythroid splicing through two different pathways, and bring new insights into the extracellular signal impact triggered by erythropoietin on late erythroid regulatory program, including pre-mRNA splicing.

  16. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  17. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F. [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author).

  18. Power potential and the energy in the Spiš region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Michal

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is a short review of the energy power information about three districts: Spišská Nová Ves, Gelnica and Levoèa. These districts are parts of the county of Košice and Prešov. The contribution contains a summary of basic illustration information about the sources of energy and about a consumption of electric and heat energy in the area. In the area of the region, there is no standard thermal power station and no nuclear power station. From own sources of the region, there is especially a water energy. The majority of heat and electric energy, which is necessary in the region, comes from outside sources. The sources of power are situated in Spišská Nová Ves and Gelnica districts. The Levoèa district has no own source of energy.In the Spišská Nová Ves district, there is one industrial establishment, which produces the heat and electric energy for the own use and also for the export. With the exception of this one establishment, in Spišská district, there are 3 little hydro - electric power plants with the total installed power capacity 138 kW. And there is also one energy unit for the output of electricity and heat with the installed power capacity 400 kW. In the area of Gelnica, there is one hydro – electric power plant, in the water reservoir named Ružín. It has installed the power capacity 2x30 MW. There are also 7 little hydro - electric power plants with the total installed power capacity 528 kW and one energy unit for the output of electricity and heat with installed power capacity 1100 kW.The future development of own energy sources in the region is oriented to the exploitation of natural energy sources, especially to the water energy and energy from biological gas. There is project of using the biological gas for the power purpose from one dump in the Spišská Nová Ves district. It will be realised in the time period of 10 years. In all listed above districts measurements are realized, which will show if

  19. Microencapsulation of model oil in wall matrices consisting of SPI and maltodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Rosenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation can provide means to entrap, protect and deliver nutritional lipids and related compounds that are susceptible to deterioration. The encapsulation of high lipid loads represents a challenge. The research has investigated the encapsulation by spray drying of a model oil, at a core load of 25–60%, in wall systems consisting of 2.5–10% SPI and 17.5–10% maltodextrin. In general, core-in-wall-emulsions exhibited unimodal PSD and a mean particle diameter < 0.5 µm. Dry microcapsules ranged in diameter from about 5 to less than 50 µm and exhibited only a limited extent of surface indentation. Core domains, in the form of protein-coated droplets, were embedded throughout the wall matrices and no visible cracks connecting these domains with the environment could be detected. Core retention ranged from 72.2 to 95.9% and was significantly affected (p < 0.05 by a combined influence of wall composition and initial core load. Microencapsulation efficiency, MEE, ranged from 25.4 to 91.6% and from 12.4 to 91.4% after 5 and 30 min of extraction, respectively (p < 0.05. MEE was significantly influenced by wall composition, extraction time, initial core load and DE value of the maltodextrins. Results indicated that wall solutions containing as low as 2.5% SPI and 17.5% maltodextrin were very effective as microencapsulating agents for high oil load. Results highlighted the functionality of SPI as microencapsulating agent in food applications and indicated the importance of carefully designing the composition of core-in-wall-emulsions.

  20. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  1. Spying on cancer: molecular imaging in vivo with genetically encoded reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Shimon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2005-01-01

    Genetically encoded imaging reporters introduced into cells and transgenic animals enable noninvasive, longitudinal studies of dynamic biological processes in vivo. The most common reporters include firefly luciferase (bioluminescence imaging), green fluorescence protein (fluorescence imaging), herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (positron emission tomography), and variants with enhanced spectral and kinetic properties. When cloned into promoter/enhancer sequences or engineered into fusion proteins, imaging reporters allow transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interactions, oncogenic transformation, cell trafficking, and targeted drug action to be spatiotemporally resolved in vivo. Spying on cancer with genetically encoded imaging reporters provides insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal.

  2. Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, S.; Nelemans, G.; Bours, M.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Claeys, J.; Mennekens, N.; Ruiter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. The standard scenarios involve thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs approaching the Chandrasekhar mass; either by accretion from a companion or by a merger of two white dwarfs. We investigate the contribution from both channels to the SNIa rate with the binary population synthesis (BPS) code SeBa in order to constrain binary processes such as the mass retention efficiency of WD accretion and common envelope evolution. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of SNIa progenitors and in particular study how assumptions affect the predicted rates.

  3. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-09-01

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  4. MEJORA DE PROCESOS DE SOFTWARE ÁGIL CON AGILE - SPI PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR PARDO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivar la aplicación de proyectos de mejora de procesos en las empresas de desarrollo de software iberoamericanas, en su gran mayoría Micro, Pequeñas y Medianas Empresas Desarrolladoras de Software (MiPyMEs_DS es una necesidad imperante para la búsqueda de una industria de software que sea competitiva no solo en contextos regionales sino también internacionales. Los modelos internacionalmente reconocidos, representan alto riesgo en su aplicación para una MiPyMES_DS, esto debido quizá a su gran inversión en dinero, tiempo, recursos, difícil gestión, además de la complejidad de las recomendaciones y un retorno de la inversión a largo plazo. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar a Agile SPI - Process como un proceso de mejora de procesos basado principalmente en metodologías y principios ágiles, requerimientos livianos y adaptaciones de modelos internacionales. De la misma manera en el artículo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la implementación de Agile SPI - Process en varias MiPyMEs_DS de Iberoamérica y el sur occidente de Colombia.

  5. From static to dynamic mapping of chromospheric magnetism - FIRS and SPIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Lin, Haosheng

    2014-06-01

    Advancements in theoretical forward modeling and observational techniques now allow the mapping of the chromospheric magnetic field vector in some regions. We report on full maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbra within NOAA AR 11408. These maps are derived from full Stokes observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm, which show both Zeeman and atomic-level polarization signatures. Yet, due to the long time to acquire these observations with the slit-based Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), our measurements primarily probe long-lived chromospheric structures, albeit at very high polarization sensitivity. The fast temporal scales remain difficult to probe with conventional slit-based spectropolarimeters. Alternatively, SPIES is an instrument based on a birefringent fiber optic IFU, designed to multiplex a two-dimensional spatial field with high spectral resolution spectropolarimetry, and is an ideal tool for probing small-scale, dynamic magnetic features. We will present movies of the dynamic chromosphere acquired from SPIES across a sunspot and its fine-scaled superpenumbra.

  6. Rainfall characterisation by application of standardised precipitation index (SPI) in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Fadhilah; Hui-Mean, Foo; Suhaila, Jamaludin; Yusop, Zulkifli; Ching-Yee, Kong

    2014-02-01

    The interpretations of trend behaviour for dry and wet events are analysed in order to verify the dryness and wetness episodes. The fitting distribution of rainfall is computed to classify the dry and wet events by applying the standardised precipitation index (SPI). The rainfall amount for each station is categorised into seven categories, namely extremely wet, severely wet, moderately wet, near normal, moderately dry, severely dry and extremely dry. The computation of the SPI is based on the monsoon periods, which include the northeast monsoon, southwest monsoon and inter-monsoon. The trends of the dry and wet periods were then detected using the Mann-Kendall trend test and the results indicate that the major parts of Peninsular Malaysia are characterised by increasing droughts rather than wet events. The annual trends of drought and wet events of the randomly selected stations from each region also yield similar results. Hence, the northwest and southwest regions are predicted to have a higher probability of drought occurrence during a dry event and not much rain during the wet event. The east and west regions, on the other hand, are going through a significant upward trend that implies lower rainfall during the drought episodes and heavy rainfall during the wet events.

  7. “Habits of employees”: smoking, spies, and shopfloor culture at Hammermill Paper Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    As cigarette smoking expanded dramatically during the early twentieth century, it brought more and more workers into conflict with the policies and demands of the manufacturers who employed them. As this paper shows, addiction to nicotine ignited daily struggles over workers’ shopfloor rights and the ability of employers to set rules, establish discipline, and monitor behavior. A specific set of records from the archives of the Hammermill Paper Company, a paper manufacturer once based in Erie, Pennsylvania, provide a unique opportunity to explore the impact of cigarette consumption on labor relations during the era of mass production, as two nosy factory spies probed and documented worker actions and attitudes in the summer of 1915. As a result of their intelligence gathering, the spies discovered a factory-wide work culture rooted in the addictive pleasure of cigarette smoke. This discovery worried them. Worker-smokers needed to dampen their hunger for nicotine with frequent, and often clandestine, breaks from work, typically in defiance of “no-smoking” rules, employer designations for the uses of factory space, and bosses’ demands for continuous production. Highlighting the intersections of the histories of labor, smoking, and addiction, this paper argues that cigarettes were a key battleground in workers’ and managers’ intensifying struggles over who really controlled the industrial shopfloor during the early 1900s.

  8. Comparing Image Perception of Bladder Tumors in Four Different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System Modalities Using the íSPIES App

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Guido M.; de Bruin, D. Martijn; Brandt, Martin J.; Knoll, Thomas; Conort, Pierre; Lapini, Alberto; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose L.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the variation of interpretation of the same bladder urothelium image in different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System (SPIES) modalities. SPIES contains a White light (WL), Spectra A (SA), Spectra B (SB), and Clara and Chroma combined (CC) modality. An App for the iPAD retina was

  9. Aging, progenitor cell exhaustion, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Frederick M; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Davis, Bryce H; Wang, Tao; Gregg, David; Ramaswami, Priya; Pippen, Anne M; Annex, Brian H; Dong, Chunming; Taylor, Doris A

    2003-07-29

    Atherosclerosis is largely attributed to chronic vascular injury, as occurs with excess cholesterol; however, the effect of concomitant vascular aging remains unexplained. We hypothesize that the effect of time in atherosclerosis progression is related to obsolescence of endogenous progenitor cells that normally repair and rejuvenate the arteries. Here we show that chronic treatment with bone marrow-derived progenitor cells from young nonatherosclerotic ApoE-/- mice prevents atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- recipients despite persistent hypercholesterolemia. In contrast, treatment with bone marrow cells from older ApoE-/- mice with atherosclerosis is much less effective. Cells with vascular progenitor potential are decreased in the bone marrow of aging ApoE-/- mice, but cells injected from donor mice engraft on recipient arteries in areas at risk for atherosclerotic injury. Our data indicate that progressive progenitor cell deficits may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  10. Comparison of rainfall based SPI drought indices with SMDI and ETDI indices derived from a soil water budget model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houcine, A.; Bargaoui, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling soil water budget is a key issue for assessing drought awareness indices based on soil moisture estimation. The aim of the study is to compare drought indices based on rainfall time series to those based on soil water content time series and evapotranspiration time series. To this end, a vertically averaged water budget over the root zone is implemented to assist the estimation of evapotranspiration flux. A daily time step is adopted to run the water budget model for a lumped watershed of 250 km2 under arid climate where recorded meteorological and hydrological data are available for a ten year period. The water balance including 7 parameters is computed including evapotranspiration, runoff and leakage. Soil properties related parameters are derived according to pedo transfer functions while two remaining parameters are considered as data driven and are subject to calibration. The model is calibrated using daily hydro meteorological data (solar radiation, air temperature, air humidity, mean areal rainfall) as well as daily runoff records and also average annual (or regional) evapotranspiration. The latter is estimated using an empirical sub-model. A set of acceptable solutions is identified according to the values of the Nash coefficients for annual and decadal runoffs as well as the relative bias for average annual evapotranspiration. Using these acceptable solutions several drought indices are computed: SPI (standard precipitation index), SMDI (soil moisture deficit index) and ETDI (evapotranspiration deficit index). While SPI indicators are based only on monthly precipitation time series, SMDI are based on weekly mean soil water content as computed by the hydrological model. On the other hand ETDI indices are based on weekly mean potential and actual evapotranspirations as estimated by the meteorological and hydrological models. For SPI evaluation various time scales are considered from one to twelve months (SPI1, SPI3, SPI6, SPI9 and SPI12). For all

  11. Characterization of a novel filarial serine protease inhibitor, Ov-SPI-1, from Onchocerca volvulus, with potential multifunctional roles during development of the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Louise; Guiliano, David B; Oksov, Yelena; Debnath, Asim K; Liu, Jing; Williams, Steven A; Blaxter, Mark L; Lustigman, Sara

    2005-12-09

    A novel filarial serine protease inhibitor (SPI) from the human parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, Ov-SPI-1, was identified through the analysis of a molting third-stage larvae expressed sequence tag dataset. Subsequent analysis of the expressed sequence tag datasets of O. volvulus and other filariae identified four other members of this family. These proteins are related to the low molecular weight SPIs originally isolated from Ascaris suum where they are believed to protect the parasite from host intestinal proteases. The two Ov-spi transcripts are up-regulated in the molting larvae and adult stages of the development of the parasite. Recombinant Ov-SPI-1 is an active inhibitor of serine proteases, specifically elastase, chymotrypsin, and cathepsin G. Immunolocalization of the Ov-SPI proteins demonstrates that the endogenous proteins are localized to the basal layer of the cuticle of third-stage, molting third-stage, and fourth-stage larvae, the body channels and multivesicular bodies of third-stage larvae and the processed material found between the two cuticles during molting. In O. volvulus adult worms the Ov-SPI proteins are localized to the sperm and to eggshells surrounding the developing embryos. RNA interference targeting the Ov-spi genes resulted in the specific knockdown of the transcript levels of both Ov-spi-1 and Ov-spi-2, a loss of native proteins, and a significant reduction in both molting and viability of third-stage larvae. We suggest the Ov-SPI proteins play a vital role in nematode molting by controlling the activity of an endogenous serine protease(s). The localization data in adults also indicate that these inhibitors may be involved in other processes such as embryogenesis and spermatogenesis.

  12. Radiation survey ship banned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S. (Nuclear Free Zones Scotland, Glasgow (United Kingdom))

    Nuclear Free local authorities in Scotland have set up an environmental pollution survey to determine the radioactivity levels in parts of coastal Britain. The monitoring was to be carried out by a Russian research ship, the 'Akademik Boris Petrov'. However, because the ship is Russian and memories of the cold war die hard, the ship was banned from entering British waters. The ship is capable of detecting the presence of military warheads and nuclear reactions and so could be considered as a spying threat. (UK).

  13. The Masses of Supernova Remnant Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin

    2012-10-01

    One of the key constraints on the production of supernovae {SNe} is the initial mass of the stars that eventually end in these cataclysmic events. Historically it has been very difficult to obtain estimates of the masses of SN progenitors because there have only been a few dozen nearby events, only a handful of which have high-quality precursor imaging.We propose dramatically increasing the number of SNe with progenitor mass estimates by applying an exciting new technique to HST archival data in M31 and M33. Through detailed modeling of the stellar populations surrounding the location of any known SNe, we can constrain the progenitor mass. Since supernova remnants {SNRs} mark the locations of SNe for the past 20,000 years and M31 and M33 contain hundreds of these objects, detailed studies of the stellar populations at these locations will constrain the progenitor masses of potentially hundreds of events. After correlating archival HST imaging with the SNR positions, there is useful data for 137 SNRs. We have already measured the progenitor masses for 65 SNRs in M31 and plan to apply our method to 72 SNRs in M33. This proposal will fund the publication of our M31 measurements, analysis of the M33 SNRs, and public release of our photometry. Ultimately, our work will increase the existing sample of SN progenitor masses in the literature by a factor of 20.

  14. Characteristics and drivers of drought in Europe-a summary of the DROUGHT-R&SPI project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallaksen, Lena M.; Stagge, James H.; Stahl, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Orth, Rene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Loon, van Anne F.; Lanen, van Henny A.J.

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite to mitigate the wide range of drought impacts is to establish a good understanding of the drought generating mechanisms from their initiation as a meteorological drought through to their development as soil moisture and hydrological drought. The DROUGHT-R&SPI project has

  15. Engineering a thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuit on SpiNNaker: a preliminary study toward modeling sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta S; Patterson, Cameron; Galluppi, Francesco; Durrant, Simon J; Furber, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of a thalamo-cortico-thalamic (TCT) implementation on SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network architecture), a brain inspired hardware platform designed to incorporate the inherent biological properties of parallelism, fault tolerance and energy efficiency. These attributes make SpiNNaker an ideal platform for simulating biologically plausible computational models. Our focus in this work is to design a TCT framework that can be simulated on SpiNNaker to mimic dynamical behavior similar to Electroencephalogram (EEG) time and power-spectra signatures in sleep-wake transition. The scale of the model is minimized for simplicity in this proof-of-concept study; thus the total number of spiking neurons is ≈1000 and represents a "mini-column" of the thalamocortical tissue. All data on model structure, synaptic layout and parameters is inspired from previous studies and abstracted at a level that is appropriate to the aims of the current study as well as computationally suitable for model simulation on a small 4-chip SpiNNaker system. The initial results from selective deletion of synaptic connectivity parameters in the model show similarity with EEG power spectra characteristics of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide a positive perspective and a basis for future implementation of a very large scale biologically plausible model of thalamo-cortico-thalamic interactivity-the essential brain circuit that regulates the biological sleep-wake cycle and associated EEG rhythms.

  16. Engineering a thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuit on SpiNNaker: a preliminary study towards modelling sleep and wakefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a preliminary study of a thalamo-cortico-thalamic (TCT implementation on SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network architecture, a brain inspired hardware platform designed to incorporate the inherent biological properties of parallelism, fault tolerance and energy efficiency. These attributes make SpiNNaker an ideal platform for simulating biologically plausible computational models. Our focus in this work is to design a TCT framework that can be simulated on SpiNNaker to mimic dynamical behaviour similar to Electroencephalogram (EEG time and power-spectra signatures in sleep-wake transition. The scale of the model is minimised for simplicity in this proof-of-concept study; thus the total number of spiking neurons is approximately 1000 and represents a `mini-column' of the thalamocortical tissue. All data on model structure, synaptic layout and parameters is inspired from previous studies and abstracted at a level that is appropriate to the aims of the current study as well as computationally suitable for model simulation on a small 4-chip SpiNNaker system. The initial results from selective deletion of synaptic connectivity parameters in the model show similarity with EEG time series characteristics of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide a positive perspective and a basis for future implementation of a very large scale biologically plausible model of thalamo-cortico-thalamic interactivity---the essential brain circuit that regulates the biological sleep-wake cycle and associated EEG rhythms.

  17. Crystallization of a Nonclassical Kazal-type Carcinoscorpius Rotundicauda Serine Protease Inhibitor, CrSPI-1, Complexed with Subtilisin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulsidas, S.; Thangamani, S; Ho, B; Sivaraman, J; Ding, J

    2009-01-01

    Serine proteases play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. The innate immune system is known to respond to invading pathogens in a nonspecific manner. The serine protease cascade is an essential component of the innate immune system of the horseshoe crab. The serine protease inhibitor CrSPI isoform 1 (CrSPI-1), a unique nonclassical Kazal-type inhibitor of molecular weight 9.3 kDa, was identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. It potently inhibits subtilisin and constitutes a powerful innate immune defence against invading microbes. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and cocrystallization of CrSPI-1 with subtilisin are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom}resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.8, b = 65.0, c = 111.9 {angstrom}, {beta} = 95.4. The Matthews coefficient (VM = 2.64 {angstrom}3 Da-1, corresponding to 53% solvent content) and analysis of the preliminary structure solution indicated the presence of one heterotrimer (1:2 ratio of CrSPI-1:subtilisin) and one free subtilisin molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  18. Supernova progenitors, their variability and the Type IIP Supernova ASASSN-16fq in M66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.; Fraser, M.; Adams, S. M.; Sukhbold, T.; Prieto, J. L.; Müller, T.; Bock, G.; Brown, J. S.; Dong, Subo; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Khan, R.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-05-01

    We identify a pre-explosion counterpart to the nearby Type IIP supernova ASASSN-16fq (SN 2016cok) in archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The source appears to be a blend of several stars that prevents obtaining accurate photometry. However, with reasonable assumptions about the stellar temperature and extinction, the progenitor almost certainly had an initial mass M* ≲ 17 M⊙, and was most likely in the mass range of M* = 8-12 M⊙. Observations once ASASSN-16fq has faded will have no difficulty accurately determining the properties of the progenitor. In 8 yr of Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) data, no significant progenitor variability is detected to rms limits of roughly 0.03 mag. Of the six nearby supernova (SN) with constraints on the low-level variability, SN 1987A, SN 1993J, SN 2008cn, SN 2011dh, SN 2013ej and ASASSN-16fq, only the slowly fading progenitor of SN 2011dh showed clear evidence of variability. Excluding SN 1987A, the 90 per cent confidence limit implied by these sources on the number of outbursts over the last decade before the SN that last longer than 0.1 yr (full width at half-maximum) and are brighter than MR < -8 mag is approximately Nout ≲ 3. Our continuing LBT monitoring programme will steadily improve constraints on pre-SN progenitor variability at amplitudes far lower than achievable by SN surveys.

  19. Temporal spying and concealing process in fibre-optic data transmission systems through polarization bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, P. Y.; Guasoni, M.; Morin, P.; Sugny, D.; Picozzi, A.; Jauslin, H. R.; Pitois, S.; Fatome, J.

    2014-08-01

    Recent research has been focused on the ability to manipulate a light beam in such a way to hide, namely to cloak, an event over a finite time or localization in space. The main idea is to create a hole or a gap in the spatial or time domain so as to allow for an object or data to be kept hidden for a while and then to be restored. By enlarging the field of applications of this concept to telecommunications, researchers have recently reported the possibility to hide transmitted data in an optical fibre. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of perpetual temporal spying and blinding process of optical data in fibre-optic transmission line based on polarization bypass. We successfully characterize the performance of our system by alternatively copying and then concealing 100% of a 10-Gb s-1 transmitted signal.

  20. Temporal spying and concealing process in fibre-optic data transmission systems through polarization bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, P Y; Guasoni, M; Morin, P; Sugny, D; Picozzi, A; Jauslin, H R; Pitois, S; Fatome, J

    2014-08-19

    Recent research has been focused on the ability to manipulate a light beam in such a way to hide, namely to cloak, an event over a finite time or localization in space. The main idea is to create a hole or a gap in the spatial or time domain so as to allow for an object or data to be kept hidden for a while and then to be restored. By enlarging the field of applications of this concept to telecommunications, researchers have recently reported the possibility to hide transmitted data in an optical fibre. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of perpetual temporal spying and blinding process of optical data in fibre-optic transmission line based on polarization bypass. We successfully characterize the performance of our system by alternatively copying and then concealing 100% of a 10-Gb s(-1) transmitted signal.

  1. Forecasting SPEI and SPI Drought Indices Using the Integrated Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Maca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper compares forecast of drought indices based on two different models of artificial neural networks. The first model is based on feedforward multilayer perceptron, sANN, and the second one is the integrated neural network model, hANN. The analyzed drought indices are the standardized precipitation index (SPI and the standardized precipitation evaporation index (SPEI and were derived for the period of 1948–2002 on two US catchments. The meteorological and hydrological data were obtained from MOPEX experiment. The training of both neural network models was made by the adaptive version of differential evolution, JADE. The comparison of models was based on six model performance measures. The results of drought indices forecast, explained by the values of four model performance indices, show that the integrated neural network model was superior to the feedforward multilayer perceptron with one hidden layer of neurons.

  2. The measurement of various molecules of pyrolysis gas of coal by using VUV-SPI-TOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Norihiro; Nishifuji, Masayuki; Hayash, Shun-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We developed and tested a system that combines a vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-SPI-TOFMS) with a Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and used it for the simultaneous detection of the various compounds generated during the pyrolysis of coal. We characterized the performance of the system, including its limits of detection and time resolution. We also determined the various compounds that could be detected using the system. The instrument exhibited a laboratory-determined detection limit that was in the parts per billion volume (ppbv) range and a detection time of 10 s for most of the aromatic compounds generated during the pyrolysis process. In addition, using this system, it was possible to determine the correlation between the pyrolysis temperature and the various compounds generated from different types of coals during the pyrolysis process.

  3. Drought analysis using SPI index and its effects on groundwater resources in East of Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, A.; Mirbagheri, B.; Kheiri, A.

