WorldWideScience

Sample records for profoundly deaf children

  1. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  2. Speech timing and working memory in profoundly deaf children after cochlear implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Burkholder, Rose A.; Pisoni, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-seven profoundly deaf children between 8- and 9-years-old with cochlear implants and a comparison group of normal-hearing children were studied to measure speaking rates, digit spans, and speech timing during digit span recall. The deaf children displayed longer sentence durations and pauses during recall and shorter digit spans compared to the normal-hearing children. Articulation rates, measured from sentence durations, were strongly correlated with immediate memory span in both norm...

  3. The Influence of Phonological Mechanisms in Written Spelling of Profoundly Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lucia; Arfe, Barbara; Bronte, Tiziana

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of phonological and working memory mechanisms involved in spelling Italian single words was explored in two groups of children matched for grade level: a group of normally hearing children and a group of pre-verbally deaf children, with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Three-syllable and four-syllable familiar…

  4. [Speech perception test in Italian language for profoundly deaf children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, E; Orzan, E; Turrini, M; Babighian, G; Arslan, E

    1995-10-01

    Speech perception tests are an important part of procedures for diagnosing pre-verbal hearing loss. Merely establishing a child's hearing threshold with and without a hearing aid is not sufficient to ensure an adequate evaluation with a view to selecting cases suitable for cochlear implants because it fails to indicate the real benefit obtained from using a conventional hearing aid reliably. Speech perception tests have proved useful not only for patient selection, but also for subsequent evaluation of the efficacy of new hearing aids, such as tactile devices and cochlear implants. In clinical practice, the tests most commonly adopted with small children are: The Auditory Comprehension Test (ACT), Discrimination after Training (DAT), Monosyllable, Trochee, Spondee tests (MTS), Glendonald Auditory Screening Priocedure (GASP), Early Speech Perception Test (ESP), Rather than considering specific results achieved in individual cases, reference is generally made to the four speech perception classes proposed by Moog and Geers of the CID of St. Louis. The purpose of this classification, made on the results obtained with suitably differentiated tests according to the child's age and language ability, is to detect differences in perception of a spoken message in ideal listening conditions. To date, no italian language speech perception test has been designed to establish the assessment of speech perception level in children with profound hearing impairment. We attempted, therefore, to adapt the existing English tests to the Italian language taking into consideration the differences between the two languages. Our attention focused on the ESP test since it can be applied to even very small children (2 years old). The ESP is proposed in a standard version for hearing-impaired children over the age of 6 years and in a simplified version for younger children. The rationale we used for selecting Italian words reflect the rationale established for the original version, but the

  5. Family influences on the cognitive development of profoundly deaf children: exploring the effects of socioeconomic status and siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Catrin E; Ford, Ruth M

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the cognitive development of 48 profoundly deaf children from hearing families (born 1994-2002, mean age M = 8.0 years at time of test, none of whom had received early auditory-verbal therapy) as a function of family socioeconomic status and number of siblings. Overall, the deaf children matched a younger group of 47 hearing controls (M = 4.6 years) on verbal ability, theory of mind, and cognitive inhibition. Partial correlations (controlling for age) revealed positive relations in the hearing group between maternal education and inhibition, between number of younger siblings and references to emotions, and between number of close-in-age siblings and references to desires and false beliefs. In the deaf group, there were positive relations between household income and memory span, between maternal education and references to false beliefs, and between number of younger siblings and nonverbal ability. In contrast, deaf children with a greater number of older siblings aged ≤12 years showed inferior memory span, inhibition, belief understanding, picture-sequencing accuracy, and mental-state language, suggesting that they failed to compete successfully with older siblings for their parents' attention and material resources. We consider the implications of the findings for understanding birth-order effects on deaf and language-impaired children.

  6. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  7. Visual impairment in severe and profound sensorineural deafness.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, I M; Burke, J. P.; Buffin, J T

    1995-01-01

    The frequency of reversible and irreversible visual impairment was determined in children with severe and profound sensorineural deafness, as subnormal vision can adversely affect their educational and social development. Eighty three of 87 such children attending an audiology service were examined to assess the incidence and severity of visual impairment. Each child underwent a detailed ophthalmic assessment. The criteria for visual impairment were visual acuity < 6/9 Snellen or equivalent a...

  8. Speech reading and learning to read: a comparison of 8-year-old profoundly deaf children with good and poor reading ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Moreno, Constanza

    2006-01-01

    Nine children with severe-profound prelingual hearing loss and single-word reading scores not more than 10 months behind chronological age (Good Readers) were matched with 9 children whose reading lag was at least 15 months (Poor Readers). Good Readers had significantly higher spelling and reading comprehension scores. They produced significantly more phonetic errors (indicating the use of phonological coding) and more often correctly represented the number of syllables in spelling than Poor Readers. They also scored more highly on orthographic awareness and were better at speech reading. Speech intelligibility was the same in the two groups. Cluster analysis revealed that only three Good Readers showed strong evidence of phonetic coding in spelling although seven had good representation of syllables; only four had high orthographic awareness scores. However, all 9 children were good speech readers, suggesting that a phonological code derived through speech reading may underpin reading success for deaf children.

  9. Development of Implanted Deaf Children's Conversational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaid; Dardier, Virginie; Pajon, Cecile; Tan-Bescond, Geraldine; David, Kristell; Deleau, Michel; Godey, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of preverbal development have highlighted the recurrent difficulties experienced by deaf children in acquiring knowledge of the social rules and social skills pertaining to discourse. We expected cochlear implants in children with bilateral profound deafness to improve their use of verbal language, so that their communication…

  10. Foveal Processing Under Concurrent Peripheral Load in Profoundly Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of the visual system typically proceeds in concert with the development of audition. One result is that the visual system of profoundly deaf individuals differs from that of those with typical auditory systems. While past research has suggested deaf people have enhanced attention in the visual periphery, it is still unclear whether or not this enhancement entails deficits in central vision. Profoundly deaf and typically hearing adults were administered a variant of the useful field of view task that independently assessed performance on concurrent central and peripheral tasks. Identification of a foveated target was impaired by a concurrent selective peripheral attention task, more so in profoundly deaf adults than in the typically hearing. Previous findings of enhanced performance on the peripheral task were not replicated. These data are discussed in terms of flexible allocation of spatial attention targeted towards perceived task demands, and support a modified “division of labor” hypothesis whereby attentional resources co-opted to process peripheral space result in reduced resources in the central visual field. PMID:26657078

  11. Deaf Children's Understanding of Other People's Thought Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of deaf children to predict the behaviours of other people, based on an understanding of their beliefs. An unexpected transfer task and a deceptive box task were used with a group of 55 severely/profoundly deaf children. Results reiterate the findings of other studies that many deaf children are grossly delayed in…

  12. Deaf and Hearing Children: A Comparison of Peripheral Vision Development

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    Codina, Charlotte; Buckley, David; Port, Michael; Pascalis, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated peripheral vision (at least 30[degrees] eccentric to fixation) development in profoundly deaf children without cochlear implantation, and compared this to age-matched hearing controls as well as to deaf and hearing adult data. Deaf and hearing children between the ages of 5 and 15 years were assessed using a new,…

  13. Postural Control in Deaf Children

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    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  14. Vestibular function of patients with profound deafness related to GJB2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Misato; Hayashi, Chieri; Iizuka, Takashi; Inoshita, Ayako; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Okada, Hiroko; Nakajima, Yukinori; Kaga, Kimitaka; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2010-09-01

    GJB2 mutations are responsible not only for deafness but also for the occurrence of vestibular dysfunction. However, vestibular dysfunction tends to be unilateral and less severe in comparison with that of bilateral deafness. The correlation between the cochlear and vestibular end-organs suggests that some children with congenital deafness may have vestibular impairments. On the other hand, GJB2 gene mutations are the most common cause of nonsyndromic deafness. The vestibular function of patients with congenital deafness (CD), which is related to GJB2 gene mutation, remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between GJB2 gene mutation and vestibular dysfunction in adults with CD. A total of 31 subjects, including 10 healthy volunteers and 21 patients with CD, were enrolled in the study. A hearing test and genetic analysis were performed. The vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured and a caloric test was performed to assess the vestibular function. The percentage of vestibular dysfunction was then statistically analyzed. The hearing level of all CD patients demonstrated a severe to profound impairment. In seven CD patients, their hearing impairment was related to GJB2 mutation. Five of the seven patients with CD related to GJB2 mutation demonstrated abnormalities in one or both of the two tests. The percentage of vestibular dysfunction of the patients with CD related to GJB2 mutation was statistically higher than in patients with CD unrelated to GJB2 mutation and in healthy controls.

  15. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    OpenAIRE

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children ...

  16. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  17. Comparing Motor Development of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents and Deaf Children of Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Volding, Lori; Winnick, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    Deaf children of Deaf parents perform better academically (Ritter-Brinton & Stewart, 1992), linguistically (Courtin, 2000; M. Harris, 2001; Vaccari & Marschark, 1997), and socially (Hadadian & Rose, 1991; M. Harris, 2001) than Deaf children of hearing parents. Twenty-nine Deaf children in residential schools were assessed to determine if a…

  18. Phonological Awareness and Reading Proficiency in Adults with Profound Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlonger, Brett; Holmes, Virginia M.; Rickards, Field W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the phonological knowledge and reading skill of deaf adults using three experimental conditions that tested sensitivity to syllables, rhyme, and phonemes. Analysis of response latencies and accuracy in the three awareness tasks demonstrated that skilled deaf readers had superior phonological awareness skill…

  19. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children of deaf parents generally exhibit normal patterns of development in social, linguistic and cognitive domains relative to their hearing peers. One of the longest-running debates in the field of deaf education was whether introducing young deaf children to sign language impairs their ability and motivation for learning spoken language. Today we have no evidence supporting the hypothesis of a negative effect of sign language on development of spoken langugage.

  20. Anger communication in deaf children

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    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  1. A gene responsible for profound congenital nonsyndromal recessive deafness maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17

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    Friedman, T.B.; Liang, Y.; Asher, J.H. Jr. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive deafness is the most common form of human hereditary hearing loss. Two percent of the 2,185 residents of Bengkala, Bali, Indonesia have profound congenital neurosensory nonsyndromal hereditary deafness due to a fully penetrant autosomal recessive mutation (NARD1). Families, identified through children with profound congenital deafness having hearing parents, give the expected 25% deaf progeny when corrected for ascertainment bias. Congenitally deaf individuals from Bengkala show no response to pure tone audiological examination. Obligate heterozygotes for autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala have normal or borderline normal hearing. A chromosomal location for NARD1 was assigned directly using a linkage strategy that combines allele-frequency dependent homozygosity mapping (AHM) followed by an analysis of historical recombinants to position NARD1 relative to flanking markers. Thirteen deaf Bengkala villagers of hearing parents were typed initially for 148 STRPs distributed across the human genome and a cluster of tightly linked 17p markers with a significantly higher number of homozygotes than expected under Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium were identified. NARD1 maps closest to STRPs for D17S261 (Mfd41) and D17S805 (AFM234ta1) that are 3.2 cM apart. Recombinant genotypes for the flanking markers, D17S122 (VAW409) and D17S783 (AFM026vh7), in individuals homozygous for NARD1 place NARD1 in a 5.3 cM interval of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17 on a refined 17p-17q12 genetic map.

  2. An epidemiological and genetic study of congenital profound deafness in Tunisia (governorate of Nabeul).

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Arab, S; Bonaïti-Pellié, C.; Belkahia, A

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological and genetic study of profound deafness has been undertaken in the governorate of Nabeul in Tunisia. This paper deals with sensorineural deafness with no associated abnormalities. The prevalence was estimated to be 0.0007 and four clusters could be identified, two of which represent 51% and 34% respectively of the total number of cases. Segregation analysis performed in 29 pedigrees containing 415 subjects with 129 affected cases provided evidence for simple recessive inheri...

  3. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

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    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  4. Evaluative Expression in Deaf Children's Written Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined…

  5. Plasma antidiuretic hormone in cases with the early onset of profound unilateral deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Taizo; Kakigi, Akinobu; Nishioka, Rie; Taguchi, Daizo; Nishimura, Masahiko

    2008-12-01

    The p-ADH level in cases of juvenile unilateral profound deafness (JUPD) and the timecourse of the level were examined to investigate whether or not an increase of p-ADH is involved in the development of delayed endolymphatic hydrops (DEH) in JUPD. In 90 consecutive patients with unilateral profound or total sensorineural deafness with the onset in early childhood, pure-tone audiometric examination and the measurement of p-ADH and plasma osmolality (p-OSM) were followed up once or twice a year as far as possible. At every testing, we performed careful history-taking about episodic vertigo/dizziness, fluctuant hearing loss, and tinnitus in order to find out whether patients had experienced these clinical signs of the development of DEH. Means and standard deviation (S.D.) of p-ADH level and osmolality in all samples tested (n=368) were 7.3+/-7.0 pg/mL (0.7-52.0 pg/mL), and 288.6+/-4.4 mOsm/L (273-306 mOsm/L), respectively. The mean of p-ADH level was much higher than those previously reported in children and adolescents. High levels of p-ADH (over 5.0 pg/mL) were often observed in subjects between 6 and 19 years of age, but not so frequently in subjects of 20 years of age or older. Long-term follow-up of p-ADH levels revealed that DEH frequently developed in cases with persistent elevation of p-ADH. The elevation of p-ADH is likely to promote the development of DEH in cases of JUPD, although the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  6. The Hands with Eyes and Nose in the Palm: As Effective Communication Alternatives for Profoundly Deaf People in Zimbabwe

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    Mutswanga, Phillipa

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from the experiences and testimonies of people with profound deafness, the study qualitatively explored the use of the hands with eyes and nose in the palm as communication alternatives in the field of deafness. The study was prompted by the 27 year old lady, Leah Katz-Hernandez who is deaf who got engaged in March 2015 as the 2016…

  7. Assessing the Efficacy of an Academic Hearing Peer Tutor for a Profoundly Deaf Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of using a hearing peer tutor to provide daily 20-minute math instruction for a profoundly deaf sixth-grade girl indicated that the peer tutoring intervention was highly successful, with the tutee meeting accuracy criteria for each of 4 curriculum objectives after only a brief period of intervention. (Author/DB)

  8. Multisensory Narrative Tracking by a Profoundly Deaf Subject Using an Electrocutaneous Vocoder and a Vibrotactile Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study assessed the ability to track connected discourse by a congenitally profoundly deaf adult using an electrocutaneous vocoder and/or a vibrotactile aid in conjunction with or without lipreading and aided hearing. Overall, improvement in tracking performance occurred within and across phases of the study. (Author/DB)

  9. Decoding Actions and Emotions in Deaf Children: Evidence from a Biological Motion Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Amanda Katherine; Heaton, Pamela; Deruelle, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the recognition of emotional and non-emotional biological movements in children with severe and profound deafness. Twenty-four deaf children, together with 24 control children matched on mental age and 24 control children matched on chronological age, were asked to identify a person's actions, subjective states,…

  10. Interaural comparison of spiral ganglion cell counts in profound deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedi, Mohammad; Eddington, Donald K; Nadol, Joseph B

    2011-12-01

    This study is designed to measure the degree to which spiral ganglion cell (SGC) survival in the left and right ears is similar in profoundly hearing-impaired human patients with symmetric (right/left) etiology and sensitivity. This is of interest because a small difference between ears would imply that one ear could be used as a control ear in temporal bone studies evaluating the impact on SGC survival of a medical intervention in the other ear. Forty-two temporal bones from 21 individuals with bilaterally symmetric profound hearing impairment were studied. Both ears in each individual were impaired by the same etiology. Rosenthal's canal was reconstructed in two dimensions and segmental and total SGCs were counted. Correlation analysis and t-tests were used to compare segmental and total counts of left and right ears. Statistical power calculations illustrate how the results can be used to estimate the effect size (right/left difference in SGC count) that can be reliably identified as a function of sample size. Left counts (segmental and total) were significantly correlated with those in the right ears (p total count were respectively 0.64, 0.91, 0.93, 0.91 and 0.98. The hypothesis that mean segmental and total counts of right and left are the same could not be rejected by paired t-test. The variance in the between-ear difference across the temporal bones studied indicates that useful effect sizes can be reliably identified using subject numbers that are practical for temporal bone studies. For instance, there is 95% likelihood that an interaural difference in SGC count of approximately 1000 cells associated with a treatment/manipulation of one ear will be reliably detected in a bilaterally-symmetric profound hearing loss population of temporal bones from approximately 10 subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Riahi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3 are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys, in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24, and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*. Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  12. The Contribution of Verbal Working Memory to Deaf Children's Oral and Written Production

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    Arfé, Barbara; Rossi, Cristina; Sicoli, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of verbal working memory to the oral and written story production of deaf children. Participants were 29 severely to profoundly deaf children aged 8-13 years and 29 hearing controls, matched for grade level. The children narrated a picture story orally and in writing and performed a reading comprehension…

  13. Congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, G M; Nikolopoulos, T; Archbold, S M; Tait, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the auditory performance of congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation. A prospective study is undertaken of 71 such children who have been implanted in a dedicated paediatric cochlear implant centre and who have been followed up to 3 years following implantation. All children are aged less than 8 years at the time of implantation and all receive a multichannel cochlear implant system. No child meeting these criteria has been excluded from the study. The average age at implantation is 56.5 months (range 27 to 93 months, standard deviation 15.9 months). Auditory performance is assessed by using the Categories of Auditory Perception (CAP) scale which is developed primarily as a clinical tool for evaluating profoundly deaf young children following cochlear implantation. The median score prior to implantation on this scale is Category 0 (no awareness of environmental sound), at the 1 year interval is Category 4 (discrimination some speech sounds without lip-reading), and at the 2 and 3 year interval, the median score on the CAP scale is Category 5 (understanding of common phrases without lip-reading). These results indicate the ability of cochlear implants to provide significant auditory receptive skills to young congenitally deaf children.

  14. Aspects of the linguistic competence of deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D

    1984-02-01

    In this paper the following three issues are considered in the light of recent research: Do severely/profoundly deaf children develop a grammar for English? Evidence is presented which suggests that they do and that this grammar displays a number of general characteristics some of which parallel the language of younger hearing children, others that do not. The limitations of this grammar will be discussed and hypotheses about the nature, origins and inevitability of such limitations explored. In what ways do the linguistic experiences of deaf children differ from that of hearing children? Some aspects of the deaf child's experience of language will be explored and their linguistic and psychological implications discussed. The relationships between current research findings on the linguistic development of the deaf and the possibility of improved educational methods will also be explored to consider the various different philosophies currently being debated in this field.

  15. Deaf children learning to sign

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    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  16. The relative contributions of speechreading and vocabulary to deaf and hearing children's reading ability.

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    Kyle, Fiona Elizabeth; Campbell, Ruth; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2016-01-01

    Vocabulary knowledge and speechreading are important for deaf children's reading development but it is unknown whether they are independent predictors of reading ability. This study investigated the relationships between reading, speechreading and vocabulary in a large cohort of deaf and hearing children aged 5 to 14 years. 86 severely and profoundly deaf children and 91 hearing children participated in this study. All children completed assessments of reading comprehension, word reading accuracy, speechreading and vocabulary. Regression analyses showed that vocabulary and speechreading accounted for unique variance in both reading accuracy and comprehension for deaf children. For hearing children, vocabulary was an independent predictor of both reading accuracy and comprehension skills but speechreading only accounted for unique variance in reading accuracy. Speechreading and vocabulary are important for reading development in deaf children. The results are interpreted within the Simple View of Reading framework and the theoretical implications for deaf children's reading are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined evaluative expression, an important narrative tool in both oral/written languages and signed languages, in narratives written in Dutch by deaf children who are proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and deaf children who are low-proficient in SLN, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We hypothesized that deaf children who are proficient in signed language use their knowledge of evaluative expression in signed language to enrich their narratives in written Dutch, and more so than deaf children who are low-proficient in signed language and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We examined the use of eight different evaluative devices in narratives written by deaf proficiently and low-proficiently signing children, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. Narratives were also examined for morpho-syntactic errors and use of complex sentences. The results show that proficiently signing deaf children's narratives contain more evaluative devices that enrich the referential structure of the narrative than narratives of low-proficiently signing deaf children, and hearing bilingual and monolingual children. We propose that proficiently signing deaf children use their knowledge of SLN to convey evaluation in their written narratives, and thus have an advantage in enriching their narratives. This study also shows that in order to gain insight into deaf people's writing, it is important to take variations in sign language proficiency into account.

  18. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  19. Lemierre’s Syndrome Associated with Mechanical Ventilation and Profound Deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Birkner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is a rare disorder that is characterized by anaerobic organisms inducing a thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV following a course of oropharyngeal infection. It often occurs in young and healthy patients. Clinicians continuously misinterpret early symptoms until infection disseminates systematically and life-threatening sepsis transpires. We report the case of a 58-year-old female developing Lemierre’s syndrome accompanied by invasive ventilation support and a profound deafness requiring the implementation of a cochlear implant. This is one of two reported cases of Lemierre’s syndrome associated with mechanical ventilation support and the only case associated with a cochlear implant.

  20. Cochlear implantation in autistic children with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Pastuszka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Mikołajewska, Lidia; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-19

    Cochlear implants have become the method of choice for the treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss in both children and adults. Its benefits are well documented in the pediatric and adult population. Also deaf children with additional needs, including autism, have been covered by this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits from cochlear implantation in deafened children with autism as the only additional disability. This study analyzes data of six children. The follow-up time was at least 43 months. The following data were analyzed: medical history, reaction to music and sound, Ling's six sounds test, onomatopoeic word test, reaction to spoken child's name, response to requests, questionnaire given to parents, sound processor fitting sessions and data. After cochlear implantation each child presented other communication skills. In some children, the symptoms of speech understanding were observed. No increased hyperactivity associated with daily use cochlear implant was observed. The study showed that in autistic children the perception is very important for a child's sense of security and makes contact with parents easier. Our study showed that oral communication is not likely to be a realistic goal in children with cochlear implants and autism. The implantation results showed benefits that varied among those children. The traditional methods of evaluating the results of cochlear implantation in children with autism are usually insufficient to fully assess the functional benefits. These benefits should be assessed in a more comprehensive manner taking into account the limitations of communication resulting from the essence of autism. It is important that we share knowledge about these complex children with cochlear implants. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ebrahimi; Eissa Mohammadi; Mohammad Ali Mohammadi; Akbar Pirzadeh; Hamzeh Mahmoudi; Ismail Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child?s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabiliti...

  2. Rehabilitation and outcome of severe profound deafness in a group of 16 infants affected by congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bovo, Roberto; Trevisi, Patrizia; Bianchini, Chiara; Arboretti, Rosa; Martini, Alessandro

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the audiological consequences of congenital cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) and to evaluate the outcome of rehabilitation with hearing aids and/or cochlear implant (CI), associated with an adequate speech-language therapy. A retrospective review of data was made from a total of 16 infants, affected by severe to profound hearing loss from congenital CMV infection, referred to a tertiary audiological center for rehabilitation. Audiological evaluation was performed using behavioral audiometry, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and/or electrocochleography (ECochG). Of the 16 children (median age at diagnosis of hearing loss: 21.33 +/- 0.7 months) with CMV hearing loss, 14 were affected by profound bilateral hearing loss and received a CI, while 2 were affected by bilateral severe hearing loss and received hearing aids. Cochlear implants can provide useful speech comprehension to patients with CMV-related deafness, even if language development is lower when compared to a group of Connexin (Cx) 26+ cochlear-implanted children (eight subjects), matched for age. Congenital CMV infection still represents a serious clinical condition, as well as an important cause of hearing loss in children. More studies have claimed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms of damage and thus to ensure a better therapeutic approach. Nonetheless, in cases of CMV-deafened babies, the overall outcome of cochlear implantation is good.

  3. Surgery to improve hearing of a preschool child with profound bilateral deafness

    OpenAIRE

    井口,郁雄; 増田,游; 高塚,ま由; 小倉, 義郎; 藤本, 明子

    1987-01-01

    Hearing loss in children under school age adversely effects speech and personality development. It is possible to improve conductive hearing loss by surgery, but difficult to improve combined hearing loss. The authors succeeded surgically improving the hearing of a 5 year-old boy suffering from speech retardation due to bilateral congenital combined hearing loss. The improvement in hearing aided speech training. He has graduated from schools for the deaf (primary, middle and senior high schoo...

  4. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  5. Sustained attention, selective attention and cognitive control in deaf and hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Matthew W G; Hauser, Peter C

    2014-03-01

    Deaf children have been characterized as being impulsive, distractible, and unable to sustain attention. However, past research has tested deaf children born to hearing parents who are likely to have experienced language delays. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an absence of auditory input modulates attentional problems in deaf children with no delayed exposure to language. Two versions of a continuous performance test were administered to 37 deaf children born to Deaf parents and 60 hearing children, all aged 6-13 years. A vigilance task was used to measure sustained attention over the course of several minutes, and a distractibility test provided a measure of the ability to ignore task irrelevant information - selective attention. Both tasks provided assessments of cognitive control through analysis of commission errors. The deaf and hearing children did not differ on measures of sustained attention. However, younger deaf children were more distracted by task-irrelevant information in their peripheral visual field, and deaf children produced a higher number of commission errors in the selective attention task. It is argued that this is not likely to be an effect of audition on cognitive processing, but may rather reflect difficulty in endogenous control of reallocated visual attention resources stemming from early profound deafness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. What We Should Teach Deaf Children: Deaf Teachers' Folk Models in Britain, the USA and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Ramsey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Deaf teachers around the world have folk models and beliefs that reflect their understanding of what deaf children need to learn in order to develop healthy identities as deaf people. In this research we report what teachers from England, the USA and Mexico have told us about using creative signing with deaf children. Themes emerging from our data…

  7. The False-Friend Effect in Three Profoundly Deaf Learners of French: Disentangling Morphology, Phonology and Orthography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Vikki; Kolokonte, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Three profoundly deaf individuals undertook a low-frequency backward lexical translation task (French/English), where morphological structure was manipulated and orthographic distance between test items was measured. Conditions included monomorphemic items (simplex), polymorphemic items (complex), items whose French morphological structure…

  8. Burnout in Professionals Working with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, Kathryn P.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred forty deaf education professionals completed an inventory on burnout, career motivation, and job satisfaction. Teachers of deaf students were more likely to experience burnout than teachers of nonhandicapped children and teachers aged 27 through 30 expressed the highest degree of emotional exhaustion. (CL)

  9. Outcomes of cochlear implantation in deaf children of deaf parents: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, S

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study compared the cochlear implantation outcomes of first- and second-generation deaf children. The study group consisted of seven deaf, cochlear-implanted children with deaf parents. An equal number of deaf children with normal-hearing parents were selected by matched sampling as a reference group. Participants were matched based on onset and severity of deafness, duration of deafness, age at cochlear implantation, duration of cochlear implantation, gender, and cochlear implant model. We used the Persian Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired, the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale, and the Sentence Imitation Test, in order to measure participants' speech perception, speech production and language development, respectively. Both groups of children showed auditory and speech development. However, the second-generation deaf children (i.e. deaf children of deaf parents) exceeded the cochlear implantation performance of the deaf children with hearing parents. This study confirms that second-generation deaf children exceed deaf children of hearing parents in terms of cochlear implantation performance. Encouraging deaf children to communicate in sign language from a very early age, before cochlear implantation, appears to improve their ability to learn spoken language after cochlear implantation.

  10. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annual directory lists programs for deaf-blind children and adults including programs for deaf-blind children and youth (national and state level), the Helen Keller Centers for deaf-blind youth and adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. (DB)

  11. Should All Deaf Children Learn Sign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Donna Jo; Mellon, Nancy K; Niparko, John K; Rathmann, Christian; Mathur, Gaurav; Humphries, Tom; Handley, Theresa; Scambler, Sasha; Lantos, John D

    2015-07-01

    Every year, 10,000 infants are born in the United States with sensorineural deafness. Deaf children of hearing (and nonsigning) parents are unique among all children in the world in that they cannot easily or naturally learn the language that their parents speak. These parents face tough choices. Should they seek a cochlear implant for their child? If so, should they also learn to sign? As pediatricians, we need to help parents understand the risks and benefits of different approaches to parent-child communication when the child is deaf [corrected]. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

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    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. (Institute of Medicine, Juelich, (West Germany))

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  13. Static and Dynamic Balance in Congenital Severe to Profound Hearing-Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh HajiHeydari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research conducted since the early 1900s has consistently identified differences between deaf and hearing children on performance of a wide variety of motor tasks, most notably balance. Our study was performed to test static and dynamic balance skills in congenital severe to profound hearing impaired children in comparison with normal age-matched children.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 severe to profound hearing impaired and 40 normal children with age 6 to 10 years old. Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency 2, balance subset with 9 parts was used for evaluation of balance skills.Results: Hearing-impaired children showed 16.7 to 100% fail results in 7 parts of the balance subset. In normal children fail result was revealed just in 3 parts of the balance subset from 2.5 to 57.5%, and differences between two groups were significant (p<0.0001. There was a significant difference between two groups in two static balance skills of standing on one leg on a line and standing on one leg on a balance beam with eyes closed (p<0.0001.conclusion: It seems that development of static balance skills are longer than dynamic ones. Because severe to profound hearing-impaired children showed more weakness than normal children in both static and dynamic balance abilities, functional tests of balance proficiency can help to identify balance disorders in these children.

  14. The Early Years: Parents and Young Deaf Children Reading Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Research is just beginning to describe the role of reading in the lives of families with deaf children. While the time that deaf children spend reading or being read to represents only a small part of their lives at home, research highlights its importance for young children--hearing as well as deaf. Children whose parents read to them at home…

  15. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  16. Deaf Children and English: More Ways Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance; Cartwright, Daisy

    1997-01-01

    Ideas to help parents of deaf children foster English language development include communicating regularly in writing, handling public encounters the "deaf" way, interacting with deaf adults, reading books by/about deaf people, learning and maintaining sign language skills, joining local and state associations, and making sure the television has a…

  17. Oral Communication Development in Severe to Profound Hearing Impaired Children After Receiving Aural Habilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Farin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication, cognition, language, and speech are interrelated and develop together. It should come as no surprise to us that the key to intervention with deaf children is to establish, as early as possible, a functional communication system for the child and the parents. Early intervention programs need to be multidisciplinary, technologically sound and most important, it should take cognizance of the specific context (community, country in which the child and family function. The main aim of this study was to obtain oral communication development regarding current status of the intervention (aural habilitation and speech therapyfor children with severe to profound hearing impairment in Iran. A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken on a consecutive group of children with severe to profound deafness. Nine severe to profound hearing-impaired children out of the primer 42 cases, who were detected below two years old, had been selected in the previous study to receive aural habilitation. The average of their speech intelligibility scores was near 70% at age 6, which was accounted as poor oral communication and only two of them were able to communicate by spoken language. An integrated intervention services continued again for one year and their oral communication skill was assessed by their speech intelligibility. The intelligibility test of children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read 10 questions such as where is your home. This can be answered only in one word. Each tape was presented to10 normal hearing listeners, and their task was to write down, the answers in Persian orthography. At the beginning (at age 6 the average speech intelligibility score of these children was 72% and only two of them had score of 90% and 100%. At age 7, all of the severe groups were over 90%, and only two profound ones achieved the score of 48% and 62%. All of severe groups develop oral communication, but profound ones had a semi-intelligible speech

  18. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children.  Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software.   Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  19. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Mohammadi, Eissa; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Pirzadeh, Akbar; Mahmoudi, Hamzeh; Ansari, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%), respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software. Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P<0.033). The stigma score was higher in mothers who were living independently of their relatives (P<0.029). The mean stigma score in mothers of children with a cochlear implant was lower than that of mothers of children with earphones (86.70 vs. 99.64), and this difference tended towards significance (P=0.057). Conclusion: This study showed that half of all mothers with deaf children were scorned and felt ashamed of having a deaf child in the family because of the stigma. The majority of mothers with deaf children felt stigmatized, and only their education and residency status affected this issue. The mothers of cochlear-implanted children perceived less stigma. Due to the various social and psychological problems caused by hearing impairment, it is necessary to consider the emotional health and psychological state of the mothers in addition to rehabilitation

  20. Deaf Children with Disabilities: Rights under the IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children who are deaf and who have disabilities often face barriers in ensuring that their children receive the services they need. Some of these barriers include lack of awareness about deafness-disability constellations, shortages of professionals knowledgeable about how deaf children learn or the impact of the disability on deaf…

  1. Should we teach thinking skills to deaf children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Tamsin Kelty

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to identify the benefits of developing thinking skills with KS1 deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL. It arose as a response to the findings of a variety of researches who had reported a number of ‘failings’ apparent in the educational and learning activity of deaf children. It used a case study approach involving five profoundly deaf Key stage 1 children and explored the extent to which, using materials grounded in the Somerset Thinking Skills Course, the teaching of thinking skills in a supportive environment could remediate some of these issues. The strongly visual nature of the material supported pupil exchanges mediated by the use of sign language. Analysis of video film was used to plot individual pupil development of scanning skills, their use of nouns versus adjectives, micro-skills and macro-abilities. Pupil reasoning skills, how they were supported, their ownership and role of the facilitator were also examined. The results showed that within eight weeks (equivalent to four hours in total the children were more able to express their perceptions. They watched other children in order to access their signed information and appeared to use this to develop, elaborate, extend and provide reasons when it was their turn to present. There was also evidence of enhanced creativity and originality in their contributions. This pilot study urges the need for further research and suggests that a priority should be given to developing this approach in the teaching of deaf children. Due to the complexity of thinking skills it further recommends that this area should be taught as a separate topic that can inform other subjects.

  2. Music lessons improve auditory perceptual and cognitive performance in deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eROCHETTE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite advanced technologies in auditory rehabilitation of profound deafness, deaf children often exhibit delayed cognitive and linguistic development and auditory training remains a crucial element of their education. In the present cross-sectional study, we assess whether music would be a relevant tool for deaf children rehabilitation. In normal-hearing children, music lessons have been shown to improve cognitive and linguistic-related abilities, such as phonetic discrimination and reading. We compared auditory perception, auditory cognition, and phonetic discrimination between 14 profoundly deaf children who completed weekly music lessons for a period of 1.5 to 4 years and 14 deaf children who did not receive musical instruction. Children were assessed on perceptual and cognitive auditory tasks using environmental sounds: discrimination, identification, auditory scene analysis, auditory working memory. Transfer to the linguistic domain was tested with a phonetic discrimination task. Musically-trained children showed better performance in auditory scene analysis, auditory working memory and phonetic discrimination tasks, and multiple regressions showed that success on these tasks was at least partly driven by music lessons. We propose that musical education contributes to development of general processes such as auditory attention and perception, which, in turn, facilitate auditory-related cognitive and linguistic processes.

  3. Music lessons improve auditory perceptual and cognitive performance in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Françoise; Moussard, Aline; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Despite advanced technologies in auditory rehabilitation of profound deafness, deaf children often exhibit delayed cognitive and linguistic development and auditory training remains a crucial element of their education. In the present cross-sectional study, we assess whether music would be a relevant tool for deaf children rehabilitation. In normal-hearing children, music lessons have been shown to improve cognitive and linguistic-related abilities, such as phonetic discrimination and reading. We compared auditory perception, auditory cognition, and phonetic discrimination between 14 profoundly deaf children who completed weekly music lessons for a period of 1.5-4 years and 14 deaf children who did not receive musical instruction. Children were assessed on perceptual and cognitive auditory tasks using environmental sounds: discrimination, identification, auditory scene analysis, auditory working memory. Transfer to the linguistic domain was tested with a phonetic discrimination task. Musically trained children showed better performance in auditory scene analysis, auditory working memory and phonetic discrimination tasks, and multiple regressions showed that success on these tasks was at least partly driven by music lessons. We propose that musical education contributes to development of general processes such as auditory attention and perception, which, in turn, facilitate auditory-related cognitive and linguistic processes.

  4. Literacy and Linguistic Development in Bilingual Deaf Children: Implications of the "and" for Phonological Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Lynn; Parrila, Rauno

    2014-01-01

    Cumulating evidence suggests that the establishment of high-quality phonological representations is the "cognitive precursor" that facilitates the acquisition of language (spoken, signed, and written). The authors present two studies that contrast the nature of bilingual profoundly deaf children's phonological representations derived…

  5. Consanguinity and deafness in Omani children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabori, Mazin Al; Patton, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on a national retrospective analysis of 1400 questionnaires on the causes of deafness in Omani children, collected from 1986 to 2000. It was found that 70% of the deaf children were from parents of consanguineous marriages, and 30% from non-consanguineous unions. In those with consanguineous families 70.16% were first cousin marriages, 17.54% were second cousins, and 10.86% were from the same tribe. The proportion arising from first cousin marriages was higher than the background rate of first cousin marriages in Oman. In the total cohort, 45% had other family members with hearing loss. There was a greater chance of other relatives being affected in the consanguineous group as opposed to the non-consanguineous group (29.7% versus 15.3%). In most cases the affected relative was a deaf sibling (67.8%). We have demonstrated a higher rate of consanguinity amongst parents of deaf children in Oman and suggest this is associated with a higher frequency of autosomal recessive deafness in this paediatric population.

  6. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-01-01

    Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions...

  7. Health promotion of families of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of hearing loss in the family dynamics of the deaf child; identify the family’s knowledge about deafness, understand how parents experience the diagnosis and treatment of child with hearing impairment. Methods: The study has aqualitative approach developed at the Center for Integrated Medical Care - NAMI, attached to the University of Fortaleza - UNIFOR located in Fortaleza - CE, Brazil. The participants were six mothers of children with hearing impairment. Data collection was carried outthrough participant observation and semi-structured interview. The Thematic Analysis of Bardin was used for processing the data. Results: After coding, some categories emerged from the discourse: Misinformation of Hearing Loss; impact of the discovery of hearingloss, caregivers and facilitators of the development of the deaf children. Conclusion: The birth of a deaf child alters the previous family balance, causing specific problems, such as the communication barrier, whose solution is related to how to handle the situation. Itis necessary to promote changes, emphasizing the involvement of caregivers and loved as facilitators of deaf child’s development. In Phonoaudiology, this attitude represents discovering new ways to identify the need for the subject, which requires strategies thatvalue their opinion, allowing the expression of expectations, perceptions, representations and feelings.

