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Sample records for profound learning disabilities

  1. Research Ethics Committees and the Benefits of Involving People with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, Kathy; Ralph, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in service user involvement in research, such involvement rarely extends to people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. New developments in visual methodologies offer the potential for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities to be included in research. At the same time, however,…

  2. Abdominal Massage for the Treatment of Idiopathic Constipation in Children with Profound Learning Disabilities: A Single Case Study Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lucy; Smith, Melanie; Wharton, Sarah; Hames, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common problem in people with learning disabilities. Treatment often involves dietary changes or long-term laxative use. The participants were five children with profound learning disabilities and additional physical difficulties. Their long-standing idiopathic constipation was managed by laxatives. Intervention lasted up…

  3. Using Photovoice to Include People with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities in Inclusive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluley, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is now expected that projects addressing the lives of people with learning disabilities include people with learning disabilities in the research process. In the past, such research often excluded people with learning disabilities, favouring the opinions of family members, carers and professionals. The inclusion of the voices of…

  4. From Individualism to Co-Construction and Back Again: Rethinking Research Methodology for Children with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ben; Watson, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are said to experience severe congenital impairments to consciousness and cognition stemming from neurological damage. Such children are understood as operating at the pre-verbal stages of development, and research in the field typically draws conceptual resources from psychology to…

  5. A comparison of the effects of four therapy procedures on concentration and responsiveness in people with profound learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, W R; Pitcaithly, D; Geelen, N; Buntin, L; Broxholme, S; Ashby, M

    1997-06-01

    This paper is an investigation into the efficacy of four therapeutic treatment procedures increasingly used with people with profound learning disabilities: snoezelen, hand massage/aromatherapy, relaxation, and active therapy (a bouncy castle). In particular, the effects of these procedures on concentration and responsiveness were examined. Eight subjects with profound learning disabilities took part in the study and each subject received each of the treatments. To assess the effects of the treatments, simple concentration tasks were administered and the subjects' responsiveness to each treatment was rated by independent observers. The results suggest that both snoezelen and relaxation had a positive effect on concentration and seemed to be the most enjoyable therapies for clients, whereas hand massage/aromatherapy and active therapy had no or even negative effects on concentration and appeared less enjoyable.

  6. An ecological method for the sampling of nonverbal signalling behaviours of young children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith; Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2016-08-01

    Profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are a complex range of disabilities that affect the general health and well-being of the individual and their capacity to interact and learn. We developed a new methodology to capture the non-symbolic signalling behaviours of children with PMLD within the context of a face-to-face interaction with a caregiver to provide analysis at a micro-level of descriptive detail incorporating the use of the ELAN digital video software. The signalling behaviours of participants in a natural, everyday interaction can be better understood with the use of this innovation in methodology, which is predicated on the ecology of communication. Recognition of the developmental ability of the participants is an integral factor within that ecology. The method presented establishes an advanced account of the modalities through which a child affected by PMLD is able to communicate.

  7. Health promotion for young people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathy; Carter, Simone; Myers, Elizabeth; Rocca, Nicola

    2018-02-07

    Research confirms that children and young people with severe learning disabilities do not have the same level of access to high-quality care, health education and health promotion activities as children and young people without disabilities. This article discusses a quality improvement, action research project to investigate alternative approaches to health promotion that enhance the health and well-being of children and young people with complex neurodisabilities. The project involved assessment of school records and completion by staff of an eight-question survey. It found that the proactive approach of school nurses in raising awareness and understanding through questioning was positively received, and reinforced how meaningful and relevant information could be delivered to these young people. The project also had unexpected benefits, including more integrated team working, increased knowledge, greater awareness and understanding of the importance of health promotion participation, and student satisfaction. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  8. Staffs' documentation of participation for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Lena; Gustafsson, Christine; Stier, Jonas; Wilder, Jenny

    2017-06-21

    This study investigated what areas of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health were documented in implementation plans for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities with focus on participation. A document analysis of 17 implementation plans was performed and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as an analytic tool. One hundred and sixty-three different codes were identified, especially in the components Activities and participation and Environmental factors. Participation was most frequently coded in the chapters Community, social and civic life and Self-care. Overall, the results showed that focus in the implementation plans concerned Self-care and Community, social and civic life. The other life areas in Activities and participation were seldom, or not at all, documented. A deeper focus on participation in the implementation plans and all life areas in the component Activities and participation is needed. It is important that the documentation clearly shows what the adult wants, wishes, and likes in everyday life. It is also important to ensure that the job description for staff contains both life areas and individual preferences so that staff have the possibility to work to fulfill social and individual participation for the target group. Implications for rehabilitation There is a need for functioning working models to increase participation significantly for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. For these adults, participation is achieved through the assistance of others and support and services carried out must be documented in an implementation plan. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can be used to support staff and ensure that information about the most important factors in an individual's functioning in their environment is not omitted in

  9. Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Learning Disabilities KidsHealth > For Teens > Learning Disabilities Print A ... study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? For someone diagnosed with a learning disability, ...

  10. Learn and Apply: Using Multi-Sensory Storytelling to Gather Knowledge about Preferences and Abilities of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities--Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the preferences and abilities of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs) is crucial for providing appropriate activities. Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) can be an ideal activity for gathering such knowledge about children with PIMDs. The aim of this study was to analyse whether using MSST did lead…

  11. Human dignity and the profoundly disabled: a theological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Pia

    2011-01-01

    One challenge to the concept of human dignity is that it is a rootless notion invoked simply to mask inequalities that inevitably exist between human beings. This privileging of humans is speciesist and its weak point is the profoundly disabled human being. This article argues that far from being a weak point, the profoundly disabled person is a source of strength and witness to the intrinsic dignity that all human beings have by virtue of being human. The disabled represent the reality of human existence that is both strong and fragile. Although human dignity can be understood philosophically its depth is rooted in Christian theological insights. The profoundly disabled occupy a privileged position and share in a theology of mission since they testify to the interdependence of every human being and human dependence on God to a myopic world that only values strength, autonomy and independence.

  12. Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  13. Learn and apply: using multi-sensory storytelling to gather knowledge about preferences and abilities of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities--three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brug, Annet Ten; Van der Putten, Annette A J; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about the preferences and abilities of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs) is crucial for providing appropriate activities. Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) can be an ideal activity for gathering such knowledge about children with PIMDs. The aim of this study was to analyse whether using MSST did lead to changes in teachers' knowledge about preferences and abilities and whether this knowledge was then applied in practice. Three dyads of children with PIMDs and their teachers read an MSST book 20 times during a 10-week period. A questionnaire designed to identify the teachers' current knowledge was filled in before the 1st and again after the 10th and 20th reading sessions. Also, the teachers were asked for their opinion about their newly gathered knowledge. In all three cases, changes in the teachers' knowledge were observed. However, teachers are insufficiently aware of their new knowledge and do not apply it in practice.

  14. Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James J.; McCarthy, Joan F.

    An attempt to collate basic knowledge concerning learning disabilities, the text discusses the background and definition of learning disabilities, and its identification, etiology, and epidemiology. Guidelines for diagnostic evaluation are presented as are approaches from perceptual motor, developmental, visual, neurophysiological, linguistic, and…

  15. Learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on

  16. Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD) See all related organizations Publications Problemas de aprendizaje Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations CHADD - Children and ... NICHD) See all related organizations Publications Problemas de aprendizaje Order NINDS Publications Definition Learning disabilities are disorders ...

  17. Learning Disabilities and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disabilities Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities affect how you understand, remember, and ... learning skills, including memory tips from LD Online. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) top ADHD is a medical condition that ...

  18. Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities : the effects of functional movement activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To determine the effect of functional movement activities within the MOVE ( Mobility Opportunities Via Education) curriculum on the independence of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Subjects: Forty-four children with profound intellectual and multiple

  19. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  20. Healhy Ageing in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities : Promoting Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, Helena; Bossink, Leontien; Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; van der Putten, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is beneficial, also for people who are characterized by profound intellectual and severe motor disabilities. However, these people are totally dependent on others to participate in physical activities. To date, promoting physical activity in people with these profound disabilities

  1. Teaching Individuals with Profound Multiple Disabilities to Access Preferred Stimuli with Multiple Microswitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gee May; Phillips, Katrina J.; Mudford, Oliver C.

    2011-01-01

    We replicated and extended previous research on microswitch facilitated choice making by individuals with profound multiple disabilities. Following an assessment of stimulus preferences, we taught 6 adults with profound multiple disabilities to emit 2 different responses to activate highly preferred stimuli. All participants learnt to activate…

  2. Factors influencing attentiveness of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities in multisensory storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Penne, Anneleen; Maes, Bea; Vlaskamp, Carla

    Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is a storytelling method developed for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The developers of MSST have established specific guidelines aimed at increasing the listener's attention. Whether, and to what extent, these guidelines indeed

  3. Joint Attention Behaviours in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: The Influence of the Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerinckx, Heleen; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of the profound cognitive and physical problems, people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are able to develop joint attention behaviours (JAB) and benefit from positive interactions. Aims: To investigate which context factors influence the JAB of people with PIMD. Method: Based on video recordings of…

  4. Standing Ovations and Profound Learning: Cultural Diversity in Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes the profound learning that took place at the International Children's Theatre Festival in Toyama City, Japan in July 2000. Argues that participation by the Japanese-American Drama Ensemble, a youth group from the public schools in Lexington, Massachusetts, and more than 400 children from all over the planet, showcased the cultural…

  5. The role of attention in the affective life of people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Pieter; De Cock, Paul; Munde, Vera; Neerinckx, Heleen; Petry, Katja; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Maes, Bea

    Although it is shown that attention plays an important role both in the onset and in the regulation of emotions in people without disabilities there is no information about how attention is related to emotions in people with severe or profound intellectual disability (ID). Therefore, in our study,

  6. Making Sense of Bereavement in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: Carer Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah; Hogg, James; Garrard, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities are thought to have a reduced capacity for understanding death. Drawing on cognitive theory, researchers have suggested that those with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities mainly perceive loss as a mismatch between past and present experiences. However, very little research has…

  7. The Structure of Informal Social Networks of Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, A.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persons with less severe disabilities are able to express their needs and show initiatives in social contacts, persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however, depend on others for this. This study analysed the structure of informal networks of persons with PIMD. Materials and Methods: Data concerning the…

  8. Measuring happiness in individuals with profound multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Joseph A; Circo, Deborah K

    2015-12-01

    This quantitative study assessed whether presentation of preferred items and activities during multiple periods of the day (and over multiple days) increased indices of happiness (over time/sustained) in individuals with PMD. A multiple baseline design across participants was utilized to measure changes in indices of happiness of the participants. Participants were recruited from an adult day activity program specializing in providing assistance to individuals with disabilities. For Mary, baseline indices of happiness were 26.67% of intervals, increasing 6.76% during intervention to 33.43%. For Caleb, baseline indices of happiness were 20.84% of intervals, increasing 6.34% during intervention to 27.18%. For Mark, baseline indices of happiness were 40.00% of intervals, increasing 12.75% during intervention to 52.75%. Overall interobserver agreement was 82.8%, with interobserver agreement observations occurring during 63.04% of the observations. The results of the investigation demonstrated that presenting preferred items and activities increased the indices of happiness compared to baseline rates of indices of happiness. Results may have been more robust if the participants were assessed for overall responsiveness patterns prior to the initiation of measurement of indices of happiness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Affect attunement in communicative interactions between adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and support workers

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Sheridan Lee

    2017-01-01

    The quality of life of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is affected by many factors, including health status, involvement in activities, and social networks; but most critical is the quality of interaction experienced by the person on a daily basis. For many people with PIMD, most of whom reside in residential services where they receive 24-hour support, the primary people for interaction are paid disability support workers (DSWs). Quality interaction is ...

  10. Visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities: An inventory of visual functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, E.G.C.; Janssen, C.G.C.; van Ramshorst, T.; Deen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities (SPMD) is the subject of considerable debate and is difficult to assess. Methods: In a typical Dutch care organization, all clients with SPMD (n = 76) participated in the study and specific

  11. The Role of Sound in Residential Facilities for People With Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Kirsten A.; Andringa, Tjeerd C.; Baskent, Deniz; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Attention to the auditory environment of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is limited, both in research and practice. As there is a dynamic interplay between the quality of the auditory environment and well-being, a study was undertaken to test the validity of the

  12. Staff interactive style during multisensory storytelling with persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penne, A.; ten Brug, A.; Munde, V.; van der Putten, A.; Vlaskamp, C.; Maes, B.

    Background Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is an individualised activity for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) in which a story is being told with an emphasis on sensory experiences and social interaction. MSST is a promising approach, but needs more empirical

  13. Staff Interactive Style during Multisensory Storytelling with Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penne, A.; ten Brug, A.; Munde, V.; van der Putten, A.; Vlaskamp, C.; Maes, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is an individualised activity for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) in which a story is being told with an emphasis on sensory experiences and social interaction. MSST is a promising approach, but needs more empirical research evidence. In general, there is a lack of…

  14. The impact of medical conditions on the support of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, HP; Vlaskamp, C

    Background The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records

  15. What parents find important in the support of a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S. L. G.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    Background The importance of a partnership between parents and professionals in the support of children with disabilities is widely acknowledged and is one of the key elements of family-centred care'. To what extent family-centred principles are also applied to the support of persons with profound

  16. Motor interventions in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities: motor, cognitive and social effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, Suzanne; van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is generally agreed that motor activity promotes motor, cognitive, and social development, but the specific benefits in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities (S-PID) are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to

  17. Investigating the Relationship between Observed Mood and Emotions in People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, P.; De Cock, P.; Petry, K.; Van Den Noortgate, W.; Maes, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The measurement of subjective well-being in people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities (ID) is a difficult challenge. As they cannot self-report about their life satisfaction, because of severe communicative and cognitive limitations, behavioural observations of their emotions and moods are important in the measurement…

  18. The Development of Plato Computer-Based Instruction for the Severely and Profoundly Developmentally Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Martin A.; Clapp, Elizabeth Jane

    The 2 year project (July 1, 1978 through June 30, 1980) sought to determine the viability, attractiveness, and effectiveness of computer based instruction with approximately 225 severely and profoundly mentally handicapped and developmentally disabled institutionalized children and adults. Over 100 instructional formats were developed by staff…

  19. Peer Interactions among children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities during group activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    Background Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the

  20. Extent, Duration, and Content of Day Services' Activities for Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, Carla; Hiemstra, Saskia J.; Wiersma, Linda A.; Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the Dutch government instituted policies that enable persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) to attend day services. Over the past 15 years, surveys have indicated a progressive increase in the number of hours that such adults spend at day activities centers. However, information about how these…

  1. Individual Focus in an Activity Centre: An Observational Study among Persons with Profound and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, S. J.; Vlaskamp, C.; Wiersma, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are being offered more--and more frequent--day services at activity centres. Little is known about the way direct support persons (DSP) in activity centres divide their time over the various tasks they have to perform and to what extent they are focused on…

  2. Interaction between Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Their Partners: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostyn, Ine; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: High quality interactions are of crucial importance for quality of life of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This literature review describes and synthesises studies addressing the interaction between persons with PIMD and their partners. Method: A computerised literature search using defined…

  3. A functionally focused curriculum for children with profound multiple disabilities : A goal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Reynders, K; Vlaskamp, C; Nakken, H

    Background This study analysed goals formulated in a functionally focused curriculum called Mobility Opportunities Via Education(TM) (MOVE). Method The subjects were 49 children with profound multiple disabilities (PMD) who attended a centre for special education where the MOVE curriculum was

  4. Heart rate and physical activity patterns in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Putten, A.A.J. van der; Stewart, R.E.; Steenbergen, B.; Wijck, R. van; Schans, C.P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  5. Heart rate and physical activity patterns in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Putten, A.A. van der; Stewart, R.E.; Steenbergen, B.; Wijck, R. van; Schans, C.P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  6. HEART RATE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN PERSONS WITH PROFOUND INTELLECTUAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, Aly; van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Stewart, Roy E.; Steenbergen, Bert; van Wijck, Ruud; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  7. Assessment of Computer-Based Preferences of Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Bishop, Vanessa A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on two studies investigating the use of computer-based stimuli that may then be used to develop activities and programming for students with profound multiple disabilities (PMD). Both studies used an alternating treatments design and systematic assessment strategy to present stimuli sequentially and to measure student…

  8. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  9. Social Peer Interactions in Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Maes, Bea

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions may positively influence developmental and quality of life outcomes. Research in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) mostly investigated interactions with caregivers. This literature review focuses on peer interactions of persons with PIMD. A computerized literature search of three databases was…

  10. Science and Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    1988-01-01

    Reactions to H. Lee Swanson's paper "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" are outlined, and his arguments are applied to reading disabilities, focusing on the importance of the scientific attitude, the misuse of ecological validity, interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work, modularity and reading disability, and scientific progress…

  11. Epidemiology of fractures in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, N.R.; Fischer, M.H.; Heisey, D.M.; Leverson, G.E.; Mann, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fractures are more prevalent among people with severe and profound developmental disabilities than in the general population. In order to characterize the tendency of these people to fracture, and to identify features that may guide the development of preventive strategies, we analyzed fracture epidemiology in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities who lived in a stable environment. Data from a 23-year longitudinal cohort registry of 1434 people with severe and profound developmental disabilities were analyzed to determine the effects of age, gender, mobility, bone fractured, month of fracture, and fracture history upon fracture rates. Eighty-five percent of all fractures involved the extremities. The overall fracture rate increased as mobility increased. In contrast, femoral shaft fracture risk was substantially higher in the least mobile [relative risk (RR), 10.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.29-32.66] compared with the most mobile group. Although the overall fracture rate was not associated with age, the femoral shaft fractures decreased but hand/foot fractures increased with age. Overall fracture risk declined in August and September (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89), being especially prominent for tibial/fibular fractures (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.13-0.70). Gender was not a factor in fracture risk. Two primary fracture mechanisms are apparent: one, largely associated with lack of weight-bearing in people with the least mobility, is exemplified by femoral fractures during non-traumatic events as simple as diapering or transfers; the other, probably due to movement- or fall-related trauma, is exemplified by hand/foot fractures in people who ambulate. The fracture experience of people with severe and profound developmental disabilities is unique and, because it differs qualitatively from postmenopausal osteoporosis, may require population-specific methods for assessing risk, for improving bone integrity, and for reduction of falls and accidents

  12. Learning Disabilities. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #7

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Learning disability" is a general term that describes specific kinds of learning problems. A learning disability can cause a person to have trouble learning and using certain skills. The skills most often affected are: reading, writing, listening, speaking, reasoning, and doing math. Following a brief story about a child with a learning…

  13. Making Sense of Bereavement in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: Carer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah; Hogg, James; Garrard, Brenda

    2017-11-01

    People with intellectual disabilities are thought to have a reduced capacity for understanding death. Drawing on cognitive theory, researchers have suggested that those with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities mainly perceive loss as a mismatch between past and present experiences. However, very little research has considered how carers conceptualize bereavement in relation to this group. Semi-structured interviews obtained responses from seven carers. Transcripts were examined using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Two superordinate themes emerged: 'difficulty articulating the experience of loss' and 'making sense of bereavement through familiar patterns'. Carers conceptualize bereavement primarily in cognitive terms, but also take account of relational factors mediating loss. Implications for training and further research are outlined. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-07-01

    Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Group activities for children with PIMD initiated by a direct support worker were video-recorded. The behaviour and positioning of the children and the behaviour of the direct support workers were coded. Limited peer-directed behaviour of the children with PIMD and peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers are observed. Weak associations were found between the positioning or peer interaction-influencing behaviours and the behaviour of children with PIMD. Children with PIMD show social interest in each other during group activities. More knowledge is needed to create an environment which facilitates peer-directed behaviours of persons with PIMD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Identifying perception behaviours in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Miriam; Verheul, Ellen; Velthausz, Frank

    2017-12-21

    To support people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), it is essential to understand how they experience their environment. Insight into perception behaviour may provide an entry point for improved understanding. A random sample of a 30-min video registration of five participants with PIMD was used to code behaviours per second based on an ethogram containing 157 different perception behaviours in nine categories. Eighty-nine different perception behaviours were observed, of which movements with eyes, head and arms were most common. The senses used most were seeing, hearing and touching. Finally, the function of five perception patterns was established in relation to their function:awareness, focusing attention and tension regulation. Close observation using an observation ethogram provides insight into how people with PIMD perceive their environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The nature of affect attunement used by disability support workers interacting with adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, S; Iacono, T

    2014-12-01

    The interactions experienced by adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) with their disability support workers (DSWs) may have a large impact on life quality. However, defining good-quality interaction has presented challenges for this group. It has been suggested that in typically developing infant-mother dyads, the presence of affect attunement may be an indicator of quality. Affect attunement refers to the recasting of one person's affect by another with emphasis. The presence and nature of affect attunement in interactions between 21 pairs of adults with PIMD and their DSWs were explored in this study. Natural interactions were videorecorded for 21 pairs of adults with PIMD and their DSWs. The recordings were analysed for the presence and nature of affect attunement incidents, and analysed using descriptive statistics. Affect attunement incidents were observed in 16 of the pairs. The DSW's attunement behaviour was in response to subtle, short duration behaviours of participants with PIMD. These brief moments of connection may be a basis of good-quality interaction. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Microswitch Technology for Enabling Self-Determined Responding in Children with Profound and Multiple Disabilities: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Laura; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio E; O'Reilly, Mark F; Green, Vanessa A

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed 18 studies reporting on the use of microswitch technology to enable self-determined responding in children with profound and multiple disabilities. Identified studies that met pre-determined inclusion criteria were summarized in terms of (a) participants, (b) experimental design, (c) microswitches and procedures used, and (d) main results. The 18 studies formed three groups based on whether the microswitch technology was primarily intended to enable the child to (a) access preferred stimuli (7 studies), (b) choose between stimuli (6 studies), or (c) recruit attention/initiate social interaction (5 studies). The results of these studies were consistently positive and support the use of microswitch technology in educational programs for children with profound and multiple disabilities as a means to impact their environment and interact with others. Implications for delivery of augmentative and alternative communication intervention to children with profound and multiple disabilities are discussed.

  18. What parents find important in the support of a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, S L G; van der Putten, A A J; Vlaskamp, C

    2013-05-01

    The importance of a partnership between parents and professionals in the support of children with disabilities is widely acknowledged and is one of the key elements of 'family-centred care'. To what extent family-centred principles are also applied to the support of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is not yet known. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine what parents with a child with PIMD find important in the support of their child. In addition, we examined which child or parent characteristics influence these parental opinions. In total, 100 parents completed an adapted version of the Measure of Processes of Care. Mean unweighted and weighted scale scores were computed. Non-parametric tests were used to examine differences in ratings due to child (gender, age, type and number of additional disabilities, type of services used and duration of service use) and parent characteristics (gender, involvement with support and educational level). Parents rated situations related to 'Respectful and Supportive Care' and 'Enabling and Partnership' with averages of 7.07 and 6.87 respectively on a scale from 1 to 10. They were generally satisfied with the services provided, expressed in a mean score of 6.88 overall. The age of the child significantly affected the scores for 'Providing Specific Information about the Child'. Parents of children in the '6-12 years' age group gave significantly higher scores on this scale than did parents of children in the '≥17 years' age group (U = 288, r = -0.34). This study shows that parents with children with PIMD find family-centred principles in the professional support of their children important. Although the majority of parents are satisfied with the support provided for their children, a substantial minority of the parents indicated that they did not receive the support they find important. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Risk factors associated with challenging behaviour in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppes, P; van der Putten, A J J; Post, W J; Vlaskamp, C

    2016-06-01

    Several factors that correlate with the onset or continuation of challenging behaviour are mentioned in research. These are factors related to persons with ID, but also to direct support professionals and the context. Although many of these factors seem to affect the onset or continuation of challenging behaviour in people with ID in general, results are often inconclusive and have little focus on people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The present study aimed to assess the extent to which known factors related to challenging behaviour are also applicable to a group of 198 people with PIMD. To determine which factors were associated with challenging behaviour, univariate analyses on associations between known risk factors and challenging behaviour were conducted. The associated factors were then subject to a regression analysis to determine the extent to which they explain the prevalence of challenging behaviour and can thus be seen as factors associated with challenging behaviour. The results show that, in particular, factors concerning the personal characteristics of people with PIMD, such as sleeping problems and auditory problems, were related to the variance in mean frequency of challenging behaviour. Only one factor related to the direct support professionals was found: when these professionals had been offered training on the subject of challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disabilities in general, they identified significantly more withdrawn behaviour. We found no contextual factors related to challenging behaviour. These findings are generally consistent with findings reported in other studies, especially concerning the personal characteristics of people with PIMD. Further research should focus on the effects of providing safe auditory environments and appropriate sleep schedules for people with PIMD on the occurrence of challenging behaviour. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of

  20. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but…

  1. The validation of an educational database for children with profound intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien Spangenberg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Western Cape Forum for Intellectual Disability took the South African Government to court in 2010 on its failure to implement the right to education for Children with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability. Subsequently, multidisciplinary teams were appointed by the Western Cape Education Department to deliver services to the Special Care Centres (SCCs. Initially, minimal information was available on this population.Objectives: The purpose is to document the process of developing and validating a database for the collection of routine data.Method: A descriptive analytical study design was used. A sample of convenience was drawn from individuals under the age of 18 years, enrolled in SCCs in the Western Cape. The team who entered and analysed the data reached consensus regarding the utility and feasibility of each item.Results: Data were collected on 134 children. The omission of certain items from the database was identified. Some information was not reliable or readily available. Of the instruments identified to assess function, the classification systems were found to be reliable and useful, as were the performance scales. The WeeFIM, on the other hand, was lengthy and expensive, and was therefore discarded.Discussion and conclusions: A list of items to be included was identified. Apart from an individual profile, it can be useful for service planning and monitoring, if incorporated into the central information system used to monitor the performance of all children. Without such inclusion, this most vulnerable population, despite court ruling, will not have their right to education adequately addressed.

  2. Initiation of activities and alertness in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, V; Vlaskamp, C

    2015-03-01

    When providing activities to individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), direct support persons (DSPs) often face questions that are, among other things, related to the alertness of the person with PIMD. While previous studies have revealed that stimulation might have a greater impact on levels of alertness than the internal conditions of the individual, they have also emphasized the importance of interaction in order to influence the level of alertness. Because the initiation of this interaction has been described as one of its core components, the present study has focused on the relationship between the stimuli presented, the initiation of the activity (by the person with PIMD or the DSP), and the level of alertness of the person with PIMD. Videotapes of the one-to-one interactions of 24 individuals with PIMD and their DSPs in multisensory environments have been scored using the Alertness Observation List. In a sequential analysis, the percentages of stimuli presented were related to the percentages of initiation. Furthermore, two other analyses focused on the relationship between the level of alertness and the preceding and subsequent percentages of initiation respectively. The results show that high percentages of the activities are initiated by the DSPs. In addition, activities that were initiated by the individual with PIMD were preceded and followed by higher percentages of alert behaviour than those initiated by the DSP. Outcomes differed for the different types of stimuli. These results have striking implications for the lives of individuals with PIMD. It is quite possible that DSPs often act too quickly, whereas they would be better off waiting for a reaction on the part of their client. In general, DSPs need to find a balance between being passive themselves and promoting in the individual with PIMD a state of being as active and alert as possible. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of

  3. Therapeutic interventions in the Netherlands and Belgium in support of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaskamp, Carla; Nakken, Han

    For several reasons, people with profound and multiple disabilities may be offered a variety of therapeutic interventions. Thus far, researchers have shown a limited interest in providing an empirical base for these interventions. Research is needed on the theoretical rationale (if any), the

  4. The effects of a power-assisted exercise intervention on alertness in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Marleen D.; Bossink, Leontien W.M.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the benefits of physical activity in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is an increase in alertness. This study investigated the effect of a power-assisted exercise intervention on alertness and the relationship of this effect to the level of additional motor

  5. Camera-based microswitch technology to monitor mouth, eyebrow, and eyelid responses of children with profound multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Bellini, D.; Oliva, D.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Lang, R.B.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    A camera-based microswitch technology was recently used to successfully monitor small eyelid and mouth responses of two adults with profound multiple disabilities (Lancioni et al., Res Dev Disab 31:1509-1514, 2010a). This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for

  6. The documentation of health problems in relation to prescribed medication in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, D. C.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; van den Berg, P. B.; Taxis, K.; Vlaskamp, C.

    Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) suffer from a wide range of health problems and use a wide range of different drugs. This study investigated for frequently used medication whether there was a health problem documented in the medical notes for the drug prescribed.

  7. Camera-Based Microswitch Technology for Eyelid and Mouth Responses of Persons with Profound Multiple Disabilities: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    These two studies assessed camera-based microswitch technology for eyelid and mouth responses of two persons with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior. This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for those responses, did not require support frames on the participants' face but only small color…

  8. See Me, Feel Me. Using Physiology to Validate Behavioural Observations of Emotions of People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, P.; De Cock, P.; Petry, K.; Van Den Noortgate, W.; Maes, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Behavioural observations are the most frequently used source of information about emotions of people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities but have not yet been validated against other measures of emotion. In this study we wanted to validate the behavioural observations of emotions using respiration (rib cage contribution,…

  9. Family matters : The experiences and opinions of family members of persons with (severe) or profound intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, Jorien

    2016-01-01

    “I love my sister, but sometimes I don’t”. This is one of the statements made in the study focused on the experiences of family members of people with (profound) intellectual (and multiple) disabilities (both of individuals living in a residential facility as persons living at home). In recent

  10. Improving Social Skills in Adolescents and Adults with Autism and Severe to Profound Intellectual Disability: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Katherine M.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2013-01-01

    Social skills are important treatment targets for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) across the lifespan. However, few treatments are available for adolescents and adults with ASD who also have severe to profound intellectual disability (S/PID). Several social skill interventions have been described that may improve social skills in…

  11. Transfer of information between parents and teachers of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities at special educational centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteine, H.; Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    Background: Because of the complexity of the problems that affect children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), communication between parents and teachers at special educational centres is indispensable. Logs are widely used in the Netherlands although only little is known

  12. Transferring Young People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities from Pediatric to Adult Medical Care: Parents' Experiences and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels-de Heus, Karen G. C. B.; van Staa, AnneLoes; van Vliet, Ingeborg; Ewals, Frans V. P. M.; Hilberink, Sander R.