    2010-09-01

    Drought is universally acknowledged as a phenomenon associated with scarcity of water. Drought varies with regard to the time of occurrence, duration, intensity, and extent of the area affected from year to year. Ground water, which is found in aquifers below the surface of the Earth, is one of the Nation's most important natural resources. Droughts, seasonal variations in rainfall, and pumping affect the height of the underground water levels. The overall objective of this study is to apply a quantitative index namely SPI (Standardized Precipitation Index) to measure the drought conditions in the east region of Kermanshah, Iran during the last 30 years. To do this, different indices were considered to determine the drought conditions such as the longest period of drought, the number of months faced to drought and total drought magnitudes(DM). To evaluate the likely effects of drought on groundwater resources, first the relationship between them was shown graphically and then the correlation was calculated. The results of the research indicated that, among all mentioned indices, total drought magnitudes is a better index showing the drought condition in the region. The results on drought effects on groundwater resources using the correlation coefficient also showed that the droughts will have significant effect on ground water discharge. An analysis of the distribution of droughts showed that for droughts with short periods, the deficit in the groundwater discharge is smaller than in the recharge. While for droughts with long periods, the deficit in the groundwater discharge is larger than in the recharge. Key words: Drought Magnitude, SPI, Groundwater, Kermanshah

  4. Mast cell progenitor trafficking and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Jenny; Gurish, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are derived from the hematopoietic progenitors found in bone marrow and spleen. Committed mast cell progenitors are rare in bone marrow suggesting they are rapidly released into the blood where they circulate and move out into the peripheral tissues. This migration is controlled in a tissue specific manner. Basal trafficking to the intestine requires expression of α4β7 integrin and the chemokine receptor CXCR2 by the mast cell progenitors and expression of MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the intestinal endothelium; and is also controlled by dendritic cells expressing the transcriptional regulatory protein T-bet. None of these play a role in basal trafficking to the lung. With the induction of allergic inflammation in the lung, there is marked recruitment of committed mast cell progenitors to lung and these cells must express α4β7 and α4β1 integrins. Within the lung there is a requirement for expression of VCAM-1 on the endothelium that is regulated by CXCR2, also expressed on the endothelium. There is a further requirement for expression of the CCR2/CCL2 pathways for full recruitment of the mast cell progenitors to the antigen-inflamed lung.

  5. Multipotent progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Benjamin P J; Ferre, François C; Couty, Ludovic; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Gourven, Murielle; Naveau, Adrien; Coulomb, Bernard; Lafont, Antoine; Gogly, Bruno

    2010-09-01

    The gum has an exceptional capacity for healing. To examine the basis for this property and explore the potential of conferring it to organs with inferior healing capacity, we sought the presence of progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue. Colony-forming units of fibroblast-enriched cells from gingival fibroblast cultures were assessed for expression of membrane markers of mesenchymal stem cells; capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, and adipocytes; and engraftment efficiency after in vivo transfer. On the basis of their ability to differentiate into several lineages, proliferate from single cells, induce calcium deposits, and secrete collagen in vivo after transfer on hydroxyapatite carriers, we suggest that this population represents gingival multipotent progenitor cells. The discovery of progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue may help improve our understanding of how the wounded gum is capable of almost perfect healing and opens the prospect of cellular therapy for wound healing using readily available cells at limited risk to the patient.

  6. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  7. SN Ia archaeology: Searching for the relics of progenitors past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Tyrone E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Rest, Armin

    2016-06-01

    Despite the critical role that SNe Ia play in the chemical enrichment of the Universe and their great importance in measuring cosmological distances, we still don't know for certain how they arise. In the canonical form of the ``single-degenerate'' scenario, a white dwarf grows through the nuclear burning of matter accreted at its surface from some companion star. This renders it a hot, luminous object (a supersoft X-ray source or SSS, 10^5-10^6K, 10^{38} erg/s) for up to a million years prior to explosion. Past efforts to directly detect the progenitors of very recent, nearby SNe Ia in archival soft X-ray images have produced only upper limits, and are only constraining assuming progenitors with much higher temperatures than known SSSs. In this talk, I will outline an alternative approach: given that such objects should be strong sources of ionizing radiation, one may instead search the environment surrounding nearby SN Ia remnants for interstellar matter ionized by the progenitor. Such fossil nebulae should extend out to tens of parsecs and linger for roughly the recombination timescale in the ISM, of order 10,000 — 100,000 years. Progress on this front has been hampered by the failure to detect nebulae surrounding most known SSSs using 1m class telescopes in the early 1990s. I will present new benchmark calculations for the emission-line nebulae expected to surround such objects, demonstrating that previous non-detections are entirely consistent with the low ISM densities expected in the vicinity of most SN Ia progenitors (Woods & Gilfanov, 2016). Modern large optical telescopes are now well able to reach the required limiting surface brightness needed to find such faint emission. With this in mind, I will introduce our new narrow-band survey for fossil nebulae surrounding young Magellanic SN Ia remnants and SSSs, already underway using the Magellan Baade telescope (PI: Alejandro Clocchiatti). In addition to opening a new era of SN Ia archaeology, I will show

  8. INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEM-X observations of LVT151012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, V.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Chenevez, J.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Diehl, R.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; von Kienlin, A.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Lutovinov, A.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Natalucci, L.; Roques, J. P.; Siegert, T.; Sunyaev, R.; Ubertini, P.

    2017-07-01

    During the first observing run of LIGO, two gravitational wave events and one lower-significance trigger (LVT151012) were reported by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. At the time of LVT151012, the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) was pointing at a region of the sky coincident with the high localization probability area of the event and thus permitted us to search for its electromagnetic counterpart (both prompt and afterglow emission). The imaging instruments on board INTEGRAL (IBIS/ISGRI, IBIS/PICsIT, SPI, and the two JEM-X modules) have been exploited to attempt the detection of any electromagnetic emission associated with LVT151012 over three decades in energy (from 3 keV to 8 MeV). The omni-directional instruments on board the satellite, i.e., the SPI-ACS and the IBIS/Veto, complemented the capabilities of the IBIS/ISGRI and IBIS/PICsIT for detections outside their imaging field of view in order to provide an efficient monitoring of the entire LVT151012 localization region at energies above 75 keV. We did not find any significant transient source that was spatially and/or temporally coincident with LVT151012, obtaining tight upper limits on the associated hard X-ray and γ-ray radiation. For typical spectral models, the upper limits on the fluence of the emission from any 1 s counterpart of LVT151012 ranges from Fγ = 3.5 × 10-8 erg cm-2 (20-200 keV), within the field of view of the imaging instruments, to Fγ = 7.1 × 10-7 erg cm-2 (75-2000 keV), considering the least favorable location of the counterpart for a detection by the omni-directional instruments. These results can be interpreted as a tight constraint on the ratio of the isotropic equivalent energy released in the electromagnetic emission to the total energy of the gravitational waves: E75-2000 keV/EGWinstruments on board INTEGRAL to hunt for γ-ray counterparts of gravitational wave events, exploiting both serendipitousand pointed follow-up observations. This will serve as a

  9. Protocol for CONSORT-SPI: an extension for social and psychological interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining the effectiveness of social and psychological interventions is important for improving individual and population health. Such interventions are complex and, where possible, are best evaluated by randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The use of research findings in policy and practice decision making is hindered by poor reporting of RCTs. Poor reporting limits the ability to replicate interventions, synthesise evidence in systematic reviews, and utilise findings for evidence-based policy and practice. The lack of guidance for reporting the specific methodological features of complex intervention RCTs contributes to poor reporting. We aim to develop an extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement for Social and Psychological Interventions (CONSORT-SPI). Methods/design This research project will be conducted in five phases. The first phase was the project launch, which consisted of the establishment of a Project Executive and International Advisory Group, and recruitment of journal editors and the CONSORT Group. The second phase involves a Delphi process that will generate a list of possible items to include in the CONSORT Extension. Next, there will be a formal consensus meeting to select the reporting items to add to, or modify for, the CONSORT-SPI Extension. Fourth, guideline documents will be written, including an explanation and elaboration (E&E) document that will provide detailed advice for each item and examples of good reporting. The final phase will comprise guideline dissemination, with simultaneous publication and endorsement of the guideline in multiple journals, endorsement by funding agencies, presentations at conferences and other meetings, and a dedicated website that will facilitate feedback about the guideline. Conclusion As demonstrated by previous CONSORT guidelines, the development of an evidence-based reporting guideline for social and psychological intervention RCTs should improve the accuracy

  10. The effect of cell growth phase on the regulatory cross-talk between flagellar and Spi1 virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouslim, Chakib; Hughes, Kelly T

    2014-03-01

    The flagellar regulon controls Salmonella biofilm formation, virulence gene expression and the production of the major surface antigen present on the cell surface: flagellin. At the top of a flagellar regulatory hierarchy is the master operon, flhDC, which encodes the FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional complex required for the expression of flagellar, chemotaxis and Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (Spi1) genes. Of six potential transcriptional start-sites within the flhDC promoter region, only two, P1(flhDC) and P5(flhDC), were functional in a wild-type background, while P6(flhDC) was functional in the absence of CRP. These promoters are transcribed differentially to control either flagellar or Spi1 virulent gene expression at different stages of cell growth. Transcription from P1(flhDC) initiates flagellar assembly and a negative autoregulatory loop through FlhD₄C₂-dependent transcription of the rflM gene, which encodes a repressor of flhDC transcription. Transcription from P1(flhDC) also initiates transcription of the Spi1 regulatory gene, hilD, whose product, in addition to activating Spi1 genes, also activates transcription of the flhDC P5 promoter later in the cell growth phase. The regulators of flhDC transcription (RcsB, LrhA, RflM, HilD, SlyA and RtsB) also exert their control at different stages of the cell growth phase and are also subjected to cell growth phase control. This dynamic of flhDC transcription separates the roles of FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional activation into an early cell growth phase role for flagellar production from a late cell growth phase role in virulence gene expression.

  11. Measuring absolute spin polarization in dissolution-DNP by Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Chappuis, Quentin; Bornet, Aurélien; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization at 1.2 K and 6.7 T allows one to achieve spin temperatures on the order of a few millikelvin, so that the high-temperature approximation (ΔEPolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR), is illustrated for various pairs of (13)C spins (I, S) in acetate and pyruvate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, Cindy Johanna Maria

    2007-01-01

    Postnatally, Endothelial Progenitor Cells are needed to maintain the integrity of the endothelium (re-endothelialization) and to augment wound healing or vascularize hypoxic areas (neovascularization). Complex networks of different signals and regulators have been identified to be involved in these

  13. Binary progenitor models of type IIb supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claeys, J.S.W.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326158707; de Mink, S.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833231; Pols, O.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111811155; Eldridge, J.J.; Baes, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824739

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars that lose their hydrogen-rich envelope down to a few tenths of a solar mass explode as extended type IIb supernovae, an intriguing subtype that links the hydrogen-rich type II supernovae with the hydrogen-poor type Ib and Ic. The progenitors may be very massive single stars that lose

  14. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  15. Cataclysmic Variables as Supernova Ia Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Kafka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the identification of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNeIa remains controversial, it is generally accepted that they originate from binary star systems in which at least one component is a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD; those systems are grouped under the wide umbrella of cataclysmic variables. Current theories for SNeIa progenitors hold that, either via Roche lobe overflow of the companion or via a wind, the WD accumulates hydrogen or helium rich material which is then burned to C and O onto the WD’s surface. However, the specifics of this scenario are far from being understood or defined, allowing for a wealth of theories fighting for attention and a dearth of observations to support them. I discuss the latest attempts to identify and study those controversial SNeIa progenitors. I also introduce the most promising progenitor in hand and I present observational diagnostics that can reveal more members of the category.

  16. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Pulecio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41+, display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  17. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  18. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, Box 351580, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zachjenn@uw.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  19. In silico clustering of Salmonella global gene expression data reveals novel genes co-regulated with the SPI-1 virulence genes through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Sánchez-Pérez, Mishael; Paredes, Claudia C; Collado-Vides, Julio; Salgado, Heladia; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-11-25

    A wide variety of Salmonella enterica serovars cause intestinal and systemic infections to humans and animals. Salmonella Patogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) is a chromosomal region containing 39 genes that have crucial virulence roles. The AraC-like transcriptional regulator HilD, encoded in SPI-1, positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as of several other virulence genes located outside SPI-1. In this study, we applied a clustering method to the global gene expression data of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium from the COLOMBOS database; thus genes that show an expression pattern similar to that of SPI-1 genes were selected. This analysis revealed nine novel genes that are co-expressed with SPI-1, which are located in different chromosomal regions. Expression analyses and protein-DNA interaction assays showed regulation by HilD for six of these genes: gtgE, phoH, sinR, SL1263 (lpxR) and SL4247 were regulated directly, whereas SL1896 was regulated indirectly. Interestingly, phoH is an ancestral gene conserved in most of bacteria, whereas the other genes show characteristics of genes acquired by Salmonella. A role in virulence has been previously demonstrated for gtgE, lpxR and sinR. Our results further expand the regulon of HilD and thus identify novel possible Salmonella virulence genes.

  20. Using Stochastic Spiking Neural Networks on SpiNNaker to Solve Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Guerra, Gabriel A.; Furber, Steve B.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems (CSP) are at the core of numerous scientific and technological applications. However, CSPs belong to the NP-complete complexity class, for which the existence (or not) of efficient algorithms remains a major unsolved question in computational complexity theory. In the face of this fundamental difficulty heuristics and approximation methods are used to approach instances of NP (e.g., decision and hard optimization problems). The human brain efficiently handles CSPs both in perception and behavior using spiking neural networks (SNNs), and recent studies have demonstrated that the noise embedded within an SNN can be used as a computational resource to solve CSPs. Here, we provide a software framework for the implementation of such noisy neural solvers on the SpiNNaker massively parallel neuromorphic hardware, further demonstrating their potential to implement a stochastic search that solves instances of P and NP problems expressed as CSPs. This facilitates the exploration of new optimization strategies and the understanding of the computational abilities of SNNs. We demonstrate the basic principles of the framework by solving difficult instances of the Sudoku puzzle and of the map color problem, and explore its application to spin glasses. The solver works as a stochastic dynamical system, which is attracted by the configuration that solves the CSP. The noise allows an optimal exploration of the space of configurations, looking for the satisfiability of all the constraints; if applied discontinuously, it can also force the system to leap to a new random configuration effectively causing a restart.

  1. Using Stochastic Spiking Neural Networks on SpiNNaker to Solve Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. Fonseca Guerra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Constraint satisfaction problems (CSP are at the core of numerous scientific and technological applications. However, CSPs belong to the NP-complete complexity class, for which the existence (or not of efficient algorithms remains a major unsolved question in computational complexity theory. In the face of this fundamental difficulty heuristics and approximation methods are used to approach instances of NP (e.g., decision and hard optimization problems. The human brain efficiently handles CSPs both in perception and behavior using spiking neural networks (SNNs, and recent studies have demonstrated that the noise embedded within an SNN can be used as a computational resource to solve CSPs. Here, we provide a software framework for the implementation of such noisy neural solvers on the SpiNNaker massively parallel neuromorphic hardware, further demonstrating their potential to implement a stochastic search that solves instances of P and NP problems expressed as CSPs. This facilitates the exploration of new optimization strategies and the understanding of the computational abilities of SNNs. We demonstrate the basic principles of the framework by solving difficult instances of the Sudoku puzzle and of the map color problem, and explore its application to spin glasses. The solver works as a stochastic dynamical system, which is attracted by the configuration that solves the CSP. The noise allows an optimal exploration of the space of configurations, looking for the satisfiability of all the constraints; if applied discontinuously, it can also force the system to leap to a new random configuration effectively causing a restart.

  2. Timing Analysis of V404 Cyg during Its Brightest Outburst with INTEGRAL/SPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodi, J.; Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    The outburst of V404 Cyg during the summer of 2015 reached unparalleled intensities at X-ray and soft gamma-ray energies with fluxes > 50 Crab in the 20-50 keV energy band. To date, studies in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray energy domain have focused primarily on the energy spectra. In this work, a timing analysis has been performed with INTEGRAL/SPI data in the 20-300 keV energy range for INTEGRAL revolution 1557, which corresponds to the brightest flare of V404 Cyg (on 2015 June 26). The power spectra are fit with broken power-law and multi-Lorentzian models and compared with previously reported results of V404 Cyg flaring activity from 1989 and 2015. Also, we took advantage of the good signal-to-noise ratio obtained above 70 keV to quantify the timing/fast-variability properties of the source as a function of energy. We then point out similarities of V404 Cyg with the black hole transient V4641 Sgr. Like V4641 Sgr, we found that the power spectra of V404 Cyg during high flux periods did not possess the expected flat-top feature typically seen in a hard spectral state. Interpretations are proposed in the framework of the fluctuating-propagation model to explain the observed properties.

  3. jSPyDB, an open source database-independent tool for data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Cavallari, Francesca; Di Guida, Salvatore; Innocente, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays, the number of commercial tools available for accessing Databases, built on Java or .Net, is increasing. However, many of these applications have several drawbacks: usually they are not open-source, they provide interfaces only with a specific kind of database, they are platform-dependent and very CPU and memory consuming. jSPyDB is a free web-based tool written using Python and Javascript. It relies on jQuery and python libraries, and is intended to provide a simple handler to different database technologies inside a local web browser. Such a tool, exploiting fast access libraries such as SQLAlchemy, is easy to install, and to configure. The design of this tool envisages three layers. The front-end client side in the local web browser communicates with a backend server. Only the server is able to connect to the different databases for the purposes of performing data definition and manipulation. The server makes the data available to the client, so that the user can display and handle them safely. Moreover, thanks to jQuery libraries, this tool supports export of data in different formats, such as XML and JSON. Finally, by using a set of pre-defined functions, users are allowed to create their customized views for a better data visualization. In this way, we optimize the performance of database servers by avoiding short connections and concurrent sessions. In addition, security is enforced since we do not provide users the possibility to directly execute any SQL statement.

  4. jSPyDB, an open source database-independent tool for data management

    CERN Document Server

    Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the number of commercial tools available for accessing Databases, built on Java or .Net, is increasing. However, many of these applications have several drawbacks: usually they are not open-source, they provide interfaces only with a specific kind of database, they are platform-dependent and very CPU and memory consuming. jSPyDB is a free web based tool written using Python and Javascript. It relies on jQuery and python libraries, and is intended to provide a simple handler to different Database technologies inside a local web browser. Such a tool, exploiting fast access libraries such as SQLAlchemy, is easy to install, and to configure. The design of this tool envisages three layers. The front-end client side in the local web browser communicates with a backend server. Only the server is able to connect to the different databases for the purposes of performing data definition and manipulation. The server makes the data available to the client, so that the user can display and handle them safely. ...

  5. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  6. Droughts in a warming climate: A global assessment of Standardized precipitation index (SPI) and Reconnaissance drought index (RDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi Zarch, Mohammad Amin; Sivakumar, Bellie; Sharma, Ashish

    2015-07-01

    Both drought and aridity indicate imbalance in water availability. While drought is a natural temporal hazard, aridity is a constant climatic feature. This paper investigates the changes in drought characteristics across different aridity zones with and without consideration of potential evapotranspiration (PET), as a means to better assess drought in a warming climate. Two drought indexes are employed: (1) Standardized precipitation index (SPI), which is solely based on precipitation; and (2) Reconnaissance drought index (RDI), which, in addition to precipitation, takes PET into account. The two indexes are first employed to observed precipitation and PET data for the period 1960-2009 from the CRU (Climate Research Unit, University of East Anglia) TS 3.1 database. The results indicate that although all the aridity zones experience both downward and upward drought trends, no significant trend is found over large parts of the zones. However, the agreement between SPI and RDI reduces from the hyper-arid zone on one extreme toward the humid zone on the other. In the three more humid zones (i.e. semi-arid, sub-humid, and humid), the indexes exhibit different trends, with RDI showing more decreasing trends (i.e. becoming drier). While SPI generally shows more drought prone areas than RDI for the pre-1998 period, the opposite is observed for the post-1998 period. Given the known changes to PET in observed records, and also expected increases as global warming intensifies, these results suggest that RDI will be consistently different to the SPI as global warming intensifies. This hypothesis is further tested for historic and future climate projections from the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia) Mk3.6 global climate model (GCM), with use of the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways). In this case, PET is calculated using FAO56-PM model for assessment of

  7. CLUES to the past: Local Group progenitors amongst high-redshift Lyman break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Pratika; Libeskind, Noam I.; Dunlop, James S.

    2013-06-01

    We use state-of-the-art numerical simulations to explore the observability and the expected physical properties of the progenitors of the Local Group galaxies at z ≃ 6-8, within 1 billion years of the big bang. We find that the most massive progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) at z ≃ 6 and 7 are predicted to have absolute ultraviolet (UV) continuum magnitudes MUV ≃ -17 to -18, suggesting that their analogues lie close to the detection limits of the deepest near-infrared (IR) surveys conducted to date [i.e. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3/IR Ultra Deep Field (UDF)12]. This in turn confirms that the majority of currently known z ≃ 6-8 galaxies are expected to be the seeds of present-day galaxies which are more massive than L* spirals. We also discuss the properties of the Local Group progenitors at these early epochs, extending down to absolute magnitudes MUV ≃ -13. The most massive MW/M31 progenitors at z ≃ 7 have stellar masses M* ≃ 107.5-8 M⊙, stellar metallicities Z* ˜ 3-6 per cent Z⊙, and predicted observed UV continuum slopes β ≃ -2.4 to -2.5.

  8. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  9. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    The objective of this research grant was to develop an approach for labeling progenitor cells, specifically those that we had identified as being able to replace ischemic heart cells, so that the distribution could be followed non-invasively. In addition, the research was aimed at determining whether administration of progenitor cells resulted in improved myocardial perfusion and function. The efficiency and toxicity of radiolabeling of progenitor cells was to be evaluated. For the proposed clinical protocol, subjects with end-stage ischemic coronary artery disease were to undergo a screening cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan using N-13 ammonia to delineate myocardial perfusion and function. If they qualified based on their PET scan, they would undergo an in-hospital protocol whereby CD34+ cells were stimulated by the administration of granulocytes-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD34+ cells would then be isolated by apharesis, and labeled with indium-111 oxine. Cells were to be re-infused and subjects were to undergo single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning to evaluate uptake and distribution of labeled progenitor cells. Three months after administration of progenitor cells, a cardiac PET scan was to be repeated to evaluate changes in myocardial perfusion and/or function. Indium oxine is a radiopharmaceutical for labeling of autologous lymphocytes. Indium-111 (In-111) decays by electron capture with a t{sub ½} of 67.2 hours (2.8 days). Indium forms a saturated complex that is neutral, lipid soluble, and permeates the cell membrane. Within the cell, the indium-oxyquinolone complex labels via indium intracellular chelation. Following leukocyte labeling, ~77% of the In-111 is incorporated in the cell pellet. The presence of red cells and /or plasma reduces the labeling efficacy. Therefore, the product needed to be washed to eliminate plasma proteins. This repeated washing can damage cells. The CD34 selected product was a 90

  10. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  11. The heavy metals content in wild growing mushrooms from burdened Spiš area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Slávik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we evaluated the rate of entry of heavy metals into the edible parts of wild mushrooms, from central Spiš area. The area is characterized by extremely high content of heavy metals particularly mercury in abiotic and biotic components of ecosystems. The toxicity of heavy metals is well known and described. Known is also the ability of fungi to accumulate contaminants from substrates in which mushrooms grow. We have collected commonly consumed species of mushrooms (Russula vesca., Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon pyriforme, Lecinum piceinum, Boletus reticulatus. Sampling was conducted for two years 2012 and 2013. The samples taken mushrooms and substrates on which to grow, we determined heavy metal content (Cd, Pb, Cu, including total mercury content modified by atomic absorption spectrometry (AMA - 254. In the substrate, we determined the humus content and pH value. The heavy metal content in soils were evaluated according to Law no. 220/2004 Z.z The exceedance limit values of Cd, Pb, Cu and Hg was recorded. Most significantly the respective limit was recorded in soil samples in the case of mercury. The determined concentration Hg was 39.01 mg.kg-1. From the results, we evaluated the degree of ability to bioaccumulate heavy metals different kinds of fungi. We also evaluated the health safety of the consumption of these fungi on the comparison with the limit values provided in the food code of SR. We recorded a high rate of accumulation of mercury in the species Boletus reticulatus and Macrolepiota procera. For these types we recorded the most significant than allowed concentrations of mercury in mushrooms. The highest recorded concentration reached 17.64 mg.kg-1 Hg in fresh matter. The limit value was exceeded also in the case of copper. We do not recommend to increased consumption of wild mushrooms in the reference area.