  8. Concurrent and Longitudinal Predictors of Reading for Deaf and Hearing Children in Primary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Terlektsi, Emmanouela; Kyle, Fiona Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Forty-one children with severe-profound prelingual hearing loss were assessed on single word reading, reading comprehension, English vocabulary, phonological awareness and speechreading at three time points, 1 year apart (T1-T3). Their progress was compared with that of a group of hearing children of similar nonverbal IQ, initially reading at the same level. Single word reading improved at each assessment point for the deaf children but there was no growth in reading comprehension from T2 to T3. There were no differences between children with cochlear implants and those with hearing aids on either reading measure but orally educated children had higher scores than children who signed in the classroom. English vocabulary and speechreading were the most consistent longitudinal predictors of reading for the deaf children. Phonological awareness was the most consistent longitudinal predictor for the hearing group and also a concurrent predictor of reading at T3 for both groups. There were many more significant correlations among the various measures for the deaf children than the hearing at both T1 and T3, suggesting that skills underpinning reading, including phonological awareness and vocabulary, are more closely related for deaf children. Implications of these findings for of deaf children's literacy are explored. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology

  10. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Knoors, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in only limited progress. This paper examines…

  11. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschark, M.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in

  12. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  13. Teaching Idioms to Children Who Are Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M.; Hornett, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for helping children who are deaf to comprehend idiomatic expressions. The teaching method involves introducing the idiom, providing examples of proper usage, requiring students to give back examples for the idiom, evaluating comprehension of the idiom, and subsequently reinforcing learning through completion of a worksheet.…

  14. Deaf Children and English: Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance

    1997-01-01

    Describes strategies parents can use to teach English to children with deafness or those hard of hearing. Strategies include modeling reading and writing, communicating with the child in writing, providing word-rich books and writing supplies, playing word-based games, and learning special techniques for reading to and with the child. (CR)

  15. A Money Unit for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, Evelyn

    1983-01-01

    A unit designed to teach deaf children (9 to 11 years old) about money, while covering other mathematical topics, is described. The program can either be covered in one block or infused into regular mathematics curriculum over a long period of time. (Author/SW)

  16. Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Eight profoundly hearing-impaired children, aged 5-11, received tactual word recognition training with tactual speech perception aids. Following training, subjects were tested on trained words and new words. Performance was significantly better on both sets of words when words were presented with a combined condition of tactual aid and aided…

  17. Sensitivity to Conversational Maxims in Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist…

  18. Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidera, Francesc; Amadó, Anna; Martínez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3-8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The…

  19. Programs for Deaf-blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This directory provides information on programs for deaf-blind children and adults including national and state programs, the Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. Within each broad category, programs are listed alphabetically by state and provide detailed contact…

  20. Literacy and linguistic development in bilingual deaf children: implications of the "and" for phonological processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Lynn; Parrila, Rauno

    2014-01-01

    Cumulating evidence suggests that the establishment of high-quality phonological representations is the cognitive precursor that facilitates the acquisition of language (spoken, signed, and written). The authors present two studies that contrast the nature of bilingual profoundly deaf children's phonological representations derived from a spoken language and from a signed language using the framework of "functional equivalence" as outlined in McQuarrie and Parilla (2009). The authors argue further that a signed-language phonological system is suited in establishing the "functional" representational base that will support reading acquisition for bilingual deaf learners. They highlight rapidly developing empirical research on dual-language interactions between signed language and written language is highlighted, and discuss the need to take such data into account in any discussion of fundamental skills necessary to support reading achievement in bilingual profoundly deaf learners.

  1. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  2. Does deafness lead to enhancement of visual spatial cognition in children? Negative evidence from deaf nonsigners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasnis, I; Samar, V; Bettger, J; Sathe, K

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated whether deafness contributes to enhancement of visual spatial cognition independent of knowledge of a sign language. Congenitally deaf school children in India who were born to hearing parents and were not exposed to any sign language, and matched hearing controls, were given a test of digit span and five tests that measured visual spatial skills. The deaf group showed shorter digit span than the hearing group, consistent with previous studies. Deaf and hearing children did not differ in their performance on the visual spatial skills test, suggesting that deafness per se may not be a sufficient factor for enhancement of visual spatial cognition. Early exposure to a sign language and fluent sign skills may be the critical factors that lead to differential development of visual spatial skills in deaf people.

  3. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  4. Psycho-physical development of deaf school-age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statiev S.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Examined the psycho-physical development of deaf children and their adaptation to the world, analyzed the studies earlier. Shows the analysis of publications of various experts, we concluded that the problem is poorly understood and requires a solution, as it is currently very topical. Proved that the psycho-physical development of deaf children is low in comparison with hearing and speech development of many deaf people is not coming. It is established that such children find it difficult to adapt to the conditions of modern life and the need to develop different ways to improve the lives of deaf children.

  5. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular…

  6. Reading comprehension of deaf children with cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.; Bon, W.H.J. van; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (0) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was

  7. Awareness and Regulation of Emotions in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    In this study, deaf children's understanding of their own emotions was compared with that of hearing peers. Twenty-six deaf children (mean age 11 years) and 26 hearing children, matched for age and gender, were presented with various tasks that tap into their emotion awareness and regulation (coping) regarding the four basic emotions (happiness,…

  8. Understanding minds: early cochlear implantation and the development of theory of mind in children with profound hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Annette; Lyxell, Björn; Jönsson, Radoslava; Heimann, Mikael

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigates how auditory stimulation from cochlear implants (CI) is associated with the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in severely and profoundly hearing impaired children with hearing parents. Previous research has shown that deaf children of hearing parents have a delayed ToM development. This is, however, not always the case with deaf children of deaf parents, who presumably are immersed in a more vivid signing environment. Sixteen children with CI (4.25 to 9.5 years of age) were tested on measures of cognitive and emotional ToM, language and cognition. Eight of the children received their first implant relatively early (before 27 months) and half of them late (after 27 months). The two groups did not differ in age, gender, language or cognition at entry of the study. ToM tests included the unexpected location task and a newly developed Swedish social-emotional ToM test. The tests aimed to test both cognitive and emotional ToM. A comparison group of typically developing hearing age matched children was also added (n=18). Compared to the comparison group, the early CI-group did not differ in emotional ToM. The late CI-group differed significantly from the comparison group on both the cognitive and emotional ToM tests. The results revealed that children with early cochlear implants solved ToM problems to a significantly higher degree than children with late implants, although the groups did not differ on language or cognitive measures at baseline. The outcome suggests that early cochlear implantation for deaf children in hearing families, in conjunction with early social and communicative stimulation in a language that is native to the parents, can provide a foundation for a more normalized ToM development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Smartphone speech-to-text applications for communication with profoundly deaf patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, F C; Clamp, P J; Hajioff, D

    2016-01-01

    Visual communication aids, such as handwriting or typing, are often used to communicate with deaf patients in the clinic. This study aimed to establish the feasibility of communicating through smartphone speech recognition software compared with writing or typing. Thirty doctors and medical students were timed writing, typing and dictating a standard set of six sentences appropriate for a post-operative consultation, and the results were assessed for accuracy and legibility. The mean time for smartphone dictation (17.8 seconds, 95 per cent confidence interval = 17.0-18.7) was significantly faster than writing (59.2 seconds, 95 per cent confidence interval = 56.6-61.7) or typing (44 seconds, 95 per cent confidence interval = 41.0-47.1) (p < 0.001). Speech recognition was slightly less accurate, but accuracy increased with time spent dictating. Smartphone dictation is a feasible alternative to typing and handwriting. Slow speech may improve accuracy. Early clinical experience has been promising.

  10. Acquiring English as a second language via print: the task for deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Robert J; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L

    2014-08-01

    Only a minority of profoundly deaf children read at age-level. We contend this reflects cognitive and linguistic impediments from lack of exposure to a natural language in early childhood, as well as the inherent difficulty of learning English only through the written modality. Yet some deaf children do acquire English via print. The current paper describes a theoretical model of how children could, in principle, acquire a language via reading and writing. The model describes stages of learning which represent successive, conceptual insights necessary for second/foreign language learning via print. Our model highlights the logical difficulties present when one cannot practice a language outside of reading/writing, such as the necessity of translating to a first language, the need for explicit instruction, and difficulty that many deaf children experience in understanding figurative language. Our model explains why learning to read is often a protracted process for deaf children and why many fail to make progress after some initial success. Because language acquisition is thought to require social interaction, with meaning cued by extralinguistic context, the ability of some deaf individuals to acquire language through print represents an overlooked human achievement worthy of greater attention by cognitive scientists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Knoors, H.E.T.; Schreuder, R.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex

  12. Complex Word Reading in Dutch Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to…

  13. A Vision Guide for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Marvin; DuBoff, Beth Reilly

    The guide for teachers of deaf blind children deals with visual functioning, evaluation, and instruction. An overview of the fundamentals of visual functioning in deaf blind children includes concepts basic to an understanding of the process. Assessment and evaluation of the child's visual functioning is discussed, and procedures for determining…

  14. What We Can Learn from Hearing Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Hearing parents of deaf children face stresses and demands related to parenting a deaf child, including difficult choices about language, technologies, education and identity for their children (Marschark, 1997). To date, few researchers have discussed the unique challenges faced by this group. Through a series of semistructured, in-depth…

  15. Parenting Practices and Behavior Problems among Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakowski, Amy; Brubaker, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    Parents of 39 deaf and 37 hearing children (ages 3-8) completed the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire and the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Inconsistent discipline was positively correlated with behavior problems for both groups. There was no evidence that greater prevalence of problems among deaf children resulted from inadequate parenting.…

  16. Establishment of joint attention in dyads involving hearing mothers of deaf and hearing children, and its relation to adaptive social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Matilda E; Tasker, Susan L; Schmidt, Louis A

    2009-01-01

    Mounting evidence points to joint attention as a mediating variable in children's adaptive behavior development. Joint attention in interactions between hearing mothers and congenitally deaf (n = 27) and hearing (n = 29) children, ages 18-36 months, was examined. All deaf children had severe to profound hearing loss. Mother-child interactions were coded for maternally initiated and child-initiated success rates in establishing joint attention; mothers completed ratings of their children's adaptive behavior. Hearing mother-deaf child dyads had significantly lower maternally initiated success rates. No significant between-group differences on child-initiated success rates were shown. Maternal ratings of adaptive behavior were significantly lower for deaf children, and related positively and significantly to both child-initiated and maternally initiated success rates. The findings suggest that mother-child interactions that are low in successful establishment of joint attention might mediate the development of socioemotional problems evident in deaf children with hearing families.

  17. Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities : the effects of functional movement activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To determine the effect of functional movement activities within the MOVE ( Mobility Opportunities Via Education) curriculum on the independence of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Subjects: Forty-four children with profound intellectual and multiple

  18. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children, and Their Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular interest. Overall, parents gave their children higher school friendship ratings than the children gave themselves, and hearing children and their pare...

  19. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions. Therefore, it is vital to establish a cooperation between parents and proper institutions and specialists. Hearing dysfunction requires intensification of parents actions in the field of recognizing and developing the strong sides of deaf child

  20. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  1. Awareness and regulation of emotions in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-11-01

    In this study, deaf children's understanding of their own emotions was compared with that of hearing peers. Twenty-six deaf children (mean age 11 years) and 26 hearing children, matched for age and gender, were presented with various tasks that tap into their emotion awareness and regulation (coping) regarding the four basic emotions (happiness, anger, sadness, and fear). The findings suggest that deaf children have no difficulties in identifying their own basic emotions and the elicitors, or multiple emotions of opposite valence (happy and sad). Yet, they did show an impaired capacity to differentiate between their own emotions within the negative spectrum, which suggests a more generic evaluation of the situation. Deaf children's emotion regulation strategies showed a strong preference for approaching the situation at hand, but almost no deaf child reported the use of an avoidant tactic in order to diminish the negative impact of the situation. Overall, deaf children's emotion regulation strategies seemed less effective than those of their hearing peers. The implications for deaf children's emotional development are discussed. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  3. Informed Choice and Deaf Children: Underpinning Concepts and Enduring Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Carr, Gwen; Hunt, Ros; McCracken, Wendy; Skipp, Amy; Tattersall, Helen

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns the first stage of a research and development project that aimed to produce both parent and professional guidelines on the promotion and provision of informed choice for families with deaf children. It begins with a theoretical discussion of the problems associated with the concept of informed choice and deaf child services…

  4. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  5. A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children's Reading Comprehension Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Cain, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although deaf children typically exhibit severe delays in reading achievement, there is a paucity of research looking at their text-level comprehension skills. We present a comparison of deaf and normally hearing readers' profiles on a commonly used reading comprehension assessment: the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability II. Methods:…

  6. Casefinding Criteria for Use in Identifying Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Catherine E.

    The study was undertaken to develop casefinding criteria for identifying deaf-blind children. Referral sources and investigative potentials were obtained from a demographic survey of 164 cases of deaf-blind persons in Louisiana. Inquiry sheets on the possible sources of casefinding twice were sent to and ranked by a panel of 20 persons, including…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions of Communication Needs of Deaf Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teachers' Perceptions of Communication Needs of Deaf Children in Kenyan School System. ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology ... It is believed that teachers being the major service deliverer in the school system, their opinion on this matter will have long-lasting effects on their deaf pupils, as it will ...

  8. Developing Written Literacy in Deaf Children through Analyzing Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Carol Tane; Armour, Victoria A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of complementary sign language instruction on three measures of literacy were evaluated with six severely to profoundly deaf high school residential students. Instruction involved comparing American Sign Language and English, literal and figurative translation, and editing and grammatical English skills. Positive results have…

  9. Spelling of Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Heather; Kessler, Brett; Treiman, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The spellings of 39 profoundly deaf users of cochlear implants, aged 6 to 12 years, were compared with those of 39 hearing peers. When controlled for age and reading ability, the error rates of the 2 groups were not significantly different. Both groups evinced phonological spelling strategies, performing better on words with more typical…

  10. Early conversational environment enables spontaneous belief attribution in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meristo, Marek; Strid, Karin; Hjelmquist, Erland

    2016-12-01

    Previous research suggests that deaf children who grow up with hearing parents display considerable difficulties in understanding mental states of others, up to their teenage years when explicitly asked in a verbal test situation (Meristo et al., 2007). On the other hand, typically developing pre-verbal infants display evidence of spontaneous false belief attribution when tested in looking-time tasks, although verbal tests are typically not passed before the age of 4years (Onishi & Baillargeon, 2005). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether deaf children of hearing parents are able to demonstrate spontaneous belief attribution in a non-verbal eye-tracking task. Thirty 4- to 8-year-old, deaf and hearing children, completed a non-verbal spontaneous-response false-belief task and a verbal elicited-response false-belief task. The deaf children were either children with cochlear implants or children with hearing aids. Comparative analyses were also carried out with a previous sample of deaf and hearing 2-year-olds (reported in Meristo, Morgan, et al., 2012). We found that in the non-verbal spontaneous-response task typically hearing children, but not deaf children, were able to predict that a person with a false belief about an object's location will search erroneously for the object. However, hearing children and deaf children with implants, but not deaf children with hearing aids, passed the verbal elicited-response task. Language development was significantly correlated with both types of false-belief tasks for the whole sample. Our findings strengthen the hypothesis that the emergence of the ability to recognize others' beliefs needs to be supported initially by very early conversational input in dialogues with caregivers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Deaf Parents and Their Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Tittle, Matthew D.

    2000-01-01

    This literature review begins with a description of the deaf community, their language and culture; then describes communication patterns and parenting issues in deaf-parented families; examines the role of the hearing child in a deaf family and how that affects their functioning in the hearing world; and finally discusses considerations and…

  12. [Clinical comparison of idiopathic sudden deafness in children and the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Min; Deng, Jie; Qi, Xing; He, Gang

    2015-07-01

    This retrospective study compared clinical manifestations of idiopathic sudden hearing loss between children and the elderly. 44 pediatric patients and 76 elderly patients diagnosed with idiopathic sudden deafness in our clinic from December 2009 to September 2014 were enrolled. Different clinical parameters were compared. The incidence of initially profound hearing loss was highest and mild hearing loss was lowest in both groups (P 0.05). The number of patients was the most in initially profound type of audiogram pattern and the fewest in ascending type in both groups (P children (27/44, 61.4%) was higher than that in elderly patients (32/76, 42.1%) (P 0.05). The highest recovery rate in children was in those with descending type and the lowest was in those with profound type (P elderly patients with initially different types of audiogram pattern (P > 0.05). Hearing recovery rates of descending type in children were higher than that in elderly patients. Presence of tinnitus in pediatric patients was not relavent to the outcome (P > 0.05). Presence of tinnitus in elderly patients was associated with favorable outcomes. (P 0.05). Presence of dizziness in elderly patients was associated with poor outcomes (P elderly patients was not relavent to the outcome (P > 0.05). Presence of chronic diseases in elderly patients was not associated with the outcome (P > 0.05). The clinical manifestion of idiopathic sudden deafness is respective in Children and in elderly patients.

  13. Multisensory speech perception of young children with profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon-Rabin, L; Haras, N; Bergman, M

    1997-10-01

    The contribution of a two-channel vibrotactile aid (Trill VTA 2/3, AVR Communications LTD) to the audiovisual perception of speech was evaluated in four young children with profound hearing loss using words and speech pattern contrasts. An intensive, hierarchical, and systematic training program was provided. The results show that the addition of the tactile (T) modality to the auditory and visual (A+V) modalities enhanced speech perception performance significantly on all tests. Specifically, at the end of the training sessions, the tactile supplementation increased word recognition scores in a 44-word, closed-set task by 12 percentage points; detection of consonant in final position by 50 percentage points; detection of sibilant in final position by 30 percentage points; and detection of voicing in final position by 25 percentage points. Significant learning over time was evident for all test materials, in all modalities. As expected, fastest learning (i.e., smallest time constants) was found for the AVT condition. The results of this study provide further evidence that sensory information provided by the tactile modality can enhance speech perception in young children.

  14. The 2008 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind" is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It represents a 25 year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB), its predecessors and each state/multi-state deaf-blind project…

  15. The 2010 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It represents a 25-plus year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB), its predecessors and each state deaf-blind project throughout the…

  16. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children, and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular interest. Overall, parents gave their children higher school friendship ratings than the children gave themselves, and hearing children and their parents were more positive about children's friendships than were deaf children and their parents. Both children and parents also saw deaf children as less successful in reading than hearing children. However, deaf children's having deaf parents, attending a school for the deaf, and using sign language at home all were associated with more positive perceptions of social success. Use of cochlear implants was not associated with perceptions of greater academic or social success. These and related findings are discussed in the context of parent and child perspectives on social and academic functioning and particular challenges confronted by deaf children in regular school settings.

  17. Individual differences in sign language abilities in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meronen, Auli; Ahonen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    The study attempted to identify characteristics of individual differences in sign language abilities among deaf children. Connections between sign language skills and rapid serial naming, hand motor skills, and early fluency were investigated. The sample consisted of 85 Finnish deaf children. Their first language was sign language. Simple correlations and multiple linear-regression analysis demonstrated the effect of early language development and serial hand movements on sign language abilities. Other significant factors were serial fingertapping and serial naming. Heterogeneity in poor sign language users was noted. Although identifying learning disorders in deaf children is complicated, developmental difficulties can be discovered by appropriate measurements. The study confirmed the results of earlier research demonstrating that the features of deaf and hearing children's learning resemble each other. Disorders in signed and spoken languages may have similar bases despite their different modalities.

  18. Observing the Communication Behavior of Deaf-Blind Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, David

    1974-01-01

    Reviewed are observational techniques for rating the communication of deaf-blind multihandicapped children, and reported is an initial study of the diagnostic observational competency of 75 speech pathologists at 5 levels of training and experience. (LC)

  19. Developmental Scales Versus Observational Measures for Deaf-Blind Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Martin H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A study involving 24 deaf-blind children (6 years to 13 years old) was conducted to determine the relationship between standardized tests and developmental scales, and systematic behavior observation ratings. (SBH)

  20. Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe. C Chidziva, J Matsekete, T Bandason, S Shamu, T Dzongodza, N Matinhira, HA Mujuru, C Kunzekwenyika, M Wellington, R Luthy, C Prescott, RA Ferrand ...

  1. Confronting the language barrier: Theory of mind in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna C; Gutierrez, Roberto; Ludlow, Amanda K

    2015-01-01

    The current study addressed deaf children's Theory of Mind (ToM) development as measured by a battery of first- and second-order belief tasks. Both a chronological age-matched control group and a younger group of pre-school aged hearing children were compared to a group of deaf children born to hearing parents. A hearing native signer enacted each of the tasks, which were pre-recorded in video clips in English (SSE), British Sign Language (BSL) and spoken English, in order to consider all communication preferences of the deaf children. Results revealed no differences in performance between the deaf and the young hearing children. However, despite the inclusion of ToM tasks based on their preferred mode of communication, the deaf children performed significantly worse at the unexpected-content and second-order belief task compared with their age-matched controls. These findings imply a delay rather than a deficit in ToM in deaf children that could be attributed to limited opportunities to converse and overhear conversations about mental states. None. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Augmented Reality Sign Language Teaching Model for Deaf Children

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica GONZÁLEZ ARRIETA; Cadeñanes Garnica, Jorge J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a Sign Language Teaching Model (SLTM) designed to develop on deaf children different Communication Skills (CS) within a Collaborative Learning Environment with Mixed-Reality (CLEMR). A pilot lesson with the Fingerspelling Alphabet was conducted at the Association of Parents of Deaf Children of Salamanca to determine the Percentage of Development of the Sign Language Communication Skill (SLCS) and others by using a kit of Pedagogical Materials as complementary teaching r...

  3. THE STRUCTURE OF MOBILITY AND SKILLS AMONG DEAF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija HASANBEGOVIĆ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A research of mobility and skills among deaf children (from 7 to 17 years old is presented in this work. The sample of examinees (N=98 is consisted of two subsamples. The first subsample is consisted of deaf children (primary-school and secondary-school level, who have been included in the educative and rehabilitative treatment in the special school (N=29 and the second subsample is consisted of hearing children (primary-school and secondary-school level, who have been chosen by random choice (N=69. For the purpose of the research, a measure instrument named “Test for evaluation of the anthropologic features (extremity movement of mobility and skills“, (TAMV, has been constructed. The aim of the research is to establish mobility and skills of deaf children. In order to test the hypothesis that there are statistically significant differencesamong deaf and hearing children (primary-school and secondary-school level in mobility and skills, discriminative analysis has been applied. The results showed that deaf examinees have been much weaker compared to hearing examinees in mobility and skills and that these differences were statistically significant when applied on the system of variables. The results enriched the knowledge about mobility and skills of deaf children, which can encourage more programs of motor mobility and skills improvement to be constructed.

  4. Congenitally deaf children's care trajectories in the context of universal neonatal hearing screening: a qualitative study of the parental experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Hardonk, Stefan; Desnerck ., Greetje; Loots, Gerrit; van Hove, Geert; Van Kerschaver, Erwin; Sigurjónsdóttir, Hanna Björg; Vanroelen, Christophe; Louckx, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the early care trajectories of congenitally deaf children from a parental perspective, starting with universal neonatal hearing screenings. The analysis using a three-dimensional care trajectory concept is aimed at developing a basic typology of postscreening care trajectories. Children with severe/profound hearing loss, registered in the Flanders' (Belgium) universal neonatal hearing screening program, born between 1999 and 2001. Thematic content ana...

  5. Temporal entrainment of visual attention in children: effects of age and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Matthew W G

    2014-12-01

    The major documented effect of auditory deprivation on visual processing is enhanced spatial attention, in particular to the visual periphery and to moving stimuli. However, there is a parallel literature that has reported deficits in temporal aspects of visual processing in individuals with profound hearing losses. This study builds upon previous work showing possible deficits in processing of rapid serial visual presentation streams in deaf children [Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience (2010), 28, 181-192]. Deaf native signers of American Sign Language and hearing children and adults were asked to perform a 2-AFC identification task with a visual target embedded in a stream of visual stimuli presented at 6 Hz. Both children and adults displayed attentional awakening, whereby target identification accuracy improved as the number of stimuli preceding the target increased. For deaf children, however, this awakening effect was less pronounced than that observed in hearing children, interpreted as difficulty sustaining entrainment to the stimulus stream. The data provide the first account of attentional awakening in children, showing that it improves across the 6-13 year age range. They also provide additional support to the possibility of domain-general alterations in the processing of temporal information in the absence of auditory input. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long QT in children with congenital deafness: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseraldin Akbari Asbagh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long QT syndromes (LQT are genetic abnormalities of ventricular repo-larization, with an estimated incidence of about one per 10000 births. It is characterized by prolongation of the QT interval in electrocardiogram (EKG and associated with a high risk for syncope and sudden death in patients. Type of this syndrome is association with congenital deafness. Our objective was to evaluate QT interval in children with congenital deafness.Methods: For 219 patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital audiometric clinic in 2011, questionnaire were completed. A total of 23 congenitally deaf children were incl-uded. All patients’ examinations were done by a pediatric cardiologist. Electrocardio-gram is conducted in all children (23 patients with sever and deep congenital deafness. Then the QT interval was measured based on Bazett’s formula. Echocardiography was also performed in these children to assess left ventricular function and the presence of mitral valve prolapse.Results: The overall patients were two hundred and nineteen children. A total of twenty three congenitally deaf children were included and electrocardiogram was obtained. Three children had obviously prolonged QTc (0.48±0.02 second. The median age of them was 6.1±5 year, the median weight was 18±11.3 kilogram and the median of QT interval was 0.48±0.02 second.Conclusion: The QT interval obtained 0.48±0.02 second. In the present study we found prolonged QT in congenital deafness, thus we recommend to evaluate the electrocardio-gram of children with congenital deafness.

  7. Children Who Are Deaf-Blind. Practice Perspectives--Highlighting Information on Deaf-Blindness. Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Peggy; Killoran, John

    2007-01-01

    Although the term deaf-blind implies a complete absence of hearing and sight, in reality, it refers to children with varying degrees of vision and hearing losses. The type and severity differ from child to child. The key feature of deaf-blindness is that the combination of losses limits access to auditory and visual information. Children with…

  8. Peer Relationships of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Predictors of Peer Entry and Peer Interaction Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniela; Bat-Chava, Yael; Lalwani, Anil; Waltzman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated factors that affect the development of positive peer relationships among deaf children with cochlear implants. Ten 5- to 6-year-old deaf children with implants were observed under conditions varying peer context difficulty in a Peer Entry task. Results revealed better outcomes for deaf children interacting in one-on-one…

  9. Developing Preschool Deaf Children's Language and Literacy Learning from an Educational Media Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B.; Moses, Annie M.

    2013-01-01

    With the increase in research on multiliteracies comes greater interest in exploring multiple pathways of learning for deaf children. Educational media have been increasingly examined as a tool for facilitating the development of deaf children's language and literacy skills. The authors investigated whether preschool deaf children (N = 31)…

  10. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

     Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  11. THE STRUCTURE OF MOBILITY AND SKILLS AMONG DEAF CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    HASANBEGOVIĆ Husnija; Senad MEHMEDINOVIĆ; Esad H. Mahmutović

    2015-01-01

    A research of mobility and skills among deaf children (from 7 to 17 years old) is presented in this work. The sample of examinees (N=98) is consisted of two subsamples. The first subsample is consisted of deaf children (primary-school and secondary-school level), who have been included in the educative and rehabilitative treatment in the special school (N=29) and the second subsample is consisted of hearing children (primary-school and secondary-school level), who have been chosen by random c...

  12. Empathy and Theory of Mind in Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C.

    2016-01-01

    Empathy (or sharing another's emotion) and theory of mind (ToM: the understanding that behavior is guided by true and false beliefs) are cornerstones of human social life and relationships. In contrast to ToM, there has been little study of empathy's development, especially in deaf children. Two studies of a total of 117 children (52 hearing; 65…

  13. Sign Language Echolalia in Deaf Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Aaron; Cooley, Frances; Meier, Richard P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We present the first study of echolalia in deaf, signing children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigate the nature and prevalence of sign echolalia in native-signing children with ASD, the relationship between sign echolalia and receptive language, and potential modality differences between sign and speech. Method: Seventeen…

  14. The Impact of Cochlear Implant in the Oral Language of Children with Congenital Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Daniela; Jorge, João Xavier; Teixeira, António; Ribeiro, Carlos; Paiva, António

    2015-01-01

    Children with severe to profound sensorineural deafness can acquire vocabulary and syntactic structures to communicate by oral language, after cochlear implant. Identify the linguistic skills of children with cochlear implant. Eighteen children of both gender, between 9 and 10 years, with congenital bilateral deafness, using cochlear implant, were studied. The evaluation instrument used was Observation Chart of Language-School Level. The results were compared with standard of normal-hearing children with the same hearing age. The scores registered in the linguistics structures studied, comparing implanted children and standard, was: phonology, 29.44 ± 8.4 vs. 29.68 ± 5.90, p = 0.91; semantics, 18.55 ± 8.89 vs. 19.20 ± 4.85, p = 0.76; morpho-syntax 21.89 ± 12.85 vs. 26.35 ± 10.36, p = 0.159. Regarding the tests of semantics, there was no significant difference. Concerning the tests of morpho-syntactic structure, the difference was significant in the derivation of words, 2.83 ± 2.81 vs. 4.65 ± 1.64, p = 0.014. In the phonology, a significant difference was found comparing implanted children and standard, in the discrimination of pseudo words, 6.6 ± 2.8 vs. 8.37 ± 2.32, p = 0.023. However, in syllabic segmentation, implanted children had a mean score 8.56 ± 1.6 significantly higher than standard, 5.9 ± 1.58, p language components studied confirms that cochlear implant promotes the development of oral verbal language in children with congenital deafness. Implanted children had acquired language skills similar to normal-hearing children with the same hearing age.

  15. Understanding of Emotions and False Beliefs among Hearing Children versus Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Margalit; Most, Tova; Cohen, Shirit

    2013-01-01

    Emotion understanding and theory of mind (ToM) are two major aspects of social cognition in which deaf children demonstrate developmental delays. The current study investigated these social cognition aspects in two subgroups of deaf children--those with cochlear implants who communicate orally (speakers) and those who communicate primarily using…

  16. Speechreading Development in Deaf and Hearing Children: Introducing the Test of Child Speechreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Campbell, Ruth; Mohammed, Tara; Coleman, Mike; MacSweeney, Mairead

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors describe the development of a new instrument, the Test of Child Speechreading (ToCS), which was specifically designed for use with deaf and hearing children. Speechreading is a skill that is required for deaf children to access the language of the hearing community. ToCS is a deaf-friendly, computer-based test…

  17. The 2009 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It represents a 25 year collaborative effort between NCDB, its predecessors and each state deaf-blind project throughout the country, as well as those projects funded in the…

  18. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  19. Relationship between intellectual functioning and communicative competence in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinich, P M

    1981-09-01

    A group of 39 deaf children tested at ages 2 1/2--4 and 5-6 1/2 yr achieved average scores on three tests of intellectual functioning: a modified version of the Stanford-Binet, the Performance scales of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, and four subtests from the Non-Verbal Intelligence Tests for Deaf and Hearing Subjects developed in Holland by Snijders and Snijders-Oomen [Non-Verbal Intelligence Tests for Deaf and Hearing Subjects (Wolters-Noordhoff N.V., Groningen, Holland, 1968)]. A significant positive correlation between intelligence test scores and an Index of Communicative Competence suggests that communicative competence must be given special attention when assessing the intelligence of children with handicaps that interfere with communication.

  20. Parent influences on physical activity participation and physical fitness of deaf children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellis, M Kathleen; Lieberman, Lauren J; Dummer, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    .... The influence of parents' hearing status and parents' involvement in Deaf sport (2) was assessed in addition to their values toward sports participation and physical fitness for their deaf children...

  1. Theory of Mind: Deaf and Hearing Children's Comprehension of Picture Stories and Judgments of Social Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys-Jones, Sara L.; Ellis, Haydn D.

    2000-01-01

    This study compared 20 prelingually profoundly deaf adolescents (age 11-16 years) and 20 matched, hearing adolescents on a picture-sequencing task and a social judgment test. Results did not support the hypothesis that deaf adolescents possess significantly poorer knowledge about social reasoning than hearing peers but it did support the…

  2. Trained Aides as Baby Sitters of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwestern Region Deaf-Blind Center, Sacramento, CA.

    The document contains the coordinator's guide, recruitment guide, practicum guide, training model, curriculum guide, bibliography, and evaluation guide for TABS, (Trained Aides as Baby Sitters), a training program that prepares individuals to be competent sitters for deaf-blind children and that provides a curriculum tailored to the needs of the…

  3. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This listing provides directory information on U.S. schools and programs for preschool, elementary, and secondary children who are deaf blind. A list of three national programs is followed by a list of state schools, local programs, and other types of resources. (Author/CR)

  4. Semantic Categorization: A Comparison between Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Ellen A.; Gijsel, Martine A. R.; Hermans, Daan; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2010-01-01

    Learning to read is a major obstacle for children who are deaf. The otherwise significant role of phonology is often limited as a result of hearing loss. However, semantic knowledge may facilitate reading comprehension. One important aspect of semantic knowledge concerns semantic categorization. In the present study, the quality of the semantic…

  5. Assessing Deaf and Hearing Children's Communication in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtig, Ida; Couto, Maria Ines Vieira; Mecca, Fabiola F. D. N.; Hartley, Sally; Wirz, Sheila; Woll, Bencie

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil there are no specific tests for either signed or spoken language for deaf children. A protocol evaluating communicative abilities independent of modality of communication (sign language or spoken language), and comprising assessments of (a) pragmatic profile; (b) modality of communication and linguistic level; (c) complexity of…

  6. Bimodal Bilingual Language Development of Hearing Children of Deaf Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Kristin; Chilla, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a bimodal bilingual language acquisition model, this qualitative case study is the first in Germany to investigate the spoken and sign language development of hearing children of deaf adults (codas). The spoken language competence of six codas within the age range of 3;10 to 6;4 is assessed by a series of standardised tests (SETK 3-5,…

  7. SELF TEACHING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPEECHREADING IN DEAF CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEYHUS, ARTHUR I.

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MOTION PICTURE FILMS AS A TEACHING DEVICE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIPREADING SKILLS AND THE USE OF A CARTRIDGE-LOAD, SELF-WINDING EIGHT MILLIMETER PROJECTOR AS A TEACHING TOOL WERE STUDIED. IT WAS HYPOTHESIZED THAT DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING CHILDREN WOULD LEARN PRESCRIBED VOCABULARY MORE QUICKLY BY AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL FILM METHODS…

  8. From the Concrete to the Abstract: Mathematics for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridriksson, Thor; Stewart, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An examination of the status of teaching mathematics to deaf students showed that teachers ignore the hands-on exploration of objects that promotes conceptualization of basic mathematic principles. An arithmetic teaching strategy is proposed which is activity-based and is derived from Piaget's theory of intellectual development in children.…

  9. Peer Interactions among children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities during group activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    Background Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the

  10. Early Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics About Deaf-Blindness > What is Deaf-Blindness Definitions of Deaf-Blindness Causes of Deaf-Blindness National Child Count & Demographics Communication > Communication Overview Early Communication Prelinguistic Communication Object Communication ...

  11. Communication problems in hearing children of deaf parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, N B; Ventry, I M

    1976-08-01

    Fifty-two children who had deaf parents and were thought to have normal hearing were evaluated for speech, hearing, and language problems. Standardized tests, audiological evaluations, and informal conversation and play techniques were used. Of the 52 children of deaf parents, less than half were considered to be developing speech and language normally and 12% had previously undiagnosed hearing loss. The prevalence of speech and language problems and hearing losses is higher in this population than in the population at large. The children appeared to be using two systems to communicate, one with hearing people and one with the deaf. Of the children having some speech and language difficulty, approximately half had problems that were not associated with other known physiological or environmental factors that might affect speech and language. Although there were no children of intelligible mothers who had speech and language problems, there were children developing normally who had parents whose speech intelligibility was poor. Contrary to indications in the literature, speech and language problems did not disappear after the children entered school. A large number of school-age children as well as preschoolers appeared to be having speech and language problems. The amount of time spent with hearing adults during the preschool years or the presence of older normal-hearing and -speaking siblings did not seem related to speech and language difficulty. However, when an elder sibling had speech and language difficulty, the younger siblings tended to have similar problems. The relationship between sign and oral language development is ambiguous, but there is no indication that the use of sign language deters oral language development. In view of the high incidence of communication problems in this population, annual audiological evaluations and counseling of deaf parents concerning aspects of hearing loss and normal language development are recommended. The problems

  12. Prevalence of Mutations in Deafness-Causing Genes in Cochlear Implanted Patients with Profound Nonsyndromic Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfen; Bai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengguo; Xiao, Yun; Gu, Lintao; Han, Yuechen; Fan, Zhaomin; Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Lei; Wang, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    The mutations of GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA12SrRNA are the most common inherited causes of nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) in China, yet previous genetic screenings were mainly carried on patients with moderate-to-profound impairment. We aimed to detect the mutation frequencies in NSHL population within a more specified range of severity. Patients with profound NSHL who had undergone cochlear implantation in the Shandong Provincial Hospital (Shandong, China) were recruited. The majority (n  =  472) were between 0.7 and 6 years old, and the remaining (n  =  63) were between 6 and 70 years old. In total, 115 mutation alleles of the three genes were screened with SNP scan assay. Of the patients, 19.44% (104/535) were found to have GJB2 mutations, and the most common allele was c.235delC, followed by c.299_300delAT and c.109G>A. SLC26A4 mutations were detected in 13.46% patients (72/535), and the most common allele was c.919-2A>G (IVS7-2A>G), followed by c.1174A>T and c.2168A>G. Seven patients (1.31%) carried mutations in mtDNA12SrRNA, with the alleles of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T. We found the allele frequency of c.109G>A (GJB2) was relatively lower in the profound NSHL population in comparison to the moderate-to-profound ones, and the c.1174A>T (SLC26A4) relatively higher. It suggests those mutations may be connected with the degree of deafness, which needs more observations and analyses to support. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  13. Foundations for literacy: An early literacy intervention for deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Amy R; Miller, Elizabeth M; Easterbrooks, Susan R; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2014-10-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new preschool early literacy intervention created specifically for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children with functional hearing. Teachers implemented Foundations for Literacy with 25 DHH children in 2 schools (intervention group). One school used only spoken language, and the other used sign with and without spoken language. A "business as usual" comparison group included 33 DHH children who were matched on key characteristics with the intervention children but attended schools that did not implement Foundations for Literacy. Children's hearing losses ranged from moderate to profound. Approximately half of the children had cochlear implants. All children had sufficient speech perception skills to identify referents of spoken words from closed sets of items. Teachers taught small groups of intervention children an hour a day, 4 days a week for the school year. From fall to spring, intervention children made significantly greater gains on tests of phonological awareness, letter-sound knowledge, and expressive vocabulary than did comparison children. In addition, intervention children showed significant increases in standard scores (based on hearing norms) on phonological awareness and vocabulary tests. This quasi-experimental study suggests that the intervention shows promise for improving early literacy skills of DHH children with functional hearing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. School Psychological Evaluation Reports for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children: Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Robert; Thomas-Presswood, Tania

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the best practices for school psychological evaluation and reports for parents and professionals who work with deaf and hard of hearing children. Deaf and hard of hearing children present unique challenges and for parents to be strong advocates for their children, knowledge about the complexities of psychological assessments is important. Parents are also provided with best practices for psychological reports with descriptions for typical areas of reports and how each is different for deaf and hard of hearing children.