    2013-01-01

    Many children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) now reach adulthood. The aim of this study was to elicit parents' experiences with the transfer from pediatric to adult medical care. A convenience sample of 131 Dutch parents of young people with PIMD (16--26 years) completed a web-based questionnaire. Twenty-two percent of…

  13. Camera-Based Microswitch Technology to Monitor Mouth, Eyebrow, and Eyelid Responses of Children with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lang, Russell; Didden, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A camera-based microswitch technology was recently used to successfully monitor small eyelid and mouth responses of two adults with profound multiple disabilities (Lancioni et al., Res Dev Disab 31:1509-1514, 2010a). This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for those responses, did not require support frames on…

  14. Establishing a Connection between Quality of Life and Pre-Academic Instruction for Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzien, Jonna L.

    2009-01-01

    The field of special education has begun to concentrate its efforts on developing objectives and procedural strategies that promote a positive quality of life for students with profound multiple disabilities, while determining which educational strategies are the most appropriate. A multi-element design was used to compare the effects of two…

  15. Domains of quality of life of people with profound multiple disabilities : The perspective of parents and direct support staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petry, K; Maes, B; Vlaskamp, C

    Background This study considered the general validity of the basic domains of quality of life that appear in theoretical models, in relation to people with profound multiple disabilities. The authors examined how parents and direct support staff operationalized these basic domains for people with

  16. Efforts to Increase Social Contact in Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: Analysing Individual Support Plans in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Aafke; van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Most people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) have limited social contact and it is unclear what is done to maintain or increase these contacts. Individual support planning (ISP) can be used in the systematic enhancement of social contacts. This study analyses the content of ISPs with respect to the social contacts of…

  17. Parental Attitudes toward the Inclusion of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities in General Primary Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke A.; Munde, Vera S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing introduction of inclusive education, children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are barely included. Because an underlying factor here may be the attitudes of those directly involved, the present study focuses on the attitude of parents and relating variables concerning experience with individuals with…

  18. The Role of the External Personal Assistants for Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities Working in the Children's Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Anna Karin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities need support to function in an optimal way. However, there is a limited knowledge about the role of external personal assistants working in the children's home. Materials and Methods: A mixed method study was performed including qualitative data from interviews with 11…

  19. Physiological Measurements as Validation of Alertness Observations: An Exploratory Case Study of Three Individuals with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Vera; Vlaskamp, Carla; Vos, Pieter; Maes, Bea; Ruijssenaars, Wied

    2012-01-01

    Although observation largely takes into account the needs and abilities of individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities, several difficulties are related to this assessment method as well. Our aim in this study was to investigate what possibilities the use of physiological measurements make available to validate alertness…

  20. Informal Social Networks of People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: Relationship with Age, Communicative Abilities and Current Living Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, A.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Post, W. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) have limited informal social contacts. Research to determine the factors which can positively influence establishing sound informal social contacts is required. Materials and Methods: Regression analysis for 200 people with PIMD was used to analyse how age,…

  1. The Documentation of Health Problems in Relation to Prescribed Medication in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, D. C.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; van den Berg, P. B.; Taxis, K.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) suffer from a wide range of health problems and use a wide range of different drugs. This study investigated for frequently used medication whether there was a health problem documented in the medical notes for the drug prescribed. Method: Persons with PIMD with an…

  2. Staff attributions of the causes of challenging behaviour in children and adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppes, P.; van der Putten, A.A.J.; ten Brug, A.; Vlaskamp, C.

    A study has shown that staff do not generally perceive challenging behaviour in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) as being of serious consequence. In this study we aimed to gain a better understanding of the causal explanations that direct care and support staff give

  3. Learning Disabilities Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provides the most current information on research, practice, theory, issues, and trends to broaden understanding and improve quality of life. Learn More If you are a parent or teacher of a child with a learning disability – or have learning disabilities yourself – you are not ...

  4. Nonverbal learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is described as a subtype of specific learning disability where the source of the disability is a difficulty in processing nonverbal information. The child with NLD presents with problems in visual, spatial, and tactile perception but with strengths in rote verbal skills. Traditionally, these children were recognized by their difficulties in arithmetic which presented a stark contrast with their strengths in spelling and decoding text. They also exhibited a split between their verbal IQ (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) scores with the VIQ being significantly higher than PIQ. Over time, however, diagnostic criteria have evolved and the broadened definition of the NLD syndrome has led many to question the utility and uniqueness of the NLD diagnosis. In addition, shifting diagnostic standards have made research results difficult to replicate. In short, the research to date leaves many unanswered questions about (1) the definition of the NLD syndrome, (2) the pervasiveness of the academic, social and psychopathological difficulties, (3) the source of the NLD syndrome, and (4) the degree to which it overlaps with other conditions. This chapter outlines a brief history of the NLD syndrome, how it is currently conceptualized, and some of the current debate about the unanswered questions above. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Holding Ashley (X): Bestowing Identity Through Caregiving in Profound Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Lisa; Liaschenko, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The controversy over the so-called Ashley Treatment (AT), a series of medical procedures that inhibited both growth and sexual development in the body of a profoundly intellectually impaired girl, usually centers either on Ashley's rights, including a right to an intact, unaltered body, or on Ashley's parents' rights to make decisions for her. The claim made by her parents, that the procedure would improve their ability to care for her, is often dismissed as inappropriate or, at best, irrelevant. We argue, however, that caregiving is a central issue in the controversy, as Ashley's need for caregiving is a defining characteristic of her life. In this article, we analyze the ethics of the Ashley Treatment within the context of family caregiving. Through the physical and emotional work of caregiving, families participate in the formation and maintenance of personal identity, a process that Hilde Lindemann recently called "holding." We argue that, in an intellectually disabled person such as Ashley, who depends on her family for every aspect of her care, the family's contribution to identity is an essential source of personhood. We believe that the treatment can be justified if it is indeed an instance of appropriate family "holding" for Ashley. Copyright 2017 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  6. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  7. Catch the wave! Time-window sequential analysis of alertness stimulation in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, V S; Vlaskamp, C; Maes, B; Ruijssenaars, A J J M

    2014-01-01

    While optimally activities are provided at those moments when the individual with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is 'focused on the environment' or 'alert', detailed information about the impact that the design and timing of the activity has on alertness is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to shed light on the sequential relationship between different stimuli and alertness levels in individuals with PIMD. Video observations were conducted for 24 participants during one-on-one interactions with a direct support person in multisensory environments. Time-window sequential analyses were conducted for the 120 s following four different stimuli. For the different stimuli, different patterns in terms of alertness became apparent. Following visual stimuli, the alertness levels of the individuals with PIMD changed in waves of about 20 s from 'active alert' to 'passive alert'. While auditory and tactile stimuli led to 'alert' reactions shortly after the stimulation, alertness levels decreased between seconds 20 and 120. Reactions to vestibular stimuli were only visible after 60 s; these were 'active alert' or 'withdrawn'. The results of the present study show that individuals with PIMD show their reactions to stimuli only slightly, so that 'waves' might reflect the optimal alertness pattern for learning and development. Consequently, it is especially important that direct support persons follow and stimulate these individual 'waves' in the activities they provide to their clients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. What Are the Symptoms of Learning Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the indicators of learning disabilities? Many children have difficulty with reading, writing, or ... point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has ...

  9. Participation of adults with visual and severe or profound intellectual disabilities: Definition and operationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzen, Gineke; van Nispen, Ruth M A; van der Putten, Annette A J; Waninge, Aly

    2017-02-01

    The available opinions regarding participation do not appear to be applicable to adults with visual and severe or profound intellectual disabilities (VSPID). Because a clear definition and operationalization are lacking, it is difficult for support professionals to give meaning to participation for adults with VSPID. The purpose of the present study was to develop a definition and operationalization of the concept of participation of adults with VSPID. Parents or family members, professionals, and experts participated in an online concept mapping procedure. This procedure includes generating statements, clustering them, and rating their importance. The data were analyzed quantitatively using multidimensional scaling and qualitatively with triangulation. A total of 53 participants generated 319 statements of which 125 were clustered and rated. The final cluster map of the statements contained seven clusters: (1) Experience and discover; (2) Inclusion; (3) Involvement; (4) Leisure and recreation; (5) Communication and being understood; (6) Social relations; and (7) Self-management and autonomy. The average importance rating of the statements varied from 6.49 to 8.95. A definition of participation of this population was developed which included these seven clusters. The combination of the developed definition, the clusters, and the statements in these clusters, derived from the perceptions of parents or family members, professionals, and experts, can be employed to operationalize the construct of participation of adults with VSPID. This operationalization supports professionals in their ability to give meaning to participation in these adults. Future research will focus on using the operationalization as a checklist of participation for adults with VSPID. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Time use of parents raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijkx, J; van der Putten, A A J; Vlaskamp, C

    2017-07-01

    Raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is expected to put extreme pressure on parental time use patterns. The aim of this study was to examine the total time use of mothers and fathers raising children with PIMD and compare it with the time use of parents of typically developing children. Twenty-seven fathers and 30 mothers raising children with PIMD completed a time use diary on a mobile phone or tablet app, as did 66 fathers and 109 mothers of typically developing children. Independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests were performed to compare mean time use. There are no differences in the time use of parents of children with PIMD on contracted time (paid work and educational activities) and necessary time (personal care, eating and drinking and sleeping) when compared with parents of typically developing children. There are significant differences between the parents of children with PIMD and the parents of typically developing children in terms of committed time (time for domestic work and the care and supervision of their children) and free time. The mothers of children with PIMD spend significantly less time on domestic work and more time on care and supervision than mothers of typically developing children. This study shows that the parents of children with PIMD have to spend a significant amount of time on care tasks and have on average 1.5 h less free time per day than parents of typically developing children. This is a striking difference, because leisure time can substantially contribute to well-being. Therefore, it is important not only to consider a child with PIMD's support needs but also to identify what parents need to continue their children's daily care and supervision. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Undernutrition in children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD): its prevalence and influence on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holenweg-Gross, C; Newman, C J; Faouzi, M; Poirot-Hodgkinson, I; Bérard, C; Roulet-Perez, E

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and to explore its influence on quality of life. Seventy-two children with PIMD (47 male; 25 female; age range 2 to 15 years 4 months; mean age 8.6, SD 3.6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, including body weight, triceps skinfold thickness, segmental measures and recumbent length. Undernutrition was determined using tricipital skinfold percentile and z-scores of weight-for-height and height-for-age. The quality of life of each child was evaluated using the QUALIN questionnaire adapted for profoundly disabled children. Twenty-five children (34.7%) were undernourished and seven (9.7%) were obese. Among undernourished children only eight (32 %) were receiving food supplements and two (8%) had a gastrostomy, of which one was still on a refeeding programme. On multivariate analysis, undernutrition was one of the independent predictors of lower quality of life. Undernutrition remains a matter of concern in children with PIMD. There is a need to better train professionals in systematically assessing the nutritional status of profoundly disabled children in order to start nutritional management when necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Effects of Participation in Service-Learning on Adolescents with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Cathy L.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed 13 special education teachers to examine effects of disabled adolescents' active participation in service learning. Found promising results for students with mild disabilities in attendance and academic skills and for adolescents with moderate to profound disabilities in socialization and relationships with nondisabled peers. (Author/NB)

  13. Technology-assisted programmes to promote leisure engagement in persons with acquired brain injury and profound multiple disabilities: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; De Pace, Claudia; Chiapparino, Claudia; Ricci, Irene; Navarro, Jorge; Addante, Luigi M; Spica, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate technology-assisted programmes for enabling a woman and a man with brain injury and profound multiple disabilities to acquire leisure engagement. METHOD. The technology for the woman (Study I) involved a portable computer with mouse, a Clicker 4 software package, a touch/pressure microswitch, and an interface to connect the Clicker with the microswitch. This technology allowed the woman to choose with a simple hand response among four stimulus categories (e.g., watching a film and interacting with others), each of which included several alternatives. The technology for the man (Study II) involved a computer-based choice system that allowed him to select preferred songs through a microswitch-aided finger-movement response. RESULTS. Data showed that the two participants learned to use the technology available and selected among the stimulus events thus reaching positive leisure engagement. CONCLUSION. Technology-assisted programmes may provide persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities leisure engagement opportunities.

  14. Health Status, Social Support, and Quality of Life among Family Carers of Adults with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities (PIMD) in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Chiao, Chi; Fu, Li-Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Primary family carers of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) experience a range of considerable demands. Method: A census survey was conducted in a city of Taiwan; 796 family carers of adults (aged 18 or older) diagnosed with intellectual disability and/or with multiple disabilities living with the family…

  15. Leadership and learning disability nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, Mark; Aspinall, Susan-Louise

    Leadership is seen as critical for the transformation of learning disability services and has been further emphasised since the publication of Transforming Care, the Department of Health's response to the review of events at Winterbourne View. What is clear within learning disability nursing and services is the demand for leadership in the quest for improving the quality and effectiveness of services across health and social care. This article discusses the challenges for the undergraduate learning disability nurse with the recommendation to pursue a framework that promotes and focuses on integrating knowledge transfer into services for people with a learning disability. It explores practice change using the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS) framework, and the example of the involvement of service users in practitioner training on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and consent and capacity to consent for treatment.

  16. Effects of music on seizure frequency in institutionalized subjects with severe/profound intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Patrizia; Giuglietti, Marta; Baglioni, Antonella; Verdolini, Norma; Murgia, Nicola; Piccirilli, Massimo; Elisei, Sandro

    2017-09-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to experience seizures despite adequate therapy with antiepileptic drugs. Drug-resistant epilepsy is even more frequent in subjects with intellectual disability. As a result, several non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to improve quality of life in patients with intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy. A number of studies have demonstrated that music can be effective at reducing seizures and epileptiform discharges. In particular, Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in patients with intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy as well. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on seizure frequency in institutionalized epileptic subjects with profound/severe intellectual disability. Twelve patients (10 males and 2 females) with a mean age of 21.6 years were randomly assigned to two groups in a cross-over design; they listened to Mozart K448 once a day for six months. A statistically significant difference was observed between the listening period and both baseline and control periods. During the music period, none of the patients worsened in seizure frequency; one patient was seizure-free, five had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and the remaining showed minimal (N=2) or no difference (N=4). The average seizure reduction compared to the baseline was 20.5%. Our results are discussed in relation to data in the literature considering differences in protocol investigation. Music may be considered a useful approach as add-on therapy in some subjects with profound intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy and can provide a new option for clinicians to consider, but further large sample, multicenter studies are needed to better understand the characteristics of responders and non-responders to this type of non

  17. Tourette syndrome and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klug Marilyn G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood. Learning disabilities are frequently comorbid with TS. Using the largest sample of TS patients ever reported, we sought to identify differences between subjects with TS only and subjects with TS and a comorbid learning disability. Methods We used the Tourette Syndrome International Consortium database (TIC to compare subjects with comorbid Tourette Syndrome and learning disabilities (TS + LD to subjects who did not have a comorbid learning disability (TS - LD. The TIC database contained 5,500 subjects. We had usable data on 5,450 subjects. Results We found 1,235 subjects with TS + LD. Significant differences between the TS + LD group and the TS - LD group were found for gender (.001, age onset (.030, age first seen (.001, age at diagnosis (.001, prenatal problems (.001, sibling or other family member with tics (.024, two or more affected family members (.009, and severe tics (.046. We used logistic modeling to identify the optimal prediction model of group membership. This resulted in a five variable model with the epidemiologic performance characteristics of accuracy 65.2% (model correctly classified 4,406 of 5,450 subjects, sensitivity 66.1%, and specificity 62.2%. Conclusion Subjects with TS have high prevalence rates of comorbid learning disabilities. We identified phenotype differences between the TS - LD group compared to TS + LD group. In the evaluation of subjects with TS, the presence of a learning disability should always be a consideration. ADHD may be an important comorbid condition in the diagnosis of LD or may also be a potential confounder. Further research on etiology, course and response to intervention for subjects with TS only and TS with learning disabilities is needed.

  18. A Vibrotactile Interface to Motivate Movement for Children with Severe to Profound Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Morrison, Ann; Larsen, Jeppe Veirum

    2014-01-01

    V-Sense is a vibrotactile interface that encourages children with severe or profound cognitive, sensory and physical impairments to move. The interface makes use of touch, in particular vibrations, as a supportive function to motivate users' actions. Specifically, we propose a vibrotactile...... interface on the arm and around the shoulder using the saltation perceptual illusion to induce movement of the corresponding joint. In this paper we describe the design principles of the interface and the proposed experimental design to evaluate it....

  19. Parents as experts : the position of parents of children with profound multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geeter, K.I.; Poppes, P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2002-01-01

    Background Parents of children with disabilities are increasingly considered as experts in the field of care. Their expertise can deliver an important contribution towards planning their child's care and education. The law is increasingly taking this factor into consideration. On the one hand,

  20. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Students with Severe and Profound Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacaru, Cristina Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The article aims to study ways of achieving human rights by offering everyone a voice, a communicational tool which will allow accessibility and access to quality education for all, regardless of the degree of disability. The main objective of the present study was to describe the profile of communication and study the use of verbal and nonverbal…

  1. Differentiating characteristics of deafblindness and autism in people with congenital deafblindness and profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaars-van den Boom, M.A.A.; Antonissen, A.C.F.M.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Vervloed, M.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    In persons with deafblindness, it is hard to distinguish autism spectrum disorders from several deafblind specific behaviours caused by the dual sensory impairments, especially when these persons are also intellectually disabled. As a result, there is an over-diagnosis of autism in persons who are

  2. Phenotype-Environment Interactions in Genetic Syndromes Associated with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Penny; Oliver, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The research literature notes both biological and operant theories of behavior disorder in individuals with intellectual disabilities. These two theories of genetic predisposition and operant reinforcement remain quite distinct; neither theory on its own is sufficient to explain challenging behavior in genetic syndromes and an integrated approach…

  3. An Examination of Specific Communication Deficits in Adults with Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belva, Brian C.; Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Bamburg, Jay W.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that adults with intellectual disability (ID) evince communication deficits. These communication problems can be divided into problems with receptive, expressive, and written domains. While much research has been devoted to investigating communication deficits in ID in general, scant research has been conducted on…

  4. Incidence and Trends in Psychopathology Symptoms over Time in Adults with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Shoemaker, Mary; Belva, Brian; Bamburg, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have a high risk for developing comorbid psychopathology. While researchers have shown that symptoms of psychopathology remain relatively stable in children with ID over time, little research has been conducted to demonstrate symptom stability for adults with ID. Incidence of psychopathology symptoms…

  5. Challenges of Developing Communicative Interaction in Individuals with Congenital Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Chau, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Background: Physiological responses have been used in individuals with acquired disability to enable communicative interaction without motor movement. This study explored four autonomic nervous system (ANS) signals--electrodermal activity, skin temperature, cardiac patterns and respiratory patterns--to enable interaction with individuals born with…

  6. Supporting End of Life Decision Making: Case Studies of Relational Closeness in Supported Decision Making for People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joanne; Wilson, Erin; Hagiliassis, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Background: The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) promotes the use of supported decision making in lieu of substitute decision making. To date, there has been a lack of focus on supported decision making for people with severe or profound intellectual disability, including for end of life decisions.…

  7. Care versus treatment at the end of life for profoundly disabled persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who are profoundly mentally handicapped do not have the capacity to make their own decisions and also do not have a past record of decisions, from when they had capacity, to guide us in making decisions for them. They represent a difficult group, ethically, for surrogate decision making. Here I propose some guidelines, distinguishing between these patients and patients in a persistent vegetative state (PVS). As the life span of patients becomes shorter, or their level of consciousness becomes permanently impaired, the presumption for comfort care should become an imperative, and the standard of evidence to justify any invasive intervention should become higher. For members of this population, who have no more ability to refuse treatment than to consent to it, protection of the vulnerable must mean allowing a peaceful death as well as a comfortable life. Reasonable legal safeguards are also proposed to allow improved end-of-life decisions to be made for this population.

  8. Learned-Helplessness Theory: Implications for Research in Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino, Frank J.

    1981-01-01

    The application of learned helplessness theory to achievement is discussed within the context of implications for research in learning disabilities. Finally, the similarities between helpless children and learning disabled students in terms of problems solving and attention are discussed. (Author)

  9. Supporting end of life decision making: Case studies of relational closeness in supported decision making for people with severe or profound intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joanne; Wilson, Erin; Hagiliassis, Nick

    2017-11-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) promotes the use of supported decision making in lieu of substitute decision making. To date, there has been a lack of focus on supported decision making for people with severe or profound intellectual disability, including for end of life decisions. Five people with severe or profound intellectual disability's experiences of supported decision making were examined. This article is particularly focused on one participant's experiences at the end of his life. All five case studies identified that supporters were most effective in providing decision-making support for participants when they were relationally close to the person and had knowledge of the person's life story, particularly in relation to events that demonstrated preference. Findings from this study provide new understandings of supported decision making for people with severe or profound intellectual disability and have particular relevance for supporting decision making at the end of life. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Communication training for centre-based carers of children with severe or profound disabilities in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Geiger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary, qualitative review of an approach to training centre-based carers in supporting basic communication development and providing communication opportunities for the children with severe and profound disabilities in their care. In South Africa, these children are often the most neglected in terms of planning and providing appropriate interventions. For those with severe communication disabilities, an additional lack is in the area of the basic human right to meaningful interactions and communication. Sustainable strategies to provide opportunities for basic communication development of these children are urgently sought. Several effective international and local parent training programmes have been developed, but the urgent need remains to train centre-based carers who are taking care of groups of diversely disabled children in severely under-resourced settings. Non-profit organisations (NPOs have been exploring practical centre-based approaches to skills sharing in physical rehabilitation, activities for daily living, feeding and support for basic communication development. As a freelance speech therapist contracted by four NPOs to implement hands-on training in basic communication for centre-based carers of non-verbal children, the author describes a training approach that evolved over three years, in collaboration with the carers and centre managements. Implications for training (for speech therapists and for community-based rehabilitation workers and for further research are identified.

  11. The Social Construction of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Marling, Curt

    2004-01-01

    Underpinning the technical gaze that dominates learning disabilities theory and practice is the assumption that learning disabilities are a pathology that resides in the heads of individual students, with the corollary that remedial efforts also focus on what goes on in the heads of students classified as learning disabled. This article begins…

  12. Identification of Learning Disabled Bilingual Hispanic Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Jesus; Mims, Joan

    1983-01-01

    The study compared 10 learning disabled and 10 non-learning disabled limited English proficient Mexican American elementary grade children. Six tests were identified as predicting learning disabilities including the Prueba de Lectura y Lenguaje Escrito and the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. (Author/DB)

  13. The Gifted/Learning Disabled Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Cheryl Walker; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the identification of learning-disabled and gifted students as well as the characteristics of the gifted learning-disabled. The reasons for failure to identify gifted learning-disabled students are examined, and procedures to help ensure identification of this group are outlined. (Author/JDD)

  14. Forensic Learning Disability Nursing Role Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne; Melling, Kat

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study carried out on the role constructs of forensic and nonforensic Learning Disability Nursing in relation to six binary themes. The aims were to identify if there were differences in perceptions of forensic learning disability nurses and nonforensic learning disability nurses in relation to the six binary themes of the…

  15. Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Michael H.; Cullinan, Douglas

    1982-01-01

    Contrasts the "ability training" and "task-analytic" approaches in teaching learning disabled children. Describes the use of the task-analytic behavioral model in Project EXCEL, a Child Service Demonstration Center. Summarizes guiding principles of this approach, and indicates that participating students have shown dramatic…

  16. The Gifted/Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Vivienne

    Identification and programing are central topics in the discussion of gifted learning disabled (LD) students. Characteristics of gifted LD students are described, including talent in the creative arts. Reasons for overlooking this population are noted, including their ability to compensate for their problems. The degree of giftedness and of…

  17. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lines. 9 Apraxia of speech. Sometimes called verbal apraxia, this disorder involves problems with speaking. People with ... http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/Pages/apraxia.aspx [top] Learning ... (n.d.). Non-verbal learning disorders . Retrieved June 15, 2012, from http:// ...

  18. Parental adaptation to out-of-home placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeffrey B; Roper, Susanne Olsen

    2014-05-01

    Utilizing grounded theory qualitative research methods, a model was developed for describing parental adaptation after voluntary placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities in out-of-home care. Interviews of parents from 20 families were analyzed. Parents' cognitive appraisals of placement outcomes were classified as either inducing emotional stress (i.e., guilt, sadness, fear and worry, anger and frustration, and uncertainty) or relief. Parental appraisals of responses to placement by children, extended family, and friends were identified as factors affecting the parents' adaptation to placement. The primary coping methods used by parents to decrease emotional stress and increase relief consisted of reappraisals regarding the necessity of placement, involvement in the child's life, psychotherapy, and the passage of time.

  19. Parents' experiences of collaborating with professionals in the support of their child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Suzanne Lg; van der Putten, Annette Aj; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-03-01

    There is little data on the collaboration between parents and professionals in the support of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Since communication is essential to collaboration, this study analysed the frequency, means, and personal experiences of communication between parents and professionals. A multiple case study ( n = 4) was conducted. Observations were logged for every contact between professionals and parents during 12 months. The mean number of contacts a month ranged from 1.9 to 16.7 across the cases. Most of the contacts were with the child's direct support persons (85.2%) and exchanging information (35.5%) was the most common function. Issues concerning health (28.4%) were the most common subjects discussed. The majority of the mothers' experiences were positive. Direct support persons play a crucial role; they need to be aware of this role and to be trained to fulfill their role to acknowledge parents as partners.

  20. The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkhuizen, Annemarie; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; Krijnen, Wim P; van der Schans, Cees P; Waninge, Aly

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. The purpose of this prospective cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of activities of daily living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were used to measure the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL) in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III; this included 120 persons with visual impairment. The impact of visual impairment on ADL was analyzed with linear regression. The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment slightly affects the ability of performing activities of daily living (BI) for persons experiencing a severe/profound intellectual disability. GMFCS Levels II or III, profound ID level, and visual impairment each have the effect of lowering BI scores. GMFCS Levels II or III, and profound ID level each have the effect of increasing CWS scores, which indicates a lower walking speed. A main effect of visual impairment is present on CWS, but our results do show a substantive interaction effect between GMFCS level III and visual impairment on Comfortable Walking Speed in persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Visual impairment has a slight effect on ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Gender Mix among Staff in Schools for Pupils with Severe and Profound Multiple Learning Difficulties and Its Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Phil

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on several studies of gender mix among staff in ten schools for students with severe, profound and/or multiple disabilities. Headteachers' perceptions of the impact of women's dominance in these positions are explored, and a series of proposals for future recruitment and staff development is put forth. (Contains seven…

  2. An overview of research on increasing indices of happiness of people with severe/profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, G E; Singh, N N; O'Reilly, M F; Oliva, D; Basili, G

    2005-02-04

    This paper was to provide an overview of research studies aimed at increasing indices of happiness of persons with severe/profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Computerized and manual searches were carried out to identify the studies published from 1990 to 2004 (i.e., the period during which the issues of quality fo life and happiness in people with disabilities have become more prominent). Twenty-four research studies were identified. They involved the use of six different procedures, that is, structured stimulation sessions, microswitch-based simulation sessions, leisure activities and favourite work tasks or conditions, positive environment or positive behaviour support programmes and mindful caregiving, favourite stimulation automatically delivered on exercise engagement, and snoezelen. Data tended to be positive with increases in the participants' indices of happiness, but some failures also occurred. The outcomes were discussed in relation to (a) methodological issues, such as designs of the studies, length of the intervention, and number of participants, and (b) personal and practical implications of the procedures. Some suggestions for future research (particularly focused on extending evidence and overcoming present methodological weakness) were also examined.

  3. Making a difference? A comparison between multi-sensory and regular storytelling for persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, A; Van der Putten, A A J; Penne, A; Maes, B; Vlaskamp, C

    2016-11-01

    Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) was developed to include persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities in storytelling culture. In order to increase the listeners' attention, MSST stories are individualised and use multiple sensory stimuli to support the verbal text. In order to determine the value of MSST, this study compared listeners' attention under two conditions: (1) being read MSST books and (2) being read regular stories. A non-randomised control study was executed in which the intervention group read MSST books (n = 45) and a comparison group (n = 31) read regular books. Books were read 10 times during a 5-week period. The 1st, 5th and 10th storytelling sessions were recorded on video in both groups, and the percentage of attention directed to the book and/or stimuli and to the storyteller was scored by a trained and independent rater. Two repeated measure analyses (with the storytelling condition as a between-subject factor and the three measurements as factor) were performed to determine the difference between the groups in terms of attention directed to the book/stimuli (first analysis) and storyteller (second analysis). A further analysis established whether the level of attention changed between the reading sessions and whether there was an interaction effect between the repetition of the book and the storytelling condition. The attention directed to the book and/or the stimuli was significantly higher in the MSST group than in the comparison group. No significant difference between the two groups was found in the attention directed to the storyteller. For MSST stories, most attention was observed during the fifth reading session, while for regular stories, the fifth session gained least attentiveness from the listener. The persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities paid more attention to the book and/or stimuli in the MSST condition compared with the regular story telling group. Being more attentive towards

  4. Vibroacoustic sound therapy: case studies with children with profound and multiple learning difficulties and the elderly in long-term residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Phil

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Vibroacoustic Sound Therapy, an approach which is being developed for use in special schools for children with profound and multiple learning difficulties, and in long-term care homes for the elderly and the elderly mentally infirm. Using non-invasive techniques and music/sound technology, children and the elderly are being empowered and enabled to (re)discover self expression and communication skills. Two case studies drawn from the world of the young disabled, and from the elderly, illustrate the potential for improving quality of life and well-being in these institutional settings.