  12. Quantifying ice loss in the eastern Himalayas since 1974 using declassified spy satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Maurer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Himalayan glaciers are important natural resources and climate indicators for densely populated regions in Asia. Remote sensing methods are vital for evaluating glacier response to changing climate over the vast and rugged Himalayan region, yet many platforms capable of glacier mass balance quantification are somewhat temporally limited due to typical glacier response times. We here rely on declassified spy satellite imagery and ASTER data to quantify surface lowering, ice volume change, and geodetic mass balance during 1974–2006 for glaciers in the eastern Himalayas, centered on the Bhutan–China border. The wide range of glacier types allows for the first mass balance comparison between clean, debris, and lake-terminating (calving glaciers in the region. Measured glaciers show significant ice loss, with an estimated mean annual geodetic mass balance of −0.13 ± 0.06 m w.e. yr−1 (meters of water equivalent per year for 10 clean-ice glaciers, −0.19 ± 0.11 m w.e. yr−1 for 5 debris-covered glaciers, −0.28 ± 0.10 m w.e. yr−1 for 6 calving glaciers, and −0.17 ± 0.05 m w.e. yr−1 for all glaciers combined. Contrasting hypsometries along with melt pond, ice cliff, and englacial conduit mechanisms result in statistically similar mass balance values for both clean-ice and debris-covered glacier groups. Calving glaciers comprise 18 % (66 km2 of the glacierized area yet have contributed 30 % (−0.7 km3 to the total ice volume loss, highlighting the growing relevance of proglacial lake formation and associated calving for the future ice mass budget of the Himalayas as the number and size of glacial lakes increase.

  13. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS, SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between E and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.

  14. Pre-supernova properties of progenitors detected by HST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-08-01

    HST has provided essential data on the connection between core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and their massive star progenitors, both through precise post-explosion localization of nearby SNe, and by identification of progenitor stars in pre-explosion HST images. However, mounting evidence suggests that many SN progenitors exhibit outbursts and/or enhanced mass loss in the years preceding the SN, potentially affecting the progenitor properties measured by HST. Inferring progenitor characteristics such as stellar mass thus requires a better theoretical understanding of the pre-SN stellar evolution. A compelling mechanism for pre-SN outbursts is energy transport via gravity/acoustic waves within massive star SN progenitors. We propose to quantify the observable effects of wave-driven outbursts and mass loss in the final years of massive star lives using stellar evolution calculations incorporating wave energy transport. Our models will make predictions for progenitor luminosity in HST bands as a function of stellar mass and time before SN explosion. We will also model the SN light curves and spectra of stars with wave energy transport, which we can compare with SN observations to assert whether wave heating operated in the progenitors detected by HST. We will then revisit the interpretation of HST progenitor data and make predictions for future SN progenitor detections by HST.

  15. Could Cancer Initiate From Bone Marrow Progenitors?

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Nasr, Hmed; Hammami, Serria Turky; Zeghal, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Background Defining cancer stem cells and their origins is of much controversy,and constitutes a challenged knockout for cell targeting- anticancer drugs. Herein,we put forward a hypothetic model for cancer stem cells initiation from bone marrow stem cells. These later, will differentiate into an ancestral progenitor that activates a memorial program - the black box cassette- that is responsible of abnormal neo-organogenesis in the form of tumors and metastases. To approve this model, we assu...

  16. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Seasonal streamflow forecasting: experiences with precipitation bias correction and SPI conditioning to improve performance for hydrological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M. H.; Crochemore, L.; Pappenberger, F.; Perrin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Many fields such as drought risk assessment or reservoir management can benefit from seasonal streamflow forecasts. This study presents the results of two analyses aiming to: 1) assess the skill of seasonal precipitation forecasts in France and provide insights into the way bias correcting precipitation forecasts can improve the skill of streamflow forecasts at extended lead times, and 2) evaluate how the conditioning of historical data based on the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) from bias-corrected GCM precipitation forecasts can be useful to select traces within the historical data and further improve the forecast of droughts. We evaluated several bias correction approaches and conditioned precipitation scenarios in sixteen catchments in France, with the help of ECMWF System 4 seasonal precipitation forecasts and the GR6J hydrological model. The results show that, in most catchments, raw seasonal precipitation and streamflow forecasts are often sharper than the conventional ESP method. However, they are not significantly better in terms of reliability. Forecast skill is generally improved when applying bias correction. The simple linear scaling of monthly values contributed mainly to increase forecast sharpness and accuracy, while the empirical distribution mapping of daily values was successful in improving forecast reliability. Our results also show that conditioning past observations based on the three-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI3) can improve the sharpness of ensemble forecasts based on historical data, while maintaining good reliability. An evaluation of forecast ensembles for low-flow forecasting showed that the SPI3-conditioned ensembles provided reliable forecasts of low-flow duration and deficit volume based on the 80th exceedance percentile. Drought risk forecasting is illustrated for the 2003 drought event.

  18. A comparative study of physicochemical characteristics and functionalities of pinto bean protein isolate (PBPI) against the soybean protein isolate (SPI) after the extraction optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ee-San; Ying-Yuan, Ngoh; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Optimisation of protein extraction yield from pinto bean was investigated using response surface methodology. The maximum protein yield of 54.8 mg/g was obtained with the optimal conditions of: temperature=25 °C, time=1 h and buffer-to-sample ratio=20 ml/g. PBPI was found to obtain high amount of essential amino acids such as leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine compared to SPI. The predominant proteins of PBPI were vicilin and phytohemagglutinins whereas the predominant proteins of SPI were glycinin and conglycinins. Significantly higher emulsifying capacity was found in PBPI (84.8%) compared to SPI (61.9%). Different isoelectric points were found in both PBPI (4.0-5.5) and SPI (4.0-5.0). Also, it was found that PBPI obtained a much higher denaturation temperature of 110.2 °C compared to SPI (92.5 °C). Other properties such as structural information, gelling capacity, water- and oil-holding capacities, emulsion stability as well as digestibility were also reported. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Virulence determinants of Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum identified by PCR signature-tagged mutagenesis and the spiC mutant as a candidate live attenuated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang

    2014-01-31

    Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum) is the causative agent of pullorum disease (PD) in chickens which results in considerable economic losses to the poultry industries in developing countries. PCR-Signature Tagged Mutagenesis was used to identify virulence determinants of S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and novel attenuated live vaccine candidates for use against this disease. A library of 1800 signature-tagged S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum mutants was constructed and screened for virulence-associated genes in chickens. The attenuation of 10 mutants was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro competitive index (CI) studies. The transposons were found to be located in SPI-1 (2/10 mutants), SPI-2 (3/10), the virulence plasmid (1/10) and non-SPI genes (4/10). One highly attenuated spiC mutant persisted in spleen and liver for less than 10 days and induced high levels of circulating antibody and protective immunity against oral challenge in young broiler chickens. The spiC mutant is a potential new vaccine candidate for use with chickens against this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Constraints on axino warm dark matter from X-ray observation at the Chandra telescope and SPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Paramita [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Roy, Sourov [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Vempati, Sudhir K., E-mail: paramita@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: biswarup@hri.res.in, E-mail: tpsr@iacs.res.in, E-mail: vempati@cts.iisc.ernet.in [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2012-05-01

    A sufficiently long lived warm dark matter could be a source of X-rays observed by satellite based X-ray telescopes. We consider axinos and gravitinos with masses between 1 keV and 100 keV in supersymmetric models with small R-parity violation. We show that axino dark matter receives significant constraints from X-ray observations of Chandra and SPI, especially for the lower end of the allowed range of the axino decay constant f{sub a}, while the gravitino dark matter remains unconstrained.

  1. Cyclosporine decreases vascular progenitor cell numbers after cardiac transplantation and attenuates progenitor cell growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William R; Wang, Shaohua; Oi, Keiji; Bailey, Kent R; Tazelaar, Henry D; Caplice, Noel M; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2005-11-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that the neointimal proliferation seen in cardiac allograft vasculopathy may in part derive from recipient progenitor cells. The effect of cyclosporine on these circulating progenitors in the setting of cardiac transplantation is currently unknown. Three surgical series were performed: sham operation alone, sham operation with immunosuppression, and heterotopic porcine cardiac transplantation with immunosuppression. The sham operation involved laparotomy and consecutive clamping of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava. Post-operative immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine at therapeutic levels (100-300 ng/ml) and 0.5 mg/kg methylprednisolone. Endothelial outgrowth colony numbers (EOC(CFU)) and smooth muscle outgrowth colony numbers (SOC(CFU)) were quantified weekly for 4 weeks post-operatively. A series of in vitro experiments were performed to determine the effect of cyclosporine on the differentiation, migration, and proliferation of EOCs and SOCs. In the sham alone series there were no changes to either EOC(CFU) or SOC(CFU). In the sham with immunosuppression and the transplant series, both EOC(CFU) and SOC(CFU) fell in the first 2 weeks (p Cyclosporine, even at a low dose, prevented differentiation, inhibited proliferation, and attenuated migration of both EOCs and SOCs. Immunosuppression in the setting of cardiac transplantation causes a profound reduction in circulating progenitor cells capable of differentiating into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This effect can in part be explained by the inhibitory effects of cyclosporine on progenitor growth and differentiation seen in this study.

  2. A topically-sprayable, activatable fluorescent and retaining probe, SPiDER-βGal for detecting cancer: Advantages of anchoring to cellular proteins after activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuko; Mochida, Ai; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Okuyama, Shuhei; Ogata, Fusa; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-06-13

    SPiDER-βGal is a newly-developed probe that is activated by β-galactosidase and is then retained within cells by anchoring to intracellular proteins. Previous work has focused on gGlu-HMRG, a probe activated by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, which demonstrated high sensitivity for the detection of peritoneal ovarian cancer metastases in an animal model. However, its fluorescence, after activation by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, rapidly declines over time, limiting the actual imaging window and the ability to define the border of lesions. The purpose of this study is to compare the fluorescence signal kinetics of SPiDER-βGal with that of gGlu-HMRG using ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro and ex vivo tissue imaging. In vitro removal of gGlu-HMRG resulted in a rapid decrease of fluorescence intensity followed by a more gradual decrease up to 60 min while there was a gradual increase in fluorescence up to 60 min after removal of SPiDER-βGal. This is most likely due to internalization and retention of the dye within cells. This was also confirmed ex vivo tissue imaging using a red fluorescence protein (RFP)-labeled tumor model in which the intensity of fluorescence increased gradually after activation of SPiDER-βGal. Additionally, SPiDER-βGal resulted in intense enhancement within the tumor due to the high target-to-background ratio, which extended up to 60 min after activation. In contrast, gGlu-HMRG fluorescence resulted in decreasing fluorescence over time in extracted tumors. Thus, SPiDER-βGal has the advantages of higher signal with more signal retention, resulting in improved contrast of the tumor margin and suggesting it may be an alternative to existing activatable probes.

  3. Ecological niche of Neanderthals from Spy Cave revealed by nitrogen isotopes of individual amino acids in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuichi I; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Drucker, Dorothée G; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Semal, Patrick; Wißing, Christoph; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    This study provides a refined view on the diet and ecological niche of Neanderthals. The traditional view is that Neanderthals obtained most of their dietary protein from terrestrial animals, especially from large herbivores that roamed the open landscapes. Evidence based on the conventional carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk collagen has supported this view, although recent findings based on plant remains in the tooth calculus, microwear analyses, and small game and marine animal remains from archaeological sites have raised some questions regarding this assumption. However, the lack of a protein source other than meat in the Neanderthal diet may be due to methodological difficulties in defining the isotopic composition of plants. Based on the nitrogen isotopic composition of glutamic acid and phenylalanine in collagen for Neanderthals from Spy Cave (Belgium), we show that i) there was an inter-individual dietary heterogeneity even within one archaeological site that has not been evident in bulk collagen isotopic compositions, ii) they occupied an ecological niche different from those of hyenas, and iii) they could rely on plants for up to ∼20% of their protein source. These results are consistent with the evidence found of plant consumption by the Spy Neanderthals, suggesting a broader subsistence strategy than previously considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The response of drought in Beiluo River Basin of China based on the comprehensive method of Pa, SPI and fuzzy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. P.; Liu, D. F.; Zhang, H. X.; Huang, Q.; Chang, J. X.

    2017-08-01

    The meteorological drought is threatening the agricultural economic development with the change of the climate. In order to analyze the characteristics of drought spatiotemporal change, the precipitation data of eight meteorological stations in the Beiluo River Basin of Shaanxi Province of China have been collected, and the drought index of Pa, SPI and FSE have been selected to analyze the drought in Shaanxi Province for the last 55 years. The results of Pa, SPI and FSE test show that the droughts happened in the Beiluo River Basin are 149, 215 and 203 times in the past 55 years, respectively. Overall, the Beiluo River has a tendency to dry out. The main type of drought is low-grade drought, followed by the mediumgrade drought, and the specially-grade drought happened least. The average rainfall decreases in the Beiluo River Basin from the southeast to the northwest, and the change of the number of drought is just opposite to that of precipitation trend, which increases from southeast to northwest. The results will provide the scientific basis for the monitoring, evaluation, early warning and drought relief.

  5. Breaking The Millisecond Barrier On SpiNNaker: Implementing Asynchronous Event-Based Plastic Models With Microsecond Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLagorce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms towards those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 microseconds. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented.

  6. ANALISA INDEKS DAN SEBARAN KEKERINGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE STANDARDIZED PRECIPITATION INDEX (SPI DAN GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS UNTUK PULAU LOMBOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humairo Saidah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since rainfall and surface water availability is limited, Lombok island has high risk drought. Drought causes poverty due to its close corellation to desease spread and lack of food. So it needs to recognize drought characteristic for early anticipation and adaptation. Standardized Precipitation Index is the method to be used to determine rainfall deviation from its normal depth. SPI was chosen because of its simplicity and ability to count the index of drought and figure its grade. Data for this analyses was taken from 1996-2015 of rainfall station entire Lombok Island, then the result figured out in a drought map using Arc GIS. The result of this study shows that the severest drought for annually deficit period indexed -3.25 was happened at Lingkuk Lime on 2002, then for 6 monthly deficit period indexed -4.97 happened at Sekotong on July-December 2000, afterwards  for 3 monthly deficit period indexed -4.72 happened at Loang Make on Pebruary-April 2002, later for monthly deficit period indexed -4.99 happened at Jurang Sate on January 2015.  Keywords: drought index, deficit period, SPI, Arc GIS.

  7. Investigation of Tobacco Pyrolysis Gases and Puff-by-puff Resolved Cigarette Smoke by Single Photon Ionisation (SPI - Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presented deals with the application of Single Photon Ionisation- Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS for the investigation of tobacco smoke. SPI-TOFMS is a modern analytical technique, which enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of organic species in complex gas mixtures in real time. The paper is a summary of a PhD thesis (1 and seven research articles, which were recently published in various scientific journals (2-8. Consequently, more detailed information on particular aspects can be found in there.

  8. Membrane Biophysics Define Neuron and Astrocyte Progenitors in the Neural Lineage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nourse, J.L; Prieto, J.L; Dickson, A.R; Lu, J; Pathak, M.M; Tombola, F; Demetriou, M; Lee, A.P; Flanagan, L.A

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) are heterogeneous populations of self‐renewing stem cells and more committed progenitors that differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes...

  9. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-08

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Lavik, Erin B

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs.......To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs....

  11. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Evan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature...

  12. Predicting the nature of supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H.

    2017-09-01

    Stars more massive than about 8 solar masses end their lives as a supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. The physical properties of massive stars before the SN event are very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. In this article, I briefly review recent efforts to predict the nature of stars before death, in particular, by performing coupled stellar evolution and atmosphere modelling of single stars in the pre-SN stage. These models are able to predict the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry, which can then be directly compared with the observations of core-collapse SN progenitors. The predictions for the spectral types of massive stars before death can be surprising. Depending on the initial mass and rotation, single star models indicate that massive stars die as red supergiants, yellow hypergiants, luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN and WO subtypes. I finish by assessing the detectability of SN Ibc progenitors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  13. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enter the Aging Arena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eWilliamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a significant risk factor for the development of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Although pharmacological treatments, including statins and anti-hypertensive drugs, have improved the prognosis for patients with cardiovascular disease, it remains a leading cause of mortality in those aged 65 years and over. Furthermore, given the increased life expectancy of the population in developed countries, there is a clear need for alternative treatment strategies. Consequently, the relationship between aging and progenitor cell-mediated repair is of great interest. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an integral role in the cellular repair mechanisms for endothelial regeneration and maintenance. However, EPCs are subject to age-associated changes that diminish their number in circulation and function, thereby enhancing vascular disease risk. A great deal of research is aimed at developing strategies to harness the regenerative capacity of these cells.In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the cells termed ‘EPCs’, examine the impact of age on EPC-mediated repair and identify therapeutic targets with potential for attenuating the age-related decline in vascular health via beneficial actions on EPCs.

  14. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  15. Mast cell progenitors: origin, development and migration to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells in tissues are developed from mast cell progenitors emerging from the bone marrow in a process highly regulated by transcription factors. Through the advancement of the multicolor flow cytometry technique, the mast cell progenitor population in the mouse has been characterized in terms of surface markers. However, only cell populations with enriched mast cell capability have been described in human. In naïve mice, the peripheral tissues have a constitutive pool of mast cell progenitors. Upon infections in the gut and in allergic inflammation in the lung, the local mast cell progenitor numbers increase tremendously. This review focuses on the origin and development of mast cell progenitors. Furthermore, the evidences for cells and molecules that govern the migration of these cells in mice in vivo are described. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The supernova progenitor mass distributions of M31 and M33: further evidence for an upper mass limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Weisz, Daniel R. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan [Box 351580, The University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry to measure star formation histories, we age-date the stellar populations surrounding supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 and M33. We then apply stellar evolution models to the ages to infer the corresponding masses for their supernova progenitor stars. We analyze 33 M33 SNR progenitors and 29 M31 SNR progenitors in this work. We then combine these measurements with 53 previously published M31 SNR progenitor measurements to bring our total number of progenitor mass estimates to 115. To quantify the mass distributions, we fit power laws of the form dN/dM∝M {sup –α}. Our new larger sample of M31 progenitors follows a distribution with α=4.4{sub −0.4}{sup +0.4}, and the M33 sample follows a distribution with α=3.8{sub −0.5}{sup +0.4}. Thus both samples are consistent within the uncertainties, and the full sample across both galaxies gives α=4.2{sub −0.3}{sup +0.3}. Both the individual and full distributions display a paucity of massive stars when compared to a Salpeter initial mass function, which we would expect to observe if all massive stars exploded as SN that leave behind observable SNR. If we instead fix α = 2.35 and treat the maximum mass as a free parameter, we find M {sub max} ∼ 35-45 M {sub ☉}, indicative of a potential maximum cutoff mass for SN production. Our results suggest that either SNR surveys are biased against finding objects in the youngest (<10 Myr old) regions, or the highest mass stars do not produce SNe.

  17. Results from Polish Spondyloarthritis Initiative registry (PolSPI) - methodology and data from - the first year of observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guła, Zofia; Barczyńska, Tacjana; Brzosko, Marek; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Jeka, Sławomir; Jodłowska-Cicio, Katarzyna; Kwaśny-Krochin, Beata; Leszczyński, Piotr; Lubiński, Łukasz; Łosińska, Katarzyna; Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Przepiera-Będzak, Hanna; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Schlabs, Małgorzata; Siedlar, Maciej; Sikorska, Dorota; Świerkot, Jerzy; Węgierska, Małgorzata; Wiland, Piotr; Korkosz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Report on one-year results from the Polish Spondyloarthritis Initiative registry (PolSPI), containing the cross-sectional analysis of clinical and imaging data as well as database methodology. The PolSPI registry includes patients with axial (axSpA) and peripheral (perSpA) spondyloarthritis according to ASAS classification criteria, and/or patients with ankylosing spondylitis according to modified New York criteria, psoriatic arthritis according to CASPAR criteria, arthropathy in inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, juvenile spondyloarthritis or undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. Epidemiologic data and history of signs, symptoms and treatment of spondyloarthritis are collected and assessment of disease activity is performed. Radiographic images of sacroiliac joint, cervical and lumbar spine, and results of bone densitometry are collected. Every 6 months blood samples for inflammatory markers, and for long-term storage are taken. During a one-year period from September 2015 to August 2016, 63 patients were registered on an electronic database; 44 (69.8%) of patients were classified as axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and 19 (30.2%) as peripheral spondyloarthritis (perSpA) according to ASAS criteria. Statistically significant differences between axSpA and perSpA were discovered in the percentage of HLA-B27 antigen occurrence (92.6% and 50%, respectively), BASDAI (2.8% and 4.1%, respectively), DAS 28 (2.66% and 4.03%, respectively), percentage of peripheral arthritis (20% and 88.8%, respectively), enthesitis (26.7% and 70.6%, respectively), dactylitis (6.7% and 88.9%, respectively), as well as extra-articular symptoms: acute anterior uveitis (26.7% and 5.6%, respectively) and psoriasis (6.9% and 55.6%, respectively). Patients with axSpA had significantly higher mean grade of sacroiliac involvement according to New York criteria, higher mSASSS score, and lower T-score in femoral neck in bone densitometry. At the early stage of the disease patients with ax

  18. Supernova simulations from a 3D progenitor model - Impact of perturbations and evolution of explosion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard; Melson, Tobias; Heger, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2017-11-01

    We study the impact of large-scale perturbations from convective shell burning on the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism using 3D multigroup neutrino hydrodynamics simulations of an 18M⊙ progenitor. Seed asphericities in the O shell, obtained from a recent 3D model of O shell burning, help trigger a neutrino-driven explosion 330 ms after bounce whereas the shock is not revived in a model based on a spherically symmetric progenitor for at least another 300 ms. We tentatively infer a reduction of the critical luminosity for shock revival by ˜ 20 {per cent} due to pre-collapse perturbations. This indicates that convective seed perturbations play an important role in the explosion mechanism in some progenitors. We follow the evolution of the 18M⊙ model into the explosion phase for more than 2 s and find that the cycle of accretion and mass ejection is still ongoing at this stage. With a preliminary value of 7.7 × 1050 erg for the diagnostic explosion energy, a baryonic neutron star mass of 1.85M⊙, a neutron star kick of ˜600 km s^{-1} and a neutron star spin period of ˜20 ms at the end of the simulation, the explosion and remnant properties are slightly atypical, but still lie comfortably within the observed distribution. Although more refined simulations and a larger survey of progenitors are still called for, this suggests that a solution to the problem of shock revival and explosion energies in the ballpark of observations is within reach for neutrino-driven explosions in 3D.

  19. Uterine physiological responses and global gene expression in ovariectomized (ovx) rats treated with soy protein isolate (spi) or 17Beta-estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns regarding increased endometrial cancer risk have been raised in women who consume soy products as the result of the estrogenicity of phytochemical components such as the isoflavones genistein and daidzein. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 20/group) were fed AIN-93G diets with casein or SPI a...

  20. Comparing Image Perception of Bladder Tumors in Four Different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System Modalities Using the íSPIES App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Guido M; de Bruin, D Martijn; Brandt, Martin J; Knoll, Thomas; Conort, Pierre; Lapini, Alberto; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose L; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the variation of interpretation of the same bladder urothelium image in different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System (SPIES) modalities. SPIES contains a White light (WL), Spectra A (SA), Spectra B (SB), and Clara and Chroma combined (CC) modality. An App for the iPAD retina was developed to study evaluation of images. A total of 80 images from 20 bladder areas acquired in four modalities were included. Seventy-three participants completed the study. Images were analyzed on differences in delineated tumor margin variation, perceived quality of the image, and delineation time. A separation between high agreement (n = 14) and low agreement (n = 6) images was found. In high agreement images, no difference in root mean square (RMS) was found between modalities. In low agreement images, WL (26.5 pixels) and SA (33.4 pixels) had a higher RMS than CC (18 pixels) and SB (21.4 pixels). The quality of SPIES modalities images was rated significantly higher. Delineation time was similar. In low agreement cases, images in CC and SB have less variation in interpretation than WL and SA. The image quality in SPIES modalities is graded significantly higher than WL. There is no difference in delineation time between modalities.

  1. Faint progenitors of luminous z ˜ 6 quasars: Why do not we see them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulli, Edwige; Valiante, Rosa; Orofino, Maria C.; Schneider, Raffaella; Gallerani, Simona; Sbarrato, Tullia

    2017-04-01

    Observational searches for faint active nuclei at z > 6 have been extremely elusive, with a few candidates whose high-z nature is still to be confirmed. Interpreting this lack of detections is crucial to improve our understanding of high-z supermassive black holes (SMBHs) formation and growth. In this work, we present a model for the emission of accreting black holes (BHs) in the X-ray band, taking into account super-Eddington accretion, which can be very common in gas-rich systems at high-z. We compute the spectral energy distribution for a sample of active galaxies simulated in a cosmological context, which represent the progenitors of a z ˜ 6 SMBH with MBH ˜ 109 M⊙. We find an average Compton-thick fraction of ˜45 per cent and large typical column densities (NH ≳ 1023 cm2). However, faint progenitors are still luminous enough to be detected in the X-ray band of current surveys. Even accounting for a maximum obscuration effect, the number of detectable BHs is reduced at most by a factor of 2. In our simulated sample, observations of faint quasars are mainly limited by their very low active fraction (fact ˜ 1 per cent), which is the result of short, supercritical growth episodes. We suggest that to detect high-z SMBHs progenitors, large area surveys with shallower sensitivities, such as COSMOS Legacy and XMM-LSS+XXL, are to be preferred with respect to deep surveys probing smaller fields, such as Chandra Deep Field South.