  15. Understanding the Needs of Deaf-Blind Children in Isolated Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blea, William A.; Dantona, Robert

    Presented are the proceedings of a conference on Understanding the Needs of Deaf-Blind Children in Isolated Areas, sponsored by the Southwest Region Deaf-Blind Center, April 29-May 1, 1976 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Talks include "Psychological Assessment" (C. Groves), "Visual Assessment and Training of the Deaf-Blind Child" (R. Funderburg), "Auditory…

  16. Evaluation on health-related quality of life in deaf children with cochlear implant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Kang, Hou-Yong; Gu, Zheng; Hong, Su-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that deaf children benefit considerably from cochlear implants. These improvements are found in areas such as speech perception, speech production, and audiology-verbal performance. Despite the increasing prevalence of cochlear implants in China, few studies have reported on health-related quality of life in children with cochlear implants. The main objective of this study was to explore health-related quality of life on children with cochlear implants in South-west China. A retrospective observational study of 213 CI users in Southwest China between 2010 and 2013. Participants were 213 individuals with bilateral severe-to-profound hearing loss who wore unilateral cochlear implants. The Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire and Health Utility Index Mark III were used pre-implantation and 1 year post-implantation. Additionally, 1-year postoperative scores for Mandarin speech perception were compared with preoperative scores. Health-related quality of life improved post-operation with scores on the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire improving significantly in all subdomains, and the Health Utility Index 3 showing a significant improvement in the utility score and the subdomains of ''hearing," ''speech," and "emotion". Additionally, a significant improvement in speech recognition scores was found. No significant correlation was found between increased in quality of life and speech perception scores. Health-related quality of life and speech recognition in prelingual deaf children significantly improved post-operation. The lack of correlation between quality of life and speech perception suggests that when evaluating performance post-implantation in prelingual deaf children and adolescents, measures of both speech perception and quality of life should be used. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Language acquisition after cochlear implantation of congenitally deaf children: Effect of age at implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, Mario; Holt, Rachael

    2005-04-01

    Evidence shows that early implantation of congenitally deaf children is beneficial. However, infants as young as 6 months of age have started to receive cochlear implants (CIs) in the USA. Such early implantation may be associated with higher risks, including anesthetic risk as well as the increased possibility of a false positive in the diagnosis of profound deafness. On the other hand, delaying implantation may be associated with the risk of missing windows of opportunity or sensitive periods for the development of communication skills. In this study, speech perception and language skills in children who received CIs in the first, second, third, or fourth year of life were compared. Participants were tested at regular 6-month intervals after implantation. The effects of several potential confounds were considered. In general, children implanted earlier outperformed those implanted later, with one exception: infants implanted at 6-12 months showed similar outcomes to children implanted at 12-24 months, at least through 2 to 2-1/2 years of age. This preliminary result may be associated with the difficulty of choosing appropriate stimulation parameters for infants, and its potential influence on the quality of the stimulation patterns delivered by the CI.

  18. A Sociocultural Perspective on Young Deaf Children's Fingerspelling: An Ethnographic Study in a Signing Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Carin

    2014-01-01

    This study, which is part of a larger longitudinal ethnographic study of young deaf children, reports on deaf children's use of fingerspelling. The children observed were early signers using Swedish Sign Language (SSL) in communication with teachers and peers. This study centres on the functions of fingerspelling in the children's everyday…

  19. Deaf Children and Young People's Experiences of Using Specialist Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Veronica; Beresford, Bryony; Sutherland, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children have an increased prevalence of mental health problems compared with hearing children. Generic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services do not have the skills or expertise to meet the mental health needs of this group of children. Three teams in England provide specialist mental health services for deaf children. This research…

  20. The effect of age on physical fitness of deaf elementary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris; Houwen, Suzanne

    The aim of this study was to measure physical fitness of deaf Dutch elementary school children compared with hearing children and to investigate the influence of age on physical fitness. Deaf children were physically less fit than hearing children. Overall, physical fitness increased with age in

  1. [Effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who use cochlear implants in conjunction with hearing aids in the opposite ears].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanjing; Zhou, Huifang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Dong; Xu, Yi; Guo, Yuxi

    2012-10-01

    To compare the effect of rehabilitation of prelingual deaf children who used a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and a hearing aids in the opposite ear while the hearing level of the opposite ears are different. Hearing ability, language ability and learning ability was included in the content. The aim of this research is to investigate better style of rehabilitation, and to offer the best help to the prelingual deaf children. Accord ing to the hearing level of the ear opposite to the one wearing a cochlear implant and whether the opposite ear wear a hearing aid or not, 30 prelingual deaf children were divided into three groups, including cochlear implant with opposite severe hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+SHA), cochlear implant with opposite profound hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+PHA), cochlear implant only (CI). The effect of rehabilitation was assessed in six different times (3,6,9,12,15 and 18 months after the cochlear implants and hearing aids began to work). The longer time the rehabilitation spends, the better the hearing ability,language ability and the learning ability were. The hearing ability of CI+SHA was better than those of CI+PHA (Pdeaf children should take much more time on rehabilitation. The effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who used cochlear implant in one ear and hearing aid in the other depend on the residual hearing level of the other ear. If a prelingual deaf children still has any residual hearing level in the ear opposite to the cochlear implant ear, it is better for him/her to wear a hearing aid in the ear.

  2. Intersecting Cultures in Deaf Mental Health: An Ethnographic Study of NHS Professionals Diagnosing Autism in D/deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenman, Natassia F; Hiddinga, Anja; Wright, Barry

    2017-02-27

    Autism assessments for children who are deaf are particularly complex for a number of reasons, including overlapping cultural and clinical factors. We capture this in an ethnographic study of National Health Service child and adolescent mental health services in the United Kingdom, drawing on theoretical perspectives from transcultural psychiatry, which help to understand these services as a cultural system. Our objective was to analyse how mental health services interact with Deaf culture, as a source of cultural-linguistic identity. We ground the study in the practices and perceptions of 16 professionals, who have conducted autism assessments for deaf children aged 0-18. We adopt a framework of intersectionality to capture the multiple, mutually enforcing factors involved in this diagnostic process. We observed that professionals working in specialist Deaf services, or with experience working with the Deaf community, had intersectional understandings of assessments: the ways in which cultural, linguistic, sensory, and social factors work together to produce diagnoses. Working with a diagnostic system that focuses heavily on 'norms' based on populations from a hearing culture was a key source of frustration for professionals. We conclude that recognising the intersectionality of mental health and Deaf culture helps professionals provide sensitive diagnoses that acknowledge the multiplicity of D/deaf experiences.

  3. The effect of cochlear implantation in development of intelligence quotient of 6-9 deaf children in comparison with normal hearing children (Iran, 2009-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Basir; Monshizadeh, Leila

    2012-06-01

    Before the introduction of cochlear implant (CI) in 1980, hearing aids were the only means by which profoundly deaf children had access to auditory stimuli. Nowadays, CI is firmly established as effective option in speech and language rehabilitation of deaf children, but much of the literature regarding outcomes for children after CI are focused on development of speech and less is known about language acquisition. So, the main aim of this study is the evaluation of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) of cochlear implanted children in comparison with normal children. 30 cochlear implanted and 30 normal hearing children with similar socio-economic level at the same age were compared by a revised version (in Persian) of WISC test (Wechsler, 1991). Then the data were analyzed through SPSS software 16. In spite of the fact that cochlear implanted children did well in different parameters of WISC test, the average scores of this group was less than normal hearing children. But in similarities (one of the parameters of WISC test) 2 group's performance was approximately the same. CI plays an important role in development of verbal IQ and language acquisition of deaf children. Different researches indicate that most of the cochlear implanted children show less language delay during the time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  5. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  6. Predicting the intelligibility of deaf children's speech from acoustic measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Geers, Ann E.; Brenner, Christine M.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2004-05-01

    A weighted combination of speech-acoustic measures may provide an objective assessment of speech intelligibility in deaf children that could be used to evaluate the benefits of sensory aids and rehabilitation programs. This investigation compared the accuracy of two different approaches, multiple linear regression and a simple neural net. These two methods were applied to identical sets of acoustic measures, including both segmental (e.g., voice-onset times of plosives, spectral moments of fricatives, second formant frequencies of vowels) and suprasegmental measures (e.g., sentence duration, number and frequency of intersentence pauses). These independent variables were obtained from digitized recordings of deaf children's imitations of 11 simple sentences. The dependent measure was the percentage of spoken words from the 36 McGarr Sentences understood by groups of naive listeners. The two predictive methods were trained on speech measures obtained from 123 out of 164 8- and 9-year-old deaf children who used cochlear implants. Then, predictions were obtained using speech measures from the remaining 41 children. Preliminary results indicate that multiple linear regression is a better predictor of intelligibility than the neural net, accounting for 79% as opposed to 65% of the variance in the data. [Work supported by NIH.

  7. Auditory plasticity in deaf children with bilateral cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2005-04-01

    Human children with cochlear implants represent a unique population of individuals who have undergone variable amounts of auditory deprivation prior to being able to hear. Even more unique are children who received bilateral cochlear implants (BICIs), in sequential surgical procedures, several years apart. Auditory deprivation in these individuals consists of a two-stage process, whereby complete deafness is experienced initially, followed by deafness in one ear. We studied the effects of post-implant experience on the ability of deaf children to localize sounds and to understand speech in noise. These are two of the most important functions that are known to depend on binaural hearing. Children were tested at time intervals ranging from 3-months to 24-months following implantation of the second ear, while listening with either implant alone or bilaterally. Our findings suggest that the period during which plasticity occurs in human binaural system is protracted, extending into middle-to-late childhood. The rate at which benefits from bilateral hearing abilities are attained following deprivation is faster for speech intelligibility in noise compared with sound localization. Finally, the age at which the second implant was received may play an important role in the acquisition of binaural abilities. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD.

  8. Autism spectrum disorders in 24 children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Bishop, Somer; Manning-Courtney, Patricia; Choo, Daniel I; Murray, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 4% of children who are deaf or hard of hearing have co-occurring autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Making an additional diagnosis of ASD in this population can be challenging, given the complexities of determining whether speech/language and social delays can be accounted for by their hearing loss, or whether these delays might be indicative of a comorbid ASD diagnosis. This exploratory study described a population of 24 children with the dual diagnosis of ASD and hearing loss. Children completed a comprehensive ASD evaluation using standardized autism diagnostic instruments (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, language and psychological testing). Children with permanent hearing loss who had a developmental evaluation between 2001 and 2011 and were diagnosed with an ASD based on the results of that evaluation were included. Information on communication modality, language and cognitive abilities was collected. The median age of diagnosis was 14 months (range 1-71) for hearing loss and 66.5 months (range 33-106) for ASD. Only 25% (n=6) children were diagnosed with ASD ≤ 48 months of age and 46% by ≤ 6 years. Twelve (50%) children were diagnosed with ASD, 11 were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified and 1 child had Asperger's. Most (67%) had profound degree of hearing loss. Fourteen (58%) children had received a cochlear implant, while 3 children had no amplification for hearing loss. Nine (38%) of the 24 children used speech as their mode of communication (oral communicators). Communication delays in children who are deaf or hard of hearing are a serious matter and should not be assumed to be a direct consequence of the hearing loss. Children who received cochlear implants completed a multidisciplinary evaluation including a developmental pediatrician, which may have provided closer monitoring of speech and language progression and subsequently an earlier ASD diagnosis. Because children who are deaf or hard of

  9. Exploring Letters in a Bimodal, Bilingual Nursery School with Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    For young deaf children a co-enrolment setting with hearing children in nursery school is recognised as a useful provision for inclusive education. The aim of the study reported in this article was to gain knowledge about pathways into literacy for young deaf children in a co-enrolment setting. The questions raised in this article are: How are…

  10. Measuring Progress in Deaf-Blind Children: Use of the "Azusa Scale".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Robert D.

    Evaluated was the use of the Azusa developmental scale with 16 deaf blind children in a completed study and 124 deaf blind children in an ongoing study to determine the scale's usefulness for objective evaluation of behavior change, instructional planning, and program evaluation. The children in the first study were rated on the performance…

  11. Motor Skill Performance and Sports Participation in Deaf Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Esther; Houwen, Suzanne; Visscher, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine motor performance in deaf elementary school children and its association with sports participation. The population studied included 42 deaf children whose hearing loss ranged from 80 to 120 dB. Their motor skills were assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, and a questionnaire was used to determine…

  12. The 2006 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2006

    2006-01-01

    National Technical Assistance and Dissemination Center for Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind and its predecessors, The National Technical Assistance Consortium for Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind (NTAC) and the Teaching Research Assistance to Children Experiencing Sensory Impairments (TRACES) project, has been conducting an annual…

  13. The Relationship between Spoken Language Ability and Intelligence Test Performance of Deaf Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D.; Brown, P. Margaret; Care, Esther; Rickards, Field

    2007-01-01

    For several decades the intellectual abilities of deaf children and adolescents, as measured by performance IQ, have been reported as comparable with those of hearing children and adolescents. Differences have been reported, however, on measures of verbal IQ, with deaf children and adolescents typically obtaining verbal IQ scores within the low…

  14. Reading books with young deaf children: strategies for mediating between American Sign Language and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Research on shared reading has shown positive results on children's literacy development in general and for deaf children specifically; however, reading techniques might differ between these two populations. Families with deaf children, especially those with deaf parents, often capitalize on their children's visual attributes rather than primarily auditory cues. These techniques are believed to provide a foundation for their deaf children's literacy skills. This study examined 10 deaf mother/deaf child dyads with children between 3 and 5 years of age. Dyads were videotaped in their homes on at least two occasions reading books that were provided by the researcher. Descriptive analysis showed specifically how deaf mothers mediate between the two languages, American Sign Language (ASL) and English, while reading. These techniques can be replicated and taught to all parents of deaf children so that they can engage in more effective shared reading activities. Research has shown that shared reading, or the interaction of a parent and child with a book, is an effective way to promote language and literacy, vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and metalinguistic awareness (Snow, 1983), making it critical for educators to promote shared reading activities at home between parent and child. Not all parents read to their children in the same way. For example, parents of deaf children may present the information in the book differently due to the fact that signed languages are visual rather than spoken. In this vein, we can learn more about what specific connections deaf parents make to the English print. Exploring strategies deaf mothers may use to link the English print through the use of ASL will provide educators with additional tools when working with all parents of deaf children. This article will include a review of the literature on the benefits of shared reading activities for all children, the relationship between ASL and English skill development, and the techniques

  15. The effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implants for severe-to-profound deafness in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoonhoven, Jelmer; Sparreboom, Marloes; van Zanten, Bert G A; Scholten, Rob J P M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Dreschler, Wouter A; Grolman, Wilko; Maat, Bert

    2013-02-01

    Assessment of the clinical effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implantation compared with unilateral cochlear implantation or bimodal stimulation, in adults with severe-to-profound hearing loss. In 2007, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the U.K. conducted a systematic review on cochlear implantation. This study forms an update of the adult part of the NICE review. The electronic databases MEDLINE and Embase were searched for English language studies published between October 2006 and March 2011. Studies were included that compared bilateral cochlear implantation with unilateral cochlear implantation and/or with bimodal stimulation, in adults with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Speech perception in quiet and in noise, sound localization and lateralization, speech production, health-related quality of life, and functional outcomes were analyzed. Data extraction forms were used to describe study characteristics and the level of evidence. The effect size was calculated to compare different outcome measures. Pooling of data was not possible because of the heterogeneity of the studies. As in the NICE review, the level of evidence of the included studies was low, although some of the additional studies showed less risk of bias. All studies showed a significant bilateral benefit in localization over unilateral cochlear implantation. Bilateral cochlear implants were beneficial for speech perception in noise under certain conditions and several self-reported measures. Most speech perception in quiet outcomes did not show a bilateral benefit. The current review provides additional evidence in favor of bilateral cochlear implantation, even in complex listening situations.

  16. Frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 in deaf children by massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Miyagawa, Maiko; Kumakawa, Kozo; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) is the most severe of the three USH subtypes due to its profound hearing loss, absent vestibular response and retinitis pigmentosa appearing at a prepubescent age. Six causative genes have been identified for USH1, making early diagnosis and therapy possible through DNA testing. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) technology enables clinicians to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using MPS along with direct sequence analysis, we screened 227 unrelated non-syndromic deaf children and detected recessive mutations in USH1 causative genes in five patients (2.2%): three patients harbored MYO7A mutations and one each carried CDH23 or PCDH15 mutations. As indicated by an earlier genotype-phenotype correlation study of the CDH23 and PCDH15 genes, we considered the latter two patients to have USH1. Based on clinical findings, it was also highly likely that one patient with MYO7A mutations possessed USH1 due to a late onset age of walking. This first report describing the frequency (1.3-2.2%) of USH1 among non-syndromic deaf children highlights the importance of comprehensive genetic testing for early disease diagnosis.

  17. The 2012 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. Begun in 1986 on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education, it represents a nearly thirty year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB),…

  18. GROUP OF HEARING MOTHERS OF DEAF CHILDREN: INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Fava de Quevedo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This experience report describes a group phenomenon, based upon a case study of a group of hearing mothers of deaf children. The weekly group, in operation for over three years, provides support for families with deaf children. At first, observations were made in the group for a subsequent analysis of the data and act on interventions. Categories containing the main features that emerged in the group were created in order to discuss the content found. The categories addressed by mothers included: independence/autonomy of the child; adolescence and sexuality; discovery of deafness and reorganization of family dynamics; and matters beyond the group goal. As for the categories related to the group process there are: resistance; containing function of the coordinator; transfer; interventions in the group field. The results lead to understanding the group as a facilitator and as a necessary support for the participants. Before that, interventions were carried out to expand the space for reflection offered by the group, which provides adaptations to the different situations experienced by the participants.

  19. Sexual Abuse of Deaf Children: A Retrospective Analysis of the Prevalence and Characteristics of Childhood Sexual Abuse among Deaf Adults in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvam, Marit Hoem

    2004-01-01

    Objective: North American studies conclude that deaf children may have a 2-3 times greater risk of sexual abuse than hearing children. No comparative studies are available in the Nordic countries. The present study was initiated to estimate the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse among deaf children in Norway, describe the nature of the abuse,…

  20. Does Deafness Spell Disaster? An Analysis of the Written English Levels of Deaf Children in the Nelson Mandela Metropole, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Carolyn; Aylif, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an empirical comparative study in the Nelson Mandela Metropole investigating the difference between the written English of deaf children and the written English of hearing children and makes recommendations on how to improve the writing of deaf children. The psycholinguistic approach was used for the…

  1. Deaf Children and Children with ADHD in the Inclusive Classroom: Working Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Kate; Dhana-Dullabh, Hansini

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the working memory functioning of deaf children, children with ADHD and typically developing children. Working memory is involved in the storage and mental manipulation of information during classroom learning activities that are crucial for the acquisition of complex skills and knowledge. Thus, it is important to determine how…

  2. The impact of medical conditions on the support of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, HP; Vlaskamp, C

    Background The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records

  3. Motor interventions in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities: motor, cognitive and social effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, Suzanne; van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is generally agreed that motor activity promotes motor, cognitive, and social development, but the specific benefits in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities (S-PID) are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to

  4. A functionally focused curriculum for children with profound multiple disabilities : A goal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Reynders, K; Vlaskamp, C; Nakken, H

    Background This study analysed goals formulated in a functionally focused curriculum called Mobility Opportunities Via Education(TM) (MOVE). Method The subjects were 49 children with profound multiple disabilities (PMD) who attended a centre for special education where the MOVE curriculum was

  5. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-07-01

    Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Group activities for children with PIMD initiated by a direct support worker were video-recorded. The behaviour and positioning of the children and the behaviour of the direct support workers were coded. Limited peer-directed behaviour of the children with PIMD and peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers are observed. Weak associations were found between the positioning or peer interaction-influencing behaviours and the behaviour of children with PIMD. Children with PIMD show social interest in each other during group activities. More knowledge is needed to create an environment which facilitates peer-directed behaviours of persons with PIMD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Two-Year Study of Northwest Regional Center's Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkovich, Paul

    The report describes the Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children conducted in 1970 and 1971 by the Northwest Regional Center for Deaf-Blind Children in Vancouver, Washington. The summer programs were primarily designed to evaluate preschool deaf-blind children in a learning and living situation. The report is intended not only…

  7. Cortical perfusion response to an electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve in profoundly deaf patients: Study with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Scao, Y.; Robier, A.; Beuter, P. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology); Baulieu, J.L.; Pourcelot, L. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    Brain activation procedures associated with single photon emission tomography (SPET) have recently been developed in healthy controls and diseased patients in order to help in their diagnosis and treatment. We investigated the effects of a promontory test (PT) on the cerebral distribution of technetium-99m hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) in 7 profoundly deaf patients, 6 PT+ and PT-. The count variation in the temporal lobe was calculated on 6 coronal slices using the ratio (R{sub stimulation}-R{sub deprivation})/R{sub deprivation} where R=counts in the temporal lobe was observed in all patients and was higher in all patients with PT+ than in the patient with PT-. The problems of head positioning and resolution of the system were taken into account, and we considered that the maximal count increment was related to the auditory cortex response to the stimulus. Further clinical investigations with high-resolution systems have to be performed in order to validate this presurgery test in cochlear implant assessment. (orig.).

  8. Phonological Activation during Visual Word Recognition in Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Ellen; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Hendriks, Angelique; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Phonological activation during visual word recognition was studied in deaf and hearing children under two circumstances: (a) when the use of phonology was not required for task performance and might even hinder it and (b) when the use of phonology was critical for task performance. Method: Deaf children mastering written Dutch and Sign…

  9. Teaching Sign Language to Hearing Parents of Deaf Children: An Action Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Jemina; Leigh, Greg; Nann, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the challenges in learning a signed language as a second language, in particular for hearing parents with deaf children, and details an action research process that led to the design of a new curriculum for teaching Australian Sign Language (Auslan) to the families of deaf children. The curriculum was developed…

  10. Assessment of Sign Language Development: The Case of Deaf Children in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we will describe the development of an assessment instrument for Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) for deaf children in bilingual education programs. The assessment instrument consists of nine computerized tests in which the receptive and expressive language skills of deaf children at different linguistic levels (phonology,…

  11. Parent influences on physical activity participation and physical fitness of deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, M Kathleen; Lieberman, Lauren J; Dummer, Gail M

    2014-04-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated that parents' values toward physical activity and fitness have strongly influenced the physical activity habits of hearing children (Welk, G. J., Wood, K., & Morss, G. [2003]. Parental influences on physical activity in children: An exploration of potential mechanisms. Pediatric Exercise Science, 15, 19-33). The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether similar findings are obtained for deaf (1) children. The influence of parents' hearing status and parents' involvement in Deaf sport (2) was assessed in addition to their values toward sports participation and physical fitness for their deaf children. Deaf children's physical activity habits were determined by the number of activities participated per week, and fitness levels by the number of scores within the Healthy Fitness Zone from the Fitnessgram test. Parents demonstrated positive values toward physical fitness regardless of hearing status; this finding was strongest among deaf parents of deaf children. Significant positive relationships were found among parents' values toward physical fitness and sport participation and children's physical activity and fitness levels, as well as between Deaf sport involvement by deaf parents and children's physical activity levels.

  12. A Tale of Two Schools: Educating Catholic Female Deaf Children in Ireland, 1846-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Noel Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the contributions of the Dominican Sisters and Sisters of Mercy in running schools for female deaf children in Ireland during the period 1846 to 1946. The schools were established as part of an attempt to educate Catholics in the Catholic faith and provide literacy to female deaf children. In assuming the challenge of…

  13. Teacher-Assigned Literacy Events in a Bimodal, Bilingual Preschool with Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of literacy practices in a Norwegian preschool where deaf and hearing children are enrolled in the same group and where communication is based on both sign language and spoken language. The aim of the study was to explore pathways to literacy for young deaf children within this setting. Our implicit assumption is…

  14. Social-Emotional Functioning of Elementary-Age Deaf Children: A Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Walcutt, Jennifer J.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Bowers, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Discussion and study of the social-emotional development of deaf and hard of hearing children, though extensive, has yet to provide an accurate understanding of the differences between deaf and hearing children. Consequently, the goal of the researchers was to conduct a profile analysis to determine similarities and differences between the two…

  15. A World of Difference. Parental Perspectives on Cochlear Implantation in Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isarin, Jet; van Zadelhoff, Ilse; Wolters-Leermakers, Nina; Speksnijder-Bregman, Marjon; Hannink, Mariën; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of deaf children with additional disabilities receive a cochlear implant (CI). International studies on cochlear implantation in deaf children with additional disabilities show less and slower speech and language gains, but improvement in overall quality of life. In order to qualify the concept of quality of life this study…

  16. Deaf/Blind. Resource Manuals for Program for Exceptional Children. Volume X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    The manual is intended to help local education agencies implement Georgia's laws for providing effective instructional programs for deaf-blind children. A definition and eligibility criteria for deaf-blind children are presented. A section discussing due process considers screening, referral, comprehensive evaluation, individualized education…

  17. An Analysis of Evaluation Procedures, Disability Types, and Recommended Treatments for 100 Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, W. Scott; Donlon, Edward T.

    Descriptions by various professionals of 70 multiply handicapped deaf-blind children evaluated at the Syracuse University Center for the Development of Blind Children were examined for terminology used to describe the child and his life situation. Purposes were to develop some epidemiological characteristics of the multiply handicapped, deaf-blind…

  18. An Approach to the Audiologic Assessment of Multi-Handicapped Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Richard D.

    The paper analyses issues in the hearing assessment of multihandicapped deaf-blind children. The experiences of the authors as consultants to centers for deaf-blind children are briefly noted. Advantages and disadvantages are considered for two basic approaches to hearing assessment: the electrophysiologic in which electricity from neural…

  19. The 2011 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. Begun in 1986 on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education (Baldwin, 1993), it represents a thirty plus year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on…

  20. The 2013 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Deaf-Blindness, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It has been collaboratively designed, implemented and revised to serve as the common vehicle to meet federal grant requirements for both the State/Multi-State and National…

  1. "Expanding the Circle": Projects for Children and Young Adults Who Are Deaf-Blind. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Susan

    This paper describes activities and achievements of a South Dakota project to improve the delivery of educational services to children with deaf-blindness and their families. Accomplishments are provided for specific objectives under the following goals: (1) children with deaf-blindness and their families will have enhanced skills and abilities…

  2. Education of Deaf Children and Young People. Guides for Special Education No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centre of Total Communication, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    This booklet presents knowledge, attitudes, and educational ideas on how to give deaf children the support they need to develop. It focuses on the fundamental and comprehensive needs of deaf children, using methods and ideas that can be adjusted to countries without great technical resources. The first chapter examines the importance of language…

  3. Predictors of Reading Development in Deaf Children: A 3-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Harris, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The development of reading ability in a group of deaf children was followed over a 3-year period. A total of 29 deaf children (7-8 years of age at the first assessment) participated in the study, and every 12 months they were given a battery of literacy, cognitive, and language tasks. Earlier vocabulary and speechreading skills predicted…

  4. Motor Skill Performance and Sports Participation in Deaf Elementary School Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Esther; Houwen, Suzanne; Visscher, Chris

    This study aimed to examine motor performance in deaf elementary school children and its association with sports participation. The population studied included 42 deaf children whose hearing loss ranged from 80 to 120 dB. Their motor skills were assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for

  5. The 2007 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. Begun in 1986 on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education (Baldwin, 1993), it represents a thirty plus year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on…

  6. Identifying emotions in music through electrical hearing in deaf children using cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopyan, T; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C

    2011-02-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) devices are the choice of treatment for individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. The CI devices provide the opportunity for children who are deaf to perceive sound by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve, with the goal of optimizing oral communication. A natural benefit of acquiring hearing using CIs is the ability to hear, and perhaps enjoy, music. Music is a non-verbal auditory stimulus and a powerful tool for transmitting emotion. Identifying emotional cues is an important part of normal social development and communication and thus music may play an important role in establishing these skills during development. To date, it is not known whether children who use cochlear implants to hear can identify the emotional content carried in music. Our objective in the present study was to determine whether children who have been deaf from infancy and are experienced CI users have acquired the ability to identify emotion in musical phrases. Study participants were 18 CI users (ages 7-13 years) who received right unilateral CIs (mean age at CI activation of 2.9 years) and 18 age-and gender-matched controls. Participants were asked to judge 32 brief musical excerpts as happy or sad by pointing to simple graphics of a smiling or frowning face. Children using CIs were able to correctly distinguish happy versus sad music well above chance levels, but performed more poorly on this task than their peers with typical hearing. Age at CI activation and time since CI activation were both uncorrelated with outcome measures. Children with CIs show the ability to perceive emotion in music but do so less accurately than typically hearing peers.

  7. Development of social-cognitive and communication skills in children born deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C

    2009-10-01

    Central to the interface of social-cognitive and communicative development is the growth of a theory of mind (ToM). ToM is mastered by most hearing children and deaf children of signing deaf parents by the age of 5 or 6 but is often seriously delayed in deaf children of hearing parents. This paper reviews recently published research on deaf children's ToM development and presents an original study consisting of eight longitudinal case histories that collectively map late-signing deaf children's ToM performance from 44 to 158 months of age. While five tentative conclusions can be posited from the collective research so far, further investigation of each of these possibilities is clearly needed.

  8. Hearing experience and receptive vocabulary development in deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Mary K; Pisoni, David B

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition (PPVT-III) data were analyzed first by examining children's errors for evidence of difficulty in specific lexical content areas, and second by calculating standard scores with reference to hearing age (HA) (i.e., chronological age [CA]--age at implantation) rather than CA. Participants showed evidence of vocabulary understanding across all PPVT-III content categories with no strong evidence of disproportionate numbers of errors in any specific content area despite below-average mean standard scores. However, whereas mean standard scores were below the test mean established for hearing children when based on CA, they were within the average range for hearing children when calculated based on HA. Thus, children's vocabulary knowledge was commensurate with years of cochlear implant experience, providing support for the role of spoken language experience in vocabulary acquisition.

  9. [The development of vocabulary capability at 2-year follow-up in the prelingual deaf children with cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Chen, Yuan; Hong, Mengdi; Chen, Aiting; Wang, Qian; Xi, Xin; Wong, Lena

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the development of early vocabulary capability in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation (CI) , and to study the feasibility of current Chinese assessment procedures about language development for hearing-impaired children. A total of 56 cases with severe-to-profound prelingual deaf children were participated in this study. The vocabulary development of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the vocabulary assessment tools: Chinese communicative development inventory (CCDI) and mandarin expressive and receptive vocabulary test (MERVT). The questionnaire assessed by parents or guardians answered the questionnaire; vocabulary tests were evaluated by children accompanied with audiologists. Patients were assessed before operation and in 2 years after switch-on. With the rehabilitation, early post-operative vocabulary development gradually improved. The vocabulary increased with an increase in the duration of CI use, and the receptive vocabulary developed earlier than the expressive ones. After 2 years of CI use, the child partly developed the vocabulary capability. Children's vocabulary test, CCDI and MERVT test, is an important index to evaluate the development of children's language ability after cochlear implantation. Vocabulary test, together with auditory and speech perception assessment procedures, constitute a more complete auditory-speech-language evaluation system for Chinese children after cochlear implants.

  10. Deaf Blind Children: Evaluating Their Multiple Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Scott, Ed.; And Others

    Prepared by specialists on the evaluation team at the Syracuse University Center for the Development of Blind Children, the book describes the procedures of the special diagnostic clinic within this unit. The diagnostic clinic was established to provide a unified approach to the evaluation and study of multiply handicapped children. Described in…

  11. How children make language out of gesture: morphological structure in gesture systems developed by American and Chinese deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Mylander, Carolyn; Franklin, Amy

    2007-09-01

    When children learn language, they apply their language-learning skills to the linguistic input they receive. But what happens if children are not exposed to input from a conventional language? Do they engage their language-learning skills nonetheless, applying them to whatever unconventional input they have? We address this question by examining gesture systems created by four American and four Chinese deaf children. The children's profound hearing losses prevented them from learning spoken language, and their hearing parents had not exposed them to sign language. Nevertheless, the children in both cultures invented gesture systems that were structured at the morphological/word level. Interestingly, the differences between the children's systems were no bigger across cultures than within cultures. The children's morphemes could not be traced to their hearing mothers' gestures; however, they were built out of forms and meanings shared with their mothers. The findings suggest that children construct morphological structure out of the input that is handed to them, even if that input is not linguistic in form.

  12. The Role of the External Personal Assistants for Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities Working in the Children's Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Anna Karin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities need support to function in an optimal way. However, there is a limited knowledge about the role of external personal assistants working in the children's home. Materials and Methods: A mixed method study was performed including qualitative data from interviews with 11…

  13. Correction and development of psychomotor function of deaf children of midchildhood by facilities of mobile games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Іvahnenko A.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correction and development of psychomotor sphere of deaf children of midchildhood is considered by facilities of physical education, in particular by mobile games. The analysis of publications of research workers is resulted in relation to the problem of development of psychomotor function of deaf children in a theory and practice of correction work. In theory is grounded value of mobile games as effective mean of development of psychomotor sphere of deaf lower boys. The necessity of application of the specially adapted mobile games is set in the process of correction-pedagogical work with the deaf children of midchildhood. The pedagogical looking is presented after the features of playing activity of deaf children of 1-4 classes.

  14. The comprehension and production of Wh-questions in deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss during the critical period for language acquisition restricts spoken language input. This input limitation, in turn, may hamper syntactic development. This study examined the comprehension, production, and repetition of Wh-questions in deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The participants were 11 orally trained Hebrew-speaking children aged 9.1-12.4 with moderate-to-profound hearing loss from birth, who consistently used hearing aids or cochlear implants and who had difficulties understanding relative clauses. Experiment 1 tested the comprehension of Wh-questions using a picture selection task, comparing subject with object questions and who- with which-questions; Experiment 2 tested the production of subject and object who-questions using an elicitation task; and Experiment 3 tested the repetition of Wh-questions and other structures derived by Wh-movement. All the DHH participants showed difficulty in the comprehension, production, and repetition of object questions, and their performance was significantly below that of hearing children. In contrast, they repeated embedded sentences without movement well, indicating that their deficit is in syntactic movement rather than embedding or the CP node in the syntactic tree. The results provide additional evidence that DHH children have difficulties with Wh-movement and emphasize that Wh-questions, which are crucial for communication, can be severely impaired in these children.

  15. Diagnosis and Evaluation of Deaf-Blind Children, Report of Workshop Proceedings (Denver, Colorado, February, 17-18, 1971).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Donald F., Ed.; And Others

    The eight major papers from the Workshop on Diagnosis and Evaluation of deaf-blind children focus upon the roles of various professionals who may be involved with deaf-blind children at the diagnostic stage. Topics covered in the role of the pediatrician in diagnosis and evaluation of the deaf-blind child, the role of the ear specialist…

  16. [Mental health problems of mothers and fathers of the deaf children with cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobosko, Joanna; Geremek-Samsonowicz, Anna; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    Child's deafness is a risk factor for the mental health of its parents. This study addresses a question whether mothers and fathers of the prelingually deaf children using cochlear implants (CI) experience a different intensity of psychopathology symptoms than parents of the hearing, typically developing children, and also if the intensity of those symptoms experienced by parents is related to how long their child is a cochlear implant user. In this study participated 153 hearing parents of the deaf children using a single cochlear implant (111 mothers, 42 fathers), and parents of the hearing children. Mean age of deaf children was 72 months, cochlear implant use duration was between 1 and 124 months. The control group of parents has been selected taking into account their typically developing child's sex and age. The parents' mental health has been assessed with Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-28 in Polish adaptation. Mothers of deaf, CI using children experience significantly more symptoms of anxiety and insomnia compared to the mothers of typically developing children, while fathers of these children show the tendency for the increased level of depression symptoms compared to the fathers from the control group. In the group of deaf CI children mothers relate substantially more somatic and anxiety symptoms than fathers, whereas level of experiencing depression symptoms and problems in everyday functioning is similar in mothers and fathers. No relation between the duration of child's CI use and parents' mental health has been ascertained. The mental health of parents of the deaf CI using children indicates that both mothers and fathers have problems in this sphere related to their child's deafness, but not to the duration of child's CI use. Parents of deaf, CI using children may need psychological help regardless of the time their child has been using the cochlear implant. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society

  17. Predicting behavior problems in deaf and hearing children: the influences of language, attention, and parent-child communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, David H; Quittner, Alexandra L; Fink, Nancy E; Eisenberg, Laurie S; Tobey, Emily A; Niparko, John K

    2009-01-01

    The development of language and communication may play an important role in the emergence of behavioral problems in young children, but they are rarely included in predictive models of behavioral development. In this study, cross-sectional relationships between language, attention, and behavior problems were examined using parent report, videotaped observations, and performance measures in a sample of 116 severely and profoundly deaf and 69 normally hearing children ages 1.5 to 5 years. Secondary analyses were performed on data collected as part of the Childhood Development After Cochlear Implantation Study, funded by the National Institutes of Health. Hearing-impaired children showed more language, attention, and behavioral difficulties, and spent less time communicating with their parents than normally hearing children. Structural equation modeling indicated there were significant relationships between language, attention, and child behavior problems. Language was associated with behavior problems both directly and indirectly through effects on attention. Amount of parent-child communication was not related to behavior problems.

  18. Deaf Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Christen A.; Brice, Patrick J.; Lam, Kay H.; Hotto, Sue A.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies investigating the prevalence of autism have increased in recent years, within the United States and abroad. However, statistics as to how many of those children may also have a comorbid hearing loss is lacking. The prevalence of school-administrator reported diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (clinical diagnosis…

  19. Semantic fluency in deaf children who use spoken and signed language in comparison with hearing peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C R; Jones, A; Fastelli, A; Atkinson, J; Botting, N; Morgan, G

    2017-07-10

    Deafness has an adverse impact on children's ability to acquire spoken languages. Signed languages offer a more accessible input for deaf children, but because the vast majority are born to hearing parents who do not sign, their early exposure to sign language is limited. Deaf children as a whole are therefore at high risk of language delays. We compared deaf and hearing children's performance on a semantic fluency task. Optimal performance on this task requires a systematic search of the mental lexicon, the retrieval of words within a subcategory and, when that subcategory is exhausted, switching to a new subcategory. We compared retrieval patterns between groups, and also compared the responses of deaf children who used British Sign Language (BSL) with those who used spoken English. We investigated how semantic fluency performance related to children's expressive vocabulary and executive function skills, and also retested semantic fluency in the majority of the children nearly 2 years later, in order to investigate how much progress they had made in that time. Participants were deaf children aged 6-11 years (N = 106, comprising 69 users of spoken English, 29 users of BSL and eight users of Sign Supported English-SSE) compared with hearing children (N = 120) of the same age who used spoken English. Semantic fluency was tested for the category 'animals'. We coded for errors, clusters (e.g., 'pets', 'farm animals') and switches. Participants also completed the Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test and a battery of six non-verbal executive function tasks. In addition, we collected follow-up semantic fluency data for 70 deaf and 74 hearing children, nearly 2 years after they were first tested. Deaf children, whether using spoken or signed language, produced fewer items in the semantic fluency task than hearing children, but they showed similar patterns of responses for items most commonly produced, clustering of items into subcategories and switching between

  20. A Vibrotactile Interface to Motivate Movement for Children with Severe to Profound Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Morrison, Ann; Larsen, Jeppe Veirum

    2014-01-01

    V-Sense is a vibrotactile interface that encourages children with severe or profound cognitive, sensory and physical impairments to move. The interface makes use of touch, in particular vibrations, as a supportive function to motivate users' actions. Specifically, we propose a vibrotactile...... interface on the arm and around the shoulder using the saltation perceptual illusion to induce movement of the corresponding joint. In this paper we describe the design principles of the interface and the proposed experimental design to evaluate it....

