WorldWideScience

Sample records for profound cenozoic erosion

  1. Long-term stability of global erosion rates and weathering during late-Cenozoic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-13

    Over geologic timescales, CO(2) is emitted from the Earth's interior and is removed from the atmosphere by silicate rock weathering and organic carbon burial. This balance is thought to have stabilized greenhouse conditions within a range that ensured habitable conditions. Changes in this balance have been attributed to changes in topographic relief, where varying rates of continental rock weathering and erosion are superimposed on fluctuations in organic carbon burial. Geological strata provide an indirect yet imperfectly preserved record of this change through changing rates of sedimentation. Widespread observations of a recent (0-5-Myr) fourfold increase in global sedimentation rates require a global mechanism to explain them. Accelerated uplift and global cooling have been given as possible causes, but because of the links between rates of erosion and the correlated rate of weathering, an increase in the drawdown of CO(2) that is predicted to follow may be the cause of global climate change instead. However, globally, rates of uplift cannot increase everywhere in the way that apparent sedimentation rates do. Moreover, proxy records of past atmospheric CO(2) provide no evidence for this large reduction in recent CO(2) concentrations. Here we question whether this increase in global weathering and erosion actually occurred and whether the apparent increase in the sedimentation rate is due to observational biases in the sedimentary record. As evidence, we recast the ocean dissolved (10)Be/(9)Be isotope system as a weathering proxy spanning the past approximately 12 Myr (ref. 14). This proxy indicates stable weathering fluxes during the late-Cenozoic era. The sum of these observations shows neither clear evidence for increased erosion nor clear evidence for a pulse in weathered material to the ocean. We conclude that processes different from an increase in denudation caused Cenozoic global cooling, and that global cooling had no profound effect on spatially and

  2. Cenozoic pre-glacial tectonostratigraphy and erosion estimates for the northwestern Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasabuda, Amando; Sverre Laberg, Jan; Knutsen, Stig-Morten

    2017-04-01

    The northwestern Barents Sea continental margin is located between Bjørnøya and Svalbard. It is a structurally complex area characterized by a series of highs and basins influenced by: 1) the formation of the Spitsbergen fold-and-thrust belt towards the north and the pull-apart basin, the Vestbakken Volcanic Province, to the south, and 2) the rifting and opening of the Fram Strait, the deep-water gateway connecting the Norwegian - Greenland Sea and the Arctic Ocean. This study incorporate newly available 2D seismic data as well as magnetic data, and aim to improve the understanding of the Cenozoic evolution of this area, including better constrain of the timing of the main sedimentation events of the Cenozoic basins and estimates of the volume of sediments involved and the corresponding rates of erosion of the drainage area. The Cenozoic development of this area is strongly related to the rifting and opening of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. During the Paleocene-Eocene, the northwestern Barents Sea margin were subjected to compression/transpression when Greenland drifted towards Svalbard that led to uplift and the development of fold-and-thrust belt on Svalbard. Subsequently, from the Oligocene, a tectonic plate reorganization occurred, leading to crustal extension, sea floor spreading and opening of the Fram Strait west of Svalbard. The seismic data shows a pronounced sequence of Early - Mid Cenozoic, pre-glacial sediments overlying the oceanic crust west of Svalbard while to the east, the Svalbard platform and the Stappen High were subjected to erosion and probably acted as the main sediment source for the northwestern Barents Sea margin. The amount of erosion will be estimated from the study of the deposited sediment volumes and their inferred source area. We will then compare the sedimentation and erosion rates to rates from other parts of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard margin as well as relevant modern systems. Furthermore, the Cenozoic paleo

  3. The impact of late Cenozoic uplift and erosion on hydrocarbon exploration: offshore Norway and some other uplifted basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, A. G.; Jensen, L. N.

    1996-03-01

    Uplift and erosion of sedimentary basins can have a wide range of effects, both positive and negative, on hydrocarbon prospectivity. These phenomena are discussed with special reference to the Norwegian Continental Shelf. Late Cenozoic uplift and erosion have affected large expanses of the shelf, and in particular the Barents Sea. Up to 3000 m of sedimentary overburden have been removed from the Barents shelf, and this process is widely held to be responsible for disappointing results in petroleum exploration. Negative effects identified include spillage of hydrocarbons from accumulations, expansion of gas and evacuation of structures, potential for seal failure and cooling of source rocks. We argue, however, that these aspects have been overstated based on a limited database. Many of the world's hydrocarbon basins (and most of the world's petroleum reserves) lie on land. Most of these basins must have been recently uplifted in order to be above sea level today. Using some of these examples, we show that in other areas with a similar magnitude of uplift and erosion to the Barents Sea sealing capacity (particularly that of evaporites) has been preserved. Hydrocarbon systems have remained intact despite phase changes and redistribution of hydrocarbons. Several enhancing effects of the uplift are documented, including the development of fracture permeability in reservoirs, the remigration of hydrocarbons to shallower subsurface levels and the exsolution of light oil (retrograde condensate). Looking to a future in which natural gas may have increased value, potential exists in uplifted basins such as the Barents Sea for vast volumes of methane formed by exsolution from formation brines. We stress the importance of studying such worldwide analogues in order to throw new light on Norwegian shelf problems. Attention is drawn to some striking similarities between the hydrocarbon systems of the Western Canada Basin and those of the Barents Sea. Examination of the massive

  4. Late Cenozoic acceleration of erosion in the Southern Central Andes revealed by low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franziska Stalder, Nadja; Herman, Frédéric; Reiners, Peter W.; Aguilar, German

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's topography is shaped by feedback mechanisms between tectonics, climate, and surface processes. To understand the influence of these interactions on mountain building processes, one can quantify the temporal and spatial history of exhumation using thermochronology. The Andes are a suitable natural laboratory to study such feedbacks, because they result from the steady subduction of the Nazca plate below the South American plate and their meridional extent crosses several global climate zones. Furthermore, the recent growth of regional low-temperature thermochronological studies led to an extensive data coverage, which can now be inverted to estimate the exhumation history at the scale of a mountain range. In this study, we present a total of 172 new thermochronological AHe, ZHe, and AFT bedrock ages filling remaining data gaps between 26°S and 34°S latitude. To avoid dating of emplacement ages instead of exhumation, ZHe and AFT analyses are restricted to pre-Miocene intrusions only present in the northern part of the study area. From about 31°S to 34°S, the study area covers a key transitional zone where topography decreases, precipitation increases, and the subduction regime changes from flat to steep dip angle. ZHe and AFT ages to the north of 33°S indicate erosion rates lower than 0.2 mm/yr since the Paleogene, except for few localized areas showing middle-to-late Miocene increased exhumation in their AHe ages. To the south of 33°S, two AHe age-elevation profiles reveal ages between 0.5 to 3.5 Ma and suggest intensified erosion during the Plio-Pleistocene relative to the northern area, with southward increasing rates from about 1.3 mm/yr to 3.8 mm/yr. The transition occurs more than 150 km south of the tectonic change in the subduction regime. However, the establishment of the modern atmospheric circulation pattern in the late Pliocene led to increased moisture transport to the North and the initiation of glaciations. Higher precipitation and

  5. Cenozoic structural evolution, thermal history, and erosion of the Ukrainian Carpathians fold-thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakapelyukh, Mykhaylo; Bubniak, Ihor; Bubniak, Andriy; Jonckheere, Raymond; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2018-01-01

    The Carpathians are part of the Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogen surrounding the Pannonian basin. Their Ukrainian part constitutes an ancient subduction-accretion complex that evolved into a foreland fold-thrust belt with a shortening history that was perpendicular to the orogenic strike. Herein, we constrain the evolution of the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian fold-thrust belt by apatite fission-track dating of sedimentary and volcanic samples and cross-section balancing and restoration. The apatite fission-track ages are uniform in the inner―southwestern part of the fold-thrust belt, implying post-shortening erosion since 12-10 Ma. The ages in the leading and trailing edges record provenance, i.e., sources in the Trans-European suture zone and the Inner Carpathians, respectively, and show that these parts of the fold-thrust were not heated to more than 100 °C. Syn-orogenic strata show sediment recycling: in the interior of the fold-thrust belt―the most thickened and most deeply eroded nappes―the apatite ages were reset, eroded, and redeposited in the syn-orogenic strata closer to the fore- and hinterland; the lag times are only a few million years. Two balanced cross sections, one constructed for this study and based on field and subsurface data, reveal an architecture characterized by nappe stacks separated by high-displacement thrusts; they record 340-390 km shortening. A kinematic forward model highlights the fold-thrust belt evolution from the pre-contractional configuration over the intermediate geometries during folding and thrusting and the post-shortening, erosional-unloading configuration at 12-10 Ma to the present-day geometry. Average shortening rates between 32-20 Ma and 20-12 Ma amounted to 13 and 21 km/Ma, respectively, implying a two-phased deformation of the Ukrainian fold-thrust belt.

  6. Late Cenozoic landscape evolution along the Ailao Shan Shear Zone, SE Tibetan Plateau: Evidence from fluvial longitudinal profiles and cosmogenic erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Zhang, Bo; Granger, Darryl E.; Zhou, Renjie; Zhang, Jinjiang; Hou, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    In tectonically active regions, geomorphic features, such as catchment slopes, terraces, and river profiles can be interpreted in the context of tectonic and climatic forcing; however, distinguishing tectonic impacts from other factors such as pre-existing geologic complexities and climate changes is challenging. We use fluvial longitudinal profiles, catchment slopes, and catchment mean erosion rates derived from in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al to examine the late Cenozoic landscape evolution of the Ailao Shan Shear Zone (ASSZ) in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. The trunk stream of the Red River, flowing along the eastern side of the shear zone, consists of three sections with distinct channel parameters, separated by knickzones (the Midu, Ejia, and Nansha sections from NW to SE). Tributaries to the Red River within the Ailao Shan Shear Zone in the Ejia and Nansha sections consistently display two channel segments (upper low-gradient and middle steep channel segments); a third set of lower, less steep channel segments are identified only along the tributaries in the Nansha section. Catchment mean erosion rates contrast sharply along strike: ca. 300 m/Myr in the Ejia section and ca. 100 m/Myr in the Nansha section. Collectively, our results provide strong evidence that: 1) two waves of incision induced by pulsed and declining regional uplift are propagating up the Red River shaping the background pattern of river incision; 2) vertical fault displacements, river reorganization and additional factors locally affect river profile morphology. Normalized steepness indices (ksn), catchment slopes, and knickzone distribution vary systematically along the Ailao Shan Shear Zone, indicating long-wavelength regional surface uplift during plateau growth in the middle-late Miocene, which points to a tectonic model involving crustal thickening and diffuse or continuous deformation in the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. Norway and adjacent sedimentary basins during Cenozoic times - sediment fluxes, accumulation rates and mass balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    2011-01-01

    related to the final stage of opening of the North Atlantic was controlling the high sediment input during Paleocene to Early Eocene times, without invoking the surface uplift. Subsequent Cenozoic epochs were tectonically quiet in the Scandinavian realm. However, the climate has changed quite dramatically...... and sediment input in Scandinavia and surrounding basins. The ICE hypothesis suggests a much more profound influence of climate, climate change and related erosional processes (e.g. Alpine-type glacial erosion, periglacial processes) in controlling the erosion rates. We propose that the tectonic activity...... epoch. Furthermore, histograms of depositional rates in the study area show a common feature with global patterns, that is a few-fold increase in sediment production during last 3-4 million years. This correlates well with the climate cooling, increased frequency of climate change and intense glacial...

  8. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M; Pérez-Claros, Juan A; De Renzi, Miquel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2012-01-17

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. These taxa can be grouped into six consecutive faunal associations that show some correspondence with the qualitative mammalian chronofaunas of previous workers. We also show that the diversity pattern of most of these chronofaunas can be correlated with the stacked deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) curve, which strongly suggests climatic forcing of faunal dynamics over a large macroevolutionary timescale. This study demonstrates the profound influence of climate on the diversity patterns of North American terrestrial mammals over the Cenozoic.

  9. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M.; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; Renzi, Miquel de; Palmqvist, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. T...

  10. What is profound?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Discussing the question, which elements on the path are to be considered profound. While a general view is that the most subtle practises are also the most profound, 'Jig-rten-mgon-po maintains that the most fundamental one's are to be considered the most profound.......Discussing the question, which elements on the path are to be considered profound. While a general view is that the most subtle practises are also the most profound, 'Jig-rten-mgon-po maintains that the most fundamental one's are to be considered the most profound....

  11. Cenozoic bryozoans from Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Martino, E.

    2014-01-01

    Bryozoans are colonial marine invertebrates with an abundant fossil record ranging from Ordovician to Holocene. They are found particularly in shelf sediments deposited at all palaeolatitudes. The Cenozoic bryozoan fauna of Indonesia has been severely neglected in the past. The paucity of previous

  12. Late Cenozoic cooling history of the central Menderes Massif: Timing of the Büyük Menderes detachment and the relative contribution of normal faulting and erosion to rock exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Glotzbach, Christoph; Heineke, Caroline; Nilius, Nils-Peter; Hetzel, Ralf; Hampel, Andrea; Akal, Cüneyt; Dunkl, István; Christl, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Based on new thermochronological data and 10Be-derived erosion rates from the southern part of the central Menderes Massif (Aydın block) in western Turkey, we provide new insights into the tectonic evolution and landscape development of an area that undergoes active continental extension. Fission-track and (U-Th)/He data reveal that the footwall of the Büyük Menderes detachment experienced two episodes of enhanced cooling and exhumation. Assuming an elevated geothermal gradient of 50 °C/km, the first phase occurred with an average rate of 0.90 km/Myr in the middle Miocene and the second one in the latest Miocene and Pliocene with a rate of 0.43 km/Myr. The exhumation rates between these two phases were lower and range from 0.14 to 0.24 km/Myr, depending on the distance to the detachment. Cosmogenic nuclide-based erosion rates for catchments in the Aydın block range from 0.1 to 0.4 km/Myr. The similarity of the erosion rates on both sides of the Aydın block (northern and southern flank) indicate that a rather symmetric erosion pattern has prevailed during the Holocene. If these millennial erosion rates are representative on a million-year timescale they indicate that, apart from normal faulting, erosion in the hanging wall of the Büyük Menderes detachment fault did also contribute to the exhumation of the metamorphic rocks.

  13. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    between the global climate record (oxygen isotopes) and lithology variations on the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the eastern North Sea. Due to the strongly limited time resolution of low temperature thermochronology, the Cenozoic sedimentary record potentially provides the most detailed history...... models. The matrix mass deposition history will be compared with the paleoclimate record (e.g. oxygen isotope curves) to see if the previously observed correlation in the eastern North Sea can be extended to other ages and locations.  ...

  14. When Lightning Strikes Twice: Profoundly Gifted, Profoundly Accomplished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, Matthew C; Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Putallaz, Martha; Benbow, Camilla P

    2016-07-01

    The educational, occupational, and creative accomplishments of the profoundly gifted participants (IQs ⩾ 160) in the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) are astounding, but are they representative of equally able 12-year-olds? Duke University's Talent Identification Program (TIP) identified 259 young adolescents who were equally gifted. By age 40, their life accomplishments also were extraordinary: Thirty-seven percent had earned doctorates, 7.5% had achieved academic tenure (4.3% at research-intensive universities), and 9% held patents; many were high-level leaders in major organizations. As was the case for the SMPY sample before them, differential ability strengths predicted their contrasting and eventual developmental trajectories-even though essentially all participants possessed both mathematical and verbal reasoning abilities far superior to those of typical Ph.D. recipients. Individuals, even profoundly gifted ones, primarily do what they are best at. Differences in ability patterns, like differences in interests, guide development along different paths, but ability level, coupled with commitment, determines whether and the extent to which noteworthy accomplishments are reached if opportunity presents itself. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Splash erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández-Raga, María; Palencia, Covadonga; Keesstra, Saskia; Jordán, Antonio; Fraile, Roberto; Angulo-Martínez, Marta; Cerda Bolinches, Artemio

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is a serious ecological and environmental problem, and the main cause of land degradation in many ecosystems at global scale. Detachment of soil particles by raindrop splash is the first stage in the soil erosion process. A review of the scientific literature published in

  16. Climate vs. tectonic induced variations in Cenozoic sediment supply from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    corresponds to an increase of sediment yield from the Scandinavian shield. Furthermore, several studies show a correlation between climate fluctuations, sequence stratigraphic surfaces and lithological changes in the North Sea. We suggest that a rapid cooling at the beginning of Oligocene (Oi-1 glaciation...... topography. Therefore, a hypothesis of climate control on erosion and deposition during the Cenozoic history of western Scandinavia and adjacent sedimentary basins emerges. This theory is further supported by higher sediment input and pronounced progradation patterns of the Molo Formation (deposited during......The rates of sediment input to the North Sea and the Norwegian Shelf varied significantly during the Cenozoic. During Paleocene and Eocene times The Shetland Platform and Scottish Highlands were the main sediment sources, while with the onset of the Oligocene more sediment was coming from...

  17. Extracting an unbiased erosion history of glacial landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Frédéric; Deal, Eric; Braun, Jean; Chanard, Kristel; de Anna, Pietro; Stalder, Nadja

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate on whether or not late Cenozoic cooling led to an increase of erosion rates. The main point of controversy comes from our ability to measure erosion rate back in time. Using a probabilistic approach, some recent studies have implied that erosional hiatuses can overshadow any potential increase in erosion rates, especially in glaciated mountain belts. The main assumption behind this proposition concerns the choice of a probability distribution that characterizes how erosion operates in time and space. Here we investigate how such a choice may influence the inferred erosion history. We show that, even when using a heavy tail distribution, the likelihood of bias of an inferred increase of erosion rates may be avoided when erosion rates are estimated over fixed time intervals and averaged spatially, in agreement with previous studies. More importantly, we find that it may be difficult to fully justify the choice of heavy tail, light tail or other probability distributions from erosion estimates alone. Using a model of glacial erosion, we find that it is difficult to justify a Pareto distribution of landscape scale erosion hiatuses. We conclude that the time scale bias on measured glacial erosion rates is not as universal as previously suggested, and does not influence erosion rates over the timescales of thermochronological data.

  18. Marine ecosystem responses to Cenozoic global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, R D; Turner, S Kirtland; Hull, P M; Ridgwell, A

    2013-08-02

    The future impacts of anthropogenic global change on marine ecosystems are highly uncertain, but insights can be gained from past intervals of high atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure. The long-term geological record reveals an early Cenozoic warm climate that supported smaller polar ecosystems, few coral-algal reefs, expanded shallow-water platforms, longer food chains with less energy for top predators, and a less oxygenated ocean than today. The closest analogs for our likely future are climate transients, 10,000 to 200,000 years in duration, that occurred during the long early Cenozoic interval of elevated warmth. Although the future ocean will begin to resemble the past greenhouse world, it will retain elements of the present "icehouse" world long into the future. Changing temperatures and ocean acidification, together with rising sea level and shifts in ocean productivity, will keep marine ecosystems in a state of continuous change for 100,000 years.

  19. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....

  20. Early cenozoic differentiation of polar marine faunas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alistair Crame

    Full Text Available The widespread assumption that the origin of polar marine faunas is linked to the onset of major global cooling in the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene is being increasingly challenged. The Antarctic fossil record in particular is suggesting that some modern Southern Ocean taxa may have Early Eocene or even Paleocene origins, i.e. well within the Early Cenozoic greenhouse world. A global analysis of one of the largest marine clades at the present day, the Neogastropoda, indicates that not only is there a decrease in the number of species from the tropics to the poles but also a decrease in the evenness of their distribution. A small number of neogastropod families with predominantly generalist trophic strategies at both poles points to the key role of seasonality in structuring the highest latitude marine assemblages. A distinct latitudinal gradient in seasonality is temperature-invariant and would have operated through periods of global warmth such as the Early Cenozoic. To test this concept a second global analysis was undertaken of earliest Cenozoic (Paleocene neogastropods and this does indeed show a certain degree of faunal differentiation at both poles. The Buccinidae, s.l. is especially well developed at this time, and this is a major generalist taxon at the present day. There is an element of asymmetry associated with this development of Paleocene polar faunas in that those in the south are more strongly differentiated than their northern counterparts; this can in turn be linked to the already substantial isolation of the southern high latitudes. The key role of seasonality in the formation of polar marine faunas has implications for contemporary ecosystem structure and stability.

  1. Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Sahara, Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record in the Sahara, and shows that the strata display some remarkably similar characteristics across much of the region. In fact, some lithologies of certain ages are exceptionally widespread and persistent, and many of the changes from one lithology to another appear to have been relatively synchronous across the Sahara. The general stratigraphic succession is that of a transition from early Cenozoic carbonate strata to late Cenozoic siliciclastic strata. This transition in lithology coincides with a long-term eustatic fall in sea level since the middle Cretaceous and with a global climate transition from a Late Cretaceous–Early Eocene “warm mode” to a Late Eocene–Quaternary “cool mode”. Much of the shorter-term stratigraphic variability in the Sahara (and even the regional unconformities) also can be correlated with specific changes in sea level, climate, and tectonic activity during the Cenozoic. Specifically, Paleocene and Eocene carbonate strata and phosphate are suggestive of a warm and humid climate, whereas latest Eocene evaporitic strata (and an end-Eocene regional unconformity) are correlated with a eustatic fall in sea level, the build-up of ice in Antarctica, and the appearance of relatively arid climates in the Sahara. The absence of Oligocene strata throughout much of the Sahara is attributed to the effects of generally low eustatic sea level during the Oligocene and tectonic uplift in certain areas during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. Miocene sandstone and conglomerate are attributed to the effects of continued tectonic uplift around the Sahara, generally low eustatic sea level, and enough rainfall to support the development of extensive fluvial systems. Middle–Upper Miocene carbonate strata accumulated in northern Libya in response to a eustatic rise in sea level, whereas Upper Miocene mudstone accumulated along the south side of the Atlas Mountains because uplift of the

  2. Characteristics, structural styles and tectonic implications of Mesozoic-Cenozoic faults in the eastern Heilongjiang basins (NE China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Chen, Hanlin; Zhang, Fengqi; Sun, Mingdao; Yang, Jianguo; Tan, Baode

    2017-09-01

    The Eastern Heilongjiang Basins (EHBs) are the assemblage of a series of meso-Cenozoic residual basins located in the northeastern corner of China. The deformation pattern of the EHBs has significant implications for the history of the Pacific Plate subduction beneath the Eurasia since the Late Mesozoic. In this paper, research on the characteristics and structural styles of the meso-Cenzoic faults in the EHBs has been conducted on the basis of a comprehensive analysis of field geology, drilling data and seismic reflection profiles. As a result, five different stages of the meso-Cenozoic faults in the EHBs have been recognized. These are in accordance with the time and relevant characteristics of fault movements, i.e. the early-stage of the Early Cretaceous normal fault, the early-stage of the Late Cretaceous thrust fault, the late-stage of the Late Cretaceous thrust fault, the Cenozoic synsedimentary normal fault and the late-stage Cenozoic shear fault. A regional geological section has been generated across the EHBs by linking four local seismic profiles together. A step-by-step reconstruction has been made to help better understand the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the EHBs. Two phases of extension (rifting) in the early Cretaceous Period and the Paleogene, respectively, are demonstrated to be interfered with two phases of regional uplift (compression) and erosion in the Late Cretaceous Period. The complicated development of multiple fault systems within the EHBs has reflected the evolution of a complex tectonic subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasia since the Cretaceous Period.

  3. Relating Cenozoic North Sea sediments to topography in southern Norway:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Stratford, Wanda Rose

    2010-01-01

    About 482 000 km3 of sediment (ca 24 m/Ma) accumulated in the North Sea during the Cenozoic. Early Cenozoic sedimentation was likely due to uplift of the circum North Atlantic landmasses related to continental break-up. Kilometre-scale transient uplift, and in some areas permanent uplift, generated...

  4. Cenozoic deformation and exhumation of the Kampot Fold Belt and implications for south Indochina tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Michael B. W.; Green, Paul F.; Bergman, Steven C.; Van Itterbeeck, Jimmy; Tri, Tran V.; Dien, Phan T.; Abatzis, Ioannis; Thomsen, Tonny B.; Chea, Socheat; Pedersen, Stig A. S.; Mai, Le C.; Tuan, Hoang A.; Nielsen, Lars H.

    2016-07-01

    Latest Mesozoic to earliest Cenozoic deformation affected SE Asia's Sundaland core. The deformation event bridges the Mesozoic SE Asian fusion with the Cenozoic era of rifting, translation, basin formation, and the creation of modern SE Asian oceans. Southern Cambodia and Vietnam are central to this shift, but geological investigations of the region are in their infancy. Based on apatite and zircon fission track analyses (AFTA and ZFTA), stratigraphic and structural observations, seismic data, thermal maturity, and igneous rock dating, the geological evolution of southern Cambodia and Vietnam is investigated. Diverse depositional styles, igneous activity, structural deformation and subsurface unconformities testify to a highly variable Phanerozoic tectonic setting. Major latest Cretaceous to Paleocene thrusting and uplift affected the Kampot Fold Belt and surrounding regions and the associated up to 11 km exhumation probably exceeds earlier denudation events since at least Permian time. The present relief of the Bokor Mountains rising high above the Kampot Fold Belt represents an artifact after differential erosion and only 2.5-4.5 km of erosion affected this area. The latest Cretaceous to Paleocene orogenesis affected much of greater Indochina probably owing to plate collision along eastern Sundaland or a combination of collisions along both east and west Sundaland. AFTA and ZFTA data document protracted cooling of Cretaceous granites and locally elevated thermal gradients persisting a few tens of million years after their emplacement. The thermal gradient had stabilized by early Miocene time, and Miocene cooling probably reflects a renewed denudation pulse driven by either regional tectonism or climate-enhanced erosion.

  5. The Cenozoic palaeoenvironment of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kathryn; Backman, Jan; Brinkhuis, Henk; Clemens, Steven C; Cronin, Thomas; Dickens, Gerald R; Eynaud, Frédérique; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Jakobsson, Martin; Jordan, Richard W; Kaminski, Michael; King, John; Koc, Nalan; Krylov, Alexey; Martinez, Nahysa; Matthiessen, Jens; McInroy, David; Moore, Theodore C; Onodera, Jonaotaro; O'Regan, Matthew; Pälike, Heiko; Rea, Brice; Rio, Domenico; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Smith, David C; Stein, Ruediger; St John, Kristen; Suto, Itsuki; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Takahashi, Kozo; Watanabe, Mahito; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Farrell, John; Frank, Martin; Kubik, Peter; Jokat, Wilfried; Kristoffersen, Yngve

    2006-06-01

    The history of the Arctic Ocean during the Cenozoic era (0-65 million years ago) is largely unknown from direct evidence. Here we present a Cenozoic palaeoceanographic record constructed from >400 m of sediment core from a recent drilling expedition to the Lomonosov ridge in the Arctic Ocean. Our record shows a palaeoenvironmental transition from a warm 'greenhouse' world, during the late Palaeocene and early Eocene epochs, to a colder 'icehouse' world influenced by sea ice and icebergs from the middle Eocene epoch to the present. For the most recent approximately 14 Myr, we find sedimentation rates of 1-2 cm per thousand years, in stark contrast to the substantially lower rates proposed in earlier studies; this record of the Neogene reveals cooling of the Arctic that was synchronous with the expansion of Greenland ice (approximately 3.2 Myr ago) and East Antarctic ice (approximately 14 Myr ago). We find evidence for the first occurrence of ice-rafted debris in the middle Eocene epoch (approximately 45 Myr ago), some 35 Myr earlier than previously thought; fresh surface waters were present at approximately 49 Myr ago, before the onset of ice-rafted debris. Also, the temperatures of surface waters during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum (approximately 55 Myr ago) appear to have been substantially warmer than previously estimated. The revised timing of the earliest Arctic cooling events coincides with those from Antarctica, supporting arguments for bipolar symmetry in climate change.

  6. Connecting America and Russia: Eocene erosion across the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Cornelia; Lisker, Frank; Piepjohn, Karsten; Estrada, Solveig; Lorenz, Henning

    2017-04-01

    The structural evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its surrounding continental areas is still poorly constrained, due to ice coverage and inaccessibility. The only scientific coring campaign within the central Arctic Ocean (the ACEX project) was positioned on the Lomonosov Ridge. This is a pronounced geomorphic structure of presumably continental origin, which stretches across the entire Arctic Ocean between the northernmost margin of the North American continent (Ellesmere Island) and the Siberian Shelf, bordering the New Siberian Islands. Geophysical data suggest that the Lomonosov Ridge may be continuous with the Siberian and Ellesmerian continental margins (e.g., Poselov et al., 2011). Rather unexpectedly, the ACEX project revealed that the Lomonosov Ridge was in very shallow water or even exposed to erosion between 44 and 18 Ma. As an explanation, it was suggested that the Lomonosov Ridge experienced compressional tectonics at that time, which may have affected the entire central Arctic Ocean, propagating from North America towards the Siberian shelf (ÓRegan et al., 2008). Here we present the first low-temperature thermochronological data from northern Ellesmere Island and from the New Siberian Islands, recording the erosion and exhumation history of these areas. Our apatite (U-Th)/He data show that while southern and central Ellesmere Island was characterized by very slow erosion during the Cenozoic, northern Ellesmere Island bordering the Arctic Ocean experienced km-scale erosion during the Eocene, contemporaneously with the stalled subsidence / uplift period of the Lomonosov Ridge. The thermochronology data from the New Siberian Islands reflect a complex erosion history: the eastern part of the North Siberian Islands, the DeLong Island Group, experienced rather limited erosion during the Cenozoic and most of the Mesozoic. By contrast, data from the western New Siberian Islands - the Lyakhov Island Group - in direct continuation of the Lomonosov Ridge are

  7. Profound thrombocytopenia after primary exposure to eptifibatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B Norgard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas B Norgard, Brian T BadgleyUniversity at Buffalo, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Eptifibatide is a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist used to reduce the incidence of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. A minority of patients given eptifibatide develop acute, profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000 cells/mm3 within a few hours of receiving the drug. This case report discusses a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia within hours of receiving eptifibatide for the first time. The Naranjo algorithm classified the likelihood that this patient’s thrombocytopenia was related to eptifibatide as probable. Profound thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but clinically important complication of eptifibatide. This case report emphasizes the importance of monitoring platelet counts routinely at baseline and within 2–6 hours of eptifibatide administration.Keywords: drug-induced thrombocytopenia, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists, eptifibatide, thrombocytopenia

  8. Cenozoic plant diversity of Yunnan: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiang Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yunnan in southwestern China is renowned for its high plant diversity. To understand how this modern botanical richness formed, it is critical to investigate the past biodiversity throughout the geological time. In this review, we present a summary on plant diversity, floristics and climates in the Cenozoic of Yunnan and document their changes, by compiling published palaeobotanical sources. Our review demonstrates that thus far a total of 386 fossil species of ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms belonging to 170 genera within 66 families have been reported from the Cenozoic, particularly the Neogene, of Yunnan. Angiosperms display the highest richness represented by 353 species grouped into 155 genera within 60 families, with Fagaceae, Fabaceae, Lauraceae and Juglandaceae being the most diversified. Most of the families and genera recorded as fossils still occur in Yunnan, but seven genera have disappeared, including Berryophyllum, Cedrelospermum, Cedrus, Palaeocarya, Podocarpium, Sequoia and Wataria. The regional extinction of these genera is commonly referred to an aridification of the dry season associated with Asian monsoon development. Floristic analyses indicate that in the late Miocene, Yunnan had three floristic regions: a northern subtropical floristic region in the northeast, a subtropical floristic region in the east, and a tropical floristic region in the southwest. In the late Pliocene, Yunnan saw two kinds of floristic regions: a subalpine floristic region in the northwest, and two subtropical floristic regions separately in the southwest and the eastern center. These floristic concepts are verified by results from our areal type analyses which suggest that in the Miocene southwestern Yunnan supported the most Pantropic elements, while in the Pliocene southwestern Yunnan had abundant Tropical Asia (Indo–Malaysia type and East Asia and North America disjunct type that were absent from northwestern Yunnan. From the late Miocene to

  9. Profound thrombocytopenia after primary exposure to eptifibatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgard, Nicholas B; Badgley, Brian T

    2010-01-01

    Eptifibatide is a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist used to reduce the incidence of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. A minority of patients given eptifibatide develop acute, profound thrombocytopenia (eptifibatide for the first time. The Naranjo algorithm classified the likelihood that this patient's thrombocytopenia was related to eptifibatide as probable. Profound thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but clinically important complication of eptifibatide. This case report emphasizes the importance of monitoring platelet counts routinely at baseline and within 2-6 hours of eptifibatide administration.

  10. Cenozoic climate change as a possible cause for the rise of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Simon; Davis, Paul

    2003-10-23

    Causal links between the rise of a large mountain range and climate have often been considered to work in one direction, with significant uplift provoking climate change. Here we propose a mechanism by which Cenozoic climate change could have caused the rise of the Andes. Based on considerations of the force balance in the South American lithosphere, we suggest that the height of, and tectonics in, the Andes are strongly controlled both by shear stresses along the plate interface in the subduction zone and by buoyancy stress contrasts between the trench and highlands, and shear stresses in the subduction zone depend on the amount of subducted sediments. We propose that the dynamics of subduction and mountain-building in this region are controlled by the processes of erosion and sediment deposition, and ultimately climate. In central South America, climate-controlled sediment starvation would then cause high shear stress, focusing the plate boundary stresses that support the high Andes.

  11. Report on ICDP workshop CONOSC (COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhoff, Wim; Donders, T.H.; Luthi, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ICDP workshop COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic focused on the scientific objectives and the technical aspects of drilling and sampling. Some 55 participants attended the meeting, ranging from climate scientists, drilling engineers, and geophysicists to stratigraphers and public outreach experts.

  12. A synthesis of Cenozoic sedimentation in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Rasmussen, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The North Sea Basin contains an almost complete record of Cenozoic sedimentation, separated by clear regional unconformities. The changes in sediment characteristics, rate and source, and expression of the unconformities reflect the tectonic, eustatic and climatic changes that the North Sea and its...... changed from early Cenozoic influx from the southwestern margin, to almost exclusively from the southern margin in the Oligocene and from all of southern Norway in the latest Cenozoic. Thick Eocene deposits in the Central Graben are sourced mainly from a western and a likely southern source, indicating...... margins have undergone. While the North Sea has been mapped locally, we present the first regional mapping of the Cenozoic sedimentary strata. Our study provides a new regional sub-division of the main seismic units in the North Sea together with maps of depocentres, influx direction and source areas. Our...

  13. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂18O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p2 were only moderately higher than today. Diversity is strongly correlated to both ∂13C and pCO2 over the last 15 my (for both: r>.9, detrended r>.6, all pwarm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  14. Profound thrombocytopenia after primary exposure to eptifibatide

    OpenAIRE

    Norgard, Nicholas; Badgley,Brian

    2010-01-01

    Nicholas B Norgard, Brian T BadgleyUniversity at Buffalo, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Eptifibatide is a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist used to reduce the incidence of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. A minority of patients given eptifibatide develop acute, profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000 cells/mm3) within a few hours of receiving the drug. This c...