  2. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Extraction from Human Auricles

    KAUST Repository

    Di Nardo, Paolo

    2017-02-22

    For many years, myocardial tissue has been considered terminally differentiated and, thus, incapable of regenerating. Recent studies have shown, instead, that cardiomyocytes, at least in part, are slowly substituted by new cells originating by precursor cells mostly embedded into the heart apex and in the atria. We have shown that an elective region of progenitor cell embedding is represented by the auricles, non-contractile atria appendages that can be easily sampled without harming the patient. The protocol here reported describes how from auricles a population of multipotent, cardiogenic cells can be isolated, cultured, and differentiated. Further studies are needed to fully exploit this cell population, but, sampling auricles, it could be possible to treat cardiac patients using their own cells circumventing rejection or organ shortage limitations.

  3. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  4. Local density maxima: Progenitors of structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-10-01

    Assuming structure is formed hierarchically from small to large scales, local density extrema are assumed to be the progenitors of structure. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). Assuming p(k)proportionalk/sup n/, virialized halos in an 0 = 1.0 universe should follow pproportionalr/sup(-9 + 3n/)/(4 + n) for -1< or =n and pproportionalr S for -3< or =n< or =-1. In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic halos. The observed structure is found to be consistent with 0 < 1.0 and n = -1.

  5. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  6. Practical Applications of the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) as a Tool for Very Early Warning of Droughts and Floods in the Balkans Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Southern Europe is repeatedly identified in IPCC Reports as being particularly vulnerable to water resource impacts with risks being assessed as medium to high with current (low) levels of adaptation. Drought frequency will likely increase by the end of the 21st century under IPCC RCP8.5 (medium confidence) . The Balkans region has encountered some of its most significant ever floods and droughts since 2000, highly symptomatic of intense climate change. Foremost of these are the regional catastrophic floods in Albania (2009-10) (2010-11), Bosnia, Herzegovina and Serbia (2014), and the widespread droughts of 2007-08 and 2013-14. There is an urgent need to improve the awareness and implementation of drought and flood risk management tools in the national Ministries and National Hydrometeorological Services (NHMSs) of s.e. Europe generally. This paper describes the development and application of a practical user-friendly tool to calculate SPI across a range of timescales as recommended by the WMO , using a conventional 'Year Book' format to enter monthly precipitation values, coupled with some automated and relatively simple VBA code. Since the tool is spreadsheet based, it is user-friendly and graphically intuitive. The conditional formatting capability introduces a visualisation element to the SPI which is extremely helpful to NHMSs and other non-expert decision makers in understanding SPI significance. Recent practical application of the tool in relation to significant recent floods and droughts in Albania, Kosovo and Macedonia has demonstrated its value as a Very Early Warning tool. However, there are some implicit dangers in simply tracking the SPI 1, 2, n value per se without taking account of the actual accumulated deficits that may generate agricultural and ultimately hydrological droughts. It is conventionally assumed that the sum of the SPI for all months within a drought event can be termed the drought's "magnitude". In fact this is not the case. In regions

  7. The Use Of Standardized Indicators (SPI And SPEI In Predicting Droughts Over The Republic Of Moldova Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedealcov M.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The drought events frequent manifestation over the Republic of Moldova territory, in the context of climate change requires a scientific monitoring adjusted to international researchers. In recent years, internationally, the estimation of this phenomenon occurs through standardized indexes. The most used of these, being the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. Since there is no a unified definition of drought, the World Meteorological Organization proposes to calculate the indexes, through developed calculation software. Thus, based on multi-annual data (1980-2014 a regional spatio-temporal estimation concerning drought in the Republic of Moldova was performed, thereby realizing the regional investigations framing in the international ones.

  8. A four channel time-to-digital converter ASIC with in-built calibration and SPI interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari Prasad, K.; Sukhwani, Menka [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Saxena, Pooja [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Chandratre, V.B., E-mail: vbc@barc.gov.in [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pithawa, C.K. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-02-11

    A design of high resolution, wide dynamic range Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) ASIC, implemented in 0.35 µm commercial CMOS technology is presented. The ASIC features four channel TDC with an in-built calibration and Serial Peripheral Interconnect (SPI) slave interface. The TDC is based on the vernier ring oscillator method in order to achieve both high resolution and wide dynamic range. This TDC ASIC is tested and found to have resolution of 127 ps (LSB), dynamic range of 1.8 µs and precision (σ) of 74 ps. The measured values of differential non-linearity (DNL) and integral non-linearity (INL) are 350 ps and 300 ps respectively.

  9. Apartheid Spies: The Character, the Reader, and the Censor in André Brink’s A Dry White Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Iannaccaro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available André Brink’s novel A Dry White Season (1979 is strictly connected with the time and place in which it was written. Its dialogue with the real Johannesburg of the late Seventies is manifest: characters and plot are grafted on real events, like the youth riots in Soweto (1976 and the death of Steve Biko in the hands of the Security Police (1977. Brink’s early novels have been commended for their political commitment, but also criticized for being ‘easily’ documentary. Yet, A Dry White Season’s structure is rather complex, and its fabricated nature is shown to the reader through the device of the double internal narrator and the considerable number of ‘documents’ discovered and employed – each telling its own truth. The metaphor of the ‘spying gaze’ proposed here is useful in order to point out the interconnections between story and history, as it shows the way in which a complex and multi-layered narrative structure succeeds in both reflecting and exposing the intricate apartheid system devised to control and ‘discipline’ its own citizens. In the novel, most of the characters intrude into the life of the others and are intruded upon, included peaceful citizens who are obliged to defend themselves from an oppressive and violent police State. At the same time, also the reader is drawn into the dangerous spying game, above all when he/she is introduced into that notorious site of interrogation, torture and detention which was the Johannesburg Police Station in John Vorster Square. The last part of the essay takes into consideration the South African censorship system in force at the time, to show that the activity of surveillance is both intrinsic to the narration and external, related to the conditions of the novel’s composition and appearance on the literary market.

  10. Intramolecular isopeptide but not internal thioester bonds confer proteolytic and significant thermal stability to the S. pyogenes pilus adhesin Spy0125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Miriam; Crow, Allister; Nelson, Miles D; Banfield, Mark J

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes and other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens present long macromolecular filaments known as pili on their surface that mediate adhesion and colonization. These pili are covalent polymers, assembled by sortases. Typically, they comprise a putative adhesin at their tip, a backbone subunit present in multiple copies and a basal subunit that is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell surface. The crystal structures of pilin subunits revealed the presence of unusual covalent linkages in these proteins, including intramolecular isopeptide and internal thioester bonds. The intramolecular isopeptide bonds in backbone pilins are important for protein stability. Here, using both the wild-type protein and a set of mutants, we assessed the proteolytic and thermal stability of the S. pyogenes pilus tip adhesin Spy0125, in the presence and absence of its intramolecular isopeptide and internal thioester bonds. We also determined a crystal structure of the internal thioester bond variant Spy0125(Cys426Ala). We find that mutations in the intramolecular isopeptide bonds compromise the stability of Spy0125. Using limited proteolysis and thermal denaturation assays, we could separate the contribution of each intramolecular isopeptide bond to Spy0125 stability. In contrast, mutation in the internal thioester bond had a lesser effect on protein stability and the crystal structure is essentially identical to wild type. This work suggests that the internal thioester in Spy0125, although having a minor contributory role, is not required for protein stability and must have a different primary function, most likely mediating a covalent interaction with host cell ligands. Copyright © 2013 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Rod progenitor cells in the mature zebrafish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ann C; Scholz, Tamera; Fadool, James M

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is an excellent model organism in which to study the retina's response to photoreceptor degeneration and/or acute injury. While much has been learned about the retinal stem and progenitor cells that mediate the damage response, several questions remain that cannot be addressed by acute models of injury. The development of genetic models, such as the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line, should further efforts to understand the nature of the signals that promote rod progenitor proliferation and differentiation following photoreceptor loss. This in turn may help to refine future approaches in higher vertebrates aimed at enhancing retinal progenitor cell activity for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms. Here, we comprehensively map myeloid progenitor subpopulations by transcriptional sorting of single cells from the bone marrow. We describe multiple progenitor subgroups, showing unexpected transcriptional priming toward seven differentiation fates but no progenitors with a mixed state....... Transcriptional differentiation is correlated with combinations of known and previously undefined transcription factors, suggesting that the process is tightly regulated. Histone maps and knockout assays are consistent with early transcriptional priming, while traditional transplantation experiments suggest...... that in vivo priming may still allow for plasticity given strong perturbations. These data establish a reference model and general framework for studying hematopoiesis at single-cell resolution....

  13. ZFOURGE/CANDELS: ON THE EVOLUTION OF M* GALAXY PROGENITORS FROM z = 3 TO 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papovich, C.; Quadri, R.; Tilvi, V.; Tran, K.-V. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Labbé, I.; Straatman, C. M. S. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Behroozi, P.; Ferguson, H. C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Glazebrook, K.; Kacprzak, G. G. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Spitler, L.; Cowley, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Davé, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Dekel, A. [Center of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dickinson, M.; Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gawiser, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Faber, S. M., E-mail: papovich@tamu.edu [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2015-04-10

    Galaxies with stellar masses near M* contain the majority of stellar mass in the universe, and are therefore of special interest in the study of galaxy evolution. The Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) have present-day stellar masses near M*, at 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} (defined here to be MW-mass) and 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} (defined to be M31-mass). We study the typical progenitors of these galaxies using the FOURSTAR Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE). ZFOURGE is a deep medium-band near-IR imaging survey, which is sensitive to the progenitors of these galaxies out to z ∼ 3. We use abundance-matching techniques to identify the main progenitors of these galaxies at higher redshifts. We measure the evolution in the stellar mass, rest-frame colors, morphologies, far-IR luminosities, and star formation rates, combining our deep multiwavelength imaging with near-IR Hubble Space Telescope imaging from Cosmic Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and Spitzer and Herschel far-IR imaging from Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-Herschel and CANDELS-Herschel. The typical MW-mass and M31-mass progenitors passed through the same evolution stages, evolving from blue, star-forming disk galaxies at the earliest stages to redder dust-obscured IR-luminous galaxies in intermediate stages and to red, more quiescent galaxies at their latest stages. The progenitors of the MW-mass galaxies reached each evolutionary stage at later times (lower redshifts) and with stellar masses that are a factor of two to three lower than the progenitors of the M31-mass galaxies. The process driving this evolution, including the suppression of star formation in present-day M* galaxies, requires an evolving stellar-mass/halo-mass ratio and/or evolving halo-mass threshold for quiescent galaxies. The effective size and SFRs imply that the baryonic cold-gas fractions drop as galaxies evolve from high redshift to z ∼ 0 and are strongly anticorrelated with an increase in the S

  14. Identification of Trend in Spatial and Temporal Dry and Wet Periods in Northwest of Iran Based on SPI and RAI Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Montaseri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Droughts are natural extreme phenomena, which frequently occur around the world. This phenomenon can occur in any region, but its effects will be more severe in arid and semi-arid regions. Several studies have highlighted the increasing of droughts trend around the world. The majority of studies in assessing the trend of time series are based on basic Mann-Kendall or Spearman's methods and no serious attention has been paid to the impact of autocorrelation coefficient on time series. However, limited numbers of studies have included the lag-1 autocorrelation coefficient and its impacts on the time series trend. The aim of this study was to investigate the trend of dry and wet periods in northwest of Iran using Mann-Kendall trend test with removing all significant autocorrelations coefficients based on SPI and RAI drought indices. Materials and Methods: Study area has a region of 334,000 square kilometers, with wet, arid and semiarid climate, located in the northwest of Iran. The rainfall data were collected from 39 synoptic stations with average rainfall of 146 mm as the minimum of Gom station, and the highest annual rainfall of 1687 mm, in the Bandaranzali station. In this study, Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI and Rainfall Anomaly Index (RAI were used for trend analysis of dry and wet periods. SPI was developed by McKee et al. in 1993 to determine and monitor droughts. This index is able to determine the wet and dry situations for a specific time scale for each location using rainfall data. RAI index was developed by Van Rooy in 1965 to calculate the deviation of rainfall from the normal amount of rainfall and it evaluates monthly or annual rainfall on a linear scale resulting from a data series. Then, correlation coefficients of time series of these drought indices with different lags were determined for check the dependence or independence of the SPI and RAI values. Finally, based on dependence or independence of the time

  15. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  16. On the progenitor of the Type Ibc supernova 2012fh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samson A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Adams, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Little is observationally known about the progenitors of Type Ibc supernovae (SNe) or the typical activity of SNe progenitors in their final years. Here, we analyze deep Large Binocular Telescope imaging data spanning the 4 years before and after the Type Ic SN 2012fh using difference imaging. We place 1$\\sigma$ upper limits on the detection of the progenitor star at $M_R>-4.0$, $M_V>-3.8$, $M_B>-3.1$, and $M_U>-3.8$ mag. These limits are the tightest placed on a Type Ic SNe and they largely rule out single star evolutionary models in favor of a binary channel as the origin of this SN. We also constrain the activity of the progenitor to be small on an absolute scale, with the RMS $UBVR$ optical variability $<2500L_\\odot$ and long-term dimming or brightening trends $<1000L_\\odot/\\text{year}$ in all four bands.

  17. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  18. Identification, Characterization, and Utilization of Adult Meniscal Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, stem cells, progenitor cells, meniscus healing , meniscus repair, osteoarthritis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...2. Keywords meniscus, meniscal cells, stem cells, progenitor cells, meniscus healing , meniscus repair, osteoarthritis 3. Overall Project Summary...Colonies will be compared for frequency and size. For colony forming assays, meniscus cells (P1) from 8wk old mice were seeded a density of 1000/25cm2

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  20. Commitment of decidual haematopoietic progenitor cells in first trimester pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereday, Laszlo; Miko, Eva; Meggyes, Matyas; Barakonyi, Aliz; Farkas, Balint; Varnagy, Akos; Bodis, Jozsef; Lynch, Lydia; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2012-01-01

    PROBLEM  The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotype and commitment of decidual haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in healthy pregnant women and in women with early miscarriage. METHOD OF STUDY  Peripheral blood and decidual tissue from healthy and pathological pregnant women were examined for HPCs and lymphoid progenitors using flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS  Compared with peripheral blood, we found a significant increase in decidual HPCs in both healthy pregnant women and women with spontaneous abortion. T/NK, natural killer (NK), gamma-delta and NKT cell progenitors were identified in all peripheral blood and decidual samples. In pathologic pregnant women, the ratios of decidual T/NK and NK cell progenitors were significantly increased compared with healthy pregnant controls. CONCLUSION  We demonstrated decidual cells with haematopoietic progenitor cell phenotype in human decidua. Increased levels of NK progenitors in the decidua of women with early spontaneous abortion suggest a dysregulation of this pathway that may contribute to pregnancy failure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Pre Cold War British Spy Fiction, the “albatross of self” and lines of flight in Gravity’s Rainbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Wishart Smith

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In his introduction to 'Slow Learner' Thomas Pynchon suggests that an influence in his short story ‘Under the Rose’ was the spy fiction he had read as a child.  What he takes from the form, he says, is an enjoyment of  “lurking, spying, false identities, psychological games.” I hope to show that this youthful reading has interesting things to tell us about Pynchon’s writing beyond ‘Under the Rose’ and in more complex ways than his quote suggests. To do this I want to focus on that perennial issue of spy fiction - the maintenance and manipulation of identity. Negotiating ideas of subjectivity is a core concern in Pynchon’s work and to consider it I want to use the four spy novelists he mentions in the 'Slow Learner' introduction - John Buchan, E. Phillips Oppenheim, Helen MacInnes and Geoffrey Household. This is a more disparate quartet of authors than Pynchon’s grouping suggests and I want to employ them to consider a variety of strategies used to ‘build character’ and the way Pynchon’s work approaches these strategies.  This allows a reflection on questions of disguise, doubles, animals and the nomad within the context of a variety of postcolonial theories and aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s “nomadology”. 'V 'would appear an obvious place to see connections to spy fiction, but, though I touch on some aspects of this novel, my focus will be very much on 'Gravity’s Rainbow' because it has a much more concerted focus on the subject of Empire. Some intriguing echoes are to be found in the work of Pynchon in these authors and I hope to show how Pynchon’s attempts to formulate US “superimperialism” (Aijaz Ahmad are reflected in the imperial concerns of what I would term the pre-Cold War British Spy fiction that engaged Pynchon in his youth.

  2. Expression of OsSPY and 14-3-3 genes involved in plant height variations of ion-beam-induced KDML 105 rice mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phanchaisri, Boonrak [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Samsang, Nuananong [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, Liang Deng; Singkarat, Somsorn [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, Somboon, E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2012-06-01

    The culm length of two semidwarf rice mutants (PKOS1, HyKOS1) obtained from low-energy N-ion beam bombardments of dehusked Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) seeds showed 25.7% and 21.5% height reductions and one spindly rice mutant (TKOS4) showed 21.4% increase in comparison with that of the KDML 105 control. A cDNA-RAPD analysis identified differential gene expression in internode tissues of the rice mutants. Two genes identified from the cDNA-RAPD were OsSPY and 14-3-3, possibly associated with stem height variations of the semidwarf and spindly mutants, respectively. The OsSPY gene encoded the SPY protein which is considered to be a negative regulator of gibberellin (GA). On the other hand, the 14-3-3 encoded a signaling protein which can bind and prevent the RSG (repression of shoot growth) protein function as a transcriptional repressor of the kaurene oxidase (KO) gene in the GA biosynthetic pathway. Expression analysis of OsSPY, 14-3-3, RSG, KO, and SLR1 was confirmed in rice internode tissues during the reproductive stage of the plants by semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The expression analysis showed a clear increase of the levels of OsSPY transcripts in PKOS1 and HyKOS1 tissue samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and TKOS4 samples at the age of 50-60 days which were at the ages of internode elongation. The 14-3-3 expression had the highest increase in the TKOS4 samples compared to those in KDML 105, PKOS1 and HyKOS1 samples. The expression analysis of RSG and KO showed an increase in TKOS4 samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and that of the two semidwarf mutants. These results indicate that changes of OsSPY and 14-3-3 expression could affect internode elongation and cause the phenotypic changes of semidwarf and spindly rice mutants, respectively.

  3. Scope of Practice and Family Medicine Match Rates: Results From a CERA Clerkship Directors' Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, David; White, Jordan; Margo, Katherine; Tarn, Derjung M

    2017-03-01

    Family medicine clerkship directors depend on community preceptors to teach and attract medical students to family medicine. Many community preceptors do not provide the full range of family medicine services, and some are not family physicians. This study aimed to determine the types of practices in which family medicine clerkship students train and whether scope of practice is associated with family medicine Match rates. Data were collected as part of the 2014 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) Family Medicine Clerkship Director Survey. Clerkship directors estimated the percentage of their preceptor sites providing each of nine clinical services and the percentage of students placed with internal medicine physicians for their family medicine rotations. We devised a Scope of Practice Index (SPI) to assess scope of practice and measured the association between a clerkship's SPI and family medicine Match rate. Limited scopes of practice were common. SPI was lowest in the Northeast and highest in the West. In bivariate and multivariable analyses, a lower SPI was associated with lower family medicine Match rates. Preventive gynecological care was the service most highly associated with family medicine Match rates. Family medicine Match rates were lower when programs used internal medicine sites for their family medicine rotations. Many clerkship students are exposed to practices with limited scopes of family medicine practice, and this is associated with lower family medicine Match rates. These findings have implications for the specialty as preceptor scope of practice declines.

  4. Decoupled black hole accretion and quenching: the relationship between BHAR, SFR and quenching in Milky Way- and Andromeda-mass progenitors since z = 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, M. J.; Spitler, L. R.; Quadri, R. F.; Goulding, A. D.; Papovich, C.; Tran, K. V. H.; Labbé, I.; Alcorn, L.; Allen, R. J.; Forrest, B.; Glazebrook, K.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Morrison, G.; Nanayakkara, T.; Straatman, C. M. S.; Tomczak, A. R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and star formation rate (SFR) for Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31)-mass progenitors from z = 0.2 to 2.5. We source galaxies from the Ks-band-selected ZFOURGE survey, which includes multiwavelength data spanning 0.3-160 μm. We use decomposition software to split the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our galaxies into their active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming components, which allows us to estimate BHARs and SFRs from the infrared (IR). We perform tests to check the robustness of these estimates, including a comparison with BHARs and SFRs derived from X-ray stacking and far-IR analysis, respectively. We find that, as the progenitors evolve their relative black hole-galaxy growth (i.e. their BHAR/SFR ratio) increases from low to high redshift. The MW-mass progenitors exhibit a log-log slope of 0.64 ± 0.11, while the M31-mass progenitors are 0.39 ± 0.08. This result contrasts with previous studies that find an almost flat slope when adopting X-ray-/AGN-selected or mass-limited samples and is likely due to their use of a broad mixture of galaxies with different evolutionary histories. Our use of progenitor-matched samples highlights the potential importance of carefully selecting progenitors when searching for evolutionary relationships between BHAR/SFRs. Additionally, our finding that BHAR/SFR ratios do not track the rate at which progenitors quench casts doubts over the idea that the suppression of star formation is predominantly driven by luminous AGN feedback (i.e. high BHARs).

  5. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  6. Harmine stimulates proliferation of human neural progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Dakic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmine is the β-carboline alkaloid with the highest concentration in the psychotropic plant decoction Ayahuasca. In rodents, classical antidepressants reverse the symptoms of depression by stimulating neuronal proliferation. It has been shown that Ayahuasca presents antidepressant effects in patients with depressive disorder. In the present study, we investigated the effects of harmine in cell cultures containing human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs, 97% nestin-positive derived from pluripotent stem cells. After 4 days of treatment, the pool of proliferating hNPCs increased by 71.5%. Harmine has been reported as a potent inhibitor of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK1A, which regulates cell proliferation and brain development. We tested the effect of analogs of harmine, an inhibitor of DYRK1A (INDY, and an irreversible selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO but not DYRK1A (pargyline. INDY but not pargyline induced proliferation of hNPCs similarly to harmine, suggesting that inhibition of DYRK1A is a possible mechanism to explain harmine effects upon the proliferation of hNPCs. Our findings show that harmine enhances proliferation of hNPCs and suggest that inhibition of DYRK1A may explain its effects upon proliferation in vitro and antidepressant effects in vivo.

  7. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Uezumi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases.

  8. Ethnic and Regional Identity in Polish Part of Spiš Region (On the Example of Jurgów Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagín Vojtech

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In my study I am focusing on the issue of national and regional identity of Spiš region inhabitants. The researched Jurgów village belongs to territory situated on the frontier between two states and at the same time between two regions. In the study I analyze the question of stereotypes present in the locality concerning gorals from the neighbouring Podhale region and Slovak part of Spiš region. In addition to that I deal with analysis of importance and understanding of space and border for the identity of local population. On the basis of the empirical data analysis results I observe that the identity of the researched village population is shaped by the fact that it belongs to the frontier territory where crossborder cultural and social interaction occurs.