  1. The influence of cochlear implants on behaviour problems in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Romero, Ma Salud

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to analyse the relationship between behaviour problems in deaf children and their auditory and communication development subsequent to cochlear implantation and to examine the incidence of these problems in comparison to their hearing peers. This study uses an ex post facto prospective design with a sample of 208 Spanish children, of whom 104 were deaf subjects with cochlear implants. The first objective assesses the relationships between behaviour problems, auditory integration, and social and communication skills in the group of deaf children. The second compares the frequency and intensity of behaviour problems of the group of deaf children with their hearing peers. The correlation analysis showed a significant association between the internal index of behaviour problems and auditory integration and communication skills, such that deaf children with greater auditory and communication development had no behaviour problems. When comparing behaviour problems in deaf children versus their hearing peers, behavioural disturbances are significantly more frequent in the former. According to these findings, cochlear implants may not guarantee adequate auditory and communicative development that would normalise the behaviour of deaf children.

  2. Music in the lives of deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Vongpaisal, Tara; Nakata, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Present-day cochlear implants provide good temporal cues and coarse spectral cues. In general, these cues are adequate for perceiving speech in quiet backgrounds and for young children's acquisition of spoken language. They are inadequate, however, for conveying the rich pitch-patterning of music. As a result, many adults who become implant users after losing their hearing find music disappointing or unacceptable. By contrast, child implant users who were born deaf or became deaf as infants or toddlers typically find music interesting and enjoyable. They recognize popular songs that they hear regularly when the test materials match critical features of the original versions. For example, they can identify familiar songs from the original recordings with words and from versions that omit the words but preserve all other cues. They also recognize theme songs from their favorite television programs when presented in original or somewhat altered form. The motivation of children with implants for listening to music or melodious speech is evident well before they understand language. Within months after receiving their implant, they prefer singing to silence. They also prefer speech in the maternal style to typical adult speech and the sounds of their native language-to-be to those of a foreign language. An important task of future research is to ascertain the relative contributions of perceptual and motivational factors to the apparent differences between child and adult implant users.

  3. Speech Intelligibility and Psychosocial Functioning in Deaf Children and Teens with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Valerie; Pisoni, David B.; Kronenberger, William G.; Castellanos, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) are at risk for psychosocial adjustment problems, possibly due to delayed speech-language skills. This study investigated associations between a core component of spoken-language ability--speech intelligibility--and the psychosocial development of prelingually deaf CI users. Audio-transcription measures…

  4. "The Business of Life": Educating Catholic Deaf Children in Late Nineteenth-Century England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangion, Carmen M.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the debates in late nineteenth-century Britain regarding the education of deaf children revolved around communication. For many Victorians, sign language was unacceptable; many proponents of oralism attempted to "normalise" the hearing impaired by replacing deaf methods of communication with spoken language and lipreading. While…

  5. Lexical Organization in Deaf Children Who Use British Sign Language: Evidence from a Semantic Fluency Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Chloe R.; Rowley, Katherine; Mason, Kathryn; Herman, Rosalind; Morgan, Gary

    2013-01-01

    We adapted the semantic fluency task into British Sign Language (BSL). In Study 1, we present data from twenty-two deaf signers aged four to fifteen. We show that the same "cognitive signatures" that characterize this task in spoken languages are also present in deaf children, for example, the semantic clustering of responses. In Study…

  6. Visual Working Memory in Deaf Children with Diverse Communication Modes: Improvement by Differential Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Crespo, Ginesa; Daza, Maria Teresa; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Although visual functions have been proposed to be enhanced in deaf individuals, empirical studies have not yet established clear evidence on this issue. The present study aimed to determine whether deaf children with diverse communication modes had superior visual memory and whether their performance was improved by the use of differential…

  7. Role of sign language in intellectual and social development of deaf children: Review of foreign publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokhlova A. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of foreign psychological publications concerning the sign language as a means of communication in deaf people. The article addresses the question of sing language's impact on cognitive development, efficiency and positive way of interacting with parents as well as academic achievement increase in deaf children.

  8. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6–14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition (PPVT-III) data were analyzed first by examining children’s errors for evidence of difficulty in specific lexical content areas, and second by calculating standard scores with reference to hearing age (HA) (i.e., chronological age [CA] − age at implantation) rather than CA. Participants showed evidence of vocabulary understanding across all PPVT-III content categories with no strong evidence of disproportionate numbers of errors in any specific content area despite below-average mean standard scores. However, whereas mean standard scores were below the test mean established for hearing children when based on CA, they were within the average range for hearing children when calculated based on HA. Thus, children’s vocabulary knowledge was commensurate with years of cochlear implant experience, providing support for the role of spoken language experience in vocabulary acquisition. PMID:20130017

  9. Verbal and spatial analogical reasoning in deaf and hearing children: the role of grammar and vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsey; Figueras, Berta; Mellanby, Jane; Langdon, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which cognitive development and abilities are dependent on language remains controversial. In this study, the analogical reasoning skills of deaf and hard of hearing children are explored. Two groups of children (deaf and hard of hearing children with either cochlear implants or hearing aids and hearing children) completed tests of verbal and spatial analogical reasoning. Their vocabulary and grammar skills were also assessed to provide a measure of language attainment. Results indicated significant differences between the deaf and hard of hearing children (regardless of type of hearing device) and their hearing peers on vocabulary, grammar, and verbal reasoning tests. Regression analyses revealed that in the group of deaf and hard of hearing children, but not in the hearing group, the language measures were significant predictors of verbal analogical reasoning, when age and spatial analogical reasoning ability were controlled for. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Peer relationships of deaf children with cochlear implants: predictors of peer entry and peer interaction success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniela; Bat-Chava, Yael; Lalwani, Anil; Waltzman, Susan B

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated factors that affect the development of positive peer relationships among deaf children with cochlear implants. Ten 5- to 6-year-old deaf children with implants were observed under conditions varying peer context difficulty in a Peer Entry task. Results revealed better outcomes for deaf children interacting in one-on-one situations compared to interactions including two other hearing children and better performance among girls than boys. In addition, longer duration of implant use and higher self-esteem were associated with better performance on the Peer Task, which was in turn related to parental reports of children's social functioning outside the experimental situation. These findings contribute to the growing literature describing the benefits of cochlear implantation in the areas of communication and socialization, while pointing to interventions that may enhance deaf children's social competence.

  11. Integrated Educational/Leisure Time Model for Deaf-Blind Children and Youth. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Marie

    The report describes the accomplishments of a swimming project to teach instructional objectives to deaf blind, severely-to-profoundly retarded students, using nonhandicapped high school and college students who were trained and paid as peer tutors. Tutors recieved hands-on as well as didactic training and were evaluated by means of pretests and…

  12. Deaf and hearing children's development of theory of mind, peer popularity, and leadership during middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C; O'Reilly, Karin; Wellman, Henry M

    2016-09-01

    This study had two primary aims. First, we compared deaf and hearing children during middle and late childhood on (a) cognitive understanding of basic and advanced theory of mind (ToM) and (b) social dimensions of peer group relations, including popularity, isolation, leadership, and the disposition to interact positively with peers. Second, using correlational analyses, we examined ToM's connections with these social variables to see whether and how ToM impacts children's social lives. A total of 57 children (36 deaf children of hearing parents and 21 hearing children) 6 to 14years of age completed a 6-step developmental ToM Scale, and their teachers reported on the social variables. Hearing children outperformed deaf children on ToM and all teacher-rated variables. For deaf children, popularity correlated positively, and social isolation correlated negatively, with ToM even after controlling for age, gender, and language ability. For hearing children, the only ToM link was a weak correlation with leadership. Possible reasons for the differences between deaf and hearing groups are discussed, together with the likelihood of bidirectional causal links and implications for deaf children's social development in school. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Narrative skills in deaf children who use spoken English: Dissociations between macro and microstructural devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, -A C; Toscano, E; Botting, N; Marshall, C-R; Atkinson, J R; Denmark, T; Herman, -R; Morgan, G

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has highlighted that deaf children acquiring spoken English have difficulties in narrative development relative to their hearing peers both in terms of macro-structure and with micro-structural devices. The majority of previous research focused on narrative tasks designed for hearing children that depend on good receptive language skills. The current study compared narratives of 6 to 11-year-old deaf children who use spoken English (N=59) with matched for age and non-verbal intelligence hearing peers. To examine the role of general language abilities, single word vocabulary was also assessed. Narratives were elicited by the retelling of a story presented non-verbally in video format. Results showed that deaf and hearing children had equivalent macro-structure skills, but the deaf group showed poorer performance on micro-structural components. Furthermore, the deaf group gave less detailed responses to inferencing probe questions indicating poorer understanding of the story's underlying message. For deaf children, micro-level devices most strongly correlated with the vocabulary measure. These findings suggest that deaf children, despite spoken language delays, are able to convey the main elements of content and structure in narrative but have greater difficulty in using grammatical devices more dependent on finer linguistic and pragmatic skills. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Speech feature discrimination in deaf children following cochlear implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeson, Tonya R.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2002-05-01

    Speech feature discrimination is a fundamental perceptual skill that is often assumed to underlie word recognition and sentence comprehension performance. To investigate the development of speech feature discrimination in deaf children with cochlear implants, we conducted a retrospective analysis of results from the Minimal Pairs Test (Robbins et al., 1988) selected from patients enrolled in a longitudinal study of speech perception and language development. The MP test uses a 2AFC procedure in which children hear a word and select one of two pictures (bat-pat). All 43 children were prelingually deafened, received a cochlear implant before 6 years of age or between ages 6 and 9, and used either oral or total communication. Children were tested once every 6 months to 1 year for 7 years; not all children were tested at each interval. By 2 years postimplant, the majority of these children achieved near-ceiling levels of discrimination performance for vowel height, vowel place, and consonant manner. Most of the children also achieved plateaus but did not reach ceiling performance for consonant place and voicing. The relationship between speech feature discrimination, spoken word recognition, and sentence comprehension will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD Research Grant No. R01DC00064 and NIH/NIDCD Training Grant No. T32DC00012.

  15. Time use of parents raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijkx, J; van der Putten, A A J; Vlaskamp, C

    2017-07-01

    Raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is expected to put extreme pressure on parental time use patterns. The aim of this study was to examine the total time use of mothers and fathers raising children with PIMD and compare it with the time use of parents of typically developing children. Twenty-seven fathers and 30 mothers raising children with PIMD completed a time use diary on a mobile phone or tablet app, as did 66 fathers and 109 mothers of typically developing children. Independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests were performed to compare mean time use. There are no differences in the time use of parents of children with PIMD on contracted time (paid work and educational activities) and necessary time (personal care, eating and drinking and sleeping) when compared with parents of typically developing children. There are significant differences between the parents of children with PIMD and the parents of typically developing children in terms of committed time (time for domestic work and the care and supervision of their children) and free time. The mothers of children with PIMD spend significantly less time on domestic work and more time on care and supervision than mothers of typically developing children. This study shows that the parents of children with PIMD have to spend a significant amount of time on care tasks and have on average 1.5 h less free time per day than parents of typically developing children. This is a striking difference, because leisure time can substantially contribute to well-being. Therefore, it is important not only to consider a child with PIMD's support needs but also to identify what parents need to continue their children's daily care and supervision. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Supporting families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing with an autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Susan; Innis, Heather

    2014-11-01

    Families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing (Deaf/HH) with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience many frustrations and challenges in the identification of ASD, accessing supports and services to address all of their child's needs, and identifying networking and support opportunities with other families with children with similar needs. Professionals working with families are in a unique position to help navigate the often disconnected systems of services for children who are Deaf/HH and services for children with ASD. This article poses some possible strategies that professionals can implement in practice when working with children who are Deaf/HH with an ASD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Vowel acquisition by prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve; Le Normand, Marie-Thérèse; Ménard, Lucie; Goud, Marilyne; Cohen, Henri

    2004-05-01

    Phonetic transcriptions (study 1) and acoustic analysis (study 2) were used to clarify the nature and rhythm of vowel acquisition following the cochlear implantation of prelingually deaf children. In the first study, seven children were divided according to their degree of hearing loss (DHL): DHL I: 90-100 dB of hearing loss, 1 children; DHL II: 100-110 dB, 3 children; and DHL III: over 110 dB, 3 children. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded and videotaped 6 and 12 months postsurgery and vowel inventories were obtained by listing all vowels that occurred at least twice in the child's repertoire at the time of recording. Results showed that degree of hearing loss and age at implantation have a significant impact on vowel acquisition. Indeed, DHL I and II children demonstrated more diversified as well as more typical pattern of acquisition. In the second study, the values of the first and second formants were extracted. The results suggest evolving use of the acoustic space, reflecting the use of auditory feedback to produce the three phonological features exploited to contrast French vowels (height, place of articulation, and rounding). The possible influence of visual feedback before cochlear implant is discussed.

  18. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  19. What Are the Communication Considerations for Parents of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children? NIDCD Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Deafness or hearing impairment affects not only a child who is deaf or has a hearing loss, but also the child's family, friends, and teachers. For hundreds of years, people have debated the best ways to develop communication skills and provide education for deaf and hard-of-hearing children. This fact sheet presents a few points upon which…

  20. The missing link in language development of deaf and hard of hearing children: pragmatic language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberis, Dianne; Beams, Dinah; Dalpes, Molly; Abrisch, Amanda; Baca, Rosalinda; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2012-11-01

    This article will provide information about the Pragmatics Checklist, which consists of 45 items and is scored as: (1) not present, (2) present but preverbal, (3) present with one to three words, and (4) present with complex language. Information for both children who are deaf or hard of hearing and those with normal hearing are presented. Children who are deaf or hard of hearing are significantly older when demonstrating skill with complex language than their normal hearing peers. In general, even at the age of 7 years, there are several items that are not mastered by 75% of the deaf or hard of hearing children. Additionally, the article will provide some suggestions of strategies that can be considered as a means to facilitate the development of these pragmatic language skills for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. A Profile of Deaf-Blind Children within Various Types of Educational Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensema, Corinne Klein

    1980-01-01

    The author cites findings from a study of the educational placement of 195 deaf blind children. Results indicate that placement seems to be based on several factors, including level of intelligence and additional physical disabilities. (Author/CL)

  2. Benefits of simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on verbal reasoning skills in prelingually deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Evi; Langereis, Margreet C.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Free, Rolien H.; Goedegebure, Andre; Smits, Cas; Stokroos, Robert J.; Ariens-Meijer, Saskia A. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Vermeulen, Anneke M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Impaired auditory speech perception abilities in deaf children with hearing aids compromised their verbal intelligence enormously. The availability of unilateral cochlear implantation (Cl) auditory speech perception and spoken vocabulary enabled them to reach near ageappropriate levels.

  3. Developing preschool deaf children's language and literacy learning from an educational media series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2013-01-01

    With the increase in research on multiliteracies comes greater interest in exploring multiple pathways of learning for deaf children. Educational media have been increasingly examined as a tool for facilitating the development of deaf children's language and literacy skills. The authors investigated whether preschool deaf children (N = 31) acquired targeted American Sign Language and literacy skills after viewing one video from an educational video series in ASL. Descriptive statistics were gathered and a split-plot ANOVA was conducted to determine whether targeted literacy scores increased from pretest to posttest and whether scores varied by baseline ASL skills. A significant improvement was found in the skills targeted in the video, which occurred regardless of the level of baseline ASL skills. The findings support the claim that learning ASL and literacy skills through educational media may benefit deaf children with varied levels of exposure to ASL.

  4. Effects of a Wearable, Tactile Aid on Language Comprehension of Prelingual Profoundly Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Adele

    Factors influencing the use of nonacoustic aids (such as visual displays and tactile devices) with the hearing impaired are reviewed. The benefits of tactile devices in improving speech reading/lipreading and speech are pointed out. Tactile aids which provide information on rhythm, rate, intensity, and duration of speech increase lipreading and…

  5. Expressive Vocabulary, Morphology, Syntax and Narrative Skills in Profoundly Deaf Children after Early Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience and research reveal generic spoken language benefits after cochlear implantation. However, systematic research on specific language domains and error analyses are required to probe sub-skills. Moreover, the effect of predictive factors on distinct language domains is unknown. In this study, outcomes of 70 school-aged children…

  6. Expressive vocabulary, morphology, syntax and narrative skills in profoundly deaf children after early cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinne Boons; Margreet Langereis; prof. Dr. Louis Peeraer; Jan Wouters; van Wieringen; Leo De Raeve

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience and research reveal generic spoken language benefits after cochlear implantation. However, systematic research on specific language domains and error analyses are required to probe sub-skills. Moreover, the effect of predictive factors on distinct language domains is unknown. In

  7. Serving Deaf-Blind Children. Theme of the International Conference on Deaf-Blind Children (4th, 22-27 August 1971, Perkins School for the Blind).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA.

    Presented are 30 papers given at a 5-day international conference on serving deaf-blind children. Additionally provided are the conference agenda, a review of the conference, reports of the nominations and resolutions committees, and a list of conference participants. Among the papers are the following titles: "Programs for Non-Verbal Children",…

  8. Primeras interacciones con ninos sordo-ciegos. Hoja informativa (Early Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind. Fact Sheet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Deborah

    This fact sheet presents numerous ways that parents can interact with their deaf-blind children. The challenges facing children with deaf-blindness are explained and compared to children without disabilities. Ways to recognize and then respond to children's actions are suggested and tips for developing good communication are presented, including…

  9. Hearing Mothers and Oral Deaf Children: An Atypical Relational Context for Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecciso, Flavia; Petrocchi, Serena; Marchetti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in a group of oral deaf children and in their hearing mothers using a battery of ToM tasks. It also investigated the connection between mother and child in ToM performance. Participants were: 17 oral deaf children (aged 5 to 14 years) were paired by gender, age, and mental age with 17 hearing…

  10. Effects of Early Auditory Experience on the Spoken Language of Deaf Children at 3 Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Johanna Grant; Geers, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: By age three, typically developing children have achieved extensive vocabulary and syntax skills that facilitate both cognitive and social development. Substantial delays in spoken language acquisition have been documented for children with severe-profound deafness, even those with auditory oral training and early hearing aid use. This study documents the spoken language skills achieved by orally educated three-year-olds whose profound hearing loss was identified and hearing aids fitted between 1 and 30 months of age and who received a cochlear implant between 12 and 38 months of age. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the effects of age, duration and type of early auditory experience on spoken language competence at age 3.5. Design: The spoken language skills of 76 children who had used a cochlear implant for at least 7 months were evaluated via standardized 30-minute language sample analysis, a parent-completed vocabulary checklist, and a teacher language-rating scale. The children were recruited from and enrolled in oral education programs or therapy practices across the United States. Inclusion criteria included: presumed deaf since birth, English the primary language of the home, no other known conditions that interfere with speech/language development, enrolled in programs using oral education methods, and no known problems with the cochlear implant lasting over 30 days. Results: Strong correlations were obtained among all language measures. Therefore, principal components analysis was used to derive a single Language Factor score for each child. A number of possible predictors of language outcome were examined, including age at identification and intervention with a hearing aid, duration of use of a hearing aid, pre-implant PTA threshold with a hearing aid, PTA threshold with a cochlear implant, and duration of use of a cochlear implant/ age at implantation (the last two variables were practically identical since all children were tested

  11. ASL Handshape Stories, Word Recognition and Signing Deaf Readers: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietz, Merrilee R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using American Sign Language (ASL) handshape stories to teach word recognition in whole stories using a descriptive case study approach was explored. Four profoundly deaf children ages 7 to 8, enrolled in a self-contained deaf education classroom in a public school in the south participated in the story time five-week…

  12. Developing Communication Skills in Deaf Primary School Pupils: Introducing and Evaluating the SmiLE Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Sherryn; Herman, Rosalind; Pring, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Many profoundly deaf signers have difficulty communicating with hearing people. This article describes a therapy called "Strategies and Measurable Interaction in Live English" (smiLE; Schamroth and Threadgill, 2007a), an approach used to teach deaf children skills to become successful communicators in real-life situations. This study…

  13. Parents' Experiences with Childhood Deafness: Implications for Family-Centered Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Traub, Randi J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the need for family-centered follow-up, this study examined parents' experiences with deafness after early identification. Qualitative inquiry methods were used to explore and describe the perceptions and experiences of nine parents of children identified with severe to profound deafness. Parents participated in face-to-face…

  14. Parenting Stress in Mothers of Mentally Retarded, Blind, Deaf and Physically Disabled Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Atefvahid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Parents of children with disabilities are poorer physical and mental health and greater stress experience. This study was conducted to evaluate Parenting stress in mothers of mentally retarded, blind, deaf and physically disabled children.Materials and Methods: This study was causal-comparative. The study population included 310 mothers of exceptional children (mothers of children with mental retardation, blind, deaf and physical-motor disabilities 7 to 12 years of age enrolled in primary schools in the academic year 90-1389 exceptional Tehran. Multi-stage cluster sampling method was used. The data obtained from questionnaires parenting stress using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA were analyzed.Results: The results showed that parenting stress in mothers of blind with mentally retarded, deaf with mentally retarded, physically with blind and deaf children are significantly different. As well as, there was significant difference between the mean score of blind, physical disorders, mentally retarded and deaf groups in terms of distraction- hyperactivity subscale.Conclusion: Mothers of children with mental retardation, physical disorders, blind and deaf have most parenting stress respectively.

  15. Review of intellectual assessment measures for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesman, Jennifer H; Day, Lori A; Szymanski, Christen A; Hughes-Wheatland, Roxanne; Witkin, Gregory A; Kalback, Shawn R; Brice, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual assessment of children who are deaf or hard of hearing presents unique challenges to the clinician charged with attempting to obtain an accurate representation of the child's skills. Selection of appropriate intellectual assessment instruments requires a working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the measure and what changes in standardized administration might be necessary to accommodate for the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In the case of some available instruments, there is limited guidance and objective research available examining the performance of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. This review summarizes available information on widely used and most recent editions of intellectual assessment measures with special attention to guidance on accommodations, score interpretation, subtest selection and other test-specific considerations when assessing children who are deaf or hard of hearing. There is much opportunity for further inquiry in the field of intellectual assessment as it applies to children who are deaf or hard of hearing, as many measures have not been closely scrutinized for their appropriate use with this population. Clinicians must recognize inherent difficulties with intellectual assessment measures with children who are deaf or hard of hearing and issues in providing for an accessible and accurate administration of test items. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Describing the trajectory of language development in the presence of severe-to-profound hearing loss: a closer look at children with cochlear implants versus hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Baca, Rosalinda L; Sedey, Allison L

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to describe the language growth of children with severe or profound hearing loss with cochlear implants versus those children with the same degree of hearing loss using hearing aids. A prospective longitudinal observation and analysis. University of Colorado Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences. There were 87 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss from 48 to 87 months of age. All children received early intervention services through the Colorado Home Intervention Program. Most children received intervention services from a certified auditory-verbal therapist or an auditory-oral therapist and weekly sign language instruction from an instructor who was deaf or hard of hearing and native or fluent in American Sign Language. The Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language, 3rd Edition, and the Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition, were the assessment tools for children 4 to 7 years of age. The expressive language subscale of the Minnesota Child Development was used in the infant/toddler period (birth to 36 mo). Average language estimates at 84 months of age were nearly identical to the normative sample for receptive language and 7 months delayed for expressive vocabulary. Children demonstrated a mean rate of growth from 4 years through 7 years on these 2 assessments that was equivalent to their normal-hearing peers. As a group, children with hearing aids deviated more from the age equivalent trajectory on the Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language, 3rd Edition, and the Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition, than children with cochlear implants. When a subset of children were divided into performance categories, we found that children with cochlear implants were more likely to be "gap closers" and less likely to be "gap openers," whereas the reverse was true for the children with hearing aids for both measures. Children who are educated through oral-aural combined with

  17. The Differential Effects of Attentional Focus in Children with Moderate and Profound Visual Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W. T. McNamara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been consistently reported that an external focus of attention leads to better motor performance than an internal focus, but no research to date has explored this effect in a population with visual impairments (VI. External focus statements typically reference something in the environment (e.g., target that may be difficult to conceptualize for people with VI since they cannot generate a visual representation of the object of focus. Internal focus statements could be more closely identifiable with proprioception that is not impaired in this population. Recent studies have reported that sighted adults with temporarily obstructed vision are able to receive an external focus benefit when performing discrete tasks (i.e., golf putt and vertical jump, however, it is unclear if those with VI would experience the same benefit. The purpose of this investigation was to compare how an internal focus and external focus impact the balance of children with VI. Eighteen children with VI were grouped into a moderate (n = 11 and a profound VI group (n = 7. Participants completed a familiarization trial, an internal focus trial (i.e., focusing on feet and an external focus trial (i.e., focusing on markers in a counterbalanced order. The moderate VI group had a lower root mean square error while using an external focus (p = 0.04, while the profound VI group did not differ between conditions (p > 0.05. These results suggest that while performing a task reliant on sensory feedback, an external focus benefit may be dependent on the severity of VI. Further research is needed to examine whether external focus statements can be presented in a way that may be more intuitive to those with profound VI. These findings may help to influence how professionals in health-related fields (e.g., physical therapist and physical educators give instructions on motor performance to populations with VI.

  18. Modeling reading vocabulary learning in deaf children in bilingual education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    The acquisition of reading vocabulary is one of the major challenges for deaf children in bilingual education programs. Deaf children have to acquire a written lexicon that can effectively be used in reading. In this paper, we present a developmental model that describes reading vocabulary acquisition of deaf children in bilingual education programs. The model is inspired by Jiang's model of vocabulary development in a second language (N. Jiang, 2000, 2004a) and the hierarchical model of lexical representation and processing in bilinguals (J. F. Kroll & E. Stewart, 1988). We argue that lexical development in the written language often fossilizes and that many words deaf readers acquire will not reach the final stage of lexical development. We argue that this feature is consistent with many findings reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss the pedagogical implications of the model.

  19. The management of children with Down syndrome and profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, E; Pal, R; Henderson, L; Green, K M J; Bruce, I A

    2016-01-01

    Although, the association between Down syndrome (DS) and conductive hearing loss is well recognized, the fact that a small proportion of these children may have a severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss that could benefit from cochlear implantation (CI) is less well understood. The management of significant co-morbidities in children with DS can delay initial diagnosis of hearing impairment and assessment of suitability for CI can likewise be challenging, due to difficulties conditioning to behavioural hearing tests. We performed a retrospective case note review of three children with DS referred to the Manchester Cochlear Implant Programme. Three illustrative cases are described including CI in a 4 years old. Using conventional outcome measurement instruments, the outcome could be considered to be suboptimal with a Categories of Auditory Performance score of 4 at 6 months post-op and at last follow up. In part, this is likely to reflect the delay in implantation, but the role of cognitive impairment must be considered. The cases described emphasize the importance of comprehensive radiological and audiological assessment in children with DS being considered for CI. The influence of cognitive impairment upon outcome of CI must be taken into account, but should not be considered a contra-indication to implantation in children with DS. Benefit that might be considered limited when quantified using existing general outcome measurement instruments, may have a significant impact upon psychosocial development and quality of life in children with significant cognitive impairment, or other additional needs.

  20. Comparison of intelligence quotients of first- and second-generation deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraei, K; Amirsalari, S; Ajalloueyan, M

    2017-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a common type of sensory loss in children. Studies indicate that children with hearing impairment are deficient in social, cognitive and communication skills. This study compared the intelligence quotients of first- and second-generation deaf children with cochlear implants. This research is causal-comparative. All 15 deaf children investigated had deaf parents and were selected from Baqiyatallah Cochlear Implant Center. The 15 children with cochlear implants were paired with similar children with hearing parents using purposive sampling. The findings show that the Hotelling trace of multivariate analysis of variance (F = 6.78, p intelligence scales except knowledge. It can be assumed that second-generation children joined their family in the use of sign language as the primary experience before a cochlear implant. The use of sign language before cochlear implants is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The development and Writing of a Children's Story to Promote an Awareness of Deaf Culture and AMerican SIgn Language

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Blaine J.

    1993-01-01

    Many advocates of the deaf fear that a whole generation of deaf children will be lost emotionally. socially. and educationally. This fear stems from the fact that many children who are deaf are not having their linguistic. sociocultural. and communicative needs met at home or at school (King, 1993). Their needs are not met primarily for three reasons. First. the hearing culture is often inaccessible to them because they do not understand most of the spoken language around them. When children ...

  2. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral

  3. Phonological awareness, vocabulary, and reading in deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carol; Goswami, Usha

    2010-04-01

    To explore the phonological awareness skills of deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) and relationships with vocabulary and reading development. Forty-three deaf children with implants who were between 5 and 15 years of age were tested; 21 had been implanted at around 2.5 years of age (Early CI group), and 22 had been implanted at around 5 years of age (Late CI group). Two control groups-a deaf hearing aided group (16 children) and a typically developing group of hearing children (19 children)-were also tested. All children received a battery of phonological processing tasks along with measures of reading, vocabulary, and speechreading. Analyses focus on deaf children within the normal IQ range (n = 53). Age at cochlear implantation had a significant effect on vocabulary and reading outcomes when quotient scores were calculated. Individual differences in age at implant, duration of fit, phonological development, vocabulary development, auditory memory, visual memory, and speech intelligibility were all strongly associated with progress in reading for the deaf implanted children. Patterns differed somewhat depending on whether quotient scores or standard scores were used. Cochlear implantation is associated with development of the oral language, auditory memory, and phonological awareness skills necessary for developing efficient word recognition skills. There is a benefit of earlier implantation.

  4. Verbal short-term memory development and spoken language outcomes in deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael S; Kronenberger, William G; Gao, Sujuan; Hoen, Helena M; Miyamoto, Richard T; Pisoni, David B

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) help many deaf children achieve near-normal speech and language (S/L) milestones. Nevertheless, high levels of unexplained variability in S/L outcomes are limiting factors in improving the effectiveness of CIs in deaf children. The objective of this study was to longitudinally assess the role of verbal short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) capacity as a progress-limiting source of variability in S/L outcomes after CI in children. Longitudinal study of 66 children with CIs for prelingual severe-to-profound hearing loss. Outcome measures included performance on digit span forward (DSF), digit span backward (DSB), and four conventional S/L measures that examined spoken-word recognition (Phonetically Balanced Kindergarten word test), receptive vocabulary (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test ), sentence-recognition skills (Hearing in Noise Test), and receptive and expressive language functioning (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals Fourth Edition Core Language Score; CELF). Growth curves for DSF and DSB in the CI sample over time were comparable in slope, but consistently lagged in magnitude relative to norms for normal-hearing peers of the same age. For DSF and DSB, 50.5% and 44.0%, respectively, of the CI sample scored more than 1 SD below the normative mean for raw scores across all ages. The first (baseline) DSF score significantly predicted all endpoint scores for the four S/L measures, and DSF slope (growth) over time predicted CELF scores. DSF baseline and slope accounted for an additional 13 to 31% of variance in S/L scores after controlling for conventional predictor variables such as: chronological age at time of testing, age at time of implantation, communication mode (auditory-oral communication versus total communication), and maternal education. Only DSB baseline scores predicted endpoint language scores on Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and CELF. DSB slopes were not significantly related to any endpoint S/L measures

  5. Peer social skills and theory of mind in children with autism, deafness, or typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida; Slaughter, Virginia; Moore, Chris; Wellman, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Consequences of theory of mind (ToM) development for daily social lives of children are uncertain. Five to 13-year-olds (N = 195) with typical development, autism, or deafness (both native and late signers) took ToM tests and their teachers reported on their social skills for peer interaction (e.g., leadership, group entry). Groups differed in both ToM understanding (with late-signing deaf children especially delayed even relative to autistic children) and peer social skills (with autistic children especially delayed even relative to deaf late signers). Crucially, for the typically developing hearing children and deaf children alike, ToM understanding independently predicted peer social skills over and above age, gender, language ability, and, for deaf children, status as native- or late-signer. These novel findings offer some of the best evidence to date of the relevance of ToM cognitions to real-world social behavior for both these groups. However, for those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) the pattern was different. The apparent link of ToM to peer competence was not a direct one but instead was significantly mediated by language ability. Several possible explanations for this intriguing autism-specific result were also discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Metric Education for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A diagnostic test of metric measurement skills was administered to 283 summer Vestibule Program students in 1978 at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Results of the testing showed that most of the deaf students lacked an understanding of the information needed for metric living. (Author)

  7. Auditory and Visual Electrophysiology of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Implications for Cross-modal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David P.; Blau, Shane; LaMarr, Todd; Lawyer, Laurel A.; Coffey-Corina, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children who receive a cochlear implant early in life and engage in intensive oral/aural therapy often make great strides in spoken language acquisition. However, despite clinicians’ best efforts, there is a great deal of variability in language outcomes. One concern is that cortical regions which normally support auditory processing may become reorganized for visual function, leaving fewer available resources for auditory language acquisition. The conditions under which these changes occur are not well understood, but we may begin investigating this phenomenon by looking for interactions between auditory and visual evoked cortical potentials in deaf children. If children with abnormal auditory responses show increased sensitivity to visual stimuli, this may indicate the presence of maladaptive cortical plasticity. We recorded evoked potentials, using both auditory and visual paradigms, from 25 typical hearing children and 26 deaf children (ages 2–8 years) with cochlear implants. An auditory oddball paradigm was used (85% /ba/ syllables vs. 15% frequency modulated tone sweeps) to elicit an auditory P1 component. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded during presentation of an intermittent peripheral radial checkerboard while children watched a silent cartoon, eliciting a P1–N1 response. We observed reduced auditory P1 amplitudes and a lack of latency shift associated with normative aging in our deaf sample. We also observed shorter latencies in N1 VEPs to visual stimulus offset in deaf participants. While these data demonstrate cortical changes associated with auditory deprivation, we did not find evidence for a relationship between cortical auditory evoked potentials and the VEPs. This is consistent with descriptions of intra-modal plasticity within visual systems of deaf children, but do not provide evidence for cross-modal plasticity. In addition, we note that sign language experience had no effect on deaf children’s early auditory and visual

  8. Identification of Effective Strategies to Promote Language in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Marker, Craig; DesJardin, Jean L.

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and communication are essential for language development in young children. However, hearing parents of deaf children face challenges in providing language input to their children. This study utilized the largest national sample of deaf children receiving cochlear implants, with the aim of identifying effective facilitative language techniques. Ninety-three deaf children (≤ 2 years) were assessed at six implant centers prior to and for three years following implantation. All parent-child interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded at each assessment. Analyses using bivariate latent difference score modeling indicated that higher versus lower-level strategies predicted growth in expressive language and word types predicted growth in receptive language over time. These effective, higher-level strategies could be used in early intervention programs. PMID:23002910

  9. Mental health and self-image among deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejstad, Lena; Heiling, Kerstin; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2009-01-01

    Mental health and self-image among deaf and hard of hearing children (ages 11-18 years) in southern Sweden was investigated. The children (N = 111) attended special schools for the deaf (n = 28), special schools for the hard of hearing (n = 23), and regular schools where hard of hearing children were mainstreamed (n = 60). The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997) was used to screen mental health and the "I Think I Am" questionnaire Ouvinen-Birgerstam (1982, 1984) to measure self-esteem. The study shows that hard of hearing children seem to do as well, as a group, as other children in Swedish society. Mean SDQ and ITIA scores indicated that the mainstreamed students and the students in special schools for the hard of hearing had higher levels of rated mental health and self-image than the students in schools for the deaf.

  10. Reading skills in Persian deaf children with cochlear implants and hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Rashedi, Vahid; Morasae, Esmaeil Khedmati

    2016-10-01

    Reading skills are necessary for educational development in children. Many studies have shown that children with hearing loss often experience delays in reading. This study aimed to examine reading skills of Persian deaf children with cochlear implant and hearing aid and compare them with normal hearing counterparts. The sample consisted of 72 s and third grade Persian-speaking children aged 8-12 years. They were divided into three equal groups including 24 children with cochlear implant (CI), 24 children with hearing aid (HA), and 24 children with normal hearing (NH). Reading performance of participants was evaluated by the "Nama" reading test. "Nama" provides normative data for hearing and deaf children and consists of 10 subtests and the sum of the scores is regarded as reading performance score. Results of ANOVA on reading test showed that NH children had significantly better reading performance than deaf children with CI and HA in both grades (P analysis, using Tukey test, indicated that there was no significant difference between HA and CI groups in terms of non-word reading, word reading, and word comprehension skills (respectively, P = 0.976, P = 0.988, P = 0.998). Considering the findings, cochlear implantation is not significantly more effective than hearing aid for improvement of reading abilities. It is clear that even with considerable advances in hearing aid technology, many deaf children continue to find literacy a challenging struggle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The written language of signals as a means of natural literacy of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Fracari Hautrive

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking the theme literacy of deaf children is currently directing the eye to the practice teaching course that demands beyond the school. Questions moving to daily practice, became a challenge, requiring an investigative attitude. The article aims to problematize the process of literacy of deaf children. Reflection proposal emerges from daily practice. This structure is from yarns that include theoretical studies of Vigotskii (1989, 1994, 1996, 1998; Stumpf (2005, Quadros (1997; Bolzan (1998, 2002; Skliar (1997a, 1997b, 1998 . From which, problematizes the processes involved in the construction of written language. It is as a result, the importance of the instrumentalization of sign language as first language in education of deaf and learning of sign language writing. Important aspects for the deaf student is observed in the condition to be literate in their mother tongue. It points out the need for a redirect in the literacy of deaf children, so that important aspects of language and its role in the structuring of thought and its communicative aspect, are respected and considered in this process. Thus, it emphasizes the learning of the writing of sign language as fundamental, it should occupy a central role in the proposed teaching the class, encouraging the contradictions that put the student in a situation of cognitive conflict, while respecting the diversity inherent to each humans. It is considered that the production of sign language writing is an appropriate tool for the deaf students record their visual language.