  15. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lazarus

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18O (climate and carbon cycle records (∂(13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2. Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001, but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  16. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all pCenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  17. Asystole Following Profound Vagal Stimulation During Hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeta John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Asystole in a non laparoscopic upper abdominal surgery following intense vagal stimulation is a rare event. This case report highlights the need for awareness of such a complication when a thoracic epidural anaesthetic has been given in addition to a general anaesthetic for an upper abdominal procedure. A combined thoracic epidural and general anaesthetic was given. The anterior abdominal wall was retracted forty minutes after administration of the epidural bolus. This maneuver resulted in a profound vagal response with bradycardia and asystole. The patient was resuscitated successfully with a cardiac massage, atropine and adrenaline and the surgery was resumed. Surgery lasted eleven hours and was uneventful.

  18. Glacial removal of late Cenozoic subglacially emplaced volcanic edifices by the West Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Blankenship, D.D.; Damaske, D.; Cooper, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Local maxima of the horizontal gradient of pseudogravity from closely spaced aeromagnetic surveys over the Ross Sea, northwestern Ross Ice Shelf, and the West Antarctic ice sheet, reveal a linear magnetic rift fabric and numerous subcircular, high-amplitude anomalies. Geophysical data indicate two or three youthful volcanic edifices at widely separated areas beneath the sea and ice cover in the West Antarctic rift system. In contrast, we suggest glacial removal of edifices of volcanic sources of many more anomalies. Magnetic models, controlled by marine seismic reflection and radar ice-sounding data, allow us to infer that glacial removal of the associated late Cenozoic volcanic edifices (probably debris, comprising pillow breccias, and hyaloclastites) has occurred essentially concomitantly with their subglacial eruption. "Removal' of unconsolidated volcanic debris erupted beneath the ice is probably a more appropriate term than "erosion', given its fragmented, ice-contact origin. The exposed volcanoes may have been protected from erosion by the surrounding ice sheet because of more competent rock or high elevation above the ice sheet. -from Authors

  19. Oligocene Laccoliths on the Colorado Plateau: A Key to Understanding Cenozoic Rock Cooling and Exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.; Reiners, P. W.; Thomson, S. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Colorado Plateau is an exceptional region of high elevation, extensive canyonlands, and minor crustal deformation in the North American Cordillera. Numerous low-temperature thermochronology studies have attempted to constrain the timing and rate(s) at which this enigmatic Cenozoic landscape developed. However, such studies have struggled to robustly interpret the thermal histories of the Plateau's rocks because most contain detrital crystals with diverse time-temperature histories that are partially reset, which confounds efforts to see clear thermochronologic signals of Cenozoic erosion. To overcome this challenge, we targeted sample collection from places on the Plateau where rock thermal histories were reset by Oligocene magmatism: the thermal aureoles of laccolith-cored Henry, La Sal, and Abajo mountains. There, shallow plutons (i.e., laccoliths) heated the late Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks ca. 26 Ma, locally resetting apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He ages so they record subsequent Miocene-Quaternary cooling. Sandstone samples from each mountain range yield single-crystal apatite He ages that vary with effective U concentration (eU). In these key samples, minimum He ages are ~5 Ma with eU 60 ppm. We model and interpret these age-eU patterns together with (1) stratigraphic constraints, (2) the timing of magmatic heating constrained by zircon U/Pb laccolith geochronology, and (3) the extent of resetting temperatures >100 ˚C by apatite fission track analysis. Results require prolonged sample residence in the apatite He partial retention zone (40-60 ˚C) from 25 to 1 km/Myr in parts of the Henry and Abajo mountains. The Plio-Pleistocene was a time of change both regionally and globally, as Colorado River base level dropped with its final integration through the Grand Canyon ca. 5.3 Ma and global climate cooling possibly enhanced erosion rates on the Plateau's high-relief mountain ranges. Ongoing work evaluates the relationship between the

  20. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  1. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  2. Cenozoic uplift and subsidence in the North Atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    , time and amplitude (where possible) of topographic changes in the North Atlantic region during the Cenozoic (65-0 Ma). Our compilation is based on published results from reflection seismic studies, AFT (apatite fission track) studies, VR (vitrinite reflectance) trends, maximum burial, sediment supply...... studies, mass balance calculations and extrapolation of seismic profiles to onshore geomorphological features. The integration of about 200 published results reveal a clear pattern of topographic changes in the North Atlantic region during the Cenozoic: (1) The first major phase of Cenozoic regional...... uplift occurred in the late Palaeocene-early Eocene (ca 60-50 Ma), probably related to the break-up of the North Atlantic between Europe and Greenland, as indicated by the northward propagation of uplift. It was preceded by middle Palaeocene uplift and over-deepening of some basins of the North Sea...

  3. Hidden bone erosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Salaffi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pictorial essay was to demonstrate the diagnostic efficacy of high-resolution sonography in detecting bone erosions in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Standard X-Ray of the feet did not reveal clearly evident erosions. Ultrasonography was able to detect the presence of bone erosions of the metatarsal heads of both the first toes and of the V toe of the left foot. Because the appearance of bone erosions on radiographs of a patient with a recent onset arthritis indicates a poor prognosis, the possibility of demonstrating small hidden erosions at the level of the early targets of the disease is of relevant practical value.

  4. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the Rfactor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national...... and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based....... Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months...

  5. Tectonic Forcing of Climate and Some Mysteries of the Cenozoic Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymo, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia in the early Cenozoic is widely believed to be the root cause of the transition from a "greenhouse" world to an "icehouse" world over the last 50 Myr. My colleagues and I proposed that this collision resulted in a globally significant increase in chemical weathering rates that led to a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and the eventual build-up of ice sheets at both poles. Geologic and field data provide support for this hypothesis, including: a) the timing of collision and cooling, b) the observation that chemical weathering rates increase with physical erosion and denudation, and c) proxy evidence for changes in ocean chemistry consistent with increased chemical weathering over Cenozoic. However, a significant problem continues to plague this seemingly straightforward interpretation--namely, where does the CO2 needed to support the inferred increase in chemical weathering over the Cenozoic come from? The ocean-atmosphere reservoir of carbon is so small that it would be depleted after million years or so. A negative feedback within the carbon cycle is needed to prevent atmospheric CO2 levels being drawn down to snowball Earth levels. Classically, a surface temperature-weathering feedback, first described by Walker in 1981, is invoked--but, if chemical weathering has been higher over the last 40-50 Myr relative to the previous period then this feedback could only work if there has been a similar increase in mantle CO2 degassing rates uncoupled to seafloor spreading rates (which are currently believed to have remained constant). Alternatively, possible negative-feedbacks within the carbon cycle may exist in the organic carbon cycle, in the seafloor basalt weathering/reverse weathering realm, and/or possibly be disguised by a large changes in the amount of terrestrial silicate weathering happening in regions without a continental signature (e.g., island arcs). Ultimately, the carbosphere, which extends from the mantle to

  6. Cretaceous–Cenozoic burial and exhumation history of the Chukchi shelf, offshore Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, William H.; Houseknecht, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) and vitrinite reflectance data from five exploration wells and three seafloor cores illuminate the thermal history of the underexplored United States Chukchi shelf. On the northeastern shelf, Triassic strata in the Chevron 1 Diamond well record apatite annealing followed by cooling, possibly during the Triassic to Middle Jurassic, which is a thermal history likely related to Canada Basin rifting. Jurassic strata exhumed in the hanging wall of the frontal Herald Arch thrust fault record a history of probable Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous structural burial in the Chukotka fold and thrust belt, followed by rapid exhumation to near-surface temperatures at 104 ± 30 Ma. This history of contractional tectonism is in good agreement with inherited fission track ages in low-thermal-maturity, Cretaceous–Cenozoic strata in the Chukchi foreland, providing complementary evidence for the timing of exhumation and suggesting a source-to-sink relationship. In the central Chukchi foreland, inverse modeling of reset AFT samples from the Shell 1 Klondike and Shell 1 Crackerjack wells reveals several tens of degrees of cooling from maximum paleo-temperatures, with maximum heating permissible at any time from about 100 to 50 Ma, and cooling persisting to as recent as 30 Ma. Similar histories are compatible with partially reset AFT samples from other Chukchi wells (Shell 1 Popcorn, Shell 1 Burger, and Chevron 1 Diamond) and are probable in light of regional geologic evidence. Given geologic context provided by regional seismic reflection data, we interpret these inverse models to reveal a Late Cretaceous episode of cyclical burial and erosion across the central Chukchi shelf, possibly partially overprinted by Cenozoic cooling related to decreasing surface temperatures. Regionally, we interpret this kinematic history to be reflective of moderate, transpressional deformation of the Chukchi shelf during the final phases of contractional tectonism in the

  7. First fossil evidence of Connaraceae R. Br. from Indian Cenozoic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the first authentic record of the occurrence of leaflet comparable to R. caudata of Connaraceae from the Cenozoic sediments of India and abroad. At present R. caudata does not grow in India and is restricted only in southeast Asia especially in China and Myanmar. This taxon probably migrated to these southeast ...

  8. Geochemistry of ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic alkali basalts from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twelve ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic alkali basalts from Jiangsu province, eastern China have been analyzed for major, trace, Sr–Nd isotopic composition and mineral chemical compositions and the origin of these ultramafic xenoliths is discussed based on the geochemical constraints. Based on classification norms, the ...

  9. Report on ICDP workshop CONOSC (COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhoff, Wim; Donders, Timme; Luthi, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    ICDP workshop COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic focused on the scientific objectives and the technical aspects of drilling and sampling. Some 55 participants attended the meeting, ranging from climate scientists, drilling engineers, and geophysicists to stratigraphers and public outreach experts.

  10. Staffs' documentation of participation for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Lena; Gustafsson, Christine; Stier, Jonas; Wilder, Jenny

    2017-06-21

    This study investigated what areas of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health were documented in implementation plans for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities with focus on participation. A document analysis of 17 implementation plans was performed and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as an analytic tool. One hundred and sixty-three different codes were identified, especially in the components Activities and participation and Environmental factors. Participation was most frequently coded in the chapters Community, social and civic life and Self-care. Overall, the results showed that focus in the implementation plans concerned Self-care and Community, social and civic life. The other life areas in Activities and participation were seldom, or not at all, documented. A deeper focus on participation in the implementation plans and all life areas in the component Activities and participation is needed. It is important that the documentation clearly shows what the adult wants, wishes, and likes in everyday life. It is also important to ensure that the job description for staff contains both life areas and individual preferences so that staff have the possibility to work to fulfill social and individual participation for the target group. Implications for rehabilitation There is a need for functioning working models to increase participation significantly for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. For these adults, participation is achieved through the assistance of others and support and services carried out must be documented in an implementation plan. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can be used to support staff and ensure that information about the most important factors in an individual's functioning in their environment is not omitted in

  11. Cenozoic Molluscan types from Java (Indonesia) in the Martin Collection (Division of Cenozoic Mollusca), National Museum of Natural History, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek Ostende, van den L.W.; Leloux, J.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    2002-01-01

    An inventory of type material in the ‘Martin Collection’ at the Division of Cenozoic Mollusca of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, The Netherlands has been made. In total 1842 lots containing over 5700 type specimens of 912 species were encountered. The status of the types is outlined.

  12. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  13. Effects of erodant particle shape and various heat treatments on erosion resistance of plain carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion tests were conducted on 1045 steel samples which had been subjected to different heat treatments. The weight of material removed upon erosion with glass beads and crushed glass was measured. The data show that there is no correlation between hardness and erosion resistance. The erosion rate was strongly dependent on the shape of erodant particles, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass than with glass beads. Heat treatment had a profound effect on the erosion resistance when the erodant particles were glass beads but little or no effect when the particles were crushed glass. It is thus concluded that different mechanisms of material removal are involved with these two erodants. This conclusion is supported by the surface morphology of annealed 1045 steel samples which had been eroded by these two types of erodant particles. SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces show that for erosion with glass beads it is deformation induced fracture of surface layers.

  14. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  15. Observed latitudinal variations in erosion as a function of glacier dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Michéle; Hallet, Bernard; Rignot, Eric; Mouginot, Jérémie; Wellner, Julia Smith; Boldt, Katherine

    2015-10-01

    Glacial erosion is fundamental to our understanding of the role of Cenozoic-era climate change in the development of topography worldwide, yet the factors that control the rate of erosion by ice remain poorly understood. In many tectonically active mountain ranges, glaciers have been inferred to be highly erosive, and conditions of glaciation are used to explain both the marked relief typical of alpine settings and the limit on mountain heights above the snowline, that is, the glacial buzzsaw. In other high-latitude regions, glacial erosion is presumed to be minimal, where a mantle of cold ice effectively protects landscapes from erosion. Glacial erosion rates are expected to increase with decreasing latitude, owing to the climatic control on basal temperature and the production of meltwater, which promotes glacial sliding, erosion and sediment transfer. This relationship between climate, glacier dynamics and erosion rate is the focus of recent numerical modelling, yet it is qualitative and lacks an empirical database. Here we present a comprehensive data set that permits explicit examination of the factors controlling glacier erosion across climatic regimes. We report contemporary ice fluxes, sliding speeds and erosion rates inferred from sediment yields from 15 outlet glaciers spanning 19 degrees of latitude from Patagonia to the Antarctic Peninsula. Although this broad region has a relatively uniform tectonic and geologic history, the thermal regimes of its glaciers range from temperate to polar. We find that basin-averaged erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude over this latitudinal transect. Our findings imply that climate and the glacier thermal regime control erosion rates more than do extent of ice cover, ice flux or sliding speeds.

  16. Observed latitudinal variations in erosion as a function of glacier dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Michéle; Hallet, Bernard; Rignot, Eric; Mouginot, Jérémie; Wellner, Julia Smith; Boldt, Katherine

    2015-10-01

    Glacial erosion is fundamental to our understanding of the role of Cenozoic-era climate change in the development of topography worldwide, yet the factors that control the rate of erosion by ice remain poorly understood. In many tectonically active mountain ranges, glaciers have been inferred to be highly erosive, and conditions of glaciation are used to explain both the marked relief typical of alpine settings and the limit on mountain heights above the snowline, that is, the glacial buzzsaw. In other high-latitude regions, glacial erosion is presumed to be minimal, where a mantle of cold ice effectively protects landscapes from erosion. Glacial erosion rates are expected to increase with decreasing latitude, owing to the climatic control on basal temperature and the production of meltwater, which promotes glacial sliding, erosion and sediment transfer. This relationship between climate, glacier dynamics and erosion rate is the focus of recent numerical modelling, yet it is qualitative and lacks an empirical database. Here we present a comprehensive data set that permits explicit examination of the factors controlling glacier erosion across climatic regimes. We report contemporary ice fluxes, sliding speeds and erosion rates inferred from sediment yields from 15 outlet glaciers spanning 19 degrees of latitude from Patagonia to the Antarctic Peninsula. Although this broad region has a relatively uniform tectonic and geologic history, the thermal regimes of its glaciers range from temperate to polar. We find that basin-averaged erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude over this latitudinal transect. Our findings imply that climate and the glacier thermal regime control erosion rates more than do extent of ice cover, ice flux or sliding speeds.

  17. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  18. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  19. Erosion Negril Beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Ham, D.; Henrotte, J.; Kraaijeveld, R.; Milosevic, M.; Smit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing erosion of the Negril Beach has become worse the past decade. In most places along the coast line, the beach will be gone in approximately 10 years. This will result in a major decrease of incomes that are made by the local tourist sector. To prevent the erosion this study has been

  20. The impact of Cenozoic cooling on assemblage diversity in planktonic foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Isabel S; Pearson, Paul N; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Farnsworth, Alexander; Lunt, Daniel J; Markwick, Paul; Purvis, Andy

    2016-04-05

    The Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera (PF) (calcareous zooplankton) have arguably the most detailed fossil record of any group. The quality of this record allows models of environmental controls on macroecology, developed for Recent assemblages, to be tested on intervals with profoundly different climatic conditions. These analyses shed light on the role of long-term global cooling in establishing the modern latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG)--one of the most powerful generalizations in biogeography and macroecology. Here, we test the transferability of environment-diversity models developed for modern PF assemblages to the Eocene epoch (approx. 56-34 Ma), a time of pronounced global warmth. Environmental variables from global climate models are combined with Recent environment-diversity models to predict Eocene richness gradients, which are then compared with observed patterns. The results indicate the modern LDG--lower richness towards the poles--developed through the Eocene. Three possible causes are suggested for the mismatch between statistical model predictions and data in the Early Eocene: the environmental estimates are inaccurate, the statistical model misses a relevant variable, or the intercorrelations among facets of diversity--e.g. richness, evenness, functional diversity--have changed over geological time. By the Late Eocene, environment-diversity relationships were much more similar to those found today. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Profound Impacts of AN Arctic Face Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son

    Son Nghiem, son.v.nghiem@jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States The ice cover on the Arctic Ocean has undergone a face lift that removes much of the older and thicker perennial ice and replaces it with the younger and thinner seasonal ice. Although the sea ice cover is a thin skin compared to the depth of the Arctic Ocean, this face lift exerts profound change in the Arctic environment. Here, we present scatterometer remote sensing of Arctic sea ice change and its implication on chemical processes from the ice surface to the troposphere extending into the internal continental land. In the context of a half century change, the extent of perennial ice declines at rate of 0.5 million km2 per decade in the 1970s-1990s while there is no discernable trend in the 1950s-1960s. Abruptly, the rate of decrease has tripled to 1.5 million km2 per decade in the 2000s. A record was set in the reduction of Arctic perennial ice extent in winter 2008. By 1 March 2008, perennial ice extent was reduced by one million km2 compared to that at the same time in 2007. On 1 May 2009, perennial ice extent was reduced to 2.1 million km2 , which is a virtual tie to 2.2 million km2 of perennial ice extent on 1 May 2008 given the uncertainty of ±0.2 million km2 . Although the extent of perennial ice extent is similar, its distribution is quite different, with a significant perennial ice pack in the Beaufort Sea in 2008, and in contrast a large expanse of perennial ice along the Transpolar Drift Stream in 2009. The continuing drastic reduction of perennial ice significantly decreases the overall surface albedo, resulting in enhanced solar heat absorption in spring and summer, which further decreases the Arctic ice pack through the ice-albedo feedback mechanism and ice melt from the underside due to oceanic thermodynamic interactions. Satellite maps of sea ice class distribution show the closely conformation with patterns of

  2. A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Palike, H.; Lyle, M.W.; Nishi, H.; Raffi, I.; Ridgwell, A.; Gamage, K.; Klaus, A.; Acton, G.; Anderson, L.; Backman, J.; Baldauf, J.; Beltran, C.; Bohaty, S.M.; Bown, P.; Busch, W.; Channell, J.E.T.; Chun, C.O.J.; Delaney, M.; Dewangan, P.; et al.

    an important role in climate regulation1. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 320/321, the "Pacific Equatorial Age Transect" (PEAT), exploited the northward Pacific plate trajectory during the Cenozoic to recover a continuous sediment... the locus of carbonate deposition between shelf and deep ocean. Therefore, increasing solute supply should be coupled to increased weathering, a warmer climate, and higher CO2, unless changes in orbital configuration significantly enhance or reduce...

  3. Erosion in America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-23

    The US loses about five billion tons of soil a year from erosion, and scientists estimate that from 20 to 50% of world cropland suffers from excessive erosion. The effect of erosion is a loss in both land and water productivity. When combined with the problems of overpopulation, overgrazing, and deforestation, the environmental impacts are very serious. There are some signs that countries are beginning to adopt conservation tilling techniques, but even cooperative government programs in the US such as the 1983 Payment-in-Kind (PIK) program have had only partial success because of expanded production on marginal farmlands. 20 reference 5 figures.

  4. Cenozoic carbon cycle imbalances and a variable weathering feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Jeremy K.; Jost, Adam B.; Lau, Kimberly V.; Maher, Kate

    2016-09-01

    The long-term stability of Earth's climate and the recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system after carbon cycle perturbations are often attributed to a stabilizing negative feedback between silicate weathering and climate. However, evidence for the operation of this feedback over million-year timescales and in response to tectonic and long-term climatic change remains scarce. For example, the past 50 million years of the Cenozoic Era are characterized by long-term cooling and declining atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). During this interval, constant or decreasing carbon fluxes from the solid Earth to the atmosphere suggest that stable or decreasing weathering fluxes are needed to balance the carbon cycle. In contrast, marine isotopic proxies of weathering (i.e., 87Sr/86Sr, δ7 Li , and 187Os/188Os) are interpreted to reflect increasing weathering fluxes. Here, we evaluate the existence of a negative feedback by reconstructing the imbalance in the carbon cycle during the Cenozoic using the surface inventories of carbon and alkalinity. Only a sustained 0.25-0.5% increase in silicate weathering is necessary to explain the long-term decline in pCO2 over the Cenozoic. We propose that the long-term decrease in pCO2 is due to an increase in the strength of the silicate weathering feedback (i.e., the constant of proportionality between the silicate weathering flux and climate), rather than an increase in the weathering flux. This increase in the feedback strength, which mirrors the marine isotope proxies, occurs as transient, 1 million year timescales remains invariant to match the long-term inputs of carbon. Over the Cenozoic, this results in stable long-term weathering fluxes even as pCO2 decreases. We attribute increasing feedback strength to a change in the type and reactivity of rock in the weathering zone, which collectively has increased the reactivity of the surface of the Earth. Increasing feedback strength through the Cenozoic reconciles mass balance in the carbon cycle with

  5. Interdigital erosions: Tinea pedis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orgaz-Molina, Jacinto; Orgaz-Molina, Maria Carmen; Cotugno, Marilena; Arias-Santiago, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Interdigital erosions are frequently due to tinea pedis. However, other infectious conditions, such as candidiasis, erythrasma or bacterial infections, can generate lesions that cannot be differentiated at the clinical level...

  6. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  7. Radiolarians Decreased Silicification as an Evolutionary Response to Reduced Cenozoic Ocean Silica Availability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David B. Lazarus; Benjamin Kotrc; Gerwin Wulf; Daniela N. Schmidt; Steven M. Stanley

    2009-01-01

    .... Gradually decreasing Cenozoic radiolarian shell weight, by contrast, suggests that competition for dissolved silica, a shared nutrient, resulted in biologic coevolution between radiolaria and marine...

  8. Early Cenozoic Multiple Thrust in the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently completed regional geological mapping at a scale of 1 : 250,000 or larger across all of the Tibetan Plateau coupled with deep seismic surveys reveals for the first time a comprehensive depiction of the major early Cenozoic thrust systems resulting from the northward subduction of the Indian Continental Plate. These systems define a series of overlapping north-dipping thrust sheets that thickened the Tibetan crust and lead to the rise of the plateau. The few south-dipping thrusts present apparently developed within a sheet when the back moved faster than the toe. Many of the thrusts are shown to extend to the middle-lower crustal depths by seismic data. The regional thrust systems are the Main Central, Renbu-Zedong, Gangdese, Central Gangdese, North Gangdese, Bangoin-Nujiang, Qiangtang, Hohxil, and South Kunlun Thrusts. The minimal southward displacements of the South Kunlun, Hohxil, South Qiangtang, and Central Gangdese Thrusts are estimated to be 30 km, 25 km, 150 km and 50 km, respectively. Deep thrusting began in the Himalaya-Tibetan region soon after India-Eurasia continental collision and led to crustal thickening and subsequent uplift of the Tibetan Plateau during Late Eocene-Early Miocene when the systems were mainly active. The major thrust systems ceased moving in Early Miocene and many were soon covered by lacustrine strata. This activity succeeded in the late Cenozoic to crustal extension and strike-slip movement in the central Tibetan Plateau. The revelation of the full array of the early Cenozoic thrust systems provides a much more complete understanding of the tectonic framework of the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Dynamic topography and the Cenozoic carbonate compensation depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. M.; Moucha, R.; Raymo, M. E.; Derry, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The carbonate compensation depth (CCD), the ocean depth at which the calcium carbonate accumulation rate goes to zero, can provide valuable insight into climatic and weathering conditions over the Cenozoic. The paleoposition of the CCD can be inferred from sediment core data. As the carbonate accumulation rate decreases linearly with depth between the lysocline and CCD, the CCD can be calculated using a linear regression on multiple sediment cores with known carbonate accumulation rates and paleodepths. It is therefore vital to have well-constrained estimates of paleodepths. Paleodepths are typically calculated using models of thermal subsidence and sediment loading and compaction. However, viscous convection-related stresses in the mantle can warp the ocean floor by hundreds of meters over broad regions and can also vary significantly over millions of years. This contribution to paleobathymetry, termed dynamic topography, can be calculated by modeling mantle flow backwards in time. Herein, we demonstrate the effect dynamic topography has on the inference of the late Cenozoic CCD with an example from the equatorial Pacific, considering sites from IODP Expeditions 320/321. The equatorial Pacific, given its large size and high productivity, is closely tied to the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, long-term changes in the equatorial Pacific CCD can be considered to reflect global changes in weathering fluxes and the carbon cycle, in addition to more regional changes in productivity and thermohaline circulation. We find that, when the dynamic topography contribution to bathymetry is accounted for, the equatorial Pacific CCD is calculated to be appreciably shallower at 30 Ma than previous estimates would suggest, implying a greater deepening of the Pacific CCD over the late Cenozoic.

  10. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  11. Did high Neo-Tethys subduction rates contribute to early Cenozoic warming?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoareau, G.; Bomou, B.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J J; Carry, N.; Marquer, D.; Donnadieu, Y.; Le Hir, G.; Vrielynck, B.; Walter-Simonnet, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The 58-51 Ma interval was characterized by a long-term increase of global temperatures (+4 to +6°C) up to the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, 52.9-50.7 Ma), the warmest interval of the Cenozoic. It was recently suggested that sustained high atmospheric pCO2, controlling warm early Cenozoic

  12. Feedbacks of lithosphere dynamics and environmental change of the Cenozoic West Antarctic Rift System.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wateren, F.M.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Global and Planetary Change contains 11 contributions dealing with various aspects of the Cenozoic West Antarctic Rift System. During the last two decades, investigations of the interplay of tectonics and climate greatly improved understanding of Cenozoic global change. Major

  13. Thermal state of the Roer Valley Graben, part of the European Cenozoic Rift System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, E.; ter Voorde, M.; van Balen, R.T.; Verweij, H.; Simmelink, E.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a detailed analysis of the thermal state of the Cenozoic Roer Valley Graben, the north-western branch of the European Cenozoic Rift System, based on a new set of temperature data. We developed a numerical technique for correcting bottom hole temperatures, including an evaluation of the

  14. Thermal state of the Roer Valley Graben, part of the European Cenozoic Rift System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, E.; ter Voorde, M.; van Balen, R.T.; Verweij, H.; Simmelink, E.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a detailed analysis of the thermal state of the Cenozoic Roer Valley Graben, the north-western branch of the European Cenozoic Rift System, based on a new set of temperature data. We developed a numerical technique for correcting bottom hole temperatures, including an evaluation of the

  15. High-resolution pCO2 reconstruction across the early Cenozoic greenhouse and late Cenozoic icehouse climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Schubert, B.

    2016-12-01

    Historical data and ice core records provide the best-constrained data on global temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO2), which can be used to calculate short-term estimates of climate sensitivity. These data, however, may not be representative of longer timescales and represent a period of Earth history when pCO2 and global temperatures were relatively low; recent work suggests that climate sensitivity may change under different climate states and timescales. Here we present a new high-resolution pCO2 reconstruction for the early (65 to 50 Ma) and late (30 to 0 Ma) Cenozoic using a proxy based on changes in carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants. This work uses widely available carbon isotope data from various terrestrial organic substrates to produce a nearly continuous record of pCO2. This record identifies both large-scale trends (e.g., the early Cenozoic is characterized by higher pCO2 than the late Cenozoic), as well as transient, highly elevated pCO2 during the early Eocene hyperthermals. We discuss the uncertainties associated with this new pCO2 reconstruction, which include the effects of precipitation, plant community shifts, and source effects on the δ13C record. Additionally, uncertainty associated with the correlation in time between δ13C estimates of atmospheric CO2 and the terrestrial δ13C of organic matter is included in the error propagation. Comparison of the new pCO2 record to existing global average temperature records based on the δ18O value of well-preserved marine foraminifera can yield new insight into Earth system climate sensitivity across a wide range of climate states and timescales.

  16. Erosive Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical studies of dental erosion and erosive wear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M; Chew, H.P; Ellwood, R.P

    2011-01-01

    We define erosion as a partial demineralisation of enamel or dentine by intrinsic or extrinsic acids and erosive tooth wear as the accelerated loss of dental hard tissue through the combined effect...

  18. Eurasia as the scene of the Late Cenozoic tectogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Ufimtsev

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to review the descriptions on the genetic series of neotectonic forms in Eurasia. Morphotectonically, the Eurasian continental block exhibits a radial-concentric pattern consisting of four kinds of tectonic units: platforms, rejuvenated and youthful mobile belts, and the continent-ocean transition zones. Vast areas of young and ancient platforms, such as Siberia, have experienced slow-rate Late-Cenozoic uplift and little interior deformation. The youthful orogenic belts are clustered into the giant Alpine-Himalayan megabelt. The rejuvenated mountain belts are characterized by a variety of structural-morphological types of orogens, such as domelike uplifts, block uplifts and intermountain basins. The continent-ocean transition zones in Eastern Asia, including marginal rifts and extensional basins, are resulted from interaction between the continental block and Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea since the Late Cenozoic. One of the conspicuous features of Eurasia is that most areas lie in the largest geoid depression of the Earth, and the NS trending Uralian-Oman lineament expresses a break on the geoid slope, implying a relationship to deep structure, including density inhomogeneities, downward to the core-mantle interface. Besides, the Eurasian continent fully demonstrates morphotectonic and recent geodynamic features of the Northern Hemisphere of the Earth, just in contrast to that of the Southern Hemisphere. It is best to view the surface morphotectonics and deep structure of the Earth as a geodynamic ensemble which has spawned the large-scale geomorphic features on the surface.

  19. Alaskan Peninsula Cenozoic stratigraphy: stratigraphic sequences and current research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, R.C.; Armentrout, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    Geology of the Alaska Peninsula-Island Arc and Continental Margin, by C.A. Burk, is the principal reference for stratigraphic studies on the Alaska Peninsula. Burk mapped the Phanerozoic stratigraphy and provided a geologic history and structural interpretation of the area between Wide Bay and Unimak Island. Cenozoic rocks were mapped as three unconformity-bounded sequences. Recognition of specific formations was difficult due to similarity of lithofacies, isolated outcrops, rapid facies changes, and alteration and burial by young volcanics. Consequently, megafossil assemblages were relied upon to facilitate correlations between study areas. The three unconformity-bounded Cenozoic sequences are: (1) the Paleogene Beaver Bay Group consisting of three formations: the dominantly nonmarine Tolstoi Formation, the dominantly marine Stepovak Formation, and the volcanic Meshik Formation. Current work suggests these units are at least in part coeval facies of late Paleocene through Oligocene age. (2) The Neogene Bear Lake Formation consisting of the lower Unga Conglomerate Member and an unnamed upper member. Rapid facies changes and incorrect reports of fossil occurrence have resulted in confusion of stratigraphic relationships within this sequence of middle to late Miocene age. (3) A late Neogene informally defined upper sequence consisting of interbedded marginal marine, coastal-plain, and volcanic facies. Current work suggests this sequence is Pliocene through Pleistocene in age.

  20. Clinical studies of dental erosion and erosive wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Chew, H.P.; Ellwood, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    We define erosion as a partial demineralisation of enamel or dentine by intrinsic or extrinsic acids and erosive tooth wear as the accelerated loss of dental hard tissue through the combined effect of erosion and mechanical wear (abrasion and attrition) on the tooth surface. Most experts believe

  1. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  2. Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Charles

    2003-04-01

    Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion has many clinical applications, including the placement of very precise sharply defined perforations in biological interfaces and membranes with focused ultrasound. With carefully chosen acoustic parameters, tissue can be rapidly eroded away at a constant etching rate. The maximum erosion rate for minimal propagated energy is obtained by using very short high intensity pulses. The etching rate is higher with shorter pulse durations. For short pulses less than 10 cycles of the drive frequency, an optimum pulse repetition rate exists which maximizes the etching rate. Higher gas saturation in the surrounding medium reduces the etching rate and reduces the spatial sharpness of the holes produced. Most of the erosion appears to be produced in the first several cycles of the therapy pulse. For example, a series of short (about 3 cycles) focused pulses of 2100 W/cm2 (Isppa) at 788 kHz can erode a very well defined 2 mm diameter hole in a 1 mm thick sample of fresh pork atrial posterior wall in about 1 min at the optimum pulse repetition rate (about 18 kHz). Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion may provide an effective image guided noninvasive tool in treatment of neonatal patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Without the mixing of oxygenated blood across perforations placed in the atrial septum, these infants do not survive.

  3. Progressive impact of glaciation on mountain erosion and topography: insights from in-situ thermochronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Glacial processes have shaped conspicuous landscapes at the Earth surface. In alpine environments, glacial pre-conditioning of the topography exerts a strong control on the geomorphological response following glacier retreat. However, whether the late Cenozoic climate cooling and onset of glaciation have had a widespread impact on mountain erosion remains debated. Sediment budgets, in various mountain ranges and at a global scale, show an increase in sediment fluxes during the late Neogene, although their interpretation as proxy for increased erosion is challenged. In-situ low-temperature thermochronometry (including recent developments such as 4He/3He and OSL thermochronometry) records rock exhumation within the upper crust to quantify long-term erosion and relief histories. Here I will review some recent thermochronometric studies that investigate the mountain erosional and topographic response to glaciation, going from mid- to high-latitude regions. In the European Alps, recent apatite 4He/3He data combined with thermal-kinematic modelling suggest a significant increase in topographic relief over the last ˜1 Myr, with 1-1.5 km of valley deepening by large and erosive glaciers. This episode is synchronous with the Mid-Pleistocene climatic transition from symmetric 40-kyr to strongly asymmetric 100-kyr glacial/interglacial cycles. Similar findings in other mountain ranges, as well as recent compilations at a global scale, point toward a globally averaged (but more pronounced at mid-latitudes) increase in erosion rates since 1-2 Ma. This would support the assumption that enhanced climatic variability during the Plio-Pleistocene, rather than cooling through the Late Cenozoic, has controlled mountain erosion and topography. However, in the high-latitude settings of the Patagonian Andes and southern Alaska, which have been glaciated since the late Miocene, new thermochronometric results show that a substantial increase in erosion had already occurred at ˜6-8 Ma

  4. Categorization of erosion control matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Erosion control is a critical aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) : construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural : waterways having been well documented. A variety of erosion control ...

  5. Regional Cenozoic Uplift of Europe from Linear Inverse Modelling of Longitudinal River Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, F.; White, N.