  5. Assumptions of Decision-Making Capacity: The Role Supporter Attitudes Play in the Realisation of Article 12 for People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Watson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD was the first legally binding instrument explicitly focused on how human rights apply to people with disability. Amongst their obligations, consistent with the social model of disability, the Convention requires signatory nations to recognise that “…persons with disabilities enjoy legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life” and mandates signatory nations to develop “…appropriate measures to provide access by persons with disability to the support they may require in exercising their legal capacity”. The Convention promotes supported decision-making as one such measure. Although Australia ratified the UNCRPD in 2008, it retains an interpretative declaration in relation to Article 12 (2, 3, 4, allowing for the use of substituted decision-making in situations where a person is assessed as having no or limited decision-making capacity. Such an outcome is common for people with severe or profound intellectual disability because the assessments they are subjected to are focused on their cognition and generally fail to take into account the interdependent nature of human decision-making. This paper argues that Australia’s interpretative declaration is not in the spirit of the Convention nor the social model of disability on which it is based. It starts from the premise that the intention of Article 12 is to be inclusive of all signatory nations’ citizens, including those with severe or profound cognitive disability. From this premise, arises a practical need to understand how supported decision-making can be used with this group. Drawing from evidence from an empirical study with five people with severe or profound intellectual disability, this paper provides a rare glimpse on what supported decision-making can look like for people with severe or profound intellectual disability. Additionally, it describes the importance of

  6. Comprehension of Humor in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Reading Disabilities, and without Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive, and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a…

  7. "Trying, Failing, Succeeding, and Trying Again and Again": Perspectives of Teachers of Pupils with Severe Profound Multiple Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phyllis; Riley, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the perspectives of seven teachers in England who teach pupils with severe profound and multiple learning difficulties about their learning to teach this group of students. Teachers' views were captured through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous online communications. Four themes emerged from teachers' perspectives…

  8. Profound Expressive Language Impairment in Low Functioning Children with Autism: An Investigation of Syntactic Awareness Using a Computerised Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as "monkey…

  9. The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, Annemarie; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Schans, van der Cees P.; Waninge, Aly

    Background: The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and

  10. Physical health issues in adults with severe or profound intellectual and motor disabilities : A systematic review of cross-sectional studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmeren, van Dinette; van der Schans, C. P.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Krijnen, W. P.; Steenbergen, H. A.; Lantman-de Valk, H. M. J. van Schrojenstein; Waninge, A.

    BackgroundPeople with severe or profound intellectual and motor disabilities (SPIMD) encounter several risk factors associated with higher mortality rates. They are also likely to experience a cluster of health problems related to the severe brain damage/dysfunction. In order to earlier detect

  11. Look closer : The alertness of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities during multi-sensory storytelling, a time sequential analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Munde, Vera S.; van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) is a storytelling method designed for individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). It is essential that listeners be alert during MSST, so that they become familiar with their personalised stories. Repetition and the

  12. A good read : A study into the use and effects of multi-sensory storytelling; a storytelling method for persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brug, Annet

    2015-01-01

    In order to include persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) into our storytelling culture, multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) has been developed. In a multi-sensory book, verbal text is supported by sensory stimuli, the form and content of the book are adjusted to the

  13. A power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility : A pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossink, Leontien W.M.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Waninge, Aly; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a twenty-week power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of this intervention.

  14. A systematic review of the effects of motor interventions to improve motor, cognitive, and/or social functioning in people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, Suzanne; van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    While if is generally agreed that motor activity promotes motor, cognitive, and social development, the specific benefits in people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities (S-PID) are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to motor

  15. The use of a Multisensory Environment for Assessment of Sensory Abilities and Preferences in Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla; Schuivens, Evelyne

    Background To offer appropriate activities within the curriculum for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is a challenge. An important determinant of the adequacy of an activity is whether teachers have detailed and specific knowledge about the sensory abilities and

  16. Feasibility, Test-Retest Reliability, and Interrater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale in Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waninge, A.; Rook, R. A.; Dijkhuizen, A.; Gielen, E.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) often describe the quality of the daily movements of these persons in terms of flexibility or stiffness. Objective outcome measures for flexibility and stiffness are muscle tone or level of spasticity. Two instruments used to grade muscle tone and spasticity are the…

  17. Becoming Aware of What You Know or Need to Know: Gathering Client and Context Characteristics in Day Services for Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, C.; Hiemstra, S. J.; Wiersma, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with profound and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are dependent on staff to be sufficiently knowledgeable as to provide them with appropriate day services. One important determinant of the appropriateness and adequacy of a day support program is the level to which staff have detailed and specific knowledge about the functional abilities and…

  18. Relabelling Behaviour. The Effects of Psycho-Education on the Perceived Severity and Causes of Challenging Behaviour in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppes, P.; van der Putten, A.; Post, W.; Frans, N.; ten Brug, A.; van Es, A.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prevalence rates of challenging behaviour are high in children and adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Moreover, many of these behaviours are observed daily. Direct support staff report that most challenging behaviour identified has little impact on the person with PIMD and attribute challenging…

  19. Stability and Change in Sustainability of Daily Routines and Social Networks in Families of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Jenny; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) demand intense family accommodations from birth and onwards. This study used an exploratory and qualitative study design to investigate stability and change in sustainability of daily routines and social networks of Swedish families of children with PIMD. Materials…

  20. Parents' Experiences of Collaborating with Professionals in the Support of Their Child with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Suzanne L. G.; van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is little data on the collaboration between parents and professionals in the support of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Since communication is essential to collaboration, this study analysed the frequency, means, and personal experiences of communication between parents and professionals. Method: A…

  1. Effects of Inservice Teacher Training on Correct Implementation of Assessment and Instructional Procedures for Teachers of Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Erin L.; Morgan, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A multicomponent training package (live training, video modeling, role playing, and feedback) was used to train teachers to conduct assessment and to instruct students with profound multiple disabilities. Phase 1 of the study involved training seven teachers to conduct assessment in three areas: (a) preference assessment (i.e., identification of…

  2. Look Closer: The Alertness of People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Multi-Sensory Storytelling, a Time Sequential Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Munde, Vera S.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) is a storytelling method designed for individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). It is essential that listeners be alert during MSST, so that they become familiar with their personalised stories. Repetition and the presentation of stimuli are likely to affect the…

  3. The Tell-Tale: What Do Heart Rate; Skin Temperature and Skin Conductance Reveal about Emotions of People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Pieter; De Cock, Paul; Munde, Vera; Petry, Katja; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Maes, Bea

    2012-01-01

    Identifying emotions in people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities is a difficult challenge. Since self-reports are not available, behaviour is the most used source of information. Given the limitations and caveats associated with using behaviour as the sole source of information about their emotions, it is important to supplement…

  4. Communication strategies and intensive interaction therapy meet the theology of the body: bioethics in dialogue with people with profound disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Pia

    2013-01-01

    Academic bioethics does not appear to be interested in communication and its ethical concerns unless communication is to do with issues such as capacity, consent, truth telling and confidentiality. In contrast practitioners are interested in actually communicating with their patients and they are often particularly perplexed when it comes to people with profound disabilities where communication appears disrupted. Although some new and not so new communication strategies, and especially intensive interaction, are available, little has been written on either the ethical concerns these may present or the deeper concepts that underpin them. This article explores the practical applications of some of these communication strategies. By engaging these strategies with theology, and specifically Pope John Paul's Theology of the Body, this article identifies and addresses some significant ethical issues that may arise, notably the risk of dualism and of objectifying the human person. Moreover it provides communication strategies with a rationale that goes beyond practicalities to one based on respect for human dignity, justice and solidarity.

  5. How parents and physicians experience end-of-life decision-making for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal-Schuller, I H; Willems, D L; Ewals, F V P M; van Goudoever, J B; de Vos, M A

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life decisions (EoLD) often concern children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Yet, little is known about how parents and physicians discuss and make these decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate the experiences of the parents and the involved physician during the end-of-life decision-making (EoLDM) process for children with PIMD. In a retrospective, qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with the physicians and parents of 14 children with PIMD for whom an EoLD was made within the past two years. A long-lasting relationship appeared to facilitate the EoLDM process, although previous negative healthcare encounters could also lead to distrust. Parents and physicians encountered disagreements during the EoLDM process, but these disagreements could also improve the decision-making process. Most parents, as well as most physicians, considered the parents to be the experts on their child. In making an EoLD, both parents and physicians preferred a shared decision-making approach, although they differed in what they actually meant by this concept. The EoLDM process for children with PIMD can be improved if physicians are more aware of the specific situation and of the roles and expectations of the parents of children with PIMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning disabilities: the need for neuropsychological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Cheryl H; Ruff, Ronald M; Iverson, Grant L; Barth, Jeffrey T; Broshek, Donna K; Bush, Shane S; Koffler, Sandra P; Reynolds, Cecil R

    2008-03-01

    A learning disability (LD) is a neurobiological disorder that presents as a serious difficulty with reading, arithmetic, and/or written expression that is unexpected, given the individual's intellectual ability. A learning disability is not an emotional disorder nor is it caused by an emotional disorder. If inadequately or improperly evaluated, a learning disability has the potential to impact an individual's functioning adversely and produce functional impairment in multiple life domains. When a learning disability is suspected, an evaluation of neuropsychological abilities is necessary to determine the source of the difficulty as well as the areas of neurocognitive strength that can serve as a foundation for compensatory strategies and treatment options.

  7. New leadership model for learning disability nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-06

    Could learning disability nurses hold the key to a new direction of care and leadership? Jim Blair, writing in Learning Disability Practice, says there must be a response to the inquiry into premature deaths of people with learning disabilities. One way for a new form of leadership could be band 8 nurses practising at consultant level. With their experiences of caring for people with learning disabilities, nurse consultants can shape service delivery and pathways to enhance quality of care, reduce poor practices and avoidable deaths.

  8. The learning-disabled medical student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, P; Haake, C; Whitman, B

    1989-10-01

    Developmental pediatricians are being consulted by medical school promotion committees with regard to the course of action to be taken with learning-disabled medical students experiencing academic difficulties. Faculty attitude, a difficulty understanding the nature of learning disabilities, appears to be a major contributor to poor medical school performance on the part of learning-disabled adults. Utilizing the sequential-simultaneous information processing model as a simplified introduction to learning disability patterns, the authors argue that recommending intensive remediation of rote spelling and writing skills in students engaged in graduate education represents both a waste of time and a further emotional trauma to these young professionals.

  9. Learning Disabilities and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysberg, Leehu; Kasler, Jon

    2017-07-04

    The literature is conflicted around the subject of the emotional abilities of individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs): While many claim cognitive challenges are associated with emotional difficulties, some suggest emotional and interpersonal abilities are not compromised in such disorders and may help individuals compensate and cope effectively with the challenges they meet in learning environments. Two studies explored differences in emotional intelligence (EI) between young adults with and without SLD. Two samples (matched on gender, approximate age, and program of study; n = 100, and unmatched; n = 584) of college students took self-report and performance-based tests of EI (Ability-EI) as well as a measure of self-esteem and demographics associated with college performance (e.g.: SAT scores, gender, etc.). The results showed that while SAT scores and ability emotional intelligence (Ability-EI) were associated with college GPA, Ability-EI did not differ between the two groups, while self-report measures of EI and self-esteem did show differences, with the group with learning disabilities ranking lower. The effects remained stable when we controlled for demographics and potential intervening factors. The results suggest that EI may play a protective role in the association between background variables and college attainment in students with SLD. The results may provide a basis for interventions to empower students with SLD in academia.

  10. Sensory Integration in the Learning Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Georgia P.; Raskin, Larry M.

    1973-01-01

    Letter learning and recognition by 72 young (kindergarten or grades 1 or 2) learning disabled children were studied using visual, tactual, and visual plus tactual training and testing with 5- and 15-second exploration times. (Author)

  11. The relationship between challenging behaviours, mood and interest/pleasure in adults with severe and profound intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, A M; Visconti, K J; Csorba, J; Radvanyi, K; Rojahn, J

    2015-11-01

    We investigated whether current mood and interest/pleasure ratings in adults with moderate to profound intellectual disabilities were predictive of challenging behaviour [self-injurious behaviour (SIB), aggressive/destructive behaviour and stereotypic behaviour] and vice versa. In this combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study, staff members of a Hungarian residential facility completed translated versions of the Behaviour Problems Inventory-Short Form (BPI-S), the Challenging Behaviour Interview (CBI) and the Mood, Interest and Pleasure Questionnaire-Short Form (MIPQ-S) for 50 participants at two time points, approximately 4 to 5 months apart. Bivariate correlations from data concurrently assessed at Time-1 showed significant linear relationships between the SIB (both frequency and severity scores) and Interest/Pleasure sub-scales, and the Aggressive/Destructive Behaviour (severity scores) and the MIPQ-S Mood sub-scales (unadjusted for multiple correlations). All of these effects were found with the BPI-S data, but not with the CBI. Multiple regression analyses revealed that (1) low interest/pleasure assessed at Time-1 predicted high SIB (frequency and severity) at Time-2. (2) Interest/pleasure was not predictive of aggressive or stereotypic behaviour. (3) Mood at Time-1 did not predict any of the three types of behaviour problems at Time-2. (4) In reverse, high SIB (frequency and severity) at Time-1 predicted low interest/pleasure ratings at Time-2. (5) Surprisingly, frequent aggressive/destructive behaviour predicted high interest/pleasure. (6) Stereotypic behaviour scores at Time-1 did not predict interest/pleasure ratings at Time-2. Again, all of these effects were only found with the BPI-S data, but not with the CBI. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Hungarian versions of all three questionnaires had generally satisfactory outcomes. The fact that increasingly frequent and severe SIB was predicted by declining

  12. Staff attributions of the causes of challenging behaviour in children and adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppes, P; van der Putten, A A J; ten Brug, A; Vlaskamp, C

    2016-01-01

    A study has shown that staff do not generally perceive challenging behaviour in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) as being of serious consequence. In this study we aimed to gain a better understanding of the causal explanations that direct care and support staff give for challenging behaviour in this group. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to determine the way staff attribute challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD; and (2) to analyse whether more experienced staff attribute challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD differently than less experienced staff. In total, 195 direct support staff and an equal number of children and adults with PIMD participated in the study. Direct support staff filled out the Challenging behaviour Attribution Scale (five causal explanatory models of challenging behaviour) to explain challenging behaviour in one individual that they supported. The results show that direct support staff as a whole report the biomedical model as the most plausible explanation for challenging behaviour in children and adults with PIMD. However, in the present study the mean scores on all models are low. This might indicate that a large number of staff found none of the models particularly useful as possible explanations of challenging behaviour in people with PIMD. This could mean that staff have difficulties stating the cause of challenging behaviour in this group. Another possible explanation could be that there is little scientific knowledge about causing and maintaining factors of challenging behaviour in people with PIMD. It could also mean that staff have additional explanations for challenging behaviour in this target group that are not mentioned in the instrument used. Future research should address these issues. No differences were found between more experienced and less experienced direct support staff. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Toward a Megatheory of Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Richard H.

    1988-01-01

    This response to H. Lee Swanson's paper, "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities," argues that the field's development from social consensus has positive consequences and that the field is a "prenormal' science. A megatheory is suggested, incorporating metatheoretical aspects of the learning-disabled's information processing…

  14. Lessons from a learning disability service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The literature on this subject is also biased towards mental health settings with learning disability services much neglected. Aim: To explore nurses' knowledge and understanding of the use of observation on patients who self-harm in a learning disability service in the United Kingdom. Design and methods: This study ...

  15. The Gifted Learning Disabled: Identification and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoruk, Genevieve; Yewchuk, Carolyn

    1986-01-01

    Examines how programs and educational alternatives for the gifted can be modified for learning disabled students. Reviews difficulties in identifying gifted learning disabled through teacher nomination, group achievement scores, group intelligence tests, and previously demonstrated accomplishments and placement in mainstreaming, resource room,…

  16. The Complete Learning Disabilities Directory. 2011 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey House Publishing, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Published for over a decade, this directory continues to be a successful, sought-after resource, providing valuable information to professionals, families, and individuals in the learning disabilities community. Supported by the National Center for Learning Disabilities, this 2011 edition brings together the most up-to-date information on LD…

  17. Learning Disability Problems Prevalent Among Elementary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... identified various learning disability problems among their children/pupils. The learning disability problem that was identified by the largest proportion of parents and teachers (81.14%) was Mathematics problems and the one identified by the smallest proportion of parents and teachers (49.04%) was Hearing problems.

  18. Multi-sensory Environments: An Exploration of Their Potential for Young People with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Helen; Cavet, Judith

    1995-01-01

    This article addresses the controversy concerning multisensory environments for children and adults with profound and multiple learning difficulties, from a British perspective. The need for critical evaluation of such multisensory interventions as the "snoezelen" approach and the paucity of relevant, rigorous research on educational…

  19. Myths about Foreign Language Learning and Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom in education has suggested that students who are classified as learning disabled (LD) will exhibit inordinate difficulties learning a foreign language (FL). Even when not explicitly stated, the notion that those classified as LD have a disability for FL learning is implied. However, while beliefs about this purported disability…

  20. The Agony and the Inspiration: Professionals’ Accounts of Working with People with Learning Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meininger, H.P.; Wilson, N.; Charnock, D.

    2009-01-01

    Professionals' accounts of working in challenging service environments bring into relief the tensions they experience in their work. An ethical dilemma where the wellbeing of a severely or profoundly learning disabled (LD) and highly dependent person is at stake is conceptually and emotionally

  1. ICTs and Montessori for Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on the Montessori philosophy and examines how this learning theory currently gives credence to cognitive processes of the mind, as suitable intervention used to the training of children with learning disabilities. Furthermore, Montessori’s system and materials in combination with the support of new technologies as well as their implementation on various kinds of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have great successes regarding the support of disability and the enhancement of learning process.

  2. Specific needs of families of young adults with profound intellectual disability during and after transition to adulthood: What are we missing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Boudreault, Camille; Gallagher, Frances; Couture, Mélanie

    2017-07-01

    At the age of 21, the trajectory of services offered to youth with profound intellectual disability (ID) change significantly since access to specialised services is more limited. Despite the desire of parents to avoid any impact on their child, several factors can influence the course of this transition. However, there is little research on facilitators and obstacles to the transition to adulthood, and impacts on people with a profound ID. It is therefore difficult to provide solutions that meet their specific needs. The study aimed to document the needs of parents and young adults with profound ID during and after the transition to adulthood by exploring their transitioning experience and factors that influenced it. Using a descriptive qualitative design, two individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourteen (14) parents of young adults aged between 18 and 26 with a profound ID. At this point, many material, informative, cognitive and emotional needs of young adults and their parents are not met. Obstacles, mainly organisational, persist and result in a particularly difficult transition to adulthood experience. By knowing the specific needs of these families, it is possible to develop and implement solutions tailored to their reality. WHAT THE PAPERS ADDS?: The transition to adulthood is a critical period for families with young adults with an intellectual disability (ID), a reality observed internationally. Current literature on all levels of ID suggests some barriers to transition that lead to negative impacts on both parents and young adults with ID. However, presently, very little research exists on the reality of families of young adults with profound ID and factors influencing transition to adult life. Most of studies target people with mild to moderate ID. Considering the significant disabilities of people with profound ID, it is possible to imagine that their experience of transition will be even more difficult and they will present

  3. Executive Functioning and Figurative Language Comprehension in Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Saied; Kaplan, Shani

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the research was to examine executive functioning and figurative language comprehension among students with learning disabilities as compared to students without learning disabilities. As part of the research, we examined 20 students with learning disabilities and 21 students with no learning disabilities, both groups of students…

  4. Learning Disabled and Gifted: Success or Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joan; Gygi, Janice

    1981-01-01

    Many gifted learning disabled (LD) students are identified by their handicapping condition rather than by their giftedness. Some suggestions for dealing with these students include providing opportunities for concentration on strengths as well as weaknesses and finding ways to circumvent the specific disability so that enrichment can take place.…

  5. Preparing the Learning Disabled Adolescent for Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sally L.

    1988-01-01

    Maintains that caring adults can intervene in many ways to help learning-disabled adolescents acquire the planning, organizational, language, and socialization skills they need to make the transition into adulthood. (BB)

  6. Learning-Disabled Children as Conversational Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Mavis

    1983-01-01

    Research is reviewed on conversational competence in learning disabled (LD) children. LD children are viewed as eager to fulfill conversational responsibilities while compensating for linguistic inadequacies. Findings emphasize the importance of teaching conversational skills. (CL)

  7. Treating obesity in people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M

    Obesity in people with learning disabilities should not be dismissed as untreatable. Such people have the same right to a healthy weight as the rest of the population. Equally, they should have the right to remain overweight if they so choose, provided their choice is an informed one. This paper reviews the reasons people with learning disabilities may become obese, addresses how this problem may be tackled and highlights some of the ethical issues involved in weight reduction for this client group.

  8. Excessive online computer use and learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD

    2010-01-01

    Online gaming has become a very popular leisure activity among adolescents. Research suggests that a small minority of adolescents may display problematic gaming behaviour and that some of these individuals may be addicted to online games, including those who have learning disabilities. This article begins by examining a case study of a 15-year old adolescent with a learning disability who appeared to be addicted to various computer and internet applications. Despite the potential negative ef...

  9. Movement skill assessment in children with profound multiple disabilities : a psychometric analysis of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To analyse the psychometric properties of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test (TDMMT), an internationally used instrument in the planning and evaluation of movement-oriented interventions. Setting: Centres for special education in the Netherlands. Subjects: Children with profound multiple

  10. A Two Hundred Year History of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to track the history of learning disabilities and collect intervention theories which might be helpful for adult college students suffering from any number of learning disabilities (LD). There is a vast difference between a learning difficulty and a learning disability; an individual with learning difficulty can learn…

  11. Learning Disability: Not Just a Problem Children Outgrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    Three papers concerning learning disabled adults and a list of resources available for disabled people are presented. The first paper, "Colin's Own Story," was written by a 16 year old learning disabled individual, and recounts his struggles and what it is like to be learning disabled. Two poems by the author further describe his emotions and…

  12. A power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossink, Leontien Wm; van der Putten, Annette Aj; Waninge, Aly; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a twenty-week power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of this intervention. Pilot randomised controlled trial. A large-scale twenty-four-hour residential facility in the Netherlands. Thirty-seven persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Participants in the intervention group received a power-assisted exercise intervention three times a week for thirty minutes over a twenty-week period. Participants in the control group received care as usual. Trial feasibility by recruitment process and outcomes completion rates; intervention feasibility by programme compliance rates; potential outcomes by functional abilities, alertness, body composition, muscle tone, oxygen saturation, cardiovascular fitness and quality of life. Thirty-seven participants were recruited ( M age = 32.1, SD = 14.6) and were randomly allocated to intervention ( n = 19) and control ( n = 18) groups. Programme compliance rates ranged from 54.2% to 97.7% with a mean (SD) of 81.5% (13.4). Oxygen saturation significantly increased in the intervention group. Standardised effect sizes on the difference between groups in outcome varied between 0.02 and 0.62. The power-assisted exercise intervention and the trial design were feasible and acceptable to people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility. This pilot study suggests that the intervention improves oxygen saturation, but further implementation with the aim of improving other outcomes should be considered with caution.

  13. Learning and Coping Strategies of Learning Disabled ABE Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jovita M.

    1988-01-01

    Interviews with 15 students identified learning and coping strategies for learning-disabled adult basic education students. A variety of learning strategies for dealing with reading, spelling, and life-skill tasks were uncovered. Learners were found to be contributing members of their social networks. (Author/JOW)

  14. Cooperative Learning and Peer Acceptance of Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Joanne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explores the effects of 417 regular education students' acceptance of 41 learning disabled classmates. Participants were upper elementary students enrolled in either cooperative or competitive learning classes. After eight months positive changes in peer ratings among the students occurred more frequently in the cooperative learning classes. (MJP)

  15. Children with Learning Disabilities. Facts for Families. Number 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Parents are often worried when their child has learning problems in school. There are many reasons for school failure, but a common one is a specific learning disability. Children with learning disabilities can have intelligence in the normal range but the specific learning disability may make teachers and parents concerned about their general…

  16. You Don't Outgrow It: Living with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Marnell L.

    Written for adults with learning disabilities, this book is based on the premise that learning disabilities are not outgrown and thus adults need to learn practical strategies and coping mechanisms. Some of the topics addressed in the book are: what a learning disability (LD) is, terminology, inheritance of LD, kinds of LD, discovering the…

  17. Profound expressive language impairment in low functioning children with autism: an investigation of syntactic awareness using a computerised learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as 'monkey flies'. The game progressed in levels from 2 to 4 word sequences, contingent upon success at each stage. Although performance was highly variable across participants, a detailed review of their learning profiles suggested that no child lacked syntactic awareness and that elementary syntactic control in a non-speech domain was superior to that manifest in their spoken language. The reasons for production failures at the level of speech in children with autism are discussed.

  18. How musical engagement promotes well-being in education contexts: The case of a young man with profound and multiple disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina S.; Shoemark, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Students with profound intellectual disabilities disorders (IDDs) have the right to participate in educational opportunities that recognize their unique resources and needs, as do all children. Because of their specific communication challenges, positive relationships with attentive communication partners are critical for success. In fact, the power of positive relationships in schools is recognized to be connected to student well-being more broadly. This article examines the case of one young man with profound IDD and his relationship with his music therapist using a duo-ethnographic informed paradigmatic case study. Video analysis based on multi-voice perspectives is used to generate hermeneutic phenomenological findings to closely examine the relationship between a young man with profound IDD and a music therapist. The voices of four allied health researchers were also gathered to inform the authors’ construction of an informed commentary on the phenomenon. The results suggest that the essence lay in a combination of attentive, responsive and creative being with the other person over time. Four principles of musical engagement were identified in the video footage as critical to the meaningful relationships through music: the music therapist listens; the music therapist takes responsibility for structure; spontaneous initiation is sought from the young person; and the relationship is built over time. These concepts are contextualized within a discussion of student well-being that is underpinned by positive relationships and leads to students achieving their full potential within diverse school contexts. PMID:23930986

  19. How musical engagement promotes well-being in education contexts: the case of a young man with profound and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina S; Shoemark, Helen

    2013-08-07

    Students with profound intellectual disabilities disorders (IDDs) have the right to participate in educational opportunities that recognize their unique resources and needs, as do all children. Because of their specific communication challenges, positive relationships with attentive communication partners are critical for success. In fact, the power of positive relationships in schools is recognized to be connected to student well-being more broadly. This article examines the case of one young man with profound IDD and his relationship with his music therapist using a duo-ethnographic informed paradigmatic case study. Video analysis based on multi-voice perspectives is used to generate hermeneutic phenomenological findings to closely examine the relationship between a young man with profound IDD and a music therapist. The voices of four allied health researchers were also gathered to inform the authors' construction of an informed commentary on the phenomenon. The results suggest that the essence lay in a combination of attentive, responsive and creative being with the other person over time. Four principles of musical engagement were identified in the video footage as critical to the meaningful relationships through music: the music therapist listens; the music therapist takes responsibility for structure; spontaneous initiation is sought from the young person; and the relationship is built over time. These concepts are contextualized within a discussion of student well-being that is underpinned by positive relationships and leads to students achieving their full potential within diverse school contexts.

  20. Learning disabilities: analysis of 69 children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister Eduardo Kaehler

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available With this article we intend to demonstrate the importance of evaluation and follow up of children with learning disabilities, through a multidisciplinary team. As well as to establish the need of intervention. We evaluate 69 children, from Aline Picheth Public School, in Curitiba, attending first or second grade of elementary school, through general and evolutionary neurological examination, pediatric checklist symptoms, and social, linguistic and psychological (WISC-III, Bender Infantile and WPPSI-figures evaluation. The incidence was higher in boys (84,1%, familiar history of learning disabilities was found in 42%, and writing abnormalities in 56,5%. The most frequent diagnosis was attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, in 39,1%. With this program, we aimed to reduce the retention taxes and stress the importance of this evaluation, and, if necessary, multidisciplinar intervention in the cases of learning disabilities.

  1. Upgraded Technology for Contingent Stimulation of Mouth Wiping by Two Persons with Drooling and Profound Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Pichierri, Sabrina; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Many persons with developmental and physical disabilities experience drooling (i.e., loss of saliva from the mouth). Technology was recently developed to help two of these persons reduce the negative effects of drooling by increasing mouth-wiping responses. This study upgraded our initial approach and tested it with the two persons who we…

  2. A Functional Genomic Analysis of NF1-Associated Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Learning disabilities severely deteriorate the life of many NFI patients. However, the pathogenic process for NFI-associated learning disabilities has not been fully understood and an effective therapy is not available...