  12. Language skills and nonverbal cognitive processes associated with reading comprehension in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, María Teresa; Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Ruiz-Cuadra, María del Mar; López-López, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between language skills (vocabulary knowledge and phonological awareness), nonverbal cognitive processes (attention, memory and executive functions) and reading comprehension in deaf children. Participants were thirty prelingually deaf children (10.7 ± 1.6 years old; 18 boys, 12 girls), who were classified as either good readers or poor readers by their scores on two reading comprehension tasks. The children were administered a rhyme judgment task and seven computerized neuropsychological tasks specifically designed and adapted for deaf children to evaluate vocabulary knowledge, attention, memory and executive functions in deaf children. A correlational approach was also used to assess the association between variables. Although the two groups did not show differences in phonological awareness, good readers showed better vocabulary and performed significantly better than poor readers on attention, memory and executive functions measures. Significant correlations were found between better scores in reading comprehension and better scores on tasks of vocabulary and non-verbal cognitive processes. The results suggest that in deaf children, vocabulary knowledge and nonverbal cognitive processes such as selective attention, visuo-spatial memory, abstract reasoning and sequential processing may be especially relevant for the development of reading comprehension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parenting Stress among Parents of Deaf and Hearing Children: Associations with Language Delays and Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Barker, David H; Cruz, Ivette; Snell, Carolyn; Grimley, Mary E; Botteri, Melissa

    2010-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates predictors of both general and context-specific parenting stress in a cross-sectional sample of hearing parents of young deaf and hearing children. DESIGN: Participants were 181 children who were deaf and 92 children with normal hearing. Perceived parenting stress was measured using both general and context-specific measures. Predictors of parenting stress included parent-reported and observed child behavior problems and language delays. RESULTS: After controlling for maternal education and family income, parents of deaf children reported more context-specific but not general parenting stress than parents of hearing children. Both parent-reported and observed behavior problems were higher in the deaf group compared to the hearing group. Children's hearing status related to child behavior problems by way of oral language delays. Furthermore, hearing status related to parenting stress by way of language delays and child behavior difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Context-specific measures of parenting stress reflect unique challenges of this population. Both language delays and child behavior problems are associated with increased parenting stress. Identification of specific stressors related to parenting a deaf child helps to inform the development of early interventions.

  14. UNILATERAL SENSORINEURAL DEAFNESS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN; A CLINICAL AND AUDIOLOGICAL EVALUATION AT A TERTIARY HOSPITAL OF TELANGANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chandra Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Interpersonal communication, day to day activities, learning language and acquiring grades in the school are important parts in the life of school going children. Unilateral or bilateral Loss of hearing affects education and the child feels handicapped socially, emotionally, and scholastically. Such children lose grades and retained in the same class affecting them emotionally. The present study was conducted in order to find out the various causes of unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss (USNHL in children and to study role of various audiological findings in diagnosing the cause of impaired hearing in children. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To find out the possible etiological causes and study the role of various audiological tests in finding the causes of unilateral impaired hearing in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted in the Department of ENT of a tertiary Hospital attached to a Medical College in Warangal, Telangana. A total of 346 children aged between 4 and 15 years attended presenting with complaints of impaired hearing. Among them 73 children with unilateral sensorineural deafness were included in the study. After a thorough ENT examination subjective tests like pure tone audiometry and behavioral observation audiometry and objective tests like impedance audiometry, Oto-acoustic emissions (OAE, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA were performed. RESULTS While identifying the possible etiological cause of USNHL, OAE revealed 56.16% REFER and 43.83% PASS results. Impedance audiometric results showed 71.22% as Type A Tympanogram. Pure tone audiometric results were mostly showed severe and profound hearing losses together accounting to 87.66%. BERA findings were mostly on severe and profound hearing loss (90.40%. No children with syndromic or cranio-facial abnormalities were found. CONCLUSIONS A prospective Hospital based study of school children with USNHL showed acquired nature of the

  15. Deaf children's non-verbal working memory is impacted by their language experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Chloë; Jones, Anna; Denmark, Tanya; Mason, Kathryn; Atkinson, Joanna; Botting, Nicola; Morgan, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that deaf children perform more poorly on working memory tasks compared to hearing children, but these studies have not been able to determine whether this poorer performance arises directly from deafness itself or from deaf children's reduced language exposure. The issue remains unresolved because findings come mostly from (1) tasks that are verbal as opposed to non-verbal, and (2) involve deaf children who use spoken communication and therefore may have experienced impoverished input and delayed language acquisition. This is in contrast to deaf children who have been exposed to a sign language since birth from Deaf parents (and who therefore have native language-learning opportunities within a normal developmental timeframe for language acquisition). A more direct, and therefore stronger, test of the hypothesis that the type and quality of language exposure impact working memory is to use measures of non-verbal working memory (NVWM) and to compare hearing children with two groups of deaf signing children: those who have had native exposure to a sign language, and those who have experienced delayed acquisition and reduced quality of language input compared to their native-signing peers. In this study we investigated the relationship between NVWM and language in three groups aged 6–11 years: hearing children (n = 28), deaf children who were native users of British Sign Language (BSL; n = 8), and deaf children who used BSL but who were not native signers (n = 19). We administered a battery of non-verbal reasoning, NVWM, and language tasks. We examined whether the groups differed on NVWM scores, and whether scores on language tasks predicted scores on NVWM tasks. For the two executive-loaded NVWM tasks included in our battery, the non-native signers performed less accurately than the native signer and hearing groups (who did not differ from one another). Multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the vocabulary

  16. Profound Expressive Language Impairment in Low Functioning Children with Autism: An Investigation of Syntactic Awareness Using a Computerised Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as "monkey…

  17. From Individualism to Co-Construction and Back Again: Rethinking Research Methodology for Children with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ben; Watson, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are said to experience severe congenital impairments to consciousness and cognition stemming from neurological damage. Such children are understood as operating at the pre-verbal stages of development, and research in the field typically draws conceptual resources from psychology to…

  18. Deaf People Can!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixtrom, Christine

    1987-01-01

    Activities designed to increase deaf students' self-esteem and positive attitudes toward their deafness included a bulletin board displaying the different things deaf children and adults could do; and a trip to see actors from the National Theater of the Deaf. (CB)

  19. Comparative characteristics of the development of psychomotor sphere deaf primary school children and their peers with hearing preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Іvahnenko A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify indicators of development of psychomotor function deaf children aged 7-10 years and find out the characteristic features of their manifestation. Material : the study involved 242 children aged 7-10 years, 128 of them deaf. Results : psychomotor development indicators defined functions deaf children aged 7-10 years. A comparative analysis with indicators of their peers with hearing preservation. Lagging indicators revealed psychomotor function deaf children ( ability to regulate spatio-temporal parameters and dynamic movements, orientation in space, coordination movements, the ability to preserve static and dynamic balance, motor memory, a sense of rhythm, the ability to arbitrarily relax muscles, hands and coordination micromovements fingers capable of simultaneously performing movements coordination ballistic movements averaging 14.6 % to 60.6 %. Conclusions : It was found that deaf children of primary school age the development of psychomotor function occurs more slowly compared with hearing children their age.

  20. The Voice of the Practitioner: Sharing Fiction Books to Support the Understanding of Theory of Mind in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, S.; Chilton, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing research interest in the development of theory of mind (ToM) in deaf children and young people and the conditions which might enable or suppress development of the set of skills involved. However, the views of practitioners working with deaf children have not been widely explored. This paper presents the…

  1. Washington State Services for Children with Deaf-Blindness. Final Project Report, October 1, 1992-September 30, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Marcia

    This report describes activities and accomplishments of the Washington State Services for Children with Deaf-Blindness 3-year, federally supported program to provide technical assistance and training to families and service providers of approximately 140 children with deaf-blindness. Specific outcomes are listed for each of the project's 11…

  2. The Relationship between American Sign Language Vocabulary and the Development of Language-Based Reasoning Skills in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The language-based analogical reasoning abilities of Deaf children are a controversial topic. Researchers lack agreement about whether Deaf children possess the ability to reason using language-based analogies, or whether this ability is limited by a lack of access to vocabulary, both written and signed. This dissertation examines factors that…

  3. Microswitch Technology for Enabling Self-Determined Responding in Children with Profound and Multiple Disabilities: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Laura; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio E; O'Reilly, Mark F; Green, Vanessa A

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed 18 studies reporting on the use of microswitch technology to enable self-determined responding in children with profound and multiple disabilities. Identified studies that met pre-determined inclusion criteria were summarized in terms of (a) participants, (b) experimental design, (c) microswitches and procedures used, and (d) main results. The 18 studies formed three groups based on whether the microswitch technology was primarily intended to enable the child to (a) access preferred stimuli (7 studies), (b) choose between stimuli (6 studies), or (c) recruit attention/initiate social interaction (5 studies). The results of these studies were consistently positive and support the use of microswitch technology in educational programs for children with profound and multiple disabilities as a means to impact their environment and interact with others. Implications for delivery of augmentative and alternative communication intervention to children with profound and multiple disabilities are discussed.

  4. Causes of childhood deafness in Pukhtoonkhwa Province of Pakistan and the role of consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, M; Khattak, A A; Bunn, J E G; Mackenzie, I

    2008-10-01

    Deafness is the hidden disability of childhood, and leads to poor educational and employment prospects. There is little published information on deafness in Pakistan. Profound hearing impairment is more prevalent in countries where consanguineous marriages are common, such as Pakistan. This study aimed to assess causes of childhood deafness and association with parental consanguinity, within deaf and hearing children in the Peshawar district of Pukhtoonkhwa Province, Pakistan. One hundred and forty deaf children were identified from two schools for deaf children within the Peshawar district. These children were assessed via audiology, otoscopic examination, case note review and parental history, in order to attempt to ascertain the cause of their deafness. Two hundred and twenty-one attendees at a local immunisation clinic (taken as representative of the local childhood population) were also screened for hearing impairment. Parents of both groups of children were assessed by interview and questionnaire in order to ascertain the mother and father's family relationship (i.e. whether cousins or unrelated). Of the 140 deaf school pupils, 92.1 per cent were profoundly hearing impaired and 7.9 per cent were severely hearing impaired. All these children had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. A possible cause of deafness was identified in only six of these children. Parental consanguinity (i.e. first or second cousins) was established for 86.4 per cent of deaf school pupils and 59.7 per cent of immunisation clinic attendees. None of the control children were identified as having a hearing problem. The prevalence of parental consanguinity was significantly higher in deaf children compared with non-hearing impaired children. However, the study also confirmed a high rate of consanguinity within the general Peshawar community. In this setting, prevention of consanguineous unions is the only means of reducing levels of congenital hearing impairment. The current levels of

  5. Cross-language effects in written word recognition: The case of bilingual deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    n recent years, multiple studies have shown that the languages of a bilingual interact during processing. We investigated sign activation as deaf children read words. In a word-picture verification task, we manipulated the underlying sign equivalents. We presented children with word-picture pairs

  6. Virtual Intervention to Improve Storytelling Ability among Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Sigal

    2014-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) children reveal considerable difficulty in producing an organised and complete narrative. The current study conducted a three-month intervention to improve D/HH children's storytelling ability through training in arranging episodes of temporal scripts, and telling the stories they created. We examined 65 D/HH…

  7. Learning to Look for Language: Development of Joint Attention in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Amy M.; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2014-01-01

    Joint attention between hearing children and their caregivers is typically achieved when the adult provides spoken, auditory linguistic input that relates to the child's current visual focus of attention. Deaf children interacting through sign language must learn to continually switch visual attention between people and objects in order to achieve…

  8. Increasing Early Reading Skills in Young Signing Deaf Children Using Shared Book Reading: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jean F.; Liu, Hsiu-Tan; Liu, Chun-Jung; Gentry, Mary Anne; Smith, Zanthia

    2017-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to test a storybook intervention to increase early reading skills of 25 young signing deaf children of ages 4-9 in grades K through third grade. The children had wide ranges of hearing losses, non-verbal IQs, and signing skills. All were at risk for developing early reading skills, reading below the first grade…

  9. Reading to Deaf Children Who Sign: A Response to Williams (2012) and Suggestions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jean F.

    2012-01-01

    A commentary on Williams's (2012) invited article on the use of adapted vocabulary learning interventions focuses on three areas: (a) Vocabulary interventions with storybook reading originally designed for hearing children can be adapted for deaf children. (b) Teachers are invited to reflect on how the read-aloud process in English differs from…

  10. Word Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Effects of Early Auditory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Derek M.; Stewart, Jessica; Moberly, Aaron; Hollich, George; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    Word-learning skills were tested in normal-hearing 12- to 40-month-olds and in deaf 22- to 40-month-olds 12 to 18 months after cochlear implantation. Using the Intermodal Preferential Looking Paradigm (IPLP), children were tested for their ability to learn two novel-word/novel-object pairings. Normal-hearing children demonstrated learning on this…

  11. The Effect of Enhanced Storybook Interaction on Signing Deaf Children's Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, Jessica W.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    The link between vocabulary and later literacy is well documented in the research base. One way children gain vocabulary is through incidental learning. Deaf or hard-of-hearing children (D/HH) often struggle with incidental learning and require vocabulary intervention to increase their lexicon. An effective vocabulary intervention is storybook…

  12. Prospective study of hearing loss in schools for deaf children in Assir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hearing loss among children attending public schools for the deaf ... to severe SNHL. The majority of these children were found to have no hearing aids and some of them were using non- functional hearing aids. Preventive methods through edu- cation of the .... encephalitis during their early childhood of whom one had se-.

  13. Influence of Yoruba Beliefs about Abnormality on the Socialization of Deaf Children: A Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togonu-Bickersteth, Funmi; Odebiyi, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    Examines patterns of communication, modes of guidance and discipline, and affectional bonds between 176 Yoruba hearing mothers and their deaf children. Mothers perceived children's expressive linguistic abilities more negatively than receptive abilities. Communication difficulties affected mothers' guidance and discipline. Mothers' verbal claims…

  14. Enhancing Social Opportunities and Relationships of Children Who Are Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, H. H.; Sall, N.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined intervention programs to increase the social integration of 3 children with deaf-blindness, aged 7 through 10. Although the number of socially integrated activities increased for each child, the children continued to have few consistent friends and acquaintances. The implications of these results for enhancing long-term social…

  15. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  16. The Development of Discourse Referencing in Cantonese of Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Felix; Tang, Gladys; Lau, Tammy; Lam, Emily; Yiu, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the development of discourse referencing in spoken Cantonese of fifteen deaf/hard-of-hearing children studying in a sign bilingual and co-enrolment education programme in a mainstream setting in Hong Kong. A comparison of their elicited narratives with those of the hearing children and adults shows that, despite a delay in…

  17. Deaf Children Attending Different School Environments: Sign Language Abilities and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf…

  18. Deaf Children with Complex Needs: Parental Experience of Access to Cochlear Implants and Ongoing Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Wendy; Turner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of parents of deaf children with additional complex needs (ACN) in accessing cochlear implant (CI) services and achieving ongoing support. Of a total study group of fifty-one children with ACN, twelve had been fitted with a CI. The parental accounts provide a rich and varied picture of service access. For some…

  19. Mode of Acquisition as a Factor in Deaf Children's Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Loes N.; Tellings, Agnes E. J. M.; van Bon, Wim H. J.; Mak, Willem M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role of mode of acquisition (MoA) of word meanings in reading comprehension: children acquire word meanings using perceptual information (e.g., hearing, seeing, or smelling the referent) and/or linguistic information (e.g., verbal explanations). A total of 72 deaf and 99 hearing children between 7 and 15 years of age…

  20. Deaf Children's Engagement in an Educational Video in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B.

    2010-01-01

    Over time children's educational television has successfully modified programming to incorporate research-based strategies to facilitate learning and engagement during viewing. However, research has been limited on whether these same strategies would work with preschool deaf children viewing videos in American Sign Language. In a descriptive…

  1. Cross-Language Effects in Written Word Recognition: The Case of Bilingual Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Ellen; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, multiple studies have shown that the languages of a bilingual interact during processing. We investigated sign activation as deaf children read words. In a word-picture verification task, we manipulated the underlying sign equivalents. We presented children with word-picture pairs for which the sign translation equivalents varied…

  2. Vocabulary acquisition in deaf and hard-of-hearing children: Research and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, D.; Wauters, L.N.; Willemsen, M.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Marschark, M.; Spencer, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    Vocabulary knowledge is fundamental to communication, language learning, and acquiring knowledge of the world. Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children face considerable challenges in acquiring age-appropriate vocabulary knowledge. The enhancement of children's vocabulary knowledge is therefore one

  3. Quantity Processing in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children: Evidence from Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Comparison Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Santos, José Miguel; Calleja, Marina; García-Orza, Javier; Iza, Mauricio; Damas, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Deaf Children usually achieve lower scores on numerical tasks than normally hearing peers. Explanations for mathematical disabilities in hearing children are based on quantity representation deficits (Geary, 1994) or on deficits in accessing these representations (Rousselle & Noël, 2008). The present study aimed to verify, by means of symbolic…

  4. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abbas Ebrahimi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB. They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP. For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France. Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS, vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05. The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  5. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amir Abbas; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Movallali, Guita; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys) with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB). They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP). For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT) was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France). Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS), vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05). The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  6. Understanding concepts in sign language and speech of deaf and hard-of-hearing children of elementary school age

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačević, Tamara; Dimić, Nadežda; Isaković, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Sign language is a natural means of expression for deaf children. While communicating with a deaf child one should use speech followed by gestures until the child learns the spoken word and understands its meaning. The deaf child learns how to pronounce a word and its meaning, i.e. the idea that the word denotes, simultaneously. The aim of the research was to examine the level of acquisition of the sign language and speech by deaf and hard-of- hearing children of the elementary-school age, an...

  7. Language and literacy development of deaf and hard-of-hearing children: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Amy R; Schick, Brenda; Spencer, Patricia E

    2013-01-01

    Childhood hearing loss presents challenges to language development, especially spoken language. In this article, we review existing literature on deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children's patterns and trajectories of language as well as development of theory of mind and literacy. Individual trajectories vary significantly, reflecting access to early identification/intervention, advanced technologies (e.g., cochlear implants), and perceptually accessible language models. DHH children develop sign language in a similar manner as hearing children develop spoken language, provided they are in a language-rich environment. This occurs naturally for DHH children of deaf parents, who constitute 5% of the deaf population. For DHH children of hearing parents, sign language development depends on the age that they are exposed to a perceptually accessible 1st language as well as the richness of input. Most DHH children are born to hearing families who have spoken language as a goal, and such development is now feasible for many children. Some DHH children develop spoken language in bilingual (sign-spoken language) contexts. For the majority of DHH children, spoken language development occurs in either auditory-only contexts or with sign supports. Although developmental trajectories of DHH children with hearing parents have improved with early identification and appropriate interventions, the majority of children are still delayed compared with hearing children. These DHH children show particular weaknesses in the development of grammar. Language deficits and differences have cascading effects in language-related areas of development, such as theory of mind and literacy development.

  8. The validation of an educational database for children with profound intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien Spangenberg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Western Cape Forum for Intellectual Disability took the South African Government to court in 2010 on its failure to implement the right to education for Children with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability. Subsequently, multidisciplinary teams were appointed by the Western Cape Education Department to deliver services to the Special Care Centres (SCCs. Initially, minimal information was available on this population.Objectives: The purpose is to document the process of developing and validating a database for the collection of routine data.Method: A descriptive analytical study design was used. A sample of convenience was drawn from individuals under the age of 18 years, enrolled in SCCs in the Western Cape. The team who entered and analysed the data reached consensus regarding the utility and feasibility of each item.Results: Data were collected on 134 children. The omission of certain items from the database was identified. Some information was not reliable or readily available. Of the instruments identified to assess function, the classification systems were found to be reliable and useful, as were the performance scales. The WeeFIM, on the other hand, was lengthy and expensive, and was therefore discarded.Discussion and conclusions: A list of items to be included was identified. Apart from an individual profile, it can be useful for service planning and monitoring, if incorporated into the central information system used to monitor the performance of all children. Without such inclusion, this most vulnerable population, despite court ruling, will not have their right to education adequately addressed.

  9. Adapted interactive writing instruction with kindergarten children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    The study describes an adapted form of interactive writing (McCarrier, Pinnell, & Fountas, 2000) and examines its effectiveness as an approach to beginning writing instruction for young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Systematic videotape analysis was used to document the content of 45 adapted interactive writing lessons across an academic year. Findings of the study suggest that interactive writing has the potential to support early writing development in young deaf and hard of hearing children, if supplemented by techniques that make the phonology of English visible.

  10. Comparison of Irrational Believes between Mothers of Severe or Profound Mentally Handicapped Children with Healthy Children Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Hivadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of present research was the comparison of mothers irrational believes with severe or profound mentally handicapped child and mothers with normal child from 6 to14 years old in Tehran city. Materials & Methods: This study was an analytical, cross – sectional and comparative (case – control research. From mothers with severe or profound mentally handicapped child who had refered to Tehran welfare services centers, 80 mothers were selected by regular randomized sampling from two rehabilitation centers and 80 mothers with normal child were selected for peering with the group of testimonial from schools areas of east, west, south, north and center of Tehran, through multi - stage cluster sampling in for variables of: age of mothers, educational levels, the location of living and the number of children. They answered to questionnaire of irrational believes of jons (IBT. Analysis of data was done by descriptive and infringing statistics methods (Independent T test, U Mann Whitney, Chi-square and fisher. Results: The findings showed that: there are significantly differences in total irrational believes and irrational believes of blame proneness, frustration reactive, anxious over concern, problem avoiding and dependency, perfectionism between two groups of mothers (P<0/05. There was no significant difference in irrational believes between mothers who had mental handicap daughter and mothers who had mental handicap son (P=0/314. There was no significantly difference between two groups of mothers in four believes of demand for approval (P=0/737, high-self expectation (P=0/126, emotional irresponsibility (P=0/727, helplessness for change (p=0/283. Conclusion: Irrational believes and many its sub scales. In mothers of severe or profound mental handicap children were more than mothers with normal child. But believes of demand for approval, high self expectation, emotional irresponsibility, helplessness for change in mothers with

  11. Semantic and syntactic reading comprehension strategies used by deaf children with early and late cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; López-Higes, Ramón; Pisón, Guzmán

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students have traditionally exhibited reading comprehension difficulties. In recent years, these comprehension problems have been partially offset through cochlear implantation (CI), and the subsequent improvement in spoken language skills. However, the use of cochlear implants has not managed to fully bridge the gap in language and reading between normally hearing (NH) and deaf children, as its efficacy depends on variables such as the age at implant. This study compared the reading comprehension of sentences in 19 children who received a cochlear implant before 24 months of age (early-CI) and 19 who received it after 24 months (late-CI) with a control group of 19 NH children. The task involved completing sentences in which the last word had been omitted. To complete each sentence children had to choose a word from among several alternatives that included one syntactic and two semantic foils in addition to the target word. The results showed that deaf children with late-CI performed this task significantly worse than NH children, while those with early-CI exhibited no significant differences with NH children, except under more demanding processing conditions (long sentences with infrequent target words). Further, the error analysis revealed a preference of deaf students with early-CI for selecting the syntactic foil over a semantic one, which suggests that they draw upon syntactic cues during sentence processing in the same way as NH children do. In contrast, deaf children with late-CI do not appear to use a syntactic strategy, but neither a semantic strategy based on the use of key words, as the literature suggests. Rather, the numerous errors of both kinds that the late-CI group made seem to indicate an inconsistent and erratic response when faced with a lack of comprehension. These findings are discussed in relation to differences in receptive vocabulary and short-term memory and their implications for sentence reading comprehension. Copyright © 2015

  12. Visual performance and the use of colored filters in children who are deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Richard S; Ludlow, Amanda K; Wilkins, Arnold J; Calver, Richard I; Allen, Peter M

    2015-06-01

    To assess visual performance and the effects of color overlays on reading in children who were deaf and children who could hear. Thirty-one children who were deaf (mean [± SD] age, 14 [± 1.99] years) and 39 children who could hear (mean [± SD] age, 13.58 [± 3.09] years) underwent an optometric examination with specific emphasis on near vision. Participants chose an overlay with color optimal for clarity and comfort and completed the Wilkins Rate of Reading Test both with and without an overlay of this color. Nineteen of the participants who were deaf were retested a year later with a modified rate of reading test that used only words that can readily be signed. This modified rate of reading test was repeated 1 week after its first administration. Participants who were deaf had greater ametropia (p = 0.003), a more distant near point of convergence (p = 0.002), and reduced amplitude of accommodation (p color overlay, with 45% choosing a yellow overlay, which increased the rate of reading by 18%. Only 66% of the participants who could hear chose an overlay, and it had no effect on reading speed. With the modified reading test, 7 of 19 (37%) again chose yellow. These participants showed a 9% increase in reading speed with the yellow overlay, which was repeatable 1 week later. The remainder showed no increase in rate of reading with their chosen overlay. An eye examination of children who are deaf needs to include a comprehensive assessment of near visual function so that deficiencies of amplitude of accommodation, near point convergence, and ametropia can be treated. A yellow overlay improved reading speed in the participants who were deaf, whereas other colors did not, a finding at variance with earlier work on hearing populations.

  13. Functional communication of children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Phillips, Jannel; Choo, Daniel; Hibner, Julie; Barnard, Holly

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between language levels and communication and social function skills in young children who are deaf/hard-of-hearing. A cross-sectional design was used with participants sampled predominately from a single clinic setting. Children between 3 and 6 years of age with permanent bilateral hearing loss were enrolled in the study. All children received the Preschool Language Scales-Fifth Edition language assessment and a neurocognitive assessment using the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised at the study visit. Communication and social function skills were measured using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Second Edition (VABS-II; mean 100 ± 15) and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI; mean 50 ± 10). Analysis included 65 children with mild to profound bilateral hearing loss (mean age 56.8 months, SD ± 14.1); 52% had hearing loss in the mild to moderate range. The mean nonverbal intelligence quotient (IQ) was 95.7 (±18.8), the mean receptive language standard score was 83.7 (±18.6), and mean expressive language standard score was 83.0 (±18.5). The mean VABS-II communication standard score was 89.1 (±17.5), and the mean PEDI social function score was 39.6 (±15.3). Both nonverbal IQ and receptive language relative to nonverbal IQ (the ratio of language to IQ) were significantly associated with communication and social functioning, explaining more than 50% of the variance in communication function scores. Children with language commensurate with their IQ had significantly higher communication and social function scores than children with language significantly lower than IQ. This finding was consistent across different levels of IQ and independent of degree of hearing loss. Even with early identification and intervention, hearing loss continues to have a life-long impact on functioning. It is important to identify when language levels are not meeting a child's capabilities

  14. Proceedings of a Special Study Institute: Conference for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children (Berkeley, California, June 22-24, 1970).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlen, Philip

    The proceedings from the special study institute for teachers of deaf-blind children contain seven conference papers. Topics covered include early child growth and development, aspects of the diagnosis and evaluation of deaf-blind children, normal language development, and stimulating the hearing, vision, and motor development of deaf-blind…

  15. Changing Schools for the Deaf: Updating the Educational Setting for Our Deaf Children in the 21st Century, a Big Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raeve, Leo; Baerts, Johan; Colleye, Evelyne; Croux, Edith

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades the population of deaf children has changed dramatically in these countries where universal hearing screening, early intervention, digital hearing aids, and cochlear implants are available. Most of these children can now acquire intelligible spoken language and they go to mainstream school in larger proportions. But…

  16. Undernutrition in children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD): its prevalence and influence on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holenweg-Gross, C; Newman, C J; Faouzi, M; Poirot-Hodgkinson, I; Bérard, C; Roulet-Perez, E

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and to explore its influence on quality of life. Seventy-two children with PIMD (47 male; 25 female; age range 2 to 15 years 4 months; mean age 8.6, SD 3.6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, including body weight, triceps skinfold thickness, segmental measures and recumbent length. Undernutrition was determined using tricipital skinfold percentile and z-scores of weight-for-height and height-for-age. The quality of life of each child was evaluated using the QUALIN questionnaire adapted for profoundly disabled children. Twenty-five children (34.7%) were undernourished and seven (9.7%) were obese. Among undernourished children only eight (32 %) were receiving food supplements and two (8%) had a gastrostomy, of which one was still on a refeeding programme. On multivariate analysis, undernutrition was one of the independent predictors of lower quality of life. Undernutrition remains a matter of concern in children with PIMD. There is a need to better train professionals in systematically assessing the nutritional status of profoundly disabled children in order to start nutritional management when necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Deaf and hard of hearing children and adolescents in China: their fears and anxieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijun; Prevatt, Frances

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the fears and anxieties of Chinese deaf and hard of hearing children and adolescents, and the ability of parents and teachers to report the presence of these fears and anxieties. Chinese deaf youth are at risk due to a lack of trained teachers, an overemphasis on oral education in schools, negative stereotypes, and parental overprotectiveness. The deaf children and adolescents in the study reported significantly higher levels of total fears, total anxieties, fear of the unknown, fear of injury and small animals, fear of medical procedures, and concentration anxiety than their hearing counterparts. Girls reported more total fears, fear of the unknown, fear of minor injury and small animals, and fear of failure and criticism than boys. Parents showed a better ability than teachers to confirm these reports of fears and anxieties. Implications and directions for future studies are presented.

  18. Movement skill assessment in children with profound multiple disabilities : a psychometric analysis of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To analyse the psychometric properties of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test (TDMMT), an internationally used instrument in the planning and evaluation of movement-oriented interventions. Setting: Centres for special education in the Netherlands. Subjects: Children with profound multiple

  19. Abdominal Massage for the Treatment of Idiopathic Constipation in Children with Profound Learning Disabilities: A Single Case Study Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lucy; Smith, Melanie; Wharton, Sarah; Hames, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common problem in people with learning disabilities. Treatment often involves dietary changes or long-term laxative use. The participants were five children with profound learning disabilities and additional physical difficulties. Their long-standing idiopathic constipation was managed by laxatives. Intervention lasted up…

  20. Transfer of information between parents and teachers of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities at special educational centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteine, H.; Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    Background: Because of the complexity of the problems that affect children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), communication between parents and teachers at special educational centres is indispensable. Logs are widely used in the Netherlands although only little is known

  1. Parental Attitudes toward the Inclusion of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities in General Primary Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke A.; Munde, Vera S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing introduction of inclusive education, children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are barely included. Because an underlying factor here may be the attitudes of those directly involved, the present study focuses on the attitude of parents and relating variables concerning experience with individuals with…

  2. Identification of acoustically similar and dissimilar vowels in profoundly deaf adults who use hearing aids and/or cochlear implants: some preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia J; Peterson, Nathaniel R; Rosado, Christian A; Pisoni, David B

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the authors examined the effects of aging and residual hearing on the identification of acoustically similar and dissimilar vowels in adults with postlingual deafness who use hearing aids (HAs) and/or cochlear implants (CIs). The authors used two groups of acoustically similar and dissimilar vowels to assess vowel identification. Also, the Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant Word Recognition Test (Peterson & Lehiste, 1962) and sentences from the Hearing in Noise Test (Nilsson, Soli, & Sullivan, 1994) were administered. Forty CI recipients with postlingual deafness (ages 31-81 years) participated in the study. Acoustically similar vowels were more difficult to identify than acoustically dissimilar vowels. With increasing age, performance deteriorated when identifying acoustically similar vowels. Vowel identification was also affected by the use of a contralateral HA and the degree of residual hearing prior to implantation. Moderate correlations were found between speech perception and vowel identification performance. Identification performance was affected by the acoustic similarity of the vowels. Older adults experienced more difficulty identifying acoustically similar confusable vowels than did younger adults. The findings might lend support to the ease of language understanding model (Ronnberg, Rudner, Foo, & Lunner, 2008), which proposes that the quality and perceptual robustness of acoustic input affects speech perception.

  3. Using Language ENvironment Analysis to improve outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Miranda; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2012-11-01

    Very little is known about the language environments of children in the United States in non-English-speaking homes. There is currently no published research that analyzes deaf or hard of hearing children in Spanish-speaking households, although the Colorado Home Intervention Program demographics indicate that these households account for 10 to 15% of the population of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In other geographic regions in the United States, it is likely that the population of deaf and hard of hearing children from Spanish-speaking homes is considerably larger. The Spanish-speaking population in the United States has grown considerably within the last 5 to 10 years and will continue to expand. For these children to receive adequate treatment, research must be conducted to understand their language environment. The Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System uses a small recording device to collect, analyze, and sort a child's language environment into multiple categories and analyzes variables such as child vocalizations, adult words, and conversational turn taking. The normative data for the LENA System are from families who are English-speaking. The article demonstrates the feasibility of using the LENA System to gain understanding of the language environment of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing in a Spanish-speaking household. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Living in the shadow of shame and stigma: Lived experience of mothers with deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital deafness is one of the most common childhood disorders and every year many children are born with permanent hearing loss. The present study was carried out to understand the experience of mothers with deaf children. This study was conducted with a qualitative approach. The participants were 35 mothers of children with congenital deafness who were selected by purposive sampling. The data was collected through semi structured indepth interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis introduced by Braun and Clarke. Data analysis revealed 3 themes and 9 sub-themes including social stigma (prying eyes, pity aversion, feeling of discrimination, taunt from people, internalized stigma (feeling of inferiority, feeling of shame and embarrassment, and reaction to stigma(turning to concealment, cautious disclosure, and marginalization. Shame and stigma were the major experiences of Iranian mothers of deaf children that shadowed their lives. These experiences lead mainly to ineffective coping mechanisms such as avoidance of using hearing aids and concealment of the child’s hearing loss. In addition, to cope with perceived stigma, mothers isolate and marginalize themselves and pursue secrecy strategies. Therefore, our findings are important for health professionals who are working with families having children with hearing loss. They need to aware of the problems faced by the families and should advocate necessary support.

  5. Benefits of Music Training for Perception of Emotional Speech Prosody in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Arla; Gordon, Karen A.; Papsin, Blake C.; Nespoli, Gabe; Hopyan, Talar; Peretz, Isabelle; Russo, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Children who use cochlear implants (CIs) have characteristic pitch processing deficits leading to impairments in music perception and in understanding emotional intention in spoken language. Music training for normal-hearing children has previously been shown to benefit perception of emotional prosody. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether deaf children who use CIs obtain similar benefits from music training. We hypothesized that music training would lead to gains...

  6. The Development and Evaluation of a Video-Tape Protocol for the Examination of Multicapped Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Edward T.; Curtis, W. Scott

    Due to the belief that written communication about a deaf blind child among professional examiners and treatment agencies can be more accurate and precise, the experimenters developed and evaluated a video tape protocol for the examination of the communication skills of 20 multiply handicapped deaf blind children, who ranged from 3 to 8 years in…

  7. How Do Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants Manage to Read Sentences: The Key Word Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, María-Soledad; González, Virginia; Alegria, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms used by deaf children with and without cochlear implants (CIs) to read sentences and the linguistic bases (vocabulary and syntax) underlying those reading mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that deaf persons read sentences using the key word strategy (KWS), which consists of identifying some…

  8. Lexical noun phrases in texts written by deaf children and adults with different proficiency levels in sign language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2010-01-01

    We report an analysis of lexical noun phrases (NPs) in narrative and expository texts written by Dutch deaf individuals from a bimodal bilingual perspective. Texts written by Dutch deaf children and adults who are either proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) or low-proficient in SLN

  9. Prevalence Of Visual Disorders In Deaf Children In Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most developed and most important of the special senses of the body is the sense of sight and hearing, both of which are predisposed to gradual impairment in the absence of the other. It has been shown that the occurrence of either visual impairment and deafness or hearing loss existing independently or ...

  10. Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted.…

  11. A Systematic Review of the Autism Research with Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sarah; Scott, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    The current study is a systematic review on the available evidence on language development, assessment, challenging behavior, and instruction for children dually diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and deafness. Results indicate a strong need for additional research in these areas, especially in the areas of evidence-based practices.

  12. Role-Taking Ability and Social Behavior in Deaf School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, David S.; Shontz, Franklin C.

    1990-01-01

    Performance by 23 deaf children (ages 7-14) on a role-taking task correlated positively with camp staff members' ratings of emotional adjustment, self-image, communicative effectiveness, and role-taking skill. Role-taking performance, however, was not reliably related to measures of aspects of social behavior such as altruism and helping.…

  13. Modality Use in Joint Attention between Hearing Parents and Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eDepowski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined differences in modality use during episodes of joint attention between hearing parent-hearing child dyads and hearing parent-deaf child dyads. Hearing children were age-matched to deaf children. Dyads were video recorded in a free play session with analyses focused on uni- and multimodality use during joint attention episodes. Results revealed that adults in hearing parent-deaf child dyads spent a significantly greater proportion of time interacting with their children using multiple communicative modalities than adults in hearing parent-hearing child dyads, who tended to use the auditory modality (e.g., oral language most often. While these findings demonstrate that hearing parents accommodate their children's hearing status, we observed greater overall time spent in joint attention in hearing parent-hearing child dyads than hearing parent-deaf child dyads. Our results point to important avenues for future research on how parents can better accommodate their child’s hearing status through the use of multimodal communication strategies.

  14. Communication Interventions for Families of Pre-School Deaf Children in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Rachel; Mahon, Merle; Herman, Rosalind; Newton, Caroline; Craig, Gordon; Marriage, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    UK professionals use a range of intervention approaches to promote communication development in pre-school deaf children by influencing the familys' interaction style. This investigation surveyed the approaches used and explored how these translated into specific practices. An online questionnaire was developed and reviewed by a panel of experts.…

  15. The Role of Sign Phonology and Iconicity During Sign Processing: The Case of Deaf Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of sign phonology and iconicity during sign processing in deaf children, the roles of these sign features were examined using an experimental sign-picture verification paradigm. Participants had to make decisions about sign-picture pairs, manipulated according to

  16. Language Planning for the 21st Century: Revisiting Bilingual Language Policy for Deaf Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoors, H.E.T.; Marschark, M.

    2012-01-01

    For over 25 years in some countries and more recently in others, bilingual education involving sign language and the written/spoken vernacular has been considered an essential educational intervention for deaf children. With the recent growth in universal newborn hearing screening and technological

  17. Language Planning for the 21st Century: Revisiting Bilingual Language Policy for Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoors, Harry; Marschark, Marc

    2012-01-01

    For over 25 years in some countries and more recently in others, bilingual education involving sign language and the written/spoken vernacular has been considered an essential educational intervention for deaf children. With the recent growth in universal newborn hearing screening and technological advances such as digital hearing aids and…

  18. Mode of acquisition as a factor in deaf children's reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauters, L.N.; Tellings, A.E.J.M.; Bon, W.H.J. van; Mak, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role of mode of acquisition (MoA) of word meanings in reading comprehension: children acquire word meanings using perceptual information (e.g., hearing, seeing, or smelling the referent) and/or linguistic information (e.g., verbal explanations). A total of 72 deaf and 99

  19. Interactive Stories and Exercises with Dynamic Feedback for Improving Reading Comprehension Skills in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mich, Ornella; Pianta, Emanuele; Mana, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Deaf children have significant difficulties in comprehending written text. This is mainly due to the hearing loss that prevents them from being exposed to oral language when they were an infant. However, it is also due to the type of educational intervention they are faced with, which accustoms them to decoding single words and isolated sentences,…

  20. prevalence of visual disorders in deaf children in benin city abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    eyes and thus even a mild refractive error may reduce visual efficiency ... There are two major causes of visual disorders in the hearing .... error (100%). Of the deaf children examined,. 63(73.26%) subjects had visual disorders. However, multiple forms of visual disorders were seen occurring in some subjects, for example,.