    2016-12-01

    The shape of a river profile is controlled by the interplay between uplift and erosion. It is generally accepted that the phenomenological stream power formulation provides a useful basis for determining how this shape evolves as a function of time and space. Typically, erosion is parametrized using two terms. The first term controls the upstream advection of knickzones and assumes that the advective velocity is a function of upstream drainage area and local slope. The second term controls `rock diffusivity', which acts to lower the river profile. In the geomorphological community, the stream power formulation is usually solved by assuming steady state and by plotting upstream drainage area as a function of slope. Here, we use an integrative approach to solve the equation without the need to assume steady state. Previous work has shown that the `rock diffusivity' term, together with the exponent of local slope (i.e. n), can be ignored at long wavelengths. This simplification enables the linear inverse problem to be posed and solved using the method of characteristics. Large inventories (i.e. thousands river profiles) can be inverted to determine regional uplift rate histories as a function of time and space. We present results from an analysis of a Western Eurasian drainage network, consisting of 1,126 river profiles. This region encompasses at least four areas of high elevation where the origin of topography is much debated (i.e. Scandinavia, Spain, Turkey, Italy). Linear inverse modelling yields excellent fits between observed and calculated river profiles. The key erosional parameters were determined using independent geologic observations (e.g. stratigraphic evidence for marine incursions, emergent marine terraces, thermochronologic constraints). Our results suggest that each of these areas has undergone significant regional uplift in Cenozoic times. Since the linearized approach is computationally efficient, it is possible to systematically test the

  6. Human dignity and the profoundly disabled: a theological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Pia

    2011-01-01

    One challenge to the concept of human dignity is that it is a rootless notion invoked simply to mask inequalities that inevitably exist between human beings. This privileging of humans is speciesist and its weak point is the profoundly disabled human being. This article argues that far from being a weak point, the profoundly disabled person is a source of strength and witness to the intrinsic dignity that all human beings have by virtue of being human. The disabled represent the reality of human existence that is both strong and fragile. Although human dignity can be understood philosophically its depth is rooted in Christian theological insights. The profoundly disabled occupy a privileged position and share in a theology of mission since they testify to the interdependence of every human being and human dependence on God to a myopic world that only values strength, autonomy and independence.

  7. Oceanic-style Subduction Controls Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Northern Pamir and Alai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, E. R.; Chen, J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Thiede, R. C.; Stockli, D. F.; Sudo, M.; Strecker, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Pamir - Alai represents the preeminent example of an active intracontinental subduction zone in the early stages of continent-continent collision. Such zones are the least understood type of plate boundary because modern examples are few and of limited access, and ancient analogs have been extensively overprinted by subsequent continent-continent collision and erosion processes. In the Pamir, at least 300 km of convergence has apparently occurred between the North Pamir and the South Tien Shan. Published P-wave tomography and earthquake epicenters suggest subduction of a ~300 km-long slab. The MPT and Pamir Frontal Thrusts (PFT) correspond to the updip projection of this subduction zone. We have compiled ca. 260 published and 18 new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission track, and biotite and muscovite Argon cooling ages from basement samples as well as several detrital samples from key areas in the Pamir region. Our synopsis shows that the hanging wall of the MPT experienced relatively minor amounts of late Cenozoic exhumation. This is incompatible with a model of a huge overthrust such as the Himalayan Main Central Thrust. Rather, the bulk of the convergence is apparently accommodated by underthrusting. The Pamir orogen as a whole is an integral part of the overriding plate in a subduction system, while the remnant basin to the north constitutes the downgoing plate. Herein, we demonstrate that the observed deformation of the upper and lower plates within the Pamir-Alai convergence zone resembles highly arcuate oceanic subduction systems characterized by slab rollback, subduction erosion, subduction accretion, and marginal slab-tear faults. We suggest that the curvature of the North Pamir is genetically linked to the short width and rollback of the south-dipping Alai slab; northward motion (indentation) of the Pamir is accommodated by crustal processes related to slab rollback and intracontinental subduction. Our model relates late Oligocene - early Miocene

  8. Meso-/Cenozoic long-term landscape evolution at the southern Moroccan passive continental margin, Tarfaya Basin, recorded by low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrt, Manuel; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Jabour, Haddou; Kluth, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the first regional study of low-temperature thermochronology to be undertaken in the Tarfaya Basin at the southern Moroccan passive continental margin. The basin is characterised by vast subsidence since Mid-Triassic times, whereby up to 12 km of Meso- to Cenozoic sedimentary rocks accumulated. The study focused on the post-rift vertical movements along a typical ;passive; margin and besides dealt with the timing and maximum temperature reached by potential source rocks of the basin. To unravel the t-T development, thermochronological analyses were performed on 50 outcrop and well samples from Meso-Cenozoic rocks. Thermochronological data reveal a continuous subsidence phase in the offshore basin from Mid-Triassic to recent times. In contrast, apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He and apatite fission-track data as well as thermal modelling point to an inversion of the northeastern onshore basin starting in the Palaeogene at 65-55 Ma. The rock uplift and exhumation period resulted in the erosion of a 1.0-1.4 km thick Cretaceous-Palaeogene sedimentary pile contemporaneously with peak Atlas surface uplift in the Cenozoic. The exhumation stage could be an explanation for the increasing periodic influx of detrital material into the offshore and southern onshore Tarfaya Basin since Palaeocene. Detrital apatite fission-track ages from 92 (± 16) to 237 (± 35) Ma of the Upper Cretaceous-Neogene succession indicate no heating above 60 °C confirming immature to early mature Cenomanian to Campanian and Eocene source rocks in the onshore Tarfaya Basin.

  9. Late Cenozoic Climate History of the Ross Embayment from the AND-1B Drill Hole: Culmination of Three Decades of Antarctic Margin Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, T.R.; Powell, R.D.; Barrett, P.J.; Levy, R.H.; Henrys, S.; Wilson, G.S.; Krissek, L.A.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Ross, J.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Pyne, A.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Because of the paucity of exposed rock, the direct physical record of Antarctic Cenozoic glacial history has become known only recently and then largely from offshore shelf basins through seismic surveys and drilling. The number of holes on the continental shelf has been small and largely confined to three areas (McMurdo Sound, Prydz Bay, and Antarctic Peninsula), but even in McMurdo Sound, where Oligocene and early Miocene strata are well cored, the late Cenozoic is poorly known and dated. The latest Antarctic geological drilling program, ANDRILL, successfully cored a 1285-m-long record of climate history spanning the last 13 m.y. from subsea-floor sediment beneath the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS), using drilling systems specially developed for operating through ice shelves. The cores provide the most complete Antarctic record to date of ice-sheet and climate fluctuations for this period of Earth’s history. The >60 cycles of advance and retreat of the grounded ice margin preserved in the AND-1B record the evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet since a profound global cooling step in deep-sea oxygen isotope records ~14 m.y.a. A feature of particular interest is a ~90-m-thick interval of diatomite deposited during the warm Pliocene and representing an extended period (~200,000 years) of locally open water, high phytoplankton productivity, and retreat of the glaciers on land.

  10. The 13 million year Cenozoic pulse of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Liu, Xiuming

    2015-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal rate changes radically from very low to extremely high. Such process indicates fundamental changes in the Earth's core reorganization and core-mantle boundary heat flow fluctuations. However, we still do not know how critical such changes are to surface geology and climate processes. Our analysis of the geomagnetic reversal frequency, oxygen isotope record, and tectonic plate subduction rate, which are indicators of the changes in the heat flux at the core mantle boundary, climate and plate tectonic activity, shows that all these changes indicate similar rhythms on million years' timescale in the Cenozoic Era occurring with the common fundamental periodicity of ∼13 Myr during most of the time. The periodicity is disrupted only during the last 20 Myr. Such periodic behavior suggests that large scale climate and tectonic changes at the Earth's surface are closely connected with the million year timescale cyclical reorganization of the Earth's interior.

  11. Multiple cenozoic invasions of Africa by penguins (Aves, Sphenisciformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksepka, Daniel T.; Thomas, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Africa hosts a single breeding species of penguin today, yet the fossil record indicates that a diverse array of now-extinct taxa once inhabited southern African coastlines. Here, we show that the African penguin fauna had a complex history involving multiple dispersals and extinctions. Phylogenetic analyses and biogeographic reconstructions incorporating new fossil material indicate that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the four Early Pliocene African penguin species do not represent an endemic radiation or direct ancestors of the living Spheniscus demersus (blackfooted penguin). A minimum of three dispersals to Africa, probably assisted by the eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar and South Atlantic currents, occurred during the Late Cenozoic. As regional sea-level fall eliminated islands and reduced offshore breeding areas during the Pliocene, all but one penguin lineage ended in extinction, resulting in today's depleted fauna. PMID:21900330

  12. Patterns of Cenozoic sediment flux from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    2012-01-01

    such as tectonism, climate and climate change. Western Scandinavia, the northern British Isles and the Faeroe-Shetland Platform were significant sediment sources during the Paleocene, which is well founded in tectonic causes related to the opening of the North Atlantic. From the Eocene and onward, variations...... in the sediment flux from western Scandinavia correlate better with climate and climate change. During the Eocene, sediment production was low. From the late Eocene onward, increased seasonality may have contributed to stimulating the sediment flux. Significant climatic cooling episodes correlate with Oligocene......The significance of variations in the sediment flux from western Scandinavia during the Cenozoic has been a matter of debate for decades. Here we compile the sediment flux using seismic data, boreholes and results from other publications and discuss the relative importance of causal agents...

  13. Cenozoic siliciclastic sediment budget at continent-scale, Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cécile; Calves, Gérôme; Baby, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    Siliciclastic sediment budget measurements was performed along the margins and onshore basins of Africa for Cenozoic times. Our objective was first to quantify the ratio between onshore and offshore sediment preservation in the case of a relief with mostly no mountain belt and secondly to understand the factors forcing the sediment supply along the passive margins of Africa that can be long to very-long relief deformation (mantle dynamics, ridge push…) or climate changes (with the major aridification of Africa since Middle Miocene). This study is based on basin-scale regional sections (seismic reflection data from industry and academics, wells correlation), calibrated in age and lithology on different types of wells (industry, DSDP/ODP). Most of the effort was on the revaluation of the ages (calibration and uncertainties). The volumes of sediments and uncertainties on depth conversion velocity laws, lithology and ages were measured using software developed by J. Braun (Grenoble University, France). • The sediment preserved onshore (750 000 km3) is one of magnitude less than was is preserved offshore • The main deformations controlling the sediment supply are (1) the growth or the domes of the East African rift and (2) the marginal bulge of the central and equatorial segments of the South Atlantic Ocean (from southern Angola to Guinea). • The aridification of Africa since at least Middle Miocene is very sensitive in the south (fossilization of the relief of the South African Plateau) and in the northwest, with a sharp decrease of the sediment supply. • Some buffer effects are very important, for example for the Nile and the Zambezi, where sediments were first stored in onshore basins, Sudan or Malawi rift, and later drained because of a capture (Nile) or a regional stress change (Zambezi). Keywords: Africa, Cenozoic, Siliciclastic sediment fluxes, Deformation, Climate

  14. Compound-specific stable isotope records of precipitation isotopes and paleotopographic evolution: Patterns of Cenozoic change in the Western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The topography of an orogen reflects the complex interplay between processes that occur at depth in the crust and processes such as erosion and weathering that shape the surface landscape. Reconstructions of paleotopography are critical for evaluating geodynamic models and separating effects of climatic and tectonic change in terrestrial records. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry has proved to be an important tool for understanding changes in topography through time, however this approach is complicated by factors such as mixing of moisture sources, uncertainty over how uplift impacts air mass transport and resultant isotope hydrology, and debate over what some proxies actually record. Hydrogen isotopes of organic molecules provide a means of reconstructing isotopes of ambient water, but these data are also impacted by factors that affect biological processes and stomatal regulation. Despite the myriad factors that can impact isotope fractionation in plant waxes, a growing body of data show these molecules to be an important record of precipitation isotopes when coupled with data that relates to ecosystem type. This study will examine the distribution of hydrogen isotopes of higher plant waxes across the western U.S. at key intervals of the Cenozoic to provide a snapshot of long-wavelength changes to topography and moisture sources from the Eocene to recent. These data demonstrate the utility of biomarker isotopes as a paleohydrologic/paleotopographic proxy and point to long-standing high topography over much of western U.S. throughout the Cenozoic.

  15. Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Eight profoundly hearing-impaired children, aged 5-11, received tactual word recognition training with tactual speech perception aids. Following training, subjects were tested on trained words and new words. Performance was significantly better on both sets of words when words were presented with a combined condition of tactual aid and aided…

  16. Standing Ovations and Profound Learning: Cultural Diversity in Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes the profound learning that took place at the International Children's Theatre Festival in Toyama City, Japan in July 2000. Argues that participation by the Japanese-American Drama Ensemble, a youth group from the public schools in Lexington, Massachusetts, and more than 400 children from all over the planet, showcased the cultural…

  17. Teaching Profoundly Retarded Adults to Ascend Stairs Safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipani, Ennio; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The study was designed to modify the stair climbing behavior of two profoundly retarded residents through backward shaping with graduated guidance, edible rewards, a correction procedure, and a 30 second timeout. Both residents showed an increase in the number of correct steps used while ascending the stairs.

  18. Pre-Language Activities for the Profoundly Mentally Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marilyn R.; And Others

    Provided are sample lesson plans for a program to develop pre-language skills in profoundly retarded children and adults. Characteristic of the suggested activities is the stimulation of all sensory channels through structured infant-like play activities in five general areas: oral stimulation, sensory arousal, motor stimulation, vocal play, and…

  19. Profound Haemaological Changes In Rats Fed On Different Diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the end of six weeks feeding period, blood samples were obtained and total leukocyte count was done. The results of total court show that animals fed in protein supplemented diet had a profound increase in their leukocyte court when compered with the control. The study shows that specific dietary elements can induce ...

  20. Soil Erosion as a stochastic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Markus C.

    2015-04-01

    The main tools to provide estimations concerning risk and amount of erosion are different types of soil erosion models: on the one hand, there are empirically based model concepts on the other hand there are more physically based or process based models. However, both types of models have substantial weak points. All empirical model concepts are only capable of providing rough estimates over larger temporal and spatial scales, they do not account for many driving factors that are in the scope of scenario related analysis. In addition, the physically based models contain important empirical parts and hence, the demand for universality and transferability is not given. As a common feature, we find, that all models rely on parameters and input variables, which are to certain, extend spatially and temporally averaged. A central question is whether the apparent heterogeneity of soil properties or the random nature of driving forces needs to be better considered in our modelling concepts. Traditionally, researchers have attempted to remove spatial and temporal variability through homogenization. However, homogenization has been achieved through physical manipulation of the system, or by statistical averaging procedures. The price for obtaining this homogenized (average) model concepts of soils and soil related processes has often been a failure to recognize the profound importance of heterogeneity in many of the properties and processes that we study. Especially soil infiltrability and the resistance (also called "critical shear stress" or "critical stream power") are the most important empirical factors of physically based erosion models. The erosion resistance is theoretically a substrate specific parameter, but in reality, the threshold where soil erosion begins is determined experimentally. The soil infiltrability is often calculated with empirical relationships (e.g. based on grain size distribution). Consequently, to better fit reality, this value needs to be

  1. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    2015-01-01

    With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint....... Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We...... of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal...

  2. Detrital provenance constraints from the Austral (Magallanes) Basin on dynamic changes in orogenic paleogeography during Cenozoic growth and denudation of the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Leonard, J. S.; Bostelmann, J. E.; Ugalde, R.; Schwartz, T.

    2015-12-01

    The topographic development of the Patagonian Andes is influenced by crustal shortening, magmatism, asthenospheric mantle upwelling, climate, and erosion - yet knowledge of how these processes interact is hindered by an incomplete understanding of the timing and tempo of deformation and erosion. We report new detrital zircon U/Pb geochronology and sedimentology from the Cenozoic Austral (Magallanes) foreland basin in Argentina and Chile (near 51°S) that record changes in orogenic paleogeography during uplift of the Patagonian Andes. Near Cerro Castillo, Chile, zircons from deltaic and estuarine sandstones of the Cerro Dorotea Fm. indicate sedimentation ~60-61 Ma, revising the long-held Danian age assignment based on the foraminiferal content. Lower Eocene (47-46 Ma) zircons constrain the age of the overlying unit, the deltaic lower Río Turbio Fm., which shares sedimentological, paleontological, and provenance affinity with the northern Man Aike Fm. Deposition of the upper Río Turbio Fm. in Argentina occurred during the Eocene-Oligocene transition ~33-34 Ma and continued until ~26 Ma. Deposition of the Río Guillermo Fm. resumed ~23.5 Ma with the first occurrence of fluvial sedimentation that continued until the marine Patagonian transgression ~21-19 Ma at this location. Detrital zircon ages reveal upsection reduction in Late Jurassic and Paleozoic igneous sources, variable contributions of Late Cretaceous zircons, and younging of arc-derived zircons. Combined with published bedrock thermochronology and structural data, we suggest that early Miocene faulting and exhumation of the thrust-belt resulted in drainage reorganization and eastward shift in the drainage divide to the central domain, isolating the retroarc basin from the Jurassic Tobífera thrust sheets. Revised timing of sedimentation and changes in upland source areas during Paleocene-Miocene time reveals a complex relationship between basin evolution, Cenozoic climate, and phases of Andean tectonic

  3. The Late Cenozoic Geology Of Southeastern Virginia And The Great Dismal Swamp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this field trip are to acquaint the participants with the late Cenozoic stratigraphic, paleontologic and geomorphic features of the Great Dis ma 1...

  4. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  5. Cenozoic topographic build-up of the Iranien plateau: first constraints from low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Thomas; Agard, Philippe; Meyer, Bertrand; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad; Chung, Sun-Lin; Bernet, Matthias; Burov, Evgueni

    2013-04-01

    The Iranian plateau is a smooth topographic high at the rear of the Zagros mountains, with average elevation of c. 1.5 km. Its formation is thought to result from the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates since ~35 Myrs, following a long-standing subduction, and represents an interesting analogue to the so far better documented Tibetan plateau. Yet, while the Zagros orogeny was reappraised by numerous authors over the past few years, the topographic build-up of both the Zagros and the Iranian plateau remains ill-constrained. We herein present (U-Th)/He and fission track (FT) thermochronology results to reconstruct the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Iranien plateau and quantify the age and amount of vertical movements. Apatite and zircon single grain cooling age data were collected on plutonic rocks (for which crystallization ages were already available: Chiu et al., 2010) from the internal domains of Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ), Urumieh-Doktar magmatic arc (UDMA), Central Iran and, for comparison, Kopet Dagh. We stress that an important milestone for topographic build-up is the presence of the marine Qom formation (coeval with the external Asmari formation) in the UDMA and part of the SSZ, indicating that the plateau was at or near sea level at 20 Ma. Temperature time paths inferred from low temperature thermochronology suggest a spatial and temporal separation of exhumation processes. The results show that the SSZ was exhumed very early in the collision process (essentially before 20 Ma), with a likely acceleration around the Oligocene (i.e., at the onset of continental collision) from 0.05 to 0.3 mm/yr. Post-collision cooling along the UDMA is marked by an average, constant exhumation rate of 0.3-0.4 mm/yr, which suggests that no significant increase or decrease of erosion occurred since continental collision. In Central Iran, the overlap (within error) of ZrFT, AFT and AHe ages from gneissic samples points to their rapid cooling during the upper

  6. Visual impairment in severe and profound sensorineural deafness.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, I M; Burke, J. P.; Buffin, J T

    1995-01-01

    The frequency of reversible and irreversible visual impairment was determined in children with severe and profound sensorineural deafness, as subnormal vision can adversely affect their educational and social development. Eighty three of 87 such children attending an audiology service were examined to assess the incidence and severity of visual impairment. Each child underwent a detailed ophthalmic assessment. The criteria for visual impairment were visual acuity < 6/9 Snellen or equivalent a...

  7. Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A; Salas, Christian E; Dockree, Suvi; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with profound amnesia are markedly impaired in explicitly recalling new episodic events, but appear to preserve the capacity to use information from other sources. Amongst these preserved capacities is the ability to form new memories of an emotional nature - a skill at the heart of developing and sustaining interpersonal relationships. The psychoanalytic study of individuals with profound amnesia might contribute to the understanding the importance of each memory system, including effects on key analytic processes such as transference and countertransference. However, psychoanalytic work in the presence of profound amnesia might also require important technical modifications. In the first report of its kind, we describe observations from a long term psychoanalytic process (72 sessions) with an individual (JL) who has profound amnesia after an anoxic episode. The nature of therapy was shaped by JL's impairment in connecting elements that belong to distant (and even relatively close) moments in the therapeutic process. However, we were also able to document areas of preservation, in what appears to be a functioning therapeutic alliance. As regards transference, the relationship between JL and his analyst can be viewed as the evolution of a narcissistic transference, and case material is provided that maps this into three phases: (i) rejecting; (ii) starting to take in; and (iii) full use of the analytic space - where each phase exhibits differing degrees of permeability between JL and the analyst. This investigation appears to have important theoretical implications for psychoanalytic practice, and for psychotherapy in general - and not only with regard to brain injured populations. We especially note that it raises questions concerning the mechanism of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and the apparent unimportance of episodic memory for many elements of therapeutic change.

  8. Profound hyperlipidaemia due to concomitant diabetes and hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Samaan, M Constantine; Murphy, Nuala; Costigan, Colm

    2010-01-01

    A previously well 5-year-old girl presented with new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis, and was found to be profoundly hyperlipidaemic. Further investigations showed that she had associated hypothyroidism. She responded to insulin and L-thyroxine treatments and her lipid profile returned to normal 2 months after diagnosis. Despite starting anticoagulant therapy early, she developed deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb. Her family screen did not demonstrate familial hy...

  9. Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A.; Salas, Christian E.; Dockree, Suvi; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with profound amnesia are markedly impaired in explicitly recalling new episodic events, but appear to preserve the capacity to use information from other sources. Amongst these preserved capacities is the ability to form new memories of an emotional nature – a skill at the heart of developing and sustaining interpersonal relationships. The psychoanalytic study of individuals with profound amnesia might contribute to the understanding the importance of each memory system, including effects on key analytic processes such as transference and countertransference. However, psychoanalytic work in the presence of profound amnesia might also require important technical modifications. In the first report of its kind, we describe observations from a long term psychoanalytic process (72 sessions) with an individual (JL) who has profound amnesia after an anoxic episode. The nature of therapy was shaped by JL’s impairment in connecting elements that belong to distant (and even relatively close) moments in the therapeutic process. However, we were also able to document areas of preservation, in what appears to be a functioning therapeutic alliance. As regards transference, the relationship between JL and his analyst can be viewed as the evolution of a narcissistic transference, and case material is provided that maps this into three phases: (i) rejecting; (ii) starting to take in; and (iii) full use of the analytic space – where each phase exhibits differing degrees of permeability between JL and the analyst. This investigation appears to have important theoretical implications for psychoanalytic practice, and for psychotherapy in general – and not only with regard to brain injured populations. We especially note that it raises questions concerning the mechanism of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and the apparent unimportance of episodic memory for many elements of therapeutic change. PMID:28890703

  10. Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Moore

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with profound amnesia are markedly impaired in explicitly recalling new episodic events, but appear to preserve the capacity to use information from other sources. Amongst these preserved capacities is the ability to form new memories of an emotional nature – a skill at the heart of developing and sustaining interpersonal relationships. The psychoanalytic study of individuals with profound amnesia might contribute to the understanding the importance of each memory system, including effects on key analytic processes such as transference and countertransference. However, psychoanalytic work in the presence of profound amnesia might also require important technical modifications. In the first report of its kind, we describe observations from a long term psychoanalytic process (72 sessions with an individual (JL who has profound amnesia after an anoxic episode. The nature of therapy was shaped by JL’s impairment in connecting elements that belong to distant (and even relatively close moments in the therapeutic process. However, we were also able to document areas of preservation, in what appears to be a functioning therapeutic alliance. As regards transference, the relationship between JL and his analyst can be viewed as the evolution of a narcissistic transference, and case material is provided that maps this into three phases: (i rejecting; (ii starting to take in; and (iii full use of the analytic space – where each phase exhibits differing degrees of permeability between JL and the analyst. This investigation appears to have important theoretical implications for psychoanalytic practice, and for psychotherapy in general – and not only with regard to brain injured populations. We especially note that it raises questions concerning the mechanism of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and the apparent unimportance of episodic memory for many elements of therapeutic change.

  11. Mesozoic and Cenozoic evolution of the SW Iberian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Adrià; Fernández, Oscar; Terrinha, Pedro; Muñoz, Josep Anton; Arnaiz, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    The SW Iberian margin lies at the eastern termination of the Azores-Gibraltar Fracture Zone (AGFZ), the diffuse transform plate boundary between Africa and Iberia (Sartori et al., 1994). It comprises the Gulf of Cadiz and the Algarve Basin, which were developed under two main different regional stages of deformation. During the Mesozoic, the SW Iberian margin evolution since the Late Triassic was dominated by the Pangea break-up and the Central Atlantic opening up to Early Jurssic, followed by the westernmost Tethyan opening up to Mid/Late Jurassic, and the North Atlantic rifting from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (e.g., Schettino and Turco, 2010). This phase of extension led to the formation of E-W to NE-SW trending, basement-involved extensional faults, the triggering of salt tectonics and the uplifting of basement highs (e.g., Guadalquivir Bank). This extensional phase was responsible not only for the sedimentary depocenter distribution, but also for the crustal configuration of this passive margin, extending from continental crust in the proximal part, to oceanic crust in the distal and deepest portion of the margin. Since the Late Cretaceous, the margin was inverted due to the N-S convergence between Africa and Iberia, being still undergoing collision given the dominance of reverse fault earthquake mechanisms (e.g., Zitellini et al., 2009). The shortening in the margin is mainly accommodated by the north-dipping foliation of the basin, expressed by south-directed blind thrusts affecting the present-day bathymetry, re-activating the basement highs and the salt tectonics, and controlling the Cenozoic depocenters. The emplacement of the Betics to the east led to the westward emplacement of the gravitational unit partially overlying the sedimentary basins, corresponding to the Allochthonous Unit of the Gulf of Cadiz (AUGC). Our observations of the margin configuration have been based on the interpretation of 2D and 3D seismic reflection surveys throughout the

  12. Cenozoic intracontinental deformation of the Kopeh Dagh Belt, Northeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yang; Wan, Bo; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens represent large tectonic zones far from plate boundaries. Since intracontinental mountain belts cannot be framed in the conventional plate tectonics theory, several hypotheses have been proposed to account for the formations of these mountain belts. The far-field effect of collision/subduction at plate margins is now well accepted for the origin and evolution of the intracontinental crust thickening, as exemplified by the Miocene tectonics of central Asia. In northern Iran, the Binalud-Alborz mountain belt witnessed the Triassic tectonothermal events (Cimmerian orogeny), which are interpreted as the result of the Paleotethys Ocean closure between the Eurasia and Central Iran blocks. The Kopeh Dagh Belt, located to the north of the Binalud-Alborz Belt, has experienced two significant tectonic phases: (1) Jurassic to Eocene rifting with more than 7 km of sediments; and (2) Late Eocene-Early Oligocene to Quaternary continuous compression. Due to the high seismicity, deformation associated with earthquakes has received more and more attention; however, the deformation pattern and architecture of this range remain poorly understood. Detailed field observations on the Cenozoic deformation indicate that the Kopeh Dagh Belt can be divided into a western zone and an eastern zone, separated by a series of dextral strike-slip faults, i.e. the Bakharden-Quchan Fault System. The eastern zone characterized by km-scale box-fold structures, associated with southwest-dipping reverse faults and top-to-the NE kinematics. In contrast, the western zone shows top-to-the SW kinematics, and the deformation intensifies from NE to SW. In the northern part of this zone, large-scale asymmetrical anticlines exhibit SW-directed vergence with subordinate thrusts and folds, whereas symmetrical anticlines are observed in the southern part. In regard to its tectonic feature, the Kopeh Dagh Belt is a typical Cenozoic intracontinental belt without ophiolites or

  13. Cenozoic stratigraphy and structure of the Chesapeake Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powars, David S.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Kidwell, Susan M.; Schindler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The Salisbury embayment is a broad tectonic downwarp that is filled by generally seaward-thickening, wedge-shaped deposits of the central Atlantic Coastal Plain. Our two-day field trip will take us to the western side of this embayment from the Fall Zone in Washington, D.C., to some of the bluffs along Aquia Creek and the Potomac River in Virginia, and then to the Calvert Cliffs on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. We will see fluvial-deltaic Cretaceous deposits of the Potomac Formation. We will then focus on Cenozoic marine deposits. Transgressive and highstand deposits are stacked upon each other with unconformities separating them; rarely are regressive or lowstand deposits preserved. The Paleocene and Eocene shallow shelf deposits consist of glauconitic, silty sands that contain varying amounts of marine shells. The Miocene shallow shelf deposits consist of diatomaceous silts and silty and shelly sands. The lithology, thickness, dip, preservation, and distribution of the succession of coastal plain sediments that were deposited in our field-trip area are, to a great extent, structurally controlled. Surficial and subsurface mapping using numerous continuous cores, auger holes, water-well data, and seismic surveys has documented some folds and numerous high-angle reverse and normal faults that offset Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits. Many of these structures are rooted in early Mesozoic and/or Paleozoic NE-trending regional tectonic fault systems that underlie the Atlantic Coastal Plain. On Day 1, we will focus on two fault systems (stops 1–2; Stafford fault system and the Skinkers Neck–Brandywine fault system and their constituent fault zones and faults). We will then see (stops 3–5) a few of the remaining exposures of largely unlithified marine Paleocene and Eocene strata along the Virginia side of the Potomac River including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum boundary clay. These exposures are capped by fluvial-estuarine Pleistocene terrace

  14. Foveal Processing Under Concurrent Peripheral Load in Profoundly Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of the visual system typically proceeds in concert with the development of audition. One result is that the visual system of profoundly deaf individuals differs from that of those with typical auditory systems. While past research has suggested deaf people have enhanced attention in the visual periphery, it is still unclear whether or not this enhancement entails deficits in central vision. Profoundly deaf and typically hearing adults were administered a variant of the useful field of view task that independently assessed performance on concurrent central and peripheral tasks. Identification of a foveated target was impaired by a concurrent selective peripheral attention task, more so in profoundly deaf adults than in the typically hearing. Previous findings of enhanced performance on the peripheral task were not replicated. These data are discussed in terms of flexible allocation of spatial attention targeted towards perceived task demands, and support a modified “division of labor” hypothesis whereby attentional resources co-opted to process peripheral space result in reduced resources in the central visual field. PMID:26657078

  15. Soil Erosion and Agricultural Sustainability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David R. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    .... The general equivalence of the latter indicates that, considered globally, hillslope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic and climate forcing, whereas conventional plow-based...

  16. Multiperspective analysis of erosion tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparovek Gerd

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion tolerance is the most multidisciplinary field of soil erosion research. Scientists have shown lack in ability to adequately analyze the huge list of variables that influence soil loss tolerance definitions. For these the perspectives of erosion made by farmers, environmentalists, society and politicians have to be considered simultaneously. Partial and biased definitions of erosion tolerance may explain not only the polemic nature of the currently suggested values but also, in part, the nonadoption of the desired levels of erosion control. To move towards a solution, considerable changes would have to occur on how this topic is investigated, especially among scientists, who would have to change methods and strategies and extend the perspective of research out of the boundaries of the physical processes and the frontiers of the academy. A more effective integration and communication with the society and farmers, to learn about their perspective of erosion and a multidisciplinary approach, integrating soil, social, economic and environmental sciences are essential for improved erosion tolerance definitions. In the opinion of the authors, soil erosion research is not moving in this direction and a better understanding of erosion tolerance is not to be expected in the near future.

  17. Intubation of Profoundly Agitated Patients Treated with Prehospital Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Travis D; Nystrom, Paul C; Cole, Jon B; Dodd, Kenneth W; Ho, Jeffrey D

    2016-12-01

    Profound agitation in the prehospital setting confers substantial risk to patients and providers. Optimal chemical sedation in this setting remains unclear. The goal of this study was to describe intubation rates among profoundly agitated patients treated with prehospital ketamine and to characterize clinically significant outcomes of a prehospital ketamine protocol. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who received prehospital ketamine, per a predefined protocol, for control of profound agitation and who subsequently were transported to an urban Level 1 trauma center from May 1, 2010 through August 31, 2013. Identified records were reviewed for basic ambulance run information, subject characteristics, ketamine dosing, and rate of intubation. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) ambulance run data were matched to hospital-based electronic medical records. Clinically significant outcomes are characterized, including unadjusted and adjusted rates of intubation. Overall, ketamine was administered 227 times in the prehospital setting with 135 cases meeting study criteria of use of ketamine for treatment of agitation. Endotracheal intubation was undertaken for 63% (85/135) of patients, including attempted prehospital intubation in four cases. Male gender and late night arrival were associated with intubation in univariate analyses (χ2=12.02; P=.001 and χ2=5.34; P=.021, respectively). Neither ketamine dose, co-administration of additional sedating medications, nor evidence of ethanol (ETOH) or sympathomimetic ingestion was associated with intubation. The association between intubation and both male gender and late night emergency department (ED) arrival persisted in multivariate analysis. Neither higher dose (>5mg/kg) ketamine nor co-administration of midazolam or haloperidol was associated with intubation in logistic regression modeling of the 120 subjects with weights recorded. Two deaths were observed. Post-hoc analysis of intubation rates suggested a

  18. Erosion mechanism and erosion products in carbon-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V. E-mail: vsafr@rico.ttk.ru; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Wuerz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A

    2002-12-01

    Plasma/material interaction was studied in disruption simulation experiments at the plasma gun facility MK-200. Graphite and carbon-fibre composites were exposed to pulsed energetic plasma under heat loads typically expected for disruptions in future tokamaks. Erosion rates, erosion mechanisms and the properties of the eroded carbon have been studied.

  19. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  20. EVALUATING THE ROLE OF SEAGRASS IN CENOZOIC CO2 VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Brandano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine seagrass angiosperms play an important role in carbon sequestration, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and binding it as organic matter. Carbon is stored in the plants themselves, but also in the sediments both in inorganic and organic forms. The inorganic component is represented by carbonates produced by calcareous organisms living as epiphytes on seagrass leaves and rhizomes. In this paper, we find that the rate of seagrass epiphyte production (leaves and rhizomes, averages 400 g m-2 yr-1, as result of seagrass sampling at seven localities along the Mediterranean coasts, and related laboratory analysis. Seagrasses have appeared in the Late Cretaceous, becoming a place of remarkable carbonate production and C sequestration during the whole Cenozoic era. Here, we explore the potential contribution of seagrass as C sink on the atmospheric CO2 decrease by measuring changes in seagrass extent, which is directly associated with variations in the global coastal length associated with plate tectonics. We claim that global seagrass distribution significantly affected the atmospheric composition, particularly at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, when the CO2 concentration fell to 400 ppm, i.e. the approximate value of current atmospheric CO2.

  1. Diagenetic evolution of Cenozoic sandstones, Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Lynton S.; Milliken, Kitty Lou; McBride, Earle F.