  3. A Functional Genomic Analysis of NF1-Associated Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Learning disabilities severely deteriorate the life of many NF1 patients. However, the pathogenic process for NF1-associated learning disabilities has not been fully understood and an effective therapy is not available...

  4. A Functional Genomic Analysis of NF1-Associated Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Learning disabilities severely deteriorate the life of many NF1 patients. However, the pathogenic process for NF1-associated learning disabilities has not been fully understood and an effective therapy is not available...

  5. Immediate Impressions of Nonverbal Ingratiation Attempts by Learning Disabled Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, James H.; Sherman, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Learning disabled and nondisabled children (in grades 3 through 5) were videotaped while being administered a standardized interview by a young adult female. In general, it was found that observers judged learning disabled children more harshly than nondisabled youngsters. (Author)

  6. Wittgenstein's language games as a theory of learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Sociological approaches to the understanding of learning disabilities are perhaps not as fully developed as they might be. Wittgenstein's notion of the language game is elucidated, and its relevance to the analysis of learning disabilities as a social phenomenon is explained. This gives some insight into an alternative conception of what learning disabilities might be, and why people who are classified as having learning disabilities continue, to some extent, to be excluded from full participation in society.

  7. A Time to Define: Making the Specific Learning Disability Definition Prescribe Specific Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Beam, Andrea P.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike other special education categories defined in U.S. law (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), the definition of specific learning disability (SLD) has not changed since first proposed in 1968. Thus, although the operational definition of SLD has responded to new knowledge and understanding about the construct, the formal definition…

  8. Awareness on Learning Disabilities among Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon K. P., Seema

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to find out the awareness on learning disabilities among elementary school teachers. The sample for the present study consisted of 500 elementary school teachers of Kerala. In this study the investigator used an Awareness Test on Learning Disabilities to measure the Awareness on Learning Disabilities among Elementary School…

  9. Legitimizing the Field of Learning Disabilities: Does Research Orientation Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Thomas E.; Mastropieri, Margo A.

    1988-01-01

    In response to H. Lee Swanson's paper, "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities," this article argues that the field of learning disabilities does not need to be legitimized and that basic research in learning disabilities is not necessarily the prerequisite vehicle by which theoretical progress can be made. (JDD)

  10. Learning Disabilities and Achieving High-Quality Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartland, Debi; Strosnider, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    This is an official document of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), of which Council for Learning Disabilities is a long-standing, active member. With this position paper, NJCLD advocates for the implementation of high-quality education standards (HQES) for students with learning disabilities (LD) and outlines the…

  11. Coping Styles of Learning Disabled Adolescents and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Shmuel; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Coping styles of 50 learning-disabled and non-learning-disabled adolescents and their parents were compared. Learning-disabled adolescents showed less ability to appraise a source of stress and to seek information about their stressful situations and showed greater pessimism about academic concerns. Coping patterns of parents did not clearly…

  12. The Challenge of Identifying Gifted/Learning Disabled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochak, Linda A.; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The following contemporary review illuminates several of the "best methods" to accurately identify gifted/learning disabled (GLD) students? Explanations which clearly define what it means to be gifted, learning disabled (LD) and gifted/learning disabled (GLD) are included and incorporated into a typology of three identities of GLD…

  13. Supporting Children with Severe-to-Profound Learning Difficulties and Complex Communication Needs to Make Their Views Known: Observation Tools and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathead, Scot; Yates, Rhiannon; Hill, Vivian; Kenny, Lorcan; Croydon, Abigail; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    All children have the right to shape decisions that influence their lives. Yet, children with severe-to-profound intellectual disabilities and complex communication needs are often marginalized from this process. Here, we examined the utility of a set of tools incorporating ethnographic and structured observational methods with three such…

  14. Learning Disabilities - Programs: Exceptional Child Bibliography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Information Center on Exceptional Children.

    One in a series of over 50 similar selected listings relating to handicapped and gifted children, the bibliography contains 96 references selected from Exceptional Child Education Abstracts concerning programing for children with learning disabilities. References include conference papers, journal articles, texts for parents and teachers, and…

  15. Group Hypnotherapy With Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lynn S.; And Others

    The impact of group hypnotic and self-hypnotic training on the academic performance and self-esteem of learning disabled children was explored. Three hypnotic training sessions and instructions for six weeks of daily self-hypnotic practice containing suggestions for imagery related to improvement in these areas were given to 15 children, their…

  16. Learning Disabilities Existing Concomitantly with Communication Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbrodt, Lisa; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A discussion of language disorders that often occur with learning disabilities focuses on definitions, characteristics, alternative assessment methods, and service delivery models and interventions. Use of standardized test batteries, curriculum-based language assessment, and portfolio assessment is reviewed. Principles and methods to enhance…

  17. Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H. Lee

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides a rationale for basic research and metatheory development in the field of learning disabilities, outlines the steps and cognitive parameters involved in validating such a metatheory, and discusses integrating the findings of basic research with instructional manipulations and reasons for the poor integration of theory and…

  18. Learning Disability and Depression in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Maryhelen; Broman, Clifford L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that children and adolescents with learning disabilities are more likely to experience depressed mood than are their peers. Many scholars explain this relationship as resulting from low self-esteem, stress, or social isolation. However, little work has explored whether this relationship continues to exist into young…

  19. The Learning Disability of Attention Deficit Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkes-Julkowski, Miriam; Stolzenberg, Jonathan

    1991-01-01

    Two discriminant function analyses were conducted to determine the cognitive/educational profile which differentiated 4 groups of 68 elementary/secondary level students: attention deficit disorder (ADD), with and without medication; learning disabilities (LD); and nonhandicapped. By treating the LD and nonmedicated ADD subjects as one group, a…

  20. Learning Strategies for Adolescents with Mild Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg; Koman, Kara; Schibelka, Mary; Higgin, Karen; Cooper, Cody; Butler, Jordyn

    2013-01-01

    Learning strategy instruction is an evidence-based practice for teaching adolescents with mild disabilities. However, researchers have not developed strategies for every content area or skill. Therefore, teachers need to be able develop strategies based on the needs of their students. This article reviews the process for developing and teaching…

  1. Personnel Preparation for the Learning Disabled Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Cherry; Geller, Carol H.

    1983-01-01

    The Statewide (Virginia) Personnel Preparation Project, designed to provide training and ongoing support for teachers of learning disabled adolescents, consists of four major components: a summer institute, a full-year follow-through directed study program, a four-activity technical assistance program, and a preservice component. (CL)

  2. The Learning Disabled Girl: A Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Irene D.; Gurian, Anita

    The learning disabilities literature of the past 15 years pertaining to sex differences is reviewed, including prevalence in children, socialization effects, physiological vulnerability, family patterns, differing expectations of parents and teachers, and differing patterns of response to failure. Analysis of data obtained over the last 2 years on…

  3. Educating Children with Learning Disabilities in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abosi, Okey

    2007-01-01

    The increase in the number of slow learners and children with learning disabilities in schools in Africa has become a major issue and concern. The situation is reflected in various school-leaving examinations, where an average of 30 percent of the results are below average or failures each year. Although there are no statistical records available…

  4. Developmental Dyscalculia Is a Familial Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ruth S.; Manor, Orly; Kerem, Batsheva; Ayali, Mady; Badichi, Navah; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2001-01-01

    Siblings and parents of 39 children with dyscalculia were assessed for arithmetic, reading, and attention disorders. Findings indicated a familial prevalence of dyscalculia almost tenfold higher than expected for the general population and suggest that dyscalculia, like other learning disabilities, has a significant familial aggregation,…

  5. [Early attention to learning disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millá, M G

    2006-02-13

    In the early stages of their development, children acquire the skills and knowledge that provide them with the foundations on which they will later add what they learn at school, including skills such as reading, writing and mathematics. The presence of learning difficulties at the infantile stage can affect the development of these academic skills during the period of compulsory schooling. Some children show learning difficulties in their earliest years. Early learning difficulties refer specifically to those problems that occur in the time between birth and the age of six and which reduce the chances of accomplishing the skills and knowledge that are typically acquired during the stage of infancy. There is a correlation between these problems and difficulties linked to cognition, to attention, perception and memory processes, to language skills involving both comprehension and expression, and to visuospatial processing. Their aetiology involves neuropsychological, social and cultural factors, as well as others that derive from the actual learning processes themselves. Following an interdisciplinary model using development scales, psychometric tests and neurodevelopmental monitoring will allow an early diagnosis to be reached. The intervention will be carried out in the medical, social, educational and family areas, and will focus on the aspects that favour maturing, development and the learning of curricular material. The new socio-educational scenario makes it necessary to attend to early learning difficulties in infants' education. Prevention and early attention offer guidelines and strategies to deal with them in a satisfactory manner.

  6. Comprehensive Assessment and Evaluation of Students with Learning Disabilities: A Paper Prepared by the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning Disability Quarterly, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD) strongly supports comprehensive assessment and evaluation of students with learning disabilities by a multidisciplinary team for the identification and diagnosis of students with learning disabilities. Comprehensive assessment of individual students requires the use of multiple data…

  7. Effectiveness of a nurse-led preadmission intervention for parents of children with profound multiple disabilities undergoing hip-joint surgery: A quasi-experimental pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliner, Brigitte; Latal, Beatrice; Spirig, Rebecca

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a family-centered care (FCC) intervention provided by an advanced practice nurse (APN) for parents of children with profound disabilities undergoing surgery. In a quasi-experimental design, we used the MPOC-20 to assess satisfaction with FCC and interviews to identify potential mechanisms for improving satisfaction. There was a positive effect on the MPOC-20 domain "general information," albeit with a small effect size (Cohen's d = 0.35). The interviewed parents expected additional support. Emphasis should be placed on providing comprehensive care coordination by an experienced APN. Shared care management is crucial in improving FCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Measurement tools for mental health problems and mental well-being in people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Samantha; Vereenooghe, Leen; Hastings, Richard P; Adams, Dawn; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Gore, Nick; Hatton, Chris; Hood, Kerry; Jahoda, Andrew; Langdon, Peter E; McNamara, Rachel; Oliver, Chris; Roy, Ashok; Totsika, Vasiliki; Waite, Jane

    2017-11-01

    Mental health problems affect people with intellectual disabilities (ID) at rates similar to or in excess of the non-ID population. People with severe ID are likely to have persistent mental health problems. In this systematic review (PROSPERO 2015:CRD42015024469), we identify and evaluate the methodological quality of available measures of mental health problems or well-being in individuals with severe or profound ID. Electronic searches of ten databases identified relevant publications. Two reviewers independently reviewed titles and abstracts of retrieved records (n=41,232) and full-text articles (n=573). Data were extracted and the quality of included papers was appraised. Thirty-two papers reporting on 12 measures were included. Nine measures addressed a broad spectrum of mental health problems, and were largely observational. One physiological measure of well-being was included. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist, Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped Scale-II and Mood, Interest and Pleasure Questionnaire are reliable measures in this population. However, the psychometric properties of six other measures were only considered within a single study - indicating a lack of research replication. Few mental health measures are available for people with severe or profound ID, particularly lacking are tools measuring well-being. Assessment methods that do not rely on proxy reports should be explored further. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. About Learning Disabilities and NF

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Areas of weakness in the child’s learning and cognition can be strengthened with proper inter- vention. It ... a flexible manner. • Monitor and evaluate behavior and emotions. • Manipulate information in immediate memory (working memory). While ...

  10. Strategies that facilitate participation in family activities of children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities: parents' and personal assistants' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Anna Karin; Imms, Christine; Wilder, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Participation throughout one's life plays a significant role for development and emotional well-being. For this reason, there is a need to identify ways to facilitate participation in family activities for children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The study design was qualitative and explorative, based on semi structured interviews with 11 parents and 9 personal assistants of children with PIMD. The interviews revealed participation-facilitating strategies relating to the children's/adolescent's proximal environment, such as "Availability and acceptability of the activity", "Good knowledge about the child" and a "A positive attitude of people close to the child", as well as strategies related to the children/adolescents themselves: "Sense of belonging", "Possible for the child/adolescent to understand", "Opportunities to influence" and "Feeling of being needed". Children and adolescents with PIMD are dependent on support obtained through their environment. The identified strategies, individually adapted through awareness and knowledge by the parents and the personal assistants, provide important evidence to assist our understanding in gaining understanding about how to improve participation in family activities of children and adolescents with PIMD. Participation-facilitating strategies related to the child/adolescent and his or her proximal environments are identified to improve participation in children and adolescents with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). Examples of strategies for the child's/adolescents' proximal environment include "good knowledge about the child/adolescent", and, for the child/adolescent, include creating "sense of belonging" and "opportunities to influence". Identifying and making these strategies explicit may assist in enhancing the participation of children and adolescents with PIMD in family activities. People in the child's/adolescent's proximal environment need to set

  11. Research with and by people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, Shirley

    Many people with learning disabilities are frequently excluded from active involvement in research and, as a result, along with researchers, have questioned research processes. These discussions have influenced how research is undertaken by, and with, people who have learning disabilities. Learning disability research is now increasingly framed as inclusive. This article explores the development of inclusive learning disability research by tracing its background and influences, identifying key characteristics and highlighting some of the challenges in its application. It demonstrates how inclusive research can give people with learning disabilities a voice that will help to inform practice.

  12. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (pdata seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed.

  13. 'It's pretty hard with our ones, they can't talk, the more able bodied can participate': staff attitudes about the applicability of disability policies to people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, C; Clement, T; Mansell, J; Beadle-Brown, J

    2009-04-01

    The level of resident's adaptive behaviour and staff facilitative practices are key sources of variation in outcomes for residents in community-based residential services. The higher the resident support needs the poorer their outcome. Although substantial investment has been made in values-based training for staff, their attitudes and the impact of these on practice is largely unexplored. The first study used ethnographic and action research methods to examine the daily lives of 25 residents with severe and profound intellectual disabilities (ID), who lived in five small group homes, and the attitudes of the staff supporting them. Thematic analysis of the data led to a proposition that although staff accept principles of inclusion, choice and participation for people with ID in general, they do not consider it feasible to apply these to the people with severe and profound ID to whom they provide support. The findings from a second study that used a group comparison design and administered a short questionnaire about staff attitudes to 144 direct-care staff and first-line managers working in disability services confirmed this hypothesis. The study suggests more focused attention is needed to staff understanding the values embedded in current policies and their application to people with more severe disabilities.

  14. Learning Differences--Not Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Concentrating on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence in elementary school classrooms ignores the dominant strengths of most children, who may possess alternative spatial, bodily kinesthetic, interpersonal, or intrapersonal intelligence. Explains how elementary teachers can transform "dysteachea" into learning strategies for…

  15. The dilemma for staff in 'playing a game' with a person with profound intellectual disabilities: empowerment, inclusion and competence in interactional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W M L; Antaki, Charles; Walton, Chris; Stribling, Penny

    2008-05-01

    Games between staff and people with intellectual disabilities serve to promote social engagement and inclusion. However, when the person has limited and idiosyncratic communicative abilities, it may be hard to gauge what his/her own view of the matter is. We examine video-taped records of two episodes in which a staff member of a group home prompted a resident with profound intellectual disabilities to play a verbal and a non-verbal 'game'. We examine how the staff member in these two cases designs her actions to solve the dilemma she faces between, on the one hand, abandoning an activity when the resident does not provide clear indications that she/he wants to continue or, on the other hand, persisting with it until the resident begins to enjoy it or, at least, participate more fully. The solution lies in a pervasive institutional practice: treat resistance or ambiguity as temporary reluctance. We discuss these interactions as examples of how principles of empowerment, inclusion and independence play out in the details of everyday interaction.

  16. Anxiety and Depression in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Reading Disabilities, or Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammarella, Irene C.; Ghisi, Marta; Bomba, Monica; Bottesi, Gioia; Caviola, Sara; Broggi, Fiorenza; Nacinovich, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to shed further light on the psychological characteristics of children with different learning disability profiles aged between 8 and 11 years, attending from third to sixth grade. Specifically, children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD), reading disabilities (RD), or a typical development (TD) were…

  17. Language Disorders Are Learning Disabilities: Challenges on the Divergent and Diverse Paths to Language Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Wallach, Geraldine P.

    2014-01-01

    This article takes readers along the pathway of language learning and disorders across childhood and adolescence, highlighting the complex relationship between early (preschool) language disorders and later (school age) learning disabilities. The discussion starts with a review of diagnostic labels widely used in schools and other professional…

  18. Route learning in Korsakoff's syndrome: Residual acquisition of spatial memory despite profound amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Wijnia, Jan W; Seekles, Maaike L; Postma, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Korsakoff's syndrome (KS) is characterized by explicit amnesia, but relatively spared implicit memory. The aim of this study was to assess to what extent KS patients can acquire spatial information while performing a spatial navigation task. Furthermore, we examined whether residual spatial acquisition in KS was based on automatic or effortful coding processes. Therefore, 20 KS patients and 20 matched healthy controls performed six tasks on spatial navigation after they navigated through a residential area. Ten participants per group were instructed to pay close attention (intentional condition), while 10 received mock instructions (incidental condition). KS patients showed hampered performance on a majority of tasks, yet their performance was superior to chance level on a route time and distance estimation tasks, a map drawing task and a route walking task. Performance was relatively spared on the route distance estimation task, but there were large variations between participants. Acquisition in KS was automatic rather than effortful, since no significant differences were obtained between the intentional and incidental condition on any task, whereas for the healthy controls, the intention to learn was beneficial for the map drawing task and the route walking task. The results of this study suggest that KS patients are still able to acquire spatial information during navigation on multiple domains despite the presence of the explicit amnesia. Residual acquisition is most likely based on automatic coding processes. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Students with Learning Disabilities in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of disabilities that music educators may never encounter among their students in the music classroom; however, all music educators will have students with learning disabilities. Students with learning disabilities may have a variety of "presenting problems" that limit their academic and social success in the music classroom. The…

  20. Academic Students' Attitudes toward Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Grinberg, Keren

    2016-01-01

    Background: Learning disabilities (LD) are lifelong disabilities that affect all facets of a person's life. Aim: Identifying the relationship between academic students' attitudes toward learning disability, self-image, and selected factors. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to 213 students from an academic center in Israel. Two different…

  1. Academic Programs for Gifted and Talented/Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfeld, Rich; Barnes-Robinson, Linda; Jeweler, Sue; Shevitz, Betty

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a comprehensive program for gifted students with learning disabilities in Maryland's Montgomery Country Public Schools (MCPS). MCPS has developed special self-contained classes for gifted students with severe learning disabilities while those with moderate and mild disabilities receive gifted instruction and services in…

  2. Learning disability in rural primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, K N; Agarwal, D K; Upadhyay, S K; Singh, M

    1991-04-01

    In rural primary school children observed for two years, 12.97 per cent of those having IQ greater than or equal to 90 were found to have poor achievement in arithmetic test and teacher's assessment. These learning disabled children had impaired perceptual maturity and conceptual grasp as observed on MISIC (Indian modification of WISC), Bender Gestalt test and Piaget's test. On WISC Bannatyne categories learning disabled children scored highest in verbal conceptualization (similarities, vocabulary, comprehension), followed by spatial (picture completion, object assembly, block design) and sequencing (arithmetic, digit span, coding) abilities. These children on Bender Gestalt test made more errors particularly distortions (distortion of parts, incorrect number of dots, shape of design lost etc). They also showed delayed development on Piagetian tasks class inclusion, conservation (for length, substance, liquid and number) ordinal relation and one to one correspondence. These observations indicate impaired perceptual maturity, conception and information processing deficit.

  3. Mathematics education and learning disabilities in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ana Miranda; Castellar, Rosa García

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of this article, we describe the basic objectives of the math curriculum in Spain as well as the basic contents, teacher resources, and obstacles perceived in mathematics instruction. Second, we briefly describe the concept of learning disabilities (LD) as they are currently defined in Spain. As stated in the recent educational reform, a student with LD is any student with special educational needs. The emphasis is placed on the educational resources that these students need in order to achieve the curricular objectives that correspond to their age group or grade. Third, we comment specifically on the educational services model and the evaluation and instructional procedures for students with math learning disabilities. Finally, we describe some lines of research that have appeared in the last few years in Spain that have led to the development of new evaluation and intervention procedures for students with LD in computation and problem solving.

  4. Auditory Processing Training in Learning Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Nívea Franklin Chaves Martins; Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Jr

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to promote a reflection about the importance of speech-therapy for stimulation a person with learning disability associated to language and auditory processing disorders. Data analysis considered the auditory abilities deficits identified in the first auditory processing test, held on April 30,2002 compared with the new auditory processing test done on May 13,2003,after one year of therapy directed to acoustic stimulation of auditory abilities disorders,in acco...

  5. A Learning Paradox: Students Who Are Gifted and Learning Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Cecilia Rose

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this generic qualitative study was to determine how and to what extent educational programming affects the success of middle school students experiencing the contemporary phenomenon identified as gifted learning disabled (GLD). The research took place within the real-life context of the middle school these GLD students attended.…

  6. Decoding Dyslexia, a Common Learning Disability | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Dyslexia Decoding Dyslexia, a Common Learning Disability Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents What Are Learning Disabilities? Learning disabilities affect how someone learns to read, ...

  7. Memory processes in learning disability subtypes of children born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomasin E; Conrad, Amy L; Richman, Lynn C; Nopoulos, Peg C; Bell, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate immediate auditory and visual memory processes in learning disability subtypes of 40 children born preterm. Three subgroups of children were examined: (a) primary language disability group (n = 13), (b) perceptual-motor disability group (n = 14), and (c) no learning disability diagnosis group without identified language or perceptual-motor learning disability (n = 13). Between-group comparisons indicate no significant differences in immediate auditory or visual memory performances between language and perceptual-motor learning disability groups. Within-group comparisons revealed that both learning disability groups performed significantly lower on a task of immediate memory when the mode of stimulus presentation and mode of response were visual.

  8. Disability-Aware Adaptive and Personalised Learning for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganji, Julius T.; Brayshaw, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to address how virtual learning environments (VLEs) can be designed to include the needs of learners with multiple disabilities. Specifically, it employs AI to show how specific learning materials from a huge repository of learning materials can be recommended to learners with various disabilities. This is…

  9. Ecological Congruence and the Identification of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Shayna

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the debate about how to evaluate students suspected of having a learning disability, the role of context in learning has been consistently minimized in the United States. Objective: This article explores the implications of the current, deficit-based approach to the definition and assessment of learning disabilities and offers a…

  10. Guide to Learning Disabilities for the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Christine

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the possibility that many English-as-a-Second-Language learners who are viewed as poor language learners are in fact struggling because they have a learning disability. This article is a basic primer on learning disabilities. It describes classroom behaviors associated with several common learning problems, and the results of research…

  11. 34 CFR 300.307 - Specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... between intellectual ability and achievement for determining whether a child has a specific learning... Educational Placements Additional Procedures for Identifying Children with Specific Learning Disabilities..., criteria for determining whether a child has a specific learning disability as defined in § 300.8(c)(10...

  12. Locus of Control and Learning Disabilities: A Review and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Marling, Curtis C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A literature review reveals that learning disabled children are more likely than normal achievers to attribute successes, but not failures, to external factors. The implications of locus of control for the field of learning disabilities are discussed in terms of its relation to academic achievement, learned helplessness, and remediation programs.…

  13. Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, A K; Granlund, M; Wilder, J

    2013-07-01

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's 'involvement in a life situation'. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared. A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test. Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities. Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The nature of peer-directed behaviours in children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and its relationship with social scaffolding behaviours of the direct support worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, S; Vlaskamp, C; Maes, B

    2016-01-01

    The multiple and complex disabilities of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) form a barrier for peer interactions and peer-directed behaviours. In this study, we further explore the nature of peer-directed behaviours in persons with PIMD and its relationship with social scaffolding behaviour of direct support workers (DSWs). Fourteen dyads of children with PIMD, who knew each other for at least 12 months, participated. They were sitting in close proximity while they were filmed with and without the presence of the DSW. Video recordings were coded continuously making use of observation schemes for the peer-directed behaviours of the children and the peer interaction influencing behaviours of the DSW. Significantly more singular peer-directed behaviour (without DSW: 18.00%; with DSW: 3.81%) was observed than multiple peer-directed behaviour (without DSW: 4.01%; with DSW: 0.52%). The amount of time the singular and multiple peer-directed behaviours were observed was significantly lower in the presence of a DSW. When the DSW shows peer interaction influencing behaviour, it was mostly social scaffolding behaviour (2.17%). The conditional probability of observing social scaffolding behaviour in the 10 s following on singular peer-directed behaviour was 0.02 with a Yule's Q of 0.04 and following on multiple peer-directed behaviour 0.04 with a Yule's Q of 0.33. The way in which peer interactions in children with PIMD are defined could have an impact on the amount of observed peer-directed behaviours and on the effect of the social scaffolding behaviours presented by DSW. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Framework for assessing individuals with rare genetic disorders associated with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD): the example of Phelan McDermid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soorya, Latha; Leon, Jill; Trelles, M Pilar; Thurm, Audrey

    2017-12-21

    Specialized strategies are needed to understand the complex neuropsychological impairments reported in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) associated with rare genetic disorders. This narrative review focuses on assessment of individuals with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome (PMS) as a condition commonly associated with PIMD. Published case series and prospective studies were reviewed to evaluate approaches to cognitive, language, motor/sensory, and behavioral domains. This review is framed using general principles for neuropsychological evaluation in PIMD. Neuropsychological assessment domains and tools varied across published reports. Adaptive behavior measures, out-of-range developmental assessments, and social-communication measures were commonly used. Available findings were used to shape a recommended framework with potential to improve measurement of clinical outcomes and advance scientific discovery. The recommended framework outlines an inter-disciplinary and multimodal neuropsychological assessment process relying on modified standardized assessments, functional assessments, and caregiver/informant reports when evaluating individuals with PIMD. Arrested development and skill variability/regression are also discussed as additional, important considerations in neuropsychological evaluation of individuals with PIMD and rare genetic disorders.

  16. A randomised controlled trial on evaluation of the clinical efficacy of massage therapy in a multisensory environment for residents with severe and profound intellectual disabilities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J S L; Chien, W T

    2017-06-01

    Recent literature has suggested that relaxation activities can reduce the challenging behaviours of people with intellectual disabilities, particularly in severe and profound grades, due to the counteractive effect of muscle relaxation on emotional frustration or psychological distress. Despite having inconclusive evidence, multisensory environment (MSE) and massage therapy (MT) are the commonly used approaches to relaxation among these people. However, these two approaches have not yet practised or tested in combination for reducing these people's challenging behaviours. A preliminary clinical efficacy trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of MT, MSE and their combined use for residents with intellectual disabilities in a long-term care facility on reducing their challenging behaviours. Eligible residents were recruited and randomly assigned to one of the four study groups (n = 11-12 per group), that is, MT in MSE, MSE alone, MT alone or usual care, for a 10-week intervention after a 1-month washout period. Outcome measures, including the Behaviour Problem Inventory, pulse and respiration rates, Behaviour Checklist and Alertness Observation Checklist, were assessed at recruitment and immediately following the interventions. A total of 42 participants (17 men and 25 women) completed the study. There were no significant differences in frequency and severity of challenging behaviours and most of the outcome measures between the four groups at post-test. Nevertheless, there were statistical significant differences on the active and inactive state (Alertness Observation Checklist) between the three treatment and control groups. Many participants in the three treatment groups changed from an active to inactive state (i.e. reduced activity levels) throughout the interventions, especially the MT in MSE. Such inactivity might suggest the participants' brief exhaustion followed by a period of alertness during the treatment activities. But their attention span and

  17. Disability Awareness Training with a Group of Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Won-Fong K.; Ortega, Karina; Sharkey, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities have been found to lack self-awareness about their disability, likely contributing to several challenges they experience, such as social skill deficits. At the same time, there is limited research investigating interventions to effectively increase disability self-awareness among this population. The current…

  18. Mathematics Synchronous Peer Tutoring System for Students with Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mengping Tsuei

    2014-01-01

    ... with learning disabilities (LD). The system provided a learning activity management module for teachers to administer peer tutoring activities, and included various math representation objects, communication tools, and reward schema...

  19. Teaching of Spanish language to students with specific learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mattasová, Monika

    2008-01-01

    When teacher of spanish language meets in his professional life some students with problem called specific learning disabilities, it`s important for him to be informed about their difficulties with learning foreign language. For these students is characteristic the deficit in their visual and auditive perception. They need tailor-made approach of the teacher. Among the specific learning disabilities, which complicates learning of foreign language, are counted foremost dyslexia, dysgraphia and...

  20. Strategic instruction for a secondary school student with learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lončar, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with learning disabilities are at leaving primary school and entering secondary school faced with increased autonomy expectations, mainly mastering the basic learning skills and their effective use at acquiring new subject material. However, because of their learning disabilities in the learning, social, cognitive and motivational areas, they often do not manage to reach the increased autonomy expectations. Firstly, at the beginning of my diploma I introduced the results of st...

  1. Visual Supports for the Learning Disabled: A Handbook for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, Leighan

    2013-01-01

    A large percent of the population is affected by learning disabilities, which significantly impacts individuals and families. Much research has been done to identify effective ways to best help the students with learning disabilities. One of the more promising strategies is the use of visual supports to enhance these students' understanding…

  2. Tanis Bryan: A Pioneer in the Field of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Mary G.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Tanis Bryan graduated from Northwestern University during the beginning of the field of learning disabilities. From this beginning, Tanis has provided invaluable insight into the field through her desire to understand the social dimensions of learning disabilities. The author wishes to thank Tanis for her assistance with this interview.