  1. Directory of Services for Deaf-Blind Children in the Southwestern Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvig, Diane L., Comp.

    The directory lists services for deaf-blind children in the Southwestern Region, including such services as associations and foundations, child care services, diagnosis and evaluation, educational programs, financial assistance, information and referral, newsletters and periodicals, recreational services, rehabilitation services, and speech and…

  2. Inservice Training Program for Teachers and Aides of Deaf-Blind Children, Summer, 1975. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Barbara

    Presented are notes taken from a 6-week inservice training program for 30 teachers and 30 paraprofessionals who work with deaf-blind children. Entries are divided into two sections--lectures and minicourses--and include the following titles: "Piaget" (V. Robinson), "Dichotic Listening--Research and Applications" (B. Franklin), "Curriculum Ideas…

  3. A Ten-Year Follow-Up Study of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, W. Scott; Donlon, Edward T.

    1984-01-01

    A 10-year followup of 49 deaf-blind children provided indirect comparisons of classifications of mental retardation, hearing loss, visual loss, and major communication mode. Results suggested problems with the methodology and indicated the need for new instruments to analyze current functioning as it relates to past evaluation data. (CL)

  4. Psychological Evaluation and Testing of Children Who Are Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A rationale and practical guide to the psychological evaluation of deaf-blind children is provided. Few adequate tests exist. The Callier Azusa Scale, designed specifically for this population, is recommended as the best instrument. Some items on the Learning Accomplishment Profile are appropriate. Operationally stated skill checklists are also…

  5. Computer-Based Exercises for Learning to Read and Spell by Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    There is a surprising lack of systematic research evaluating the effects of reading exercises for young deaf children. Therefore, for this article, two computer-based exercises were developed and learning effects were determined by posttests. One (spelling oriented) exercise was to select the correct word among three orthographically similar…

  6. Intelligence, Parental Depression, and Behavior Adaptability in Deaf Children Being Considered for Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Krull, Kevin; Hannay, Julia; Mehta, Paras; Caudle, Susan; Oghalai, John

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive ability and behavioral adaptability are distinct, yet related, constructs that can impact childhood development. Both are often reduced in deaf children of hearing parents who do not provide sufficient language and communication access. Additionally, parental depression is commonly observed due to parent-child communication difficulties…

  7. A Competency Based Instructional Program for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Erin Kent; And Others

    Described is a 9-week, summer, competency-based, instructional program for teachers of deaf blind children. Information provided includes the background and rationale for the program, a list of administrative and instructional staff members, program goals, and a sample scheduling sequence. Goals, session topics, texts and materials, session…

  8. Prospective study of hearing loss in schools for deaf children in Assir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this prospective study, various types and etiology of hearing loss among children attending public schools for the deaf were examined. One hundred students from two schools below the age of 15 years were enrolled in the study. Questionnaire was sent to all parents. Multiple modalities of investigations of hearing ...

  9. Dystonia and deafness due to SUCLA2 defect; Clinical course and biochemical markers in 16 children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Steuerwald, U.; Carrozzo, R.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Joensen, F.; Santer, R.; Dionisi-Vici, C.; Wevers, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with SUCLA2 gene defects characteristically develop the trias of early hypotonia, progressive dystonia and sensori-neural deafness. We describe the clinical course and biochemical phenotype in 16 children from the Faroe Islands with a homozygous SUCLA2 splice site mutation. Elevated urinary

  10. Concurrent Correlates of Chinese Word Recognition in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Boby Ho-Hong; Nunes, Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relative contributions of phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness to Chinese word recognition in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Measures of word recognition, general intelligence, phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness were administered to 32 DHH and 35…

  11. Psychological Evaluation of Children Who Are Deaf-Blind: An Overview with Recommendations for Practice. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides answers to frequently asked questions about psychological evaluations for infants, children and adults who are deaf-blind, we hope to clarify the evaluation process and the active roles that may be taken by everyone who is involved--family members, professionals, educators, and the student. Finally, by discussing quality…

  12. Enhancing sustained interaction between children with congenital deaf-blindness and their educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Dijk, J.P.M. van; Huisman, M.J.M.E.; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Educators and children with congenital deaf-blindness experience major challenges in building interactions that are reciprocated and sustained. Studies have shown that affect attunement and sensitive responsiveness are crucial for a child to feel recognized and for synchronizing early conversations.

  13. Enhancing Sustained Interaction between Children with Congenital Deaf-Blindness and Their Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Dijk, Jan P. M.; Huisman, Mark; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Educators and children with congenital deaf-blindness experience major challenges in building interactions that are reciprocated and sustained. Studies have shown that affect attunement and sensitive responsiveness are crucial for a child to feel recognized and for synchronizing early conversations. The authors previously presented the Diagnostic…

  14. The Future of Telepractice for Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stredler-Brown, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Telepractice can be used to deliver early intervention, therapeutic, and educational services to children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). For infants and toddlers, telepractice can provide early access to family-centered services that are delivered by experts in hearing loss, irrespective of where either party lives. For school-age…

  15. Child Modifiability as a Predictor of Language Abilities in Deaf Children Who Use American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Wolfgang; Peña, Elizabeth D; Morgan, Gary

    2015-08-01

    This research explored the use of dynamic assessment (DA) for language-learning abilities in signing deaf children from deaf and hearing families. Thirty-seven deaf children, aged 6 to 11 years, were identified as either stronger (n = 26) or weaker (n = 11) language learners according to teacher or speech-language pathologist report. All children received 2 scripted, mediated learning experience sessions targeting vocabulary knowledge—specifically, the use of semantic categories that were carried out in American Sign Language. Participant responses to learning were measured in terms of an index of child modifiability. This index was determined separately at the end of the 2 individual sessions. It combined ratings reflecting each child's learning abilities and responses to mediation, including social-emotional behavior, cognitive arousal, and cognitive elaboration. Group results showed that modifiability ratings were significantly better for stronger language learners than for weaker language learners. The strongest predictors of language ability were cognitive arousal and cognitive elaboration. Mediator ratings of child modifiability (i.e., combined score of social-emotional factors and cognitive factors) are highly sensitive to language-learning abilities in deaf children who use sign language as their primary mode of communication. This method can be used to design targeted interventions.

  16. Factors Associated with Social Interactions between Deaf Children and Their Hearing Peers: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Georgina; Oakes, Peter M.; Alexander, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that deaf children can have marked social difficulties compared with their hearing peers. Factors that influence these social interactions need to be reviewed to inform interventions. A systematic search of 5 key databases and 3 specialized journals identified 14 papers that met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of…

  17. A Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of Parents of a Child or Children Diagnosed with Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the lived experiences of 12 parents who have a child or children diagnosed with deafness, and the meaning these parents have made of their experiences. The researcher conducted individual, semi-structured interviews and analyzed the data in accordance with the practices of phenomenological research. Thirty-seven…

  18. Peer Social Skills and Theory of Mind in Children with Autism, Deafness, or Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida; Slaughter, Virginia; Moore, Chris; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Consequences of theory of mind (ToM) development for daily social lives of children are uncertain. Five to 13-year-olds (N = 195) with typical development, autism, or deafness (both native and late signers) took ToM tests and their teachers reported on their social skills for peer interaction (e.g., leadership, group entry). Groups differed in…

  19. Language and Literacy Development of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Amy R.; Schick, Brenda; Spencer, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood hearing loss presents challenges to language development, especially spoken language. In this article, we review existing literature on deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children's patterns and trajectories of language as well as development of theory of mind and literacy. Individual trajectories vary significantly, reflecting access to…

  20. We Need to Communicate! Helping Hearing Parents of Deaf Children Learn American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.; Starner, Thad

    2011-01-01

    Language immersion from birth is crucial to a child's language development. However, language immersion can be particularly challenging for hearing parents of deaf children to provide as they may have to overcome many difficulties while learning American Sign Language (ASL). We are in the process of creating a mobile application to help hearing…

  1. Two Instructional Films on Pre-School Deaf Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Bruce M.; Greenhill, Leslie P.

    A project produced two instructional films on preschool deaf children. Both were black and white sound films about 30 minutes long. Evaluation followed completion of the active phase of film making. Designed to aid in professional education and program development, the two films presented principles of parent-child programs and demonstrated…

  2. Daily Stress, Hearing-Specific Stress and Coping: Self-Reports from Deaf or Hard of Hearing Children and Children with Auditory Processing Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbeck, Heike; Gillé, Vera; Heim-Dreger, Uwe; Schock, Alexandra; Schott, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated stressors and coping strategies in 70 children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) or with auditory processing disorder (APD) attending Grades 5 and 6 of a school for deaf and hard-of-hearing children. Everyday general stressors and more hearing-specific stressors were examined in a hearing-specific modified stress and…

  3. Early identification: Language skills and social functioning in deaf and hard of hearing preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Anouk P; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Korver, Anna M H; Konings, Saskia; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; Dekker, Friedo W; Frijns, Johan H M

    2015-12-01

    Permanent childhood hearing impairment often results in speech and language problems that are already apparent in early childhood. Past studies show a clear link between language skills and the child's social-emotional functioning. The aim of this study was to examine the level of language and communication skills after the introduction of early identification services and their relation with social functioning and behavioral problems in deaf and hard of hearing children. Nationwide cross-sectional observation of a cohort of 85 early identified deaf and hard of hearing preschool children (aged 30-66 months). Parents reported on their child's communicative abilities (MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory III), social functioning and appearance of behavioral problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). Receptive and expressive language skills were measured using the Reynell Developmental Language Scale and the Schlichting Expressive Language Test, derived from the child's medical records. Language and communicative abilities of early identified deaf and hard of hearing children are not on a par with hearing peers. Compared to normative scores from hearing children, parents of deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower social functioning and more behavioral problems. Higher communicative abilities were related to better social functioning and less behavioral problems. No relation was found between the degree of hearing loss, age at amplification, uni- or bilateral amplification, mode of communication and social functioning and behavioral problems. These results suggest that improving the communicative abilities of deaf and hard of hearing children could improve their social-emotional functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Picture-Elicited Written Narratives, Process and Product, in 18 Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asker-Arnason, Lena; Ibertsson, Tina; Wass, Malin; Wengelin, Asa; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the narrative writing of 18 children, ages 11 to 19, with severe and profound hearing impairment who had cochlear implants (CI), compared with the performance of hearing children. Nine of the 18 children had prelingual deafness and 9 children had postlingual deafness. The hearing impairment was progressive…

  5. Deaf children's engagement in an educational video in American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B

    2010-01-01

    Over time, children's educational television has successfully modified programming to incorporate research-based strategies to facilitate learning and engagement during viewing. However, research has been limited on whether these same strategies would work with preschool deaf children viewing videos in American Sign Language. In a descriptive study, engagement behaviors of 25 preschool deaf children during multiple viewings of an educational video in ASL were examined. The video incorporated research-based interactive strategies to facilitate engagement while targeting vocabulary through ASL, fingerspelling, and English print. Each of 3 viewing sessions was recorded; videos were transcribed and coded for frequency of children's movements, pointing, fingerspelling, and signing. Behaviors were analyzed for frequency within and across multiple viewings and by level of signing skills. It was found that each of these engagement behaviors occurred frequently throughout viewings and increased across multiple viewings regardless of a child's age or signing skills.

  6. Exploring the motor development of young children with possible severe to profound cognitive and motor developmental delay by means of a questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; van der Putten, Annette; Maes, Bea; Vlaskamp, Carla

    Aim: Early motor stimulation may be valuable for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however limited knowledge of their typical motor developmental trajectory may be currently restraining the efficacy and specificity of this intervention. Research on young children

  7. Parents Sharing Books with Young Deaf Children in Spoken English and in BSL: The Common and Diverse Features of Different Language Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth; Watson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Twelve parents of young deaf children were recorded sharing books with their deaf child--six from families using British Sign Language (BSL) and six from families using spoken English. Although all families were engaged in sharing books with their deaf child and concerned to promote literacy development, they approached the task differently and…

  8. Some Functions and Uses of Literacy in the Deaf Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Madeline

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the ways writing is used among the deaf and between deaf and hearing communicators by four groups; deaf adults who sign, families in which parents are hearing and at least one child is deaf, families in which parents are deaf and children are hearing or deaf, and deaf and hearing schoolteachers. (SED)

  9. Attitudes toward the capabilities of deaf and hard of hearing adults: insights from the parents of deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; McKinnon, David H; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2015-01-01

    Children who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) grow up in environments influenced by their parents' attitudes, which may facilitate or impede these children's development and participation (World Health Organization, 2007). The attitudes of 152 Australian parents of DHH children ages 3 years 7 months to 9 years 5 months (M = 6 years 5 months) were investigated with the Opinions About Deaf People Scale (Berkay, Gardner, & Smith, 1995a). The parents' responses showed very positive attitudes toward the capabilities of DHH adults, particularly on items describing their intellectual and vocational capabilities. Parents' responses to most of the items on the scale were positively skewed, raising questions about its validity as a research tool when used with parents of DHH children. The study findings suggest that for these children, parents' attitudes may facilitate rather than present an environmental barrier to their development.

  10. Att Tolka Barns Signaler: Gravt utvecklingsstorda flerhandikappade barns lek och kommunikation (To Interpret Childrens' Signals: Play and Communication in Profoundly Mentally Retarded and Multiply Handicapped Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Jane

    Written in Swedish with an English-language summary, this report describes a study which examined the interaction between mothers or caregivers and their children with profound mental retardation and multiple disabilities, particularly looking at the function of play in communicative interaction. The six children all had five or six handicaps in…

  11. Deaf parents of cochlear-implanted children: beliefs on bimodal bilingualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf (1) families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted. The majority of the Deaf families exhibited positive beliefs toward bimodal bilingualism, where they set high expectations for their children to become equally fluent in both languages. However, their perspectives about the purpose for each language differed; they viewed English as a "survival language" and ASL as a "cultural language" but supported the use of both languages at home as part of their children's lives. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Neurolinguistic development in deaf children: the effect of early language experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; D'Hondt, Murielle

    2003-07-01

    Recent investigations have indicated a relationship between the development of cerebral lateralization for processing language and the level of development of linguistic skills in hearing children. The research on cerebral lateralization for language processing in deaf persons is compatible with this view. We have argued that the absence of appropriate input during a critical time window creates a risk for deaf children that the initial bias for left-hemisphere specialization will be distorted or disappear. Two experiments were conducted to test this hypothesis The results of these investigations showed that children educated early and intensively with cued speech or with sign language display more evidence of left-hemisphere specialization for the processing of their native language than do those who have been exposed later and less intensively to those languages.

  13. Parental perspective of the benefits of genetic testing in children with congenital deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, E A; Harrison, K; Davey, A; Walpole, I R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the perceived value of genetic testing for congenital deafness in families attending a clinical genetic outpatients department at a children's hospital. The major testing objective was to provide information regarding deafness etiology, although families were advised that changes in treatment as a result of the test were unlikely. Using a 'willingness-to-pay' approach in the form of a questionnaire developed by Ryan et al. [J Med Genet 2003;40:1-5], parents were surveyed for their attitudes and willingness to pay for genetic testing. Forty-nine families provided data for analysis, representing 56% of clinic attendances throughout the period. Most of the parents were themselves unaffected by hearing loss (93%) and none were deaf, although almost a quarter (22%) reported a family member born deaf. Parents considered the major benefit gained from testing was to better achieve clarity of understanding arising from discussion and the possible ascertainment of etiology. The average sum parents were willing to pay for genetic testing was 200 Australian dollars (AUD, 2007) or approximately 123 euros (EUR), ranging from 150 to 295 AUD according to ability to pay (as measured by gross income). However, the amount that even the highest income level were willing to pay underestimated the full economic cost of genetic testing. Genetic testing for deafness is highly valued by affected families despite the current limited overall expectation of definitive genetic diagnosis or changes in treatment. Parents considered the major benefits to be a better understanding of congenital deafness and the potential for assignment of causality. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A longitudinal study of lexical and grammar development in deaf Italian children provided with early cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilosi, Anna Maria; Comparini, Alessandro; Scusa, Maria Flora; Orazini, Laura; Forli, Francesca; Cipriani, Paola; Berrettini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of studies on deaf children with cochlear implant (CI) document a significant improvement in receptive and expressive language skills after implantation, even if they show language delay when compared with normal-hearing peers. Data on language acquisition in CI Italian children are still scarce and limited to only certain aspects of language. The purpose of this study is to prospectively describe the trajectories of language development in early CI Italian children, with particular attention to the transition from first words to combinatorial speech and to acquisition of complex grammar in a language with rich morphology, such as Italian. Six children, with profound prelingual deafness, provided with CI, between 16 and 24 months of age were prospectively assessed and followed over a mean period of up to 34.8 months postimplant. During follow-up, each child received between four to five individual language evaluations through a combination of indirect procedures (parent reports of early lexical and grammar development) and direct ones (administration of standardized receptive and expressive language tests with Italian norms and collection of spontaneous language samples). In relation to chronological age, the acquisition of expressive vocabulary was delayed. However, considering the duration of hearing experience, most CI participants showed an earlier start and faster growth of expressive rather than receptive vocabulary in comparison with typically developing children. This quite atypical result persisted right up until the end of the follow-up. The acquisition of expressive grammar was delayed relative to chronological age, though all but one CI participant achieved the expected grammar level after approximately 3 years of CI use. In addition, the rate of grammar acquisition was not homogeneous during development, showing two different paces: one comparable with normal hearing in the transition from holophrastic to primitive combinatorial speech

  15. The Language Proficiency Profile-2: Assessment of the Global Communication Skills of Deaf Children Across Languages and Modalities of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, James M.; Calderon, Rosemary; Treder, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Data are presented from two studies that investigate the developmental trends and concurrent validity of a measure of language and communication skills for deaf children, the Language Proficiency Profile-2 (LPP-2), developed by Bebko and McKinnon (1993). The LPP-2 was designed to evaluate the overall linguistic/communicative skills of deaf children, independent of any specific language or modality of expression. It focuses on the totality of the children's communication skills. Experiment 1 investigated developmental trends of the LPP-2 for both deaf and hearing children, studying a combined sample of deaf and hearing children from the United States and Canada. Experiment 2 investigated the relationship between the LPP-2 and two commonly used measures to assess deaf children on language development (Preschool Language Scale-3) and early reading skills (Test of Early Reading Ability-Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing). Results from the two studies indicate that the LPP-2 has good utility not only as a measure of overall language development but also as a predictor of achievement for English language and early reading skills.

  16. Navigating Uncertainty: Health Professionals’ Knowledge, Skill, and Confidence in Assessing and Managing Pain in Children with Profound Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited evidence to underpin the assessment and management of pain in children with profound cognitive impairment and these children are vulnerable to poor pain assessment and management. Health professionals working with children with profound cognitive impairment from a single paediatric tertiary referral centre in England were interviewed to explore how they develop and acquire knowledge and skills to assess and manage pain in children with cognitive impairment. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Nineteen health professionals representing different professional groups and different levels of experience participated in the study. A metatheme “navigating uncertainty; deficits in knowledge and skills” and two core themes “framing as different and teasing things out” and “the settling and unsettling presence of parents” were identified. Uncertainty about aspects of assessing and managing the pain of children with cognitive impairment tended to erode professional confidence and many discussed deficits in their skill and knowledge set. Uncertainty was managed through engaging with other health professionals and the child’s parents. Most health professionals stated they would welcome more education and training although many felt that this input should be clinical and not classroom oriented.

  17. The effects of an environmental "enrichment" program on the behavior of institutionalized profoundly retarded children.

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, R D

    1980-01-01

    This study determined the effects of procedures designed to "enrich" the physical and social environment of an institutional ward on the "adaptive" and "maladaptive" child, adult, self, and object-directed behaviors of five profoundly retarded ambulatory females. Behavior observed in two treatment conditions, an environment "enriched" with toys and objects and an "enriched" environment coupled with differential reinforcement of adaptive behavior, was compared to behavior occurring in correspo...

  18. The effect of interventional proprioceptive training on static balance and gait in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Mahdi; Farahpour, Nader; Azadian, Elaheh; Amini, Mahdi

    2014-12-01

    Children with hearing impairment have balance and motor deficits primarily due to concomitant damage to the vestibular structures. Although early intervention focused on the development of communication skills, investigations of intervention for the amelioration of balance deficits in children with hearing loss have been minimal and inconclusive. Therefore, using an experimental design, the present study investigated the effect of a 12-session exercise balance program based on proprioception training on balance and gait in deaf as compared with hearing schoolchildren. The subjects, 10 deaf and 10 typically developing children were assigned to an experimental and a control group respectively. Taking up the initial differences between the groups through a pretest under different conditions, the participants in the experimental group went through a 12-session intervention program including static and dynamic training with emphasis on proprioceptive system. After this, the participants were tested again. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measure. A comparison between the control and experimental groups revealed that the intervention program had not significantly increased gait velocity while it had significantly decreased the amount of sway. Thus, it was concluded that an exercise program that enhances somatosensory ability can result in improved balance in deaf children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of rhythmic gymnastics on the rhythm perception of children with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadou, Eleni G; Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi F; Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Karamouzi, Anna M; Angelopoulou, Nickoletta A

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of a rhythmic gymnastics program on the rhythm perception of children with deafness. Two groups--control and experiment--of 12 and 17 children, respectively, coming from the same school for the deaf participated in this study. The duration of the program for the individuals in the experiment group was 16 weeks (at a frequency of 3 lessons per week, for 40 minutes each lesson), while children of both groups adhered to their regular school schedules. Five rhythmic patterns in 3 speeds (tempi) were reproduced both by a metronome and each child's performance and were recorded on a digital disk before and after the application of the program. The rate of time deviation (in seconds) between the 2 beats represented the score for each child. The average rate of the 5 rhythmic patterns in each tempo was calculated separately, giving 3 scores (one for every tempo) for each child. Significance was set at p < or = 0.05. The data revealed significant postexercise differences in favor of the experiment group, an improvement of the experiment group in all pre-post values, as well as an improved medium tempo with relation to the control group. The findings show the effectiveness of the specific program in terms of improving rhythm ability, thus indicating its use in educating children with deafness on rhythm instead of preferring the routine of the adapted school program.

  20. Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21-39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Interactions were analyzed in depth to determine how children obtained and maintained attention. Contrary to previous reports, children were found to possess a high level of communicative competence from an early age. Analysis of peer interactions revealed that children used a range of behaviors to obtain attention with peers, including taps, waves, objects, and signs. Initiations were successful approximately 65% of the time. Children followed up failed initiation attempts by repeating the initiation, using a new initiation, or terminating the interaction. Older children engaged in longer and more complex interactions than younger children. Children's early exposure to and proficiency in American Sign Language is proposed as a likely mechanism that facilitated their communicative competence.

  1. Information about Psychology and Psychological Diagnostics of Deaf Children in Czech and Foreign Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Klásková, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with available information about psychology and psychological diagnostics of deaf children in the Czech and foreign specialized literature. The opening methodological part focuses on characteristic of the literature and on description of how the Czech and English texts were searched and processed. The information in the following part, that deals with processing the publications, are clearly arranged into a bibliographic research. The research of the Czech specialized litera...

  2. Intelligence development of pre-lingual deaf children with unilateral cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Xun; Wu, Weijing; Xie, Dinghua; Xiao, Zi-An

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to test whether deaf children with unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) have higher intelligence quotients (IQ). We also try to find out the predictive factors of intelligence development in deaf children with CI. Totally, 186 children were enrolled into this study. They were divided into 3 groups: CI group (N = 66), hearing loss group (N = 54) and normal hearing group (N = 66). All children took the Hiskey-Nebraska Test of Learning Aptitude to assess the IQ. After that, we used Deafness gene chip, Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) methods to evaluate the genotype, auditory and speech performance, respectively. At baseline, the average IQ of hearing loss group (HL), CI group, normal hearing (NH) group were 98.3 ± 9.23, 100.03 ± 12.13 and 109.89 ± 10.56, while NH group scored higher significantly than HL and CI groups (p IQ of HL group, CI group, NH group were99.54 ± 9.38,111.85 ± 15.38, and 112.08 ± 8.51, respectively. No significant difference between the IQ of the CI and NH groups was found (p > 0.05). The growth of SIR was positive correlated with the growth of IQ (r = 0.247, p = 0.046), while no significant correlation were found between IQ growth and other possible factors, i.e. gender, age of CI, use of hearing aid, genotype, implant device type, inner ear malformation and CAP growth (p > 0.05). Our study suggests that CI potentially improves the intelligence development in deaf children. Speech performance growth is significantly correlated with IQ growth of CI children. Deaf children accepted CI before 6 years can achieve a satisfying and undifferentiated short-term (12 months) development of intelligence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIEBERMAN, AMY M.

    2014-01-01

    Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21–39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Interactions were analyzed in depth to determine how children obtained and maintained attention. Contrary to previous reports, children were found to possess a high level of communicative competence from an early age. Analysis of peer interactions revealed that children used a range of behaviors to obtain attention with peers, including taps, waves, objects, and signs. Initiations were successful approximately 65% of the time. Children followed up failed initiation attempts by repeating the initiation, using a new initiation, or terminating the interaction. Older children engaged in longer and more complex interactions than younger children. Children’s early exposure to and proficiency in American Sign Language is proposed as a likely mechanism that facilitated their communicative competence. PMID:26166917

  4. What hearing children think regarding the inclusion of deaf children in the regular classroom: a comparative study with Brazilian children in a public and a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vargas Dorneles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how hearing children relate to the presence of a deaf child in a classroom group. An analysis is made of the influence of social class in relation to the acceptance of the deaf child by the hearing children. The 144 children from the 3rd to 5th series that participated in the study were distributed thus: 76 from a private school and 68 from a public school, both from Porto Alegre, RS. The public school largely attended lower level socioeconomic classes, while the private school attended pupils from predominantly middle to upper social classes. All received the same task: Complete a story that describes the reaction of hearing students to the insertion of a new deaf colleague in the classroom group. The study demonstrates that pupils wish to attempt to communicate with the deaf child and would socialize with the child outside the classroom. They demonstrate a somewhat protective discourse in relation to the subject who they consider disabled but not incapable of communicating. Understanding how hearing children relate to, and include a deaf child within the classroom, raises the possibility of new forms of thinking regarding the preparation of hearing children to possible inclusion processes. Recognizing their ideas, feelings and forms of communication aids educational institutions to invest in inclusion policies.

  5. Profound expressive language impairment in low functioning children with autism: an investigation of syntactic awareness using a computerised learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as 'monkey flies'. The game progressed in levels from 2 to 4 word sequences, contingent upon success at each stage. Although performance was highly variable across participants, a detailed review of their learning profiles suggested that no child lacked syntactic awareness and that elementary syntactic control in a non-speech domain was superior to that manifest in their spoken language. The reasons for production failures at the level of speech in children with autism are discussed.

  6. Concurrent and Longitudinal Predictors of Reading for Deaf and Hearing Children in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Terlektsi, Emmanouela; Kyle, Fiona Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Forty-one children with severe-profound prelingual hearing loss were assessed on single word reading, reading comprehension, English vocabulary, phonological awareness and speechreading at three time points, 1 year apart (T1-T3). Their progress was compared with that of a group of hearing children of similar nonverbal IQ, initially reading at the…

  7. Effects of early identification and intervention on language development in Japanese children with prelingual severe to profound hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Norio; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Omori, Kana; Sugaya, Akiko; Ojima, Toshiyuki

    2012-04-01

    Early identification and intervention for prelingual bilateral severe to profound hearing loss is supposed to reduce the delay in language development. Many countries have implemented early detection and hearing intervention and conducted regional universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS). However, the benefits of UNHS in later childhood have not yet been confirmed, although language development at school age has a lifelong impact on children's future. Our Research on Sensory and Communicative Disorders project attempted to reveal the effects of UNHS and those of early intervention on the development of verbal communication in Japanese children. In this study, 319 children with prelingual bilateral severe to profound hearing loss, 4 to 10 years of age, were evaluated with the Test of Question-Answer Interaction Development used as an objective variable. Participation in UNHS and early intervention were used as explanatory variables. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was calculated after adjusting several confounding factors with use of logistic regression analysis. In addition, caregivers' answers were obtained by a questionnaire, and the process of diagnosis with and without UNHS was analyzed retrospectively. Early intervention was significantly associated with better language development (AOR, 3.23; p identification leads directly to early intervention.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in children in Estonia: decreasing seroprevalence during the 11-year period of profound socioeconomic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oona, Marje; Utt, Meeme; Nilsson, Ingrid; Uibo, Oivi; Vorobjova, Tamara; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is inversely associated with socioeconomic conditions in childhood. In Estonia, a high prevalence of H. pylori infection has been observed among children born in 1987 and earlier. Since 1991, after the dissolution of the USSR, profound social and economic changes have taken place in the country. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among children in the period 1991-2002. The hospital-based study population consisted of two groups of children enrolled in 1991 (n = 425) and 2002 (n = 296) according to the same inclusion criteria. The immunoglobulin G antibodies to the cell surface proteins of H. pylori were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the sera with the borderline results were analyzed by immunoblot analysis. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the associations between H. pylori seropositivity and different variables such as demographic characteristics, diagnoses and year of enrollment. The only two variables linked independently to H. pylori serostatus were age and year of enrollment: the adjusted odds of being H. pylori seropositive were 1.92 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33-2.76] times higher for the children enrolled in 1991 compared with the children enrolled in 2002. The age-standardized seroprevalence rate was 42.2% (95% CI 37.4-47.0%) for the group of 1991 and 28.1% (95% CI 23.1-33.6%) for the group of 2002. The prevalence of H. pylori infection among children has significantly decreased during the 11-year period of profound socioeconomic changes in Estonia.

  9. Self-Reports versus Parental Perceptions of Health-Related Quality of Life among Deaf Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Guijarro, María Jesús; Martínez-Andrés, María; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca; Solera-Martínez, Montserrat; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between deaf children's and adolescents' self-ratings of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and their parents' proxy reports. This observational cross-sectional study included 114 deaf 8- to 18-years-old students and proxy family members. HRQoL was measured using the KIDSCREEN-27 questionnaire,…

  10. Predicate Structures, Gesture, and Simultaneity in the Representation of Action in British Sign Language: Evidence From Deaf Children and Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cormier, K.; Smith, S.; Sevcikova, Z.

    2013-01-01

    British Sign Language (BSL) signers use a variety of structures, such as constructed action (CA), depicting constructions (DCs), or lexical verbs, to represent action and other verbal meanings. This study examines the use of these verbal predicate structures and their gestural counterparts, both separately and simultaneously, in narratives by deaf children with various levels of exposure to BSL (ages 5;1 to 7;5) and deaf adult native BSL signers. Results reveal that all groups used the same t...

  11. Training Program for Defectologists Working with Deaf-blind Children with Sensory-integrative Dysfunction in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Idalmis Luisa Martínez Serrano; Alfredo Espinosa Roca; Belquis Rosa Vilaboy Pérez; María Isabel Mantecón Ledo; Clara Mercedes Vitale Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background: defectologists´ training for the management of deaf-blind people is a topic being currently investigated by different authors. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a training program for defectologists working with deaf-blind children with sensory-integrative dysfunction in primary health care. Methods: before and after intervention research including all defectologists in primary health care in the province of Cienfuegos from June 2006 to July 2008. With this research some...

  12. Listening and speaking ability of Thai deaf children in preschool aural rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Kasemkosin, Nittaya; Cheewareungroj, Wichit; Kasemsuwan, Lalida

    2010-04-01

    An auditory-oral approach can help deaf children achieve success in oral communication. Many studies confirm that deaf children with access to sound through high-powered and appropriate hearing aids at the youngest age possible have the capability to acquire communication skills similar to their hearingpeers. Evaluate the listening and speaking progress made by 27 Thai hearing-impaired children who attended a preschool aural rehabilitation program, which was established at Audiology and Speech clinic. After hearing aids fitting, deaf children were enrolled to the preschool aural rehabilitation program after receiving their parents consent. Hearing impaired children were divided into groups of 4-6 children with approximately the same level of performance. The listening and speaking performance at the initial period were recorded. Each group participated in the 3-hour-program once a week, included auditory training, conversation (maternal reflexive method), and speech stimulation. The improvements and problems of each child were recorded at the end of session. Listening and speaking performance evaluation were recorded at six months intervals. There were 12 boys and 15 girls. The average hearing loss in the better ear was 104 dBHL, range from 83-117 dBHL, SD = 8.33. The mean age of enrollment was 2 years and 10 months. The majority gradually developed listening skills and speaking ability. There was no relationship between age of enrollment and the listening and speaking ability (p > 0.05). However, listening skills had positive relationship with length of speech (r = 0.685), number of spoken vocabulary (r = 0.665), and speech character (r = 0.598); p children to participate in hearing society.

  13. Some Ethical Dimensions of Cochlear Implantation for Deaf Children and Their Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merv Hyde; Des Power

    A major source of controversy between Deaf people and those who support a "social/cultural" view of Deafness as "a life to be lived" and those who see deafness within a "medical model" as a "condition...

  14. Exploring the use of dynamic language assessment with deaf children, who use American Sign Language: Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Wolfgang; Peña, Elizabeth D; Morgan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We describe a model for assessment of lexical-semantic organization skills in American Sign Language (ASL) within the framework of dynamic vocabulary assessment and discuss the applicability and validity of the use of mediated learning experiences (MLE) with deaf signing children. Two elementary students (ages 7;6 and 8;4) completed a set of four vocabulary tasks and received two 30-minute mediations in ASL. Each session consisted of several scripted activities focusing on the use of categorization. Both had experienced difficulties in providing categorically related responses in one of the vocabulary tasks used previously. Results showed that the two students exhibited notable differences with regards to their learning pace, information uptake, and effort required by the mediator. Furthermore, we observed signs of a shift in strategic behavior by the lower performing student during the second mediation. Results suggest that the use of dynamic assessment procedures in a vocabulary context was helpful in understanding children's strategies as related to learning potential. These results are discussed in terms of deaf children's cognitive modifiability with implications for planning instruction and how MLE can be used with a population that uses ASL. The reader will (1) recognize the challenges in appropriate language assessment of deaf signing children; (2) recall the three areas explored to investigate whether a dynamic assessment approach is sensitive to differences in deaf signing children's language learning profiles (3) discuss how dynamic assessment procedures can make deaf signing children's individual language learning differences visible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Development of early auditory and speech perception skills within one year after cochlear implantion in prelingual deaf children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Chen, Yuan; Xi, Xin; Hong, Mengdi; Chen, Aiting; Wang, Qian; Wong, Lena

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the development of early auditory capability and speech perception in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation, and to study the feasibility of currently available Chinese assessment instruments for the evaluation of early auditory skill and speech perception in hearing-impaired children. A total of 83 children with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing impairment participated in this study. Participants were divided into four groups according to the age for surgery: A (1-2 years), B (2-3 years), C (3-4 years) and D (4-5 years). The auditory skill and speech perception ability of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the infant-toddler/meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS/MAIS) questionnaire, the Mandarin Early Speech Perception (MESP) test and the Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (MPSI) test. The questionnaires were used in face to face interviews with the parents or guardians. Each child was assessed before the operation and 3 months, 6 months, 12 months after switch-on. After cochlear implantation, early postoperative auditory development and speech perception gradually improved. All MAIS/IT-MAIS scores showed a similar increasing trend with the rehabilitation duration (F=5.743, P=0.007). Preoperative and post operative MAIS/IT-MAIS scores of children in age group C (3-4 years) was higher than that of other groups. Children who had longer hearing aid experience before operation demonstrated higher MAIS/IT-MAIS scores than those with little or no hearing aid experience (F=4.947, P=0.000). The MESP test showed that, children were not able to perceive speech as well as detecting speech signals. However as the duration of CI use increased, speech perception ability also improved substantially. However, only about 40% of the subjects could be evaluated using the most difficult subtest on the MPSI in quiet at 12 months after switch-on. As MCR decreased, the proportion of children who could be tested

  16. Subtitling for d/Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: Current Practices and New Possibilities to Enhance Language Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Ana; Chaume, Frederic

    2017-06-30

    In order to understand and fully comprehend a subtitle, two parameters within the linguistic code of audiovisual texts are key in the processing of the subtitle itself, namely, vocabulary and syntax. Through a descriptive and experimental study, the present article explores the transfer of the linguistic code of audiovisual texts in subtitling for deaf and hard-of-hearing children in three Spanish TV stations. In the first part of the study, we examine current practices in Spanish TV captioning to analyse whether syntax and vocabulary are adapted to satisfy deaf children's needs and expectations regarding subtitle processing. In the second part, we propose some alternative captioning criteria for these two variables based on the needs of d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children, suggesting a more appropriate way of displaying the written linguistic code for deaf children. Although no specific distinction will be made throughout this paper, it is important to refer to these terms as they have been widely used in the literature. Neves (2008) distinguishes between the "Deaf", who belong to a linguistic minority, use sign language as their mother tongue, and usually identify with a Deaf community and culture; the "deaf", who normally have an oral language as their mother tongue and feel part of the hearing community; and the "hard of hearing", who have residual hearing and, therefore, share the world and the sound experience of hearers. In the experimental study, 75 Spanish DHH children aged between 8 and 13 were exposed to two options: the actual broadcast captions on TV, and the alternative captions created by the authors. The data gathered from this exposure were used to analyse the children's comprehension of these two variables in order to draw conclusions about the suitability of the changes proposed in the alternative subtitles.

  17. Young Skilled Deaf Readers Have an Enhanced Perceptual Span in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Nathalie N; Lee, Michelle; Schotter, Elizabeth R

    2017-04-27

    Recently, Bélanger, Slattery, Mayberry and Rayner (2012) showed, using the moving window paradigm, that profoundly deaf adults have a wider perceptual span during reading relative to hearing adults matched on reading level. This difference might be related to the fact that deaf adults allocate more visual attention to simple stimuli in the parafovea (Bavelier, Dye & Hauser, 2006). Importantly, this reorganization of visual attention in deaf individuals is already manifesting in deaf children (Dye, Hauser & Bavelier, 2009). This leads to questions about the time course of the emergence of an enhanced perceptual span (which is under attentional control; Rayner, 2014; Miellet, O'Donnell, & Sereno, 2009) in young deaf readers. The present research addressed this question by comparing the perceptual spans of young deaf readers (age 7-15) and young hearing children (age 7-15). Young deaf readers, like deaf adults, were found to have a wider perceptual span relative to their hearing peers matched on reading level, suggesting that strong and early reorganization of visual attention in deaf individuals goes beyond the processing of simple visual stimuli and emerges into more cognitively complex tasks, such as reading.