    1987-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin is a natural laboratory for the study of on-going diagenetic and incipient metamorphic processes. Sediments and rocks of Eocene through Pleistocene age have been studied from the surface to depths in excess of 6 km. Sediments heated to temperatures above 100°C have been massively transformed by mechanical compaction, cementation, and extensive alteration of detrital components. Grain dissolution, albitization, and clay-mineral transformations have reduced an initially complex detrital assemblage to quartz, albite, illite and minor carbonate at temperatures above 100°C. Volumetrically significant diagenetic processes observed in the basin include cementation by quartz, carbonate and kaolinite, grain dissolution (affecting mainly potassium feldspar, heavy minerals, and plagioclase), albitization, and the transformation of smectite to illite. Excepting carbonate cementation which shows essentially no depth-related variation, these processes occur shallower in older units, most likely in response to variations in the geothermal gradient, which is higher in the older Cenozoic depocenters. The magnitudes of the principal diagenetic processes all support the view that basinal diagenesis operates as an open system on a very large scale. Strontium isotopic data for authigenic carbonates document vertical transport on the scale of kilometers. The extent to which metamorphic processes below 6 km have effected the course of diagenesis in shallower rocks is still unproven, but current data suggest that burial diagenesis must be studied in such a context.

  2. Cenozoic rifting in the West Antarctic Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, R.; Cande, S. S.; Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Davey, F. J.

    2007-12-01

    The West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) experienced two episodes of Cenozoic rifting. Seafloor spreading at the Adare spreading axis, north of the Ross Sea, from Middle Eocene to Late Oligocene time (43 - 26 Ma), was directly linked with motions within the WARS. For this time interval, marine magnetic anomalies within the Adare Basin and structural features within the Ross Sea constrain the motion between East and West Antarctica. During this episode, widespread intrusive activity took place in the continental part of the rift. Subsequent Late Oligocene until present-day (26 - 0 Ma) extension was characterized by a transition to volcanic activity. Yet, the details of extension during this episode have been poorly resolved. We present preliminary results of new seismic reflection and seafloor mapping data acquired on geophysical cruise 07-01 aboard the R/VIB Nathaniel Palmer in the northern part of the rift. Our results suggest that the style of deformation changed from spreading-related faulting into diffuse normal faulting (tilted blocks) that trend NE-SW with little resultant E-W extension. Recent volcanism is distributed throughout but tends to align with the NE-SW trend, into a localized zone. Formation of the Terror Rift, Ross Sea, within the same time frame suggests that the pole of rotation has changed its position, reflecting a change in the relative magnitudes of tensile stresses along the rift. Moreover, this change was accompanied with a sharp decrease of extension rates.

  3. Equatorial convergence of India and early Cenozoic climate trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Dennis V; Muttoni, Giovanni

    2008-10-21

    India's northward flight and collision with Asia was a major driver of global tectonics in the Cenozoic and, we argue, of atmospheric CO(2) concentration (pCO(2)) and thus global climate. Subduction of Tethyan oceanic crust with a carpet of carbonate-rich pelagic sediments deposited during transit beneath the high-productivity equatorial belt resulted in a component flux of CO(2) delivery to the atmosphere capable to maintain high pCO(2) levels and warm climate conditions until the decarbonation factory shut down with the collision of Greater India with Asia at the Early Eocene climatic optimum at approximately 50 Ma. At about this time, the India continent and the highly weatherable Deccan Traps drifted into the equatorial humid belt where uptake of CO(2) by efficient silicate weathering further perturbed the delicate equilibrium between CO(2) input to and removal from the atmosphere toward progressively lower pCO(2) levels, thus marking the onset of a cooling trend over the Middle and Late Eocene that some suggest triggered the rapid expansion of Antarctic ice sheets at around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary.

  4. Geophysical Characterization of the Central Yakutat Shelf and Cenozoic Basin Development, Offshore Southeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    In southeastern Alaska the collision of the Yakutat Block with North America has led to uplift of the highest costal mountain range in the world, the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains. By 5.5 Ma uplift of the ranges was sufficient to cause glaciation on the continental margin, making it a unique area to study the interactions between tectonics and climate driven processes. This study uses coincident seismic reflection and refraction data from the St. Elias Erosion and Tectonics Project (STEEP) focusing on line STEEP02. We present a high resolution two-dimensional compressional velocity model that helps to elucidate the patterns of deformation offshore of the southeastern Alaskan syntaxis. The velocity model is able to constrain the location of the pinch out of the Poul Creek Formation offshore beneath the mouth of Yakutat Bay. The pinch out of the formation is likely due to an erosional event of the pre-glacial strata associated with the initial formation of the Yakataga fold-and-thrust belt, rather than a depositional feature. This geometry suggests sufficient uplift in the St. Elias syntaxis to cause large scale denudation before deposition of the Yakataga Formation at 6 Ma. The velocity model is transformed to porosity using relationships specific to the Cenozoic sediments on the Yakutat shelf. The Poul Creek Formation is identified as a unit of low velocity, 2.8 km/s, and elevated porosity, .25, across its entire offshore extent and may be a pre-existing weak zone that preferentially accommodates slip when incorporated into the western fold-and-thrust belts. Van Avendonk et al. (2013) identified a zone of lateral compaction 100 km outboard of the offshore Pamplona Zone deformation front along a seismic line perpendicular to STEEP02 which is defined by a landward lateral increase in velocity and decrease porosity in the Yakataga Formation. No landward increase in velocity or decrease in porosity is observed along STEEP02, constraining the deformation front due to

  5. The Late Cenozoic Climatic and Tectonic Evolution of the Mount Everest Region, Central Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mary Hannah

    The collision of India and Eurasia constructed the Himalayan Mountains. Questions remain regarding how subsequent exhumation by climatic and tectonic processes shaped the landscape throughout the Late Cenozoic to create the complex architecture observed today. The Mount Everest region underwent tectonic denudation by extension and bestrides one of the world's most significant rain shadows. Also, glacial and fluvial processes eroded the Everest massif over shorter timescales. In this work, I review new bedrock and detrital thermochronological and geochronological data and both one- and two-dimensional thermal-mechanical modeling that provides insights on the age range and rates of tectonic and erosional processes in this region. A strand of the South Tibetan detachment system (STDS), a series of prominent normal-sense structures that dip to the north and strike along the Himalayan spine, is exposed in the Rongbuk valley near Everest. Using thermochronometric techniques, thermal-kinematic modeling, and published (U-Th)/Pb geochronology, I show exhumation rates were high ( 3-4 mm/a) from at least 20 to 13 Ma because of slip on the STDS. Subsequently, exhumation rates dropped drastically to ≤ 0.5 mm/a and remain low today. However, thermochronometric datasets and thermal-kinematic modeling results from Nepal south of Everest reveal a sharp transition in cooling ages and exhumation rates across a major knickpoint in the river profile, corresponding to the modern-day Himalayan rainfall transition. To the north of this transition, exhumation histories are similar to those in Tibet. Conversely, < 3 km south of the transition, exhumation rates were relatively low until the Pliocene, when they increased to 4 mm/a before slowing at 3 Ma. Such contrasting exhumation histories over a short distance suggest that bedrock exhumation rates correlate with modern precipitation patterns in deep time, however, there are competing interpretations regarding this correlation. My work

  6. Cenozoic sedimentary dynamics of the Ouarzazate foreland basin (Central High Atlas Mountains, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harfi, A.; Lang, J.; Salomon, J.; Chellai, E. H.

    2001-06-01

    Cenozoic continental sedimentary deposits of the Southern Atlas named "Imerhane Group" crop out (a) in the Ouarzazate foreland basin between the Precambrian basement of the Anti Atlas and the uplifted limestone dominated High Atlas, and (b) in the Aït Kandoula and Aït Seddrat nappes where Jurassic strata detached from the basement have been thrust southwards over the Ouarzazate Basin. New biostratigraphic and geochronological data constraining the final Eocene marine regression, the characterization of the new "Aït Ouglif Detrital Formation" presumed to be of Oligocene age, and the new stratigraphic division proposed for the Continental Imerhane Group clarify the major tectonogenetic alpidic movements of the Central High Atlas Range. Four continental formations are identified at regional scale. Their emplacement was governed principally by tectonic but also by eustatic controls. The Hadida and Aït Arbi formations (Upper Eocene) record the major Paleogene regression. They are composed of margino-littoral facies (coastal sabkhas and fluviatile systems) and reflect incipient erosion of the underlying strata and renewed fluvial drainage. The Aït Ouglif Formation (presumed Oligocene) had not been characterized before. It frequently overlies all earlier formations with an angular unconformity. It includes siliciclastic alluvial deposits and is composed predominantly of numerous thin fining-upward cycles. The Aït Kandoula Formation (Miocene-Pliocene) is discordant, extensive, and represents a thick coarsening-upward megasequence. It is composed of palustro-lacustrine deposits in a context of alluvial plain with localized sabkhas, giving way to alluvial fans and fluviatile environments. The Upper Conglomeratic Formation (Quaternary) is the trace of a vast conglomeratic pediment, forming an alluvial plain and terraces. The second and third formations correspond to two megasequences engendered by the uplift of the Central High Atlas in two major compressive phases

  7. Late Cenozoic Climate Change and its Implications on the Denudation of Orogen Syntaxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Sebastian; Ehlers, Todd

    2017-04-01

    The denudation history of active orogens is often interpreted in the context of modern climate gradients. Despite the influence of climatic conditions on erosion rates, information about paleoclimate evolution is often not available and thus not considered when denudation histories are interpreted. In this study, we analyze output from paleoclimate simulations conducted with ECHAM5-wiso at T159 (ca. 80x80km) resolution. Specifically, we analyze simulations of pre-industrial (PI, pre-1850), Mid-Holocene (MH, ca. 6ka), Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 21ka) and Pliocene (PLIO, ca. 3ka) climates and focus on a selection of orogen syntaxes as study regions (e.g. Himalaya, SE Alaska, Cascadia, and Central Andes). For the selected region, we carry out a cluster analysis using a hybrid of hierarchical and k-means clustering procedures using mean annual temperature (MAT), temperature amplitude, mean annual precipitation (MAP), precipitation amplitude and u-wind and v-wind in different months to provide a general overview of paleoclimates in the study regions. Additionally, we quantify differences between paleoclimates by applying two-group linear discrimination analyses to the simulation output for a similar selection of variables. Results indicate the largest differences to the PI climate are observed for the LGM and PLIO climates in the form of widespread cooling and reduced precipitation in the LGM and warming and enhanced precipitation during the PLIO. These global trends can be observed for most locations in the investigated areas, but the strength varies regionally and the trends in precipitation are less uniform than trends in temperatures. The LGM climate shows the largest deviation in annual precipitation from the PI climate, and shows enhanced precipitation in the temperate Andes, and coastal regions for both SE Alaska and the US Pacific Northwest Pacific. Furthermore, LGM precipitation is reduced in the western Himalayas and enhanced in the eastern Himalayas

  8. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 2: Modelling large-scale landscape evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Egholm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of strong periglacial control on bedrock erosion in mountain landscapes, including the shaping of low-relief surfaces at high elevations (summit flats. But, as yet, the hypothesis that frost action was crucial to the assumed Late Cenozoic rise in erosion rates remains compelling and untested. Here we present a landscape evolution model incorporating two key periglacial processes – regolith production via frost cracking and sediment transport via frost creep – which together are harnessed to variations in temperature and the evolving thickness of sediment cover. Our computational experiments time-integrate the contribution of frost action to shaping mountain topography over million-year timescales, with the primary and highly reproducible outcome being the development of flattish or gently convex summit flats. A simple scaling of temperature to marine δ18O records spanning the past 14 Myr indicates that the highest summit flats in mid- to high-latitude mountains may have formed via frost action prior to the Quaternary. We suggest that deep cooling in the Quaternary accelerated mechanical weathering globally by significantly expanding the area subject to frost. Further, the inclusion of subglacial erosion alongside periglacial processes in our computational experiments points to alpine glaciers increasing the long-term efficiency of frost-driven erosion by steepening hillslopes.

  9. Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Mark; Pierson, Fred; Hernandez, Mariano; Al-Hamdan, Osama; Weltz, Mark; Spaeth, Ken; Wei, Haiyan; Stone, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    Soil loss rates on rangelands are considered one of the few quantitative indicators for assessing rangeland health and conservation practice effectiveness. An erosion model to predict soil loss specific for rangeland applications has been needed for many years. Most erosion models were developed from croplands where the hydrologic and erosion processes are different, largely due to much higher levels of heterogeneity in soil and plant properties at the plot scale and the consolidated nature of the soils. The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) was designed to fill that need. RHEM is an event-based model that estimates runoff, erosion, and sediment delivery rates and volumes at the spatial scale of the hillslope and the temporal scale of a single rainfall event. It represents erosion processes under normal and fire-impacted rangeland conditions, it adopts a new splash erosion and thin sheet-flow transport equation developed from rangeland data, and it links the model hydrologic and erosion parameters with rangeland plant communities by providing a new system of parameter estimation equations based on 204 plots at 49 rangeland sites distributed across 15 western U.S. states. Recent work on the model is focused on representing intra-storm dynamics, using stream-power as the driver for detachment by flow, and deriving parameters for after-fire conditions.

  10. Dune erosion during storm surges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Large parts of The Netherlands are protected from flooding by a narrow strip of sandy beaches and dunes. The aim of this thesis is to extend the existing knowledge of dune erosion during storm surges as it occurs along the Dutch coast. The thesis discusses: • A large scale dune erosion experiment to

  11. Interaural comparison of spiral ganglion cell counts in profound deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedi, Mohammad; Eddington, Donald K; Nadol, Joseph B

    2011-12-01

    This study is designed to measure the degree to which spiral ganglion cell (SGC) survival in the left and right ears is similar in profoundly hearing-impaired human patients with symmetric (right/left) etiology and sensitivity. This is of interest because a small difference between ears would imply that one ear could be used as a control ear in temporal bone studies evaluating the impact on SGC survival of a medical intervention in the other ear. Forty-two temporal bones from 21 individuals with bilaterally symmetric profound hearing impairment were studied. Both ears in each individual were impaired by the same etiology. Rosenthal's canal was reconstructed in two dimensions and segmental and total SGCs were counted. Correlation analysis and t-tests were used to compare segmental and total counts of left and right ears. Statistical power calculations illustrate how the results can be used to estimate the effect size (right/left difference in SGC count) that can be reliably identified as a function of sample size. Left counts (segmental and total) were significantly correlated with those in the right ears (p total count were respectively 0.64, 0.91, 0.93, 0.91 and 0.98. The hypothesis that mean segmental and total counts of right and left are the same could not be rejected by paired t-test. The variance in the between-ear difference across the temporal bones studied indicates that useful effect sizes can be reliably identified using subject numbers that are practical for temporal bone studies. For instance, there is 95% likelihood that an interaural difference in SGC count of approximately 1000 cells associated with a treatment/manipulation of one ear will be reliably detected in a bilaterally-symmetric profound hearing loss population of temporal bones from approximately 10 subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Profound Muscle Weakness and Pain after One Dose of Actonel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Badayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO defines osteopenia as a bone density between 1 and 2.5 standard deviation (SD below the bone density of a normal young adult Iqbal 2000. Osteoporosis is defined as 2.5 SD or more below that reference point Iqbal 2000. Bisphosphonates are a group of medications used to treat osteoporosis, Padget's disease of bone, and osteopenia. We report a woman who developed profound muscle weakness and pain after one dose of Risedronate (Actonel.

  13. Modeling soil erosion in a watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Lanuza, R.

    1999-01-01

    Most erosion models have been developed based on a plot scale and have limited application to a watershed due to the differences in aerial scale. In order to address this limitation, a GIS-assisted methodology for modeling soil erosion was developed using PCRaster to predict the rate of soil erosion at watershed level; identify the location of erosion prone areas; and analyze the impact of landuse changes on soil erosion. The general methodology of desktop modeling or soil erosion at watershe...

  14. Progressive Cenozoic cooling and the demise of Antarctica's last refugium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John B; Warny, Sophie; Askin, Rosemary A; Wellner, Julia S; Bohaty, Steven M; Kirshner, Alexandra E; Livsey, Daniel N; Simms, Alexander R; Smith, Tyler R; Ehrmann, Werner; Lawver, Lawrence A; Barbeau, David; Wise, Sherwood W; Kulhanek, Denise K; Kulhenek, Denise K; Weaver, Fred M; Majewski, Wojciech

    2011-07-12

    The Antarctic Peninsula is considered to be the last region of Antarctica to have been fully glaciated as a result of Cenozoic climatic cooling. As such, it was likely the last refugium for plants and animals that had inhabited the continent since it separated from the Gondwana supercontinent. Drill cores and seismic data acquired during two cruises (SHALDRIL I and II) in the northernmost Peninsula region yield a record that, when combined with existing data, indicates progressive cooling and associated changes in terrestrial vegetation over the course of the past 37 million years. Mountain glaciation began in the latest Eocene (approximately 37-34 Ma), contemporaneous with glaciation elsewhere on the continent and a reduction in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. This climate cooling was accompanied by a decrease in diversity of the angiosperm-dominated vegetation that inhabited the northern peninsula during the Eocene. A mosaic of southern beech and conifer-dominated woodlands and tundra continued to occupy the region during the Oligocene (approximately 34-23 Ma). By the middle Miocene (approximately 16-11.6 Ma), localized pockets of limited tundra still existed at least until 12.8 Ma. The transition from temperate, alpine glaciation to a dynamic, polythermal ice sheet took place during the middle Miocene. The northernmost Peninsula was overridden by an ice sheet in the early Pliocene (approximately 5.3-3.6 Ma). The long cooling history of the peninsula is consistent with the extended timescales of tectonic evolution of the Antarctic margin, involving the opening of ocean passageways and associated establishment of circumpolar circulation.

  15. Eptifibatide-induced acute profound thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graidis, Christos; Golias, Christos; Dimitriadis, Dimokritos; Dimitriadis, Georgios; Bitsis, Theodosis; Dimitrelos, Ilias; Tsiakou, Afroditi; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-02-25

    The interactions among cells or among cells and components of the extracellular matrix, is a crucial pathophysiological process involving some molecules collectively known as adhesion molecules (CAMs). Glycoprotein IIb / IIIa receptors are only restricted to blood platelets and they bind fibrinogen and adhesion proteins such as fibronectin, vitronectin, von Willebrand factor to form cross bridges between adjacent platelets. IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists are an object of intense research activity for target therapy worldwide during the last decades. Three GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors, abciximab, tirofiban, and eptifibatide, have been approved for clinical use. Profound thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but clinically important complication of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. This case report discusses a forty-four-year-old male patient with acute coronary syndrome who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and developed profound thrombocytopenia within 4 hours of first administration of eptifibatide. This report adds another case of eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia to the medical literature and endorses the importance of platelet count monitoring after initiating therapy with this agent.

  16. Vegetarian children and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Dlaigan, Y H; Shaw, L; Smith, A J

    2001-05-01

    There have been recent changes in teenage lifestyle and diet. The increasing consumption of soft drinks and foods containing significant acidic components may play a role in the development of dental erosion. The aims of this investigation were firstly to assess the prevalence of vegetarian children in a cluster random sample of 14-year-old children in Birmingham, United Kingdom. Secondly, to determine the prevalence of dental erosion in these children, and thirdly, to see if there were any differences between vegetarian and non-vegetarian children in the prevalence of dental erosion and dietary intake. A cluster random sample of 418 14-year-old children (209 males and 209 females) were examined from 12 different schools in Birmingham, United Kingdom; a dietary questionnaire was completed and the levels of tooth wear were recorded using a modification of the (TWI) index. All data were analysed using SPSS with t-test and Chi-square analysis. Significance was accepted at the P children were vegetarian; 52% of them had low dental erosion and 48% moderate dental erosion. Statistically there were no significant differences between vegetarian and non-vegetarian children in the prevalence of erosion; however, there were significant differences in some food and drink consumption. It was concluded that dental erosion is common in teenage children, but there were no significant differences in prevalence between vegetarian and non-vegetarian children.

  17. Cavitation erosion size scale effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Size scaling in cavitation erosion is a major problem confronting the design engineers of modern high speed machinery. An overview and erosion data analysis presented in this paper indicate that the size scale exponent n in the erosion rate relationship as a function of the size or diameter can vary from 1.7 to 4.9 depending on the type of device used. There is, however, a general agreement as to the values of n if the correlations are made with constant cavitation number.

  18. Persistent Thalamic Sound Processing Despite Profound Cochlear Denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Chambers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons at higher stages of sensory processing can partially compensate for a sudden drop in input from the periphery through a homeostatic plasticity process that increases the gain on weak afferent inputs. Even after a profound unilateral auditory neuropathy where > 95% of synapses between auditory nerve fibers and inner hair cells have been eliminated with ouabain, central gain can restore the cortical processing and perceptual detection of basic sounds delivered to the denervated ear. In this model of profound auditory neuropathy, cortical processing and perception recover despite the absence of an auditory brainstem response (ABR or brainstem acoustic reflexes, and only a partial recovery of sound processing at the level of the inferior colliculus (IC, an auditory midbrain nucleus. In this study, we induced a profound cochlear neuropathy with ouabain and asked whether central gain enabled a compensatory plasticity in the auditory thalamus comparable to the full recovery of function previously observed in the auditory cortex (ACtx, the partial recovery observed in the IC, or something different entirely. Unilateral ouabain treatment in adult mice effectively eliminated the ABR, yet robust sound-evoked activity persisted in a minority of units recorded from the contralateral medial geniculate body (MGB of awake mice. Sound-driven MGB units could decode moderate and high-intensity sounds with accuracies comparable to sham-treated control mice, but low-intensity classification was near chance. Pure tone receptive fields and synchronization to broadband pulse trains also persisted, albeit with significantly reduced quality and precision, respectively. MGB decoding of temporally modulated pulse trains and speech tokens were both greatly impaired in ouabain-treated mice. Taken together, the absence of an ABR belied a persistent auditory processing at the level of the MGB that was likely enabled through increased central gain. Compensatory

  19. Cenozoic structures and the tectonic evolution of the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.; Egholm, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Abundant seismic sections and well data from the Cenozoic succession in the eastern North Sea area generally reveal normal faulting, salt tectonics and localized tectonic inversion. However, inferences on the Cenozoic dynamic evolution of the region require thorough analysis of interactions between...... or cover tectonism took place. Our objectives are thus 1) to analyze the interaction between basement and cover structures, and if possible 2) to relate the structures to the regional tectonic evolution. The Zechstein evaporites pinch out onto the Ringkøbing-Fyn High, which in the eastern North Sea...... influencede.g. Miocene deposition and controlled the generation of second order faults. The latter detached along the top Chalk Group due to the topography generated during faulting, i.e. they are second order detachment surfaces. We conclude that the regional tectonic significance of the Cenozoic structures...

  20. Compost for steep slope erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to develop guidelines for maintenance erosion control measures for steep slopes. The study focused on evaluating and monitoring KY-31 fescue germination rates using two media treatments 1) 100 percent by weight compost and 2)...

  1. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  2. Did high Neo-Tethys subduction rates contribute to early Cenozoic warming?

    OpenAIRE

    Hoareau, Guilhem; BOMOU, B.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Carry, N.; Marquer, D.; Donnadieu, Y.; Le Hir, G.; Vrielynck, Bruno; Walter-Simonnet, A.-V.

    2015-01-01

    The 58–51 Ma interval was characterized by a long-term increase of global temperatures (+4 to +6 °C) up to the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, 52.9–50.7 Ma), the warmest interval of the Cenozoic. It was recently suggested that sustained high atmospheric pCO2, controlling warm early Cenozoic climate, may have been released during Neo-Tethys closure through the subduction of large amounts of pelagic carbonates and their recycling as CO2 at arc volcanoes. To analyze the imp...

  3. The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central and Northern North Sea based on seismic sequence stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordt, Henrik

    1996-03-01

    This thesis represents scientific results from seismic sequence stratigraphic investigations. These investigations and results are integrated into an ongoing mineralogical study of the Cenozoic deposits. the main results from this mineralogical study are presented and discussed. The seismic investigations have provided boundary conditions for a forward modelling study of the Cenozoic depositional history. Results from the forward modelling are presented as they emphasise the influence of tectonics on sequence development. The tectonic motions described were important for the formation of the large oil and gas fields in the North Sea.

  4. Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities : the effects of functional movement activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To determine the effect of functional movement activities within the MOVE ( Mobility Opportunities Via Education) curriculum on the independence of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Subjects: Forty-four children with profound intellectual and multiple

  5. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, A.-Rim; Choi, Sung Hi; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Der-Chuen

    2017-02-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions of Late Cenozoic (4.1 to 13.8 Ma) basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam have been determined to understand the nature of their mantle source. The volcanic rocks are composed of tholeiite basalt, alkaline basanite, trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, and trachyandesite. The alkaline rocks show light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, with (La/Yb)N = 10.3-29.8. The tholeiite basalts are distinguished by much lower values (8.8-9.5) of (La/Yb)N. On a primitive mantle-normalized trace element distribution diagram, they show oceanic island basalt (OIB)-like large-ion lithophile element enrichment without high field strength element depletion. However, some samples exhibit positive anomalies in K and Pb and negative anomalies in Sm, suggesting K-rich residual amphibole in the source. The samples contain Sr (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703794-0.704672), Nd (ɛNd = + 1.7-5.7), Hf (ɛHf = + 4.0-10.9), and Pb (206Pb/204Pb = 18.23-18.75; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.53-15.59; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.32-38.88) isotopes, plotting among OIBs, with depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt mantle-enriched mantle type 2 (DMM-EM2) characteristics. There are no discernible isotopic differences between tholeiite and the alkaline series, reflecting the same source. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions are coupled, and plot along the mantle-crust array, ruling out the possibility of lithospheric mantle in the source. Plots of NiO against the Fo numbers of olivines from the basaltic rocks are within the range of Hainan and Hawaiian basalt olivines, implying that hybrid pyroxenite is present in the source. Also note that the estimated primary melt compositions fall within the experimental field defined by partial melting of silica-poor eclogite and peridotite. The effective melting pressure (Pf) and melting temperature (T) of the primary melts are Pf = 29.6-32.8 kbar and T = 1470-1480 °C. We suggest that Vietnamese basaltic rocks may be produced by

  6. Geomagnetic secular variations at the Mesozoic-Cenozoic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V.; Veselovskiy, R. V.; fluteau, F.; Latyshev, A.; Fetisova, A.

    2013-05-01

    the same as during the Latest Cenozoic.

  7. The gap in the Arctic Cenozoic Record: Expect the Unexpected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, F.; Brumsack, H.; Schouten, S.; Brinkhuis, H.; Kaminski, M. A.; Reichart, G.; Stickley, C. E.; Willard, D. A.; Sinninghe Damste', J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302, a.k.a. the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX), drilled more than 400 meters below the seafloor at the central Lomonosov Ridge, ca 250 km from the modern North Pole in water depths of about 1300 m. The partially recovered sediments provide a unique record of the geological and paleoceanographical evolution of the Arctic Ocean during the Cenozoic. The record indicates a transition from a "greenhouse world", characterized by a relative shallow marine setting, with organic-rich sediment and frequent brackish or even fresh surface waters during the latest Palaeocene and the early Eocene, to an "icehouse world" of hemipelagic sedimentation affected by the occurrence of sea ice from the middle Miocene to present. Much to our surprise, these two states are separated by a major hiatus, not obvious from the seismic record and the lithology of the cores, spanning at least 25 Ma as derived from dinocyst and benthic foraminifer stratigraphies. These testify that deposits of probable late early Miocene age directly overlie early middle Eocene sediments. To unravel the nature of the hiatus, we performed a multiproxy micropaleontological and geochemical study on the surrounding record, i.e. lithological units 1/6, 1/5 and 1/4, where the sediment changes from homogeneous dark into a cm-scaled alternation ("zebra-like") black and grey bands to light grey, blue and reddish-brown. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, pollen and spores, benthic foraminifera, inorganic and organic geochemistry and siliceous remains reveal conspicuous changes, suggesting a transition from brackish-freshwater to shallow-lagoonal and to open marine environments. These environmental turnovers, coupled with the occurrence of such a large hiatus, cannot be due to climatic shifts alone, but suggest that major tectonic rearrangements likely changed the depositional setting. On-going organic geochemical analysis will be

  8. Mesozoic to Cenozoic magmatic history of the Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, James B.; Scoggin, Shane H.; Kapp, Paul; Carrapa, Barbara; Ducea, Mihai N.; Worthington, James; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon; Gadoev, Mustafo

    2018-01-01

    New geochronologic, geochemical, and isotopic data for Mesozoic to Cenozoic igneous rocks and detrital minerals from the Pamir Mountains help to distinguish major regional magmatic episodes and constrain the tectonic evolution of the Pamir orogenic system. After final accretion of the Central and South Pamir terranes during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, the Pamir was largely amagmatic until the emplacement of the intermediate (SiO2 > 60 wt.%), calc-alkaline, and isotopically evolved (-13 to -5 zircon εHf(t)) South Pamir batholith between 120-100 Ma, which is the most volumetrically significant magmatic complex in the Pamir and includes a high flux magmatic event at ∼105 Ma. The South Pamir batholith is interpreted as the northern (inboard) equivalent of the Cretaceous Karakoram batholith and the along-strike equivalent of an Early Cretaceous magmatic belt in the northern Lhasa terrane in Tibet. The northern Lhasa terrane is characterized by a similar high-flux event at ∼110 Ma. Migration of continental arc magmatism into the South Pamir terrane during the mid-Cretaceous is interpreted to reflect northward directed, low-angle to flat-slab subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. Late Cretaceous magmatism (80-70 Ma) in the Pamir is scarce, but concentrated in the Central and northern South Pamir terranes where it is comparatively more mafic (SiO2 assimilation or mixing with the Central/South Pamir terrane lower crust. The Vanj complex is speculatively interpreted to be the consequence of a mantle drip or small delamination event that was induced by India-Asia collision. The age, geochemistry, outcrop pattern, and tectonic position of the Vanj magmatic complex suggest that it is part of a series of magmatic complexes that extend for >2500 km across the Pamir and northern Qiangtang terrane in Tibet. All of these complexes are located directly south of the Tanymas-Jinsha suture zone, an important lithospheric and rheological boundary that focused

  9. The Impact of Drainage Reorganization on Cenozoic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanites, B. J.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Landscape evolution and the resulting sedimentary deposits are controlled by the development and organization of drainage basins. As a landscape evolves within a climatic and tectonic environment, drainage reorganization events can occur, where one river basin grows at the expense of another. The added discharge downstream of a river capture location will generate a transient topographic response. The records of these events are preserved the sedimentary record and modern topography. Drainage reorganization has been proposed to occur in a number of major drainage systems around the world including the Colorado, Rhine, Snake, Yellow, Yangtze, Indus, and Zambezi rivers as well as a number of smaller rivers. Yet little work has focused on quantifying the topographic and erosional consequence of such events. Here we propose a simple model that quantifies the impacts of drainage capture on the evolution of a drainage basin. The model is based on the inverse slope-contributing drainage area relationship observed in rivers throughout the world and describes the expected river elevation change as drainage area is added (and therefore slopes lowered) by a capture event. Furthermore, we develop a numerical model of drainage capture that quantifies the transience of erosion and sediment production based on a shear stress dependent fluvial incision and sediment transport model. Our focus here is on quantifying the impact of capture of the Rhine/Aare river system (~45,000 km2) during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene. Our models suggest 500-800 m of river elevation change (lowering profiles) occurred over short time periods (less than a million years), contributing as much as 0.4 mm/yr of erosion to the Alpine foreland and Swiss Alps when averaged over the last few million years. The predicted incision magnitudes are consistent with incision measured from the elevation of Pliocene and early Pleistocene river gravels, suggesting that the majority of incision across northern

  10. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  11. Rainfall Erosivity in Southeastern Nigeria | Ezemonye | Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calabar Owerri and Port-Harcourt recorded the highest erosive storms/ more months of very high erosivity index. The deterministic relationship between kinetic energy of rains and erosivity pattern observed for the different stations showed that erosive rains contribute significantly to detachment of soil materials in the study ...

  12. The Jameson Land basin (east Greenland): a fission track study of the tectonic and thermal evolution in the Cenozoic North Atlantic spreading regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirsten; Bergman, Steven C.; Henk, Bo

    2001-02-01

    The Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermal history of the Jameson Land basin is constrained by new apatite and zircon fission track (FT) data of surface Permian to Jurassic sedimentary rocks. The results show a general regional thermal evolution related to burial to temperatures close to and in excess of the maximum temperatures of the apatite annealing interval (∼125°C) followed by cooling mainly due to Cenozoic uplift and erosion. Faulting and differential movements in the basin generally occurred after cooling below the apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ: ∼75-125°C). However, in the northern part of the basin the data suggest a thicker sediment cover or localized heating related to an earlier fracture zone. Both apatite FT analysis and vitrinite reflectance values reveal a postmature signature for the studied rocks in the northeastern Jameson Land and premature to mature for the western, central and southern Jameson Land rocks with respect to generation of hydrocarbons. The chemical variations of apatite enhance the possibility of recognizing sample positions near maximum temperatures in the PAZ. Furthermore, the Pb-Zn mineralization pattern closely follows the Tertiary maturity trend given by the FT data. The type and distribution of mineralization suggest that it was influenced by the regional thermal evolution of the basin. In the northeast domain, circulating fluids may have overprinted the regional thermal record before ca. 20 Ma. Basaltic dyke and sill intrusions (55-45 Ma) locally caused resetting of apatite FT ages, but generally the direct influence from upper crustal magmatic activity played only a minor role. The thermal evolution in northeast Jameson Land is related to the late tectonic evolution of the Northeast Atlantic involving a change in ridge position at ca. 25 Ma which followed the passage of the proto-Icelandic mantle plume at 63-40 Ma.

  13. Impact of glaciations on the long-term erosion in Southern Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Labric, Thibaud; Herman, Frederic; Baumgartner, Lukas; Shuster, David L.; Braun, Jean; Reiners, Pete W.; Valla, Pierre G.; Leuthold, Julien

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes are an ideal setting to study the impact of Late-Cenozoic climate cooling and onset of glaciations impact on the erosional history of mountain belts. The lack of tectonic activity during the last ~12 Myr makes the denudation history mainly controlled by surface processes, not by tectonics. Moreover, the glaciations history of Patagonia shows the best-preserved records within the southern hemisphere (with the exception of Antarctica). Indeed, the dry climate on the leeward side of Patagonia and the presence of lava flows interbedded with glacial deposits has allowed an exceptional preservation of late Cenozoic moraines with precise dating using K-Ar analyses on lava flow. The chronology of moraines reveals a long history covering all the Quaternary, Pliocene, and up to the Upper Miocene. The early growth of large glaciers flowing on eastern foothills started at ~7-6 Myr, while the maximum ice-sheet extent dates from approximately 1.1 Myr. In order to quantify the erosion history of the Southern Patagonian Andes and compare it to the glaciations sediment record, we collected samples along an age-elevation profile for low-temperature thermochronology in the eastern side of the mountain belt (Torres del Paine massif). The (U-Th)/He age-elevation relationship shows a clear convex shape providing an apparent long-term exhumation rate of ~0.2 km/Myr followed by an exhumation rate increase at ~6 Myr. Preliminary results of 4He/3He thermochronometry for a subset of samples complete the erosion history for the Plio-Pleistocene epoch. We used inverse procedure predicting 4He distributions within an apatite grain using a radiation-damage and annealing model to quantify He-diffusion kinetics in apatite. The model also allows quantifying the impact of potential U-Th zonation throughout each apatite crystal. Inversion results reveal a denudation history composed by a pulse of denudation at ~6 Ma, as suggested by the age-elevation relationship

  14. Stratigraphy and Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic history of northern Sierra Los Ajos and adjacent areas, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Gray, Floyd; Iriondo, Alexander; Miggins, Daniel; Blodgett, Robert B.; Maldonado, Florian; Miller, Robert J.