  3. Basic Research and Basic Needs in Research on Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    In rebuttal to H. Lee Swanson's paper, "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities," this article emphasizes that a bias toward applied research in learning disabilities is appropriate, that explanatory theories may not provide control over the phenomena explained, and that the field's orientation toward social consensus rather than…

  4. Learning Disabilities Research: The Need, the Integrity, and the Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a previous article, the paper notes additional reasons for the deficit in basic research and theory in learning disabilities, stresses the need for more good systematic research using multiple methods, and suggests that a metatheory for learning disabilities is not yet possible or profitable. (DB)

  5. Effective Spelling Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeski, Kristin L.

    2011-01-01

    Difficulty with spelling is a perennial challenge for students with learning disabilities. Several decades of research, however, have identified both fundamental linguistic concepts and instructional approaches that, when understood by a teacher, can be applied to teach students with learning disabilities to spell. In this article, a brief history…

  6. Gifted Learning Disabilities: Is It Such a Bright Idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Sharon

    1989-01-01

    Literature related to the definition, identification, characteristics, and intervention for gifted learning-disabled students is reviewed. Under-researched areas revealed include identification of characteristics and effectiveness of specific interventions. Issues in gifted/learning-disabled education and suggestions for future research are…

  7. Gifted and Learning Disabled Students: Practical Considerations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    The article provides practical suggestions for teachers working with gifted learning-disabled students. It includes a discussion of whether students can be both gifted and learning disabled, and reviews service options, methods of identification, and programing for this population. (DB)

  8. Definitional and Theoretical Issues and Research on Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a previous article, the paper stresses that, in addition to theory development, the field of learning disabilities needs to resolve definitional issues involving disability specificity, intelligence, measurement concepts, and the continua of abilities. Suggestions for developing operational definitions of both learning disabilities…

  9. The Dilemma of Identifying Learning Disabled Hearing-Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Ann

    1988-01-01

    A teacher, speech-language pathologist, school principal, and audiologist rated 27 hearing-impaired elementary students on effective use of language, speech, and sign language and on presence of a learning disability and/or behavior problem. Ratings were compared with each other and with test scores purporting to identify learning disabilities or…

  10. Learning Disabled Children's Syntactic Proficiency on a Communicative Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Mavis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The syntactic proficiency of 67 learning disabled children was evaluated during a task requiring them to convey information to a listener. Learning disabled children in all grades were found to produce shorter mean main clauses than nondisabled children even on this relatively simple communicative task. (Author/SEW)

  11. Language Processing Deficits in Learning Disabled Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Eleanor M.; Wiig, Elisabeth H.

    The authors summarize results of their own and others' research of auditory language processing deficits associated with learning disabilities in children and adolescents. Among findings reported are that learning disabled children exhibit delays in the acquisition of morphological and syntactic rules, delays in logical growth, short-term memory…

  12. A Search for Meaning: Telling Your Life with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jaime Helena; Moss, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified the collective experiences of oppression, stigma and isolation in the lives of people with learning disabilities. Against the backdrop of social and cultural processes that shape and limit the life experiences of people with learning disabilities, the authors are interested in how the individual develops a sense of self and…

  13. Social comparisons of learning disabled and nonexceptional adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, E P; Tracy, D B

    1994-08-01

    36 learning disabled high school subjects rated themselves lower on academic, psychomotor, and verbal performance on a social comparisons task than a control group of 53 nonexceptional peers. Learning disabled students tended to see themselves as less able in most areas involving school achievement but not in areas involving extracurricular activities.

  14. Teachers' Perceptions of the Concomitance of Emotional Behavioural Difficulties and Learning Disabilities in Children Referred for Learning Disabilities in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented overlapping and coexisting characteristics of learning disabilities (LD) and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD). Such concomitance may impact teacher referrals of children at risk for LD which in turn may influence service delivery. Using the Learning Disabilities Diagnostic Inventory (LDDI) and the Strengths and…

  15. Research teaching in learning disability nursing: Exploring the views of student and registered learning disability nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Parker, Michelle; James, Neil; Davies, Lynsey; Johnson, Kaye; Wilson, Sally

    2015-12-01

    Whilst there is a need to develop the research base within learning disability nursing it is also significant that currently there is little published data as to how research is taught to this group of nurses. To increase understanding of how research is currently taught to learning disability nurses within the UK. A survey design was used. The research was undertaken at a conference held in the UK in March 2014. 310 learning disability nurses attending the conference of which 212 completed the free text question. This comprised student nurses (n=158), registered nurses working in practice settings (n=25) and registered nurses working in educational institutions (n=24). Five participants did not specify their background. Participants were invited to complete a questionnaire that included a free text question regarding the teaching of research to learning disability nurses: it is the responses to this question that are reported in this paper. Responses were transcribed and thematically analysed. Eight themes emerged: Teaching approach--the good and the bad; finding the right level; right from the start; we need more time; generic versus specialist; there's not enough; getting research into practice; and what should we focus on? Variations exist in terms of the timing of research education, the teaching approaches used, and hence the quality of student experience. Of particular concern is the apparent gap between research teaching and the use of research in practice, and the reported lack of support for research within practice settings. However, enthusiasm for research is evident and hence recommendations are made both to enhance teaching and to strengthen links with practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Learning Disability Nurses in Promoting Cervical Screening Uptake in Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jennifer L.; Coulson, Neil S.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that the uptake of cervical screening by women with intellectual disabilities (commonly known as learning disabilities within UK policy frameworks, practice areas and health services) is poor compared to women without intellectual disabilities. The present study explored learning disability nurses' experiences of supporting women…

  17. ICT Learning Technologies for Disabled People: Recommendations for Good Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Marion

    2015-01-01

    The use of ICT in education is becoming increasingly important and has potential advantages to disabled learners if the technologies are appropriately designed, including for accessibility and usability, and used. This paper presents the first sets of recommendations for learning technologies for disabled people aimed at disabled learners, teachers, developers and educational institutions respectively. They were developed as part of the work of the Enable Network for ICT Learning for Disabled People and involved input from both experts and end-users. The concise format facilitates production in a variety of formats and languages for accessibility and wide distribution. The paper discusses the recommendations and their relationship to existing guidelines.

  18. Assumptions of Decision-Making Capacity: The Role Supporter Attitudes Play in the Realisation of Article 12 for People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne Watson

    2016-01-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) was the first legally binding instrument explicitly focused on how human rights apply to people with disability. Amongst their obligations, consistent with the social model of disability, the Convention requires signatory nations to recognise that “…persons with disabilities enjoy legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life” and mandates signatory nations to develop “…appropriate measures...

  19. Learning disabilities and social problem solving skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Filippello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Recent studies showed that children with learning disabilities present significant difficulties in learning as well as in social skills (Siperstein, 2009.Therefore, it was observed how it is difficult for these children to establish adequate relationships, especially to advise coping strategies to face interpersonal conflicts (Oliva & LaGreca, 1988. Accordingly to this argument and with reference to Agaliotis e Kalyva (2004, 2009, this study examines the preferences for strategies to solve an hypothetical conflict on a sample of children with LD in comparison to typical developing peers. They used the method of social story to conduct this research. In fact, researchers asked to the children, after they have listened a short story describing an interpersonal conflict interaction between adult and peers,  which strategies they would have chosen if they were in the same situation and the strategies that would be most appropriate to resolve a conflict. Results obtained from the experiment corroborated literature data and demonstrated that children with LD, in comparison to typical developing peers, use and prefer dysfunctional coping strategies, aggressive or passive, also in relation to the partner interaction (adult or peers to face interpersonal conflict.

  20. [Research into learning disabilities: a documentary analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ferrer, M

    Our current understanding of learning disabilities (LD) is essentially limited by their actual definition, the heterogeneity of the samples and the unsuitability of the control groups. This study offers an overview of the methodological aspects and the areas of research in LD. From a bibliographical search conducted in the Psychological Abstracts database, PsycINFO, we identified and selected the studies the review was to focus on, and this was completed with previous reviews. Quantitative research methods are preferred in 99.7% of cases, whereas the remaining 0.3% opted for qualitative methods. There was in increase in the number of research reviews, as well as longitudinal studies and those aimed at determining the effectiveness of the interventions, with the resulting interest in new techniques for data analysis such as meta-analysis, path analysis and latent growth curves. The research topics that aroused most interest were LD-related problems (16.7%), difficulties in learning to read (15.82%), studies focusing on intervention (10.15%) and diagnostics in LD. The primary objectives of the research appear to be the characterisation of LD and the problems they cause throughout the patient's life cycle, together with their identification and early treatment. Research is also extended towards other, more practical matters, with a special emphasis on the school setting.

  1. Confronting Similar Challenges? Disabled and Non-Disabled Students' Learning and Assessment Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriaga, Manuel; Hanson, Katie; Heaton, Caroline; Kay, Helen; Newitt, Sarah; Walker, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The article presents evidence from a systematic survey of disabled (n = 172) and non-disabled (n = 312) students regarding their learning and assessment experiences within one higher education institution in the UK. This study builds upon previous work in the sector, with the aim of gathering evidence to inform inclusive policy and practice for…

  2. Visual Literacy: A Concrete Language for the Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinatra, Richard

    The role of the right hemisphere of the brain in learning is examined, and the possibility of using visuals to improve verbal learning in right brain dominant learning disabled students is suggested. Approaches to stimulate oral language production, aid in the recall of written language, and achieve organizational style in writing through…

  3. Social and Emotional Learning for Children with Learning Disability: Implications for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavioni, Valeria; Grazzani, Ilaria; Ornaghi, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the key role of social and emotional learning programmes for children with Learning Disability (LD). The first part of the paper discusses the difficulties students with learning disability may encounter in their education, such as issues related to peer group acceptance, friendship and social isolation, low self-efficacy and…

  4. Learning Disability Documentation in Higher Education: What Are Students Submitting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard L.; Lovett, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the supporting documentation submitted by students with learning disability (LD) diagnoses. The participants were 210 students who were enrolled in a college support program for students with disabilities at a private liberal arts college. Findings showed that although most students submitted a psychoeducational evaluation,…

  5. Immersing Students in the Culture of Disability through Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rosa Milagros; Ruppar, Andrea L.; Jeans, Laurie M.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a description of service learning implemented in an introductory special education course focused on the culture of disability. Collaborating with liaisons from five community service organizations, students provided services to individuals with disabilities in a variety of projects across two semesters. Communication and…

  6. Summer Learning Loss among Elementary School Children with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Jessica; Wilson, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether students with reading disabilities (RD) showed greater regression in reading skills than did non-RD students over the summer vacation. The RD group consisted of 30 students in grades 4 to 6 from a private school for students with learning disabilities and a comparison group of 30 average readers in grades 4 to 6…

  7. Causes of learning disability and epilepsy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Elizabeth; Ring, Howard

    2011-04-01

    Although the association between learning disability and epilepsy is well known, until relatively recently specific processes underlying this association were relatively poorly understood. However, scientific advances in molecular biology are starting to guide researchers towards descriptions of genetic and pathophysiological processes that may explain why syndromes of epilepsy and learning disability often co-exist. This article will focus largely on three areas of advancing knowledge: insights gained from wider use of genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), specific insights gained from detailed study of Rett syndrome and the role of abnormalities of astrocytic function in predisposing to both epilepsy and learning disability. The enormous complexity of the biological underpinnings of the co-occurrence of epilepsy and learning disability are becoming apparent. In the future it is likely that research into therapeutic approaches will include, amongst other approaches, investigations of gene structure and expression, the role of astrocytes and the stability of dendritic spines.

  8. Assessment of Learning Disabilities: A Case-Typing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Stanley L.; Selznick, Richard

    1982-01-01

    The case typing, or student profile, method of assessing learning disabilities is discussed, along with guidelines for adequate assessment, obstacles to adequate assessment, the characteristics of good remedial instruction, and pitfalls of individualized education programs. (SEW)

  9. The brain of a learning-disabled individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, N

    1984-01-01

    The concept of learning disability is less absolute than is usually realized. In a nonliterate society only the advantages of many dyslexics may be evident without the disadvantages. By contrast markedly unmusical individuals can go through modern educational systems with little difficulty, although in some particular social conditions they could correctly be regarded as severely learning disabled. These considerations lead to a fresh look at the evolutionary significance of brain changes found in learning disorders, and their relationship not only to disability, but also to giftedness. This paper considers many of these issues in the context of the life of an individual who is not at all dyslexic but suffers from a severe form of another neglected learning disability, i.e., dysmusia.

  10. Decline in degree places for learning disability nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Berry, Stephanie

    2017-04-19

    The number of places on learning disability nursing undergraduate programmes have either decreased or remained unchanged at 21 out of 24 universities in England in the past two academic years, Nursing Standard can reveal.

  11. Telling Tales: Narratives and Learning-Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Katherine

    1986-01-01

    The article examines the social-academic nature of storytelling, reviews studies of narrative ability of learning disabled students, and offers suggestions for developing narratives in the classroom setting. (CL)

  12. Oral Narrative Abilities of Learning-Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Froma P.

    1986-01-01

    The literature on oral narrative comprehension, memory, and production abilities of language-learning-disabled students is reviewed. The relationship of these abilities to academic success is noted. (Author/DB)

  13. The Learning Disabled, Hearing Impaired Students: Reality, Myth, or Overextension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, Joan

    1989-01-01

    This paper focuses on definitions, incidence, and characteristics of the multihandicapping condition known as "learning disabled, hearing impaired," in order to provide a means of identifying these children and determining whether or not they require different teaching strategies. (JDD)

  14. People with learning disabilities in rural Scotland: review of policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Anthony

    2015-10-14

    People with learning disabilities may have additional healthcare needs compared to the general population, and the NHS faces challenges in addressing these needs. Scotland has many remote and rural communities, and residents of these communities can encounter difficulties in accessing healthcare resources. This article considers Scotland's healthcare policy in relation to remote and rural areas, and how effective it is in meeting the needs of people with learning disabilities in these communities.

  15. Pitch perception deficits in nonverbal learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Prieto, I; Caprile, C; Tinoco-González, D; Ristol-Orriols, B; López-Sala, A; Póo-Argüelles, P; Pons, F; Navarra, J

    2016-12-01

    The nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is a neurological dysfunction that affects cognitive functions predominantly related to the right hemisphere such as spatial and abstract reasoning. Previous evidence in healthy adults suggests that acoustic pitch (i.e., the relative difference in frequency between sounds) is, under certain conditions, encoded in specific areas of the right hemisphere that also encode the spatial elevation of external objects (e.g., high vs. low position). Taking this evidence into account, we explored the perception of pitch in preadolescents and adolescents with NLD and in a group of healthy participants matched by age, gender, musical knowledge and handedness. Participants performed four speeded tests: a stimulus detection test and three perceptual categorization tests based on colour, spatial position and pitch. Results revealed that both groups were equally fast at detecting visual targets and categorizing visual stimuli according to their colour. In contrast, the NLD group showed slower responses than the control group when categorizing space (direction of a visual object) and pitch (direction of a change in sound frequency). This pattern of results suggests the presence of a subtle deficit at judging pitch in NLD along with the traditionally-described difficulties in spatial processing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. An Independent Investigation of the Utility of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ) within a Community Learning Disability Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirk, Steven; Field, Bryony; Black, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Background: The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ) has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity to identify those who are likely to meet intellectual disability diagnostic criteria (McKenzie, et al. [McKenzie K., 2015]). However, there is no independent research to date to support these findings. Materials and Methods:…

  17. What is profound?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Discussing the question, which elements on the path are to be considered profound. While a general view is that the most subtle practises are also the most profound, 'Jig-rten-mgon-po maintains that the most fundamental one's are to be considered the most profound.......Discussing the question, which elements on the path are to be considered profound. While a general view is that the most subtle practises are also the most profound, 'Jig-rten-mgon-po maintains that the most fundamental one's are to be considered the most profound....

  18. CAPTCHA: Impact on User Experience of Users with Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Gafni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CAPTCHA is one of the most common solutions to check if the user trying to enter a Website is a real person or an automated piece of software. This challenge-response test, implemented in many Internet Websites, emphasizes the gaps between accessibility and security on the Internet, as it poses an obstacle for the learning-impaired in the reading and comprehension of what is presented in the test. Various types of CAPTCHA tests have been developed in order to address accessibility and security issues. The objective of this study is to investigate how the differences between various CAPTCHA tests affect user experience among populations with and without learning disabilities. A questionnaire accompanied by experiencing five different tests was administered to 212 users, 60 of them with learning disabilities. Response rates for each test and levels of success were collected automatically. Findings suggest that users with learning disabilities have more difficulties in solving the tests, especially those with distorted texts, have more negative attitudes towards the CAPTCHA tests, but the response time has no statistical difference from users without learning disabilities. These insights can help to develop and implement solutions suitable for many users and especially for population with learning disabilities.

  19. Culturally Responsive Reading Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourea, Lefki; Gibson, Lenwood; Werunga, Robai

    2018-01-01

    As student populations are becoming more diverse in ability and ethnicity across American classrooms, teachers are faced with instructional challenges in meeting their students' learning needs. Challenges are heightened for general and special education teachers who teach students with learning disabilities (LD) and have a culturally and…

  20. Slim Chance: A Weight Control Program for the Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotatori, Anthony J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A school-based diet program for learning disabled children stresses modifying eating behavior by learning alternative ways of interacting with the environment. Techniques stress the importance of self regulation, strategies for self monitoring, the establishment of realistic weight goals, use of stimulus control procedures, increased physical…

  1. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated with Learning Disability Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M.; Holland, Sara C.; Kubas, Hanna A.; Fitzer, Kim R.; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A.; Fraccaro, Rebecca L.; Smith, Amanda D.; Macoun, Sarah J.; Harrison, Gina L.; Hale, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent…

  2. An Enrichment Program for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Susan

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program was developed for gifted learning-disabled students, based on the Enrichment Triad Model. Learning behaviors, time on task, and motivation showed marked improvement as the grade four-five students completed individual creative projects. Described are procedures for identifying program participants, program activities, and program…

  3. Working Together: Computers and People with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers ways in which people with learning disabilities can benefit from both mainstream and specialized computer hardware and software. First, definitions are provided of terminology, including terms such as dysgraphia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia, non-verbal learning disorder, and dyslexia. Discussion of the role of assistive…

  4. Methodological Issues and Learning Disabilities Diagnosis in Clinical Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphaus, Randy W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated diagnosis of learning problems in 177 boys (ages 6-13) with behavior problems. The standard score discrepancy method and standard score plus low achievement method were more likely to identify children with above-average intelligence quotients as learning disabled, whereas a regression approach identified learning…

  5. Cognitive and Academic Instructional Intervention for Learning-Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenberg, Pearl L.

    1988-01-01

    Research on learning-disabled secondary school students' academic deficits, response to classroom environment, and response to instructional interventions is integrated with research on metacognition in text learning. A metacognitive orientation is recommended for instructional intervention programs, which should address general comprehension…

  6. Learning Disabilities and Conductive Hearing Loss Involving Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Julie; Healey, William C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of research on the relationship of otitis media (ear infection) and learning/language/hearing disorders revealed that incidence of otitis media was twice as common in learning disabled as nonLD students; and that, in general, otitis-prone children scored below controls with frequent evidence of performance deficits. (CL)

  7. The Adolescent with a Learning Disability: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Louisa D.

    1979-01-01

    The psychosocial difficulties that usually accompany learning disabilities are examined from a framework of developmental theory, particularly that of Erik Erikson. The implications of this perspective for treatment of adolescents with learning problems is discussed, and the summer residential program at Goddard College described. (Author)

  8. Breaking bad news to people with a learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, S

    This article identifies the difficulties often associated with breaking bad news, from a nursing perspective. The additional considerations involved in breaking bad news to people with learning disabilities are identified, and a six-step protocol (Buckman, 1991) is introduced and explored in relation to this client group. Effective communication is seen to be crucial when working with people with a learning disability, and a system for accurate listening is offered (Conboy-Hill, 1992). Finally, recommendations for helping professionals to learn how to break bad news sensitively to this client group are suggested. They include multi-agency working, education and training opportunities, standard statements, resources, support and research initiatives.

  9. Family-Peer Linkages for Children with Intellectual Disability and Children with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Frank J; Olsen, Darren L

    2017-09-01

    Family interactions are potential contexts for children with intellectual and learning disabilities to develop skillful social behaviors needed to relate effectively with peers. This study examined problem solving interactions within families of elementary school-age children (7-11 years) with intellectual disability (n = 37), specific learning disabilities (n =48), and without disabilities (n = 22). After accounting for group differences in children's behaviors and peer acceptance, across all groups, mothers' behaviors that encouraged egalitarian problem solving predicted more engaged and skillful problem solving by the children. However, mothers' controlling, directive behaviors predicted fewer of these behaviors by the children. Fathers' behaviors had mixed associations with the children's actions, possibly because they were reactive to children's unengaged and negative behaviors. For the children, greater involvement, more facilitative behaviors, and less negativity with their families were associated with greater acceptance from their peers, supporting family-peer linkages for children at risk for peer rejection.

  10. Screening for offenders with an intellectual disability: the validity of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Michie, Amanda; Murray, Aja; Hales, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed the validity of an intellectual disability screening tool, the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ), in three forensic settings: a community intellectual disability forensic service; a forensic in-patient secure unit and a prison, using data for 94 individuals. A significant positive relationship was found between full scale IQ and LDSQ score, indicating convergent validity. Discriminative validity was indicated by, firstly, a significant difference in the LDSQ scores between those with and without an intellectual disability, with those with a diagnosis of intellectual disability, scoring significantly lower. Secondly, a ROC analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of the LDSQ were both above 80%. The screening tool was found to have lower sensitivity in the forensic populations than was obtained in the original community standardisation sample, but had slightly higher specificity. Limitations and implications of the study are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. What Are the Treatments for Learning Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be used to help a child remember math concepts. Use of computers. A child with dyscalculia ... Center for Children with Disabilities. (n.d.). 10 basic steps in special education . Retrieved January 28, 2011, ...

  12. Neurocognitive profiles of learning disabled children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Orraca-Castillo, Miladys; Estévez-Pérez, Nancy; Reigosa-Crespo, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is a genetic condition generally associated with intellectual deficiency and learning disabilities. Although there have been groundbreaking advances in the understanding of the molecular, cellular, and neural systems underlying learning deficits associated to NF1 in animal models, much remains to be learned about the spectrum of neurocognitive phenotype associated with the NF1 clinical syndrome. In the present study, 32 children with NF1 ranging from 7 to 14 years we...

  13. Reimagining Disability and Inclusive Education Through Universal Design for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Doolittle Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1975, Congress enacted a law eventually known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, which ensures that children with disabilities receive a free, appropriate, public education. Since then, scholarly and popular debates about the effectiveness of inclusive education have proliferated and typically focus on the ability or inability of students with disabilities to succeed in so-called regular classrooms. These debates reflect widespread assumptions that the regular classroom is rightly the province of nondisabled students and a neutral, value-free space that students with disabilities invade and disrupt via their very presence and their costly needs for adaptation. But as many scholars in the field of Disability Studies in Education (DSE have argued, these discussions often fail to recognize that the space of the regular classroom, far from neutral, is constructed for a nondisabled, neurotypical, white, male, middle-class "norm" that neither reflects nor accommodates the wide range of diverse learners within it, regardless of whether these learners have been diagnosed with a disability. A DSE perspective sees the educational environment, not students with disabilities, as the "problem" and calls for a Universal Design for Learning approach to education, or the design of instructional materials and activities that allows the learning goals to be achievable by individuals with wide differences in their abilities and backgrounds. Agreeing with this DSE perspective, this article uses an autoethnographic approach to reexamine inclusive education and to consider how university classrooms, pedagogy, and curricular materials can be improved in order to accommodate all students, not just those with disabilities. Ultimately, the article argues that Universal Design for Learning has the potential to radically transform the meaning of inclusive education and the very concept of disability.

  14. Overcoming the obstacles: Life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Crista Marie

    Scientific discovery is at the heart of solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Scientists are retiring at rates that exceed the numbers of new scientists. Unfortunately, scientific careers still appear to be outside the reach of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities in their preparation and performance as scientists. This narrative inquiry involved the researcher writing the life stories of four scientists. These life stories were generated from extensive interviews in which each of the scientists recounted their life histories. The researcher used narrative analysis to "make sense" of these learning disabled scientists' life stories. The narrative analysis required the researcher to identify and describe emergent themes characterizing each scientist's life. A cross-case analysis was then performed to uncover commonalities and differences in the lives of these four individuals. Results of the cross-case analysis revealed that all four scientists had a passion for science that emerged at an early age, which, with strong drive and determination, drove these individuals to succeed in spite of the many obstacles arising from their learning disabilities. The analysis also revealed that these scientists chose careers based on their strengths; they actively sought mentors to guide them in their preparation as scientists; and they developed coping techniques to overcome difficulties and succeed. The cross-case analysis also revealed differences in the degree to which each scientist accepted his or her learning disability. While some demonstrated inferior feelings about their successes as scientists, still other individuals revealed feelings of having superior abilities in areas such as visualization and working with people. These individuals revealed

  15. Ethical challenges in everyday work with adults with learning disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Hall, Elisabeth; Støre Brinchmann, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthcare providers caring for learning-disabled individuals in institutions face challenges of what is right or wrong in their daily work. Serving this group, it is of utmost importance for the healthcare staff to raise awareness and to understand how ethical values are at stake....... Research question: What ethical challenges are discussed among healthcare providers working with adults with learning disabilities? Research design: The study had a qualitative and investigative design. Participants and research context: The study was conducted in a community institution for adults...... with learning disabilities. Participants were healthcare providers joining regular focused group discussions. Two groups participated and each group consisted of six participants. The conversations were taped and transcribed. Ethical considerations: The study was reported to Norwegian Social Science Data...

  16. Disability and eLearning: Opportunities and Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Kent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the current rising rates of online learning in higher education. It examines how disability is activated differently online and the impact of this on learning and teaching through the internet and the accessibility of two of the most popular learning management systems, Blackboard and Moodle, and the different approaches, benefits and problems associated with each system. It then explores the eLearning environment beyond the structure of a LMS to a broader digital campus that includes social networks, video hosting sites and micro blogging, where students and staff are increasingly expanding the learning and social environment in higher education. It also questions the legal and moral responsibilities of universities to make all their online activities accessible to all students, regardless of disability.

  17. Metacognitive reading strategies of children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolielo-Carrilho, Ana Paola; Hage, Simone Rocha de Vasconcellos

    2017-05-15

    to check the use of metacognitive reading strategies in children with learning disabilities and determine whether there is a relationship between their use and text comprehension. the study was conducted on 30 children, aged 8 to 12 years, of both genders, divided into experimental group (EG) - 15 children with learning disabilities; and control group (CG) - 15 children without disability. All children were submitted to the Reading Strategies Scale and Prolec text comprehension subtest. The sample was described in mean, median, minimum and maximum values. Comparative analysis was performed between the groups using the Mann-Whitney test. The degree of correlation between variables was verified by Spearman Correlation Analysis. The significance level was set at 5%. across the total scores of the scale, EG performance was lower in all descriptive measures, with a significant difference compared to CG. The EG achieved a performance close to children without difficulties only in global strategies. The correlation between the use of metacognitive strategies and reading comprehension was positive. children with learning disabilities showed deficits in the use of metacognitive reading strategies when compared to children without learning disabilities. The better the performance in reading strategies, the better textual comprehension was and vice versa, suggesting that metacognitive reading skills contribute to reading comprehension.

  18. The Effects of Weighted Vests on Appropriate In-Seat Behaviors of Elementary-Age Students with Autism and Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Amy L.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna; Ayres, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of weighted vests on the amount of time 3 elementary-age students with autism, intellectual disabilities, and sensory processing abnormalities engaged in appropriate in-seat behavior. An alternating treatments design was used to examine the duration of appropriate in-seat behavior under three…

  19. Measuring general hospital staff attitudes towards people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Frank; Wigram, Tony; Balakumar, Thanusha

    People with learning disabilities often experience health inequalities and barriers to healthcare services as a result of poor communication and discriminatory attitudes. We developed an educational package for healthcare staff as well as an attitude questionnaire to measure the impact of this training; the questionnaire is called the Attitudes of Secondary Healthcare Personnel Toward People with Severe Learning Disabilities (ASH-LD). This article describes the process of designing and piloting the ASH-LD questionnaire, and how it will be used to measure the effect of the planned training on staff attitudes.

  20. Peer tutoring in arithmetic for children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirne-Smith, M

    1991-02-01

    This study explored the effects of peer tutoring on the acquisition of single-digit addition facts in primary-aged students with learning disabilities and their cross-age tutors, and it investigated the relative effectiveness of two tutoring procedures, as follows: a counting-on approach (Method A) and a rote-memorization approach (Method B). Method C, a no-treatment control condition was included. Results strongly support the use of peer tutoring for students with learning disabilities. No significant differences were found for tutors or between Method A and Method B tutees.

  1. Learning disabilities at the dawn of the XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goikoetxea, Edurne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to inform to the reader the current debate on learning disabilities area. The language barrier imposed by the scientific literature in English makes professionals and college to miss the exciting progress on this diagnostic category so controversial from its formal beginning. We first analyze the definitions of specific learning disabilities that have been in force until the first decade of this century, then make the new definitions formulated to now and discuss characteristics of the history of definitions in this field. We conclude with the demands that we face because of the new definitions.