  9. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2017-09-01

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope. I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap

  10. Triad of human cellular proteins, IRF2, FAM111A, and RFC3, restrict replication of orthopoxvirus SPI-1 host-range mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Debasis; Fernandez, Daniel J; Lal, Madhu; Buehler, Eugen; Moss, Bernard

    2017-04-04

    Viruses and their hosts can reach balanced states of evolution ensuring mutual survival, which makes it difficult to appreciate the underlying dynamics. To uncover hidden interactions, virus mutants that have lost defense genes may be used. Deletion of the gene that encodes serine protease inhibitor 1 (SPI-1) of rabbitpox virus and vaccinia virus, two closely related orthopoxviruses, prevents their efficient replication in human cells, whereas certain other mammalian cells remain fully permissive. Our high-throughput genome-wide siRNA screen identified host factors that prevent reproduction and spread of the mutant viruses in human cells. More than 20,000 genes were interrogated with individual siRNAs and those that prominently increased replication of the SPI-1 deletion mutant were subjected to a secondary screen. The top hits based on the combined data-replication factor C3 (RFC3), FAM111A, and interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2)-were confirmed by custom assays. The siRNAs to RFC1, RFC2, RFC4, and RFC5 mRNAs also enhanced spread of the mutant virus, strengthening the biological significance of the RFC complex as a host restriction factor for poxviruses. Whereas association with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and participation in processive genome replication are common features of FAM111A and RFC, IRF2 is a transcriptional regulator. Microarray analysis, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblotting revealed that IRF2 regulated the basal level expression of FAM111A, suggesting that the enhancing effect of depleting IRF2 on replication of the SPI-1 mutant was indirect. Thus, the viral SPI-1 protein and the host IRF2, FAM111A, and RFC complex likely form an interaction network that influences the ability of poxviruses to replicate in human cells.

  11. SPI1 defective mutants of Salmonella enterica induce cross-protective immunity in chickens against challenge with serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Babak, Vladimir; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-06-28

    In this study we were interested in the serovar cross-protection potential of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1) attenuated vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium and immune response of vaccinated and naive chickens to Salmonella infection. The immune response was characterized by real time PCR quantifying transcripts of interleukins IL1β, IL17, IL22, interferon gamma (IFNγ), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, IgY and Ig light chain, and six genes of acute phase response including avidin, serum amyloid A, extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP), immune responsive gene 1, chemokine AH221 and trappin-6. Vaccination with SPI1 mutants of both serovars protected chickens against Salmonella infection, independent of the serovar used for the challenge and the time post infection. However, expressions of all interleukins, iNOS and Ex-FABP showed that protection against homologous serovars was significantly higher than against heterologous serovars after intravenous challenge at 4 days post infection. The vaccination with a mixture of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium SPI1 mutants induced an intermediate protection against challenge with both serovars, i.e. the mixed vaccine provided an additional protective effect when compared with the chickens vaccinated with a vaccine formed by only a single Salmonella serovar. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of temporal identity regulation in mouse retinal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Pierre; Cayouette, Michel

    2015-01-01

    While much progress has been made in recent years toward elucidating the transcription factor codes controlling how neural progenitor cells generate the various glial and neuronal cell types in a particular spatial domain, much less is known about how these progenitors alter their output over time. In the past years, work in the developing mouse retina has provided evidence that a transcriptional cascade similar to the one used in Drosophila neuroblasts might control progenitor temporal identity in vertebrates. The zinc finger transcription factor Ikzf1 (Ikaros), an ortholog of Drosophila hunchback, was reported to confer early temporal identity in retinal progenitors and, more recently, the ortholog of Drosophila castor, Casz1, was found to function as a mid/late temporal identity factor that is negatively regulated by Ikzf1. The molecular mechanisms by which these temporal identity factors function in retinal progenitors, however, remain unknown. Here we briefly review previous work on the vertebrate temporal identity factors in the retina, and propose a model by which they might operate.

  13. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  14. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow of mice and promote progenitor cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sollars Vincent E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega 3 fatty acids have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and promote differentiation in various cell types. The processes of cell survival, expansion, and differentiation are of key importance in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in controlling the frequency of various myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Increased progenitor cell frequency and blocked differentiation are characteristics of hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage, such as myeloproliferative diseases and myeloid leukemias. Results We found that increasing the proportion of omega 3 fatty acids relative to the proportion of omega 6 fatty acids in the diet caused increased differentiation and reduced the frequency of myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Furthermore, this had no adverse effect on peripheral white blood cell counts. Conclusion Our results indicate that omega 3 fatty acids impact hematopoietic differentiation by reducing myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow and promoting progenitor cell differentiation. Further exploration of this discovery could lead to the use of omega 3 fatty acids as a therapeutic option for patients that have various disorders of hematopoiesis.

  15. CXCR4 expression in prostate cancer progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dubrovska

    Full Text Available Tumor progenitor cells represent a population of drug-resistant cells that can survive conventional chemotherapy and lead to tumor relapse. However, little is known of the role of tumor progenitors in prostate cancer metastasis. The studies reported herein show that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, a key regulator of tumor dissemination, plays a role in the maintenance of prostate cancer stem-like cells. The CXCL4/CXCR12 pathway is activated in the CD44(+/CD133(+ prostate progenitor population and affects differentiation potential, cell adhesion, clonal growth and tumorigenicity. Furthermore, prostate tumor xenograft studies in mice showed that a combination of the CXCR4 receptor antagonist AMD3100, which targets prostate cancer stem-like cells, and the conventional chemotherapeutic drug Taxotere, which targets the bulk tumor, is significantly more effective in eradicating tumors as compared to monotherapy.

  16. In vitro toxicity of trichothecenes on rat haematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent-Massin, D; Thouvenot, D

    1995-01-01

    The fusarial toxicosis induced by trichothecenes is characterized by common syndromes such as vomiting, inflammation, haemorrhages, diarrhoea and haematological changes. Subchronic ingestion of trichothecenes causes a decrease in circulating white cells. This leukopenic change of animals is reported as a characteristic feature in the best known human disorder: Alimentary Toxic Aleukia (ATA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the haematologic disorders imputed to trichothecenes were a result of myelotoxicity by investigating in an in vitro model. Rat haematopoietic progenitors, Colony Forming Units-Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM), were cultured in the presence of several concentrations of four trichothecenes; T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and deoxynivalenol (DON). All these trichothecenes were cytotoxic to rat haematopoietic progenitor cells. It is concluded that haematological disorders observed during trichothecene intoxication of animals are caused by the destruction of haematopoietic progenitors such as CFU-GM cells.

  17. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z ~ 0.01-0.1 of rV = 4.26$+1.39 +0.10\\atop{-1.93 -0.10}$h3 x 10-4 SNe Ia/yr/Mpc3 from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea and endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qing Wang,1,* Qi Wu,2,* Jing Feng,3,4 Xin Sun5 1The Second Respiratory Department of the First People's Hospital of Kunming, Yunnan, People's Republic of China; 2Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 3Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 5Respiratory Department of Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women in the general population, and the prevalence is even higher in specific patient groups. OSA is an independent risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial injury could be the pivotal determinant in the development of cardiovascular pathology in OSA. Endothelial damage ultimately represents a dynamic balance between the magnitude of injury and the capacity for repair. Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs within adult peripheral blood present a possible means of vascular maintenance that could home to sites of injury and restore endothelial integrity and normal function. Methods: We summarized pathogenetic mechanisms of OSA and searched for available studies on numbers and functions of EPCs in patients with OSA to explore the potential links between the numbers and functions of EPCs and OSA. In particular, we tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the effects of OSA on EPCs. Conclusion: Intermittent hypoxia cycles and sleep fragmentation are major pathophysiologic characters of OSA. Intermittent hypoxia acts as a trigger of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and sympathetic activation. Sleep fragmentation is associated with a burst of sympathetic activation and systemic inflammation. In most studies, a reduction in circulating EPCs has

  19. Chemical Method to Improve CO{sub 2} Flooding Sweep Efficiency for Oil Recovery Using SPI-CO{sub 2} Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle D.

    2009-04-14

    The problem in CO{sub 2} flooding lies with its higher mobility causing low conformance or sweep efficiency. This is an issue in oilfield applications where an injected fluid or gas used to mobilize and produce the oil in a marginal field has substantially higher mobility (function of viscosity and density and relative permeability) relative to the crude oil promoting fingering and early breakthrough. Conformance is particularly critical in CO{sub 2} oilfield floods where the end result is less oil recovered and substantially higher costs related to the CO{sub 2}. The SPI-CO{sub 2} (here after called “SPI”) gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a technically effective solution to the conformance problem with CO{sub 2} floods. This SPI gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an external initiator (CO{sub 2}) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current technologies where the gels set up as a function of time, regardless of where it is placed in the reservoir. In those current systems, the internal initiator is included in the injected fluid for water shut off applications. In this new research effort, the CO{sub 2} is an external initiator contacted after SPI gel solution placement. This concept ensures in the proper water wet reservoir environment that the SPI gel sets up in the precise high permeability path followed by the CO{sub 2}, therefore improving sweep efficiency to a greater degree than conventional systems. In addition, the final SPI product in commercial quantities is expected to be low cost over the competing systems. This Phase I research effort provided “proof of concept” that SPI gels possess strength and may be formed in a sand pack reducing the permeability to brine and CO{sub 2} flow. This SPI technology is a natural extension of prior R & D and the Phase I effort that together show a high potential for success in a Phase II follow-on project. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a major by-product of

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  2. File list: ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. The quiescent progenitors of four Type II supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Samson A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Adams, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope difference imaging data for the final years of four Type II supernovae progenitors. For all four, we find no significant evidence for stochastic or steady variability in the U, B, V, or R-bands. Our limits constrain variability to no more than roughly 5-10% of the expected R-band luminosities of the progenitors. These limits are comparable to the observed variability of red supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds. Based on these four events, the probability o...

  5. Systematic Features and Progenitor Dependence of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    We present our latest results of two-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations for about 400 progenitors. Our self-consistent supernova models reveal the systematic features of core-collapse supernova properties such as neutrino luminosity and energy spectrum, explosion energy, remnant mass, and yield of radioactive 56Ni. We find that these explosion characteristics tend to show a monotonic increase as a function of mass accretion rate onto a shock. The accretion rate depends on the structure of the progenitor core and its envelope, which is well described by the compactness parameter.

  6. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...... progenitors. Thus, cdc42 has a crucial role at the apical pole of progenitors, thereby regulating the position of mitoses and cell fate....

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  10. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 RNA polymerase Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor SRX736456,SRX736457 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 DNase-seq Neural Induced neural progeni...tors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238868,SRX238870 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 TFs and others Neural Induced neural progeni...tors SRX323564,SRX323573 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 DNase-seq Neural Induced neural progeni...tors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX802060,SRX109471 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 Unclassified Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 TFs and others Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor SRX736459,SRX736458,SRX736460,SRX736461 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX109471,SRX802060 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 DNase-seq Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315277,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 DNase-seq Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 TFs and others Neural Induced neural progeni...tors SRX323564,SRX323573 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 RNA polymerase Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor SRX736457,SRX736456 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX109471,SRX802060 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127407,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 Unclassified Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Histone Neural Induced neural progeni...tors SRX667381,SRX668240 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 RNA polymerase Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor SRX736457,SRX736456 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Histone Neural Induced neural progeni...tors SRX667381,SRX668240 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 Histone Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 Histone Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural progeni...tors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX315277,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127394,SRX127409,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127381,SRX127383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are productsof interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBarge, Mark A.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, René

    2009-01-01

    combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells.Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well......, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages....

  4. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural ...progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural ...progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Induced neural... progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  7. Type Ia supernovae: explosions and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang Eitel

    2011-08-01

    that they somehow need to acquire mass if they are to explode as SN Ia. Currently there are two major scenarios for this mass acquisition. In the favoured single degenerate scenario the white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star which is much younger in its evolutionary state. The less favoured double degenerate scenario sees the merger of two white dwarfs (with a total combined mass of more than 1.38 Msun). This thesis has tried to answer the question about the mass acquisition in two ways. First the single degenerate scenario predicts a surviving companion post-explosion. We undertook an observational campaign to find this companion in two ancient supernovae (SN 1572 and SN 1006). Secondly, we have extended an existing code to extract the elemental and energy yields of SNe Ia spectra by automating spectra fitting to specific SNe Ia. This type of analysis, in turn, help diagnose to which of the two major progenitor scenarios is right.

  8. Type IA supernovae: Their progenitors and use as cosmological probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Brandon

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are important cosmological probes, but we are uncertain how they explode. There are two progenitor channels for SNe Ia: single and double degenerate white dwarf (WD) systems. In either model, we expect the system to be detectable as a Supersoft X-ray Source (SSS) for a significant amount of time before the explosion. By studying these SSSs, we hope to improve our understanding of SNe Ia. In Chapter 2, we analyze an interesting source (r1-25) in M31. We found that the source exhibited spectral changes to harder X-ray states. r1-25 is the first source of its kind, and we require unique physical models to fit its behavior. We find that existing WD models are inconsistent with the spectra of the source. We explore new black hole and neutron star models, and find that they can model the unusual behavior of r1-25. In Chapter 3, we study three gravitationally lensed SNe from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Based on photometric classification, we found that two SNe (SN CLO12Car and CLN12Did) are likely to be SNe Ia, while the classification of the third is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ˜ 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ˜ 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. From independent CLASH strong+weak lensing maps of the clusters , we derived similar magnifications for the two SNe Ia. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Finally, in Chapter 4 we discuss a new light curve fitter for SNe Ia, which we call Multicolor Light Curve Shapes 3 (MLCS3). The project has not been completed, but we discuss some of the features, and the expected improvements from MLCS3

  9. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Simon N; van Os, Ronald P; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Animal models have added significantly to our understanding of the mechanism(s) of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. Such models suggest that changes in the interaction between the HSPC and the hematopoietic microenvironmental 'niche' (cellular and extracellular components)

  10. Progenitor models of Wolf-Rayet+O binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413316556; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498

    2007-01-01

    Since close WR+O binaries are the result of a strong interaction of both stars in massive close binary systems, they can be used to constrain the highly uncertain mass and angular momentum budget during the major mass- transfer phase. We explore the progenitor evolution of the three best suited WR+O

  11. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  12. Evolution of gamma-ray burst progenitors at low metallicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing evidence that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are associated with deaths of Wolf-Rayet stars, the evolutionary path of massive stars to GRBs and the exact nature of GRB progenitors remain poorly known. However, recent massive star evolutionary models indicate that — for sufficiently

  13. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimball, C.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  14. Adult spinal cord radial glia display a unique progenitor phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Petit

    Full Text Available Radial glia (RG are primarily embryonic neuroglial progenitors that express Brain Lipid Binding Protein (Blbp a.k.a. Fabp7 and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (Gfap. We used these transcripts to demarcate the distribution of spinal cord radial glia (SCRG and screen for SCRG gene expression in the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas (ASCA. We reveal that neonatal and adult SCRG are anchored in a non-ventricular niche at the spinal cord (SC pial boundary, and express a "signature" subset of 122 genes, many of which are shared with "classic" neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone (SVZ and SC central canal (CC. A core expressed gene set shared between SCRG and progenitors of the SVZ and CC is particularly enriched in genes associated with human disease. Visualizing SCRG in a Fabp7-EGFP reporter mouse reveals an extensive population of SCRG that extend processes around the SC boundary and inwardly (through the SC white matter (WM, whose abundance increases in a gradient from cervical to lumbar SC. Confocal analysis of multiple NSC-enriched proteins reveals that postnatal SCRG are a discrete and heterogeneous potential progenitor population that become activated by multiple SC lesions, and that CC progenitors are also more heterogeneous than previously appreciated. Gene ontology analysis highlights potentially unique regulatory pathways that may be further manipulated in SCRG to enhance repair in the context of injury and SC disease.

  15. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  16. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  17. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...

  18. Human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells: a short history of nearly everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Patrick; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2012-08-01

    The high occurrence of cardiac disease in the Western world has driven clinicians and cardiovascular biologists to look for alternative strategies to treat patients. A challenging approach is the use of stem cells to repair the heart, in itself an inspiring thought. In the past 10 years, stem cells from different sources have been under intense investigation and, as a result, a multitude of studies have been published on the identification, isolation, and characterization, of cardiovascular progenitor cells and repair in different animal models. However, relatively few cardiovascular progenitor populations have been identified in human hearts, including, but not limited to, cardiosphere-derived cells, cKit+ human cardiac stem cells , Isl1+ cardiovascular progenitors, and, in our lab, cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs). Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive summary of the past findings and present challenges for future therapeutic potential of CMPCs. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2017-10-28

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from

  20. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells: the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Caroline E.; Schwab, Kjiana E.; Deane, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The existence of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium was postulated many years ago, but the first functional evidence was only published in 2004. The identification of rare epithelial and stromal populations of clonogenic cells in human endometrium has opened an active area of research on endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the subsequent 10 years. METHODS The published literature was searched using the PubMed database with the search terms ‘endometrial stem cells and menstrual blood stem cells' until December 2014. RESULTS Endometrial epithelial stem/progenitor cells have been identified as clonogenic cells in human and as label-retaining or CD44+ cells in mouse endometrium, but their characterization has been modest. In contrast, endometrial mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been well characterized and show similar properties to bone marrow MSCs. Specific markers for their enrichment have been identified, CD146+PDGFRβ+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and SUSD2+ (sushi domain containing-2), which detected their perivascular location and likely pericyte identity in endometrial basalis and functionalis vessels. Transcriptomics and secretomics of SUSD2+ cells confirm their perivascular phenotype. Stromal fibroblasts cultured from endometrial tissue or menstrual blood also have some MSC characteristics and demonstrate broad multilineage differentiation potential for mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineages, indicating their plasticity. Side population (SP) cells are a mixed population, although predominantly vascular cells, which exhibit adult stem cell properties, including tissue reconstitution. There is some evidence that bone marrow cells contribute a small population of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. The discovery of specific markers for endometrial stem/progenitor cells has enabled the examination of their role in endometrial proliferative disorders, including endometriosis, adenomyosis and Asherman

  1. Effect of Reishi polysaccharides on human stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2010-12-15

    The polysaccharide fraction of Ganoderma lucidum (F3) was found to benefit our health in many ways by influencing the activity of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, F3 was found to promote the adipose tissue MSCs' aggregation and chondrosphere formation, with the increase of CAM (N-CAM, I-CAM) expressions and autokine (BMP-2, IL-11, and aggrecan) secretions, in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay. In a stem cell expansion culture, it possesses the thrombopoietin (TPO) and GM-CSF like functions to enhance the survival/renewal abilities of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs). F3 was found to promote the dendrite growth of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the expression of cell adhesion molecules in the formation of immature dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, F3 exhibited inhibitory effects on blood endothelial progenitor (EPC) colony formation, with concomitant reduction of cell surface endoglin (CD105) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) marker expressions, in the presence of angiogenic factors. A further cytokine array analysis revealed that F3 indeed inhibited the angiogenin synthesis and enhanced IL-1, MCP-1, MIP-1, RANTES, and GRO productions in the blood EPC derivation culture. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the polysaccharide fraction of G. lucidum F3 exhibits cytokine and chemokine like functions which are beneficial to human tissue stem/progenitor cells by modulating their CAM expressions and biological activities. These findings provide us a better the observation that F3 glycopolysaccharides indeed possesses anti-angiogenic and immune-modulating functions and promotes hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing for better human tissue protection, reducing disease progression and health. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of progenitor domains in the developing mouse thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vue, Tou Yia; Aaker, Joshua; Taniguchi, Aya; Kazemzadeh, Christina; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Martin, Donna M; Martin, James F; Treier, Mathias; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2007-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis of the specification of thalamic nuclei, we analyzed the expression patterns of various transcription factors and defined progenitor cell populations in the embryonic mouse thalamus. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig3 is expressed in the entire thalamic ventricular zone and the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI). Next, we define two distinct progenitor domains within the thalamus, which we name pTH-R and pTH-C, located caudal to the ZLI. pTH-R is immediately caudal to the ZLI and expresses Nkx2.2, Mash1, and Olig3. pTH-C is caudal to pTH-R and expresses Ngn1, Ngn2, and Olig3. Short-term lineage analysis of Olig3-, Mash1-, Ngn1-, and Ngn2-expressing progenitor cells as well as tracing the Pitx2 cell lineage suggests that pTH-C is the only major source of thalamic nuclei containing neurons that project to the cerebral cortex, whereas pTH-R and ZLI are likely to produce distinct postmitotic populations outside of the cortex-projecting part of the thalamus. To determine if pTH-C is composed of subdomains, we characterized expression of the homeodomain protein Dbx1 and the bHLH protein Olig2. We show that Dbx1 is expressed in caudodorsal-high to rostroventral-low gradient within pTH-C. Analysis of heterozygous Dbx1(nlslacZ) knockin mice demonstrated that Dbx1-expressing progenitors preferentially give rise to caudodorsal thalamic nuclei. Olig2 is expressed in an opposite gradient within pTH-C to that of Dbx1. These results establish the molecular heterogeneity within the progenitor cells of the thalamus, and suggest that such heterogeneity contributes to the specification of thalamic nuclei. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  3. Study of the electron-positron annihilation in the galactic center region with the Integral/SPI spectrometer; Etude de l'annihilation electron-positon dans la region du centre galactique avec le spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizun, P

    2007-04-15

    A spectral feature was detected in 1970 in the gamma-ray emission from the central regions of the Milky Way, during balloon flight observations. Located near 511 keV, this feature was soon attributed to the gamma-ray line tracing the annihilation of electrons with their anti-particles, positrons. However, none of the multiple astrophysical scenarios contemplated to explain the production of positrons in the Galactic bulge has been able to reproduce the high injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line, close to 10{sup 43} positrons per second. Launched in 2002, the European gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL was provided with a spectrometer, SPI, whose unprecedented imaging and spectral capabilities in this energy range enable us to further study the source of the 511 keV line detected in the Galactic centre region. Indeed, a better determination of the spatial extent of the source, the intrinsic width of the line and the fraction of positrons annihilating in-flight, directly or via the formation of ortho-Positronium atoms would improve our knowledge of both the annihilation medium and the initial source of positrons, and could allow us to discriminate between the various explanatory scenarios. The first part of this thesis deals with a key ingredient in the extraction of the annihilation spectrum: the optimization of the instrumental background model. New data screening and tracer selection procedures are presented. Classical multi-linear models are compared to neural and Bayesian networks. Finally, three years of observation are used to constrain the width of the source and derive its spectrum. The second part of the thesis focuses on one of the possible scenarios explaining the high positron injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line: the annihilation of light dark matter particles into electron-positron pairs. The various radiation mechanisms involved are modeled and confronted to observations in order to set an upper limit on the injection

  4. Determination of the Integral/SPI instrumental response and his application to the observation of gamma ray lines in the Vela region; Determination de la reponse instrumentale du spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI et application a l'observation des raies gamma de la region des Voiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attie, D

    2005-01-15

    The INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer was designed to observe the sky in the energy band of 20 keV to 8 MeV. The specificity of instrument SPI rests on the excellent spectral resolution (2.3 keV with 1 MeV) of its detecting plan, composed of 19 cooled germanium crystals; covering an effective area of 508 cm{sup 2}. The use of a coded mask, located at 1.7 m above the detection plan ensures to it a resolving power of 2.5 degrees. The aim of this thesis, begun before the INTEGRAL launch, is made up of two parts. The first part relates to the analysis of the spectrometer calibration data. The objective was to measure and check the performances of the telescope, in particular to validate simulations of the INTEGRAL/SPI instrument response. This objective was successfully achieved. This analysis also highlights the presence of a significant instrumental background noise. Whereas, the second part concentrates on the data analysis of the Vela region observations. I have approached two astrophysical topics dealing with: - the search for radioactive decays lines of titanium-44, which is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis, in the supernova remnant of Vela Junior and, - the search of cyclotron resonance scattering features expected towards 25 keV and 52 keV in the accreting pulsar spectrum of the x-ray binary star Vela X-1. Putting forward the hypothesis that the result obtained previously by COMPTEL is correct and considering the no-detection of the titanium-44 lines by SPI, we give a lower limit at 4500 km s{sup -1} for the ejecta velocity from Vela Junior. The analysis on the research of the cyclotron lines have shown that the results are very sensitive to the instrumental background. Thorough studies will be necessary to guarantee an unambiguous detection of these lines. (author)

  5. Control mediante joystick de tarjeta avr butterfly (con microcontrolador atmega169) mediante comunicación spi con tarjeta lpcxpresso controladora de motor bldc

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana, Walter; Banchón, Gian; Valdivieso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo principal de este proyecto es diseñar un sistema maestro – esclavo mediante una comunicación SPI entre las tarjetas AVR Butterfly y LPCXpresso para controlar un Motor BLDC mediante un Joystick. Se presenta un enfoque práctico y específico, para enlazar y comprender toda la teoría del funcionamiento de este protocolo; haciendo uso de varias herramientas como el software AVR STUDIO 4, para programar el kit AVR BUTTERFLY que trabaja con microcontrolador ATmega169; y el software ...