    2010-04-01

    Geologic mapping in the northern Sierra Los Ajos reveals new stratigraphic and structural data relevant to deciphering the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the range. The northern Sierra Los Ajos is cored by Proterozoic, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian strata, equivalent respectively to the Pinal Schist, Bolsa Quartzite and Abrigo Limestone, Martin Formation, Escabrosa Limestone, and Horquilla Limestone. The Proterozoic-Paleozoic sequence is mantled by Upper Cretaceous rocks partly equivalent to the Fort Crittenden and Salero Formations in Arizona, and the Cabullona Group in Sonora, Mexico. Absence of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Bisbee Group below the Upper Cretaceous rocks and above the Proterozoic-Paleozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos was part of the Cananea high, a topographic highland during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Deposition of Upper Cretaceous rocks directly on Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos area had subsided as part of the Laramide Cabullona basin during Late Cretaceous time. Basal beds of the Upper Cretaceous sequence are clast-supported conglomerate composed locally of basement (Paleozoic) clasts. The conglomerate represents erosion of Paleozoic basement in the Sierra Los Ajos area coincident with development of the Cabullona basin. The present-day Sierra Los Ajos reaches elevations of greater than 2600 m, and was uplifted during Tertiary basin-and-range extension. Upper Cretaceous rocks are exposed at higher elevations in the northern Sierra Los Ajos and represent an uplifted part of the inverted Cabullona basin. Tertiary uplift of the Sierra Los Ajos was largely accommodated by vertical movement along the north-to-northwest-striking Sierra Los Ajos fault zone flanking the west side of the range. This fault zone structurally controls the configuration of the headwaters of the San Pedro River basin, an important bi-national water resource in the US

  15. Stratigraphy and Mesozoic–Cenozoic tectonic history of northern Sierra Los Ajos and adjacent areas, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Gray, Floyd; Iriondo, Alexander; Miggins, Daniel P.; Blodgett, Robert B.; Maldonado, Florian; Miller, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the northern Sierra Los Ajos reveals new stratigraphic and structural data relevant to deciphering the Mesozoic–Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the range. The northern Sierra Los Ajos is cored by Proterozoic, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian strata, equivalent respectively to the Pinal Schist, Bolsa Quartzite and Abrigo Limestone, Martin Formation, Escabrosa Limestone, and Horquilla Limestone. The Proterozoic–Paleozoic sequence is mantled by Upper Cretaceous rocks partly equivalent to the Fort Crittenden and Salero Formations in Arizona, and the Cabullona Group in Sonora, Mexico.Absence of the Upper Jurassic–Lower Cretaceous Bisbee Group below the Upper Cretaceous rocks and above the Proterozoic–Paleozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos was part of the Cananea high, a topographic highland during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Deposition of Upper Cretaceous rocks directly on Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos area had subsided as part of the Laramide Cabullona basin during Late Cretaceous time. Basal beds of the Upper Cretaceous sequence are clast-supported conglomerate composed locally of basement (Paleozoic) clasts. The conglomerate represents erosion of Paleozoic basement in the Sierra Los Ajos area coincident with development of the Cabullona basin.The present-day Sierra Los Ajos reaches elevations of greater than 2600 m, and was uplifted during Tertiary basin-and-range extension. Upper Cretaceous rocks are exposed at higher elevations in the northern Sierra Los Ajos and represent an uplifted part of the inverted Cabullona basin. Tertiary uplift of the Sierra Los Ajos was largely accommodated by vertical movement along the north-to-northwest-striking Sierra Los Ajos fault zone flanking the west side of the range. This fault zone structurally controls the configuration of the headwaters of the San Pedro River basin, an important bi-national water resource in the US

  16. FORECAST THE SOIL EROSION THROUGH THE CARTOGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Mădălina - Cristina Marian

    2014-01-01

    Soil erosion in Arges County affects a high percentage of agricultural land. Most agricultural lands are located on slopes undergoing erosion, excess humidity temporarily or permanently, landslides. The importance lies in the need to know theme addressed erosion, the erosive potential of the land, the causes and factors that led to the onset of erosion and its deployment at a accelerated rate and now, because the based on this knowledge to determine the effective measures to prevent and c...

  17. Tolerable soil erosion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Frank; Jones, Bob; Rickson, Jane; Smith, Celina

    2010-05-01

    Soil loss by erosion has been identified as an important threat to soils in Europe* and is recognised as a contributing process to soil degradation and associated deterioration, or loss, of soil functioning. From a policy perspective, it is imperative to establish well-defined baseline values to evaluate soil erosion monitoring data against. For this purpose, accurate baseline values - i.e. tolerable soil loss - need to be differentiated at appropriate scales for monitoring and, ideally, should take soil functions and even changing environmental conditions into account. The concept of tolerable soil erosion has been interpreted in the scientific literature in two ways: i) maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of soil quantity, and ii) maintaining biomass production, at a location. The first interpretation ignores soil quality by focusing only on soil quantity. The second approach ignores many soil functions by focusing only on the biomass (particularly crop) production function of soil. Considering recognised soil functions, tolerable soil erosion may be defined as 'any mean annual cumulative (all erosion types combined) soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur'. Assumptions and problems of this definition will be discussed. Soil functions can generally be judged not to deteriorate as long as soil erosion does not exceed soil formation. At present, this assumption remains largely untested, but applying the precautionary principle appears to be a reasonable starting point. Considering soil formation rates by both weathering and dust deposition, it is estimated that for the majority of soil forming factors in most European situations, soil formation rates probably range from ca. 0.3 - 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1. Although the current agreement on these values seems relatively strong, how the variation within the range is spatially distributed across Europe and how this may be affected by climate, land use and land management

  18. From the Palaeontological Collection of the Universalmuseum Joanneum - The Cenozoic Decapod Crustaceans (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Decapoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, Matúš; Gross, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cenozoic decapod crustaceans housed in the collections of the Universalmuseum Joanneum (Graz, Austria) are reviewed. Previous descriptions, geographic and stratigraphic provenance and collection history are discussed. Altogether 72 specimens are figured, including five holotypes. Taxonomic affinity of previously unpublished material is addressed. Gebiacantha sp. from the middle Miocene of Wetzelsdorf is the first fossil record of the genus from the Paratethys.

  19. Mount Kenya volcanic activity and the Late Cenozoic landscape reorganisation in the upper Tana fluvial system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, A.; Schoorl, J.M.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Claessens, L.F.G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic–fluvial landscape interaction of the late Cenozoic Mt Kenya region in the upper Tana catchment has been reconstructed. The oldest newly dated phonolite flow is 5.78 Ma (40Ar/39Ar), placing the initiation of Mt Kenya volcanic activity within the Late Miocene, much earlier than reported

  20. The effect of gateways on ocean circulation patterns in the Cenozoic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Heydt, A.S.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Both geological data and climate model studies indicate that substantially different patterns of the global ocean circulation have existed throughout the Cenozoic. In a climate model study of the late Oligocene [von der Heydt, A., Dijkstra, H.A. (2006). Effect of ocean gateways on the global ocean

  1. Quantifying the Cenozoic marine diatom deposition history: links to the C and Si cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudie, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms are, today, among the world's main primary producers as well as the main organic carbon exporter to the deep sea despite the fact that they were a very minor component of the plankton at the beginning of the Cenozoic. They are also the main silica exporter to the deep sea, thus balancing global chemical weathering. This study reviews their global Cenozoic depositional pattern in order to understand the modality and the context of their rise to dominance, but also to understand how diatom evolution affected the Cenozoic functioning of the ocean's biological pump. After two short-lived major abundance peaks near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and in the late Oligocene, diatom abundance in sediments shifted in the middle Miocene to globally higher values which have largely persisted to the modern day. These quantitative findings provide support for the hypothesis according to which diatoms, through their ecological role in the ocean's biological carbon pump, have contributed to the Cenozoic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide pressure and consequently to changes in the global climate state. Additionally, correlations between diatom abundance peaks and shifts in seawater strontium and osmium isotopic composition hint at a strong control of the silicate weathering on diatom deposition.

  2. Cretaceous and Cenozoic vegetation of Antarctica integrating the fossil wood record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Cantrill, David J.

    2006-01-01

    A compilation of data for Cretaceous and Cenozoic Antarctic fossil wood floras, predominantly from the James Ross Island Basin, provides a different perspective on floristic and vegetation change when compared with previous studies that have focused on leaf macrofossils or palynology. The wood

  3. The Amazonian Craton and its influence on past fluvial systems (Mesozoic-Cenozoic, Amazonia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, C.; Roddaz, M.; Dino, R.; Soares, E.; Uba, C.; Ochoa-Lozano, D.; Mapes, R.; Hoorn, C.; Wesselingh, F.P.

    2010-01-01

    The Amazonian Craton is an old geological feature of Archaean/Proterozoic age that has determined the character of fluvial systems in Amazonia throughout most of its past. This situation radically changed during the Cenozoic, when uplift of the Andes reshaped the relief and drainage patterns of

  4. Correcting the Cenozoic δ18O deep-sea temperature record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    The oxygen isotope signal in benthic foraminifera from deep-sea cores is mainly determined by deep-ocean temperature and land ice volume. Separating the temperature and ice volume signals is a key step in understanding the evolution of Cenozoic climate. Except for the last few million years,

  5. Cenozoic vegetation, climate changes and hominid evolution in tropical Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefille, Raymonde

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews information on past vegetation of tropical Africa during the Cenozoic, focused upon the last 10 Ma, a time spanning hominid record in Central and East Africa. Summary of palaeobotanical data collected at terrestrial sites are compared with new results on the long term evolution of the continental vegetation zones documented from marine pollen record of two deep sea cores recovered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Section 2 includes a summary of modern distribution of vegetation belts in the African continent and a synthesis of the results of both macrobotanical (fossil wood, leaves and fruits) and microbotanical (mainly pollen) studies presented according to time scale and geographical location. The main features emphasized by the palaeobotanical results are 1) seasonal vegetation and climate documented as soon as the Eocene in Tanzania 2) well diversified forests existing in northern West Ethiopia during the Oligocene 3) high temporal and spatial variabilities of forests composition during the Miocene when deciduous Legume woodland was documented in Ethiopia whereas wetter evergreen forests existed in Western Kenya 4) lack of evidence for an evergreen forest belt, continuous from Western Congo to East Africa. Section 3 presents new original pollen data recovered from a long core in the Gulf of Aden documenting large scale past vegetation changes in East Africa during the last 11 Ma. These results are discussed in comparison with a summarized long pollen sequence previously published from a marine core offshore the Niger delta. This comparison illustrates variations in geographical distribution of large vegetation zone at the continental scale, through time. In Section 4, vegetation changes registered during the last 10 Ma are discussed in relation with the results of isotopic studies and an updated presentation of hominids evolution in Africa. Several changes are shown in the marine records. An expansion of savanna/grassland is shown at 10

  6. Cenozoic to active deformation in Western Yunnan (Myanmar China border)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socquet, A.; Pubellier, M.

    2003-04-01

    The northward movement of India induces a right-lateral shear band from the Sunda trench to the easternmost Himalaya, where wrenching between India and Sunda plates, interfere with a clockwise flow of material around the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. We describe brittle and ductile deformation styles in Western Yunnan and Northern Myanmar, using field data and Landsat 7 imagery for Cenozoic structures as well as GPS and seismicity for active structures to unravel the Neogene to Present evolution. Western Yunnan is crossed by three continental-size ductile shear zones characterized by high mountain belts mainly composed of high-grade metamorphics and mylonitic rocks, and affected by active faulting. The easternmost metamorphic range, the Gaoligong Shan composed of verticalized foliated granites and mylonites is flattened westward and joins the Mogok metamorphic belt in Myanmar. East of the Gaoligong Shan, lie the Chong Shan and the Ailao / Diangcan Shan metamorphic ranges, which presents a vertical shistosity and a left-lateral motion. These three shear zones are separated by sedimentary fold-and-thrust-belts in the East, and , West of the Gaoligong, by Quaternary basins and volcanics. Preliminary results indicate that the Shan Scarp constituted the major strike-slip boundary between Indochina and India during Eocene to Miocene time, and accommodated deformation in right-lateral wrench. At the same time, the Ailao / Diangcan Shan and the Chong Shan zones were sheared left-laterally allowing the displacement toward the SE of Indochina block relative to south China. In the Miocene, ductile deformation migrated north along the Shan Scarp to the Mogok / Ruili metamorphic belt and the Gaoligong belt, dragging the Chong Shan right-laterally and superimposing a late right-lateral ductile deformation on its metamorphic rocks. The present-day relative motion between India and Sundaland, inferred from GPS processing, reaches 35 mm / yr in the Myanmar area. It is classically

  7. Profound sedation with propofol modifies atrial fibrillation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    During atrial fibrillation (AF), multiple wandering propagation wavelets at high rates drift around both atria under controversial hierarchical models. Antiarrhythmic drugs modify the cardiac ionic currents supporting the fibrillation process within the atria, and can alter AF propagation dynamics and even terminate the arrhythmia. However, some other drugs, theoretically nonantiarrhythmic, may slightly block particular cardiac ionic currents through uncertain mechanisms in such a subtle way at regular heart rates that may have been pharmacologically overlooked. These potential effects might be better exposed at much higher activation rates as in AF, where atrial cells depolarize over 400 times per second. In this review, we aimed to compile and discuss results from several studies evaluating the net effect of profound sedation with propofol on atrial cells and atrioventricular (AV) conduction. Propofol is a very commonly used anesthetic agent, and its possible effect on AF dynamics has systematically not been taken into account in the myriad of clinical studies dealing with AF intracardiac recordings. The possible effect of sedation with propofol on AF was evaluated through the analysis of AF propagation patterns before and after its infusion in a series of patients submitted to pulmonary vein ablation. Effect on AV conduction will be discussed as well. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Multisensory speech perception of young children with profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon-Rabin, L; Haras, N; Bergman, M

    1997-10-01

    The contribution of a two-channel vibrotactile aid (Trill VTA 2/3, AVR Communications LTD) to the audiovisual perception of speech was evaluated in four young children with profound hearing loss using words and speech pattern contrasts. An intensive, hierarchical, and systematic training program was provided. The results show that the addition of the tactile (T) modality to the auditory and visual (A+V) modalities enhanced speech perception performance significantly on all tests. Specifically, at the end of the training sessions, the tactile supplementation increased word recognition scores in a 44-word, closed-set task by 12 percentage points; detection of consonant in final position by 50 percentage points; detection of sibilant in final position by 30 percentage points; and detection of voicing in final position by 25 percentage points. Significant learning over time was evident for all test materials, in all modalities. As expected, fastest learning (i.e., smallest time constants) was found for the AVT condition. The results of this study provide further evidence that sensory information provided by the tactile modality can enhance speech perception in young children.

  9. EFFECT OF JUMPS IN PROFOUNDNESS ON THE FOOTBALLER REFLECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Đošić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The treatment endured one month. For this time 8 trainings and totally 322 jums in profoundness were done with differant altitudes from 42 cm to 105 cm. The complete time of work with time-out between sequences was about 120 minutes. The time-out between the sequences was from 2 ' til 6'. The pause between the training was from 2 to 5 days. The puls after 30 '' from the finishing of the jums in th sequence was from 100 to 140 pulsation in the minute measured by palpation. On the finaly measurement is constated that the two leg jump from place in height was better for 7 cm , and the one leg jump with three footsteps spring was better for 2 cm. This such result indicate on the assumption that the progress must bi greater if the program would be longer , for example two, three months and if this program should be done by footbalers which are active and in the best player years i.e. between 18 -30 year. The author was by this time 40 years old.

  10. Cancer Prevention Knowledge of People with Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Helen E.; Reed, Barbara D.; Sen, Ananda; Gorenflo, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deaf persons, a documented minority population, have low reading levels and difficulty communicating with physicians. The effect of these on their knowledge of cancer prevention recommendations is unknown. METHODS A cross-sectional study of 222 d/Deaf persons in Michigan, age 18 and older, chose one of four ways (voice, video of a certified American Sign Language interpreter, captions, or printed English) to complete a self-administered computer video questionnaire about demographics, hearing loss, language history, health-care utilization, and health-care information sources, as well as family and social variables. Twelve questions tested their knowledge of cancer prevention recommendations. The outcome measures were the percentage of correct answers to the questions and the association of multiple variables with these responses. RESULTS Participants averaged 22.9% correct answers with no gender difference. Univariate analysis revealed that smoking history, types of medical problems, last physician visit, and women having previous cancer preventive tests did not affect scores. Improved scores occurred with computer use (p = 0.05), higher education (p English in multiple situations (p English use (p = 0.01) and believing that smoking was bad (p = 0.05) were associated with improved scores. CONCLUSION Persons with profound hearing loss have poor knowledge of recommended cancer prevention interventions. English use in multiple settings was strongly associated with increased knowledge. PMID:19132325

  11. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  12. The costs of soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santos Telles

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was a survey of the estimated costs of soil erosion, an issue of fundamental importance in view of the current worldwide discussions on sustainability. A list was drawn up of research papers on erosion (on-site and off-site effects and their respective costs. The estimates indicate the amount of resources spent in the process of soil degradation, raising a general awareness of the need for soil conservation. On-site costs affect the production units directly, while off-site costs create a burden borne by the environment, economy and society. In addition, estimating the costs of soil erosion should be effective to alert the agricultural producers, society and government for the need for measures that can be implemented to bring erosion under control. Among the various estimates of soil erosion costs between 1933 a 2010, the highest figure was 45.5 billion dollars a year for the European Union. In the United States, the highest figure was 44 billion dollars a year. In Brazil, estimates for the state of Paraná indicate a value of 242 million dollars a year, and for the state of São Paulo, 212 million dollars a year. These figures show, above all, that conservation measures must be implemented if crop and livestock farming production are to be sustainable.

  13. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  14. Mesozoic and Cenozoic vertical movements in the Atlas system (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia): An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lamotte, Dominique Frizon; Leturmy, Pascale; Missenard, Yves; Khomsi, Sami; Ruiz, Geoffrey; Saddiqi, Omar; Guillocheau, Francois; Michard, André

    2009-09-01

    The E-W trending Atlas System of Maghreb consists of weakly shortened, intra-continental fold belts associated with plateau areas ("Mesetas"), extending between the south-westernmost branch of the Mediterranean Alpine Belt (Rif-Tell) and the Sahara Platform. Although the Atlas system has been erected contemporaneously from Morocco to Algeria and Tunisia during the Middle Eocene to Recent, it displays a conspicuous longitudinal asymmetry, with i) Paleozoic outcrops restricted to its western part; ii) highest elevation occurring in the west, both in the Atlas System and its foreland (Anti-Atlas); iii) low elevation corridors (e.g. Hodna) and depressed foreland (Tunisian Chotts and Sahel area) in the east. We analyse the origin of these striking contrasts in relation with i) the Variscan heritage; ii) crustal vertical movements during the Mesozoic; iii) crustal shortening during the Cenozoic and finally, iv) the occurrence of a Miocene-Quaternary hot mantle anomaly in the west. The Maghreb lithosphere was affected by the Variscan orogeny, and thus thickened only in its western part. During the Late Permian-Triassic, a paleo-high formed in the west between the Central Atlantic and Alpine Tethys rift systems, giving birth to the emergent/poorly subsident West Moroccan Arch. During the late Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, Morocco and western Algeria were dominantly emergent whereas rifting lasted on in eastern Algeria and Tunisia. We ascribe the uplift of the western regions to thermal doming, consistent with the Late Jurassic and Barremian gabbroic magmatism observed there. After the widespread transgression of the high stand Cenomanian-Turonian seas, the inversion of the Atlas System began during the Senonian as a consequence of the Africa-Eurasia convergence. Erosion affected three ENE-trending uplifted areas of NW Africa, which we consider as lithospheric anticlines related to the incipient Africa-Europe convergence. In contrast, in eastern Algeria and Tunisia a NW

  15. Soil erosion in Slovene Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Mikoš

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From the end of nineties of the 20th century, intense hydrologic and geomorphologic research is taking place in the Slovene Istria. As a part of this research also studies on soil erosion were undertaken in the period from 2005 to 2008. The field measurements were under taken onclosed 1m2 large erosion plots under three different land uses (on bare soils in an olive grove, on an overgrown meadow, in a forest, placed south of the Marezige village in the Rokava River basin.We show weekly measurements of surface erosion (interrill erosion for the period of 13 months (the end of March 2005 – the end of April 2006, as well as monthly and seasonal averages together with selected linear statistical correlations between soil erosion and weather parameters.From May 2005 to April 2006 the interrill erosion on bare soils in an olive grove with an inclination of 5.5° amounted to 9013 g/m2 (90 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 8.5 mm/yr; on an overgrown meadow with an inclination of 9.4° it amounted to 168 g/m2 (1,68 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.16 mm//yr; and in a forest with an inclination of 7.8° it amounted to 391 g/m2 (3,91 t/ha and in a forest with an inclination of 21.4° it amounted to 415 g/m2 (4,15 t/ha, respectively, that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.4 mm/yr.

  16. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks from Malta Escarpment (central Mediterranean)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scandone, P. (Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Pisa, Italy); Patacca, E.; Radoicic, R.; Ryan, W.B.F.; Cita, M.B.; Rawson, M.; Chezar, H.; Miller, E.; McKenzie, J.; Rossi, S.

    1981-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks of Triassic-Neogene age are present on the Malta Escarpment of the eastern Mediterranean. Upper Triassic dolomitic limestones of shallow-water origin, at depths between 2.5 and 3.5 km, are similar in lithofacies to coeval platform carbonates of the Siracusa (Syracuse) belt of southern Sicily. Jurassic rocks include lower-middle Liassic shallow-water limestones followed by condensed hemipelagic lime deposits indicative of sinking and starving of the former platform. Cretaceous materials are represented by both red marls rich in planktonic faunas and reworkd volcaniclastic breccias including shallow-water skeletal material. Paleogene rocks are both shallow-water limestones with corals, algae, and bivalves, and redeposited calcarenites of lithofacies similar to those from surface and subsurface of the Ragusa zone. Oligocene-lower Miocene rocks from the escarpment are also similar in lithology to the coeval Ragusa deposits. Tortonian is represented by hemipelagic marls indicating open-marine environment. Pervasive dolomitization on lime crusts and on initial-stage fissure fillings with strongly positive isotopic oxygen ratio is thought to be a product of Messinian evaporitic drawdown. Pliocene sediments belong to the Trubi facies and consist of pelagic foraminiferal chalk. An impressive vertical relief existed by Miocene times, as attested by Messinian crusts and veins on or in rocks as old as Late Triassic. Our data do not provide evidence that this morphologic feature necessarily coincides with a continent-ocean transition. The present escarpment was produced by faulting, erosion, and defacement. 14 figures, 1 table.

  17. Cochlear implantation in autistic children with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Pastuszka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Mikołajewska, Lidia; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-19

    Cochlear implants have become the method of choice for the treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss in both children and adults. Its benefits are well documented in the pediatric and adult population. Also deaf children with additional needs, including autism, have been covered by this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits from cochlear implantation in deafened children with autism as the only additional disability. This study analyzes data of six children. The follow-up time was at least 43 months. The following data were analyzed: medical history, reaction to music and sound, Ling's six sounds test, onomatopoeic word test, reaction to spoken child's name, response to requests, questionnaire given to parents, sound processor fitting sessions and data. After cochlear implantation each child presented other communication skills. In some children, the symptoms of speech understanding were observed. No increased hyperactivity associated with daily use cochlear implant was observed. The study showed that in autistic children the perception is very important for a child's sense of security and makes contact with parents easier. Our study showed that oral communication is not likely to be a realistic goal in children with cochlear implants and autism. The implantation results showed benefits that varied among those children. The traditional methods of evaluating the results of cochlear implantation in children with autism are usually insufficient to fully assess the functional benefits. These benefits should be assessed in a more comprehensive manner taking into account the limitations of communication resulting from the essence of autism. It is important that we share knowledge about these complex children with cochlear implants. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic Surgery Profoundly Influences Gut Microbial-Host Metabolic Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia V.; Ashrafian, Hutan; Bueter, Marco; Kinross, James; Sands, Caroline; le Roux, Carel W; Bloom, Stephen R.; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Marchesi, Julian R.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Holmes, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Bariatric surgery is increasingly performed worldwide to treat morbid obesity and is also known as metabolic surgery to reflect its beneficial metabolic effects especially with respect to improvement in type 2 diabetes. Understanding surgical weight loss mechanisms and metabolic modulation is required to enhance patient benefits and operative outcomes. Methods We apply a parallel and statistically integrated metagenomic and metabonomic approach to characterize Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) effects in a rat model. Results We show substantial shifts of the main gut phyla towards higher levels of Proteobacteria (52-fold) specifically Enterobacter hormaechei. We also find low levels of Firmicutes (4.5-fold) and Bacteroidetes (2-fold) in comparison to sham-operated rats. Faecal extraction studies reveal a decrease in faecal bile acids and a shift from protein degradation to putrefaction through decreased faecal tyrosine with concomitant increases in faecal putrescine and diamnoethane. We find decreased urinary amines and cresols and demonstrate indices of modulated energy metabolism post-RYGB including decreased urinary succinate, 2-oxoglutarate, citrate and fumarate. These changes could also indicate renal tubular acidosis, which associates with increased flux of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. A surgically-induced effect on the gut-brain-liver metabolic axis is inferred by increased neurotropic compounds; faecal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. Conclusion This profound co-dependence of mammalian and microbial metabolism, which is systematically altered following RYGB surgery, suggests that RYGB exerts local and global metabolic activities. The effect of RYGB surgery on the host metabolic-microbial crosstalk augments our understanding of the metabolic phenotype of bariatric procedures and can facilitate enhanced treatments for obesity-related diseases. PMID:21572120

  19. Rainfall erosivity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, Andreas; Haas, Kathrin; Dvorackova, Anna; Fuller, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall and its kinetic energy expressed by the rainfall erosivity is the main driver of soil erosion processes by water. The Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Factor (R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation is one oft he most widely used parameters describing rainfall erosivity. This factor includes the cumulative effects of the many moderate-sized storms as well as the effects oft he occasional severe ones: R quantifies the effect of raindrop impact and reflects the amopunt and rate of runoff associated with the rain. New Zealand is geologically young and not comparable with any other country in the world. Inordinately high rainfall and strong prevailing winds are New Zealand's dominant climatic features. Annual rainfall up to 15000 mm, steep slopes, small catchments and earthquakes are the perfect basis for a high rate of natural and accelerated erosion. Due to the multifacted landscape of New Zealand its location as island between the Pacific and the Tasmanian Sea there is a high gradient in precipitation between North and South Island as well as between West and East Coast. The objective of this study was to determine the R-factor for the different climatic regions in New Zealand, in order to create a rainfall erosivity map. We used rainfall data (breakpoint data in 10-min intervals) from 34 gauging stations for the calcuation of the rainfall erosivity. 15 stations were located on the North Island and 19 stations on the South Island. From these stations, a total of 397 station years with 12710 rainstorms were analyzed. The kinetic energy for each rainfall event was calculated based on the equation by Brown and Foster (1987), using the breakpoint precipitation data for each storm. On average, a mean annual precipitation of 1357 mm was obtained from the 15 observed stations on the North Island. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is relatively even with 22-24% of annual rainfall occurring in spring , fall and winter and 31% in summer. On the South Island

  20. [Speech perception test in Italian language for profoundly deaf children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, E; Orzan, E; Turrini, M; Babighian, G; Arslan, E

    1995-10-01

    Speech perception tests are an important part of procedures for diagnosing pre-verbal hearing loss. Merely establishing a child's hearing threshold with and without a hearing aid is not sufficient to ensure an adequate evaluation with a view to selecting cases suitable for cochlear implants because it fails to indicate the real benefit obtained from using a conventional hearing aid reliably. Speech perception tests have proved useful not only for patient selection, but also for subsequent evaluation of the efficacy of new hearing aids, such as tactile devices and cochlear implants. In clinical practice, the tests most commonly adopted with small children are: The Auditory Comprehension Test (ACT), Discrimination after Training (DAT), Monosyllable, Trochee, Spondee tests (MTS), Glendonald Auditory Screening Priocedure (GASP), Early Speech Perception Test (ESP), Rather than considering specific results achieved in individual cases, reference is generally made to the four speech perception classes proposed by Moog and Geers of the CID of St. Louis. The purpose of this classification, made on the results obtained with suitably differentiated tests according to the child's age and language ability, is to detect differences in perception of a spoken message in ideal listening conditions. To date, no italian language speech perception test has been designed to establish the assessment of speech perception level in children with profound hearing impairment. We attempted, therefore, to adapt the existing English tests to the Italian language taking into consideration the differences between the two languages. Our attention focused on the ESP test since it can be applied to even very small children (2 years old). The ESP is proposed in a standard version for hearing-impaired children over the age of 6 years and in a simplified version for younger children. The rationale we used for selecting Italian words reflect the rationale established for the original version, but the

  1. Nanotechnological Inventions and Nanomaterials Produce A Profound Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLASOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The inventions in the area of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials produce a profound effect in construction, housing and communal services and adjacent economic fields as they allow us: to increase mechanical strength, coefficient of elasticity, alkali resistance and temperature of products vitrification; to obtain nanostructured coatings with the property of shape memory on the steel; to raise the dynamics of coal burning and its full burnout in the boilers of thermoelectric power station; to produce metal nanopowders with increased stored energy 10–15% etc. For example, the invention «Epoxy composition for high strength, alkali resistant structures» refers to epoxy composition used as a binder for production of high strength, thermal- and alkali-resistant glass-fiber material which can be applied in the manufacture process of construction reinforcement to strengthen concrete structures. The invention «The method to produce nanostructured reaction foil» can be used to join different materials including metal alloys, ceramics, amorphous materials and elements of microelectronic devices that are sensible to the heating. This process provides decreased labour-output ratio and energy consumption as well as the condition to manufacture foil with specified stored energy and high mechanical properties. The invention «The method of intensification of burning lowreactionary coal in the boilers of thermoelectric power station» refers to the thermal energy and can be implemented at the thermal plants. The increased dynamics of inflaming and burning leads to full burnout of powdered-coal low-reactionary fuel and decreased mechanical underfiring. The specialists may be also interested in the following inventions: fine dispersed organic suspension of carbon metal-containing nanostructures and the method to produce it; the dispersion of carbon nanotubes; the composition for reinforcement of building structures; the reinforced plate element made of

  2. Did high Neo-Tethys subduction rates contribute to early Cenozoic warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoareau, G.; Bomou, B.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Carry, N.; Marquer, D.; Donnadieu, Y.; Le Hir, G.; Vrielynck, B.; Walter-Simonnet, A.-V.

    2015-12-01

    The 58-51 Ma interval was characterized by a long-term increase of global temperatures (+4 to +6 °C) up to the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, 52.9-50.7 Ma), the warmest interval of the Cenozoic. It was recently suggested that sustained high atmospheric pCO2, controlling warm early Cenozoic climate, may have been released during Neo-Tethys closure through the subduction of large amounts of pelagic carbonates and their recycling as CO2 at arc volcanoes. To analyze the impact of Neo-Tethys closure on early Cenozoic warming, we have modeled the volume of subducted sediments and the amount of CO2 emitted along the northern Tethys margin. The impact of calculated CO2 fluxes on global temperature during the early Cenozoic have then been tested using a climate carbon cycle model (GEOCLIM). We show that CO2 production may have reached up to 1.55 × 1018 mol Ma-1 specifically during the EECO, ~ 4 to 37 % higher that the modern global volcanic CO2 output, owing to a dramatic India-Asia plate convergence increase. The subduction of thick Greater Indian continental margin carbonate sediments at ~ 55-50 Ma may also have led to additional CO2 production of 3.35 × 1018 mol Ma-1 during the EECO, making a total of 85 % of the global volcanic CO2 outgassed. However, climate modeling demonstrates that timing of maximum CO2 release only partially fits with the EECO, and that corresponding maximum pCO2 values (750 ppm) and surface warming (+2 °C) do not reach values inferred from geochemical proxies, a result consistent with conclusions arising from modeling based on other published CO2 fluxes. These results demonstrate that CO2 derived from decarbonation of Neo-Tethyan lithosphere may have possibly contributed to, but certainly cannot account alone for early Cenozoic warming. Other commonly cited sources of excess CO2 such as enhanced igneous province volcanism also appear to be up to 1 order of magnitude below fluxes required by the model to fit with proxy data of pCO2 and

  3. Climate-sensitive feedbacks between hillslope processes and fluvial erosion in sediment-driven incision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Daniel S.; Egholm, David L.

    2016-04-01

    Surface erosion and sediment production seem to have accelerated globally as climate cooled in the Late Cenozoic, [Molnar, P. 2004, Herman et al 2013]. Glaciers emerged in many high mountain ranges during the Quaternary, and glaciation therefore represents a likely explanation for faster erosion in such places. Still, observations and measurements point to increases in erosion rates also in landscapes where erosion is driven mainly by fluvial processes [Lease and Ehlers (2013), Reusser (2004)]. Flume experiments and fieldwork have shown that rates of incision are to a large degree controlled by the sediment load of streams [e.g. Sklar and Dietrich (2001), Beer and Turowski (2015)]. This realization led to the formulation of sediment-flux dependent incision models [Sklar and Dietrich (2004)]. The sediment-flux dependence links incision in the channels to hillslope processes that supply sediment to the channels. The rates of weathering and soil transport on the hillslopes are processes that are likely to respond to changing temperatures, e.g. because of vegetation changes or the occurrence of frost. In this study, we perform computational landscape evolution experiments, where the coupling between fluvial incision and hillslope processes is accounted for by coupling a sediment-flux-dependent model for fluvial incision to a climate-dependent model for weathering and hillslope sediment transport. The computational experiments first of all demonstrate a strong positive feedback between channel and hillslope processes. In general, faster weathering leads to higher rates of channel incision, which further increases the weathering rates, mainly because of hillslope steepening. Slower weathering leads to the opposite result. The experiments also demonstrate, however, that the feedbacks vary significantly between different parts of a drainage network. For example, increasing hillslope sediment production may accelerate incision in the upper parts of the catchment, while at

  4. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  5. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natur...