  2. Neuropsychological characteristics of learning disabled/gifted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, D E; Dunham, M D; Dean, R S; Kundert, D K

    1995-11-01

    The neuropsychological characteristics of 68 learning-disabled/gifted children (LD/Gifted) were studied using the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery for Children (HRNB-C). The proportion of LD/Gifted children identified as impaired was low compared to previous research that has examined the proportion of school-identified learning-disabled students who scored within the impaired range on the HRNB-C. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study indicated that LD/Gifted children were also more likely to demonstrate impairment on the Tactual Performance Test-Memory, Tactual Performance Test-Localization, and Trails B-Errors components of the HRNB-C.

  3. Learning Disabilities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of specific leaning disabilities (SLD in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 was determined in a cohort of 81 patients (43 males, 38 females; mean age 11 years 6 months; age range 8-16 followed at Children's Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

  4. Reasoning Disorders in Learning-Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, C. Addison

    1981-01-01

    Results indicated that 8 of the 36 adolescents fell into the strategy-absent category, characterized by a large discrepancy (in either direction) between their verbal and nonverbal abilities. Ss whose disabilities were limited primarily to reading and written language were largely spontaneous strategy users (17 out of 20). (Author)

  5. Involving users with learning difficulties in health improvement: lessons from inclusive learning disability research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Jan

    2004-03-01

    In this paper the author considers the lessons to be drawn from what is termed "inclusive" learning disability research for user involvement around health improvement. Inclusive learning disability research refers to research where people with learning difficulties (intellectual disability) are involved as active participants, as opposed to passive subjects. There is by now a considerable body of such research, developed over the past 25 years. From the review, the author draws attention to areas which can inform practice in involvement of users in a way that adds value.

  6. Comparisons of Self-Determination among Students with Autism, Intellectual Disability, and Learning Disabilities: A Multivariate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Chi; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Palmer, Susan B.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2017-01-01

    This study examined differences in self-determination among students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), students with intellectual disability (ID), and students with learning disabilities (LD). A total of 222 participants with an equal size group for each of the three disability categories were selected to participate in the comparison of total…

  7. Cognitive Profiles of Mathematical Problem Solving Learning Disability for Different Definitions of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Tammy D.; Fuchs, Lynn; Fletcher, Jack M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2016-01-01

    Three cohorts of third-grade students (N = 813) were evaluated on achievement, cognitive abilities, and behavioral attention according to contrasting research traditions in defining math learning disability (LD) status: low achievement versus extremely low achievement and IQ-achievement discrepant versus strictly low-achieving LD. We use methods…

  8. At sea with disability! Transformative learning in medical undergraduates voyaging with disabled sailors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Trevor; Lamont-Robinson, Catherine; Williams, Val

    2016-08-01

    Attitudinal objectives are difficult to formulate, teach and assess; yet good attitudes are fundamental to good practice. For instance, studies highlight negative attitudes to disability in the medical student community that contrast with the self-conceptions of disabled persons. This study was designed to better understand attitudinal learning, inadequately addressed by contemporary programmes, through the application of Mezirow's 'transformative learning theory' (TLT) to a novel educational intervention. Participating students went to sea, for voyages of 5-7 days, in tall ships operated by the Jubilee Sailing Trust. Each student was buddied with another sailor living with disability. Disabilities included cerebral palsy, loss of sight, loss of limbs and paraplegia. Students recorded their experiences using audio diaries, written logs, formal voyage reports and art work and in post-voyage seminars. The data were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis, and the results are considered under five themes suggested by Mezirow. Sixteen students were recruited, with four students sailing on each of four separate voyages. Each student recorded audio-diary entries, which had a total duration of between 10 and 212 minutes. For seven of the 16 students, the five key elements of TLT were demonstrable, suggesting that transformative learning, as described by Mezirow, was occurring. Drawing on diverse qualitative data, insights into different aspects of this transformation are provided. TLT can be used to characterise, and thus design, educational interventions to meet attitudinal learning objectives. Students can be helped to discover their less helpful frames of reference. In safe environments these frames can be challenged and subjected to personal and communal reflection. Drawing on audio diaries and other evidence, and in answer to critiques of contemporary medical teaching on disability, we demonstrate such transformation in students 'at sea with

  9. Field dependence in visually and nonvisually involved learning disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, R J; Harway, N I

    1976-08-01

    39 visually and nonvisually perceptually impaired 8- to 11-yr.-old boys with learning disabilities were compared with a control group of 35 "normal" learners on the Rod-and-frame and Children's Embedded-figures Tests. Previous findings of greater field dependence of learning disabled children are confounded because the experimental tasks involved visual perception. In our study the 27 "visuals" were more field-dependent than either the 12 "nonvisuals" or the controls. The latter groups did not differ significantly from one another, which may in part be a function of the small sample of nonvisual children identified. Alternative explanations, e.g., the visual nature of the field-dependence measures and the lack of reading difficulty of the nonvisual group, are considered. For the visually disabled Ss only Vocabulary scores, suggesting that among such children those with higher verbal intelligence may be more field-independent.

  10. Learning Disabilities and Its Impact on Poverty and Adult Literacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Glenn; Gerber, Paul J.; Reder, Stephen; Cooper, Richard

    The four papers that make up this document report on poverty issues as they pertain to adults with learning disabilities. "Programmatic Response to Welfare Clients with Learning Disabilities" (Glenn Young) describes steps in the Learning Disabilities Initiative that works with federal agencies, states, local governments, and nonprofit…

  11. Paradigms Lost: Learning Disabilities and the New Ghost in the Old Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnine, Douglas; Woodward, John

    1988-01-01

    This critique of H. Lee Swanson's "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" comments on Swanson's concept of learning disabilities, cognitive science, and information processing theory. A different research and theory-building agenda is proposed, focusing on society's definition of learning disabilities and instructional issues and…

  12. A Qualitative Investigation into the Experiences of Having a Parent with a Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Olivia; Clarke, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Background: More people with a learning disability are becoming parents. Little is known about the lived experiences of the children who have a parent with a learning disability. Methods: This study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to understand the lived experiences of people who have a parent with a learning disability. Five…

  13. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  14. Working Alongside Older People with a Learning Disability: Informing and Shaping Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Daniel; Priest, Helena M.; Read, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Background: There has been an increase in inclusive research in the learning disability field; however, this has not been reflected within learning disability and dementia research, where little is known from the perspective of people with learning disabilities. This paper will define inclusive research, explore reasons for the dearth of inclusive…

  15. Experiencing, and Being Experienced As, Learning Disabled Choreographers in the West of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Speckled Egg Dance was established in Galway, Ireland, in 2013, to facilitate opportunities for learning disabled dance artists to develop semi-professional dance skills and independent choreographic practice. The company aims to contest normative perceptions of learning disabled dance ability, and to make learning disabled dance aesthetics…

  16. Differences in Delinquency among Children with and without Learning Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a meta-analysis of the empirical literature on delinquent behavior among children with learning disabilities in comparison to their non-learning disabled peers. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria and results indicated that children with learning disabilities (n = 3,202) have higher mean scores on…

  17. Metacognition and High Intellectual Ability: Insights from the Study of Learning-Disabled Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, C. Lynne; Shore, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    This study compared metacognitive performance of gifted, gifted learning-disabled, learning-disabled, and average males in grades 5 and 6 and grades 11 and 12. For metacognitive knowledge, skill on think-aloud error detection reading, and comprehension, the performance of gifted learning-disabled students resembled that of gifted students more…

  18. An Investigation into the Public Health Roles of Community Learning Disability Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuba, Kay; Gates, Bob

    2015-01-01

    International studies have shown poor uptake of public health initiatives by people with learning disabilities. In addition, studies have shown that people with learning disabilities experience poor access to public health services. The contribution of community learning disability nurses in meeting the public health needs of people with learning…

  19. Physiological Uniqueness: A New Perspective on the Learning Disabled/Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bireley, Marlene; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A body of psychoeducational data were gathered on 11 children (ages 8-14) who were gifted and learning disabled. Results from brain imaging and vision testing for hyperacuity and contrast sensitivity suggest that the interaction of high ability and learning disability results in brain and vision patterns unique to the learning-disabled/gifted…

  20. Social Grace or Disgrace: Adolescent Social Skills and Learning Disability Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Socialization difficulties encountered by a particular learning disabled adolescent may be related to the type of underlying learning disability. Two subtypes of learning disability are discussed (language disorders and disturbed visual spatial functions) along with implications for problems in development of social skills and for effective…

  1. Substance Abuse and Learning Disabilities: Peas in a Pod or Apples and Oranges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    This paper was developed as a result of a 1999 conference on substance abuse and learning disabilities. An introductory chapter urges early identification of learning disabilities and appropriate treatment for both problems when they co-exist. The second chapter discusses the differences between learning disabilities and behavioral disorders, the…

  2. Teaching Academic Vocabulary to Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Kristen D.; Sanchez, Victoria M.; Flynn, Lindsay; O'Connor, Rollanda E.

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the meaning of academic vocabulary words helps adolescents understand content-area text and improves their academic achievement. To demonstrate deep understanding of words, students reading below grade level and students with learning disabilities must be explicitly taught word meanings, encounter target words in illustrative contexts, and…

  3. The Uses of Hypnotherapy with Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lynn S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Explored the impact of group hypnotic and self-hypnotic training on the academic performance and self-esteem of learning disabled (LD) children. Important predictors of self-esteem improvement were the child's hypnotic susceptibility score and self-hypnotic practice by children and parents. Hypnotherapy is of potential benefit to self-esteem…

  4. Loneliness and Coherence among Preschool Children with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Malka

    1998-01-01

    This study examined loneliness and sense of coherence among 187 preschool children in Israel, of which 111 were at high risk for developing learning disabilities. The high risk children demonstrated higher levels of loneliness and lower levels of coherence than the control group. The high risk children also were less accepted by nondisabled peers.…

  5. An Exploration of Community Learning Disability Nurses' Therapeutic Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsham, Marian

    2012-01-01

    This literature review and primary qualitative research explores therapeutic role from the perspective of Community Learning Disability Nurses. Semi-structured interviews, based on Critical Incident Technique ("Psychol Bull", 51, 1954, 327), and descriptive phenomenological methodology were adopted to elicit data amenable to systematic…

  6. Response to Intervention and the Identification of Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschly, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of response-to-intervention (RTI) to identify children and youth with specific learning disabilities (SLDs) is described with multiple illustrations. Essential components of the RTI process are specified at multiple tiers of intervention, each essential to valid SLD identification. The RTI goals are prevention in general education, early…

  7. Adolescents with learning disabilities: a comparative life-stream interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, J C

    1993-11-01

    The subjective experiences of adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) were compared to those of their low-achieving and normally achieving peers. Three groups of juniors and seniors from one suburban high school district, 18 students with learning disabilities (15 males, 3 females), 17 low-achieving students (12 males, 5 females), and 20 average-achieving students (12 males, 8 females), were given electronic pagers and booklets for 1 week. They were signaled every 40 minutes during school hours, and every 2 hours after school. As soon as possible after receiving a signal, they responded to questions in their booklets. The questions provided subjective measures on levels of affect, activation, cognitive efficiency self-esteem, motivation, and feedback from others. The students with learning disabilities reported feeling more positive and active than either of the other groups during school hours, while after school there were no differences on any of the subjective measures for the three groups. Specific LD school practices are high-lighted for their probable impact on the heightened affect and activation of the students with learning disabilities.

  8. Students with Learning Disabilities in an Inclusive Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Patricia; Fu, Danling

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study on two fourth grade students with learning disabilities in two different writing situations: writing for test preparation and writing for digital stories. The students' writing behaviors, processes, and products in these two settings are contrasted. The differences in the students' writing experiences suggest…

  9. University Teaching with a Disability: Student Learnings beyond the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Lynnaire; Kotevski, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the learning experience of university students who were tutored by a teacher with quadriplegia mixed type cerebral palsy. It was inspired by Pritchard's [2010. "Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers." "Journal of Social Inclusion" 1 (1): 43-51] argument that the presence of people with a…

  10. Job Satisfaction of College Graduates with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Raymond H.; Philips, Lois; Kakela, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Job satisfaction was examined for 55 self-identified college graduates with learning disabilities (LD) and 55 control graduates matched by gender, major, degree, and graduation year. Graduates with LD perceived themselves as receiving significantly less pay and promotion opportunities, and reported less total job satisfaction than graduates…

  11. 45 CFR 1308.14 - Eligibility criteria: Learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... skills for reading, writing, spelling or doing mathematical calculations. The term includes such... expression, listening comprehension, pre-reading, pre-writing and pre-mathematics; or (3) The child shows...) This definition for learning disabilities applies to four and five year old children in Head Start. It...

  12. Math Peer Tutoring for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, April D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reasons to use students as tutors to teach mathematics to students with specific learning disabilities are discussed. Descriptions of types of tutoring and training procedures for tutors are included. A guide for implementing math peer tutoring is provided, including procedures for getting ready, running the program, and enrichment and extension.…

  13. Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities: Legislation, Regulation, and Court Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumeta, Rebecca O.; Zirkel, Perry A.; Danielson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Specific learning disability (SLD) identification and eligibility practices are evolving and sometimes contentious. This article describes the historical context and current status of the SLD definition, legislation, regulation, and case law related to the identification of students eligible for special education services. The first part traces…

  14. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  15. Preparing Students with Learning Disabilities To Participate in Inclusive Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda-Amaya, Lisa E.; Dieker, Lisa; Reed, Fran

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of a program that provided systematic training and support to ensure the successful inclusion of 5 seventh-grade students with learning disabilities into a general-education setting co-taught by general and special educators. A self-monitoring system was implemented to provide support to students. (Author/CR)

  16. Self-Regulated Math Instructions for Pupils with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Saied

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we considered the different impact two methods of teaching had on pupils' ability to solve complex math problems. The methods considered were: self-regulated study and traditional teaching. We also examined the pedagogical consequences the differences made among the population of pupils with learning disabilities in special…

  17. Personality Patterns of Successful and Unsuccessful Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Larry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Adults (N=86) with learning disabilities completed the Personality Pattern Inventory, an employment history, and an interview. Verbal intelligence quotient was found to be the best predictor of employment success or lack of success. The incidence of reactor, persister, and workaholic personality types differed between subjects and a population of…

  18. Preventing Suicide in Learning Disabled Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Marnell L.; Sloat, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    Learning-disabled students may have some characteristics that make them particularly vulnerable to suicide. This article describes common misconceptions about suicide, discusses danger signs indicative of suicide risk, outlines steps in crisis intervention, and lists suggested information pamphlets and films. (JDD)

  19. Otitis Media and Learning Disabilities: More Than a Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Carol; Mandell, Colleen

    The relationship between recurrent otitis media (middle ear infection characterized by the presence of middle ear fluid and possibly leading to a temporary conductive hearing loss) and learning disabilities (LD) is examined. Traditional treatment approaches (antibiotic medication and surgery) are reviewed. The definition of LD is presented and the…

  20. A Social Emotional/Awareness Program for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susla, Brenda M.

    The social and emotional development needs of fourth and fifth grade students (N=16) with learning disabilities were addressed through development and implementation of a 12-week awareness program called "Pupils' Over-Whelming Esteem Rise" (Project POWER). This project targeted: (1) self-awareness; (2) social awareness; (3) coping, organizing,…

  1. Behavioral Coping Styles of Mentally Retarded and Learning Disabled Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Barrie Jo; Marsh, George E., II

    The Coping Analysis Schedule for Educational Settings (CASES), an observation instrument to identify students' primary coping or interaction styles, was evaluated with 44 educable mentally retarded (EMR), learning disabled (LD), or normal children (7 to 11 years old). CASES is intended to be a quantitative tool for collecting the data required…

  2. Correctional Education Experiences of Female Offenders with a Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    Minimal employable skills, poor work habits, and substance abuse are problems that often result in released female offenders' recidivating within 36 months of their prison release. Recidivism is further compounded when the female offender suffers from a learning disability. Research suggests that correctional education experiences do not address…

  3. The "Learning Disabilities to Juvenile Detention" Pipeline: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents becoming formally involved with a juvenile court because of school-related behavior and discipline problems is a phenomenon known as the school-to-prison pipeline. Adolescents with learning disabilities are disproportionately represented within this pipeline. A study was conducted to review the outcomes for a population of youthful…

  4. List Memory in Young Adults with Language Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Li; Byrd, Courtney T.; McGregor, Karla K.; Zimmerman, Hannah; Bludau, Kadee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the verbal memory limitations of young adults with language learning disability (LLD). Method: Sixteen young adults with LLD and 34 age- and education-matched controls with typical language participated in a Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) list…

  5. The Apophasis of Limits: Genius, Madness, and Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bernadette

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the author sidles up to the "problema" of identifying children as having a learning disability (LD) in the USA to ascertain what an analysis of limping characters, limping readers and limping rhythms might teach individuals about justice. In much current educational literature children labelled LD circulate as "maimed individuals"…

  6. Optimising Web Site Designs for People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Hennig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Much relevant internet-mediated information is inaccessible to people with learning disabilities because of difficulties in navigating the web. This paper reports on the methods undertaken to determine how information can be optimally presented for this cohort. Qualitative work is outlined where attributes relating to site layout affecting…

  7. Eliciting Web Site Preferences of People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Internet can be an excellent tool to help people with learning disabilities access relevant and appropriately written information. However, little work has been undertaken to ascertain web design or content preferences for this cohort. This paper examines methods to address this issue. Twenty five participants were presented with three web…

  8. Graphic Organizers for Secondary Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Sabrina M.; Filce, Hollie Gabler

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests students with learning disabilities often have trouble connecting new and prior knowledge, distinguishing essential and nonessential information, and applying comprehension strategies (DiCecco & Gleason, 2002; Vaughn & Edmonds, 2006). Graphic organizers have been suggested as tools educators can use to facilitate critical…

  9. Developing Media Literacy Skills for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jessica Everett

    2014-01-01

    Students with specific learning disabilities (SLD), such as emotional disturbances, and speech or language impairment, attending high schools located in the rural Mississippi Delta lack media literacy skills that could impact the student's ability to successfully graduate from high school. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify…

  10. Teaching Techniques for the Learning Disabled/Gifted Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    Through a review of the literature, recent research, and implementation results, this article explores teaching methods for use with gifted students with learning disabilities. Methods for application in regular and special classrooms are discussed, including establishment of relationships between home and school life, individualized intervention…

  11. Meeting the Needs of Learning Disabled Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Intended to provide information about learning disabled gifted students, the article discusses a rationale for providing enrichment activities within the framework of a program for the gifted. Identification strategies are discussed and program ideas using the enrichment triad model are offered. (Author/CL)

  12. Developing Assessment Profiles for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Belinda Davis

    1989-01-01

    Case studies are presented for 4 gifted learning-disabled students, ages 8-16. The students received a multidisciplinary assessment which indicated that psychometric test scores need to be supplemented with informal assessments; historical data; direct student observation; task analysis of permanent products; and information from parents,…

  13. Setting Up SHOP: A Program for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Loisann B.

    1990-01-01

    SHOP, or Search Handicapped Outreach Program, identifies gifted/learning-disabled students, develops enrichment activities using J. Renzulli's Triad Model, and implements effective delivery models to provide an environment in which the students can utilize their strengths and interact with gifted peers. (JDD)

  14. Intellectually Gifted Learning Disabled Students: A Special Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Susan J.; And Others

    The Intellectually Gifted/Learning Disabled Project investigated characteristics of this population and implications for educational programming. Twenty-three children, aged 7 to 16 years old, were identified through a referral process involving schools and parents. Only two subjects were female. A detailed analysis of school records; individual…

  15. Issues in Identification of Gifted/Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewchuck, C.

    1986-01-01

    Six issues relating to assessment of gifted/learning disabled (GLD) students are discussed: (1) incidence; (2) cut-off IQ scores; (3) barriers to identification; (4) use of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Revised; (5) differentiation between GLD and underachieving gifted; (6) qualitative differences between GLD, gifted, and learning…

  16. Mentoring Empowers Gifted/Learning Disabled Students To Soar!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevitz, Betty; Weinfeld, Rich; Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Wings Mentor Program in Maryland, a program developed to provide additional support to students with gifts who also have learning disabilities and highly able students who were not succeeding in the classroom. Students realize their creative and intellectual potential when paired with mentors who nurture them. (Contains…

  17. Taurodontism and learning disabilities in patients with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Gary S; Redford-Badwal, Deborah; Poole, Andrew; Mathieu, Gregory; Burleson, Joseph; Dauser, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive clinical study was to determine the prevalence rates of taurodontism and learning disabilities in a sample of patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Questionnaires and dental radiographs of Klinefelter syndrome patients were obtained and analyzed using previously published methods. Prevalence rates were determined for taurodontism and learning disabilities in the sample population and compared to the general population. Statistical analyses included a Fisher's exact 2-sided test to compare the prevalence rates to that found in the general population and subsequent determination of the positive predictive value. Taurodontism was found in 75% of the 24 participants. Eighty-three percent of the participants reported having a learning disability. These rates are significantly higher than the general population, as reported in the literature. The positive predictive value for Klinefelter syndrome, given a male patient with taurodontism and a learning disability, is 84%. In this case, the dentist should recommend karyotyping to the patient, parent, or physician. This demonstrates how important it is for dentists to understand and assist physicians in the diagnosis of genetic disorders.

  18. Teaching the History of Science to Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelget, Jeanne; Matthews, Catherine E.; Hildreth, David P.; Daniel, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    This article offers a guide to teaching the history of science to students with learning disabilities and provides a lesson template designed to engage students in a specific science event from the past. Activities including hypothesis testing and an historical role-play teach the vocabulary of natural selection and evolution using the landmarked…

  19. Auditory Processing Learning Disability, Suicidal Ideation, and Transformational Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Frank S.; Yocum, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this personal experience as a narrative investigation is to describe how an auditory processing learning disability exacerbated--and how spirituality and religiosity relieved--suicidal ideation, through the lived experiences of an individual born and raised in the United States. The study addresses: (a) how an auditory processing…

  20. Hearing Problems in the Learning Disability Population: Is Anybody Listening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Brennan, Siobhan; Hargreaves, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    We undertook this project because we believed that hearing loss experienced by the target population was greater than the referral figures suggested. Therefore, we set up a trial service initiative designed to examine the efficacy of different referral routes into audiology services for adults with learning disability. This retrospective analysis…

  1. Microcomputer Use in Learning Disabilities Programs at California Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Gilbert

    A study was conducted to gather information about the use of microcomputers within the learning disabilities (LD) programs in California community colleges. Surveys were sent to all 106 two-year colleges in the state, requesting information on the number of students enrolled in LD programs, the kind and number of computers used in the LD programs,…

  2. Adolescents and Learning Disability: An Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabis, Roman

    A treatment approach to adolescents with learning disabilities which incorporates remediation and psychotherapy is explored through two case studies of two youngsters (ages 14 and 17). After a review of earlier studies, the author focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of a 17 year old boy with a ninth grade education. Once a diagnosis of dyslexia…

  3. Prior History of Learning Disabilities in Reye's Syndrome Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quart, Ellen J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-six children (ages 9-18) who had recovered from Reye's syndrome (characterized by lethargy, disorientation, personality changes, and decreased consciousness) were tested for possible memory deficits. In reviewing school histories, an unexpected finding was the disproportionately high number of students who were learning disabled before…

  4. Written Cohesion in Children with and without Language Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoftas, Anthony D.; Petersen, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cohesion refers to the linguistic elements of discourse that contribute to its continuity and is an important element to consider as part of written language intervention, especially in children with language learning disabilities (LLD). There is substantial evidence that children with LLD perform more poorly than typically developing…

  5. Managing Resistance: An Essential Consulting Skill for Learning Disabilities Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Marilyn; Bauwens, Jeanne

    1988-01-01

    The article explores characteristics of resistance by general educators to special education consultation programs. It offers teachers of learning disabled students strategies for managing specific types of resistance as well as a general plan for minimizing resistance as well as suggestions for evaluating the impact of resistance management…

  6. Online Learning and Students with Disabilities: Parent Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Paula J.; Greer, Diana L.

    2014-01-01

    While research has been conducted on parental involvement in K-12 online learning, none of this research relates specifically to the parents of students with disabilities. Thus, researchers developed a survey around the following constructs: parental roles, instruction and assessment, communication and support from the school, and parental…

  7. Children's Attitudes towards ADHD, Depression and Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanca, Faye Francesca; Pote, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression and general learning disabilities (LD) are common difficulties for British primary school children. It has been found that characteristics associated with these difficulties can result in negative attitudes and stigma from other children, causing problems with peer relationships.…

  8. Neuropsychological Subtyping of Learning-Disabled Children: History, Methods, Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, John L.; Rourke, Byron P.

    1983-01-01

    The neuropsychological approach to studying learning disabilities (LD) has produced two extreme positions: the view of LD as (1) homogeneous and unitary and (2) as a pattern of unique and idiosyncratic characteristics. Resulting classification approaches for determining subtypes of the population have important implications for assessment and…

  9. The Relationship of Self-Esteem and Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Joan E.

    Self esteem in the learning disabled (LD) child is considered in terms of family, school, and peer influences. A review of the literature points out that the LD child seems to have a greater need than the normal child for parental support which helps to establish high self esteem. Performance, and not potential, appears to be the more important…

  10. Teaching Multiplication with Regrouping to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Margaret M.; Hinton, Vanessa M.; Schweck, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core Standards require demonstration of conceptual knowledge of numbers, operations, and relations between mathematical concepts. Supplemental instruction should explicitly guide students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) in these skills. In this article, we illustrate implementation of the concrete-representational-abstract…

  11. Mathematics for the Learning Disabled Child in the Regular Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    Assists teachers by helping them to recognize problems in mathematics that are often demonstrated by students with suspected or diagnosed learning disabilities. Also suggests remedial and compensatory techniques to help these teachers cope with such problems. Dyscalculia, hyperactivity, distractability, and perseveration are among the problems…

  12. Communicative Skills and Peer Relations of Learning Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Mavis; Bryan, Tanis

    1984-01-01

    Research is reviewed on the communicative ability of learning disabled (LD) adolescents and its effects on acceptance by peers. Difficulties are noted in social perception, oral language, and social experience. Suggestions for enhancing communication and social skills include using group-contingent reinforcements and exposing LD students to normal…

  13. An Intervention Framework for Learning Disabled Students with Communication Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekman, Nancy J.; Roth, Froma P.

    1982-01-01

    An intervention framework for the management of communication disorders in learning disabled children is presented. The model is comprised of three components: communicative intentions (what a speaker wants to convey), presupposition (a speaker's message in relation to specific information needs of a listener), and the social organization of…

  14. Linguistic Stress Judgments of Language Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highnam, Cliff; Morris, Valerie

    1987-01-01

    The ability of 10 language learning disabled (LD) children (age 9-12) and 10 sex/age matched normals to judge correctness of linguistic stress and semantic appropriateness was examined. Results indicated more difficulty on the linguistic stress task than the semantic interpretation task for LD children and better performance by normals on both…

  15. Written Expression: Assessment and Remediation for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ann M.

    1982-01-01

    The educational evaluation and remediation of written language disorders in learning disabled students are considered. It is suggested that a written language assessment should involve a thorough educational history and a complete psychoeducational evaluation. Attention is directed to written language assessment and remediation for handwriting,…

  16. Referential Communication Skills of Learning Disabled/Language Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meline, Timothy J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the communicative behaviors of 18 learning disabled/language impaired (LD/LI) children with two matched groups of normally developing children. LD and normal groups were matched up by age and language mates, and observed for evidence of communicative effectiveness and verbal output. Findings of the study are discussed and related to the…

  17. Effectiveness of Language Intervention with the Language/Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Chad; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A total of 43 studies, involving 1,703 subjects with a mean age of 6:11, were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of language intervention with language/learning disabled children. Results suggested that the average language-disordered child moved from the 50th percentile to the 85th as a result of language intervention. (Author/JDD)

  18. Characteristics of Language Disorders in Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candler, Ann C.; Hildreth, Bertina L.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to the characteristics, identification, and remediation of language disorders frequently associated with learning-disabled students. Characteristics include off-target responding, inaccurate word selection, neologisms, referent errors, topic closure, and sequencing difficulties. Remediation involves self-concept building,…

  19. Contextualizing Instruction for English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rhonda D.

    2016-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities (LD) can find navigating the content areas quite difficult due to challenges involving limitations in English language proficiency, gaps in English academic vocabulary, difficulties with working memory and long-term memory, and limited background knowledge on content area topics. However,…

  20. Cognitive and Emotional Factors in Children with Mathematical Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passolunghi, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Emotional and cognitive factors were examined in 18 children with mathematical learning disabilities (MLD), compared with 18 normally achieving children, matched for chronological age, school level, gender and verbal IQ. Working memory, short-term memory, inhibitory processes, speed of processing and level of anxiety in mathematics were assessed…

  1. Intrinsic vs Extrinsic Motivation in Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Peggy Tarpley; Loper, Ann Booker

    1983-01-01

    Forty-four children identified as learning disabled were administered Harter's Scale of Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Orientation in the Classroom. Scores were correlated with several indices of school behavior, standardized achievement test scores, report-card grades, and teachers' behavioral ratings. No pattern was evidenced between the scale and…

  2. The Importance of Romantic Love to People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Claire; Terry, Louise; Popple, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Background: Love is important aspect of life, including to people with learning disabilities both historically and more recently. Participants value the companionship, support and social status associated with a partner. Relationships are considered mechanisms to meet certain needs including feeling loved, company, intimacy and enabling…

  3. A Narrative Approach to Supporting Students Diagnosed with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Milsom, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Students diagnosed with learning disabilities experience many challenges that school counselors may address through narrative therapy. Narrative therapy is a postmodern, social constructionist approach based on the theoretical construct that individuals create their notions of truth and meaning of life through interpretive stories. This article…

  4. Discrepancy Dinosaurs and the Evolution of Specific Learning Disability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores-Abdool, Whitney; Unzueta, Caridad H.; Vazquez Donet, Dolores; Bijlsma, Eduard

    2008-01-01

    Identifying Specific Learning Disability (SLD) has been an arduous task. Until IDEA 2004, diagnosing SLD was limited to IQ discrepancy models lacking in both empirical evidence and contributing to minority over-representation. This paper examines the history of SLD assessment, the phenomena of minority over-representation, and the implementation…

  5. Rodin, Patton, Edison, Wilson, Einstein: Were They Really Learning Disabled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Kimberly A.; Adelman, Howard S.