  6. Uncovering the Number and Clonal Dynamics of Mesp1 Progenitors during Heart Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Chabab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart arises from distinct sources of cardiac progenitors that independently express Mesp1 during gastrulation. The precise number of Mesp1 progenitors that are specified during the early stage of gastrulation, and their clonal behavior during heart morphogenesis, is currently unknown. Here, we used clonal and mosaic tracing of Mesp1-expressing cells combined with quantitative biophysical analysis of the clonal data to define the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth during heart development. Our data indicate that the myocardial layer of the heart derive from ∼250 Mesp1-expressing cardiac progenitors born during gastrulation. Despite arising at different time points and contributing to different heart regions, the temporally distinct cardiac progenitors present very similar clonal dynamics. These results provide insights into the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth and open up avenues to decipher the clonal dynamics of progenitors in other organs and tissues.

  7. Age-related dysfunction in mechano-transduction impairs differentiation of human mammary epithelial progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier, Fanny A.; Garbe, James C.; Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Miyano, Masaru; Lin, ChunHan; Jokela, Tiina; Kumar, Sanjay; Stampfer, Martha R.; Lorens, James B.; LaBarge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dysfunctional progenitor and luminal cells with acquired basal cell properties accumulate during human mammary epithelia aging for reasons not understood. Multipotent progenitors from women aged modulus, and increased rigidity caused a differentiation bias towards myoepithelial cells while reducing production of luminal cells and progenitor maintenance. Lineage representation in progenitors from women >55 years was unaffected by physiological modulus changes. Efficient activation of Hippo pathway transducers YAP and TAZ was required for the modulus-dependent myoepithelial/basal-bias in younger progenitors. In older progenitors YAP/TAZ were only activated when stressed by extra-physiologically rigid matrices, which biased differentiation towards luminal-like phenotypes. YAP was primarily active in myoepithelia of younger breast tissues, but activity increased in luminal cells with age. Thus aging phenotypes of mammary epithelia may arise partly because alterations in Hippo pathway activation affect the processes of progenitor differentiation and lineage specificity. PMID:24910432

  8. Spie, mandarini, bramini: i gesuiti e i loro travestimenti / Spies, Mandarins, Brahmins. The Jesuits and their disguises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Pavone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nella prima età moderna l’abito degli ordini religiosi rappresenta un importante fattore di identità immediatamente riconoscibile. È per questo motivo che i gesuiti vennero visti con sospetto: essi erano infatti vestiti come preti secolari. Ignazio di Loyola decise di non avere alcun segno distintivo poiché voleva vivere nel mondo, ma la sua scelta venne male interpretata e intesa come una forma di dissimulazione: la mancanza di un abito specifico fu vista come strumentale all’assunzione di ogni tipo di travestimento e presto, in determinati contesti, i gesuiti vennero considerati vere e proprie spie. Ai loro occhi infatti indossare l’abito del paese che si accingevano a evangelizzare era anche il modo migliore, certo non l’unico, per entrare in contatto con le altre culture. In questo saggio si vuole prendere in esame tanto l’uso dell’abito come elemento della pratica evangelizzatrice nelle missioni quanto la leggenda nera che dalle origini circondò i gesuiti e vide proprio nell’abito uno dei segni più importanti della loro attitudine al travestimento.   In the early modern age, the religious orders habit represent a very significant factor of identity to be immediately recognised, that’s why the Jesuits were looked with suspicion: in fact they were dressed as secular priests. Ignazio of Loyola decided not to have any distinctive sign because he wanted to live inside the world, but this choice was misinterpreted as a way of dissimulation: the lack of an habit was considered as a manner to assume any kind of disguise and soon Jesuits were considered as spies. In their opinion, to take the habit of the country they wanted to evangelize, was also the best way to be brought into contact with others cultures. In this paper I would like to consider either the Jesuits evangelisation practice in missions or the black legend that since the origins surrounded them considering also the habit one of the most important signal of their

  9. Irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Marusyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of mutations that drive cancer evolution constitute a major focus of cancer research. Consequently, dominant paradigms attribute the tumorigenic effects of carcinogens in general and ionizing radiation in particular to their direct mutagenic action on genetic loci encoding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, the effects of irradiation are not limited to genetic loci that encode oncogenes and tumor suppressors, as irradiation induces a multitude of other changes both in the cells and their microenvironment which could potentially affect the selective effects of some oncogenic mutations. P53 is a key tumor suppressor, the loss of which can provide resistance to multiple genotoxic stimuli, including irradiation. Given that p53 null animals develop T-cell lymphomas with high penetrance and that irradiation dramatically accelerates lymphoma development in p53 heterozygous mice, we hypothesized that increased selection for p53-deficient cells contributes to the causal link between irradiation and induction of lymphoid malignancies. We sought to determine whether ionizing irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors in vivo using mouse models. We found that p53 disruption does not provide a clear selective advantage within an unstressed hematopoietic system or in previously irradiated BM allowed to recover from irradiation. In contrast, upon irradiation p53 disruption confers a dramatic selective advantage, leading to long-term expansion of p53-deficient clones and to increased lymphoma development. Selection for cells with disrupted p53 appears to be attributable to several factors: protection from acute irradiation-induced ablation of progenitor cells, prevention of irradiation-induced loss of clonogenic capacity for stem and progenitor cells, improved long-term maintenance of progenitor cell fitness, and the disabling/elimination of competing p53 wild-type progenitors. These studies

  10. Spying on spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The British Coal Technical Services and Research Executive (TSRE) has carried out a project to investigate potential applications of fibre optic based distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technology within a mining environment. The objective was to determine whether DTS could identify and locate spontaneous combustion earlier than conventional systems. The trials took place in a British mine from April to September 1992 and from August to November 1993 using a commercially available system from York Sensors Ltd. Results indicate that DTS is capable of very sensitive temperature monitoring, revealing sub-degree thermal trends resulting from various activities and local heatings. DTS has several prospective mining applications, e.g. monitoring known hot spots, investigating ventilation and heat flow through mine workings. The trials show that the system can be installed, calibrated, operated and maintained by relatively inexperienced personnel. 1 photo.

  11. Spying on Search Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Only the most dedicated super-searchers are motivated to learn and control command systems, like DialogClassic, that rely on the user to input complex search strategies. Infrequent searchers and most end users choose interfaces that do some of the work for them and make the search process appear easy. However, the easier a good interface seems to…

  12. Spying on volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    Active volcanoes can be incredibly dangerous, especially to those who live nearby, but how do you get close enough to observe one in action? Matthew Watson explains how artificial drones are providing volcanologists with insights that could one day save human lives

  13. 05 Spies 03.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tienie01

    26 Feb 2005 ... “the best technique for revealing beauty and meaning in literature” as Camille Paglia rightly maintains in Break, Blow, Burn. (2005). Furthermore, my approach follows Eybers' concept that poetry is closely linked to music and that a good poem should comply to the rules of rhythm and purity of sound.

  14. Secrets and spies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    There is no shortage of popular histories of the creation of nuclear weapons. From the mid-1940s to the present day, scientists, historians and others have tried to explain the genesis of these awesome and awful weapons, and the reasons for their use against Japan at the end of the Second World War. From the official 1945 Smyth Report on the Manhattan Project to Richard Rhodes' 1986 Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb and beyond, the history of nuclear weapons and the Cold War continues to exert a powerful and sometimes macabre fascination for those interested in the history of modern science.

  15. La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Aroca Montolío

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Prosecutor’s Office of the Minor, the accusation interposed by mothers and/or fathers victims by theirs children, along 2007 were 2603, in 2008 amounted 4.211, in 2009 there were 5.209 and in 2010 there were 8.000 accusations. Suede this worrying increase, the principal aim of our article is to check the scientific international and national documentation, from 1957 until the year 2010 that analyses the phenomenon of the adolescent violence against parents, to achieve an approximation to its keys that there allows us the comprehension and analysis of this serious familiar problem. For it we will analyse: (a the importance of this crime by means of criminological mediators: prevalence and incidence; (b the age and sex variables’ aggressors to be able to establish a basic profile about theirs and, (c the violence types that the teenagers wield to damage, prejudice and suffering against their progenitors, with the aim to obtain what they want. The information obtained in this research review and qualitative analysis, change in base to the methodology used and the type of sample under study to obtain conclusions. Even though, we wantto do research into needs to investigate this type of familiar violence, and from there, to do researches with rigorous scientific methodologies, unifying criteria and variables to be investigating, to be able to anticipate in this increasing problem that the parents have. Según la Fiscalía del Menor en el año 2007, las denuncias interpuestas por madres y/o padres, víctimas de malos tratos por sus hijos e hijas menores de edad, fueron 2.683. En 2008 ascendieron a 4.211, en 2009 se presentaron 5.209 y en el año 2010 se registraron 8.000 denuncias. Ante éste preocupante incremento, el objetivo principal de nuestro artículo es revisar la documentación científica que analiza la violencia filio-parental,  desde 1957 hasta el año 2011, para lograr una aproximación a sus claves que nos permita la

  16. Analogue spies in a digital world : changing technology and attitudes on confidentiality make an oilfield scout's job harder than ever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, P.

    2009-04-15

    Spying amongst oil companies is now declining as a result of cultural shifts in how privacy is viewed as well as by new court decisions on how confidential information is used to gain competitive advantages. In the 1970s, oil company scouts used visual monitoring as a means of gaining information related to oil field technologies. New digital communications processes mean that scouts can no longer eavesdrop on analogue communications equipment using radio equipment. Energy companies are now enjoying an unprecedented level of security. Satellite digital communications minimize the risk of in-field interception by sending signals directly upward from a localized point. Although cellphone scanning equipment is available, it is illegal in Canada. New privacy rules state that listening to a cell phone conversation without the consent of the people talking is now illegal. Devices have also been designed to intercept communications of new digital mobile units. However, the equipment is costly and civilian use of it is illegal. Cellphone technologies are advancing at such a rapid rate that many new spying devices become obsolete very quickly. It was concluded that a recent case in which a small oil and gas operator bid on leases days before a larger company won when the larger company proved that the bid was based on the misuse of confidential data. 3 figs.

  17. Giovanni Paolo Marana’s Turkish Spy and the Police of Louis XIV: the Fear of Being Secretly Observed by Trained Agents in Early Modern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Porada

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Paolo Marana’s epistolary novel, entitled l’Espion du Grand-Seigneur and published for the first time in the 1680s, was a pioneering work of a genre that was to flourish much later, namely spy story. The story features an Arab who comes to Paris in 1637 and spends the next 45 years collecting information about French government’s activity without being ever identified by French counter-intelligence. The main character was an undercover agent of a Muslim empire, who watched Christians with contempt - and yet the book that pretended to be just a bunch of his letters, accidentally found and translated from Arabic by Marana, was a bestseller in late seventeenth- and then eighteenth-century Western Europe. The paper presents the fates of the work and discusses the reasons of its huge success. Apart from the fact that the novel was written in a brilliant style, and published at the time when the ongoing Habsburg-Turkish war had triggered intensive interest in the Muslim East, one of these reasons was the fact that it was published in the time when in France a modern police force was created. Its tasks included collecting information about political opinions, religious practices and intimate lives of the Sun King’s subjects. The new feeling of being observed by the government’s men and informers certainly prepared the ground for the success of the first spy story of the West.

  18. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  19. Is black-hole ringdown a memory of its progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis; Hannam, Mark; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2012-10-05

    We perform an extensive numerical study of coalescing black-hole binaries to understand the gravitational-wave spectrum of quasinormal modes excited in the merged black hole. Remarkably, we find that the masses and spins of the progenitor are clearly encoded in the mode spectrum of the ringdown signal. Some of the mode amplitudes carry the signature of the binary's mass ratio, while others depend critically on the spins. Simulations of precessing binaries suggest that our results carry over to generic systems. Using Bayesian inference, we demonstrate that it is possible to accurately measure the mass ratio and a proper combination of spins even when the binary is itself invisible to a detector. Using a mapping of the binary masses and spins to the final black-hole spin allows us to further extract the spin components of the progenitor. Our results could have tremendous implications for gravitational astronomy by facilitating novel tests of general relativity using merging black holes.

  20. Focus on biological identity of endothelial progenitors cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, V; Flore, R; Santoro, L; De Matteis, G; Giupponi, B; Li Puma, D D; Santoliquido, A

    2015-11-01

    Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) were discovered by Asahara et al in 1997 and defined as bone marrow CD34+/KDR+ cells endowed with angiogenic potentialities in vitro and in vivo. The most likely assumption is that EPCs consist of several cell subpopulations with functions targeted at accomplishing the post-natal neovascularization process in a synergic and complementary fashion. Indeed, the subsequent identification of numerous and differentiated hematic populations, characterized by the capacity to develop an endothelial phenotype, has posed a number of questions as to the real identity of EPCs. This concept does not represent a sterile speculation but rather it suggests important implications for the future practice of stem cell therapy. The aim of this report was to explore through a critical analysis the two main experimental methodologies, in vitro culture and flow cytometry, applied to EPCs, followed by a brief revaluation of the endothelial progenitors employing a globally functional approach.

  1. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Muscle Progenitors: Inspiration for Clinical Therapies

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    Silvia Consalvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of regenerative medicine, based on the potential of stem cells to restore diseased tissues, epigenetics is becoming a pivotal area of interest. Therapeutic interventions that promote tissue and organ regeneration have as primary objective the selective control of gene expression in adult stem cells. This requires a deep understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms controlling transcriptional programs in tissue progenitors. This review attempts to elucidate the principle epigenetic regulations responsible of stem cells differentiation. In particular we focus on the current understanding of the epigenetic networks that regulate differentiation of muscle progenitors by the concerted action of chromatin-modifying enzymes and noncoding RNAs. The novel exciting role of exosome-bound microRNA in mediating epigenetic information transfer is also discussed. Finally we show an overview of the epigenetic strategies and therapies that aim to potentiate muscle regeneration and counteract the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD.

  2. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Paiva, Artur; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cell count and endothelial activation in a pediatric population with obesity. Observational and transversal study, including 120 children and adolescents with primary obesity of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, who were recruited at this Cardiovascular Risk Clinic. The control group was made up of 41 children and adolescents with normal body mass index. The variables analyzed were: age, gender, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, E-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine and circulating progenitor endothelial cell count. Insulin resistance was correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine (ρ=0.340; p=0.003), which was directly, but weakly correlated to E-selectin (ρ=0.252; p=0.046). High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not found to be correlated to markers of endothelial activation. Systolic blood pressure was directly correlated to body mass index (ρ=0.471; p<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (ρ=0.230; p=0.012), and inversely correlated to adiponectin (ρ=-0.331; p<0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ρ=-0.319; p<0.001). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count was directly, but weakly correlated, to body mass index (r=0.211; p=0.016), leptin (ρ=0.245; p=0.006), triglyceride levels (r=0.241; p=0.031), and E-selectin (ρ=0.297; p=0.004). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count is elevated in obese children and adolescents with evidence of endothelial activation, suggesting that, during infancy, endothelial repairing mechanisms are present in the context of endothelial activation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells, cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rossella; Felice, Francesca; Feriani, Roberto; Balbarini, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute substantially to preservation of a structurally and functionally intact endothelium. EPCs home in to the sites of endothelial injury and ischemia, where they proliferate, differentiate and integrate into the endothelial layer or exert a paracrine function by producing vascular growth factors. This review will focus on successful lifestyle interventions that aim to maintain vascular health through beneficial actions on cell populations with vasculogenic potential. The results of the studies proving the role of healthy lifestyle are particularly emphasized.

  4. Identification of Novel Human NK Cell Progenitor Subsets

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    Priyanka Sathe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathways and regulation of human haematopoiesis, in particular, lymphopoiesis, is vital to manipulation of these processes for therapeutic purposes. However, although haematopoiesis has been extensively characterised in mice, translation of these findings to human biology remains rudimentary. Here, we describe the isolation of three progenitor subsets from human foetal bone marrow that represent differential stages of commitment to the natural killer (NK cell lineage based on IL-15 responsiveness. We identify CD7 as a marker of IL-15 responsive progenitors in human bone marrow and find that this expression is maintained throughout commitment and maturation. Within the CD7+ fraction, we focussed on the lineage potential of three subsets based on CD127 and CD117 expression and observed restricted lymphoid and biased NK cell potential amongst subsets. We further demonstrate the presence of subsets similar in both phenotype and function in umbilical cord blood and the bone marrow of humanised mice, validating these as appropriate sources of progenitors for the investigation of human haematopoiesis. Overall, we describe several stages in the process of lymphopoiesis that will form the basis of investigating the regulators of this process in humans.

  5. Superluminous supernova progenitors have a half-solar metallicity threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wan; Smartt, Stephen J.; Yates, Rob M.; Nicholl, Matt; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Dennefeld, Michel; Inserra, Cosimo

    2017-09-01

    Host galaxy properties provide strong constraints on the stellar progenitors of superluminous supernovae. By comparing a sample of 19 low-redshift (z explosion site is likely lower than the integrated host value. We found that superluminous supernova hosts do not always have star formation rates higher than typical star-forming galaxies of the same mass. However, we confirm that high absolute specific star formation rates are a feature of superluminous supernova host galaxies, but interpret this as simply a consequence of the anticorrelation between gas-phase metallicity and specific star formation rate and the requirement of on-going star formation to produce young, massive stars greater than ∼10-20 M⊙. Based on our sample, we propose an upper limit of ˜ 0.5 Z_{⊙} for forming superluminous supernova progenitors (assuming an N2 metallicity diagnostic and a solar oxygen abundance of 8.69). Finally, we show that if magnetar powering is the source of the extreme luminosity, then the required initial spins appear to be correlated with metallicity of the host galaxy. This correlation needs further work, but if it applies, it is a powerful link between the supernova parameters and nature of the progenitor population.

  6. Dendritic Cell Lineage Potential in Human Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

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    Julie Helft

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs are thought to descend from a DC precursor downstream of the common myeloid progenitor (CMP. However, a mouse lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor has been shown to generate cDCs following a DC-specific developmental pathway independent of monocyte and granulocyte poiesis. Similarly, here we show that, in humans, a large fraction of multipotent lymphoid early progenitors (MLPs gives rise to cDCs, in particular the subset known as cDC1, identified by co-expression of DNGR-1 (CLEC9A and CD141 (BDCA-3. Single-cell analysis indicates that over one-third of MLPs have the potential to efficiently generate cDCs. cDC1s generated from CMPs or MLPs do not exhibit differences in transcriptome or phenotype. These results demonstrate an early imprinting of the cDC lineage in human hematopoiesis and highlight the plasticity of developmental pathways giving rise to human DCs.

  7. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Cardiovascular Disease

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    Caterina Oriana Aragona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify, evaluate, and synthesize evidence on the predictive power of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in cardiovascular disease, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources. MEDLINE was searched using keywords related to “endothelial progenitor cells” and “endothelium” and, for the different categories, respectively, “smoking”; “blood pressure”; “diabetes mellitus” or “insulin resistance”; “dyslipidemia”; “aging” or “elderly”; “angina pectoris” or “myocardial infarction”; “stroke” or “cerebrovascular disease”; “homocysteine”; “C-reactive protein”; “vitamin D”. Study Selection. Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 927 database hits, 43 quantitative studies were included. Data Syntheses. EPC count has been suggested for cardiovascular risk estimation in the clinical practice, since it is currently accepted that EPCs can work as proangiogenic support cells, maintaining their importance as regenerative/reparative potential, and also as prognostic markers. Conclusions. EPCs showed an important role in identifying cardiovascular risk conditions, and to suggest their evaluation as predictor of outcomes appears to be reasonable in different defined clinical settings. Due to their capability of proliferation, circulation, and the development of functional progeny, great interest has been directed to therapeutic use of progenitor cells in atherosclerotic diseases. This trial is registered with registration number: Prospero CRD42015023717.

  8. NOTCH signaling in skeletal progenitors is critical for fracture repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Inzana, Jason A.; Mirando, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Jie; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Awad, Hani A.; Hilton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture nonunions develop in 10%–20% of patients with fractures, resulting in prolonged disability. Current data suggest that bone union during fracture repair is achieved via proliferation and differentiation of skeletal progenitors within periosteal and soft tissues surrounding bone, while bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) and other skeletal progenitors may also contribute. The NOTCH signaling pathway is a critical maintenance factor for BMSCs during skeletal development, although the precise role for NOTCH and the requisite nature of BMSCs following fracture is unknown. Here, we evaluated whether NOTCH and/or BMSCs are required for fracture repair by performing nonstabilized and stabilized fractures on NOTCH-deficient mice with targeted deletion of RBPjk in skeletal progenitors, maturing osteoblasts, and committed chondrocytes. We determined that removal of NOTCH signaling in BMSCs and subsequent depletion of this population result in fracture nonunion, as the fracture repair process was normal in animals harboring either osteoblast- or chondrocyte-specific deletion of RBPjk. Together, this work provides a genetic model of a fracture nonunion and demonstrates the requirement for NOTCH and BMSCs in fracture repair, irrespective of fracture stability and vascularity. PMID:26950423

  9. No hot and luminous progenitor for Tycho's supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. E.; Ghavamian, P.; Badenes, C.; Gilfanov, M.

    2017-11-01

    Type Ia supernovae have proven vital to our understanding of cosmology, both as standard candles and for their role in galactic chemical evolution; however, their origin remains uncertain. The canonical accretion model implies a hot and luminous progenitor that would ionize the surrounding gas out to a radius of 10-100 pc for 100,000 years after the explosion. Here, we report stringent upper limits on the temperature and luminosity of the progenitor of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572), determined using the remnant itself as a probe of its environment. Hot, luminous progenitors that would have produced a greater hydrogen ionization fraction than that measured at the radius of the present remnant ( 3 pc) can thus be excluded. This conclusively rules out steadily nuclear-burning white dwarfs (supersoft X-ray sources), as well as disk emission from a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf accreting approximately greater than 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 (recurrent novae; M⊙ is equal to one solar mass). The lack of a surrounding Strömgren sphere is consistent with the merger of a double white dwarf binary, although other more exotic scenarios may be possible.

  10. Observational properties of massive black hole binary progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainich, R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Shenar, T.; Marchant, P.; Eldridge, J. J.; Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Langer, N.; Todt, H.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The first directly detected gravitational waves (GW 150914) were emitted by two coalescing black holes (BHs) with masses of ≈ 36 M⊙ and ≈ 29 M⊙. Several scenarios have been proposed to put this detection into an astrophysical context. The evolution of an isolated massive binary system is among commonly considered models. Aims: Various groups have performed detailed binary-evolution calculations that lead to BH merger events. However, the question remains open as to whether binary systems with the predicted properties really exist. The aim of this paper is to help observers to close this gap by providing spectral characteristics of massive binary BH progenitors during a phase where at least one of the companions is still non-degenerate. Methods: Stellar evolution models predict fundamental stellar parameters. Using these as input for our stellar atmosphere code (Potsdam Wolf-Rayet), we compute a set of models for selected evolutionary stages of massive merging BH progenitors at different metallicities. Results: The synthetic spectra obtained from our atmosphere calculations reveal that progenitors of massive BH merger events start their lives as O2-3V stars that evolve to early-type blue supergiants before they undergo core-collapse during the Wolf-Rayet phase. When the primary has collapsed, the remaining system will appear as a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary. Based on our atmosphere models, we provide feedback parameters, broad band magnitudes, and spectral templates that should help to identify such binaries in the future. Conclusions: While the predicted parameter space for massive BH binary progenitors is partly realized in nature, none of the known massive binaries match our synthetic spectra of massive BH binary progenitors exactly. Comparisons of empirically determined mass-loss rates with those assumed by evolution calculations reveal significant differences. The consideration of the empirical mass-loss rates in evolution calculations will

  11. Identification of (3S, 9R)- and (3S, 9S)-megastigma-6,7-dien-3,5,9-triol 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranosides as damascenone progenitors in the flowers of Rosa damascena Mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Shigetaka; Mizoguchi, Masaya; Hirata, Satoshi; Takagi, Kazuteru; Hashimoto, Ikue; Yamano, Yumiko; Ito, Masayoshi; Fleischmann, Peter; Winterhalter, Peter; Morita, Tetuichiro; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2002-12-01

    The progenitors of damascenone (1), the most intensive C13-norisoprenoid volatile aroma constituent of rose essential oil, were surveyed in the flowers of Rosa damascena Mill. Besides 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-3-hydroxy-7,8-didehydro-beta-ionol (4b), a stable progenitor already isolated from the residual water after steam distillation of flowers of R. damascena Mill., two labile progenitors were identified to be (3S, 9R)- and (3S, 9S)-megastigma-6,7-dien-3,5,9-triol 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranosides (2b) based on their synthesis and HPLC-MS analytical data. Compound 2b gave damascenone (1), 3-hydroxy-beta-damascone (3) and 4b upon heating under acidic conditions.