  6. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  7. Late Cenozoic Bryozoa from diamictites of Cape Lamb, Vega Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamonis Susana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryozoans were found in upper Cenozoic diamictite debris that crops out at the southwestern tip of Cape Lamb, Vega Island. The diamictite is the youngest deposit on the island and richly composed of foraminifers, brachiopods and scallops. The foraminifera assemblage recovered from the Cape Lamb diamictite and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic age obtained from the pectinid Adamussium colbecki in the nearby locality of Terrapin indicates a Pleistocene age for this deposit. The main goal of this contribution is to present a bryozoan assemblage of Microporella stenoporta Hayward et Taylor, Hippothoa flagellum Manzoni, Ellisina antarctica (Kluge, Micropora notialis Hayward et Ryland and an indeterminate crisiid constituting the first record of these bryozoan taxa in Cenozoic diamictites of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  8. Linked canopy, climate, and faunal change in the Cenozoic of Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Regan E; Strömberg, Caroline A E; Madden, Richard H; Kohn, Matthew J; Carlini, Alfredo A

    2015-01-16

    Vegetation structure is a key determinant of ecosystems and ecosystem function, but paleoecological techniques to quantify it are lacking. We present a method for reconstructing leaf area index (LAI) based on light-dependent morphology of leaf epidermal cells and phytoliths derived from them. Using this proxy, we reconstruct LAI for the Cenozoic (49 million to 11 million years ago) of middle-latitude Patagonia. Our record shows that dense forests opened up by the late Eocene; open forests and shrubland habitats then fluctuated, with a brief middle-Miocene regreening period. Furthermore, endemic herbivorous mammals show accelerated tooth crown height evolution during open, yet relatively grass-free, shrubland habitat intervals. Our Patagonian LAI record provides a high-resolution, sensitive tool with which to dissect terrestrial ecosystem response to changing Southern Ocean conditions during the Cenozoic. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Constraining the CO_{2} system of the early Cenozoic Greenhouse with boron isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Matthew A.; Rae, James W. B.; Sexton, Philip F.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Foster, Gavin L.; Greene, Sarah; Greenop, Rosanna; Kirtland-Turner, Sandra; Ridgwell, Andy

    2017-04-01

    The CO2 dynamics of the early Cenozoic Greenhouse remain poorly understood: estimates of past atmospheric CO2 concentrations over this time are high but variable, and discussion remains on the driving mechanisms of long term changes in carbon cycling. This climatic state also provides the backdrop for numerous hyperthermal events, including the PETM, which may provide crucial insights to the current carbon cycle perturbation. This research aims to shed light on the state of the ocean carbonate system in the Paleocene and Early Eocene. We present new boron isotope data from benthic foraminifera, which can be used to reconstruct relative changes in ocean pH. These are coupled with modelling experiments performed with cGenie Earth system model runs to give new constraints on the carbon cycle and carbonate system of the early Cenozoic.

  10. Cenozoic exhumation history of South China: A case study from the Xuefeng Mt. Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yannan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Beihang; Zhao, Heng

    2018-01-01

    New apatite fission track (AFT) dating was applied to the Xuefeng Mt. Range and Yuanma Basin to constrain the Cenozoic exhumation process of the southeastern Yangtze Block, South China. The analyzed samples in this study have AFT ages ranging from 27.9 ± 2.5 to 61.5 ± 5.9 Ma, which are younger than the deposition or crystallization ages of the host rocks. The AFT analysis and thermal history modeling indicate that both the Xuefeng Mt. Range and the Yuanma Basin underwent significant exhumation during the early Cenozoic (ca. 60-40 Ma). These samples were rapidly exhumed to near the surface during this period. Our results suggest that an important tectonic event occurred along or near regional fault zones (e.g., the Qinhang Fault) in South China during the early Cenozoic (ca. 60-40 Ma). However, it is difficult to relate this event to the Eastern Sichuan fold belt, which is much older and is characterized by large-scale folding and thrusting. Combined with fieldwork in the Yuanma, Xupu, and Xinning basins, we refute the Cretaceous "Pan-Yangtze Basin" that was proposed to have been separated by the uplifted Xuefeng Mt. Range after the Late Cretaceous. The exhumation stage from ca. 60 Ma to 40 Ma was an important period during which plate movements across the eastern Asian and Pacific regions were reorganized. The early Cenozoic tectonothermal event in South China can be attributed to a change in the direction and speed of the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate. An Oligocene-Miocene cooling event was also recorded in the eastern Xuefeng Mt. Range, which we tentatively attribute to the activity of dextral faults in this area as a far-field effect of the collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates.

  11. Climate vs. tectonic induced variations in Cenozoic sediment supply from western Scandinavia

    OpenAIRE

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    2010-01-01

    The scope of this work is the causality of sediment flux variations from western Scandinavia during the Cenozoic. Over the decades of exploration in the North Sea and in the Norwegian shelf most of these variations were given tectonic causes. During the final period of North Atlantic break-up (Paleocene-Early Eocene) this link is quite striking, especially in the northern British Isles and in the Faeroe-Shetland Platform where sediment production pulses can be correlated with well documented ...

  12. Regional stratigraphy and subsurface geology of Cenozoic deposits, Gulf Coastal Plain, south-central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosman, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis includes all major aquifer systems in Cenozoic deposits in the Gulf Coastal Plain in the States of Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, and small areas in Alabama and Florida (western panhandle area), an area of about 290,000 square miles. The Gulf Coast geosyncline and the Mississippi embayment were the major depocenters for the Tertiary and Quaternary deposits that form the framework for the aquifer systems.

  13. N2-fixing tropical legume evolution: a contributor to enhanced weathering through the Cenozoic?

    OpenAIRE

    Epihov, Dimitar Z.; Batterman, Sarah A.; Hedin, Lars O.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Smith, Lisa M; David J Beerling

    2017-01-01

    Fossil and phylogenetic evidence indicates legume-rich modern tropical forests replaced Late Cretaceous palm-dominated tropical forests across four continents during the early Cenozoic (58?42 Ma). Tropical legume trees can transform ecosystems via their ability to fix dinitrogen (N2) and higher leaf N compared with non-legumes (35?65%), but it is unclear how their evolutionary rise contributed to silicate weathering, the long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Here we hypothesize...

  14. Landslide-channel feedbacks amplify flood response and channel erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Georgina; Kean, Jason; Rengers, Francis; Ryan, Sandra; Rathburn, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Flood stream power is amplified in mountainous catchments by channel confinement and steep slopes, generating widespread channel erosion and causing significant challenges for flood risk management. Approaches to predicting flood channel response include identification of stream power thresholds. However, in a mountainous catchment in Colorado, USA, we find that stream power, estimated from the pre-storm DEM, was not a good predictor of channel flood response and that landslide-channel feedbacks better explain the observed pattern of channel erosion. The North St Vrain is a 250 km2 catchment in the Colorado Front Range. It was among several catchments impacted by a 1000 yr prolonged rainfall event in September 2013, which generated a 200 yr flood and >100 landslides in the catchment. We estimated peak discharge and stream power using radar-based rainfall data, wherein the rainfall was converted to a discharge based on the upstream drainage area and assuming no infiltration (a reasonable assumption after 3 days of heavy rainfall). Measured high water marks in key reaches were used to calculate a field-based estimate of peak discharge. These discharge estimates were compared with spatial erosion estimates, calculated using the differenced pre- and post-flood LiDAR DEMs. We found that the onset of profound channel erosion was determined by the formation and failure of an in-channel dam. The dam, composed of debris flow and tributary sediment input, was sufficiently large (˜150,000 m3) to temporarily overwhelm channel transport capacity even during flood. Our field-based estimate of peak discharge downstream of the dam is more than 2 times greater than our rainfall-based estimate, which suggests a dam burst event occurred. Further downstream we observe additional channel reaches in which erosion was amplified by landslide and tributary sediment input, either through the formation and failure of dams or potentially through sediment bulking alone. These findings imply

  15. Distribution of Cenozoic plant relicts in China explained by drought in dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongjiang; Jacques, Frédéric M. B.; Su, Tao; Ferguson, David K.; Tang, Hui; Chen, Wenyun; Zhou, Zhekun

    2015-01-01

    Cenozoic plant relicts are those groups that were once widespread in the Northern Hemisphere but are now restricted to some small isolated areas as a result of drastic climatic changes. They are good proxies to study how plants respond to climatic changes since their modern climatic requirements are known. Herein we look at the modern distribution of 65 palaeoendemic genera in China and compare it with the Chinese climatic pattern, in order to find a link between the plant distribution and climate. Central China and Taiwan Island are shown to be diversity centres of Cenozoic relict genera, consistent with the fact that these two regions have a shorter dry season with comparatively humid autumn and spring in China. Species distribution models indicate that the precipitation parameters are the most important variables to explain the distribution of relict genera. The Cenozoic wide-scale distribution of relict plants in the Northern Hemisphere is therefore considered to be linked to the widespread humid climate at that time, and the subsequent contraction of their distributional ranges was probably caused by the drying trend along with global cooling. PMID:26369980

  16. Cenozoic imprints on the phylogenetic structure of palm species assemblages worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, W. Daniel; Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Baker, William J.; Borchsenius, Finn; Couvreur, Thomas L. P.; Balslev, Henrik; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest in the origin and maintenance of species diversity, little is known about historical drivers of species assemblage structure at large spatiotemporal scales. Here, we use global species distribution data, a dated genus-level phylogeny, and paleo-reconstructions of biomes and climate to examine Cenozoic imprints on the phylogenetic structure of regional species assemblages of palms (Arecaceae), a species-rich plant family characteristic of tropical ecosystems. We find a strong imprint on phylogenetic clustering due to geographic isolation and in situ diversification, especially in the Neotropics and on islands with spectacular palm radiations (e.g., Madagascar, Hawaii, and Cuba). Phylogenetic overdispersion on mainlands and islands corresponds to biotic interchange areas. Differences in the degree of phylogenetic clustering among biogeographic realms are related to differential losses of tropical rainforests during the Cenozoic, but not to the cumulative area of tropical rainforest over geological time. A largely random phylogenetic assemblage structure in Africa coincides with severe losses of rainforest area, especially after the Miocene. More recent events also appear to be influential: phylogenetic clustering increases with increasing intensity of Quaternary glacial-interglacial climatic oscillations in South America and, to a lesser extent, Africa, indicating that specific clades perform better in climatically unstable regions. Our results suggest that continental isolation (in combination with limited long-distance dispersal) and changing climate and habitat loss throughout the Cenozoic have had strong impacts on the phylogenetic structure of regional species assemblages in the tropics. PMID:22529387

  17. Splash erosion. A bibliometric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Ellison (1944) developed the splash board as a system for measuring splash erosion that was both cheap and reliable. Bollinne (1975), Morgan (1978, 1981). Mutchler (1967) described another different type of splash detectors according to whether they were passive or could register data. In the study mentioned above these authors included bottles, funnels, glasses, photography, markers. After that several devices has been made up like the splash sampler (Leguedois et al., 2005), soil tray (Van Dijk et al., 2002), splash funnel (Terry, 1989) and several rain cups (Fernandez-Raga et al., 2010; Molina and Llinares, 1996; Torri et al., 1987). Splash erosion research has materialized in the form of a number of papers published in international journals. The database of bibliographic references employed has been one of the most prestigious ones: theWeb of Science (ISI). The search was carried out on January 27th 2012. Among the 3x10^8 scholarly documents included in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) 1899 to present , the searching engine located 439 containing the word "splash erosion*", where the asterisk acts as a wildcard for any letter or group of letters. Of these, 383 were classified as articles, 87 as proceeding papers, 5 as editorial material, 2 as notes and 1 as correction. These documents have been published in 163 different journals, although four are particularly recurrent: Earth surface processes and Landforms, Catena, Soil Science Society of America Journal and Hydrological processes, with 41, 35, 35 and 26 published documents respectively. A geographic analysis of these articles has been carried out in an attempt to determine in what parts of the world research projects were making use of splash erosion. The results are that anglo-saxon countries, as USA, England and Australia dominate, particularly USA, with 130 articles. China and Japan are large communities of researches too, and some Central European countries as Belgium, France Germany

  18. Soil Erosion Threatens Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burgess

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since humans worldwide obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and aquatic ecosystems, preserving cropland and maintaining soil fertility should be of the highest importance to human welfare. Soil erosion is one of the most serious threats facing world food production. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for world food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization report that two-thirds of the world population is malnourished. Overall, soil is being lost from agricultural areas 10 to 40 times faster than the rate of soil formation imperiling humanity’s food security.

  19. Sports drinks and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Warden H; Donovan, Terence E; Geissberger, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Sports drinks were originally developed to improve hydration and performance in athletes taking part in intense or endurance sporting events. These drinks contain relatively high amounts of carbohydrates (sugars), salt, and citric acid. These ingredients create the potential for dental ramifications and overall public health consequences such as obesity and diabetes. High intake of sports drinks during exercise, coupled with xerostomia from dehydration, may lead to the possibility of erosive damage to teeth.

  20. Dental erosion in French adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Muller-Bolla, Mich?le; Courson, Fr?d?ric; Smail-Faugeron, Violaine; Bernardin, Thibault; Lupi-P?gurier, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the 2000s, different epidemiological studies focusing on the prevalence or the aetiology of DE in adolescents recognised them as an at-risk population due to their eating behaviours. None was carried out in French adolescents. The primary objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion (DE) using the total BEWE score among adolescents in the department of Alpes Maritimes, France. The secondary objectives were to observe changes in prevalence estimates d...

  1. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly...... events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be applied in different seasons of the year....... to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive...

  2. Healhy Ageing in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities : Promoting Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, Helena; Bossink, Leontien; Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; van der Putten, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is beneficial, also for people who are characterized by profound intellectual and severe motor disabilities. However, these people are totally dependent on others to participate in physical activities. To date, promoting physical activity in people with these profound disabilities

  3. Teaching Individuals with Profound Multiple Disabilities to Access Preferred Stimuli with Multiple Microswitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gee May; Phillips, Katrina J.; Mudford, Oliver C.

    2011-01-01

    We replicated and extended previous research on microswitch facilitated choice making by individuals with profound multiple disabilities. Following an assessment of stimulus preferences, we taught 6 adults with profound multiple disabilities to emit 2 different responses to activate highly preferred stimuli. All participants learnt to activate…

  4. Joint Attention Behaviours in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: The Influence of the Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerinckx, Heleen; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of the profound cognitive and physical problems, people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are able to develop joint attention behaviours (JAB) and benefit from positive interactions. Aims: To investigate which context factors influence the JAB of people with PIMD. Method: Based on video recordings of…

  5. Modeling regional wind erosion using different model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongling; Chang, Chunping; Wang, Rende; Li, Jifeng; Li, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Wind erosion is an important factor causing soil degradation in arid and semi-arid regions. The need to quantitatively evaluate wind induced soil erosion yields many wind erosion models. These models include Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ), Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ),Wind Erosion Predicted System (WEPS) etc. at a field scale and Wind Erosion Assessment Model (WEAM), Integrated Wind Erosion Modeling System (IWEMS), AUStralian Land Erodibility Model (AUSLEM) etc. at a regional scale. The challenge of precisely estimating wind erosion at a regional scale still remain to date. To assess regional wind erosion, WEQ, RWEQ and WEPS have been scaled up to regional versions. However, no attempt is performed to compare these models for regional wind erosion modeling. In this study, the regional versions of WEQ, RWEQ, WEPS and WEAM, IWEMS, AUSLEM will be selected to model regional wind erosion of farmlands in the Kangbao County of northern China with annual soil loss by wind erosion based on 137 Cs analysis. Remote sensing image is used to determine the size and shape of local farmlands. Weather data of 2000-2010, China Soil Survey and published soil data, crops rotations etc. are compiled to generate raster layers of inputs for selected models using ArcGIS 10.2. These models were rebuilt based on ArcGIS Model-builder Module. Spatial distribution of annual soil loss by wind erosion determined from different model will be tested using annual soil loss data by 137 Cs analysis. Performances of these models will be investigated, and restrictions of these models will be further ascertained.

  6. Constraining the vertical surface motions of the Hampshire Basin, south England During the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip; England, Richard; Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The potential effect of rising sea level on the UK has received considerable attention in recent years. However, the ongoing long-term changes in surface topography of the UK driven by regional tectonics and the mechanisms responsible are not fully understood. It is thought that glacial loading/unloading is the primary influence. However, this is inconsistent with present-day vertical surface motions recorded from Continuous Global Positioning Stations (CGPS) across the UK. The lateral variations in the present day motions are too complex to be explained by glacial isostatic rebound. We are investigating the hypothesis that the vertical motions of SE England also reflect the long term tectonic history by backstripping the Cenozoic geological record. So far the Paleogene stratigraphic record of the Hampshire basin in southern England has been investigated and using a series of deep boreholes that reach the chalk basement, a 2-D backstripping method has been applied. Subsidence analysis of cliff sections and boreholes reveal the Hampshire Basin was tectonically subsiding at a steady rate from 56.5Ma and any major periods of uplift and denudation to the present day state must have occurred from the mid Oligocene onwards. At this time the northern and western regions of the UK were believed to be uplifting as evidenced by heavy mineral transport directionns and sediment drainage patterns. A rapid increase in tectonic subsidence from 42Ma recorded by the three Isle of Wight sections in close proximity to an existing Variscan fault, thought to reactivate as a thrust during the Cenozoic, suggests a compressional stress regime in this region. The stress pattern observed from the tectonic subsidence data and evidence from drainage patterns supports a model in which the UK was uplifting in the north and west while the south east was subsiding. As this pattern is similar to the present day vertical surface motions and pre-dates glaciation, we propose glacial unloading as a

  7. When erosion ruins the chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Blume, Katharina; Lücke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human land-use has considerably shaped the landscape of north-western Germany over the past millennia. Deforestation and agriculture created a predominantly open scenery preserved until today with only a few remnants of former landscape elements such as woodlands, peat bogs, heath lands and lakes. Here we present a multi-proxy approach including sedimentological and geochemical parameters (e. g. element concentrations and stable isotopes) as well as biological proxies (pollen, macro fossils and diatoms) combined with an archaeological site analysis to investigate the effects of prehistoric land-use on lake systems and their catchment areas with a special focus on changes of the water quality, e. g. eutrophication and acidification and its natural regeneration during phases of weaker land-use impact. The study reveals a millenia-long history of erosion processes caused by successive selective woodland clearances starting in Neolithic Times. The geochemical evidence of soil erosion is recorded by distinct peaks of the terrigenic elements K and Ti. However, due to (1) the low sensitivy of the XRF scanner for Si and (2) the prevalence of diatom related biogenic silicon XRF-scanning of highly organic lake sediments fails to reflect the actual sand input caused by erosion. Particularly single quartz grains are not detected in the organic sediment matrix. Therefore we make successful use of mineral grain analysis which previously has only been applied to record aeolian input in bogs. K and Ti concentrations are not correlated with the content of mineral grains which suggest two different erosion processes. Our efforts to construct robust age-depth relationships based on AMS 14C-dates of terrestrial plant macrofossils reveal a specific dating issue of northwest German lakes. Especially in younger sediments we observe 14C-dates which are on the one hand too old and on the other hand among themselves roughly contemporaneous. We explain this feature with the extensive bog

  8. Cenozoic exhumation patterns of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, northern Colombia, through bayesian modeling of detrital thermochronometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mauricio; Gallagher, Kerry; Echeverri, Sebastián; María Patiño, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Thermochronometry of modern river sands exploits the natural downstream sampling of detritus in a river catchment to infer plausible regional exhumation patterns. When combined with available bedrock thermochronometric information, this form of detrital thermochronometry can provide a better understanding of spatially variable denudation rates and improved inference of the potential controlling mechanisms. We have developed a Bayesian inversion approach to modeling both detrital and bedrock thermochronometric data. Following the approach presented in Gallagher (2012), we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to sample many candidate thermal histories models. We use the present day hypsometric curve in a drainage basin as a starting point to sample age-elevation profiles predicted for each candidate thermal history. From these we can then predict the detrital age distribution for a detrital sample representative of the catchment. We can accept candidate thermal histories by quantitatively comparing the predictions to the bedrock profile data, the detrital sample data or both. In principle, discrepancies between the predictions from these models allow us to refine the sampling of the age-elevation profile and infer a detrital sampling distribution different to that implied from the hypsometric curve. Application of the method of new and existing bedrock apatite fission track data (AFT) and new detrital apatite (U-Th)/He, AFT and zircon fission-track (ZFT) data from small (Sierra Nevada in northern Colombia documents the long-term Cenozoic exhumation rates associated to dextral convergence of the Caribbean plate along the northern South American margin. Located 85 km to the SE of the Caribbean abyssal plain and with elevations up to 5.8 km, the Santa Marta Sierra Nevada is the highest coastal range on Earth, with a topographic relief in excess of 9 km. Our data reveal spatially variable, episodic exhumation with a major peak in middle to late-Miocene (30-15) and decreasing

  9. The Brahmaputra tale of tectonics and erosion: Early Miocene river capture in the Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracciali, Laura; Najman, Yani; Parrish, Randall R.; Akhter, Syed H.; Millar, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen provides a type example on which a number of models of the causes and consequences of crustal deformation are based and it has been suggested that it is the site of a variety of feedbacks between tectonics and erosion. Within the broader orogen, fluvial drainages partly reflect surface uplift, different climatic zones and a response to crustal deformation. In the eastern Himalaya, the unusual drainage configuration of the Yarlung Tsangpo-Brahmaputra River has been interpreted either as antecedent drainage distorted by the India-Asia collision (and as such applied as a passive strain marker of lateral extrusion), latest Neogene tectonically-induced river capture, or glacial damming-induced river diversion events. Here we apply a multi-technique approach to the Neogene paleo-Brahmaputra deposits of the Surma Basin (Bengal Basin, Bangladesh) to test the long-debated occurrence and timing of river capture of the Yarlung Tsangpo by the Brahmaputra River. We provide U-Pb detrital zircon and rutile, isotopic (Sr-Nd and Hf) and petrographic evidence consistent with river capture of the Yarlung Tsangpo by the Brahmaputra River in the Early Miocene. We document influx of Cretaceous-Paleogene zircons in Early Miocene sediments of the paleo-Brahmaputra River that we interpret as first influx of material from the Asian plate (Transhimalayan arc) indicative of Yarlung Tsangpo contribution. Prior to capture, the predominantly Precambrian-Paleozoic zircons indicate that only the Indian plate was drained. Contemporaneous with Transhimalayan influx reflecting the river capture, we record arrival of detrital material affected by Cenozoic metamorphism, as indicated by rutiles and zircons with Cenozoic U-Pb ages and an increase in metamorphic grade of detritus as recorded by petrography. We interpret this as due to a progressively increasing contribution from the erosion of the metamorphosed core of the orogen. Whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic data from the same samples

  10. Comparison of erosion and erosion control works in Macedonia, Serbia and Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Blinkov

    2013-12-01

    Natural conditions in the Balkan countries contribute to the appearance of various erosion forms and the intensity of the erosion processes. Over the history of these countries, people who settled this region used the available natural resources to fill their needs (tree cutting, incorrect plugging, overgrazing, which contributed to soil erosion. Organized erosion control works in the Balkans started in the beginning of the 20th century (1905 in Bulgaria. The highest intensity of erosion control works were carried out during the period 1945 – 1990. Various erosion control works were launched. Bulgaria had a large anti-erosion afforestation, almost 1 million ha. Bulgaria's ecological river restoration approach has been in use for almost 50 years. Serbia contributed significant erosion and torrent control works on hilly agricultural areas. Specific screen barrages and afforestation on extremely dry areas are characteristic in Macedonia. A common characteristic for all countries is a high decrease in erosion control works in the last 20 years.

  11. Telomere erosion varies with sex and age at immune challenge but not with maternal antibodies in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, Sophie; Gasparini, Julien; Corbel, Hélène; Frantz, Adrien; Perret, Samuel; Zahn, Sandrine; Criscuolo, Francois; Jacquin, Lisa

    2018-01-25

    Conditions experienced early in life have profound impact on adult fitness, and telomere erosion could be a key mechanism in this process. In particular, early exposure to parasites is a frequent phenomenon in young vertebrates, which is associated with several short- and long-term costs such as telomere erosion. However, the timing of exposure to parasites during ontogeny and maternal antibodies can strongly modulate the costs of immunity, and could differentially affect telomere erosion. Here, we compared the effects of an early or late immune challenge on telomere erosion rate in male and female young feral pigeons (Columba livia) having received or not maternal antibodies. More specifically, we tested whether (i) early or late injections of antigens had different effects on nestling telomere erosion rate, (ii) whether this effect was different between male and female nestlings, and (iii) whether maternal antibodies could modulate telomere erosion rate. Our results show an interaction between sex and age at injection. Late-injected nestlings (injected at 14 days of age) had an accelerated erosion rate compared with the early-injected nestlings (injected at 3 days of age), and this effect was higher in females compared with the males. However, we did not find any effect of maternal antibodies on telomere erosion rate. These results suggest that the age at which an immune challenge occurs is important for telomere erosion and that sex-specific approaches are needed to better understand the short-term and long-term costs of parasite exposure in young vertebrates. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Validating and Improving Interrill Erosion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Wang, Zhan-Li; Yang, Ming-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plot experiments have largely ignored the effects of slope length and plot size on interrill erosion rate. This paper describes a series of simulated rainfall experiments which were conducted according to a randomized factorial design for five slope lengths (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m) at a width of 0.4 m, five slope gradients (17%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%), and five rainfall intensities (48, 62.4, 102, 149, and 170 mm h−1) to perform a systematic validation of existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plots. The results indicated that the existing interrill erosion equations do not adequately describe the relationships between interrill erosion rate and its influencing factors with increasing slope length and rainfall intensity. Univariate analysis of variance showed that runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length had significant effects on interrill erosion rate and that their interactions were significant at p = 0.01. An improved interrill erosion equation was constructed by analyzing the relationships of sediment concentration with rainfall intensity, slope length, and slope gradient. In the improved interrill erosion equation, the runoff rate and slope factor are the same as in the interrill erosion equation in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), with the weight of rainfall intensity adjusted by an exponent of 0.22 and a slope length term added with an exponent of −0.25. Using experimental data from WEPP cropland soil field interrill erodibility experiments, it has been shown that the improved interrill erosion equation describes the relationship between interrill erosion rate and runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length reasonably well and better than existing interrill erosion equations. PMID:24516624

  13. Cenozoic landforms and post-orogenic landscape evolution of the Balkanide orogen: Evidence for alternatives to the tectonic denudation narrative in southern Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnell, Y.; Calvet, M.; Meyer, B.; Pinna-Jamme, R.; Bour, I.; Gautheron, C.; Carter, A.; Dimitrov, D.

    2017-01-01

    Continental denudation is the mass transfer of rock from source areas to sedimentary depocentres, and is typically the result of Earth surface processes. However, a process known as tectonic denudation is also understood to expose deep-seated rocks in short periods of geological time by displacing large masses of continental crust along shallow-angle faults, and without requiring major contributions from surface erosion. Some parts of the world, such as the Basin and Range in the USA or the Aegean province in Europe, have been showcased for their Cenozoic tectonic denudation features, commonly described as metamorphic core-complexes or as supradetachment faults. Based on 22 new apatite fission-track (AFT) and 21 helium (AHe) cooling ages among rock samples collected widely from plateau summits and their adjacent valley floors, and elaborating on inconsistencies between the regional stratigraphic, topographic and denudational records, this study frames a revised perspective on the prevailing tectonic denudation narrative for southern Bulgaria. We conclude that conspicuous landforms in this region, such as erosion surfaces on basement-cored mountain ranges, are not primarily the result of Paleogene to Neogene core-complex formation. They result instead from "ordinary" erosion-driven, subaerial denudation. Rock cooling, each time suggesting at least 2 km of crustal denudation, has exposed shallow Paleogene granitic plutons and documents a 3-stage wave of erosional denudation which progressed from north to south during the Middle Eocene, Oligocene, Early to Middle Miocene, and Late Miocene. Denudation initially prevailed during the Paleogene under a syn-orogenic compressional regime involving piggyback extensional basins (Phase 1), but subsequently migrated southward in response to post-orogenic upper-plate extension driven by trench rollback of the Hellenic subduction slab (Phase 2). Rare insight given by the denudation pattern indicates that trench rollback

  14. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley. Overall, small

  15. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pfattheicher

    Full Text Available The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump. Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O

  16. Varioliform erosions in the stomach and duodenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, W.; Schulz, D.; Munkel, G.

    1984-04-01

    One thousand five hundred and eighty-three patients who were x-rayed for dyspepsia showed varioliform erosions in 15.3%. Men had an incidence of 9.8%, almost twice as common as in women (5.5%). Mucosal polyps, usually of the hyperplastic type, occurred in 2.4%. 15% of patients with gastric ulcers and 16% of patients with duodenal ulcers had varioliform erosions. On the other hand, amongst patients with erosions, 11% had gastric ulcers and 8.3% duodenal ulcers. The definitions of erosion which have been given in the literature are partly contradictory, and are discussed. Varioliform erosions, also known as complete erosions, may be acute or chronic. They are the third most common cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. With modern radiological methods of examining the stomach, they are no longer a rare finding. 5 figs.

  17. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in children is likely to be associated with a number of general health and dietary factors, but it is also aggravated by the relatively more rapid progression of erosion in the deciduous teeth. An understanding of the aetiologies and risk factors for erosion is important for early recognition of dental erosion to prevent serious irreversible damage to the dentition. This paper discusses the erosion in children with regard to its epidemiology, prevalence, clinical features, measurement and prevention.

  18. Investigating Cenozoic climate change in tectonically active regions with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Sebastian; Ehlers, Todd; Li, Jingmin; Werner, Martin; Stepanek, Christian; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Studies of Cenozoic palaeo-climates contribute to our understanding of contemporary climate change by providing insight into analogues such as the Pliocene (PLIO), and by evaluation of GCM (General Circulation Models) performance using the Mid-Holocene (MH) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Furthermore, climate is a factor to be considered in the evolution of ecology, landscapes and mountains, and in the reconstruction of erosion histories. In this study, we use high-resolution (T159) ECHAM5 simulations to investigate pre-industrial (PI) and the the above mentioned palaeo-climates for four tectonically active regions: Alaska (St. Elias Range), the US Northwest Pacific (Cascade Range), western South America (Andes) and parts of Asia (Himalaya-Tibet). The PI climate simulation is an AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) style ECHAM5 experiment, whereas MH and LGM simulation are based on simulations conducted at the Alfred Wegner Institute, Bremerhaven. Sea surface boundary conditions for MH were taken from coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations (Wei and Lohmann, 2012; Zhang et al, 2013) and sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentration for the LGM are based on GLAMAP project reconstructions (Schäfer-Neth and Paul, 2003). Boundary conditions for the PLIO simulation are taken from the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) project and the employed PLIO vegetation boundary condition is created by means of the transfer procedure for the PRISM vegetation reconstruction to the JSBACH plant functional types as described by Stepanek and Lohmann (2012). For each of the investigated areas and time slices, the regional simulated climates are described by means of cluster analyses based on the variability of precipitation, 2m air temperature and the intra-annual amplitude of the values. Results indicate the largest differences to a PI climate are observed for LGM and PLIO climates in the form of widespread cooling and warming

  19. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Williams; Giesen, Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refractory. Knowledge of the treatment options for erosive lichen planus is insufficient. Further research is required to clarify their effectiveness, ideally adopting an evidence-based methodology.

  20. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troisk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Arkhipov, I. [Inst. of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Werle, H.; Wuerz, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heatloads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  1. Vertical displacements of circum-Arctic lithosphere caused by glacial erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Hartz, Ebbe; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic, as many other places, is affected by complex geodynamic features, including the effects of plumes, heat, basin formation etc. In contrast with other places, however, effects of complex features in the Arctic are masked by the last, and in many ways obvious, geodynamic effects of ice and erosion. We aim to resolve this overriding geodynamic event and quantify its effects before older and more complex processes are debated. During the Quaternary, the northern hemisphere was intensely sculptured by thick icecaps, and ice-streams. In some areas, like central East Greenland, or NE Canada, huge fjords and inlets are carved more than 3 km below the summit surface. This erosion cause major unloading, and thus uplift which we model by numerically placing back eroded material, and calculating the flexural isostatic response (vertical motion) repeatedly backwards in time until eroded features are filled to the summit surface. Model results show that Late Cenozoic (mostly glacial) erosion has caused dramatic vertical motions and tilts. Regions such as greater Ellesmere-NW Greenland and central East Greenland have experienced regional erosional uplift in excess of 1 km, which is of the scale of the vertical displacement (down) induced by the load of the Greenland icecap. Interestingly, this erosional uplift solves long-standing enigmas of the occurrence of marine sediments above 1 km altitude in tectonically quiet areas like East Greenland and some islands of Canadian Arctic archipelago and adds systematics between regional AFT ages and elevation. In some areas, like Svalbard and Iceland, modelled erosional uplift and associated down flexing are highly influenced by the assumed effective elastic thickness, and the results thus give direct input to our understanding of the Earth's interior.

  2. Spatial patterns of erosion and landscape evolution in the central Menderes Massif (Western Turkey) revealed by cosmogenic ^{10}Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Hetzel, Ralf; Nilius, Nils-Peter; Glotzbach, Christoph; Wölfler, Andreas; Hampel, Andrea; Akal, Cüneyt; Christl, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    exhumation rate of ˜1 km/Myr in the footwall of the Büyük Menderes detachment (Wölfler et al, in revision). Our results imply that normal faulting played the dominant role for rock exhumation at both detachments but that the relative contribution of erosion is higher at the Büyük Menderes detachment than at the Gediz detachment. References Buscher, J.T., Hampel, A., Hetzel, R., Dunkl, I, Glotzbach, C., Struffert, A., Akal, C., Rätz, M. 2013. Quantifying rates of detachment faulting and erosion in the central Menderes Massif (western Turkey) by thermochronology and cosmogenic 10Be. J. Geol. Soc. Lond. 170, 669-683. Gessner, K., Gallardo, L.A., Markwitz, V., Ring, U., Thomson, S.N., 2013. What caused the denudation of the Menderes Massif: Review of crustal evolution, lithosphere structure, and dynamic topography in southwest Turkey. Gondwana Res. 24, 243-274. Ring U., Brandon, M.T., Lister, G.S., Willett, S.D. 1999. Exhumation processes. In: Ring U., Brandon, M.T., Lister, G.S., Willett, S.D. (eds.). Exhumation processes: normal faulting, ductile flow, and erosion. Geol. Soc. Lond. Spec. Publ. 154, 1-27. Wölfler, A., Glotzbach, C., Heineke, C., Nilius, N.P., Hetzel, R., Hampel, A., Akal, C., Dunkl, I., Christl, M. (manuscript in revision for Tectonophysics). Late Cenozoic cooling history of the central Menderes Massif: timing and slip rate of the Büyük Menderes detachment and the relative contribution of normal faulting and erosion to rock exhumation.