  18. Relating pitch awareness to phonemic awareness in children: implications for tone-deafness and dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Kroog, Kenneth; Zuk, Jennifer; Winner, Ellen; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Language and music are complex cognitive and neural functions that rely on awareness of one's own sound productions. Information on the awareness of vocal pitch, and its relation to phonemic awareness which is crucial for learning to read, will be important for understanding the relationship between tone-deafness and developmental language disorders such as dyslexia. Here we show that phonemic awareness skills are positively correlated with pitch perception-production skills in children. Children between the ages of seven and nine were tested on pitch perception and production, phonemic awareness, and IQ. Results showed a significant positive correlation between pitch perception-production and phonemic awareness, suggesting that the relationship between musical and linguistic sound processing is intimately linked to awareness at the level of pitch and phonemes. Since tone-deafness is a pitch-related impairment and dyslexia is a deficit of phonemic awareness, we suggest that dyslexia and tone-deafness may have a shared and/or common neural basis.

  19. Relating Pitch Awareness to Phonemic Awareness in Children: Implications for Tone-Deafness and Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Language and music are complex cognitive and neural functions that rely on awareness of one’s own sound productions. Information on the awareness of vocal pitch, and its relation to phonemic awareness which is crucial for learning to read, will be important for understanding the relationship between tone-deafness and developmental language disorders such as dyslexia. Here we show that phonemic awareness skills are positively correlated with pitch perception-production skills in children. Children between the ages of 7 and 9 were tested on pitch perception and production, phonemic awareness, and IQ. Results showed a significant positive correlation between pitch perception-production and phonemic awareness, suggesting that the relationship between musical and linguistic sound processing is intimately linked to awareness at the level of pitch and phonemes. Since tone-deafness is a pitch-related impairment and dyslexia is a deficit of phonemic awareness, we suggest that dyslexia and tone-deafness may have a shared and/or common neural basis.

  20. Bilingual skills of deaf/hard of hearing children from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This study described the first language (L1) and second language (L2) skills of a group of Spanish deaf/hard of hearing (DHH) children who were bilingual. Participants included parents of 51 DHH children from Spain. Parents completed an electronic survey that included questions on background, details on child's hearing loss, and bilingual status and L2 exposure. Parents also completed the Student Oral Language Observation Matrix, a rating scale that describes language skills. DHH bilingual children demonstrated L1 skills that were stronger than their monolingual DHH peers. Bilingual children demonstrated a wide range of L2 proficiency, and most were exposed to an L2 through parents and/or schooling. The majority of parents reported that their children demonstrated L2 skills that were either better than or at the level they had expected. These results correspond with earlier studies that indicate the DHH children are capable of becoming bilingual. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  1. Use of Structured Teaching for Treatment of Children with Autism and Severe and Profound Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Simonetta; Ferrante, Letizia; Caputo, Valeria; Impellizzeri, Carmela

    1998-01-01

    Multidimentional assessment procedure was used to evaluate effects of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH) program principles and strategies on 18 children and adolescents with autism after 12 and 18 months of structured intervention. Results showed an increase in working skills and functional…

  2. How to improve communication with deaf children in the dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmark, Silvia San Bernardino; García, Joaquín; Martínez, María Rosa Mourelle; López, Nuria Esther Gallardo

    2007-12-01

    It may be difficult for hearing-impaired people to communicate with people who hear. In the health care area, there is often little awareness of the communication barriers faced by the deaf and, in dentistry, the attitude adopted towards the deaf is not always correct. A review is given of the basic rules and advice given for communicating with the hearing-impaired. The latter are classified in three groups - lip-readers, sign language users and those with hearing aids. The advice given varies for the different groups although the different methods of communication are often combined (e.g. sign language plus lip-reading, hearing-aids plus lip-reading). Treatment of hearing-impaired children in the dental clinic must be personalised. Each child is different, depending on the education received, the communication skills possessed, family factors (degree of parental protection, etc.), the existence of associated problems (learning difficulties), degree of loss of hearing, age, etc.

  3. SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY DEVELOPMENT IN SEVERE TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN ESTABLISHMENT OF A DATA COLLECTION FOR EARLY INTERVENTION IN HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Daneshman P. Borghei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of early detection of hearing impairment in children is early intervention. There is growing interest in early detection of hearing impairment in developing countries. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the spoken language development in severe to profound hearing impaired children and compared their speech intelligibility with normal hearing children at the same age. Nine severe to profound hearing impaired children below 2 years old out of the primer 42 cases were selected for this survey. They receive aural habilitation and also speech therapy after beginning the speech production. Speech intelligibility test of these children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read five questions which can be answered with one word only, at the age of 4, 5 and 6 in comparison with 27 normal hearing children at the same age. At the age of 4 the mean speech intelligibility score of the studied group was 31.77% (SD 12.17 and the control was %96 (SD 2.23. At the age of 5, this score was %51.22 (SD 14.42, the control one 97.85% (SD 1.93. Finally at age 6 it was 72% (SD 18.97 for hearing–impaired group and 99.22% (SD 1.18 in control one. Severe to profound hearing impaired children acquired spoken language but not at the same level. In general, their speech development showed about 2 to 3 years delay. Their speech intelligibility was acceptable for severe group around the age 6 but almost semi–intelligible for profound group at the same age.

  4. Predicate Structures, Gesture, and Simultaneity in the Representation of Action in British Sign Language: Evidence From Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy

    2013-01-01

    British Sign Language (BSL) signers use a variety of structures, such as constructed action (CA), depicting constructions (DCs), or lexical verbs, to represent action and other verbal meanings. This study examines the use of these verbal predicate structures and their gestural counterparts, both separately and simultaneously, in narratives by deaf children with various levels of exposure to BSL (ages 5;1 to 7;5) and deaf adult native BSL signers. Results reveal that all groups used the same types of predicative structures, including children with minimal BSL exposure. However, adults used CA, DCs, and/or lexical signs simultaneously more frequently than children. These results suggest that simultaneous use of CA with lexical and depicting predicates is more complex than the use of these predicate structures alone and thus may take deaf children more time to master. PMID:23670881

  5. ``I Have Been Given the Power to Teach. The Children Understand Me Very Well.'' The Social and Academic Impact of Deaf Teacher Training in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Christopher; Corce, Heidi

    2010-02-01

    Kenya has 41 Deaf schools that serve children from Class 1 through secondary school. These schools are all characterised by the fact that they have very few teachers who are fluent in Kenyan sign language. In order to meet the needs of schools and to provide employment opportunities for Deaf Kenyan adults, a small non-governmental organisation identified Deaf secondary school students for training. They received two years of teacher training free of charge. Most have since been awarded teaching contracts by the Kenyan Teacher Service Commission or local school boards. This article reports on results from a preliminary study of the social and academic impacts of this innovation. Results indicate that Deaf teachers are inspirational in the classroom, represent a significant resource for their school communities and are preferred by Deaf students. A follow-up study on the relative learning gains of Deaf students when taught by Deaf teachers is planned once relevant data are available.

  6. Communication training for centre-based carers of children with severe or profound disabilities in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Geiger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary, qualitative review of an approach to training centre-based carers in supporting basic communication development and providing communication opportunities for the children with severe and profound disabilities in their care. In South Africa, these children are often the most neglected in terms of planning and providing appropriate interventions. For those with severe communication disabilities, an additional lack is in the area of the basic human right to meaningful interactions and communication. Sustainable strategies to provide opportunities for basic communication development of these children are urgently sought. Several effective international and local parent training programmes have been developed, but the urgent need remains to train centre-based carers who are taking care of groups of diversely disabled children in severely under-resourced settings. Non-profit organisations (NPOs have been exploring practical centre-based approaches to skills sharing in physical rehabilitation, activities for daily living, feeding and support for basic communication development. As a freelance speech therapist contracted by four NPOs to implement hands-on training in basic communication for centre-based carers of non-verbal children, the author describes a training approach that evolved over three years, in collaboration with the carers and centre managements. Implications for training (for speech therapists and for community-based rehabilitation workers and for further research are identified.

  7. How parents and physicians experience end-of-life decision-making for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal-Schuller, I H; Willems, D L; Ewals, F V P M; van Goudoever, J B; de Vos, M A

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life decisions (EoLD) often concern children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Yet, little is known about how parents and physicians discuss and make these decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate the experiences of the parents and the involved physician during the end-of-life decision-making (EoLDM) process for children with PIMD. In a retrospective, qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with the physicians and parents of 14 children with PIMD for whom an EoLD was made within the past two years. A long-lasting relationship appeared to facilitate the EoLDM process, although previous negative healthcare encounters could also lead to distrust. Parents and physicians encountered disagreements during the EoLDM process, but these disagreements could also improve the decision-making process. Most parents, as well as most physicians, considered the parents to be the experts on their child. In making an EoLD, both parents and physicians preferred a shared decision-making approach, although they differed in what they actually meant by this concept. The EoLDM process for children with PIMD can be improved if physicians are more aware of the specific situation and of the roles and expectations of the parents of children with PIMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implicit Mentalizing Persists beyond Early Childhood and Is Profoundly Impaired in Children with Autism Spectrum Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Jarvers, Irina; Vuori, Maria; Sodian, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Implicit mentalizing, a fast, unconscious and rigid way of processing other's mental states has recently received much interest in typical social cognitive development in early childhood and in adults with autism spectrum condition (ASC). This research suggests that already infants implicitly mentalize, and that adults with ASC have a sustained implicit mentalizing deficit. Yet, we have only sparse empirical evidence on implicit mentalizing beyond early childhood, and deviations thereof in children with ASC. Here, we administered an implicit mentalizing eye tracking task to assess the sensitivity to false beliefs to a group of 8-year-old children with and without ASC, matched for chronological age, verbal and non-verbal IQ. As previous research suggested that presenting outcomes of belief-based actions leads to fast learning from experience and false belief-congruent looking behavior in adults with ASC, we were also interested in whether already children with ASC learn from such information. Our results provide support for a persistent implicit mentalizing ability in neurotypical development beyond early childhood. Further, they confirmed an implicit mentalizing deficit in children with ASC, even when they are closely matched to controls for explicit mentalizing skills. In contrast to previous findings with adults, no experience-based modulation of anticipatory looking was observed. It seems that children with ASC have not yet developed compensatory general purpose learning mechanisms. The observed intact explicit, but impaired implicit mentalizing in ASC, and correlation patterns between mentalizing tasks and executive function tasks, are in line with theories on two dissociable mentalizing systems.

  9. An Investigation of the Motivational Effects of Talking Pedometers among Children with Visual Impairments and Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Stuart, Moira E.; Hand, Karen; Robinson, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of using a talking pedometer on walking behavior and the value placed on walking by 22 children who are visually impaired or deaf-blind. The results revealed that the children were motivated to set challenging goals for increasing daily activity levels through the feedback provided by the talking…

  10. Project Word-Back: Exploratory Follow-Up Study on Deaf-Blind (Rubella) Children in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffelin, Edward J.

    Project Word-Back, an exploratory followup study of 21 young deaf-blind (Rubella) children (6 to 9 years old), was conducted to establish a tentative reference source of information, obtain teacher estimates on selected aspects of the current functioning level of a sample of children, and provide basic data from which hypotheses may be formulated…

  11. Oral and Written Discourse Skills in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children: The Role of Reading and Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the discourse skills of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children by comparing their oral and written narratives produced for the wordless picture book, "Frog, Where Are You?" (Mayer, 1969), with those of school-age-matched hearing peers. The written stories produced by 42 Italian 7- to 15-year-old children with…

  12. Factors Affecting Psychosocial and Motor Development in 3-Year-Old Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Greg; Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Crowe, Kathryn; Cupples, Linda; Marnane, Vivienne; Seeto, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown an association between children's development of psychosocial and motor skills. This study evaluated the development of these skills in 301 three-year-old deaf and hard of hearing children (M: 37.8 months) and considered a range of possible predictors including gender, birth weight, age at first fitting with hearing…

  13. Contact: Effects of an Intervention Program To Foster Harmonious Interactions between Deaf-Blind Children and Their Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Dijk, Jan P. M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention program to improve the quality of daily interaction between six congenitally deaf-blind children and their 14 educators (teachers, caregivers, and mothers). With video analysis as the most important tool, the interaction coaches trained the educators to recognize the children's signals and attune…

  14. Vocabulary Instruction for the Development of American Sign Language in Deaf Children: An Investigation into Teacher Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lianna

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of vocabulary is an important aspect of young children's development that may impact their later literacy skills (National Reading Panel, 2000; Cunningham & Stanovitch, 1997). Deaf children who are American Sign Language users, however, often have smaller vocabularies and lower literacy levels than their hearing peers…

  15. Parents of deaf children with cochlear implants: a study of technology and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Laura

    2012-05-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) is increasingly used to treat deafness, despite arguments from the deaf community. Deaf children born to hearing parents are the fastest growing group of CI recipients, making parents the primary consumers. Instead of focusing on the controversy over implants, this article examines the clinical structures shaping parental decision-making and how parents integrate clinical practices into family and community. Observations and in-depth interviews were conducted in a CI clinic and at various community sites. The data reveal strong inter-institutional co-operations between the clinic, the state and local school districts. Working together, these institutions anticipate parental needs, foster a CI community and thus increase compliance. I conclude that implantation is an ongoing practice enculturating parents into a new community characterised by the adoption of long-term rehabilitative duties. However, the long-term nature of rehabilitation creates disparities in outcomes, which would be better understood through further research on the social relations in families and across parent networks in the CI community. © 2011 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Parents as experts : the position of parents of children with profound multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geeter, K.I.; Poppes, P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2002-01-01

    Background Parents of children with disabilities are increasingly considered as experts in the field of care. Their expertise can deliver an important contribution towards planning their child's care and education. The law is increasingly taking this factor into consideration. On the one hand,

  17. Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children with Severe to Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilosi, Anna M.; Comparini, Alessandro; Scusa, Maria F.; Berrettini, Stefano; Forli, Francesca; Battini, Roberta; Cipriani, Paola; Cioni, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The effects of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are often complicated by additional disabilities, but the epidemiology of associated disorders is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of additional neurodevelopmental disabilities in a sample of children with SNHL and to investigate the relation…

  18. Peer victimization experienced by children and adolescents who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenberg, Maartje; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; de Rooij, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Victimization is a relatively common, yet serious problem, with potentially severe consequences for children's psychosocial and academic functioning. Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH) may be at a higher risk for victimization than hearing children. The aims of the present study were to compare DHH and hearing children on i) self-reported experiences of victimization and ii) associations between victimization, parental- and child variables. In total 188 children (mean age 11;11 years) from the Netherlands and Dutch-speaking part of Belgium participated in the study. No difference between DHH and hearing children were found on general experiences of victimization. However, differences between the groups were found on specific forms of experienced victimization and on the associations between victimization and parental variables. For DHH children, parental sensitivity and parents who challenge their DHH children to become competent in the practical, emotional, cognitive and social domain is associated with them being less victimized. For hearing children at this age these relations were reversed, absent or more complex. Finally, DHH children in special schools were more victimized than DHH children in regular schools. It can be concluded that parents can play an important role in reducing social problems experienced by DHH children and young adolescents.

  19. Peer victimization experienced by children and adolescents who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Kouwenberg

    Full Text Available Victimization is a relatively common, yet serious problem, with potentially severe consequences for children's psychosocial and academic functioning. Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH may be at a higher risk for victimization than hearing children. The aims of the present study were to compare DHH and hearing children on i self-reported experiences of victimization and ii associations between victimization, parental- and child variables. In total 188 children (mean age 11;11 years from the Netherlands and Dutch-speaking part of Belgium participated in the study. No difference between DHH and hearing children were found on general experiences of victimization. However, differences between the groups were found on specific forms of experienced victimization and on the associations between victimization and parental variables. For DHH children, parental sensitivity and parents who challenge their DHH children to become competent in the practical, emotional, cognitive and social domain is associated with them being less victimized. For hearing children at this age these relations were reversed, absent or more complex. Finally, DHH children in special schools were more victimized than DHH children in regular schools. It can be concluded that parents can play an important role in reducing social problems experienced by DHH children and young adolescents.

  20. Implicit mentalizing persists beyond early childhood and is profoundly impaired in children with autism spectrum conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schuwerk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Implicit mentalizing, a fast, unconscious and rigid way of processing other's mental states has recently received much interest in typical social cognitive development in early childhood and in adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC. This research suggests that already infants implicitly mentalize, and that adults with ASC have a sustained implicit mentalizing deficit. Yet, we have only sparse empirical evidence on implicit mentalizing beyond early childhood, and deviations thereof in children with ASC. Here, we administered an implicit mentalizing eye tracking task to assess the sensitivity to false beliefs to a group of 8-year-old children with and without ASC, matched for chronological age, verbal and nonverbal IQ. As previous research suggested that presenting outcomes of belief-based actions leads to fast learning from experience and false belief-congruent looking behavior in adults with ASC, we were also interested in whether already children with ASC learn from such information. Our results provide support for a persistent implicit mentalizing ability in neurotypical development beyond early childhood. Further, they confirmed an implicit mentalizing deficit in children with ASC, even when they are closely matched to controls for explicit mentalizing skills. In contrast to previous findings with adults, no experience-based modulation of anticipatory looking was observed. It seems that children with ASC have not yet developed compensatory general purpose learning mechanisms. The observed intact explicit, but impaired implicit mentalizing in ASC, and correlation patterns between mentalizing tasks and executive function tasks, are in line with theories on two dissociable mentalizing systems.

  1. Orientation in space - one of constituents of dancings motions of deaf children 6-10 years old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statiev S.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The indexes of development of orientation in space of deaf children of midchildhood are considered. 258 children took part in experiment (from them 100 are children without pathology of auditory to the analyzer. The constituents of dancings motions of children are considered. The necessity of perfection of specific co-ordinating capabilities is marked for children. Possibilities are rotined in relation to the arbitrary weakening of muscles, vestibular firmness. It is well-proven that indexes of development of orientation in space of deaf children considerably less indexes of children without violation of auditory to the analyzer. It is set that the basic constituents of dancings motions are instrumental in the improvement of parameters of orientation of children in space.

  2. Language Development in the First Year of Life: What Deaf Children Might Be Missing Before Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Dani; Strother-Garcia, Kristina; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy

    2016-02-01

    Language development is a multifaceted, dynamic process involving the discovery of complex patterns, and the refinement of native language competencies in the context of communicative interactions. This process is already advanced by the end of the first year of life for hearing children, but prelingually deaf children who initially lack a language model may miss critical experiences during this early window. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, we examine the published literature on language development during the first 12 months in typically developing children. Second, we use this literature to inform our understanding of the language outcomes of prelingually deaf children who receive cochlear implants (CIs), and therefore language input, either before or after the first year. During the first 12 months, typically developing infants exhibit advances in speech segmentation, word learning, syntax acquisition, and communication, both verbal and nonverbal. Infants and their caregivers coconstruct a communication foundation during this time, supporting continued language growth. The language outcomes of hearing children are robustly predicted by their experiences and acquired competencies during the first year; yet these predictive links are absent among prelingually deaf infants lacking a language model (i.e., those without exposure to sign). For deaf infants who receive a CI, implantation timing is crucial. Children receiving CIs before 12 months frequently catch up with their typically developing peers, whereas those receiving CIs later do not. Explanations for the language difficulties of late-implanted children are discussed.

  3. Fostering Positive Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom /

    OpenAIRE

    Hipskind, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    All Deaf children deserve to have opportunities to openly explore, examine, and affirm their own Deaf identities at school, yet there is a shortage of curricula and resources dedicated to this basic need. The aim of this thesis is to provide Deaf children with such opportunities. The curriculum within- Fostering Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom- consists of two units that address positive Deaf identity formation. The first unit focuses on the characterization and affirmation ...

  4. The music perception abilities of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabej, Katja Kladnik; Smid, Lojze; Gros, Anton; Zargi, Miha; Kosir, Andrej; Vatovec, Jagoda

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the music perception abilities of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants, in comparison to a group of normal-hearing children, and to consider the factors that contribute to music perception. The music perception abilities of 39 prelingually deaf children with unilateral cochlear implants were compared to the abilities of 39 normal hearing children. To assess the music listening abilities, the MuSIC perception test was adopted. The influence of the child's age, age at implantation, device experience and type of sound-processing strategy on the music perception were evaluated. The effects of auditory performance, nonverbal intellectual abilities, as well as the child's additional musical education on music perception were also considered. Children with cochlear implants and normal hearing children performed significantly differently with respect to rhythm discrimination (55% vs. 82%, pperformance and melody discrimination (r=0.27; p=0.031), between auditory performance and instrument identification (r=0.20; p=0.059) and between the child's grade (mark) in school music classes and melody discrimination (r=0.34; p=0.030). In children with cochlear implant only, the music perception ability assessed by the emotion rating test was negatively correlated to the child's age (r(S)=-0.38; p=0.001), age at implantation (r(S)=-0.34; p=0.032), and device experience (r(S)=-0.38; p=0.019). The child's grade in school music classes showed a positive correlation to music perception abilities assessed by rhythm discrimination test (r(S)=0.46; pmusic perception abilities of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants in comparison to the group of normal hearing children, but not for all the tests of music perception. Additional multi-centre studies, including a larger number of participants and a broader spectrum of music subtests, considering as many as possible of the factors that may contribute to music perception, seem reasonable. Copyright © 2012

  5. A study of the incidence and causation of deafness among the children in the tribal population of Manipur and its prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Das, C.; Sanasam, J. C.; Chukhu, N.; Bimol, N.

    1999-01-01

    In a clinico-audiological study of 6,674 children in 24 tribal villages in the hills of Manipur in a total population of 18,565, the incidence of deafness is found to be 6.62% The incidence of the conductive deafness is 98.64% and that of the sensori-neural is 1.35%. Episodes of cold attacks and running nose are found to be precursurs of the prevalent conductive deafness. Preventive measures are worked out.

  6. An ecological method for the sampling of nonverbal signalling behaviours of young children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith; Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2016-08-01

    Profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are a complex range of disabilities that affect the general health and well-being of the individual and their capacity to interact and learn. We developed a new methodology to capture the non-symbolic signalling behaviours of children with PMLD within the context of a face-to-face interaction with a caregiver to provide analysis at a micro-level of descriptive detail incorporating the use of the ELAN digital video software. The signalling behaviours of participants in a natural, everyday interaction can be better understood with the use of this innovation in methodology, which is predicated on the ecology of communication. Recognition of the developmental ability of the participants is an integral factor within that ecology. The method presented establishes an advanced account of the modalities through which a child affected by PMLD is able to communicate.

  7. Benefits of augmentative signs in word learning: Evidence from children who are deaf/hard of hearing and children with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel-van Hoof, L. van; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Augmentative signs may facilitate word learning in children with vocabulary difficulties, for example, children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH) and children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Despite the fact that augmentative signs may aid second language learning in

  8. Auditory pathway functioning in prelingual deafness : The clinical consequences for cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implantation has proven itself as a very successful treatment for both children and adults with severe to profound hearing loss. Although most patients obtain a high level of speech perception, performance is more variable in prelingually deaf patients, i.e., patients with an onset of

  9. Fontbonne University: Collaboration in Speech-Language Pathology and Early Intervention in Deaf Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gale; Lenihan, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are best served through the collaborative efforts of their parents and a team of professionals. For communication development and educational achievement, speech-language pathologists and teachers of the deaf working together can have a profound impact. A collaborative approach to assessment, direct instruction, and…

  10. Needs of parents of children who are deaf/hard of hearing with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Susan; Gustafson, Samantha; Rozniak, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) with a coexisting autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of our study was to understand the needs of children who are D/HH with coexisting ASD. We posed questions for group discussion about diagnostic process, impact of dual diagnosis on communication, and helpful resources. Four parents of three children participated. Challenges in the diagnostic process included the challenges in the appropriateness of the evaluation tools and the limited expertise of the professionals performing the evaluations. Broad-based special educational settings were perceived as helpful. Families described a range of broad-based communication strategies (spoken, sign, and written language, augmentative communication approaches). Families prioritized a focus on behavior and day-to-day functioning over academic performance. Families recognized the lack of professionals who understand ASD and deafness but have found the internet and technology as a mechanism to connect to information and families with similar needs.

  11. Cued Speech for Enhancing Speech Perception and First Language Development of Children With Cochlear Implants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J

    2010-01-01

    .... Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music...

  12. Supporting Children with Severe-to-Profound Learning Difficulties and Complex Communication Needs to Make Their Views Known: Observation Tools and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathead, Scot; Yates, Rhiannon; Hill, Vivian; Kenny, Lorcan; Croydon, Abigail; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    All children have the right to shape decisions that influence their lives. Yet, children with severe-to-profound intellectual disabilities and complex communication needs are often marginalized from this process. Here, we examined the utility of a set of tools incorporating ethnographic and structured observational methods with three such…

  13. Stability and Change in Sustainability of Daily Routines and Social Networks in Families of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Jenny; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) demand intense family accommodations from birth and onwards. This study used an exploratory and qualitative study design to investigate stability and change in sustainability of daily routines and social networks of Swedish families of children with PIMD. Materials…

  14. Learn and Apply: Using Multi-Sensory Storytelling to Gather Knowledge about Preferences and Abilities of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities--Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the preferences and abilities of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs) is crucial for providing appropriate activities. Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) can be an ideal activity for gathering such knowledge about children with PIMDs. The aim of this study was to analyse whether using MSST did lead…

  15. Are Auditory Steady-State Responses Useful to Evaluate Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Schuster Grasel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR at high intensities in pediatric cochlear implant candidates and to compare the results to behavioral tests responses. Methods. This prospective study evaluated 42 children with suspected severe-to-profound hearing loss, aged from 3 to 72 months. All had absent ABR and OAE responses. ASSR were evoked using binaural single frequency stimuli at 110 dB HL with a 10 dB down-seeking procedure. ASSR and behavioral test results were compared. Results. Forty-two subjects completed both ASSR and behavioral evaluation. Eleven children (26.2% had bilateral responses. Four (9.5% showed unilateral responses in at least two frequencies, all confirmed by behavioral results. Overall 61 ASSR responses were obtained, most (37.7% in 500 Hz. Mean thresholds were between 101.3 and 104.2 dB HL. Among 27 subjects with absent ASSR, fifteen had no behavioral responses. Seven subjects showed behavioral responses with absent ASSR responses. No spurious ASSR responses were observed at 100 or 110 dB HL. Conclusion. ASSR is a valuable tool to detect residual hearing. No false-positive ASSR results were observed among 42 children, but in seven cases with absent ASSR, the test underestimated residual hearing as compared to the behavioral responses.

  16. The impact of verbal capacity on theory of mind in deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrez, Clovis; Bourdin, Beatrice; Le Driant, Barbara; D'Arc, Baudouin Forgeot; Vandromme, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Even when they have good language skills, many children with hearing loss lag several years behind hearing children in the ability to grasp beliefs of others. The researchers sought to determine whether this lag results from difficulty with the verbal demands of tasks or from conceptual delays. The researchers related children's performance on a nonverbal theory of mind task to their scores on verbal aptitude tests. Twelve French children (average age about 10 years) with severe to profound hearing loss and 12 French hearing children (average about 7 years) were evaluated. The children with hearing loss showed persistent difficulty with theory of mind tasks, even a nonverbal task, presenting results similar to those of hearing 6-year-olds. Also, the children with hearing loss showed a correlation between language level (lexical and morphosyntactic) and understanding of false beliefs. No such correlation was found in the hearing children.

  17. Phonological awareness: explicit instruction for young deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Lederberg, Amy R; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the development of spoken phonological awareness for deaf and hard-of-hearing children (DHH) with functional hearing (i.e., the ability to access spoken language through hearing). Teachers explicitly taught five preschoolers the phonological awareness skills of syllable segmentation, initial phoneme isolation, and rhyme discrimination in the context of a multifaceted emergent literacy intervention. Instruction occurred in settings where teachers used simultaneous communication or spoken language only. A multiple-baseline across skills design documented a functional relation between instruction and skill acquisition for those children who did not have the skills at baseline with one exception; one child did not meet criteria for syllable segmentation. These results were confirmed by changes on phonological awareness tests that were administered at the beginning and end of the school year. We found that DHH children who varied in primary communication mode, chronological age, and language ability all benefited from explicit instruction in phonological awareness.

  18. Developing Concepts with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Barbara; McLetchie, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In children, concepts develop in a spiral, with the child at the center. A positive self-concept begins within a responsive caregiving environment. Concepts build upon one another. The more ideas and memories that a child has about the way the world and relationships work, the easier it is to develop further ideas. Once a child realizes, for…

  19. Preoperative cerebral metabolic difference related to the outcome of cochlear implantation in prelingually deaf children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Lim, G. C.; Ahn, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Kim, J. S. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) has known to be variable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative regional glucose metabolism difference related to the speech perception outcome after CI in prelingually deaf children. Forty-one prelingually deaf children who underwent CI at age 2{approx}10 years were included. All patients underwent F-18 FDG brain PET within one month before CI and measured speech perception using the institute version of the CID at 2 years after CI. Patients were classified into younger (2{approx}6 years) and older (7{approx}10 years) groups. Each group was also divided into a GOOD (CID scores>80) and a BAD (CID scores<60) subgroup. We assessed regional metabolic difference according to CID scores and age by voxel based analysis (SPM2) comparing normal controls (n =8, 20{approx}30 years). Speech perception was good in 19 (68%) of 28 younger patients and 5 (38%) of 13 older patients after CI. Regional metabolism of both younger and older GOOD subgroup was significantly decreased in right temporal, left cerebellar and right frontal regions compared to normal controls (uncorrected p<0.001). In younger GOOD subgroup, left frontotemporal and both parietal regions showed decreased metabolism and right frontal, left temporal and anterior cingulate regions showed increased metabolism compared to BAD subgroup (uncorrected p<0.005). In younger group, regional metabolism in left superior frontal, right temporal and right occipital regions showed a significant negative correlation with CID scores (uncorrected p<0.005). In older group, the pattern of regional metabolic difference correlated with CID score was not similar to that of younger group. Preoperative regional cerebral metabolism is decreased in several brain regions related to the language in preligually deaf patients and the neuralplasty of younger patients are different according to the outcome of speech perception after CI.

  20. Cognitive outcomes and familial stress after cochlear implantation in deaf children with and without developmental delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghalai, John S.; Caudle, Susan E.; Bentley, Barbara; Abaya, Homer; Lin, Jerry; Baker, Dian; Emery, Claudia; Bortfeld, Heather; Winzelberg, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Objective The benefits of cochlear implantation for children with developmental delays (DD) are often unclear. We compared cognition, adaptive behavior, familial stress, and communication in children with and without DD. Study Design Retrospective review Setting Two tertiary care pediatric hospitals Patients 204 children who underwent cochlear implantation assessed before and >1 year after implantation Main Outcome Measures The Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL), Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), Parental Stress Index (PSI), and Preschool Language Scale (PLS). Results We developed a specific definition of DD for hearing-impaired children based upon DSM-IV criteria for mental retardation; 60 children met the criteria for DD and 144 children did not. Prior to implantation, multiple linear regression demonstrated that children with DD had lower scores in every domain of the MSEL and VABS (p0.1) compared to children without DD. After implantation, children without DD demonstrated significant improvements in intelligence as measured by the MSEL, age-appropriate improvements in adaptive behavior as evaluated by the VABS, and their familial stress levels were not increased after cochlear implantation. In contrast, children with DD underwent implantation at a later age and demonstrated less comprehensive developmental improvements after cochlear implantation and higher stress levels. However, when the age differences were taken into account using multiple linear regression analyses, the differences between two cohorts were reduced. Conclusions These data indicate that our definition of DD is a reliable method of stratifying deaf children. While children with DD have a normal developmental rate of adaptive behavior after cochlear implantation, their developmental rate of intelligence is lower and they have higher stress levels than children without DD. However, our data suggest that if children with DD could be implanted as early as children without DD, their

  1. Comparison of the prevalence of mental health problems in deaf and hearing children and adolescents in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D; Brown, P Margaret

    2010-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to (i) identify the prevalence rate and nature of mental health problems in a group of Australian deaf children and adolescents and compare these to those reported for the Australian hearing population; and (ii) identify specific demographic characteristics that may typify deaf children and adolescents with mental health problems. Sixty-six parents of deaf children and adolescents aged 6-18 years, their teachers and 38 adolescents participated in the study. Data related to mental health problems were collected using the Child Behaviour Checklist and Youth Self-Report. Data related to demographic characteristics were obtained via parent and teacher surveys. The overall prevalence rate of mental health problems reported by parents and adolescents in the present study is comparable to that of the Australian hearing population. Parents in the present study, however, reported significantly more concerns on the social problem and thought problem scales than did Australian parents of hearing children and adolescents. There were also significant differences between the prevalence and nature of mental health problems as reported by the deaf adolescents in the present study when compared to deaf adolescents in another Australian study. These differences appear to be explained by differences in the preferred communication mode of the participants in the two studies. The known heterogeneity within the Australian deaf child and adolescent population with respect to preferred mode of communication has important implications not only for the appropriate selection and use of psychiatric instruments in assessing child and adolescent mental health but also for the accurate reporting of the prevalence and nature of mental health problems within this population.

  2. Comparison of psychological well-being and coping styles in mothers of deaf and normally-hearing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Ghasempour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Families who have a child with hearing deficiency deal with different challenges, and mothers have a greater responsibility towards these children because of their traditional role of caregiver; so, they deal with more psychological problems. The aim of this study was to compare the psychological well-being and coping styles in mothers of deaf and normal children.Methods: In this cross-sectional and post event study (causal-comparative method, 30 mothers of deaf students and 30 mothers of normal students from elementary schools of Ardabil, Iran, were selected using available sampling. The Ryff psychological well-being (1989 and Billings and Moos coping styles (1981 questionnaires were used in this study. The data were analyzed using MANOVA test.Results: We found that in mother's of deaf children, psychological well-being and its components was significantly lower than mothers of normal children (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively. There was a significant difference between two groups in terms of cognitive coping style, too (p<0.01. However, mothers of deaf children used less cognitive coping style.Conclusions: It seems that child's hearing loss affects on mothers psychological well-being and coping styles; this effect can be visible as psychological problems and lower use of adaptive coping styles.

  3. Staff attributions of the causes of challenging behaviour in children and adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppes, P; van der Putten, A A J; ten Brug, A; Vlaskamp, C

    2016-01-01

    A study has shown that staff do not generally perceive challenging behaviour in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) as being of serious consequence. In this study we aimed to gain a better understanding of the causal explanations that direct care and support staff give for challenging behaviour in this group. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to determine the way staff attribute challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD; and (2) to analyse whether more experienced staff attribute challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD differently than less experienced staff. In total, 195 direct support staff and an equal number of children and adults with PIMD participated in the study. Direct support staff filled out the Challenging behaviour Attribution Scale (five causal explanatory models of challenging behaviour) to explain challenging behaviour in one individual that they supported. The results show that direct support staff as a whole report the biomedical model as the most plausible explanation for challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD. However, in the present study the mean scores on all models are low. This might indicate that a large number of staff found none of the models particularly useful as possible explanations of challenging behaviour in people with PIMD. This could mean that staff have difficulties stating the cause of challenging behaviour in this group. Another possible explanation could be that there is little scientific knowledge about causing and maintaining factors of challenging behaviour in people with PIMD. It could also mean that staff have additional explanations for challenging behaviour in this target group that are not mentioned in the instrument used. Future research should address these issues. No differences were found between more experienced and less experienced direct support staff. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The relationship between the reading and signing skills of deaf children in bilingual education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on one experiment in which we investigated the relationship between reading and signing skills. We administered a vocabulary task and a story comprehension task in Sign Language of the Netherlands and in written Dutch to a group of 87 deaf children from bilingual education programs. We found a strong and positive correlation between the scores obtained in the sign vocabulary task and the reading vocabulary task when age, short-term memory scores, and nonverbal intelligence scores were controlled for. In addition, a correlation was observed between the scores in the story comprehension tasks in Sign Language of the Netherlands and written Dutch but only when vocabulary scores for words and signs were not taken into account. The results are briefly discussed with reference to a model we recently proposed to describe lexical development for deaf children in bilingual education programs (Hermans, D., Knoors, H., Ormel, E., & Verhoeven, L., 2008). In addition, the implications of the results of the present study for previous studies on the relationship between reading and signing skills are discussed.

  5. Measuring phonological awareness in deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mi-young L; Lederberg, Amy R

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated psychometric properties of 2 phonological awareness (PA) tests normed for hearing children when used with deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children with functional hearing. It also provides an in-depth description of these children's PA. One hundred and eight DHH children (mean age = 63.3 months) with cochlear implants or hearing aids were assessed in the fall and spring of the school year. Sixty-three percent communicated only with spoken language; 37% communicated with both sign and speech. Examiners administered PA subtests from the Phonological Awareness Test-2 and the Test of Preschool Early Literacy, along with assessments of speech perception and early literacy. Item analyses indicated that both tests showed good psychometric properties (e.g., high item discriminations and internal consistencies). DHH children scored higher on subtests and items that measured words, rhymes, and syllables than those that assessed phonemes. Although subtest difficulty influenced the factor structure in the fall, spring PA was best characterized as a single factor. PA correlated concurrently and predictively with early literacy. This study suggests that these 2 standardized tests are valid for use with DHH children with functional hearing. Although delayed, these children's PA was structurally similar to that of hearing children.

  6. Auditory Deprivation Does Not Impair Executive Function, but Language Deprivation Might: Evidence from a Parent-Report Measure in Deaf Native Signing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew L.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Bortfeld, Heather; Lillo-Martin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children are often described as having difficulty with executive function (EF), often manifesting in behavioral problems. Some researchers view these problems as a consequence of auditory deprivation; however, the behavioral problems observed in previous studies may not be due to deafness but to some other factor, such as lack of early…

  7. Lexical-Semantic Organization in Bilingually Developing Deaf Children with ASL-Dominant Language Exposure: Evidence from a Repeated Meaning Association Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Wolfgang; Sheng, Li; Morgan, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the lexical-semantic organization skills of bilingually developing deaf children in American Sign Language (ASL) and English with those of a monolingual hearing group. A repeated meaning-association paradigm was used to assess retrieval of semantic relations in deaf 6-10-year-olds exposed to ASL from birth by their deaf…

  8. Assessment and Education of Deaf-Blind Children. Proceedings of the Special Study Institute (Los Angeles, CA, March 17-19, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwestern Region Deaf-Blind Center, Sacramento, CA.