  12. Exploring the Chemical Link Between Local Ellipticals and Their High-Redshift Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Andrews, Brett H.; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Van Der Wel, Arjen; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present Keck/MOSFIRE K-band spectroscopy of the first mass-selected sample of galaxies at z approximately 2.3. Targets are selected from the 3D-Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey. The six detected galaxies have a mean [N II]lambda6584/H-alpha ratio of 0.27 +/- 0.01, with a small standard deviation of 0.05. This mean value is similar to that of UV-selected galaxies of the same mass. The mean gas-phase oxygen abundance inferred from the [N II]/Halpha ratios depends on the calibration method, and ranges from 12+log(O/H)(sub gas) = 8.57 for the Pettini & Pagel calibration to 12+log(O/H)(sub gas) = 8.87 for the Maiolino et al. calibration. Measurements of the stellar oxygen abundance in nearby quiescent galaxies with the same number density indicate 12+log(O/H)(sub stars) = 8.95, similar to the gas-phase abundances of the z approximately 2.3 galaxies if the Maiolino et al. calibration is used. This suggests that these high-redshift star forming galaxies may be progenitors of today's massive early-type galaxies. The main uncertainties are the absolute calibration of the gas-phase oxygen abundance and the incompleteness of the z approximately 2.3 sample: the galaxies with detected Ha tend to be larger and have higher star formation rates than the galaxies without detected H-alpha, and we may still be missing the most dust-obscured progenitors.

  13. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

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    Minhua DENG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  14. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-02-20

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  16. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: Interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I.; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipo...

  17. Biology of the Adult Hepatic Progenitor Cell: “Ghosts in the Machine”

    OpenAIRE

    Darwiche, Houda; Petersen, Bryon E.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the basic biological principles governing adult progenitor cells of the liver and the mechanisms by which they operate. If scientists were better able to understand the conditions that govern stem cell mechanics in the liver, it may be possible to apply that understanding in a clinical setting for use in the treatment or cure of human pathologies. This chapter gives a basic introduction to hepatic progenitor cell biology and explores what is known about progenitor...

  18. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deng,Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara ce...

  19. Comparison of methods for localizing the source position of deauthentication attacks on WAP 802.11n using Chanalyzer and Wi-Spy 2.4x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaweres, R. B.; Mokoginta, S.; Alaydrus, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper descnbes a comparison of three methods used to locate the position of the source of deauthentication attacks on Wi-Fi using Chanalyzer, and Wi-Spy 2.4x adapter. The three methods are wardriving, absorption and trilateration. The position of constant deauthentication attacks is more easily analyzed compared to that of random attacks. Signal propagation may provide a comparison between signal strength and distance which makes the position of attackers more easily located. The results are shown on the chart patterns generated from the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSS). And it is proven that these three methods can be used to localize the position of attackers, and can be recommended for use in the environment of organizations using Wi-Fi.

  20. Ovarian monocyte progenitor cells: phenotypic and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Cherry J; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Haraguchi, Soichi; Lerner, Danika; Baldwin, Margi; El-Badri, Nagwa S

    2005-04-01

    Leukocytes of the macrophage lineage are abundant in the ovarian tissues and have an important function in both follicular development and regression of postovulatory follicles. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that continuous production of macrophages in the ovarian stroma is maintained by a resident population of progenitors. We established a long-term culture of ovarian follicular stromal cells from BALB/c and green fluorescent protein-transgenic (GFP-TG) C57BL/6 mice. Nonadherent cells were collected and tested for hematopoietic function in vitro and in vivo. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed a homogenous population of monocyte-like rounded cells. Nonadherent cells continued to proliferate in culture for several months without senescence. When plated at very low density in methylcellulose, these cells formed colonies consisting of monocyte-like cells. Ovarian monocyte-like cells reacted with CD45, CD11b, CD11c, and Ly6-Gr-1 cell surface markers. A distinct CD45low population within these cells reacted with CD117 (C-kit) surface marker, suggestive of a primitive hematopoietic progenitor. Fifty thousand nonadherent cells failed to provide radioprotection to lethally irradiated mice and thus were not considered to be equivalent to pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Ovarian nonadherent stromal cells were positive for alkaline phosphatase but lacked embryonic cell antigens stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1) and Oct-4. We conclude that in the ovaries, a higher requirement for macrophages is provided by a resident stromal population of progenitors whose progeny is restricted to the production of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage.

  1. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

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    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  2. Aberrant lymphatic endothelial progenitors in lymphatic malformation development.

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    June K Wu

    Full Text Available Lymphatic malformations (LMs are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4, circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2, and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3. Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133- cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133- LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133- LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs.

  3. Aberrant lymphatic endothelial progenitors in lymphatic malformation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, June K; Kitajewski, Christopher; Reiley, Maia; Keung, Connie H; Monteagudo, Julie; Andrews, John P; Liou, Peter; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Wong, Alvin; Kandel, Jessica J; Shawber, Carrie J

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4), circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2), and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3). Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133- cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133- LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133- LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs.

  4. The Salmonella enterica PhoP directly activates the horizontally acquired SPI-2 gene sseL and is functionally different from a S. bongori ortholog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Gal-Mor

    Full Text Available To establish a successful infection within the host, a pathogen must closely regulate multiple virulence traits to ensure their accurate temporal and spatial expression. As a highly adapted intracellular pathogen, Salmonella enterica has acquired during its evolution various virulence genes via numerous lateral transfer events, including the acquisition of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI-2 and its associated effectors. Beneficial use of horizontally acquired genes requires that their expression is effectively coordinated with the already existing virulence programs and the regulatory set-up in the bacterium. As an example for such a mechanism, we show here that the ancestral PhoPQ system of Salmonella enterica is able to regulate directly the SPI-2 effector gene sseL (encoding a secreted deubiquitinase in an SsrB-independent manner and that PhoP plays a part in a feed-forward regulatory loop, which fine-tunes the cellular level of SseL. Additionally, we demonstrate the presence of conserved cis regulatory elements in the promoter region of sseL and show direct binding of purified PhoP to this region. Interestingly, in contrast to the S. enterica PhoP, an ortholog regulator from a S. bongori SARC 12 strain was found to be impaired in promoting transcription of sseL and other genes from the PhoP regulon. These findings have led to the identification of a previously uncharacterized residue in the DNA-binding domain of PhoP, which is required for the transcriptional activation of PhoP regulated genes in Salmonella spp. Collectively our data demonstrate an interesting interface between the acquired SsrB regulon and the ancestral PhoPQ regulatory circuit, provide novel insights into the function of PhoP, and highlight a mechanism of regulatory integration of horizontally acquired genes into the virulence network of Salmonella enterica.

  5. The type VI secretion system encoded in SPI-6 plays a role in gastrointestinal colonization and systemic spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pezoa

    Full Text Available The role of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs in pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection in the chicken is poorly studied, while many studies have been completed in murine models. The Type VI Secretion System (T6SS is a recently described protein secretion system in Gram-negative bacteria. The genus Salmonella contains five phylogenetically distinct T6SS encoded in differentially distributed genomic islands. S. Typhimurium harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6, which contributes to the ability of Salmonella to colonize mice. On the other hand, serotype Gallinarum harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19 that is required for colonization of chicks. In this work, we investigated the role of T6SSSPI-6 in infection of chicks by S. Typhimurium. Oral infection of White Leghorn chicks showed that a ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant had reduced colonization of the gut and internal organs, compared with the wild-type strain. Transfer of the intact T6SSSPI-6 gene cluster into the T6SS mutant restored bacterial colonization. In addition, our results showed that transfer of T6SSSPI-19 from S. Gallinarum to the ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant of S. Typhimurium not only complemented the colonization defect but also resulted in a transient increase in the colonization of the cecum and ileum of chicks at days 1 and 3 post-infection. Our data indicates that T6SSSPI-6 contributes to chicken colonization and suggests that both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 perform similar functions in vivo despite belonging to different phylogenetic families.

  6. Assisted reproductive medicine in Poland --Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG) 2012 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Anna; Spaczyńiski, Robert Z; Kurzawa, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this report is to present data concerning results and complications related to infertility treatment using assisted reproductive technology (ART) and insemination (IUI) in Poland in 2012. The report was prepared by the Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG), based on individual data provided by fertility clinics. Reporting was voluntary data were not subject to external verification. The report presents the availability and the structure of infertility treatment services, the number of procedures performed, their effectiveness and the most common complications. In 2014, 34 Polish fertility clinics provided information to the report, presenting data from 2012. The total number of reported treatment cycles using ART was 17,116 (incl. 10,714 fresh IVF/ICSI) and 14,727 IUI. The clinical pregnancy rate per cycle was on average 33.7% for fresh IVF/ICSI and 13.3% for IUI. The prevalence of multiple births was 15.7% and 6.2%, in case of IVF/ICSI and IUI methods respectively The most frequent complication in the course of treatment using ART was ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)--severe OHSS constituted 0.68% of all stimulated cycles. The SPiN PTG report shows the average effectiveness and safety of ART and was the only proof of responsibility and due diligence of fertility centres in Poland. However, due to the lack of a central register of fertility clinics, facultative participation in the report as well as incomplete information on pregnancy and delivery rate, the collected data do not reflect the full spectrum of Polish reproductive medicine.

  7. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osório, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group...... has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe...

  8. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT...... of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling....

  9. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  10. Osteopontin neutralisation abrogates the liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, J D; Swiderska-Syn, M; Dollé, L; Reid, D; Eksteen, B; Claridge, L; Briones-Orta, M A; Shetty, S; Oo, Y H; Riva, A; Chokshi, S; Papa, S; Mi, Z; Kuo, P C; Williams, R; Canbay, A; Adams, D H; Diehl, A M; van Grunsven, L A; Choi, S S; Syn, W K

    2015-07-01

    Chronic liver injury triggers a progenitor cell repair response, and liver fibrosis occurs when repair becomes deregulated. Previously, we reported that reactivation of the hedgehog pathway promotes fibrogenic liver repair. Osteopontin (OPN) is a hedgehog-target, and a cytokine that is highly upregulated in fibrotic tissues, and regulates stem-cell fate. Thus, we hypothesised that OPN may modulate liver progenitor cell response, and thereby, modulate fibrotic outcomes. We further evaluated the impact of OPN-neutralisation on murine liver fibrosis. Liver progenitors (603B and bipotential mouse oval liver) were treated with OPN-neutralising aptamers in the presence or absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, to determine if (and how) OPN modulates liver progenitor function. Effects of OPN-neutralisation (using OPN-aptamers or OPN-neutralising antibodies) on liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis were assessed in three models of liver fibrosis (carbon tetrachloride, methionine-choline deficient diet, 3,5,-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine diet) by quantitative real time (qRT) PCR, Sirius-Red staining, hydroxyproline assay, and semiquantitative double-immunohistochemistry. Finally, OPN expression and liver progenitor response were corroborated in liver tissues obtained from patients with chronic liver disease. OPN is overexpressed by liver progenitors in humans and mice. In cultured progenitors, OPN enhances viability and wound healing by modulating TGF-β signalling. In vivo, OPN-neutralisation attenuates the liver progenitor cell response, reverses epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in Sox9+ cells, and abrogates liver fibrogenesis. OPN upregulation during liver injury is a conserved repair response, and influences liver progenitor cell function. OPN-neutralisation abrogates the liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis in mouse models of liver fibrosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  11. Osteopontin Neutralization Abrogates the Liver Progenitor Cell Response and Fibrogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, J; Swiderska-Syn, M; Dollé, L; Reid, D; Eksteen, B; Claridge, L; Briones-Orta, MA; Shetty, S; Oo, YH; Riva, A; Chokshi, S; Papa, S; Mi, Z; Kuo, PC; Williams, R; Canbay, A; Adams, DH; Diehl, AM; van Grunsven, LA; Choi, SS; Syn, WK

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic liver injury triggers a progenitor-cell repair-response, and liver fibrosis occurs when repair becomes de-regulated. Previously, we reported that reactivation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway promotes fibrogenic liver-repair. Osteopontin (OPN) is a Hh-target, and a cytokine that is highly upregulated in fibrotic tissues, and regulates stem-cell fate. Thus, we hypothesized that OPN may modulate liver progenitor-cell response, and thereby, modulate fibrotic outcomes. We further evaluated the impact of OPN-neutralization on murine liver fibrosis. Methods Liver progenitors (603B and BMOL) were treated with OPN-neutralizing aptamers in the presence or absence of TGF–β, to determine if (and how) OPN modulates liver progenitor function. Effects of OPN-neutralization (using OPN-aptamers or OPN-neutralizing antibodies) on liver progenitor-cell response and fibrogenesis were assessed in three models of liver fibrosis (carbon tetrachloride, methionine-choline deficient diet, 3, 5,-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine diet) by qRTPCR, Sirius-Red staining, hydroxyproline assay, and semi-quantitative double-immunohistochemistry. Finally, OPN expression and liver progenitor response were corroborated in liver tissues obtained from patients with chronic liver disease. Results OPN is over-expressed by liver progenitors in humans and mice. In cultured progenitors, OPN enhances viability and wound-healing by modulating TGF-β signaling. In vivo, OPN-neutralization attenuates the liver progenitor-cell response, reverses epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in Sox9+ cells, and abrogates liver fibrogenesis. Conclusions OPN upregulation during liver injury is a conserved repair-response, and influences liver progenitor-cell function. OPN-neutralization abrogates the liver progenitor-cell response and fibrogenesis in mouse models of liver fibrosis. PMID:24902765

  12. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identifies genes differentially expressed in human epicardial progenitors and hiPSC-derived cardiac progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnergren, Jane; Drowley, Lauren; Plowright, Alleyn T; Brolén, Gabriella; Goumans, Marie-José; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Sartipy, Peter; Wang, Qing-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Regenerative therapies hold great potential to change the treatment paradigm for cardiac diseases. Human cardiac progenitor cells can be used for drug discovery in this area and also provide a renewable source of cardiomyocytes. However, a better understanding of their characteristics is critical for interpreting data obtained from drug screening using these cells. In the present study, we performed global transcriptional analysis of two important sources of cardiac progenitors, i.e., patient epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) and cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we also compared the gene expression profiles of these cells when they were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We identified 3,289 mRNAs that were differentially expressed between EPDCs and CPCs. Gene ontology annotation and pathway enrichment analyses further revealed possible unique functions of these two cell populations. Notably, the impact of hypoxia vs normoxia on gene expression was modest and only a few genes (e.g., AK4, ALDOC, BNIP3P1, PGK1, and SLC2A1) were upregulated in EPDCs and CPCs after the cells were exposed to low oxygen for 24 h. Finally, we also performed a focused analysis of the gene expression patterns of a predefined set of 92 paracrine factors. We identified 30 of these genes as differentially expressed, and 29 were expressed at higher levels in EPDCs compared with CPCs. Taken together, the results of the present study advance our understanding of the transcriptional programs in EPDCs and CPCs and highlights important differences and similarities between these cell populations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, C.J.; Casas-Selves, M.; Kim, J.; Zaberezhnyy, V.; Aghili, L.; Daniel, A.E.; Jimenez, L.; Azam, T.; McNamee, E.N.; Clambey, E.T.; Klawitter, J.; Serkova, N.J.; Tan, A.C.; Dinarello, C.A.; DeGregori, J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed

  14. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  15. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases induces astrocytic differentiation of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Anirban; Dhara, Sujoy K; Swetenburg, Raymond; Mithani, Miloni; Cao, Kaixiang; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; Stice, Steven L

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how to specify rapid differentiation of human neural progenitor towards enriched non-transformed human astrocyte progenitors will provide a critical cell source to further our understanding of how astrocytes play a pivotal role in neural function and development. Human neural progenitors derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cells and propagated in adherent serum-free cultures provide a fate restricted renewable source for quick production of neural cells; however, such cells are highly refractive to astrocytogenesis and show a strong neurogenic bias, similar to neural progenitors from the early embryonic central nervous system (CNS). We found that several astrocytic genes are hypermethylated in such progenitors potentially preventing generation of astrocytes and leading to the proneuronal fate of these progenitors. However, epigenetic modification by Azacytidine (Aza-C) and Trichostatin A (TSA), with concomitant signaling from BMP2 and LIF in neural progenitor cultures shifts this bias, leading to expression of astrocytic markers as early as 5days of differentiation, with near complete suppression of neuronal differentiation. The resultant cells express major astrocytic markers, are amenable to co-culture with neurons, can be propagated as astrocyte progenitors and are cryopreservable. Although previous reports have generated astrocytes from pluripotent cells, the differentiation required extensive culture or selection based on cell surface antigens. The development of a label free and rapid differentiation process will expedite future derivation of astrocytes from various sources pluripotent cells including, but not limited to, human astrocytes associated with various neurological diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  17. Are the models for type Ia supernova progenitors consistent with the properties of supernova remnants?,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badenes, C.; Hughes, J.P.; Bravo, E.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the models for progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae and the properties of the supernova remnants that evolve after the explosion. Most models for Type Ia progenitors in the single-degenerate scenario predict substantial outflows during the presupernova

  18. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on purified bone marrow progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bot (Freek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used highly enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells and in-vitro culture to examine the following questions: 1. The effects of recombinant lL-3 and GM-CSF on proliferation and differentiation of enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells have not been clearly defined: - how do IL~3

  19. Successful periodontal ligament regeneration by periodontal progenitor preseeding on natural tooth root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangaria, Smit Jayant; Ito, Yoshihiro; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2011-10-01

    The regeneration of lost periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone is the purpose of periodontal tissue engineering. The goal of the present study was to assess the suitability of 3 odontogenic progenitor populations from dental pulp, PDL, and dental follicle for periodontal regeneration when exposed to natural and synthetic apatite surface topographies. We demonstrated that PDL progenitors featured higher levels of periostin and scleraxis expression, increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential, and pronounced elongated cell shapes on barren root chips when compared with dental pulp and dental follicle cells. When evaluating the effect of surface characteristics on PDL progenitors, natural root surfaces resulted in elongated PDL cell shapes, whereas PDL progenitors on synthetic apatite surfaces were rounded or polygonal. In addition, surface coatings affected PDL progenitor gene expression profiles: collagen I coatings enhanced alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression levels and laminin-1 coatings increased epidermal growth factor (EGF), nestin, cadherin 1, and keratin 8 expression. PDL progenitors seeded on natural tooth root surfaces in organ culture formed new periodontal fibers after 3 weeks of culture. Finally, replantation of PDL progenitor-seeded tooth roots into rat alveolar bone sockets resulted in the complete formation of a new PDL and stable reattachment of teeth over a 6-month period. Together, these findings indicate that periodontal progenitor cell type as well as mineral surface topography and molecular environment play crucial roles in the regeneration of true periodontal anchorage.

  20. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Schutgens, Frans; Verhaar, Marianne C; Clevers, Hans

    Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for

  2. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I; Briddell, R

    2001-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have the potential for providing benefit in a variety of clinical settings. These include cells for support of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, as a target for replacement gene therapy, and as a source of cells for immunotherapy. The limitation to many of these applications has been the total absolute number of defined target cells. Therefore many investigators have explored methods to culture hematopoietic cells in vitro to increase the numbers of these cells. Studies attempting to expand hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells, and mature cells in vitro have become possible over the past decade due to the availability of recombinant growth factors and cell selection technologies. To date, no studies have demonstrated convincing data on the expansion of true stem cells, and so the focus of this review is the expansion of committed progenitor cells and mature cells. A number of clinical studies have been preformed using a variety of culture conditions, and several studies are currently in progress that explore the use of ex vivo expanded cells. These studies will be discussed in this review. There are evolving data that suggest that there are real clinical benefits associated with the use of the expanded cells; however, we are still at the early stages of understanding how to optimally culture different cell populations. The next decade should determine what culture conditions and what cell populations are needed for a range of clinical applications.

  3. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  4. Selection of progenitors for increase in oil content in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Isabela da Silva Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The low genetic diversity brings limitation to breeding, because genetically similar genotypes share alleles in common, causing little complementarity and low vigor due to the low levels of heterozygosity in crosses. The objective of this work was to analyze the oil content and genetic diversity of soybean genotypes (Glycine max (L. Merrill based on QTL regions of this trait for choice of progenitors for increase in oil content. Twenty-two genotypes with wide variation in oil content, including cultivars with high oil contents, were cultivated in different Brazilian conditions and the oil content of the grains was quantified by infrared spectrometry. Microsatellite markers selected based on QTL regions for oil content in soybean were analyzed to estimate the genetic diversity. In these studies, a wide variation in oil content (17.28-23.01% and a reasonable diversity among the genotypes were observed, being PI181544 the most divergent genotype, followed by Suprema. The genotypes PI371610/Suprema and Suprema/CD01RR8384 showed genetic distance and higher oil contents in the grains, while the cultivars Suprema and CD01RR8384 had the highest oil contents and proved to be little genetically related. These genotypes are promising progenitors for selection of high oil content in soybean.

  5. THE PROGENITOR OF SN 2011ja: CLUES FROM CIRCUMSTELLAR INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborti, Sayan [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ray, Alak; Yadav, Naveen [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Smith, Randall [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ryder, Stuart [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Sutaria, Firoza [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore (India); Dwarkadas, Vikram V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chandra, Poonam [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada); Pooley, David [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX (United States); Roy, Rupak, E-mail: schakraborti@fas.harvard.edu [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital (India)

    2013-09-01

    Massive stars, possibly red supergiants, which retain extended hydrogen envelopes until core collapse, produce Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. The ejecta from these explosions shocks the circumstellar matter originating from the mass loss of the progenitor during the final phases of its life. This interaction accelerates particles to relativistic energies which then lose energy via synchrotron radiation in the shock-amplified magnetic fields and inverse Compton scattering against optical photons from the supernova. These processes produce different signatures in the radio and X-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Observed together, they allow us to break the degeneracy between shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification. In this work, we use X-rays observations from the Chandra and radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array to study the relative importance of processes which accelerate particles and those which amplify magnetic fields in producing the non-thermal radiation from SN 2011ja. We use radio observations to constrain the explosion date. Multiple Chandra observations allow us to probe the history of variable mass loss from the progenitor. The ejecta expands into a low-density bubble followed by interaction with a higher density wind from a red supergiant consistent with M{sub ZAMS} {approx}> 12 M{sub Sun }. Our results suggest that a fraction of Type IIP supernovae may interact with circumstellar media set up by non-steady winds.

  6. No surviving evolved companions of the progenitor of SN 1006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Jonay I; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Tabernero, Hugo M; Montes, David; Canal, Ramon; Méndez, Javier; Bedin, Luigi R

    2012-09-27

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to occur when a white dwarf made of carbon and oxygen accretes sufficient mass to trigger a thermonuclear explosion. The accretion could be slow, from an unevolved (main-sequence) or evolved (subgiant or giant) star (the single-degenerate channel), or rapid, as the primary star breaks up a smaller orbiting white dwarf (the double-degenerate channel). A companion star will survive the explosion only in the single-degenerate channel. Both channels might contribute to the production of type Ia supernovae, but the relative proportions of their contributions remain a fundamental puzzle in astronomy. Previous searches for remnant companions have revealed one possible case for SN 1572 (refs 8, 9), although that has been questioned. More recently, observations have restricted surviving companions to be small, main-sequence stars, ruling out giant companions but still allowing the single-degenerate channel. Here we report the results of a search for surviving companions of the progenitor of SN 1006 (ref. 14). None of the stars within 4 arc minutes of the apparent site of the explosion is associated with the supernova remnant, and we can firmly exclude all giant and subgiant stars from being companions of the progenitor. In combination with previous results, our findings indicate that fewer than 20 per cent of type Ia supernovae occur through the single-degenerate channel.

  7. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation requires anti-inflammatory M2-polarized macrophages to clear dying adipocytes and to recruit new brown adipocytes from progenitors. In this Extra Views article, we discuss in greater detail the cellular elements of adipogenic niches and report a strategy to isolate and characterize the subpopulations of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors that actively participate in adrenergic tissue remodeling. Further characterization of these subpopulations may facilitate identification of new cellular targets to improve metabolic and immune function of adipose tissue.