  3. Erosion controls transpressional wedge kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leever, K. A.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    High resolution digital image analysis of analogue tectonic models reveals that erosion strongly influences the kinematics of brittle transpressional wedges. In the basally-driven experimental setup with low-angle transpression (convergence angle of 20 degrees) and a homogeneous brittle rheology, a doubly vergent wedge develops above the linear basal velocity discontinuity. In the erosive case, the experiment is interrupted and the wedge topography fully removed at displacement increments of ~3/4 the model thickness. The experiments are observed by a stereo pair of high resolution CCD cameras and the incremental displacement field calculated by Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). From this dataset, fault slip on individual fault segments - magnitude and angle on the horizontal plane relative to the fault trace - is extracted using the method of Leever et al. (2011). In the non-erosive case, after an initial stage of strain localization, the wedge experiences two transient stages of (1) oblique slip and (2) localized strain partitioning. In the second stage, the fault slip angle on the pro-shear(s) rotates by some 30 degrees from oblique to near-orthogonal. Kinematic steady state is attained in the third stage when a through-going central strike-slip zone develops above the basal velocity discontinuity. In this stage, strain is localized on two main faults (or fault zones) and fully partitioned between plate boundary-parallel displacement on the central strike-slip zone and near-orthogonal reverse faulting at the front (pro-side) of the wedge. The fault slip angle on newly formed pro-shears in this stage is stable at 60-65 degrees (see also Leever et al., 2011). In contrast, in the erosive case, slip remains more oblique on the pro-shears throughout the experiment and a separate central strike-slip zone does not form, i.e. strain partitioning does not fully develop. In addition, more faults are active simultaneously. Definition of stages is based on slip on

  4. Surface uplift and atmospheric flow deflection in the Late Cenozoic southern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, H.; Caves, J. K.; Winnick, M.; Ritch, A. J.; Reilly, S.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Given the intimate links between topography, tectonics, climate and biodiversity, considerable effort has been devoted to developing robust elevation histories of orogens. In particular, quantitative geochemical reconstructions using stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes have been applied to many of the world's mountain belts. Yet after decades of study, determining the Cenozoic surface uplift history of the Sierra Nevada remains a challenge. While geological and geophysical evidence suggests the southern Sierra underwent 1-2 km of Late Cenozoic surface uplift, stable isotope paleoaltimetry studies to date have been restricted to the Basin and Range interior. Recent advances in atmospheric modeling have suggested that such stable isotope records from leeward sites can be affected by the complicating role that sufficiently elevated topography such as the southern (High) Sierra plays in diverting atmospheric circulation. In order to examine the potential role of these terrain blocking effects, we produced stable isotope records from three Late Cenozoic sedimentary basins in the Eastern Sierra and Basin and Range: 1) Authigenic clay minerals in the Mio-Pliocene Verdi Basin (VB), 2) Fluvial and lacustrine carbonates from the Plio-Pleistocene Coso Basin (CB), and 3) Miocene to Holocene pedogenic, fluvial and lacustrine carbonates of Fish Lake Valley (FLV). Whereas both the VB (near present-day Reno) and CB (southern Owens Valley) receive input of water directly from the Sierra crest, FLV is a region of proposed reconvergence of moisture in the Basin and Range. The oxygen isotope records in both CB and FLV increase during the Neogene by approximately 2 ‰, while the hydrogen isotope record of the VB decreases by distillation. A Neogene pulse of uplift in the southern Sierra could have driven modern flow around the High Sierra, increasing δ18O values in CB and FLV while simultaneously decreasing those of the VB. Future paleoaltimetry studies should evaluate the potential

  5. Cenozoic extension along the reactivated Aurora Fault System in the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Maggi, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The East Antarctic Craton is characterized by major intracontinental basins and highlands buried under the 34 Ma East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their formation remains a major open question. Paleozoic to Cenozoic intraplate extensional tectonic activity has been proposed for their development and in this work the latter hypothesis is supported. Here we focus on the Aurora Trench (AT) within the Aurora Subglacial Basin (latitude 75°-77°S, longitude 117°-118°E) whose origin is still poorly constrained. The AT is an over 150-km-long, 25-km-wide subglacial trough, elongated in the NNW-SSE direction. Geophysical campaigns allowed better definition of the AT physiography showing typical half-graben geometry. The rounded morphology of the western flank of the AT was simulated through tectonic numerical modelling. We consider the subglacial landscape to primarily reflect the locally preserved relict morphology of the tectonic processes affecting the interior of East Antarctica in the Cenozoic. The bedrock morphology was replicated through the activity of the listric Aurora Trench Fault, characterized by a basal detachment at 34 km (considered the base of the crust according to available geophysical interpretations) and vertical displacements ranging between 700 and 300 m. The predicted displacement is interpreted as the (partial) reactivation of a weaker zone along a major Precambrian crustal-scale tectonic boundary. We propose that the Aurora Trench Fault is the southern continuation of the > 1000 km long Aurora Fault independently recognized by previous studies. Together they form the Aurora Fault System, a long lived tectonic boundary with poly-phased tectonic history within the EAC that bounds the eastern side of the Aurora Subglacial Basin. The younger Cenozoic reactivation of the investigated segment of the Aurora Fault System relates to the intraplate propagation of far-field stresses associated to the plate-scale kinematics in the Southern Ocean.

  6. Late Cenozoic fire enhancement response to aridification in mid-latitude Asia: Evidence from microcharcoal records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yunfa; Fang, Xiaomin; Song, Chunhui; Yan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ping; Meng, Qingquan; Li, Fang; Wu, Fuli; Yang, Shengli; Kang, Shuyuan; Wang, Yuanping

    2016-05-01

    Fire provides an important indicator of paleoclimatic change. However, little information relating to late Cenozoic fire history has been gathered in mid-latitude Asia (including Inner Asia and East Asia), a key region for understanding the development of the arid-monsoon climate system as well as the driving forces behind it. Here we first report the records of microcharcoal concentrations (MC) covering the Holocene (10-0 ka) and late Pleistocene (0.8-0 Ma), which we use to analyze the fire activity patterns at an orbital time scale; then we compile the late Cenozoic MC record to investigate the long-term fire history by analyzing four cores from the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) area, East Asia (representing 8-0 Ma) and three sites in Inner Asia (representing 18-2 Ma). The results show that the (i) MC remained higher during the relatively dry late Holocene/glacial stages than that during the humid middle Holocene/interglacial stages at individual sites; (ii) MC increased with time in both Inner Asia and East Asia after 18 and 8 Ma, respectively; and (iii) MC always remained higher in the dry Inner Asia than in the contemporaneous wet East Asia. All these characteristics imply that late Cenozoic fire occurrence in mid-latitude Asia experienced a gradual increasing trend along with the global temperature/ice volume change, and indicates a continuous aridification trend across mid-latitude Asia. The global cooling, rather than the Tibetan Plateau uplift, might have played a key role in this observed trend.

  7. The impacts of Cenozoic climate and habitat changes on small mammal diversity of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua X.; Hopkins, Samantha S. B.

    2017-02-01

    Through the Cenozoic, paleoclimate records show general trends of global cooling and increased aridity, and environments in North America shifted from predominantly forests to more open habitats. Paleobotanical records indicate grasses were present on the continent in the Eocene; however, paleosol and phytolith studies indicate that open habitats did not arise until the late Eocene or even later in the Oligocene. Studies of large mammalian herbivores have documented changes in ecomorphology and community structure through time, revealing that shifts in mammalian morphology occurred millions of years after the environmental changes thought to have triggered them. Smaller mammals, like rodents and lagomorphs, should more closely track climate and habitat changes due to their shorter generation times and smaller ranges, but these animals have received much less study. To examine changes in smaller mammals through time, we have assembled and analyzed an ecomorphological database of all North American rodent and lagomorph species. Analyses of these data found that rodent and lagomorph community structure changed dramatically through the Cenozoic, and shifts in diversity and ecology correspond closely with the timing of habitat changes. Cenozoic rodent and lagomorph species diversity is strongly biased by sampling of localities, but sampling-corrected diversity reveals diversity dynamics that, after an initial density-dependent diversification in the Eocene, track habitat changes and the appearance of new ecological adaptations. As habitats became more open and arid through time, rodent and lagomorph crown heights increased while burrowing, jumping, and cursorial adaptations became more prevalent. Through time, open-habitat specialists were added during periods of diversification, while closed-habitat taxa were disproportionately lost in subsequent diversity declines. While shifts among rodents and lagomorphs parallel changes in ungulate communities, they started

  8. Conventional and anti-erosion fluoride toothpastes: effect on enamel erosion and erosion-abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, C; Lussi, A; Grunau, O; Klimek, J; Schlueter, N

    2011-01-01

    New toothpastes with anti-erosion claims are marketed, but little is known about their effectiveness. This study investigates these products in comparison with various conventional NaF toothpastes and tin-containing products with respect to their erosion protection/abrasion prevention properties. In experiment 1, samples were demineralised (10 days, 6 × 2 min/day; citric acid, pH 2.4), exposed to toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min/day) and intermittently stored in a mineral salt solution. In experiment 2, samples were additionally brushed for 15 s during the slurry immersion time. Study products were 8 conventional NaF toothpastes (1,400-1,490 ppm F), 4 formulations with anti-erosion claims (2 F toothpastes: NaF + KNO(3) and NaF + hydroxyapatite; and 2 F-free toothpastes: zinc-carbonate-hydroxyapatite, and chitosan) and 2 Sn-containing products (toothpaste: 3,436 ppm Sn, 1,450 ppm F as SnF(2)/NaF; gel: 970 ppm F, 3,030 ppm Sn as SnF(2)). A mouth rinse (500 ppm F as AmF/NaF, 800 ppm Sn as SnCl(2)) was the positive control. Tissue loss was quantified profilometrically. In experiment 1, most NaF toothpastes and 1 F-free formulation reduced tissue loss significantly (between 19 and 42%); the Sn-containing formulations were the most effective (toothpaste and gel 55 and 78% reduction, respectively). In experiment 2, only 4 NaF toothpastes revealed significant effects compared to the F-free control (reduction between 29 and 37%); the F-free special preparations and the Sn toothpaste had no significant effect. The Sn gel (reduction 75%) revealed the best result. Conventional NaF toothpastes reduced the erosive tissue loss, but had limited efficacy regarding the prevention of brushing abrasion. The special formulations were not superior, or were even less effective. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Factors influencing attentiveness of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities in multisensory storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Penne, Anneleen; Maes, Bea; Vlaskamp, Carla

    Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is a storytelling method developed for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The developers of MSST have established specific guidelines aimed at increasing the listener's attention. Whether, and to what extent, these guidelines indeed

  10. New Eocene damselflies and first Cenozoic damsel-dragonfly of the isophlebiopteran lineage (Insecta: Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Romain; Nel, André

    2015-10-09

    The study of a new specimen of Petrolestes hendersoni from the Eocene Green Formation allows a more precise description of the enigmatic damselfly and the diagnosis of the Petrolestini. Petrolestes messelensis sp. nov. is described from the Eocene Messel Formation in Germany, extending the distribution of the Petrolestini to the European Eocene. The new damsel-dragonfly family Pseudostenolestidae is described for the new genus and species Pseudostenolestes bechlyi, from the Eocene Messel Formation. It is the first Cenozoic representative of the Mesozoic clade Isophlebioptera.

  11. Early Cenozoic radiations in the Antarctic marine realm and their evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crame, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    The extensive and very well exposed Late Cretaceous - Early Paleogene sedimentary succession of Seymour Island, NE Antarctic Peninsula presents a unique opportunity to examine Early Cenozoic evolutionary radiations in a variety of macrofaunal taxa. Building on the extensive pioneer studies by US and Argentinian palaeontologists, recent investigations have focused on refining litho-, bio- and chronostratigraphies, and taxonomic revisions to a number of key groups. Within the numerically dominant Mollusca, the balance of faunas changes significantly across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, with gastropods becoming numerically dominant for the first time in the Early Paleocene Sobral Formation (SF). At this level seven of the 31 gastropod genera present (= 23%) can be referred to modern Southern Ocean taxa and the same figure is maintained in the Early Eocene La Meseta Formation (LMF) where 21 of 63 genera are modern. A major reason for the rise of the gastropods in the earliest Cenozoic of Antarctica is a significant radiation of the Neogastropoda, which today forms one of the largest clades in the sea. 50% of the SF gastropod fauna and 53% of the LMF at the species level are neogastropods. This important burst of speciation is linked to a major pulse of global warming from ~63 - 43Ma when warm temperate conditions prevailed for long intervals of time at 65ºS. The marked Early Paleogene radiation of neogastropods in Antarctica represents a distinct pulse of southern high-latitude taxa that was coeval with similar tropical/subtropical radiations in localities such as the US Gulf Coast and NW Europe. Thus it would appear that the Early Cenozoic radiation of this major taxon was truly global in scale and not just confined to one latitudinal belt. Whereas it is possible to regard a significant proportion of the modern bivalve fauna as relicts, and thus Antarctica as an evolutionary refugium, or sink, it is much less easy to do so for the Neogastropoda. At least in the

  12. Graffiti for science - erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Alexander R.; Kirchner, James W.; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide) gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15-40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  13. Graffiti for science – erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Beer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15–40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  14. Quantifying accelerated soil erosion through ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work explores how organising soil erosion assessments using established groupings of similar soils (ecological sites) can inform systems for managing accelerated soil erosion. We evaluated aeolian sediment transport and fluvial erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA...

  15. Acute profound thrombocytopenia with second exposure to eptifibatide associated with a strong antibody reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTAYA, SHARIFF; KANTHI, YOGENDRA; ASTER, RICHARD; MCCRAE, KEITH

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of eptifibatide-induced acute profound thrombocytopenia in a 64-year-old male receiving eptifibatide for the second time during percutaneous coronary intervention. Although rare, short and self-limited episodes of acute and profound thrombocytopenia have been associated with eptifibatide exposure. The thrombocytopenia is thought to be immune mediated, and assays are available to test for eptifibatide-induced platelet antibodies. PMID:19172524

  16. Acute profound thrombocytopenia with second exposure to eptifibatide associated with a strong antibody reaction

    OpenAIRE

    ATTAYA, SHARIFF; KANTHI, YOGENDRA; ASTER, RICHARD; MCCRAE, KEITH

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of eptifibatide-induced acute profound thrombocytopenia in a 64-year-old male receiving eptifibatide for the second time during percutaneous coronary intervention. Although rare, short and self-limited episodes of acute and profound thrombocytopenia have been associated with eptifibatide exposure. The thrombocytopenia is thought to be immune mediated, and assays are available to test for eptifibatide-induced platelet antibodies.

  17. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome with unusual profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Lucia; Nataren, Nathalie; Feng, Jinghua; Schreiber, Andreas W; Hahn, Christopher N; Conwell, Louise S; Coman, David; Scott, Hamish S

    2015-08-01

    The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone transporter, Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). It is characterized by profound intellectual disability and abnormal thyroid function. We report on a patient with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) with profound sensorineural hearing loss which is not usually a feature of AHDS and which may have been due to a coexisting nonsense mutation in Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dental erosion in French adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Courson, Frédéric; Smail-Faugeron, Violaine; Bernardin, Thibault; Lupi-Pégurier, Laurence

    2015-11-19

    Since the 2000s, different epidemiological studies focusing on the prevalence or the aetiology of DE in adolescents recognised them as an at-risk population due to their eating behaviours. None was carried out in French adolescents. The primary objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion (DE) using the total BEWE score among adolescents in the department of Alpes Maritimes, France. The secondary objectives were to observe changes in prevalence estimates depending on both the cutoffvalue of total BEWE score with different teeth/dental surfaces examined, and to identify the related risk factors. A cross-sectional study in a multistage random sample of 339 14-yr-old schoolchildren was carried out in 2014. The children completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning diet and oral habits. Caries was assessed with ICDAS-II (International Caries Detection and Assessment System-II) criteria and erosion with BEWE (Basic Erosive Wear Examination) index. The total BEWE score was calculated to assess the DE prevalence with two cutoff values (3 and 1). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models. The 331 children were aged 14.4 ± 0.5 years. The DE prevalence was 39 % using a total BEWE score ≥ 3. With a cutoff total BEWE score of 1 (at least one affected tooth), the prevalence varied from 3.9 to 56.8 % depending on the teeth/surfaces that were used for the analysis. The DE prevalence, assessed with only first molars and maxillary incisors, was about 54 %. The risk factors for DE (total BEWE score ≥ 3) were daily consumption of acidic beverages (OR: 4.0; 95 % CI: 2.1-7.6) and acidic sweets (OR: 3.2; 95 % CI: 1.2-8.0), low socio economic category (OR: 2.4; 95 % CI: 1.1-5.0) and visible dental biofilm (OR: 2.0; 95 % CI: 1.2-3.4). Depending on the method chosen, the prevalence varied from 3.9 to 56.8 % among these adolescents. Thus, a consensus on choice of index, teeth to examine and age at

  19. Cenozoic Deformation of the Tarim Basin (Xinjiang, China): a Record of the Deformation Propagation through the Asian Orogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, A.; Barrier, L.; Simoes, M.; Li, H.

    2016-12-01

    During the Cenozoic, the ongoing India-Eurasia collision resulted in the formation of the Himalayan-Tibetan plateau and reactivated the Tian Shan and Altai ranges located thousands of kilometers further north. Despite numerous studies carried out on the geology and tectonics of this large convergent orogenic system, several mechanisms remain controversial such as the stress propagation through the Asia Continent or the strain partitioning between crustal thickening and lateral extruding of its lithosphere. Located between the Tibetan Plateau and the Tian Shan Range, the Tarim Basin and its several kilometres thick Cenozoic sediments derived from the surrounding mountain belts are key recorders to reconstruct the evolution of the latters. Moreover, this basin is often considered as a relatively rigid block, which behaved as a secondary ``indenter'' transmitting collisional stresses to the Tian Shan. However, due to the size of the Tarim and its thick Cenozoic sedimentary series hiding most of its structures, the constraints on the spatial distribution and timing of the its Cenozoic deformation remain fragmentary. Therefore, the main objective of our study was to produce a synthetic view of this deformation at the scale of the whole basin. Based on numerous surface and subsurface data (satellite images, field surveys, seismic profiles, and well data), we established a tectonic map of the Cenozoic structures in the region and built balanced geological cross-sections across the basin. Our surface and subsurface observations confirm that, contrary to what had been proposed, the Tarim block has also undergone a major deformation during the Cenozoic. The quantification and history of this deformation provide useful insights into the modalities of the crustal shortening in the area and the problems of stress propagation and strain partitioning following the Indo-Asian collision.

  20. Rainfall erosivity in Brazil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the erosivity studies conducted in Brazil to verify the quality and representativeness of the results generated and to provide a greater understanding of the rainfall erosivity (R-factor) in Brazil. We searched the ISI Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholar datab...

  1. Backward erosion piping : Initiation and progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beek, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Backward erosion piping is an internal erosion mechanism during which shallow pipes are formed in the direction opposite to the flow underneath water-retaining structures as a result of the gradual removal of sandy material by the action of water. It is an important failure mechanism in both dikes

  2. EVALUATION OF RAINFALL EROSIVIT OF RAINFALL EROSIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    climate change [19]. Vegetation intercepts rain, reducing its energy and preventing splash erosion. It also slows runoff, reduces sheet erosion, and anchors and reinforces the soil ... hydro geological significance in terms of groundwater yield and exploitation ..... Australia's Tropics”, Australian Journal of Soil. Research. Vol.

  3. Saliva Parameters and Erosive Wear in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, N.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Truin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 +/- 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately.

  4. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date interrill erosion processes and regimes are not fully understood. The objectives are to 1) identify the erosion regimes and limiting processes between detachment and transport on steep slopes, 2) characterize the interactive effects between rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment trans...

  5. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate

  6. Past, Present, Future Erosion at Locke Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2006-08-08

    This report describes and documents the erosion that has occurred along the northeast side of Locke Island over the last 10 to 20 years. The principal cause of this erosion is the massive Locke Island landslide complex opposite the Columbia River along the White Bluffs, which constricts the flow of the river and deflects the river's thalweg southward against the island.

  7. Hydrogeological And Geotechnical Investigations Of Gully Erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For many years, gully erosion and landslides are posing a serious threat to human existence, agricultural land, infrastructure and socio-economic activities in Calabar and its environs. Consequently, hydrogeological and geotechnical studies of gully erosion sites were carried out in order to provide information on the ...

  8. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion.......EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion....

  9. Evaluation of soil factors controlling gully erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollobarren, Paul; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier

    2015-04-01

    Current models for prediction of (ephemeral) gully erosion rely mainly on topographic factors while soil conditions are almost neglected. However, soil erodibility is essential for analyzing and properly modeling gully erosion. But, despite the wealth of studies to characterize soil vulnerability to gully erosion, a universal approach is still lacking. Moreover, a useful and feasible soil characterization for gully erosion prediction at large scale should be based on simple, quick, repeatable and relatively inexpensive tests to perform. In this work an experimental approach to quantify soil contribution on gully erosion is proposed. From simple methodologies and techniques found in the literature for assessing physical-chemical properties of the soil, a large pool of variables -that presumably underpin gully erosion- were defined. These methodologies includes the use of vane shear apparatus, penetrometers and a mini-rain simulator as well as some current (modified) laboratory tests for assessing soil crustability and erodibility. Thirteen ephemeral gullies developed under different soil condition in agricultural fields of Navarre (Spain) were selected for experiments. Then, the aforementioned variables were calculated for each of the gullies through field and lab experiments. Furthermore, the most relevant variables were detected by means of multivariate analysis and their contribution to gully erosion was finally quantified by using multiple regression analysis. In addition, gully erosion rates of typical agricultural fields are given.

  10. Reduction of soil erosion on forest roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward R. Burroughs; John G. King

    1989-01-01

    Presents the expected reduction in surface erosion from selected treatments applied to forest road traveledways, cutslopes, fillslopes, and ditches. Estimated erosion reduction is expressed as functions of ground cover, slope gradient, and soil properties whenever possible. A procedure is provided to select rock riprap size for protection of the road ditch.

  11. FORECAST THE SOIL EROSION THROUGH THE CARTOGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina - Cristina Marian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion in Arges County affects a high percentage of agricultural land. Most agricultural lands are located on slopes undergoing erosion, excess humidity temporarily or permanently, landslides. The importance lies in the need to know theme addressed erosion, the erosive potential of the land, the causes and factors that led to the onset of erosion and its deployment at a accelerated rate and now, because the based on this knowledge to determine the effective measures to prevent and combat this phenomenon of soil degradation. The importance of knowing this erosion is related both to protect land and diminishing rates of clogging existing accumulation lakes in the river basin. Erosion mapping was carried out in recent years with the use of means modern cadastral- topographical. So not provided with sufficient precision to determine the areas affected by erosion. This paper presents methods using modern maps using satellite images, topographical precision instrumentation, cartograms results can be easily integrated into a GIS system monitoring. The information is graphically and containing a database solid. Cartograms accuracy depends on the quality of engineerings survey carried out in the field.

  12. Rethinking erosion on Java: a reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de J.; Wiersum, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent article (Diemont et al., 1991) about erosion on Java, it has been postulated that low inputs, not surface erosion, is the main cause of low productivity of upland food crops on this island. In this article it is argued that this hypothesis is too simple. An analysis of empirical field

  13. Cirque-driven erosion of the Scandinavian mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, John D.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Korup, Oliver; Stroeven, Arjen; Goodfellow, Bradley; Andersen, Jane L.; Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Klein, Josefin

    2015-04-01

    Climatic versus tectonic explanations for Scandinavian topography have sustained a century-long dispute. Here, at high-latitudes, the more recent question of whether Late-Cenozoic cooling has influenced mountain erosion rates is especially apt because glaciations commenced earlier: >10 Myr and possibly ~34 Myr according to marine palaeorecords. Although selective glacial incision along valley troughs is well recognised in Scandinavia, the legacy of glacial cirque erosion has yet to be fully investigated. We examine the topographic legacy of mountain glaciation in seven massifs of the Caledonian Scandes (western Scandinavia ~61-70° N): Lyngen, Kebnekaise, Sarek, Saltfjellet, Dovrefjell, Jostedalsbreen, and Jotunheimen. Glacial cirques are the product of discrete alpine glaciers and so the elevation of ice-free cirques provides a guide to past fluctuations in regional equilibrium line altitude (ELA). The Scandes currently hosts >3400 mountain glaciers and the distribution of >10,000 ice-free cirques indicates that glaciers have extended much lower and farther in the past. Previous workers argue that alpine glaciations focus erosion selectively at and above a zone of cirques, which approximates the long-term average 'palaeo-ELA'. First, we set out to examine the topographic relationships between mountain peak elevation, ELA, cirque-floor elevations, and the distribution of low-slope (<10°) terrain. To estimate the regional ELA for each massif, inclined planar trend-surfaces (first-order polynomial) were fitted to median elevations of existing glaciers. A total of ~4000 ice-free cirques were mapped and plotted relative to the ELA surfaces. For all seven massifs, cirque-floors cluster within a discrete elevational range: 240-490 m (25-75th percentiles) below ELA, suggesting a well-defined 'palaeo-ELA'. Hypsometric analyses show that this 'palaeo-ELA' closely matches the maximum frequency of low-slope terrain. Consistent with studies elsewhere, terrain surface area

  14. Weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, B.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-03-03

    A literature review was made. In spite of similarities between abrasive wear and solid particle erosion, weld overlay hardfacing alloys that exhibit high abrasion resistance may not necessarily have good erosion resistance. The performance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys in erosive environments has not been studied in detail. It is believed that primary-solidified hard phases such as carbides and intermetallic compounds have a strong influence on erosion resistance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys. However, relationships between size, shape, and volume fraction of hard phases in a hardfacing alloys and erosion resistance were not established. Almost all hardfacing alloys can be separated into two major groups based upon chemical compositions of the primary solidified hard phases: (a) carbide hardening alloys (Co-base/carbide, WC-Co and some Fe base superalloys); and (b) intermetallic hardening alloys (Ni-base alloys, austenitic steels, iron-aluminides).

  15. Dietary assessment and counseling for dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A

    2018-02-01

    Dental erosion occurs after exposure to intrinsic or extrinsic acids. Exposure to intrinsic gastrointestinal acids is associated with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, or gastroesophageal reflux. Extrinsic dietary acids from foods or beverages also can cause erosion, particularly when exposure is prolonged by holding or swishing behaviors. Clinicians should screen patients exhibiting dental erosion for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Clinicians should screen patients without a medical explanation for their erosion for exposure to acidic foods and beverages, particularly for habits that prolong exposure. Identification of intrinsic and extrinsic acid exposures and recommendations to minimize exposures are important to prevent erosion and maintain oral health. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    Coastlines around the world are receding due to coastal erosion.With rising sea levels and a potential climatic deterioration due to climate change, erosion rates are likely to increase at many locations in the future.Together with the current preference of people to settle near or directly...... by the ocean, coastal erosion issues become increasingly more important to the human values at risk. Along many Danish coastlines, hard structures already act as coastal protection in the form of groins, breakwaters, revetments etc. These eroding coasts however still lack sand and where the public, in general......, neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes...

  17. A Cenozoic diffuse alkaline magmatic province (DAMP) in the southwest Pacific without rift or plume origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Panter, Kurt S.

    2005-02-01

    Common geological, geochemical, and geophysical characteristics of continental fragments of East Gondwana and adjacent oceanic lithosphere define a long-lived, low-volume, diffuse alkaline magmatic province (DAMP) encompassing the easternmost part of the Indo-Australian Plate, West Antarctica, and the southwest portion of the Pacific Plate. A key to generating the Cenozoic magmatism is the combination of metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, in contrast to large igneous provinces where mantle temperatures are presumed to be high. The SW Pacific DAMP magmatism has been conjecturally linked to rifting, strike-slip faulting, mantle plumes, or hundreds of hot spots, but all of these associations have flaws. We suggest instead that sudden detachment and sinking of subducted slabs in the late Cretaceous induced Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the former Gondwana margin that in turn triggered lateral and vertical flow of warm Pacific mantle. The interaction of the warm mantle with metasomatized subcontinental lithosphere that characterizes much of the SW Pacific DAMP concentrates magmatism along zones of weakness. The model may also provide a mechanism for warming south Pacific mantle and resulting Cenozoic alkaline magmatism, where the oceanic areas are characterized primarily, but not exclusively, by short-lived hot spot tracks not readily explained by conventional mantle plume theory. This proposed south Pacific DAMP is much larger and longer-lived than previously considered.

  18. Preliminary study of the application of natural olivine in Cenozoic dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Masashi [Department of Geography, Nara Women' s University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)]. E-mail: takada@cc.nara-wu.ac.jp; Tani, Atsushi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Shimada, Aiko [Department of Geography, Nara Women' s University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    The study investigated the luminescence behaviour of natural olivine to discuss the potential for Cenozoic (quaternary) dating. The UV-blue thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of irradiated olivines have a resolved peak at 190 deg. C and other peaks at higher temperature at lower dose levels, and broad signals around 275-310 and 375-400 deg. C at higher dose levels. The UV-blue TL increases with additional laboratory dose to {approx}1.6kGy within a plateau temperature region, suggesting the possibility of dosimetry and Cenozoic dating. Both infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and blue light stimulated luminescence (BLSL) were detected from laboratory-irradiated olivines although the BLSL was weaker than the IRSL. Furthermore, post-BL IRSL was detected but post-IR BLSL was not observed. Therefore, IR stimulation is recommended for optically stimulated luminescence measurements with natural olivine. The growth of the IRSL signal component with doses less than several tens of Gy are too weak to measure. The dose-response curves suggest that further investigations on various types of olivine are needed for practical IRSL dating in the late Pleistocene or more recent.

  19. Cenozoic extinctions account for the low diversity of extant gymnosperms compared with angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Michael D; Cook, Lyn G

    2011-12-01

    We test the widely held notion that living gymnosperms are 'ancient' and 'living fossils' by comparing them with their sister group, the angiosperms. This perception derives partly from the lack of gross morphological differences between some Mesozoic gymnosperm fossils and their living relatives (e.g. Ginkgo, cycads and dawn redwood), suggesting that the rate of evolution of gymnosperms has been slow. We estimated the ages and diversification rates of gymnosperm lineages using Bayesian relaxed molecular clock dating calibrated with 21 fossils, based on the phylogenetic analysis of alignments of matK chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and 26S nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) sequences, and compared these with published estimates for angiosperms. Gymnosperm crown groups of Cenozoic age are significantly younger than their angiosperm counterparts (median age: 32 Ma vs 50 Ma) and have long unbranched stems, indicating major extinctions in the Cenozoic, in contrast with angiosperms. Surviving gymnosperm genera have diversified more slowly than angiosperms during the Neogene as a result of their higher extinction rate. Compared with angiosperms, living gymnosperm groups are not ancient. The fossil record also indicates that gymnosperms suffered major extinctions when climate changed in the Oligocene and Miocene. Extant gymnosperm groups occupy diverse habitats and some probably survived after making adaptive shifts. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Cenozoic deformation history of the area around Yangnam-Yangbuk, SE Korea and its tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Park, Joon-Young

    2006-01-01

    Detailed mapping and structural analysis were carried out to establish the Cenozoic deformation history of the Yangnam-Yangbuk area, SE Korea. All structural elements were analyzed to establish the chronological sequence, based on the classification of the fracture systems and the ages of the rocks. Two detailed grid maps represent the deformation history, based on the cross-cutting relationship between deformation fabrics. We established the Cenozoic deformation history in the studied area by synthesizing the analysis of structural elements in rocks of different ages and observing cross-cutting relationships on grid maps. Results using these two approaches, with two independent data sets, are consistent. The deformation history is comparable to that proposed from previous studies. Restoration of the structural elements suggests tilting and rotation in this area. There is clear evidence of tectonic inversion, which was observed in a previous trench study of the Eupchon Fault. This implies that normal faults related to the right-lateral Yangsan Fault associated with opening of the East Sea (Japan Sea) may have been reactivated as thrust faults in the Quaternary period.

  1. Cenozoic macroevolution in the deep-sea microfossil record: can we let go of species richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannisdal, Bjarte; Liow, Lee Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    The deep-sea microfossil record is an outstanding resource for the study of macroevolutionary changes in planktonic groups. Studies of plankton evolution and its possible link to climate changes over the Cenozoic have typically targeted apparent trends in species richness. However, most species are rare, and fossil richness is particularly vulnerable to the imperfections (incompleteness, reworking, age and taxonomic errors) of existing microfossil occurrence databases. Here we use an alternative macroevolutionary quantity: Summed Common Species Occurrence Rate (SCOR). By focusing on the most commonly occurring species, SCOR is decoupled from species richness, robust to preservation/sampling variability, yet sensitive to relative changes in the overall abundance of a group. Numerical experiments are used to illustrate the sampling behavior of SCOR and its relationship to (sampling-standardized) species richness. We further show how SCOR estimated from the NEPTUNE database (ODP/DSDP) can provide a new perspective on long-term evolutionary and ecological changes in major planktonic groups (e.g. coccolithophores and forams). Finally, we test possible linkages between planktonic SCOR records and proxy reconstructions of climate changes over the Cenozoic.

  2. N2-fixing tropical legume evolution: a contributor to enhanced weathering through the Cenozoic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epihov, Dimitar Z; Batterman, Sarah A; Hedin, Lars O; Leake, Jonathan R; Smith, Lisa M; Beerling, David J

    2017-08-16

    Fossil and phylogenetic evidence indicates legume-rich modern tropical forests replaced Late Cretaceous palm-dominated tropical forests across four continents during the early Cenozoic (58-42 Ma). Tropical legume trees can transform ecosystems via their ability to fix dinitrogen (N2) and higher leaf N compared with non-legumes (35-65%), but it is unclear how their evolutionary rise contributed to silicate weathering, the long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Here we hypothesize that the increasing abundance of N2-fixing legumes in tropical forests amplified silicate weathering rates by increased input of fixed nitrogen (N) to terrestrial ecosystems via interrelated mechanisms including increasing microbial respiration and soil acidification, and stimulating forest net primary productivity. We suggest the high CO2 early Cenozoic atmosphere further amplified legume weathering. Evolution of legumes with high weathering rates was probably driven by their high demand for phosphorus and micronutrients required for N2-fixation and nodule formation. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. Rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul Essel; Eric T Glover; Serwaa Yeboah; Yaw Adjei-Kyereme; Israel Nutifafa Doyi Yawo; Mawutoli Nyarku; Godfred S Asumadu-Sakyi; Gustav Kudjoe Gbeddy; Yvette Agyiriba Agyiri; Evans Mawuli Ameho; Emmanuel Atule Aberikae

    2016-01-01

      Rainfall erosivity is the potential ability for rainfall to cause soil loss. The purpose of this study was to estimate the Rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site in order to compute the surface erosion rate...

  4. Rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Essel, Paul; Glover, Eric T; Yeboah, Serwaa; Adjei-Kyereme, Yaw; Yawo, Israel Nutifafa Doyi; Nyarku, Mawutoli; Asumadu-Sakyi, Godfred S; Gbeddy, Gustav Kudjoe; Agyiri, Yvette Agyiriba; Ameho, Evans Mawuli; Aberikae, Emmanuel Atule

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is the potential ability for rainfall to cause soil loss. The purpose of this study was to estimate the rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site in order to compute the surface erosion rate...