    1987-01-01

    The practice of posthumously diagnosing historical figures is discussed. Emphasis is on the unsatisfactory nature of evidence found for those diagnosed as learning-disabled or dyslexic and the possibility of other explanations for identified problems. Posthumous diagnoses of Auguste Rodin, George Patton, Thomas Edison, Woodrow Wilson, and Albert…

  6. The Gross Motor Skills of Children with Mild Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Karen P.; Jernice, Tan Sing Yee

    2014-01-01

    Many international studies have examined the gross motor skills of children studying in special schools while local studies of such nature are limited. This study investigated the gross motor skills of children with Mild Learning Disabilities (MLD; n = 14, M age = 8.93 years, SD = 0.33) with the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2, Ulrich,…

  7. Triadic Moral Learning and Disability Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicester, Mal

    2011-01-01

    Since moral action often requires understanding the nature of justice and the development of empathy and compassion, moral education involves the learner's intellect, emotions and will. The lifelong learning involved is thus multifaceted and plausibly benefits from the integration of personal and political with professional learning. I explore…

  8. ICTs and Music in Special Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Τhis study is a critical review of published scientific literature on the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT, Virtual Reality, multimedia, music and their applications in children with special learning difficulties.  Technology and music are two factors that are recognized as tools which ensure quality of life, success and access to knowledge and learning resources. In the following papers of the last decade (2006-2015 are proposed models of music therapy for students with special learning difficulties in a psycho educational setting. There are also defined future research perspectives concerning the applications of technology in this particular research field.

  9. Clinical psychologists' views of intensive interaction as an intervention in learning disability services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth; Firth, Graham; Leeming, Catherine; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Intensive Interaction was initially developed in the 1980s as an educational approach for developing social communication and engagement with people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities and/or autism. Intensive Interaction has subsequently been adopted by a range of practitioners and professionals working in learning disability services and has a broad multi-disciplinary acceptance, being recommended in a number of UK governmental guidance documents. Despite this, there has been limited work on developing a deeper psychological understanding of the approach. This study utilises a qualitative description/thematic analysis approach to explore how clinical psychologists conceptualise the approach with regard to currently accepted psychological theories, as well as looking at other factors that influence their adoption and advocacy. The sample deliberately consisted of eight NHS (National Health Service) clinical psychologists known to be using or advocating the use of Intensive Interaction with people with a learning disability. The results of this study indicate that although the participants referred to some theories that might explain the beneficial outcomes of Intensive Interaction, these theories were rarely explicitly or clearly referenced, resulting in the authors having to attribute specific theoretical positions on the basis of inductive analysis of the participants' responses. Moreover, the participants provided varying views on how Intensive Interaction might be conceptualised, highlighting the lack of a generally accepted, psychologically framed definition of the approach. In conclusion, it was felt that further research is required to develop a specifically psychological understanding of Intensive Interaction alongside the formation of a Special Interest Group, which might have this task as one of its aims. There appeared to be a limited recognition amongst the participants of the specific psychological theories that can be seen to explain

  10. Psychology of Adjustment and the Learning Disabled Student. Alternative Techniques for Teaching Psychology to Learning Disabled Students in the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodey, Darwin

    A faculty member involved with the HELDS (Higher Education for Learning Disabled Students) project describes ways in which Psychology of Adjustment courses can be modified to accommodate LD students. He describes the goals and general approach (structured informality) of his class, which features group evening meetings and written assignments in…

  11. Contextualism as an Alternative Worldview of Learning Disabilities: A Response to Swanson's "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavelek, James R.; Palincsar, Annemarie Sullivan

    1988-01-01

    In response to a previous article, the paper finds weaknesses in the mechanistic worldview represented by the emphasis on information processing research in constructing a metatheory for learning disabilities. An alternative--contextualist--world view is proposed which is holistic, social, and developmental providing insight into processes of…

  12. Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children: Activities Groups Can Do for Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children thru Movement Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth I.

    Described are perceptual motor activities in the areas of coordination, agility, strength, balance, and endurance for use with learning disabled children. Provided are a rationale for movement education and definitions of 10 terms such as laterality and endurance. A sequence of activities is provided for the following skills: ball bouncing, rope…

  13. ICTs and Montessori for Learning Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Athanasios Drigas; Eugenia G. Gkeka

    2017-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the Montessori philosophy and examines how this learning theory currently gives credence to cognitive processes of the mind, as suitable intervention used to the training...

  14. Competencies of postsecondary education personnel serving students with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlander, K A; Shaw, S F; McGuire, J M

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey designed to identify the needed competencies of both administrative and direct service personnel in directing and implementing postsecondary support programs for students with learning disabilities. Data were collected from a national sample of 299 practitioners. In addition to information about respondent characteristics, results include ratings for all items on the survey. Competency areas perceived as most desired by learning specialists were assessment skills, cognitive interventions, and instructional skills, while administrative personnel rated management/leadership skills as most desired. Implications for professional development activities are addressed. The need for strengthening linkages between secondary and postsecondary personnel to foster effective transition planning for students with learning disabilities is also explored.

  15. Interactivity in work with disabled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Petersson, Eva; Hasselblad, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reflects upon a case study where exploration, play and empowerment in interactive therapy sessions with audio and visual stimuli resulted in achievement, self-esteem and a shared pride between a young adult with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), his mother and the spe......This paper reflects upon a case study where exploration, play and empowerment in interactive therapy sessions with audio and visual stimuli resulted in achievement, self-esteem and a shared pride between a young adult with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), his mother...

  16. Multiple intelligences and underachievement: lessons from individuals with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, D; Stone, S

    1995-01-01

    The field of learning disabilities, like education in the main, is undergoing calls for reform and restructuring, an upheaval brought on in great part by the forces of opposing paradigms--reductionism and constructivism. In reexamining our past, we must begin to address the failures of traditional deficit models and their abysmally low "cure" rate. Several new theories have arisen that challenge traditional practices in both general and special education classrooms. Particularly influential has been the work of Howard Gardner, whose theory of multiple intelligences calls for a restructuring of our schools to accommodate modes of learning and inquiry with something other than deficit approaches. At least some current research in the field of learning disabilities has begun to focus on creativity and nontraditional strengths and talents that have not been well understood or highly valued by the schools. In this article, we briefly summarize the findings in our search for the talents of students labeled learning disabled, evidence of their abilities, implications of these for the schools, and a beginning set of practical recommendations.

  17. Unspoken Words: Understanding Nonverbal Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Much of what is communicated in the classroom is through nonverbal means. Sending appropriate nonverbal signals, as well as recognizing and interpreting the nonverbal signals of others, are essential features of the learning process. Students' abilities to encode and decode nonverbal communication have the potential to affect all aspects of their…

  18. Music and dance as learning interventions for children with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Jhalukpreya Surujlal

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the many disadvantaged groups of people in the world, an important minority are children with intellectual disabilities. Relative to their counterparts without intellectual disabilities, children with intellectual disabilities face a wide spectrum of challenges, including learning difficulties, social segregation and negative stereotyping. Children with intellectual disabilities find it difficult to perform various functions such as communicating and socialising with others, and, in m...

  19. Students with Learning Disabilities in the Foreign Language Learning Environment and the Practice of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Mary Caitlin S.

    2015-01-01

    This examination of the literature on foreign, or second, language learning by native English-speaking students with disabilities addresses the benefits of language learning, the practices and policies of language exemption, the perceptions of students and educators regarding those practices, and available resources for supporting students with…

  20. Computer-Mediated Intersensory Learning Model for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Soonhwa; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Poggio, John C.; Meyen, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a computer-mediated intersensory learning model as an alternative to traditional instructional approaches for students with learning disabilities (LDs) in the inclusive classroom. Predominant practices of classroom inclusion today reflect the six principles of zero reject, nondiscriminatory evaluation, appropriate education,…

  1. Learned Helplessness and Expectancy Factors: Implications for Research in Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Adele

    1979-01-01

    Learned helplessness is a state of passivity and loss of persistence resulting from individuals' perceptions, over a period of time, that they cannot control outcomes of events nor can their efforts lead to attainment of goals. Research studies are reviewed and implications for the study of learning disabilities are evaluated. (MH)

  2. Wage differentials between college graduates with and without learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David L; Verbeek, Roelant L

    2002-01-01

    Wage differential studies examining legally protected groups typically focus on gender or racial differences. Legislation also fully protects individuals with learning disabilities (LD). This article is the first to decompose wage differentials between adults with and without LD. An original data set of college graduates with documented LD was constructed, and these individuals were compared to a control group from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our results show that much of the observed lower wages for individuals with LD is due to differences in productivity characteristics. However, there is an unexplained portion of the wage gap that could possibly be considered wage discrimination against individuals with LD. This possibility seems smaller due to the fact that the subsample of the employers who knew of the employee's learning disabilities did not appear to pay significantly lower wages to these individuals. Alternative hypotheses are discussed, as are sample-specific issues.

  3. The Fragile X Syndrome: Behavioral Phenotype and Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia GRAU RUBIO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the behavioral phenotype of individuals with Fragile X Syndrome and its impact in the educational scope. This syndrome is characterized by difficulties in sensory integration, cognitive deficits (verbal reasoning, abstract/ visual and cuantitative skills, short term memory, sequential processing, attention and executive processes, language disorders (phonetic-phonologicals, semanticals, morphosyntacticals and pragmaticals and communication disorders, social anxiety, general hyperarousal, autism, non autistic social difficulties, attention deficit and hyperactivity, and learning disabilities. The behavioral phenotype is highly variable and depends on sex, age, and mutation status (full mutation or premutation. The behavioural phenotype has important repercussions in education, as it enables us to understand the learning disabilities and to develop specific intervention strategies.

  4. Learning Styles, Learning Abilities and Learning Problems in College: An Exploration of Learning Disabilities in College Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Renee L.; Zern, David S.

    The study examined differences between 57 learning disabled (LD) and 24 non-LD college students on measures of psychoeducational assessment. In addition, differences between LD students with good and poor academic performance were studied, and coping strategies were identified for both sub-groups. A variety of standardized tests were administered…

  5. An Independent Investigation of the Utility of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ) within a Community Learning Disability Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirk, Steven; Field, Bryony; Black, Jessica

    2016-12-19

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ) has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity to identify those who are likely to meet intellectual disability diagnostic criteria (McKenzie, et al. ). However, there is no independent research to date to support these findings. An archival research design was used, utilizing data from diagnostic tools including the LDSQ, Wechsler Adult Intelligence assessments and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System Second Edition (ABAS-II) scores. Sensitivity and specificity values derived here were lower than those reported by (McKenzie, et al. ). Only IQ, not adaptive/social functioning, was found to be an accurate predictor of the LDSQ score. Results indicate limited validity in using (McKenzie, et al. ) proposed cut-off scores. The authors have expressed caution around using the LDSQ in isolation to identify those with an intellectual disability. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Perceptual and academic patterns of learning-disabled/gifted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, K A; Saphire, D G

    1992-04-01

    This research explored ways gifted children with learning disabilities perceive and recall auditory and visual input and apply this information to reading, mathematics, and spelling. 24 learning-disabled/gifted children and a matched control group of normally achieving gifted students were tested for oral reading, word recognition and analysis, listening comprehension, and spelling. In mathematics, they were tested for numeration, mental and written computation, word problems, and numerical reasoning. To explore perception and memory skills, students were administered formal tests of visual and auditory memory as well as auditory discrimination of sounds. Their responses to reading and to mathematical computations were further considered for evidence of problems in visual discrimination, visual sequencing, and visual spatial areas. Analyses indicated that these learning-disabled/gifted students were significantly weaker than controls in their decoding skills, in spelling, and in most areas of mathematics. They were also significantly weaker in auditory discrimination and memory, and in visual discrimination, sequencing, and spatial abilities. Conclusions are that these underlying perceptual and memory deficits may be related to students' academic problems.

  7. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated With Learning Disability Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenson, Erica M; Holland, Sara C; Kubas, Hanna A; Fitzer, Kim R; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A; Fraccaro, Rebecca L; Smith, Amanda D; Macoun, Sarah J; Harrison, Gina L; Hale, James B

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent comprehensive evaluations for learning and/or behavior problems in two Pacific Northwest school districts. Using concordance-discordance model (C-DM) processing strengths and weaknesses SLD identification criteria, results revealed working memory SLD (n = 20), processing speed SLD (n = 30), executive SLD (n = 32), and no disability groups (n = 41). Of the SLD subtypes, repeated measures MANOVA results revealed the processing speed SLD subtype exhibited the greatest psychosocial and adaptive impairment according to teacher behavior ratings. Findings suggest processing speed deficits may be behind the cognitive and psychosocial disturbances found in what has been termed "nonverbal" SLD. Limitations, implications, and future research needs are addressed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  8. The Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia in Mathematic Learning: Utilizing Power Points for Students with Learning Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo Dwi Riyanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The fact shows that students with learning disability need media of learning mathematics. The purpose of this study was to (1 develop interactive learning multimedia of power point, and (2 examine the effectiveness of power point in mathematics learning. The sample was a group of students in elementary school in Ngawi, East Java, Indonesia, especially those with learning disability. This study was a research and development comprising three stages: preliminary study, product development, and testing the effectiveness of the product. The data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and tests, then analyzed by descriptive qualitative, and t-test was to analize the effect of the product. In the development stage, the result showed that Experts validation is high as indicated by the mean score of 4.50 for the learning material, and the mean score of 4.44 for quality of the multimedia. The trial results showed that the quality of multimedia was very good as indicated by the mean score of 4.32. In term of the effectiveness of the product, the result from the t-test shows an increase of 14.27 (21.88%. This means that the interactive learning multimedia of power point improves the achievement of mathematic learning for students with learning disability in mathematics. Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

  9. Learning Disabilities in Children: Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Importance of Early Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with learning disabilities have significant impairment in reading, writing and mathematics, in spite of normal intelligence and sensory abilities. In reading disability, children will have difficulties in phonemic sensitivity, phonetic decoding, word recognition, word decoding skills and reading comprehension. The lifetime prevalence of learning disability is about 10%. Learning disabilities are more frequently seen in boys compared to girls. There are several risk factors for learning disabilities. Low birth weight, preterm birth, neonatal complications, language delay and epilepsy are important risk factors for learning disabilities in children. Students with learning disabilities have poor scholastic performance, anxiety and significant stress. They have more social, emotional and behavioural problems than those without learning problems. If not remedied at the earliest, learning disabilities will lead to failure in exams and these children may develop stress related disorders. Hence all children with learning problems should be evaluated scientifically at the earliest, for identification of learning disability. By providing scientific guidance and intensive one to one remedial training, learning problems of children can be managed successfully.

  10. Natural Learning and Learning Disabilities: What I’ve Learned As the Parent of a 2 Year Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen CSOLI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many students with learning disabilities continue to struggle in the classrooms of our traditional school systems, where curriculum objectives usually take precedence over the natural processes of learning. In this article, I review and summarize what I have learned about learning through the observation and parenting of my 2 year old son. I reflect on the question: What do these lessons about natural learning teach me about instructing students with learning disabilities? While I conclude that students still need compensatory strategies, they also need the space to allow learning to move at its own pace, the freedom to make good and bad choices, honesty from educators, and they need to learn independence within structure.

  11. Natural Learning and Learning Disabilities: What I've Learned As the Parent of a 2 Year Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen CSOLI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many students with learning disabilities continue to struggle in the classrooms of our traditional school systems, where curriculum objectives usually take precedence over the natural processes of learning. In this article, I review and summarize what I have learned about learning through the observation and parenting of my 2 year old son. I reflect on the question: What do these lessons about natural learning teach me about instructing students with learning disabilities? While I conclude that students still need compensatory strategies, they also need the space to allow learning to move at its own pace, the freedom to make good and bad choices, honesty from educators, and they need to learn independence within structure.

  12. Longitudinal models of reading achievement of students with learning disabilities and without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L; Kohli, Nidhi; Farnsworth, Elyse M; Sadeh, Shanna; Jones, Leila

    2017-09-01

    Accurate estimation of developmental trajectories can inform instruction and intervention. We compared the fit of linear, quadratic, and piecewise mixed-effects models of reading development among students with learning disabilities relative to their typically developing peers. We drew an analytic sample of 1,990 students from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 1998, using reading achievement scores from kindergarten through eighth grade to estimate three models of students' reading growth. The piecewise mixed-effects models provided the best functional form of the students' reading trajectories as indicated by model fit indices. Results showed slightly different trajectories between students with learning disabilities and without disabilities, with varying but divergent rates of growth throughout elementary grades, as well as an increasing gap over time. These results highlight the need for additional research on appropriate methods for modeling reading trajectories and the implications for students' response to instruction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Misconceptions Regarding Accommodations on High-Stakes Tests: Recommendations for Preparing Disability Documentation for Test Takers with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, Loring C.; Banerjee, Manju

    2007-01-01

    The process of submitting documentation to testing agencies as proof of a disability can be time consuming, expensive, and even intimidating to test takers with learning disabilities. Misconceptions about the accommodations review process employed by testing agencies add to the anxiety that many test takers feel around obtaining approval for…

  14. Estimating the severity of intellectual disability in adults: a Mokken scaling analysis of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Aja L; McKenzie, Karen

    2013-09-01

    A Mokken scaling analysis of the learning disability screening questionnaire (LDSQ) suggested that, with the exception of 1 item, the scale conforms to the properties of a Mokken scale. This has advantages for estimating the severity of intellectual disability and inferring the difficulties likely to be experienced by an individual for whom there is incomplete information on intellectual and adaptive functioning.

  15. Classification Framework for ICT-Based Learning Technologies for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Marion

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the first systematic approach to the classification of inclusive information and communication technologies (ICT)-based learning technologies and ICT-based learning technologies for disabled people which covers both assistive and general learning technologies, is valid for all disabled people and considers the full range of…

  16. Effects of an Intervention on Math Achievement for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, Vivian D.; Deris, Aaron R.; Simon, Marilyn K.

    2016-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities score lower than other at-risk groups on state standardized assessment tests. Educators are searching for intervention strategies to improve math achievement for students with learning disabilities. The study examined the effects of a mathematics intervention known as Cover, Copy, and Compare for learning basic…

  17. Cooperative Group, Risk-Taking and Inclusion of Pupils with Learning Disabilities in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Amael; Louvet, Benoit; Deneuve, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the impact of cooperative learning on changes in cooperative behaviours and acceptance amongst pupils with learning disabilities related to risk-taking. One hundred and sixty-eight French first year middle school pupils participated in this study. Thirty-six pupils with learning disabilities were mainstreamed…

  18. Parental Role and Support for Online Learning of Students with Disabilities: A Paradigm Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean J.; Burdette, Paula J.; Cheatham, Gregory A.; Harvey, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    This study, conducted by researchers at the Center on Online Learning and Students With Disabilities, investigated parent perceptions and experiences regarding fully online learning for their children with disabilities. Results suggest that with the growth in K-12 fully online learning experiences, the parent (or adult member) in students'…

  19. Cognitive Profiles of Mathematical Problem Solving Learning Disability for Different Definitions of Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Tammy D; Fuchs, Lynn; Fletcher, Jack M; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L

    2016-01-01

    Three cohorts of third-grade students (N= 813) were evaluated on achievement, cognitive abilities, and behavioral attention according to contrasting research traditions in defining math learning disability (LD) status: low achievement versus extremely low achievement and IQ-achievement discrepant versus strictly low-achieving LD. We use methods from these two traditions to form math problem solving LD groups. To evaluate group differences, we used MANOVA-based profile and canonical analyses to control for relations among the outcomes and regression to control for group definition variables. Results suggest that basic arithmetic is the key distinguishing characteristic that separates low-achieving problem solvers (including LD, regardless of definition) from typically achieving students. Word problem solving is the key distinguishing characteristic that separates IQ-achievement-discrepant from strictly low-achieving LD students, favoring the IQ-achievement-discrepant students. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  20. Forensic learning disability nursing skills and competencies: a study of forensic and non-forensic nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the skills and competencies of forensic learning disability nurses in the United Kingdom. The two sample populations were forensic learning disability nurses from the high, medium, and low secure psychiatric services and non-forensic learning disability nurses from generic services. An information gathering schedule was used to collect the data; of 1200 schedules, 643 were returned for a response rate of 53.5%. The data identified the "top ten" problems that forensic learning disability nurses may encounter, the skills and competencies necessary to overcome them, and the areas that need to be developed in the future. The results indicated that the forensic learning disability nurses tended to focus on the physical aspects to the role whilst the non-forensic learning disability nurses tended to perceive the forensic role in relational terms. This has implications for practice, policy, and procedures.

  1. Family-centredness of professionals who support people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities: validation of the Dutch 'Measure of Processes of Care for Service Providers' (MPOC-SP-PIMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Suzanne L G; van der Putten, Annette A J; Post, Wendy J; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2014-07-01

    A Dutch version of the 'Measure of Processes of Care for Service Providers' (MPOC-SP) was developed to determine the extent to which professionals apply the principles of family-centred care in the rehabilitation of children with physical disabilities. However, no data were available on the reliability and construct validity of this instrument when it comes to supporting people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This study aimed to validate an adapted version of the Dutch MPOC-SP for assessing the family-centred behaviours of professionals who support this group (MPOC-SP-PIMD). A total of 105 professionals took part in the study. A Mokken scale analysis was conducted to determine whether the instrument satisfied the assumptions of both monotone homogeneity and double monotonicity. Loevinger's scalability coefficient (H) was used for the scalability of the entire scale and of each item separately. Rho was calculated as a measure of the internal consistency of the scales. The analyses resulted in two scales: a nine-item scale interpreted as 'Showing Interpersonal Sensitivity', with H=.39 and rho=.76, and a seven-item scale interpreted as 'Treating People Respectfully', with H=.49 and rho=.78. A validated version of the MPOC-SP-PIMD, suitable for supporting people with PIMD, consists of a subset of two scales from the original Dutch MPOC-SP. This instrument can be used to compare the family-centredness of professionals with parent's expectations and views. This information can be used in practice to match the support to the needs of the parents and family of the child with PIMD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Audio textbook of Spanish for children afflicted with specific learning disability{--} with dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    LACINOVÁ, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This work dedicates to education of foreign languages of children afflicted with specific learning disability, with dyslexia. Theoretic part is occupied by specific learning disability, above all by its reasons, tokens, diagnostic and reeducation. The second part can be used as a help in education of Spanish of children afflicted with specific learning disability, with dyslexia. It is audio textbook of Spanish which contains also CD that serves as a audio help for reading texts and for learni...

  3. When children with profound multiple disabilities are hospitalized: A cross-sectional survey of parental burden of care, quality of life of parents and their hospitalized children, and satisfaction with family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliner, Brigitte; Latal, Bea; Spirig, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to assess parental burden of care, satisfaction with family-centered care, and quality of life (HRQoL) of parents and their hospitalized children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), and determine the relationship among these factors. A cross-sectional study using printed questionnaires and qualitative questions was undertaken at a Swiss University Children's Hospital. The 117 parents (98 mothers, 19 fathers) studied indicated a substantial impact on burden of care and parental health-related quality of life. Significant correlations with the hospitalized children's well-being were rs = .408 for burden of care and rs -.368 for quality of life. Qualitative results showed parents struggling to safeguard their children and worrying most about the children's well-being. Health professionals need to be aware of parental burden and that the perception of the children's well-being and the parents' efforts determine their support needs. Easing parents' burden and fostering confidence in the hospitalized children's well-being requires coordination of care provided by advanced nurse specialists, with an institutional framework that clarifies parental collaboration. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Children with learning disabilities and their participation in judicial procedures – what can disability advocacy offer?

    OpenAIRE

    Petri, Gabor

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the paper titled “The Zone of Parental Control, The ‘Gilded Cage’ and The Deprivation of a Child’s Liberty: Getting Around Article 5”. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses the original article as a jumping off point to assess what aids advocacy organisations and human rights instruments can give to children with learning disabilities who\\ud enter legal procedures.\\ud Findings – Existing human rights laws such as the UN...

  5. A Child With Learning Disability:A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Sedaie

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This case can be placed in a neurologic classification. The patient is a child with learning disability in school activities. He was first referred to an audiological clinic because of a central auditory processing disorder (CAPD. His mother has noticed several hearing problems and this led us to the evaluations for his central auditory processing disorder. He has problems in hearing speech in noise and speech processing and need his friends repeat words during communication. no vestibular disorder was noticed nor any localization problem. The child has a good progress in school and only suffered problems in reading tasks. Intelligence quotient(IQ was also normal.

  6. Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities: Part 1--Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a six part article intended to give parents the information and strategies they need to cope with their child with epilepsy who may have school learning problems. Epilepsy and seizures affect the classroom in unique ways that can make the learning experience especially challenging for some kids. Fortunately, much can be done to give the…

  7. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  8. Factors Affecting Learners with Disabilities-Instructor Interaction in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Abdulrahman; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2017-01-01

    Little research is available documenting the success of students with various types of disabilities in online classroom environments. This study investigates which factors associated with learners with disabilities impact student outcomes in an online learning environment. Forty learners with disabilities participating in online higher education…

  9. An Evaluation of the Disabled Students Learning Project at Deakin University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, J. Eric; McBeath, Clare

    A project to adapt learning materials and provide support services for severely disabled persons 22-76 years old in Australia is described and evaluation data presented. Disabilities of the eight students included total blindness, severe physical disability, and partial deafness. Three courses were chosen for adaptation: "Images of…

  10. Utilizing WAIS Scores to Determine Foreign Language Pathways and Learning Assistance for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Foreign language (FL) requirements at postsecondary institutions remain a major hurdle for many students with learning disabilities (LD) as well as a significant portion of students without diagnosed LD. Many institutions have developed foreign language substitution (FLS) policies that allow students with LD to take alternate paths to meet the…

  11. Using Learning-Strategies Instruction with Students Who Are Gifted and Learning Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Regardless of prevalence, students who are gifted and learning disabled do exist in America's public schools, and they have unique needs that must be met through our education system (Bees, 1998). Special education teachers, regular education teachers, and teachers of the gifted should be aware of the unique characteristics of students who are…

  12. Test of the definition of learning disability based on the difference between IQ and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L

    2005-08-01

    A learning disability is commonly defined as a discrepancy between IQ and achievement. This has been criticized for identifying too many children as having a learning disability who have high IQs and average academic achievement. Such overidentification as actually occurred was assessed in 473 referred children (8-16 years, M= 10, SD=2) with normal intelligence. Learning disability was defined as a significant discrepancy (pLearning disability was diagnosed in 312 (66%) of the children. There was no overidentification because all children had one or more WIAT scores below the normative level for their age, i.e., learning disability based on a WIAT score in the 90s. These children had a mean IQ of 123 and were rated by their teachers and parents as having learning problems.

  13. Teacher recommended academic and student engagement strategies for learning disabled students: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Bethel C.

    There has been a push towards the education of students with Learning Disabilities in inclusive educational settings with their non-disabled peers. Zigmond (2003) stated that it is not the placement of students with disabilities in general education setting alone that would guarantee their successes; instead, the strategies teachers use to ensure that these children are being engaged and learning will enable them become successful. Despite the fact that there are several bodies of research on effective teaching of students with learning disabilities, special education teachers continue to have difficulties concerning the appropriate strategies for promoting student engagement and improving learning for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings (Zigmond, 2003). This qualitative study interviewed and collected data from fifteen high performing special education teachers who were employed in a Southern state elementary school district to uncover the strategies they have found useful in their attempts to promote student engagement and attempts to improve student achievement for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings. The study uncovered strategies for promoting engagement and improving learning outcomes for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive classrooms. The findings showed that in order to actually reach the students with learning disabilities, special education teachers must go the extra miles by building rapport with the school communities, possess good classroom management skills, and become student advocates.