    The document contains nine conference papers which address several approaches to assessment of deaf blind children. Entries include the following titles and authors: "Parent-Teacher Relationships and the Deaf-Blind Child" (M. Schleifer); "Congenital Rubella--The Teenage Years" (P. Ziring); "Psychological Assessment" (guidelines for assessing the…

  9. Educational and employment achievements in prelingually deaf children who receive cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venail, Frederic; Vieu, Adrienne; Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the educational and employment achievements of prelingually deaf children who undergo cochlear implantation. Prospective study. Data were examined within groups defined by current age and additional disabilities. Multivariate analyses were used to identify variables influencing grade failure and communication mode. Tertiary referral center. One hundred prelingually deaf children who received cochlear implants before 6 years of age and who also had at least 4 years of follow-up. Interview of parents using a standardized questionnaire. The type of schooling, form of communication, employment status, age at which the child learned to read and write, number of grade failures, and educational support required. Mainstream schooling, regardless of educational level, was the standard experience for children without additional disabilities (16 of 24 [67%] in the 12- to 15-year age group to 20 of 24 [83%] in the 8- to 11-year age group). Four of 8 participants older than 18 years (50%) had a university-level education; the remainder had vocational training. Delayed reading and writing skills were experienced by 19 of 74 participants (26%) and, depending on the age group, 42% to 61% of participants (10 of 24 in the 8- to 11-year age group to 11 of 18 in the 16- to 18-year age group) had failed a grade. The number of grade failures was associated with communication mode at the time of the survey. Age at implantation, preoperative communication mode, and educational support influenced the final communication mode. In children with additional disabilities, the level of academic achievement and employment status varied. Despite significant differences in the grade failure rate between the children with cochlear implants and the general population, the participants in the present study ultimately achieved educational and employment levels similar to those of their normal-hearing peers. To minimize these delays and improve academic success in mainstream education

  10. Early Visual Language Exposure and Emergent Literacy in Preschool Deaf Children: Findings from a National Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas E.; Letteri, Amy; Choi, Song Hoa; Dang, Daqian

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is provided of recent research on the impact of early visual language exposure on a variety of developmental outcomes, including literacy, cognition, and social adjustment. This body of work points to the great importance of giving young deaf children early exposure to a visual language as a critical precursor to the acquisition of…

  11. Interactive Reading with Young Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children in eBooks versus Print Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Loes; Dirks, Evelien

    2017-01-01

    Interactive storybook reading is effective in enhancing deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children's emergent literacy skills. The current digital era gives parents more opportunities to read books with their child. From an early age on, interaction between parent and child during literacy activities is very important for the development of emergent…

  12. Embedding Music into Language and Literacy Instruction for Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri H.; Wright, Whitney; Parker, Elizabeth W.

    2016-01-01

    Children who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) using Listening and spoken language (LSL) as their primary mode of communication have emerged as a growing population in general education and special education classroom settings, and have educational performance expectations similar to their same aged hearing peers. Academic instruction that…

  13. Mental health problems of deaf dutch children as indicated by parents' responses to the child behavior checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eldik, T. van; Treffers, P.D.A.; Veerman, J.W.; Verhulst, F.C.

    2004-01-01

    Emotional/behavioral problems of 238 deaf Dutch children ages 4-18 years were studied. Parental reports indicated that 41% had emotional/behavioral problems, a rate nearly 2.6 times higher than the 16% reported by parents of a Dutch normative sample. Mental health problems seemed most prevalent in

  14. The Resilience of Structure Built around the Predicate: Homesign Gesture Systems in Turkish and American Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Namboodiripad, Savithry; Mylander, Carolyn; Özyürek, Asli; Sancar, Burcu

    2015-01-01

    Deaf children whose hearing losses prevent them from accessing spoken language and whose hearing parents have not exposed them to sign language develop gesture systems, called "homesigns", which have many of the properties of natural language--the so-called resilient properties of language. We explored the resilience of structure built…

  15. Facilitative Communication Strategies of Hearing Mothers with Their Children Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aznan Che; Brown, P. Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how the type and duration of early intervention (EI) experience impacts hearing parents' views of the importance of different types of facilitative communication strategies when interacting with their children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Sixteen mothers were involved in the study. Respondents were allocated to…

  16. The Use of Play Assessment to Examine the Development of Communication Skills in Children Who Are Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, D. M.; Fewell, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the play behaviors of 18 deaf blind children (aged 3-12) and their communication skills using the Play Assessment Scale and several multidomain developmental checklists. Results revealed that behaviors observed during play assessment were highly related to ratings of receptive, expressive, and…

  17. Pre-Placement Program for Severely Multi-Handicapped Deaf-Blind Children, 1980-1981. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert; And Others

    Evaluation of the sixth and final year of operation for a preplacement program for 13 severely multiply handicapped deaf blind children, located in the Industrial Home for the Blind, is reported. The program is explained to prepare students for entrance into their existing special education programs. Qualitative findings on the physical setting,…

  18. Investigating Use of a Parent Report Tool to Measure Vocabulary Development in Deaf Greek-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktapoti, Maria; Okalidou, Areti; Kyriafinis, George; Petinou, Kakia; Vital, Victor; Herman, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are very few measures of language development in spoken Greek that can be used with young deaf children. This study investigated the use of Cyprus Lexical List (CYLEX), a receptive and expressive vocabulary assessment based on parent report that has recently been adapted to Standard Greek, to measure the vocabulary development of…

  19. "Multi-County Diagnostic-Instructional Program for Young Deaf Children" (Serving Lee, Collier, Hendry and Charlotte Counties).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee County Board of Public Instruction, Fort Myers, FL.

    Described is a 1 year program designed to provide a sequential diagnostic-instructional program for 16 young deaf and hearing impaired children in four Florida counties. Objectives of the program are said to have included the development of language and communication skills, inservice education for staff members, parent activities to encourage…

  20. Toward a Diagnostic Intervention Model for Fostering Harmonious Interactions between Deaf-Blind Children and Their Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Dijk, Jan P. M.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a diagnostic intervention model as a guide for designing and conducting interventions to foster harmonious interactions between deaf-blind children and their educators in various settings and explicates its theoretical and empirical foundations. The model includes a stated purpose, intervention principles, and a five-step…

  1. Using the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" to Teach Sign Language to Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoddon, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    No formal Canadian curriculum presently exists for teaching American Sign Language (ASL) as a second language to parents of deaf and hard of hearing children. However, this group of ASL learners is in need of more comprehensive, research-based support, given the rapid expansion in Canada of universal neonatal hearing screening and the…

  2. Bridge of Signs: Can Sign Language Empower Non-Deaf Children to Triumph over Their Communication Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This pilot research project examined the use of sign language as a communication bridge for non-Deaf children between the ages of 0-6 years who had been diagnosed with, or whose communication difficulties suggested, the presence of such disorders as Autism, Down Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and/or learning disabilities.…

  3. SKI-HI Home Intervention for Families with Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Barbara; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The SKI-HI program, which provides home-based family support services for infants, toddlers, and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing, has been implemented by approximately 250 agencies and annually serves about 4,000 families. Information is provided on the program's rationale, development, family-centered home-based services,…

  4. Deaf Families with Children Who Have Cochlear Implants: Perspectives and Beliefs on Bilingualism in American Sign Language and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2012-01-01

    This study examines Deaf parents with children who have cochlear implants on their beliefs and perspectives of bilingualism in American Sign Language and English using complementary mixed methods through surveys and follow-up interviews. Seventeen families participated in the survey and eight families continued their participation in semi-formal…

  5. Generation of Signs within Semantic and Phonological Categories: Data from Deaf Adults and Children Who Use American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Figueroa, Daileen M.

    2017-01-01

    Two key areas of language development include semantic and phonological knowledge. Semantic knowledge relates to word and concept knowledge. Phonological knowledge relates to how language parameters combine to create meaning. We investigated signing deaf adults' and children's semantic and phonological sign generation via one-minute tasks,…

  6. Using assessment of higher brain functions of children with GJB2-associated deafness and cochlear implants as a procedure to evaluate language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Akihiro; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kataoka, Yuko; Fukuda, Shoichiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2006-08-01

    While investigators have reported that patients with GJB2-associated deafness and cochlear implants have preferable language development, the mechanisms of this phenomenon remains unknown. The goal of the present study was to assess higher brain functions of patients with GJB2-related and GJB2-unrelated deafness as a method of evaluating language development. Eight children with cochlear implants were subjected to genetic testing for GJB2 and underwent the Raven colored progressive matrices test, Rey's auditory verbal learning test, Rey's complex figure test, the standardized language test for aphasia, the picture vocabulary test, and the standardized comprehension test for abstract words. Three children were diagnosed with GJB2-related deafness, and five children were diagnosed with GJB2-unrelated deafness. All three GJB2-related cases demonstrated normal range higher brain functions and fair language development. By contrast, one GJB2-unrelated case showed a semantic disorder, another demonstrated a visual cognitive disorder with dyslexia, and another had attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Children with GJB2-unrelated deafness showed a high frequency of heterogeneous disorders that can affect proper language development. This difference between children with GJB2-related and GJB2-unrelated deafness may account for the improved language development in children with GJB2-related deafness and cochlear implants. Further, genetic diagnosis of the non-syndromic hearing loss represents a useful tool for the preoperative prediction of outcomes following a cochlear implant procedure.

  7. Causes of deafness in British Bangladeshi children: a prevalence twice that of the UK population cannot be accounted for by consanguinity alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Y; Sirimanna, T; Albert, D M; Qadir, P; Jenkins, L; Cortina-Borja, M; Bitner-Glindzicz, M

    2009-04-01

    To study the causes and prevalence of sensorineural deafness in Bangladeshi children resident in East London. This was a cross sectional survey of children of Bangladeshi origin living in East London with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss of 40 db HL or more. In this study, 134 patients were included. The study looked primarily at the causes of sensorineural hearing loss in this population. The prevalence of deafness in Bangladeshi children in East London is approximately 3.86 per 1000 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 3.20, 4.65] which is significantly greater than the average UK prevalence of 1.65 per 1000. The prevalence of deafness in these Bangladeshi children belonging to non-consanguineous families only, the prevalence falls to 2.73 per 1000 (95% CI 2.19, 3.41). In 60% cases the cause of deafness was genetic. The single most common cause of sensorineural hearing loss in this population was mutations in the GJB2 gene (Connexin 26) in 20 of these patients (17%). Parents were consanguineous in 33% of the families. This study concludes that prevalence of sensorineural deafness in Bangladeshi children is at least 2.3 times the national average. This study also concludes that genetic causes are the common cause of deafness in this ethnic group, with nearly 30% of children with non-syndromic deafness having mutations in GJB2. Although parental consanguinity was very high in this population it did not account for the whole increase in prevalence.

  8. Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mi-Young; Lederberg, Amy R; Branum-Martin, Lee; McDonald Connor, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms underlying developing literacy has promoted the development of more effective reading interventions for typically developing children. Such knowledge may facilitate effective instruction of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Hence, the current study examined the multivariate associations among phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, word reading, and vocabulary skills in DHH children who have auditory access to speech. One hundred and sixty-seven DHH children (M age = 60.43 months) were assessed with a battery of early literacy measures. Forty-six percent used at least 1 cochlear implant; 54% were fitted with hearing aids. About a fourth of the sample was acquiring both spoken English and sign. Scores on standardized tests of phonological awareness and vocabulary averaged at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the hearing norming sample. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that DHH children's early literacy skills were best characterized by a complex 3-factor model in which phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, and vocabulary formed 3 separate, but highly correlated constructs, with letter-sound knowledge and word reading skills relating to both phonological awareness and alphabetic knowledge. This supports the hypothesis that early reading of DHH children with functional hearing is qualitatively similar to that of hearing children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Emotional Well-Being of Older Siblings of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Older Siblings of Children with Typical Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, Renuka Sundaram

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the emotional well-being of older siblings of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and older siblings of children with typical hearing (control group). We interviewed 70 families and had both the parent and the older sibling complete questionnaires on sibling perceptions and relationships. Findings revealed no significant…

  10. Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, A K; Granlund, M; Wilder, J

    2013-07-01

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's 'involvement in a life situation'. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared. A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test. Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities. Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Programs for the Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This directory lists contact information for programs for the deaf-blind in the United States in 3 categories: (1) programs for deaf-blind children and youth (29 programs listed); (2) Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults (1 national and 10 regional offices); and (3) programs for training teachers of the deaf-blind (4…

  12. [Hereditary deafness in Kirov oblast: estimation of the incidence rate and DNA diagnosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Osetrova, A A; Sharonova, E I

    2012-04-01

    Genetic analysis of hereditary deafness (HD) has been performed in the city of Kirov and ten rural districts of Kirov oblast (administrative region). The analysis employed the methods used in audiology, medical genetic counseling, and DNA diagnosis. Deafness has been established to be hereditary in 143 children from 100 unrelated families. The incidence rates of isolated and syndromic HDs in the period studied (1995-2001) have been estimated at 1.25 and 0.36 per 1000 newborns, respectively, the total incidence rate of all HD forms being 1.61 per 1000 newborns (1 case per 621 newborns). DNA analysis for the detection of seven frequent mutations in the genes GJB2 (the 35delG, 167delT, 235delC, and M34T mutations), GJB6 (the del(GJB6-D13S1854) and del(GJB6-D13S1830) mutations), and TMC1 (the R34X mutation) has been performed in families with isolated neurosensory deafness. Molecular genetic analysis has detected mutations in 51 children (48.6%); in 54 children (51.4%), no mutations have been found. The following genotypes have been identified in children with HD: 35delG/35delG in 32 probands (30.5%), 35delG/+ in 16 probands (15.2%), 35delG/235delC in 1 proband (0.95%), M34T/+ in 1 proband (0.95%), and M34T/35delG in 1 proband (0.95%). The 167delT mutation has not been found. The frequency of the 35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene has been estimated to be 39.05%. In the group with a family history of HD, mutations have been found in 66.7% of patients; in the group without a family history of HD, in 37.5% of patients. No mutation has been found in the GJB6 or TMC1 gene. Molecular genetic analysis has been performed in a family with clinically diagnosed Treacher Collins-Franceschetti syndrome. Sequencing has been used to find the 748-69C>T polymorphism in intron 6 (in the homozygous state) and the 3635C>G mutation in exon 23 leading to the substitution of glycine for alanine at position 1176 of the amino acid sequence (Ala1176Gly, in the heterozygous state), which have not

  13. Perception of binaural cues develops in children who are deaf through bilateral cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Karen A; Deighton, Michael R; Abbasalipour, Parvaneh; Papsin, Blake C

    2014-01-01

    There are significant challenges to restoring binaural hearing to children who have been deaf from an early age. The uncoordinated and poor temporal information available from cochlear implants distorts perception of interaural timing differences normally important for sound localization and listening in noise. Moreover, binaural development can be compromised by bilateral and unilateral auditory deprivation. Here, we studied perception of both interaural level and timing differences in 79 children/adolescents using bilateral cochlear implants and 16 peers with normal hearing. They were asked on which side of their head they heard unilaterally or bilaterally presented click- or electrical pulse- trains. Interaural level cues were identified by most participants including adolescents with long periods of unilateral cochlear implant use and little bilateral implant experience. Interaural timing cues were not detected by new bilateral adolescent users, consistent with previous evidence. Evidence of binaural timing detection was, for the first time, found in children who had much longer implant experience but it was marked by poorer than normal sensitivity and abnormally strong dependence on current level differences between implants. In addition, children with prior unilateral implant use showed a higher proportion of responses to their first implanted sides than children implanted simultaneously. These data indicate that there are functional repercussions of developing binaural hearing through bilateral cochlear implants, particularly when provided sequentially; nonetheless, children have an opportunity to use these devices to hear better in noise and gain spatial hearing.

  14. Frequency of Congenital Heart Diseases in Prelingual Sensory-Neural Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing impairment is the most frequent sensorial congenital defect in newborns and has increased to 2–4 cases per 1,000 live births. Sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL accounts for more than 90% of all hearing loss. This disorder is associated with other congenital disorders such as renal, skeletal, ocular, and cardiac disorders. Given that congenital heart diseases are life-threatening, we decided to study the frequency of congenital heart diseases in children with congenital sensory-neural deafness.  Materials and Methods: All children who had undergone cochlear implantation surgery due to SNHL and who had attended our hospital for speech therapy during 2008–2011 were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography.  Results: Thirty-one children (15 boys and 16 girls with a mean age of 55.70 months were examined, and underwent electrocardiography (ECG and echocardiography. None of the children had any signs of heart problems in their medical records. Most of their heart examinations were normal, one patient had expiratory wheeze, four (12% had mid-systolic click, and four (12% had an intensified S1 sound. In echocardiography, 15 children (46% had mitral valve prolapse (MVP and two (6% had minimal mitral regurgitation (MR. Mean ejection fraction (EF was 69% and the mean fractional shortening (FS was 38%.  Conclusion:  This study indicates the need for echocardiography and heart examinations in children with SNHL.

  15. Objective analysis versus subjective assessment of vowels pronounced by deaf and normal-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkum, M J; Plomp, R; Pols, L W

    1995-08-01

    Objective whole-spectrum and formant analyses have been performed on all 15 Dutch vowels pronounced in /C1VC2/ words by 24 deaf and 24 normal-hearing children, in order to develop a model of pronunciation quality for evaluating (deaf) speech; the results as obtained for adult males by Bakkum et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 1989-2004 (1993)] have been verified and extended. Spectral representations of the vowels were created by determining the output levels of a bank of 16 filters (90-7200 Hz), with 1/3-oct bandwidths and logarithmic spacing of their center frequencies. Spectral differences agree well with subjective differences in pronunciation quality obtained from magnitude estimation and identification experiments. Spectral differences not related to pronunciation quality judgments arise as a consequence of physiological interspeaker differences and variation in fundamental frequency, but these differences can be compensated for by speaker-normalization and F0-compensation procedures. Using principal components analysis (PCA), the vowel spectra can be described by a limited number of dimensions, without losing much information; a description in a two-dimensional PCA subspace still agrees well with the subjective judgments and it also agrees with a description by the first two formants. The whole-spectrum approach provides a determinate, readily interpretable model of pronunciation quality for evaluating vowels. As a practical advantage, its computational requirements are modest and, in conjunction with PCA, the vowel dynamics can be visualized, which makes the approach suitable for vowel training and diagnostics.

  16. Developing a Sense of Knowing and Acquiring the Skills to Manage Pain in Children with Profound Cognitive Impairments: Mothers’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Carter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with profound cognitive impairment (PCI are a heterogenous group who often experience frequent and persistent pain. Those people closest to the child are key to assessing their pain. This mixed method study aimed to explore how parents acquire knowledge and skills in assessing and managing their child’s pain. Eight mothers completed a weekly pain diary and were interviewed at weeks 1 and 8. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis and the quantitative data using descriptive statistics. Mothers talked of learning through a system of trial and error (“learning to get on with it”; this was accomplished through “learning to know without a rule book or guide”; “learning to be a convincing advocate”; and “learning to endure and to get things right.” Experiential and reflective learning was evident in the way the mothers developed a “sense of knowing” their child’s pain. They drew on embodied knowledge of how their child usually expressed and responded to pain to help make pain-related decisions. Health professionals need to support mothers/parents to develop their knowledge and skills and to gain confidence in pain assessment and they should recognise and act on the mothers’ concerns.

  17. Music: A Tool for Expressive and Receptive Vocabulary for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Children with congenital hearing loss are at risk for speech, language, and academic delays. Early identification of hearing loss provides the opportunity for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) to obtain appropriate technology, such as hearing aids or cochlear implants, and to receive early intervention services to optimize development of listening and spoken language. Almost all industrialized countries have adopted policies for universal newborn hearing screening (National Cente...

  18. The use of a Multisensory Environment for Assessment of Sensory Abilities and Preferences in Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla; Schuivens, Evelyne

    Background To offer appropriate activities within the curriculum for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is a challenge. An important determinant of the adequacy of an activity is whether teachers have detailed and specific knowledge about the sensory abilities and

  19. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  20. Background and educational characteristics of prelingually deaf children implanted by five years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann; Brenner, Chris

    2003-02-01

    This study documents child, family and educational characteristics of a large representative sample of 8- to 9-yr-old prelingually deaf children who received a cochlear implant by 5 yr of age. Because pre-existing factors such as the child's gender, family characteristics, additional handicaps, age at onset of deafness and at implant, may affect postimplant outcomes, these variables must be accounted for before the impact of educational factors on performance with an implant can be adequately determined. Classroom variables that may affect postimplant outcomes include placement in public or private, mainstream or special education, oral or total communication environments. Other intervention variables include type and amount of individual therapy, experience of the therapist and parent participation in therapy. Documenting these characteristics for a large representative sample of implanted children can provide clinicians and researchers with insight regarding the types of families who sought early cochlear implantation for their children and the types of educational programs in which they placed their children after implantation. It is important to undertake studies that control for as many of these factors as possible so that the relative benefits of specific educational approaches for helping children to get the most benefit from their cochlear implant can be identified. Over a 4-yr period, 181 children from across the US and Canada, accompanied by a parent, attended a cochlear implant research camp. Parents completed questionnaires in which they reported the child's medical and educational history, characteristics of the family, and their participation in the child's therapy. The parent listed names and addresses of clinicians who had provided individual speech/language therapy to the child and signed permission for these clinicians to complete questionnaires describing this therapy. To the extent that this sample is representative of those families seeking a

  1. Fifty Years of Research on the Intelligence of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: A Review of Literature and Discussion of Implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCay Vernon

    2005-01-01

    ... the publication of this classic review paper. Vernon succinctly spotlights biases in IQ, assessment of deaf children resulting from improper testing methods, research participant sampling, even the experience level of the evaluators themselves...

  2. Effect of age at cochlear implantation and at exposure to Cued Speech on literacy skills in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, S; Ecalle, J; Truy, E; Lina-Granade, G; Magnan, A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how age at cochlear implantation (CI) and age at exposure to Cued Speech (CS, Manual system that resolves the ambiguity inherent lipreading) could impact literacy skills in deaf children. Ninety deaf children fitted with CI (early vs late) and exposed to CS (early vs late) from primary schools (from Grade 2 to Grade 5) took part in this study. Five literacy skills were assessed: phonological skills through phoneme deletion, reading (decoding and sentence comprehension), word spelling and vocabulary. The results showed that both age at CI and age at first exposure to CS had some influence on literacy skills but there was no interaction between these factors. This implies that the positive effects of age at CI, especially on all literacy skills in the younger children, were not strengthened by age at exposure to CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Joint Engagement in Young Deaf and Hearing Children: Effects of Chronological Age and Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, Ivette; Barker, David H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Niparko, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate joint engagement (JE) in age-matched children with and without hearing and its relationship to oral language skills. Method: Participants were 180 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss prior to cochlear implant surgery, and 96 age-matched children with normal hearing; all parents were hearing. JE was evaluated in a…

  4. The effect of enhanced storybook interaction on signing deaf children's vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, Jessica W; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2014-07-01

    The link between vocabulary and later literacy is well documented in the research base. One way children gain vocabulary is through incidental learning. Deaf or hard-of-hearing children (D/HH) often struggle with incidental learning and require vocabulary intervention to increase their lexicon. An effective vocabulary intervention is storybook reading. When dialogic methods are added to storybook reading, the gains are greater than with traditional storybook reading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an enhanced storybook reading intervention, which included scripted questions and picture prompts, on the vocabulary of young signing D/HH children. We utilized a multiple baseline across content probe design. We discovered a functional relation between the storybook intervention and picture vocabulary identification for several participants. This outcome offers insight into appropriate interventions to increase vocabulary for signing D/HH children. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Computerized Sign Language-Based Literacy Training for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Emil; Heimann, Mikael; Rudner, Mary

    2017-10-01

    Strengthening the connections between sign language and written language may improve reading skills in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) signing children. The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether computerized sign language-based literacy training improves reading skills in DHH signing children who are learning to read. Further, longitudinal associations between sign language skills and developing reading skills were investigated. Participants were recruited from Swedish state special schools for DHH children, where pupils are taught in both sign language and spoken language. Reading skills were assessed at five occasions and the intervention was implemented in a cross-over design. Results indicated that reading skills improved over time and that development of word reading was predicted by the ability to imitate unfamiliar lexical signs, but there was only weak evidence that it was supported by the intervention. These results demonstrate for the first time a longitudinal link between sign-based abilities and word reading in DHH signing children who are learning to read. We suggest that the active construction of novel lexical forms may be a supramodal mechanism underlying word reading development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Theory of Mind and Reading Comprehension in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Signing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Emil; Heimann, Mikael; Rudner, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is related to reading comprehension in hearing children. In the present study, we investigated progression in ToM in Swedish deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) signing children who were learning to read, as well as the association of ToM with reading comprehension. Thirteen children at Swedish state primary schools for DHH children performed a Swedish Sign Language (SSL) version of the Wellman and Liu (2004) ToM scale, along with tests of reading comprehension, SSL comprehension, and working memory. Results indicated that ToM progression did not differ from that reported in previous studies, although ToM development was delayed despite age-appropriate sign language skills. Correlation analysis revealed that ToM was associated with reading comprehension and working memory, but not sign language comprehension. We propose that some factor not investigated in the present study, possibly represented by inference making constrained by working memory capacity, supports both ToM and reading comprehension and may thus explain the results observed in the present study.

  7. Theory of Mind and Reading Comprehension in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Signing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Emil; Heimann, Mikael; Rudner, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is related to reading comprehension in hearing children. In the present study, we investigated progression in ToM in Swedish deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) signing children who were learning to read, as well as the association of ToM with reading comprehension. Thirteen children at Swedish state primary schools for DHH children performed a Swedish Sign Language (SSL) version of the Wellman and Liu (2004) ToM scale, along with tests of reading comprehension, SSL comprehension, and working memory. Results indicated that ToM progression did not differ from that reported in previous studies, although ToM development was delayed despite age-appropriate sign language skills. Correlation analysis revealed that ToM was associated with reading comprehension and working memory, but not sign language comprehension. We propose that some factor not investigated in the present study, possibly represented by inference making constrained by working memory capacity, supports both ToM and reading comprehension and may thus explain the results observed in the present study. PMID:27375532

  8. Theory of Mind and Reading Comprehension in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Signing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil eHolmer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Theory of Mind (ToM is related to reading comprehension in hearing children. In the present study, we investigated progression in ToM in Swedish deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH signing children who were learning to read, as well as its assocation with reading comprehension. Thirteen children at Swedish state primary schools for DHH children performed a Swedish Sign Language (SSL version of the Wellman and Liu (2004 ToM scale, along with tests of reading comprehension, SSL comprehension, and working memory. Results indicated that ToM progression did not differ from that reported in previous studies, although ToM development was delayed despite age-appropriate sign language skills. Correlation analysis revealed that ToM was associated with reading comprehension and working memory, but not sign language comprehension. We propose that some factor not investigated in the present study, possibly represented by inference making constrained by working memory capacity, supports both ToM and reading comprehension and may thus explain the results observed in the present study.

  9. Recognition of Disorders and Emotional Problems of Deaf Children Using House-Tree-Person and Draw-A-Person Tests in Comparison with Normal Children of Hamadan Province

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    D. Amini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Deaf children have special emotional reactions, Understanding these characteristics and problems can help medical and paramedical professionals, parents and teachers to reach the purpose of behavioral adaptability.The present study was performed in order to recognize disorders, emotional problems and functions of deaf children compared with normal children in emotional components of anxiety, depression, aggression, impulsiv-ity and lack of compromise. Materials & Methods: In order to recognize emotional disorders and problems of deaf children, sample groups of 120 male and female patients (60 deaf children and 60 children with nor-mal hearing with equal number of male and female enrolled in primary schools of Hamadan province were selected by multi stage randomly sampling in this casual_comparative study. House-Tree-Person (HTP and Draw-A-Person tests (DAP were used to determine their emotional problems. Results:Our results indicate that in terms of parameters related to the two tests (distance of three components of each other ,anxiety, aggression, depression and impulsivity and lack of compromise, participants' overall scores in two tests by major scales such as anxiety (?=0.01, P< 0.05; 3.48, 3.13 aggression (?= 0.05 , 0.01, P< 0.05; 6.12 ,3.97 depression (?=0.05 P<0.05 ; 3.75,3.81 , impulsivity (?=0.05, 0.01, P<0.05 ; 3.47, 3.01 and lack of compromise (?=0.05, 0.01, P<0.05; 4.89, 4.95 are significantly different from each other. Conclusion:The deaf children in terms of denotative parameters related to the two tests are sig-nificantly different from normal children; and the overall scores obtained on each of the scales generally show a significant difference with normal children,In the deaf group with regard to gender variable (male and female significant differences in some of the scales such as distance of three components of each other ,anxiety, aggression, depression and lack of compromise iare observed between

  10. Factors influencing speech and language outcomes of children with early identified severe/profound hearing loss: Clinician-identified facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Anne Nivelles; Purcell, Alison; Baker, Elise; Munro, Natalie

    2015-06-01

    Early identification of severe/profound childhood hearing loss (HL) gives these children access to hearing devices and early intervention to facilitate improved speech and language outcomes. Predicting which infants will go on to achieve such outcomes remains difficult. This study describes clinician identified malleable and non-malleable factors that may influence speech and language outcomes for children with severe/profound HL. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six experienced auditory verbal clinicians. A collective case study design was implemented. The interviews were transcribed and coded into themes using constant comparative analysis. Clinicians identified that, for children with severe/profound HL, early identification, early amplification and commencing auditory-verbal intervention under 6 months of age may facilitate child progress. Possible barriers were living in rural/remote areas, the clinicians' lack of experience and confidence in providing intervention for infants under age 6-months and belonging to a family with a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background. The results indicate that multiple factors need to be considered by clinicians working with children with HL and their families to determine how each child functions within their own environment and personal contexts, consistent with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Such an approach is likely to empower clinicians to carefully balance potential barriers to, and facilitators of, optimal speech and language outcomes for all children with HL.

  11. Speech perception, production and intelligibility in French-speaking children with profound hearing loss and early cochlear implantation after congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, L; Ettienne, V; Prang, I; Couloigner, V; Garabedian, E-N; Loundon, N

    2015-12-01

    To analyze speech in children with profound hearing loss following congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection with cochlear implantation (CI) before the age of 3 years. In a cohort of 15 children with profound hearing loss, speech perception, production and intelligibility were assessed before and 3 years after CI; variables impacting results were explored. Post-CI, median word recognition was 74% on closed-list and 48% on open-list testing; 80% of children acquired speech production; and 60% were intelligible for all listeners or listeners attentive to lip-reading and/or aware of the child's hearing loss. Univariate analysis identified 3 variables (mean post-CI hearing threshold, bilateral vestibular areflexia, and brain abnormality on MRI) with significant negative impact on the development of speech perception, production and intelligibility. CI showed positive impact on hearing and speech in children with post-cCMV profound hearing loss. Our study demonstrated the key role of maximizing post-CI hearing gain. A few children had insufficient progress, especially in case of bilateral vestibular areflexia and/or brain abnormality on MRI. This led us to suggest that balance rehabilitation and speech therapy should be intensified in such cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Receptive vocabulary development in deaf children with cochlear implants: achievement in an intensive auditory-oral educational setting.

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    Hayes, Heather; Geers, Ann E; Treiman, Rebecca; Moog, Jean Sachar

    2009-02-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants are at a disadvantage in learning vocabulary when compared with hearing peers. Past research has reported that children with implants have lower receptive vocabulary scores and less growth over time than hearing children. Research findings are mixed as to the effects of age at implantation on vocabulary skills and development. One goal of the current study is to determine how children with cochlear implants educated in an auditory-oral environment compared with their hearing peers on a receptive vocabulary measure in overall achievement and growth rates. This study will also investigate the effects of age at implant on vocabulary abilities and growth rates. We expect that the children with implants will have smaller vocabularies than their hearing peers but will achieve similar rates of growth as their implant experience increases. We also expect that children who receive their implants at young ages will have better overall vocabulary and higher growth rates than older-at-implant children. Repeated assessments using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test were given to 65 deaf children with cochlear implants who used oral communication, who were implanted under the age of 5 yr, and who attended an intensive auditory-oral education program. Multilevel modeling was used to describe overall abilities and rates of receptive vocabulary growth over time. On average, the deaf children with cochlear implants had lower vocabulary scores than their hearing peers. However, the deaf children demonstrated substantial vocabulary growth, making more than 1 yr's worth of progress in a year. This finding contrasts with those of previous studies of children with implants, which found lower growth rates. A negative quadratic trend indicated that growth decelerated with time. Age at implantation significantly affected linear and quadratic growth. Younger-at-implant children had steeper growth rates but more tapering off with time than children

  13. Frequency of Usher syndrome in two pediatric populations: Implications for genetic screening of deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, William J; Hildebrand, Michael S; Shearer, A Eliot; Jensen, Maren L; Halder, Jennifer A; Trzupek, Karmen; Cohn, Edward S; Weleber, Richard G; Stone, Edwin M; Smith, Richard J H

    2010-08-01

    Usher syndrome is a major cause of genetic deafness and blindness. The hearing loss is usually congenital and the retinitis pigmentosa is progressive and first noticed in early childhood to the middle teenage years. Its frequency may be underestimated. Newly developed molecular technologies can detect the underlying gene mutation of this disorder early in life providing estimation of its prevalence in at risk pediatric populations and laying a foundation for its incorporation as an adjunct to newborn hearing screening programs. A total of 133 children from two deaf and hard of hearing pediatric populations were genotyped first for GJB2/6 and, if negative, then for Usher syndrome. Children were scored as positive if the test revealed > or =1 pathogenic mutations in any Usher gene. Fifteen children carried pathogenic mutations in one of the Usher genes; the number of deaf and hard of hearing children carrying Usher syndrome mutations was 15/133 (11.3%). The population prevalence was estimated to be 1/6000. Usher syndrome is more prevalent than has been reported before the genome project era. Early diagnosis of Usher syndrome has important positive implications for childhood safety, educational planning, genetic counseling, and treatment. The results demonstrate that DNA testing for Usher syndrome is feasible and may be a useful addition to newborn hearing screening programs.

  14. Classroom management programs for deaf children in state residential and large public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkus, M; Rittenhouse, B; Dancer, J

    1999-12-01

    Personnel in 4 randomly selected state residential schools for the deaf and 3 randomly selected large public schools with programs for the deaf were surveyed to assess the types of management or disciplinary programs and strategies currently in use with deaf students and the rated effectiveness of such programs. Several behavioral management programs were identified by respondents, with Assertive Discipline most often listed. Ratings of program effectiveness were generally above average on a number of qualitative criteria.

  15. Identifying specific language impairment in deaf children acquiring British Sign Language: implications for theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kathryn; Rowley, Katherine; Marshall, Chloe R; Atkinson, Joanna R; Herman, Rosalind; Woll, Bencie; Morgan, Gary

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the first ever group study of specific language impairment (SLI) in users of sign language. A group of 50 children were referred to the study by teachers and speech and language therapists. Individuals who fitted pre-determined criteria for SLI were then systematically assessed. Here, we describe in detail the performance of 13 signing deaf children aged 5-14 years on normed tests of British Sign Language (BSL) sentence comprehension, repetition of nonsense signs, expressive grammar and narrative skills, alongside tests of non-verbal intelligence and fine motor control. Results show these children to have a significant language delay compared to their peers matched for age and language experience. This impaired development cannot be explained by poor exposure to BSL, or by lower general cognitive, social, or motor abilities. As is the case for SLI in spoken languages, we find heterogeneity within the group in terms of which aspects of language are affected and the severity of the impairment. We discuss the implications of the existence of language impairments in a sign language for theories of SLI and clinical practice.

  16. Canine deafness.

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    Strain, George M

    2012-11-01

    Conductive deafness, caused by outer or middle ear obstruction, may be corrected, whereas sensorineural deafness cannot. Most deafness in dogs is congenital sensorineural hereditary deafness, associated with the genes for white pigment: piebald or merle. The genetic cause has not yet been identified. Dogs with blue eyes have a greater likelihood of hereditary deafness than brown-eyed dogs. Other common forms of sensorineural deafness include presbycusis, ototoxicity, noise-induced hearing loss, otitis interna, and anesthesia. Definitive diagnosis of deafness requires brainstem auditory evoked response testing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bilingualism of Colombian Deaf Children in the Teaching-Learning of Mathematics in the First Year of Elementary School

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    Olga Lucía León Corredor

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes some results of the first ethnographic research study conducted in Colombia in three different elementary schools for deaf children in which bilingualism (sign-language and written-language is starting to be emphasized. This study focuses on the teaching of mathematics in classrooms for deaf children using contexts proclaimed as bilingual. The participants in the study were first grade teachers. The analysis presented in this paper illustrates the struggles that teachers experience teaching arithmetic in such a context. The teaching of arithmetic using bilingualism requires three types of semiotic registers: sign-language and written-Spanish, and the Hindu-Arabic numeration system. The analysis indicates some puzzling teaching learning issues interweaving language and mathematics. These issues are of linguistic and communicative, social and cultural, and cognitive and pedagogical nature.

  18. Deaf Children Building Narrative Texts. Effect of Adult-Shared vs. Non-Shared Perception of a Picture Story

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    Tarwacka-Odolczyk Agata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the communicative competence of deaf children. It illustrates the process in which such children build narrative texts in interaction with a deaf teacher, and presents the diversity of this process due to the shared vs. non-shared perception of a picture - the source of the topic. Detailed analyses focus on the formal and semantic aspect of the stories, including the length of the text in sign language, the content selected, information categories, and types of answers to the teacher’s questions. This text is our contribution in memory of Professor Grace Wales Shugar, whose idea of dual agentivity of child-adult interaction inspired the research presented here.

  19. The incidence of congenital syphilis and hepatitis-B virus surface antigen carrier state among deaf mute children

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    Gururaj A Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred deaf mute children of both the sexes, aged between 5-16 years were examined for the presence of syphilitic stigmata. All these children were having bilateral total sensory-neural deafness. None showed Hutchinson′s triad. VDRL and micro TPHA tests for syphilis and RPHA test for HbsAg tested Blood samples. VDRL test was positive in 15 (5% TPHA test in 34 (1133% cases and HBsAg in 36 (12% cases. VDRL and TPHA tests were both Positive in 15 (5% cases, but VDRL negativity was observed in 19,(6.3% TPHA positive cases, while VDRL, TPHA and HBsAg were positive in6 (2% cases.

  20. Language ENvironment Analysis Language and Autism Screen and the Child Development Inventory Social Subscale as a possible autism screen for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jason; Xu, Dongxin; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2014-11-01

    The Language ENvironment Analysis Language and Autism Screen (LLAS) is an automated vocal production analysis that has been shown to be a valid screener for autism in hearing children between the ages of 24 to 48 months of age. Although there is reportedly a higher incidence of autism among children who are deaf or hard of hearing, the diagnosis of autism is usually later than that in children with hearing. None of the traditional screening instruments have been used with children with hearing loss. Data about the utility of LLAS with children who are deaf or hard of hearing will be presented and discussed. Though more data will be needed, an LLAS at-risk flag in conjunction with the Social Quotient from the Child Development Inventory holds significant promise for a screen for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.