  8. Yap controls stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the mouse postnatal epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverdam, Annemiek; Claxton, Christina; Zhang, Xiaomeng; James, Gregory; Harvey, Kieran F; Key, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Tissue renewal is an ongoing process in the epithelium of the skin. We have begun to examine the genetic mechanisms that control stem/progenitor cell activation in the postnatal epidermis. The conserved Hippo pathway regulates stem cell turnover in arthropods through to vertebrates. Here we show that its downstream effector, yes-associated protein (YAP), is active in the stem/progenitor cells of the postnatal epidermis. Overexpression of a C-terminally truncated YAP mutant in the basal epidermis of transgenic mice caused marked expansion of epidermal stem/progenitor cell populations. Our data suggest that the C-terminus of YAP controls the balance between stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the postnatal interfollicular epidermis. We conclude that YAP functions as a molecular switch of stem/progenitor cell activation in the epidermis. Moreover, our results highlight YAP as a possible therapeutic target for diseases such as skin cancer, psoriasis, and epidermolysis bullosa.

  9. Specification of excitatory neurons in the developing cerebral cortex: progenitor diversity and environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcos R; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The mature cerebral cortex harbors a heterogeneous population of glutamatergic neurons, organized into a highly intricate histological architecture. Classically, this mixed population of neurons was thought to be generated sequentially from a seemingly homogenous group of progenitors under the influence of external cues. This view, however, has been challenged in the last decade by evidences pointing to the existence of fate-restricted neuronal progenitors in the developing neocortex. Here, we review classical studies using cell transplantation, retroviral labeling and cell culture, as well as new data from genetic fate-mapping analysis, to discuss the lineage relationships between neocortical progenitors and subclasses of excitatory neurons. We also propose a temporal model to conciliate the existence of fate-restricted progenitors alongside multipotent progenitors in the neocortex. Finally, we discuss evidences for a critical period of plasticity among post mitotic excitatory cortical neurons when environmental influences could change neuronal cell fate.

  10. Índice estandarizado de precipitación (SPI para la caracterización de sequías meteorológicas en la cuenca del río Dagua-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loaiza Cerón, Wilmar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI characterizes meteorological droughts of a place, by quantifying the deficit of rainfall in different time periods. Negative SPI values represents drought, while positive values indicate wet periods. The results suggest that negative SPI periods coincide with El Niño years: 82-83, 91-92 and 97-98. The 91-92 event had the largest impact on the region. These results indicate that the most severe droughts in the basin of Dagua, were presented at the quarters of Dec- Jan-Feb, Jan-Feb-Mar, Jun-Jul-Aug and Jul-Aug-Sep. The results have been obtained with geostatistical techniques, and are a basic input to formulate adaptation strategies and ensure food sovereignty of small farmers against drought.El Índice Estandarizado de Precipitación (SPI caracteriza las sequías meteorológicas de un lugar, mediante la cuantificación del déficit de precipitación en diferentes períodos de tiempo. Valores negativos del SPI representan sequías, mientras valores positivos indican periodos húmedos. Los resultados muestran que los períodos SPI negativos, coinciden con años clasificados como El Niño: 82-83, 91-92 y 97-98, de los cuales, el evento 91-92 presentó los mayores impactos en la región. En general, los resultados indican que las sequías más intensas en la cuenca del Dagua, se presentaron en los trimestres de Dic-Ene-Feb, Ene-Feb-Mar, Jun-Jul-Ago y Jul-Ago-Sep; estos resultados se espacializaron con técnicas geoestadísticas, y son insumo básico para formular estrategias de adaptación y garantizar la soberanía alimentaria de los pequeños agricultores frente a las sequías. [fr] L’Indice de précipitations normalisé (SPI caractérise les sécheresses météorologiques d’un lieu, en quantifiant le déficit de précipitations à différentes périodes de temps. Les valeurs négatives de SPI indiquent périodes sécheresse, tandis que les positives indiquent des périodes humides. Les r

  11. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda LoGuidice

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in

  12. Viral-mediated gene transfer to mouse primary neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie M; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Sauter, Sybille L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells may provide for cell replacement or gene delivery vehicles in neurodegen-erative disease therapies. The expression of therapeutic proteins by neural progenitors would be enhanced by viral-mediated gene transfer, but the effects of several common recombinant viruses on primary progenitor cell populations have not been tested. To address this issue, we cultured cells from embryonic day 16-18 mouse brain in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor, and investigated how transduction with recombinant viral vectors affected maintenance and differentiation properties of progenitor cells. Neurosphere cultures were incubated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), adeno-associated virus (AAV) or ade-noviral (Ad) constructs expressing either beta-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescent protein at low multiplicity of infection. Nestin-positive neurospheres were regenerated after incubation of single progenitor cells with FIV, indicating that FIV-mediated gene transfer did not inhibit progenitor cell self-renewal. In contrast, adenovirus induced differentiation into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. The AAV serotypes tested did not effectively transduce progenitor cells. FIV-transduced progenitors retained the potential for differentiation into neurons and glia in vitro, and when transplanted into the striatum of normal adult C57BL/6 mice differentiated into glia, or remained undifferentiated. In the presence of tumor cells, FIV-transduced progenitors migrated significantly from the injection site. Our results suggest that FIV-based vectors can transduce progenitor cell populations in vitro, with maintenance of their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types or to respond to injury within the central nervous system. These results hold promise for the use of genetically manipulated stem cells for CNS therapies.

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  3. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. TRASTORNOS DEL ESPECTRO AUTISTA Y EXPOSICIONES OCUPACIONALES DE LOS PROGENITORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Pino-López

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentos: Estudios con hermanos y gemelos sugieren un componente genético en el origen del autismo que no explica su crecimiento actual. El objetivo es investigar si factores ambientales como algunas exposiciones profesionales (trabajo nocturno, manejo de disolventes y/o campos electromagnéticos incrementan la probabilidad de trastornos del espectro autista (TEA en los hijos. Métodos: Estudio observacional de casos y controles mediante análisis de expedientes de 206 niños entre 16 y 36 meses de edad evaluados en el Servicio de Atención Temprana de Ciudad Real (70 con TEA y 136 no afectados. Para medir el riesgo de TEA asociado al trabajo nocturno, con disolventes y/o campos electromagnéticos se calculó la odds ratio (OR con un intervalo de confianza (IC del 95%. Resultados: El riesgo de TEA se multiplica por 2,22 cuando un progenitor trabaja en las ocupaciones estudiadas (OR=2,22, IC 95%=1,42-3,48, destacando trabajo con disolventes (OR=2,81, IC 95%=1,28-6,17 y nocturno (OR=2,18, IC 95%=1,21-3,93. El riesgo se multiplica por 3 si la madre trabaja en estas ocupaciones (OR=3, IC95%=1,44-6,26, destacando trabajo nocturno (OR=3,47, IC 95%=1,39-8,63 y con disolventes (OR=2,88, IC 95%=1,28-6,17. El riesgo se multiplica por 1,94 si el padre trabaja en estas ocupaciones(OR=1,94, IC 95%=1,07-3,53 y por 2,81 con disolventes (OR=2,81, IC 95%=1,01-7,86. Se encontró asociación positiva entre nivel educativo de los progenitores y TEA. Conclusiones: Encontramos relación significativa entre exposición de los progenitores a los riesgos estudiados y TEA en los hijos. Los resultados sugieren la participación de alteraciones genéticas ocasionadas por factores ambientales en el origen del trastorno.

  3. Archival Investigation of Outburst Sites and Progenitors of Extragalactic Intermediate-Luminosity Mid-IR Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard

    2017-08-01

    Our team is using Spitzer in a long-term search for extragalactic mid-infrared (MIR) variable stars and transients-the SPIRITS project (SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey). In this first exploration of luminous astrophysical transients in the infrared, we have discovered a puzzling new class. We call them SPRITEs: eSPecially Red Intermediate-luminosity Transient Events. They have maximum MIR luminosities between supernovae and classical novae, but are not detected in the optical to deep limits. To date, we have discovered more than 50 SPRITEs in galaxies out to 17 Mpc. In this Archival Research proposal, we request support in order to investigate the pre-eruption sites in HST images of some 3 dozen SPRITEs discovered to date, and an additional 2 dozen that we are likely to find until the end of Spitzer observing in late 2018. Our aims are (1) characterize the pre-outburst environments at HST resolution in the visible and near-IR, to understand the stellar populations, stellar ages and masses, and interstellar medium at the outburst sites; (2) search for progenitors; (3) help prepare the way for a better understanding of the nature of extragalactic IR transients that will be investigated by JWST.

  4. Making the Standard Candle: A study of how the progenitor white dwarf modulates the peak luminosity of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Edward F [Michigan State University

    2010-01-21

    The goals of the proposed research as stated in the proposal were to: • Build a suite of one-dimensional initial models of different metallicities and central densities. • Using the improved flame capturing scheme, simulate the explosion of a white dwarf with embedded Lagrangian tracer particles, and post-process the thermal histories of the tracers to reconstruct the nucleosynthesis of the explosion. • Survey the effects of a changing progenitor metallicity on the isotopic yields. Of particular interest is 1) whether the linear relation between the mass of 56Ni synthesized and the pro- genitor metallicity is moderated by the effect of electron captures in the core; and 2) how a varying central density alters the relation between metallicity and 56Ni mass. • Using these results, examine how the observed metallicity distribution would affect the brightness distribution of SNe Ia and the isotopic ratios about the Fe-peak.

  5. Functional endothelial progenitor cells from cryopreserved umbilical cord blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Dreyzin, Alexandra; Aamodt, Kristie; Dudley, Andrew C.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is recognized as an enriched source of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) with potential therapeutic value. Because cryopreservation is the only reliable method for long-term storage of UCB cells, the clinical application of EPCs depends on our ability to acquire them from cryopreserved samples; however, the feasibility of doing so remains unclear. In this study we demonstrate that EPCs can be isolated from cryopreserved UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs). The number of outgrowth EPC colonies that emerged in culture from cryopreserved samples was similar to that obtained from fresh UCB. Furthermore, EPCs obtained from cryopreserved MNCs were phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from freshly isolated ones, including the ability to form blood vessels in vivo. Our results eliminate the necessity of performing cell isolation procedures ahead of future clinical needs and suggest that EPCs derived from cryopreserved UCB may be suitable for EPC-related therapies. PMID:20887663

  6. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-09

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrically Induced Calcium Handling in Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T. Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For nearly a century, the heart was viewed as a terminally differentiated organ until the discovery of a resident population of cardiac stem cells known as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs. It has been shown that the regenerative capacity of CPCs can be enhanced by ex vivo modification. Preconditioning CPCs could provide drastic improvements in cardiac structure and function; however, a systematic approach to determining a mechanistic basis for these modifications founded on the physiology of CPCs is lacking. We have identified a novel property of CPCs to respond to electrical stimulation by initiating intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We used confocal microscopy and intracellular calcium imaging to determine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ signal and the key proteins involved in this process using pharmacological inhibition and confocal Ca2+ imaging. Our results provide valuable insights into mechanisms to enhance the therapeutic potential in stem cells and further our understanding of human CPC physiology.

  8. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... inflammatory cells in the choroid near the transplantation site. Large choroidal infiltrates were evident at 2-5 weeks. Serum from naive and RPC-xenografted pigs contained significant levels of preformed IgG and IgM antibodies against murine antigens. Xenogeneic RPCs transplanted to the porcine SRS induced...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor controls progenitor migration during remyelination in the adult rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Julien; Macchi, Magali; Magalon, Karine; Cayre, Myriam; Durbec, Pascale

    2013-02-13

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to be expressed after brain lesions and in particular after demyelination. Here, we addressed the role of this cytokine in the regulation of neural progenitor migration in the adult rodent brain. Using an acute model of demyelination, we show that CNTF is strongly re-expressed after lesion and is involved in the postlesional mobilization of endogenous progenitors that participate in the myelin regenerative process. We show that CNTF controls the migration of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural progenitors toward the demyelinated corpus callosum. Furthermore, an ectopic source of CNTF in adult healthy brains changes SVZ-derived neural progenitors' migratory behavior that migrate toward the source by activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway. Using various in vitro assays (Boyden chambers, explants, and video time-lapse imaging), we demonstrate that CNTF controls the directed migration of SVZ-derived progenitors and oligodendrocyte precursors. Altogether, these results demonstrate that in addition to its neuroprotective activity and its role in progenitor survival and maturation, CNTF acts as a chemoattractant and participates in the recruitment of endogenous progenitors during myelin repair.

  10. Bmp signaling maintains a mesoderm progenitor cell state in the mouse tailbud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Shafer, Maxwell E R; Bareke, Eric; Tremblay, Mathieu; Majewski, Jacek; Bouchard, Maxime

    2017-08-15

    Caudal somites are generated from a pool of progenitor cells located in the tailbud region. These progenitor cells form the presomitic mesoderm that gradually differentiates into somites under the action of the segmentation clock. The signals responsible for tailbud mesoderm progenitor pool maintenance during axial elongation are still elusive. Here, we show that Bmp signaling is sufficient to activate the entire mesoderm progenitor gene signature in primary cultures of caudal mesoderm cells. Bmp signaling acts through the key regulatory genes brachyury (T) and Nkx1-2 and contributes to the activation of several other regulators of the mesoderm progenitor gene network. In the absence of Bmp signaling, tailbud mesoderm progenitor cells acquire aberrant gene expression signatures of the heart, blood, muscle and skeletal embryonic lineages. Treatment of embryos with the Bmp inhibitor noggin confirmed the requirement for Bmp signaling for normal T expression and the prevention of abnormal lineage marker activation. Together, these results identify Bmp signaling as a non-cell-autonomous signal necessary for mesoderm progenitor cell homeostasis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Transcriptional Pathways in cPGI2-Induced Adipocyte Progenitor Activation for Browning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, Irem; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Kocanova, Silvia; Sousa, Isabel Sofia; Lerch, Sarah; Hardt, Olaf; Wild, Stefan; Bosio, Andreas; Bystricky, Kerstin; Herzig, Stephan; Vegiopoulos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    De novo formation of beige/brite adipocytes from progenitor cells contributes to the thermogenic adaptation of adipose tissue and holds great potential for the therapeutic remodeling of fat as a treatment for obesity. Despite the recent identification of several factors regulating browning of white fat, there is a lack of physiological cell models for the mechanistic investigation of progenitor-mediated beige/brite differentiation. We have previously revealed prostacyclin (PGI2) as one of the few known endogenous extracellular mediators promoting de novo beige/brite formation by relaying β-adrenergic stimulation to the progenitor level. Here, we present a cell model based on murine primary progenitor cells defined by markers previously shown to be relevant for in vivo browning, including a simplified isolation procedure. We demonstrate the specific and broad induction of thermogenic gene expression by PGI2 signaling in the absence of lineage conversion, and reveal the previously unidentified nuclear relocalization of the Ucp1 gene locus in association with transcriptional activation. By profiling the time course of the progenitor response, we show that PGI2 signaling promoted progenitor cell activation through cell cycle and adhesion pathways prior to metabolic maturation toward an oxidative cell phenotype. Our results highlight the importance of core progenitor activation pathways for the recruitment of thermogenic cells and provide a resource for further mechanistic investigation.

  12. Isolation of primitive endoderm, mesoderm, vascular endothelial and trophoblast progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Micha; Tang, Chad; Ardehali, Reza; Rinkevich, Yuval; Seita, Jun; Lee, Andrew S; Mosley, Adriane R; Weissman, Irving L; Soen, Yoav

    2012-05-27

    To identify early populations of committed progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we screened self-renewing, BMP4-treated and retinoic acid-treated cultures with >400 antibodies recognizing cell-surface antigens. Sorting of >30 subpopulations followed by transcriptional analysis of developmental genes identified four distinct candidate progenitor groups. Subsets detected in self-renewing cultures, including CXCR4(+) cells, expressed primitive endoderm genes. Expression of Cxcr4 in primitive endoderm was confirmed in visceral endoderm of mouse embryos. BMP4-induced progenitors exhibited gene signatures of mesoderm, trophoblast and vascular endothelium, suggesting correspondence to gastrulation-stage primitive streak, chorion and allantois precursors, respectively. Functional studies in vitro and in vivo confirmed that ROR2(+) cells produce mesoderm progeny, APA(+) cells generate syncytiotrophoblasts and CD87(+) cells give rise to vasculature. The same progenitor classes emerged during the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). These markers and progenitors provide tools for purifying human tissue-regenerating progenitors and for studying the commitment of pluripotent stem cells to lineage progenitors.

  13. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  14. Identification of Different Classes of Luminal Progenitor Cells within Prostate Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Agarwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary prostate cancer almost always has a luminal phenotype. However, little is known about the stem/progenitor properties of transformed cells within tumors. Using the aggressive Pten/Tp53-null mouse model of prostate cancer, we show that two classes of luminal progenitors exist within a tumor. Not only did tumors contain previously described multipotent progenitors, but also a major population of committed luminal progenitors. Luminal cells, sorted directly from tumors or grown as organoids, initiated tumors of adenocarcinoma or multilineage histological phenotypes, which is consistent with luminal and multipotent differentiation potentials, respectively. Moreover, using organoids we show that the ability of luminal-committed progenitors to self-renew is a tumor-specific property, absent in benign luminal cells. Finally, a significant fraction of luminal progenitors survived in vivo castration. In all, these data reveal two luminal tumor populations with different stem/progenitor cell capacities, providing insight into prostate cancer cells that initiate tumors and can influence treatment response.

  15. Transcriptional pathways in cPGI2-induced adipocyte progenitor activation for browning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem eBayindir

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available De novo formation of beige/brite adipocytes from progenitor cells contributes to the thermogenic adaptation of adipose tissue and holds great potential for the therapeutic remodeling of fat as a treatment for obesity. Despite the recent identification of several factors regulating browning of white fat, there is a lack of physiological cell models for the mechanistic investigation of progenitor-mediated beige/brite differentiation. We have previously revealed prostacyclin (PGI2 as one of the few known endogenous extracellular mediators promoting de novo beige/brite formation by relaying beta-adrenergic stimulation to the progenitor level. Here we present a cell model based on murine primary progenitor cells defined by markers previously shown to be relevant for in vivo browning, including a simplified isolation procedure. We demonstrate the specific and broad induction of thermogenic gene expression by PGI2 signaling in the absence of lineage conversion, and reveal the previously unidentified nuclear relocalization of the Ucp1 gene locus in association with transcriptional activation. By profiling the time course of the progenitor response we show that PGI2 signaling promoted progenitor cell activation through cell cycle and adhesion pathways prior to metabolic maturation towards an oxidative cell phenotype. Our results highlight the importance of core progenitor activation pathways for the recruitment of thermogenic cells and provide a resource for further mechanistic investigation.

  16. Matrix adhesion polarizes heart progenitor induction in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Jennifer; Cooley, James; Islam, A. F. M. Tariqul; Cota, Christina D.; Davidson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesion strongly influences developmental signaling. Resulting impacts on cell migration and tissue morphogenesis are well characterized. However, the in vivo impact of adhesion on fate induction remains ambiguous. Here, we employ the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis to delineate an essential in vivo role for matrix adhesion in heart progenitor induction. In Ciona pre-cardiac founder cells, invasion of the underlying epidermis promotes localized induction of the heart progenitor lineage. We found that these epidermal invasions are associated with matrix adhesion along the pre-cardiac cell/epidermal boundary. Through targeted manipulations of RAP GTPase activity, we were able to manipulate pre-cardiac cell-matrix adhesion. Targeted disruption of pre-cardiac cell-matrix adhesion blocked heart progenitor induction. Conversely, increased matrix adhesion generated expanded induction. We were also able to selectively restore cell-matrix adhesion and heart progenitor induction through targeted expression of Ci-Integrin β2. These results indicate that matrix adhesion functions as a necessary and sufficient extrinsic cue for regional heart progenitor induction. Furthermore, time-lapse imaging suggests that cytokinesis acts as an intrinsic temporal regulator of heart progenitor adhesion and induction. Our findings highlight a potentially conserved role for matrix adhesion in early steps of vertebrate heart progenitor specification. PMID:23444358

  17. Functional interleukin-33 receptors are expressed in early progenitor stages of allergy-related granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Hirofumi; Arinobu, Yojiro; Miyawaki, Kohta; Takaki, Ayako; Ota, Shun-Ichiro; Ota, Yuri; Mitoma, Hiroki; Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Mori, Yasuo; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Niiro, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Akashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) induces T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production and eosinophilia independently of acquired immunity, leading to innate immunity-mediated allergic inflammation. Allergy-related innate myeloid cells such as eosinophils, basophils and mast cells express the IL-33 receptor (IL-33R), but it is still unknown how IL-33 regulates allergic inflammation involving these cells and their progenitors. Here, we revealed that the functional IL-33R was expressed on eosinophil progenitors (EoPs), basophil progenitors (BaPs) and mast cell progenitors (MCPs). In the presence of IL-33, these progenitors did not expand, but produced a high amount of Th2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-9, IL-13, IL-1β and IL-6. The amount of cytokines produced by these progenitors was greater than that by mature cells. In vivo, IL-33 stimulated the expansion of EoPs, but it was dependent upon the elevated serum IL-5 that is presumably derived from type 2 innate lymphoid cells that express functional IL-33R. These data collectively suggest that EoPs, BaPs and MCPs are not only the sources of allergy-related granulocytes, but can also be sources of allergy-related cytokines in IL-33-induced inflammation. Because such progenitors can differentiate into mature granulocytes at the site of inflammation, they are potential therapeutic targets in IL-33-related allergic diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

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    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  19. Circulating Progenitor Cell Response to Exercise in Wheelchair Racing Athletes.

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    Niemiro, Grace M; Edwards, Thomas; Barfield, J P; Beals, Joseph W; Broad, Elizabeth M; Motl, Robert W; Burd, Nicholas A; Pilutti, Lara A; De Lisio, Michael

    2017-08-11

    Circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) are a heterogeneous population of stem/progenitor cells in peripheral blood that participate in tissue repair. CPC mobilization has been well characterized in able-bodied persons, but has not been previously investigated in wheelchair racing athletes. The purpose of this study was to characterize CPC and CPC sub-population mobilization in elite wheelchair racing athletes in response to acute, upper-extremity aerobic exercise to determine if CPC responses are similar to ambulatory populations. Eight participants (3 female; age=27.5±4.0 years; supine height=162.5±18.6cm; weight=53.5±10.9kg, VO2peak=2.4±0.62 L/min; years post injury=21.5±6.2 years) completed a 25 km time trial on a road course. Blood sampling occurred before (Pre) and immediately post (Post) exercise for quantification of CPCs (CD34), HSPCs (CD34/CD45), HSCs (CD34/CD45/CD38), CD34 adipose tissue-derived (AT)-MSCs (CD45/CD34/CD105/CD31), CD34 bone marrow-derived (BM)-MSCs (CD45/CD34/CD105/CD31), and EPCs (CD45/CD34/VEGFR2) via flow cytometry. Blood lactate was measured Pre- and Post-trial as an indicator of exercise intensity. CPC concentration increased 5.7 fold post-exercise (P=0.10). HSPCs, HSCs, EPCs, and both MSC populations were not increased post exercise. Baseline HSPCs were significantly positively correlated to absolute VO2peak (Rho = 0.71, Pracing athletes is related to cardiorespiratory fitness and responses to exercise are positively related to exercise intensity.

  20. Presence of stem/progenitor cells in the rat penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guiting; Alwaal, Amjad; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jianwen; Wang, Lin; Li, Huixi; Wang, Guifang; Ning, Hongxiu; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F

    2015-01-15

    Tissue resident stem cells are believed to exist in every organ, and their identification is commonly done using a combination of immunostaining for putative stem cell markers and label-retaining cell (LRC) strategy. In this study, we employed these approaches to identify potential stem cells in the penis. Newborn rats were intraperitoneally injected with thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU), and their penis was harvested at 7 h, 3 days, 1 week, and 4 weeks. It was processed for EdU stains and immunofluorescence staining for stem cell markers A2B5, PCNA, and c-kit. EdU-positive cells were counted for each time point and co-localized with each stem cell marker, then isolated and cultured in vitro followed by their characterization using flowcytometry and immunofluorescence. At 7 h post-EdU injection, 410 ± 105.3 penile corporal cells were labeled in each cross-section (∼28%). The number of EdU-positive cells at 3 days increased to 536 ± 115.6, while their percentage dropped to 25%. Progressively fewer EdU-positive cells were present in the sacrificed rat penis at longer time points (1 and 4 weeks). They were mainly distributed in the subtunic and perisinusoidal spaces, and defined as subtunic penile progenitor cells (STPCs) and perisinusoidal penile progenitor cells (PPCs). These cells expressed c-kit, A2B5, and PCNA. After culturing in vitro, only ∼0.324% corporal cells were EdU-labeled LRCs and expressed A2B5/PCNA. Therefore, labeling of penis cells by EdU occurred randomly, and label retaining was not associated with expression of c-kit, A2B5, or PCNA. The penile LRCs are mainly distributed within the subtunic and perisinusoidal space.