  14. A Bypass Program of Supportive Instruction for Secondary Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    The developmental bypass teaching technique (which provides students an opportunity to bypass their learning deficits) was studied with regard to social studies achievement and classroom behaviors in 50 learning disabled junior high school students. (Author/PHR)

  15. Disability, technology and e-learning: challenging conceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In considering the role that technology and e-learning can play in helping students access higher education and an effective learning experience, a large amount of the current research and practice literature focuses almost exclusively on accessibility legislation, guidelines and standards, and the rules contained within them (Abascal et al., 2004; Chisholm & Brewer, 2005; Gunderson & May, 2005; Paolucci, 2004; Reed et al., 2004; Slatin, 2005. One of the major problems of such an approach is that it has drawn higher education practitioners into thinking that their objective is to comply with rules. I argue that it is not (Seale, 2006. The objective should be to address the needs of students. The danger of only focusing on rules is that it can constrain thinking and therefore practice. We need to expand our thinking beyond that of how to comply with rules, towards how to meet the needs of students with disabilities, within the local contexts that students and practitioners are working. In thinking about how to meet the needs of students with disabilities, practitioners will need to develop their own tools. These tools might be user case studies, evaluation methodologies or conceptualizations:

  16. Use of the dichotic listening technique with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrzut, John E; Mahoney, Emery B

    2011-07-01

    Dichotic listening (DL) techniques have been used extensively as a non-invasive procedure to assess language lateralization among children with and without learning disabilities (LD), and with individuals who have other auditory system related brain disorders. Results of studies using DL have indicated that language is lateralized in children with LD and that the lateralized language asymmetries do not develop after age 6 nor are they affected by gender. Observed differences in lateralized language processes between control children and those with LD were found not due to delayed cerebral dominance, but rather to deficits in selective attention. In addition, attention factors have a greater influence on auditory processing of verbal than nonverbal stimuli for children with LD, and children with LD exhibit a general processing bias to the same hemisphere unlike control children. Furthermore, employing directed attention conditions in DL experiments has played an important role in explaining learning disabled children's performance on DL tasks. We conclude that auditory perceptual asymmetries as assessed by DL with children who experience LD are the result of the interaction of hemispheric capability and attention factors. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of multimedia vocabulary instruction on adolescents with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael J; Deshler, Donald D; Lloyd, John Wills

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of using content acquisition podcasts (CAPs), an example of instructional technology, to provide vocabulary instruction to adolescents with and without learning disabilities (LD). A total of 279 urban high school students, including 30 with LD in an area related to reading, were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions with instruction occurring at individual computer terminals over a 3-week period. Each of the four conditions contained different configurations of multimedia-based instruction and evidence-based vocabulary instruction. Dependent measures of vocabulary knowledge indicated that students with LD who received vocabulary instruction using CAPs through an explicit instructional methodology and the keyword mnemonic strategy significantly outperformed other students with LD who were taught using the same content, but with multimedia instruction that did not adhere to a specific theoretical design framework. Results for general education students mirrored those for students with LD. Students also completed a satisfaction measure following instruction with multimedia and expressed overall agreement that CAPs are useful for learning vocabulary terms. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  18. Syntactic Awareness and Arithmetic Word Problem Solving in Children With and Without Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Christian; Jiménez, Juan E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Bisschop, Elaine; Villarroel, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Arithmetic word problem (AWP) solving is a highly demanding task for children with learning disabilities (LD) since verbal and mathematical information have to be integrated. This study examines specifically how syntactic awareness (SA), the ability to manage the grammatical structures of language, affects AWP solving. Three groups of children in elementary education were formed: children with arithmetic learning disabilities (ALD), children with reading learning disabilities (RLD), and children with comorbid arithmetic and reading learning disabilities (ARLD). Mediation analysis confirmed that SA was a mediator variable for both groups of children with reading disabilities when solving AWPs, but not for children in the ALD group. All groups performed below the control group in the problem solving task. When SA was controlled for, semantic structure and position of the unknown set were variables that affected both groups with ALD. Specifically, children with ALD only were more affected by the place of the unknown set. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  19. How children with neurofibromatosis type 1 differ from "typical" learning disabled clinic attenders: nonverbal learning disabilities revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, L E; Koth, C W; Denckla, M B

    2000-01-01

    To further investigate cognitive deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1), children with NF-1 were compared to typical learning disabled clinic attenders (LD-clinic), all of whom had reading disabilities, as well as to a group with no disabilities (NoDx). Results indicated that both the NF-1 group and LD-clinic group had reading and reading-related deficits when compared to the NoDx group; however, the NF-1 group was more globally language impaired than the LD-clinic group. In addition, the NF-1 group scored significantly lower than the LD-clinic group, but not the NoDx group, on the visuospatial measures, thus confirming that children with NF-1 have visuospatial deficits not typical of a general LD-clinic population. The NF-1 group was not impaired in comparison to the NoDx group on certain language and visuospatial tasks that were previously found to be deficits in sibling pairwise matched designs; thus, the importance of considering genetic and familial context when studying the impact of genetic disorders on cognition was demonstrated.

  20. Loaded Pistols: The Interplay of Social Intervention and Anti-Aesthetic Tradition in Learning Disabled Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the aesthetics of applied performance with people with learning disabilities. Focusing on the integrated punk band Heavy Load, it explores how the aesthetic structure reconstructs notions of learning disability and intervenes in its social experience. It argues that this is facilitated through the punk form which positions…

  1. Adapting Compassion Focused Therapy for an Adult with a Learning Disability--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rosalind; Frearson, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Joe was referred to the Community Learning Disabilities Team (CLDT) for support around low mood and overeating. Initial formulation suggested compassion focused therapy (CFT) as an intervention. The evidence base for using CFT with people with learning disabilities is currently limited. Materials and Methods: Adaptations were made to…

  2. Exposure Therapy for Fear of Spiders in an Adult with Learning Disabilities: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Felicity A.; Walz, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The evidence-base for exposure therapy in people with learning disabilities experiencing specific phobias is sparse. This case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of spider phobia in a woman with learning disabilities using an exposure-based intervention augmented with mindfulness practice and bereavement work. To evaluate…

  3. Predicting the Motivation in College-Aged Learning Disabled Students Based on the Academic Motivation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Alberto D.

    2013-01-01

    Given the paucity of research on factors associated with motivation in learning disabled college students, the present study investigated the motivation levels in college students with learning disabilities. The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) has been validated cross-nationally and across all educational age groups of students having various…

  4. Reading Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities in the Upper Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Kent, Shawn C.

    2012-01-01

    For students with learning disabilities, the upper elementary grades may represent a unique opportunity to provide successful remediation for lessening a reading difficulty and preventing students with learning disabilities from falling behind in other content areas. This article discusses effective reading interventions for students with learning…

  5. The Impact of Irish Policy and Legislation on How Adults with Learning Disabilities Make Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Eileen; Griffiths, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects the impact of policy and legislation in the context of how adults with learning disabilities make choices. Following an overview of policies which have improved choice for people with learning disability in the United Kingdom, this paper reviews "choice" in current Irish policy and legislation. This paper, while…

  6. Informed consent for blood tests in people with a learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Lesley; Woodward, Val; Jackson, Leigh; Skirton, Heather

    2013-09-01

    This article is a report of a study of informed consent in people with a learning disability. The aims of the study were to explore the information needs of people with mild-to-moderate learning disabilities with respect to consent for blood tests and to identify ways of facilitating informed consent. The recent political agenda for social change in the UK has emphasized the right of people with a learning disability to have more autonomy and make their own decisions. As in other countries, there has also been a shift towards shared decision-making in healthcare practice. Qualitative study using an ethnographic approach. An ethnographic approach was used for this qualitative study. Phase 1 involved observation of six participants with a learning disability having a routine blood test in general practice, followed by semi-structured interviews with 14 participants with a learning disability in Phase 2. Data were collected between February 2009-February 2010. The data showed that consent procedures were often inadequate and provision of information to patients prior to a blood test was variable. People with a learning disability expressed clearly their information requirements when having a routine blood test; this included not wanting any information in some cases. Healthcare practitioners and people with a learning disability need to be familiar with current consent law in their own country to facilitate valid consent in the healthcare context. This study demonstrated the value of qualitative research in exploring the knowledge and attitudes of people with learning disability. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Fathers of Adults Who Have a Learning Disability: Roles, Needs and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davys, Deborah; Mitchell, Duncan; Martin, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is little research that specifically relates to fathers of adults with a learning disability despite the social expectation that fathers will provide a supportive role over the lifespan. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with seven fathers of adults with a learning disability to explore their roles, needs and…

  8. Exploring the Self-concept of Adults with Mild Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to add to the research on the self-concept of adults with mild learning disabilities and to generate a deeper understanding of their self-perceptions rather than draw generalised quantitative conclusions. Eight adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities receiving support from a supported living project were…

  9. School-Related Stress and Depression in Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurer, D. Paige; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined school-related stress and depression in adolescents with and without learning disabilities. A total of 87 students (38 learning-disabled and 49 nondisabled) from secondary schools in Calgary completed questionnaires on depressive symptoms and on school-related stress. Results indicated that the adolescents with LD reported…

  10. Setting up and Running a Loss and Bereavement Support Group for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Paul; Freeman, Adele; Offen, Liz

    2010-01-01

    Following evidence based literature, the Birmingham Clinical Psychology Service for People with Learning Disabilities ran a Loss and Bereavement Psychotherapy Group. The group consisted of five adults with mild learning disabilities, who met for 8 consecutive weeks. This paper reports the process of setting up a bereavement group for people with…

  11. Conformity to peer pressure by students with learning disabilities: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, T; Pearl, R; Fallon, P

    1989-01-01

    This study assessed the reported responses of junior high school students with learning disabilities and normally achieving classmates to peer pressure to conform in prosocial and antisocial activities. The results replicate those of an earlier study in finding that students with learning disabilities indicated more willingness than their classmates to conform to peer pressure to engage in antisocial actions.

  12. PIC Profiles for Learning-Disabled and Behavior-Disordered Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, David S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the performance of learning-disabled and behavior-disordered children (N=60) on the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). Results showed that learning-disabled and behavior-disordered children could be differentiated clearly on subtests that comprise the cognitive development and conduct disorder factors. However, less differentiation…

  13. "Sad, Just Sad": A Woman with a Learning Disability Experiencing Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison; Bell, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    This case study considers the psychological assessment, formulation and treatment of Hannah, a woman with a learning disability who recently experienced the death of her mother. Death still remains a challenging and often taboo subject. Moreover, when the grief is of a person with a learning disability, this combines with underlying difficulties…

  14. Health and Social Care Interventions Which Promote Social Participation for Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Sharon; Morris, David; Newlin, Meredith; Webber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are among the most socially excluded in society. There is a significant gap in research evidence showing how health and social care workers can intervene to improve the social participation of adults with learning disabilities. A systematic review and modified narrative synthesis was used to appraise the quality…

  15. Using Contact Work in Interactions with Adults with Learning Disabilities and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sharon; Paterson, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a project about using contact work with people with learning disabilities and autistic spectrum disorder. People with learning disabilities and additional autistic spectrum disorder are at risk of becoming socially isolated because of their difficulties in interacting with others. Contact work is a form of Pre-Therapy, which…

  16. "My Memory's Back!" Inclusive Learning Disability Research Using Ethics, Oral History and Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    The following article outlines the methodological approach used to include people with learning disabilities as active participants in an oral history produced in Australia. The history sought to document life inside Kew Cottages, Australia's oldest and largest specialised institution for people with learning disabilities. This work furthers…

  17. A Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dental Anxiety for People with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangnell, Simon J.; Green, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Dental anxiety is a common form of anxiety problem, and research suggests that more people with learning disabilities experience dental anxiety than in the general population. Very little work has been done to investigate effective non-medical approaches for supporting people with a learning disability and dental anxiety to access dental care.…

  18. Placement and Achievement of Urban Hispanic Middle Schoolers with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrocas, Lisa; Cramer, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined achievement gains in reading and math for Hispanic middle school students with specific learning disabilities in inclusive versus segregated settings in a large urban school district. The authors report learning gains for students with and without disabilities in inclusive versus segregated settings. Results indicate no…

  19. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  20. A Neuropsychological Approach to the Assessment of Adults with Learning Disabilities in Vocational Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Craig A.; Lazar, J. Wayne; Risucci, Donald A.

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the cognitive, academic, and personality characteristics of 75 adults with learning disabilities referred for services through the state/federal vocational rehabilitation system. Results found the subjects were homogenous relative to other groups of adults with learning disabilities, with low-average cognitive functioning and…

  1. Test Anxiety and Its Effect on the Personality of Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufi, Dubi; Okasha, Susan; Cohen, Arie

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to look for personality variables that characterized young adults with learning disabilities and test anxiety. Fifty-four Israeli adults diagnosed with learning disabilities participated in the study, 24 of them were diagnosed as having test anxiety; 30 did not have test anxiety. The participants completed the Test…

  2. Young People with Harmful Sexual Behaviour: Do Those with Learning Disabilities Form a Distinct Subgroup?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Louise; Giles, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The study examines 102 young people with Learning Disabilities (n = 51) and without a learning disability (NLD; n = 51) to explore ways in which LD young people with harmful sexual behaviours (HSB) should be recognized as a subgroup requiring specialized treatment and intervention. Throughout this comparison of perpetrator, victim and abuse…

  3. Recognition, Expression, and Understanding Facial Expressions of Emotion in Adolescents with Nonverbal and General Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Elana; Heath, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) have been found to be worse at recognizing facial expressions than children with verbal learning disabilities (LD) and without LD. However, little research has been done with adolescents. In addition, expressing and understanding facial expressions is yet to be studied among adolescents with LD…

  4. The "Double-Bind of Dependency": Early Relationships in Men with Learning Disabilities in Secure Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Kelly; Wood, Harry; Beail, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Although the development of secure attachments has been shown to be more problematic for people with learning disabilities, there is a shortage of research into the attachment experience of people with learning disabilities who have broken the law. The present study used thematic analysis to explore the attachment experiences of 10 men with…

  5. The Conundrum of Training and Capacity Building for People with Learning Disabilities Doing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nind, Melanie; Chapman, Rohhss; Seale, Jane; Tilley, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study explores the training involved when people with learning disabilities take their place in the community as researchers. This was a theme in a recent UK seminar series where a network of researchers explored pushing the boundaries of participatory research. Method: Academics, researchers with learning disabilities, supporters…

  6. AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs of Learning Disabled, Gifted, and Average Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Fung L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Provides quantitative research on the AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of learning-disabled, gifted, and average students in high schools. Finds that gifted students obtained a higher mean score on knowledge of AIDS compared with learning-disabled and average students. Finds no significant difference in attitudes and beliefs…

  7. Scholastica Institute: An Innovative Learning Disability Program for Teachers and Middle Years Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Scholastica '85 (University of Regina) was an academic summer day camp designed to serve both gifted and learning disabled adolescents and to afford experienced teachers a practicum opportunity wherein learning disabled and gifted student engaged in integrated activities when common denominators were present and segregated activities when the…

  8. Setting Up SHOP: A Program for Gifted/Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailor, Colette B.; Huntley, Lois

    The paper describes a Norwich, Connecticut, program for gifted learning disabled students. After a definition of giftedness, a chart lists characteristics of gifted/learning disabled students, and a brief discussion examines application of the Enrichment Triad Model of Joseph Renzulli to this population. Other program information pieces include a…

  9. Social and Self-Perceptions of Adolescents Identified as Gifted, Learning Disabled, and Twice-Exceptional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Carolyn; Mueller, Conrad T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the social and self-perceptions of twice-exceptional "students", those students who meet criteria for being identified as both gifted and learning disabled. In particular, we focus on how twice-exceptional students are similar to, or different from, students with only a learning disability or who…

  10. Gifted and Learning-Disabled Gifted Students' Knowledge and Use of Mathematical Problem-Solving Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Marjorie

    1991-01-01

    Three gifted and three learning-disabled gifted students (ages 13-15) viewed themselves on videotape solving mathematical problems and responded to questions pertaining to their problem-solving strategies. The non-learning-disabled students applied substantially more cognitive and metacognitive knowledge to the problem-solving task. (Author/DB)

  11. Cognitive Processes Underlying WISC-R Performance of Gifted and Learning-Disabled Navajos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shitala P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Administered Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised to 45 learning-disabled and 41 gifted Navajo elementary students. Interpreted performance according to Luria-Das Model of Simultaneous and Successive cognitive processes. Gifted and learning disabled students had disparate loadings for some subtests expected to involve Successive and…

  12. How Do People Described as Having a Learning Disability Make Sense of Friendship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Paul; Timms, Ken; Hayburn, Tracey; Watters, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Background: For many people with learning disabilities, friendships can be limited or restricted, with loneliness being a significant problem. Although much research has been undertaken exploring these issues, little attention has been given to what people with learning disabilities themselves have to say about friendship. The aim of this study is…

  13. Relationship between Pregnancy and Birth Complications and the Later Development of Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, Lorraine F.

    1979-01-01

    Perinatal histories of 50 learning-disabled children (ages 7 to 12) with minimum neurological dysfunctions were evaluated (using a normative population for comparison) to discover if any relationship existed between pregnancy and birth complications and the development of learning disabilities. The experimental group had had a significantly higher…

  14. Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donna Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success. Donna Elizabeth Williams, 2011: Applied Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University, Abraham S. Fischler School of Education. ERIC Descriptors: Learning Disabilities, Community Based Instruction, Academic Advising, Career Counseling, Career Planning. This…

  15. Social Anxiety among Arab Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities in Various Educational Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to examine differences in social anxiety between learning disabled (LD) and non-learning disabled (non-LD) students, taking into account educational placement. The present research is the first to consider the above relations among Christian Arab adolescents living in Israel as an Eastern collectivist minority. On…

  16. Barriers to Learning Online Experienced by Students with a Mental Health Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Dean; Dryer, Rachel; Henning, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Online education is widely regarded as increasing accessibility to higher education to individuals with disadvantage and disability, including those with a mental health disability. However, the learning challenges these students experience within the online learning environment are not well understood. The purpose of this qualitative case study…

  17. Adults with Learning Disabilities Experiences of Using Community Dental Services: Service User and Carer Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Carolyn; Poole, Helen; Brennan, Michelle; Irvine, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Background: The government alongside other health and social care organisation have identified the need to improve the care provided for people with learning disabilities. Materials and Methods: This service evaluation aimed to explore the experiences of people with learning disabilities and their carers who accessed community dental services…

  18. Experiences of Two Multidisciplinary Team Members of Systemic Consultations in a Community Learning Disability Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clair; Viljoen, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Systemic approaches can be useful in working with people with learning disabilities and their network. The evidence base for these approaches within the field of learning disabilities, however, is currently limited. Materials and Methods: This article presents part of a service evaluation of systemic consultations in a Community…

  19. Focus on Research in Learning Disabilities: Reports from the Research Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischner, Jeannette, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Eight articles report on findings of the five Research Institutes in Learning Disabilities. T. Bryan reports on "The Chicago Institute for Learning Disabilities" with findings concerning children's conversational skills, how children account for success and failure, children's ingratiation tactics, children who forget quickly, and children's…

  20. How Can Meta-Analyses Guide Practice? A Review of the Learning Disability Research Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, William J.; Zaman, Maliha; Banda, Devender R.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis is considered an acceptable method to evaluate research studies for evidence-based practices. The purpose of this review is to examine the applicability of using meta-analyses in the learning disability field to guide classroom practice. The authors evaluated 15 learning disability meta-analyses in three domains: large-scale…

  1. Understanding Secondary Learning Disabled Students: A Developmental By-Pass Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Robert J.; Tharpe, Ken

    The booklet describes a rationale for teaching junior high school level learning disabled (LD) students. The author discusses how to recognize an LD profile, how to screen for learning disabilities, and how to diagnose using the discrepancy model (chart illustrating the difference between I.Q. expectancy and actual performance). A description of…

  2. Cue System Usage of Students with and without Learning Disabilities in Oral and Silent Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Jeanne Shay; Arguelles, Maria Elena; Bessell, Ann; Giambo, Debra; Shimizu, Ward; Valle-Riestra, Diana; Zhang, Zhigang

    1998-01-01

    Compares how third- and fifth-grade learning-disabled and non-learning-disabled students use orthographic cues and contextual information during oral and silent reading. Finds that reliance on orthographic cues was consistently more pronounced in the oral than in the silent condition for all groups. Finds differences for students with and without…

  3. Diagnosing and Treating Learning Disabilities in Gifted Children: A Neurodevelopmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokot, Shirley J.

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the identification of students with learning disabilities, gifted children, and problems facing the remediation of their difficulties. An outline is given of an approach that applies neuroscience to understanding and treating the root cause of learning disabilities. A case study of a child labeled dyslexic is presented.…

  4. The Experiences of Children with Learning Disabilities, Their Carers and Staff during a Hospital Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Guvenir, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Government policy is that people with learning disabilities should have their healthcare needs met by mainstream services. This study interviewed the carers of 13 children with learning disabilities admitted to hospital for a period longer than 24 h. Nursing staff and two children were also interviewed. Five themes were identified as having a…

  5. How Would Blackstone Teach Today's Law Students with Learning Disabilities?: A Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Suzanne J.

    2007-01-01

    Although Sir William Blackstone would not have known if he had been lecturing to students with learning disabilities, today's law professors are. Law schools are legally required to accommodate students with learning disabilities unless the requested accommodation would alter the fundamental nature of the program. Courts give great deference to…

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Substance Use: A Comparison between Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, John W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use among 123 adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) and 138 nondisabled students. Only tobacco and marijuana use was proportionally higher for adolescents with learning disabilities. Scores on the Adolescent Drinking Index were reliable predictors of marijuana use for LD…

  7. Learning word meanings during reading by children with language learning disability and typically-developing peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sara C; Watkins, Ruth V

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated whether children with language learning disability (LLD) differed from typically-developing peers in their ability to learn meanings of novel words presented during reading. Fifteen 9-11-year-old children with LLD and 15 typically-developing peers read four passages containing 20 nonsense words. Word learning was assessed through oral definition and multiple-choice tasks. Variables were position of informative context, number of exposures, part of speech, and contextual clues. The LLD group scored lower than same-aged peers on oral definition (p vocabulary intervention in the upper elementary years for children with LLD.

  8. Special ways of knowing in science: expansive learning opportunities with bilingual children with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    The field of bilingual special education is currently plagued with contradictions resulting in a serious underrepresentation of emergent bilinguals with learning disabilities in professional science fields. This underrepresentation is due in large part to the fact that educational systems around the world are inadequately prepared to address the educational needs of these children; this inadequacy is rooted in a lack of understanding of the linguistic and cultural factors impacting learning. Accepting such a premise and assuming that children learn in unexpected ways when instructional practices attend to culture and language, this study documents a place-based learning experience integrating geoscience and literacy in a fourth-grade dual language classroom. Data sources include transcribed audio-taped conversations from learning experience sessions and interviews that took place as six focus children, who had been identified as having specific learning disabilities, read published science texts (i.e. texts unaltered linguistically or conceptually to meet the needs of the readers). My analysis revealed that participants generated responses that were often unexpected if solely analyzed from those Western scientific perspectives traditionally valued in school contexts. However, these responses were also full of purposeful and rich understandings that revealed opportunities for expansive learning. Adopting a cultural historical activity theory perspective, instructional tools such as texts, visuals, and questions were found to act as mediators impacting the learning in both activity systems: (a) teacher- researcher learning from children, and (b) children learning from teachers. I conclude by suggesting that there is a need to understand students' ways of knowing to their full complexity, and to deliberately recognize teachers as learners, researchers, and means to expansive learning patterns that span beyond traditional learning boundaries.

  9. Consensus Statement of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics on Evaluation and Management of Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C Nair, M K; Prasad, Chhaya; Unni, Jeeson; Bhattacharya, Anjan; Kamath, S S; Dalwai, Samir

    2017-07-15

    Learning Disability (LD) in children is a well-recognized developmental disorder, which has profound academic and psychosocial consequences. Due to the complex nature of LD and multiple disadvantages posed to the child due to LD, a multidisciplinary approach towards intervention is warranted. Given the paucity of evidence-based standardized treatment approaches, consensus guidelines for management of LD are needed. The meeting on formulation of national consensus guidelines on neurodevelopmental disorders was organized by Indian Academy of Pediatrics in Mumbai on 18th and 19th December, 2015. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Developmental Pediatricians, Pediatric Neurologists, Psychiatrists, Remedial Educators and Clinical Psychologists. The participants framed guidelines after extensive discussions. Thereafter, a committee was established to review and finalize the points discussed in the meeting. To provide guidelines on evaluation and management of LD in children in India. A basic intervention approach should focus on: (i) interpretation of evaluation reports; (ii) description of specific skills that may be delayed (e.g., phoneme awareness and phonics; reading comprehension; spelling; number sense and organizational skills) and (iii) identification of co-morbidities. The intervention should be inter-disciplinary and individualized to each child. Required services include: developmental pediatrics evaluation; neurological evaluation; ophthalmology and audiology evaluation; clinical psychology assessment; occupational therapy, remedial education, counseling for family, and career-counselling.

  10. Technology and Communications Coursework: Facilitating the Progression of Students with Learning Disabilities through High School Science and Math Coursework

    OpenAIRE

    Shifrer, Dara; Callahan, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Students identified with learning disabilities experience markedly lower levels of science and mathematics achievement than students who are not identified with a learning disability. Seemingly compounding their disadvantage, students with learning disabilities also complete more credits in non-core coursework—traditionally considered non-academic coursework—than students who are not identified with a learning disability. The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, a large national dataset with...

  11. Experiential Learning through a Physical Activity Program for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Eberline, Andrew D.; Padaruth, Sookhenlall; Templin, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning has become a popular pedagogical tool to promote academic and civic learning. One form of service-learning provides physical activity for underrepresented community groups, including children with disabilities. Using experiential learning theory, the purpose of this descriptive case study was to evaluate college students'…

  12. Specific learning disability and its newest definition: which is comprehensive? And which is insufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, David

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association's proposed definition of specific learning disability ("specific learning disorder") for the DSM-5 reflects current thinking and best practice in learning disabilities. It continues the core conceptualization of learning disability (LD) as well as proposes identification criteria to supplant the discredited aptitude-achievement discrepancy formula. Improvements can be found along with long-standing and new controversies about the nature of LD. The proposed definition both provides a model of a currently acceptable definition and reflects critical issues in the operationalization of LD that the field continues to neglect.

  13. Psychiatric implications of language disorders and learning disabilities: risks and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundheim, Suzanne T P V; Voeller, Kytja K S

    2004-10-01

    This article reviews the relationship between different learning disabilities, language disorders, and the psychiatric disorders that are commonly associated with learning disabilities and language disorder: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders, depression, and conduct or antisocial personality disorder. The complex associations between language disorders and specific learning disabilities--dyslexia, nonverbal learning disorder, dyscalculia--and the various psychiatric disorders are discussed. Clinical vignettes are presented to highlight the impact of these disorders on a child's social and psychological development and the importance of early recognition and treatment.

  14. Cognitive Profiles of Mathematical Problem Solving Learning Disability for Different Definitions of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Tammy D.; Fuchs, Lynn; Fletcher, Jack M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    Three cohorts of third-grade students (N = 813) were evaluated on achievement, cognitive abilities, and behavioral attention according to contrasting research traditions in defining math learning disability (LD) status: low achievement versus extremely low achievement and IQ-achievement discrepant versus strictly low-achieving LD. We use methods from these two traditions to form math problem solving LD groups. To evaluate group differences, we used MANOVA-based profile and canonical analyses to control for relations among the outcomes and regression to control for group definition variables. Results suggest that basic arithmetic is the key distinguishing characteristic that separates low-achieving problem solvers (including LD, regardless of definition) from typically achieving students. Word problem solving is the key distinguishing characteristic that separates IQ-achievement-discrepant from strictly low-achieving LD students, favoring the IQ-achievement-discrepant students. PMID:24939971

  15. Knowledge before School-Age, Is Power during School-Age: A Study of Urban Preschool and the Learning Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tylia

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if urban preschool decreased the likelihood of future identification of learning disabled (LD). According to the Child Development Institute (2010) and the Learning Disabilities Association of America (2010), four to ten percent of the school-aged students in this country are learning disabled.…

  16. General Information about Learning Disabilities (Fact Sheet Number 7) = Informacion General sobre Impedimentos en el Aprendizaje (Fact Sheet Number 19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Research Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet providing general information about learning disabilities is presented in both English and Spanish versions. It begins with the federal definition of learning disabilities and a discussion of its implications followed by estimates of incidence. Typical characteristics of students with learning disabilities are then summarized as…

  17. Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy in Adults with Learning Disability: Current Uptake and Adjustments to Facilitate Equality of Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Equality of access to health care for adults with learning disability has been in the spotlight in the UK in recent years due to publication of several reports. Adults with learning disability are thought to account for a significant proportion of the diabetic population in the UK. A list of adults known to the learning disability health…

  18. Technology and Communications Coursework: Facilitating the Progression of Students with Learning Disabilities through High School Science and Math Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara; Callahan, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Students identified with learning disabilities experience markedly lower levels of science and mathematics achievement than students who are not identified with a learning disability. Seemingly compounding their disadvantage, students with learning disabilities also complete more credits in non-core coursework--traditionally considered nonacademic…

  19. The Role of Parenting for the Adjustment of Children with and without Learning Disabilities: A Person-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkauskiene, Rasa

    2009-01-01

    A person-oriented approach was used to examine the role of parenting in the associations between single learning disabilities and multiple learning disabilities and the adjustment difficulties in 8-11-year-olds. The results revealed that multiple, but not single, learning disabilities were associated with greater difficulties in emotional and…

  20. Neurocognitive profiles of learning disabled children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladys eOrraca-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 is a genetic condition generally associated with intellectual deficiency and learning disabilities. Although there have been groundbreaking advances in the understanding of the molecular, cellular, and neural systems underlying learning deficits associated to NF1 in animal models, much remains to be learned about the spectrum of neurocognitive phenotype associated with the NF1 clinical syndrome. In the present study, 32 children with NF1 ranging from 7 to 14 years were evaluated with neurocognitive tests dedicated to assess basic capacities which are involved in reading and mathematical achievement. Deficits in lexical and phonological strategies and poor number facts retrieval were found underlying reading and arithmetic disorders, respectively. Additionally, efficiencies in lexical/phonological strategies and mental arithmetic were significant predictors of individual differences in reading attainment and math. However, deficits in core numeric capacities were not found in the sample, suggesting that it is not responsible for calculation dysfluency. The estimated prevalence of Developmental Dyscalculia was 18.8%, and the male:female ratio was 5:1. On the other hand, the prevalence of Developmental Dyslexia was almost 3 times as high (50%, and no gender differences were found (male:female ratio=1:1. This study offers new evidence to the neurocognitive phenotype of NF1 contributing to an in depth understanding of this condition, but also to possible treatments for the cognitive deficits associated with NF1.