  5. Cenozoic Deformation History of Asia and its Relationship to Igneous Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Cenozoic tectonic history of Asia has been reconstructed mostly from a forward approach based on mechanical models. Here I use the geologic data to reconstruct Asian deformation resulted from both collision of India and Arabia with Eurasia and subduction of western Pacific plates beneath Asia. Between 65 and 25 Ma, deformation of east Asia was mainly induced by the Indo-Asian collision dominated by north-south contraction in Tibet and the Himalaya. The northern contractional front of the Indo-Asian collision zone propagated northward across Tarim basin to the south Tian Shan at 25-20 Ma and to the northern Tian Shan and the Altai Shan at about 15-10 Ma. Since about 15 Ma, E-W extension began to occur throughout Asia, from Tibetan rift systems in the south to the Baikal rift system in the north. E-W extension is commonly associated with N-S contraction accommodated either by conjugate strike-slip faults or E-trending contractional structures. E-W extensional strains in Tibet and North China are kinematically linked via a large contractional step-over structure between the left-slip Qinling and Kunlun faults at the western end of the Qinling range. The Cenozoic continental-margin extension of Asia developed in two stages: (1) initially in widely distributed zone about 500-800 km wide during 65-35 Ma followed by (2) relatively localized extension associated with formation of back-arc basins floored by oceanic crust during 35-15 Ma. Since ˜15 Ma, the eastern margin of Asia became contractional as expressed by collapse of back-arc basins. This event is coeval with widespread east-west extension in the interior of mainland Asia. The Oligo-Miocene Arabia-Eurasia collision may have created a 3000-km long and 700-km wide zone of subparallel and relatively evenly spaced right-slip faults, stretching from the Main Recent Fault in NW Iran in the south to the Altai fault of western Mongolia in the north. The collision may have also assisted the initiation of the

  6. DMPD: Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1916089 Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneuk...ep;5(12):2652-60. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effect...tive endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. Authors Raetz

  7. Soil erosion and the global carbon budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R

    2003-07-01

    Soil erosion is the most widespread form of soil degradation. Land area globally affected by erosion is 1094 million ha (Mha) by water erosion, of which 751 Mha is severely affected, and 549 Mha by wind erosion, of which 296 Mha is severely affected. Whereas the effects of erosion on productivity and non-point source pollution are widely recognized, those on the C dynamics and attendant emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are not. Despite its global significance, erosion-induced carbon (C) emission into the atmosphere remains misunderstood and an unquantified component of the global carbon budget. Soil erosion is a four-stage process involving detachment, breakdown, transport/redistribution and deposition of sediments. The soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is influenced during all four stages. Being a selective process, erosion preferentially removes the light organic fraction of a low density of erosion causes a severe depletion of the SOC pool on eroded compared with uneroded or slightly eroded soils. In addition, the SOC redistributed over the landscape or deposited in depressional sites may be prone to mineralization because of breakdown of aggregates leading to exposure of hitherto encapsulated C to microbial processes among other reasons. Depending on the delivery ratio or the fraction of the sediment delivered to the river system, gross erosion by water may be 75 billion Mg, of which 15-20 billion Mg are transported by the rivers into the aquatic ecosystems and eventually into the ocean. The amount of total C displaced by erosion on the earth, assuming a delivery ratio of 10% and SOC content of 2-3%, may be 4.0-6.0 Pg/year. With 20% emission due to mineralization of the displaced C, erosion-induced emission may be 0.8-1.2 Pg C/year on the earth. Thus, soil erosion has a strong impact on the global C cycle and this component must be considered while assessing the global C budget. Adoption of conservation-effective measures may reduce the risks of C emission and

  8. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha-1h-1) compared to winter (87MJmmha-1h-1). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R2 values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be applied in

  9. Late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Ailao Shan-Red River fault (SE Tibet): implications for kinematic change during Plateau growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Schoenbohm, Lindsay; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhou, Renjie; Hou, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    The India-Eurasia continental collision has created the Tibetan Plateau, a spectacular example of continental plateaus. Along its southeastern margin, surface uplift, river incision, shear-zone exhumation and displacement along active faults have all interacted to shape the landscape. The Ailao Shan-Red River fault, a continental-scale strike-slip fault striking over 1000 km from the Tibetan Plateau to South China Sea, is an excellent recorder for those processes, providing important insights into the evolution of the southeastern plateau margin. However, its late Cenozoic tectonic evolution still remains elusive. This work presents new structural and stratigraphic data from the Miocene basin in the bend area and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological data from the shear zone to put constraints on the timing and nature of structural and geomorphic evolution of the Ailao Shan-Red River fault region. Our observations indicate that the major bend in the fault was a releasing bend in the early Miocene, but became a restraining bend after the late Miocene reversal of displacement. The strata preserved in bend area record the nature and timing of exhumation of the shear zone. Apatite (U-Th)/He data show two phases of rapid exhumation in the Miocene. The first rapid exhumation occurred before 16 Ma, the timing of which is supported by the early Miocene sedimentary record and previous geochronologic results. It may have ended before the formation of a low-relief erosion surface. The second episode of rapid exhumation began at ~14-13 Ma, lasting 2-3Myr. During this interval, the Ailao Shan range may have uplift to the modern elevation and the high relief may have developed along the range due to river incision. Metamorphic clasts from the shear zone were deposited in the Red River valley. Regional compilation reveals a coincidence of tectonic events in the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings in the middle-late Miocene, indicating dramatic kinematic change during the course

  10. Petrography and geochemistry of Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of the southern Samar Island, Philippines: Clues to the unroofing history of an ancient subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacle, Nichole Anthony D.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Payot, Betchaida D.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2017-07-01

    The Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of southern Samar Island in eastern Philippines were examined to understand the unroofing history of an ancient arc terrane. Petrographic and geochemical data revealed varying degrees of inputs from the ophiolite basement and differences in modal compositions. The sedimentary units are mostly made up of lithic fragments. The Late Oligocene to Early Miocene Daram Formation contains more chert and volcanic fragments whereas the late Middle Miocene to Early Pliocene Catbalogan Formation is dominantly composed of ultramafic components. These variances are correspondingly reflected in the geochemical signatures of these two sedimentary formations. The Catbalogan Formation clastic rocks have higher volatile-free MgO and Fe2O3 values (average: 8.4% for both oxides) compared to the Daram Formation samples (average: 5.1 and 6.3%, respectively). Geochemical variations are also reflected in the Co, Cr and Ni values: the Catbalogan Formation samples reflect higher concentrations (Co: 15-57 ppm; Cr: 231-1094 ppm; Ni: 84-484 ppm) compared to the Daram Formation samples (Co: 24-32 ppm; Cr: 234-418 ppm; Ni: 212-323 ppm). These observations suggest that the Daram Formation eroded and transported more of the crustal portions of the ophiolite, while the younger Catbalogan Formation represents a later exhumation and subsequent erosion of the ultramafic section. An oceanic island arc (OIA) setting is proposed for the two formations based on several tectonic discrimination diagrams (e.g., Th-La-Sc, La vs. Th). The OIA signature is further supported by their smooth chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns with no obvious Eu anomaly as well as LREE enrichment which are typical of sediments deposited in OIA setting. Based on the dominantly ophiolitic provenance of the Daram and Catbalogan formations, the post-emplacement history of the nearby Samar Ophiolite is constrained during the Late Oligocene to Early Pliocene period.

  11. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  12. Soft drinks and in vitro dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravelle, Brent L; Hagen Ii, Ted W; Mayhew, Susan L; Crumpton, Brooks; Sanders, Tyler; Horne, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine to what extent the in vitro exposure of healthy teeth to various commonly consumed carbonated soft drinks may precipitate dental erosion. Forty-two healthy, extracted, previously unerupted human molars were weighed prior to, during, and after suspension in various sugared and diet or zero-calorie carbonated beverages for 20 days; the specimens were stored at room temperature while being stirred at 275 rpm. The percentage decrease in tooth weight from before to after exposure represented the weight loss due to enamel erosion; values in the experimental groups varied from 3.22% to 44.52% after 20 days' exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe testing at a level of α = 0.05. Nonsugared drinks (diet and zero-calorie) as a whole were more erosive than sugared beverages. A significant positive correlation was found between the amount of titratable acid and percentage of tooth erosion, while a significant negative correlation was revealed between the beverage pH and percentage of tooth erosion. No significant correlations were found between calcium or phosphate ion concentrations and the amount of erosion. It appears that enamel erosion is dependent on not only the beverage flow rate, pH, and amount of titratable acid, but also whether the soft drink is of the diet or zero-calorie variety, which reflects the type of artificial sweetener present.

  13. Coupled wellbore erosion and stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulou, M.; Papanastasiou, P.; Vardoulakis, I.

    1998-09-01

    This paper extends earlier work on sand erosion and presents an attempt to couple sand erosion to mechanical damage of rock around a wellbore. Porosity which evolves in time and space as surface erosion progresses, is chosen as the coupling parameter. Both rock elasticity and strength (cohesion) are assumed to depend on porosity in such a way that the material becomes weaker with increasing porosity. The mathematical model, consists of erosion equations, mixture flow equations and stress equilibrium equations, is solved numerically by Galerkin finite element method. Numerical results suggest that erosion, resulting in sand production, is high close to the free surface. Erosion is accompained by changes in porosity and a significant permeability increase. Erosion in the vicinity of the wellbore induces alterations in the mechanical behaviour of the medium. Weakening of rock stiffness leads to severe alteration of both effective stresses and pore pressure near the cavity. Since cohesion decreases with increasing porosity, one can also identify the time instant at which rock mechanical failure starts.

  14. Catalogue of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic holotypes in the collection of plant fossils in the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenburg-van Cittert, van J.H.A.; Waveren, van I.M.; Jonckers, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    This is an inventory of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic type material in the original palaeobotanical collections of the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden, The Netherlands. In total 60 holotypes are documented and one is noted as missing from the collections. One new combination is made

  15. Simulation of chemical erosion in rough fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberg, R; Ladd, A J C

    2002-05-01

    We report on numerical simulations of acid erosion in a fractured specimen of Carrara marble. The simulations combine two recent advances in lattice-Boltzmann methodology to accurately and efficiently calculate the velocity field in the pore space. A tracer diffusion algorithm was then used to calculate the distribution of reactants in the fracture, and the local erosion rate was obtained from the flux of tracer particles across the surfaces. Our results show that at large length scales, erosion leads to increased heterogeneity via channel formation, whereas at small length scales it tends to smooth out the roughness in the local aperture.

  16. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES – THE WAY OF SOCIALIZATION OF PEOPLE WITH PROFOUND VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii I. Netosov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the software and hardware, that give people with profound visual impairments the opportunity to work on the computer. Attention is drawn to the Braille printers, relief-dot displays, voice synthesizers, scanners that can read, adaptation and correction programs and so on. It is emphasized that ICT for the blind is a factor of their inclusion in the life as the subjects of action. For solving this problem people with profound visual impairments need systemic help of the state and civil society in getting programs and equipment, because they are high-tech, and therefore expensive. It is important to spread the information about the activity of the centers of tiflo-computerization, to organize the laboratories of correction and socialization of people with profound visual impairments, to provide the training of the specialists.

  17. Retrodiction of secular variations in deep-sea CaCO3 burial during the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Bernard P.; Luo, Yiming

    2017-09-01

    Deep-sea sediments record changes in oceanic carbonate chemistry and CaCO3 sedimentation rate through temporal variations in the total burial of CaCO3 and the position of the carbonate snowline, i.e., the ocean depth at which CaCO3-free sediments are first recorded. This paper links mathematically secular changes in snowline to those in the burial rate through a set of relatively simple equations. When the available Cenozoic deep-sea burial records are employed to predict secular variations in snowline, the process fails at some time in the past, indicating that these records are not consistent with each other. The burial records are more likely the source of this problem, as they involve far more uncertainties than the snowline records. As a consequence, we introduce a method for estimating carbonate burial through the use of a canonical CaCO3-depth profile, which can respond dynamically to secular changes in carbonate sedimentation and the positions of both the snowline and the carbonate saturation horizon. The resulting synthetic CaCO3 burial record is consistent with snowline records and indicates that the burial rates offered by Davies and Worsley (1981) are generally too high, with highly questionable maxima at 25 and 47 Ma BP. Our estimates of burial are more consistent with the range advanced by Mackenzie and Morse (1992); nevertheless, our results differ from the latter with respect to timing and magnitude of the variations. Our approach allows simultaneous calculation of the mean carbonate ion concentration of the deep sea. We find that carbonate-ion levels fell through the Cenozoic and are similar to those calculated by Tyrrell and Zeebe (2004), using a different model. Secular variations in CaCO3 burial are found to be primarily driven by changes in the Ca2+-CO3 2 - ion product within the bottom-waters, with an increase in the sedimentation rate of CaCO3 of secondary importance over the Cenozoic.

  18. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  19. Coupling between tectonics and surface processes in the Congo Basin: Cretaceous-Cenozoic sedimentation and erosion triggered by climatic and tectonic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Putter, Thierry; Mees, Florias; Bayon, Germain; Ruffet, Gilles; Smith, Thierry; Delvaux, Damien

    2017-04-01

    Cretaceous to Recent evolution of the Congo Basin in Central Africa is still poorly documented although its history over the last 75 Myr has potentially recorded global and major regional events, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at 56 Ma and the Miocene aperture of the Western branch of the East African Rift System along its eastern border at 25 Ma. Available data for associated off-shore deposits show that in parallel, the Congo River delta experienced a starvation period during the Mid- to Late Cretaceous and Paleogene, with endorheic lacustrine to desert environments in the upstream basin, followed by a period marked by high rates of drainage and sediment supply in the Neogene. Here, we combine new observations on the recent tectonic evolution with newly obtained 39Ar-40Ar ages for cryptomelane from Katanga (Kasekelesa) and Kasaï (Mt Mwatshimwa) and the preliminary results of the Landana condensed section ( 45 m) Paleogene-Neogene sequence. The maximum burial in the Congo Basin is estimated at 80 Ma and was followed by the removal of at least 900-1500 m of sediments (Sachse et al., 2012). Soon after the 39Ar-40Ar ages reveal that a major (Campanian or older) surface formed in the Kasai and Katanga before 76 Ma, followed by at least two younger Eocene denudation episodes, during the Lutetian ( 45 Ma) and the Priabonian ( 35 Ma) and more Mio-Pliocene denudation surfaces during the Mio-Pliocene (De Putter et al., 2016). The older surface likely belongs to the subcontinental 'African Surface' that had previously not been identified for Central Africa. During this long-lasting erosional history of the central part of the Congo Basin, the Landana section along the Atlantic coast recorded a condensed ( 45 m) sequence of Paleogene-Neogene sediments. The first 25m are shallow marine carbonates with little detrital input, recording slightly increasing weathering from the Danian to the Lutetian (Bayon et al., 2016). Whether this section had a physical connection with the inland basin at the time is not known. Simultaneously, a 150 m thick eolian sand accumulation (Kalahari Group s.l.) is assumed to have been deposited in the south-western margin of the Congo Basin. The strong silicification at the top of the Lutetian beds of the Landana section indicates a major discontinuity, which would correspond to the Lutetian denudation surface in Katanga. After this hiatus, sedimentation recorded by the Landana section changes sharply to coarse-grained siliciclastics, through a likely (re-established?) connection with the inland basin. A major change in sediment source is confirmed by ɛNd, whereas isotopic proxies of weathering (ɛHf, 30Si) document a major decrease in weathering intensity. The sharp increase in sediment discharge is attributed to uplift along the southern and eastern margins of the Congo Basin, preceding the opening of the East African Rift in the Oligocene. Bayon et al., 2016. Goldschmidt Conf. 2016, abstract book, 181 De Putter et al., 2015. Ore Geol. Rev. 71, 350-362 Sachse, V.F, Delvaux, D. and Littke, R., 2012. AAPG bulletin, 96(2), 277-300.

  20. Numerical simulation of backward erosion piping in heterogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yue; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Wang, Yu-Li; Liu, Mingwei; Wang, Junjie; Hao, Yonghong

    2017-04-01

    Backward erosion piping (BEP) is one of the major causes of seepage failures in levees. Seepage fields dictate the BEP behaviors and are influenced by the heterogeneity of soil properties. To investigate the effects of the heterogeneity on the seepage failures, we develop a numerical algorithm and conduct simulations to study BEP progressions in geologic media with spatially stochastic parameters. Specifically, the void ratio e, the hydraulic conductivity k, and the ratio of the particle contents r of the media are represented as the stochastic variables. They are characterized by means and variances, the spatial correlation structures, and the cross correlation between variables. Results of the simulations reveal that the heterogeneity accelerates the development of preferential flow paths, which profoundly increase the likelihood of seepage failures. To account for unknown heterogeneity, we define the probability of the seepage instability (PI) to evaluate the failure potential of a given site. Using Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS), we demonstrate that the PI value is significantly influenced by the mean and the variance of ln k and its spatial correlation scales. But the other parameters, such as means and variances of e and r, and their cross correlation, have minor impacts. Based on PI analyses, we introduce a risk rating system to classify the field into different regions according to risk levels. This rating system is useful for seepage failures prevention and assists decision making when BEP occurs.

  1. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  2. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  3. RAINFALL EROSIVITY IN SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA *Ezemonye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2011-10-13

    Oct 13, 2011 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management EJESM Vol. 5 No. 2 2012 ..... a rainfall erosivity model for the Mediterranean region, Journal of Hydrology ... Journal of Applied. Social Sciences, vol 1 no 1 pp 5-14.

  4. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  5. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  6. Vegetated Reinforced Soil Slope Streambank Erosion Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sotir, Robbin B; Fischenich, J. C

    2003-01-01

    ...). The VRSS system is useful for the immediate repair or prevention of deeper failures providing a structurally sound system with soil reinforcement, drainage and erosion control typically on steepened...

  7. Regulated Environmental Activity Sites - CriticalErosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Created based on the Critical Erosion Report for 2005. Indicates the condition of shoreline, determined by our staff of Coastal Engineers, for the year 2005. This...

  8. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  9. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  10. Rapid Cenozoic Subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico Resulting From Hess Rise Conjugate Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huilin; Gurnis, Michael; Skogseid, Jakob

    2017-11-01

    Enigmatic surface deflections occurred in North America starting from the Cretaceous, including the continental-scale drainage reorganization and the long-wavelength subsidence in the Western Interior Seaway. These surface undulations cannot be simply explained by sea level change or flexure loading. Coinciding with the large-scale surface deflection, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) has an immense Paleocene sediment deposition probably caused by tectonic subsidence. Increasing evidence indicates a distinct seismic anomaly localized in the mantle below the GOM. With geodynamic models, we show that the Hess Rise conjugate coincides with the position of the seismic anomaly. The basalt-eclogite transition in the Hess conjugate can lead to a localized dynamic subsidence in the GOM, which is superimposed on the broad surface deflection caused by the Farallon slab. The Hess conjugate, transformed to eclogite, could tilt the surface southward in the U.S. and help frame the GOM as a main depocenter in the Cenozoic.

  11. Cenozoic tectonics of western North America controlled by evolving width of Farallon slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, W P; Stegman, D R; Farrington, R J; Freeman, J; Moresi, L

    2010-07-16

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through two modes: subducting plate motion and trench migration. Using a global subduction zone data set and three-dimensional numerical subduction models, we show that slab width (W) controls these modes and the partitioning of subduction between them. Subducting plate velocity scales with W(2/3), whereas trench velocity scales with 1/W. These findings explain the Cenozoic slowdown of the Farallon plate and the decrease in subduction partitioning by its decreasing slab width. The change from Sevier-Laramide orogenesis to Basin and Range extension in North America is also explained by slab width; shortening occurred during wide-slab subduction and overriding-plate-driven trench retreat, whereas extension occurred during intermediate to narrow-slab subduction and slab-driven trench retreat.

  12. Climate vs. tectonic induced variations in Cenozoic sediment supply from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    -22] and floral assemblages [23]. The Paleocene and Eocene epochs were times of warm climates, peaking in the Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum [21]. A rapid cooling on the Eocene-Oligocene transition changed the global conditions from ‘greenhouse’ to ‘icehouse’, resulting in glaciers reaching sea level in East......-36. 12. Riis, F., Quantification of Cenozoic vertical movements of Scandinavia by correlation of morphological surfaces with offshore data. Global and Planetary Change, 1996. 12(1-4): p. 331-357. 13. Rasmussen, E.S., The interplay between true eustatic sea-level changes, tectonics, and climatic changes...... Greenland [24] as well as in increased seasonality through colder winters [25]. After a subsequent warming in late Oligocene and Early Miocene the climate started to deteriorate after the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum towards the Pliocene when the North Hemisphere Glaciation begun and the frequency...

  13. [Principal stages in the Cenozoic diversification of shallow-water molluscan faunas in the North Pacific].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafanov, A I

    2006-01-01

    Cluster analysis of bivalve species recorded in Cenozoic deposits in Sakhalin Island, western Kamchatka, Hokkaido, and California was used to determine geological age of the modem North Pacific biogeographic region and its constituent subregions (Japan-Mandchurian, Beringian, and Oregon-Sitkan). The North Pacific region developed during the Paleogene-Neogene transition due to Drake Passage opening to deep-water movement, formation of the deep-water Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the change in climate from greenhouse to psychospheric. Differentiation of the three subregions within the North Pacific Region seems to have occurred in late Miocene-early Pliocene, about 5.6 millions years ago and was probably due to the flooding of the Bering Land Bridge and development of the present configuration of circulation in the North Pacific. In the Northwest Pacific, during Paleogene and early Neogene, the faunal diversification occurred more rapidly and was more extensive than in the Northeast Pacific.

  14. Soil erosion - a local and national problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.G. Bates; O.R. Zeasman

    1930-01-01

    The erosion of soils through the action of rain water and that from melting snow is almost universal in its occurrence. The gradual erosion and levelling of any country is inevitable, being a process which has gone on as long as there has been free water on the face of the earth. Nevertheless, this process is an extremely slow one where the landscape is naturally well...

  15. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in c...

  16. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Nearing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natural, non-cropped conditions have been documented to be less than 2 Mg ha−1 yr−1. On-site rates of erosion of lands under cultivation over large cropland areas, such as in the United States, have been documented to be on the order of 6 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. In northeastern China, lands that were brought into production during the last century are thought to have average rates of erosion over this large area of as much as 15 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. Broadly applied soil conservation practices, and in particular conservation tillage and no-till cropping, have been found to be effective in reducing rates of erosion, as was seen in the United States when the average rates of erosion on cropped lands decreased from on the order of 9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 to 6 or 7 Mg ha−1 yr−1 between 1982 and 2002, coincident with the widespread adoption of new conservation tillage and residue management practices. Taking cropped lands out of production and restoring them to perennial plant cover, as was done in areas of the United States under the Conservation Reserve Program, is thought to reduce average erosion rates to approximately 1 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or less on those lands.

  17. Impacts of decentralization - erosion or renewal?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Madsen, Jørgen Steen; Due, Jesper Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    to observe erosive tendencies in these hitherto sturdy fortresses of “organised decentralisation”. It is the main thesis of this article that the dualistic German system makes it more difficult for the German parties to adapt the bargaining system so that their overall coordination can be preserved even...... and the more homogeneous composition of company sizes in Denmark are core explanations why Denmark exhibits fewer erosive trends than Germany and more signs of renewal in the development towards multi-level regulation....

  18. Carbon isotope ratio of Cenozoic CO2: A comparative evaluation of available geochemical proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Brett J.; Meyers, Stephen R.; Pagani, Mark

    2010-07-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of plant material is commonly used to reconstruct the relative distribution of C3 and C4 plants in ancient ecosystems. However, such estimates depend on the δ13C of atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2) at the time, which likely varied throughout Earth history. For this study, we use benthic and planktonic δ13C and δ18O records to reconstruct a long-term record of Cenozoic δ13CCO2. Confidence intervals for δ13CCO2 values are assigned after careful consideration of equilibrium and non-equilibrium isotope effects and processes, as well as resolution of the data. We find that benthic foraminifera better constrain δ13CCO2 compared to planktonic foraminiferal records, which are influenced by photosymbiotes, depth of production, seasonal variability, and preservation. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses designed to quantify the effects of temperature uncertainty and diagenesis on benthic foraminifera δ13C and δ18O values indicate that these factors act to offset one another. Our reconstruction suggests that Cenozoic δ13CCO2 averaged -6.1 ± 0.6‰ (1σ), while only 11.2 million of the last 65.5 million years correspond to the pre-Industrial value of -6.5‰ (with 90% confidence). Here δ13CCO2 also displays significant variations throughout the record, at times departing from the pre-Industrial value by more than 2‰. Thus, the observed variability in δ13CCO2 should be considered in isotopic reconstructions of ancient terrestrial-plant ecosystems, especially during the Late and Middle Miocene, times of presumed C4 grassland expansion.

  19. The late Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the South China Sea: A petrologic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanshu; Shi, Xuefa; Castillo, Paterno R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a review of available petrological, geochonological and geochemical data for late Mesozoic to Recent igneous rocks in the South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent regions and a discussion of their petrogeneses and tectonic implications. The integration of these data with available geophysical and other geologic information led to the following tectono-magmatic model for the evolution of the SCS region. The geochemical characteristics of late Mesozoic granitic rocks in the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB), micro-blocks in the SCS, the offshore continental shelf and Dalat zone in southern Vietnam, and the Schwaner Mountains in West Kalimantan, Borneo indicate that these are mainly I-type granites plus a small amount of S-type granites in the PRMB. These granitoids were formed in a continental arc tectonic setting, consistent with the ideas proposed by Holloway (1982) and Taylor and Hayes (1980, 1983), that there existed an Andean-type volcanic arc during later Mesozoic era in the SCS region. The geochonological and geochemical characteristics of the volcanics indicate an early period of bimodal volcanism (60-43 Ma or 32 Ma) at the northern margin of the SCS, followed by a period of relatively passive style volcanism during Cenozoic seafloor spreading (37 or 30-16 Ma) within the SCS, and post-spreading volcanism (tholeiitic series at 17-8 Ma, followed by alkali series from 8 Ma to present) in the entire SCS region. The geodynamic setting of the earlier volcanics was an extensional regime, which resulted from the collision between India and Eurasian plates since the earliest Cenozoic, and that of the post-spreading volcanics may be related to mantle plume magmatism in Hainan Island. In addition, the nascent Hainan plume may have played a significant role in the extension along the northern margin and seafloor spreading in the SCS.

  20. Meso–Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure in the Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxing Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bohai Bay Basin is a region where part of the North China Craton has been thinned and destroyed. It has experienced two periods of crustal thinning that occurred during the Cretaceous and Paleogene, but investigations of its Mesozoic and Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure are limited. Therefore, in this study, the distributions of mantle heat flow, crustal heat flow, and Moho temperatures during the Meso–Cenozoic are calculated based on analyses of the thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin. The results indicate that the ratio of mantle heat flow to surface heat flow peaked during the late stages of the early Cretaceous and during the middle to late Paleogene. The corresponding mantle heat flow was more than 65% of the surface heat flow. Moho temperatures reached three peaks: 900–1100 °C in the late stages of the early Cretaceous; 820–900 °C in the middle to late Paleogene; and (in the Linqing Depression, Cangxian Uplift, and Jizhong Depression 770–810 °C during the early Neogene. These results reveal that the Bohai Bay Basin experienced significant geological change during the Cretaceous, including the transformation of lithospheric thermal structure from “cold mantle and hot crust” before the Cretaceous to “hot mantle and cold crust” after the Cretaceous. The results also indicate that the basin experienced two large-scale rifting events. Therefore, this work may provide the thermal parameters for further investigations of the geodynamic evolution of eastern China.

  1. A Late Cenozoic Kinematic Model for Deformation Within the Greater Cascadia Subduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. S.; McCrory, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Relatively low fault slip rates have complicated efforts to characterize seismic hazards associated with the diffuse subduction boundary between North America and offshore oceanic plates in the Pacific Northwest region. A kinematic forward model that encompasses a broader region, and incorporates seismologic and geodetic as well as geologic and paleomagnetic constraints offers a tool for constraining fault rupture chronologies—all within a framework tracking relative motion of the Juan de Fuca, Pacific, and North American plates during late Cenozoic time. Our kinematic model tracks motions as a system of rigid microplates, bounded by the more important mapped faults of the region or zones of distributed deformation. Though our emphasis is on Washington and Oregon, the scope of the model extends eastward to the rigid craton in Montana and Wyoming, and southward to the Sierra Nevada block of California to provide important checks on its internal consistency. The model reproduces observed geodetic velocities [e.g., McCaffrey et al., 2013, JGR], for 6 Ma to present, with only minor reorganization for 12-6 Ma. Constraints for the older deformation history are based on paleomagnetic rotations within the Columbia River Basalt Group, and geologic details of fault offsets. Since 17 Ma, our model includes 50 km of N-S shortening across the central Yakima fold and thrust belt, substantial NW-SE right-lateral strike slip distributed among faults in the Washington Cascade Range, 90 km of shortening on thrusts of Puget Lowland, and substantial oroclinal bending of the Crescent Formation basement surrounding the Olympic Peninsula. This kinematic reconstruction provides an integrated, quantitative framework with which to investigate the motions of various PNW forearc and backarc blocks during late Cenozoic time, an essential tool for characterizing the seismic risk associated with the Puget Sound and Portland urban areas, hydroelectric dams, and other critical infrastructure.

  2. The evolution of mammal body sizes: responses to Cenozoic climate change in North American mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, B G; Mowoe, M O

    2013-06-01

    Explanations for the evolution of body size in mammals have remained surprisingly elusive despite the central importance of body size in evolutionary biology. Here, we present a model which argues that the body sizes of Nearctic mammals were moulded by Cenozoic climate and vegetation changes. Following the early Eocene Climate Optimum, forests retreated and gave way to open woodland and savannah landscapes, followed later by grasslands. Many herbivores that radiated in these new landscapes underwent a switch from browsing to grazing associated with increased unguligrade cursoriality and body size, the latter driven by the energetics and constraints of cellulose digestion (fermentation). Carnivores also increased in size and digitigrade, cursorial capacity to occupy a size distribution allowing the capture of prey of the widest range of body sizes. With the emergence of larger, faster carnivores, plantigrade mammals were constrained from evolving to large body sizes and most remained smaller than 1 kg throughout the middle Cenozoic. We find no consistent support for either Cope's Rule or Bergmann's Rule in plantigrade mammals, the largest locomotor guild (n = 1186, 59% of species in the database). Some cold-specialist plantigrade mammals, such as beavers and marmots, showed dramatic increases in body mass following the Miocene Climate Optimum which may, however, be partially explained by Bergmann's rule. This study reemphasizes the necessity of considering the evolutionary history and resultant form and function of mammalian morphotypes when attempting to understand contemporary mammalian body size distributions. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. Evidence for a Cenozoic radiation of ferns in an angiosperm-dominated canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettpelz, Eric; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2009-07-07

    In today's angiosperm-dominated terrestrial ecosystems, leptosporangiate ferns are truly exceptional--accounting for 80% of the approximately 11,000 nonflowering vascular plant species. Recent studies have shown that this remarkable diversity is mostly the result of a major leptosporangiate radiation beginning in the Cretaceous, following the rise of angiosperms. This pattern is suggestive of an ecological opportunistic response, with the proliferation of flowering plants across the landscape resulting in the formation of many new niches--both on forest floors and within forest canopies--into which leptosporangiate ferns could diversify. At present, one-third of leptosporangiate species grow as epiphytes in the canopies of angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forests. However, we know too little about the evolutionary history of epiphytic ferns to assess whether or not their diversification was in fact linked to the establishment of these forests, as would be predicted by the ecological opportunistic response hypothesis. Here we provide new insight into leptosporangiate diversification and the evolution of epiphytism by integrating a 400-taxon molecular dataset with an expanded set of fossil age constraints. We find evidence for a burst of fern diversification in the Cenozoic, apparently driven by the evolution of epiphytism. Whether this explosive radiation was triggered simply by the establishment of modern angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forest canopies, or spurred on by some other large-scale extrinsic factor (e.g., climate change) remains to be determined. In either case, it is clear that in both the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, leptosporangiate ferns were adept at exploiting newly created niches in angiosperm-dominated ecosystems.

  4. First results of high-resolution modeling of Cenozoic subduction orogeny in Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Sobolev, S. V.; Babeyko, A. Y.; Krueger, F.; Quinteros, J.; Popov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Andean Orogeny is the result of the upper-plate crustal shortening during the Cenozoic Nazca plate subduction beneath South America plate. With up to 300 km shortening, the Earth's second highest Altiplano-Puna Plateau was formed with a pronounced N-S oriented deformation diversity. Furthermore, the tectonic shortening in the Southern Andes was much less intensive and started much later. The mechanism of the shortening and the nature of N-S variation of its magnitude remain controversial. The previous studies of the Central Andes suggested that they might be related to the N-S variation in the strength of the lithosphere, friction coupling at slab interface, and are probably influenced by the interaction of the climate and tectonic systems. However, the exact nature of the strength variation was not explored due to the lack of high numerical resolution and 3D numerical models at that time. Here we will employ large-scale subduction models with a high resolution to reveal and quantify the factors controlling the strength of lithospheric structures and their effect on the magnitude of tectonic shortening in the South America plate between 18°-35°S. These high-resolution models are performed by using the highly scalable parallel 3D code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model). This code is based on finite difference staggered grid approach and employs massive linear and non-linear solvers within the PETSc library to complete high-performance MPI-based parallelization in geodynamic modeling. Currently, in addition to benchmark-models we are developing high-resolution (Paleozoic-Cenozoic sediments above the uppermost crust in the Subandean Ranges. Future work will be focused on the origin of different styles of deformation and topography evolution in Altiplano-Puna Plateau and Central-Southern Andes through 3D modeling of large-scale interaction of subducting and overriding plates.

  5. The evolution of endothermy in Cenozoic mammals: a plesiomorphic-apomorphic continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Barry Gordon

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of endothermy in birds and mammals was one of the most important events in the evolution of the vertebrates. Past tests of hypotheses on the evolution of endothermy in mammals have relied largely on analyses of the relationship between basal and maximum metabolic rate, and artificial selection experiments. I argue that components of existing hypotheses, as well as new hypotheses, can be tested using an alternative macrophysiological modeling approach by examining the development of endothermy during the Cenozoic. Recent mammals display a 10°C range in body temperature which is sufficiently large to identify the selective forces that have driven the development of endothermy from a plesiomorphic (ancestral) Cretaceous or Jurassic condition. A model is presented (the Plesiomorphic-Apomorphic Endothermy Model, PAE Model) which proposes that heterothermy, i.e. bouts of normothermy (constant body temperature) interspersed with adaptive heterothermy (e.g. daily torpor and/or hibernation), was the ancestral condition from which apomorphic (derived), rigid homeothermy evolved. All terrestrial mammal lineages are examined for existing data to test the model, as well as for missing data that could be used to test the model. With the exception of Scandentia and Dermoptera, about which little is known, all mammalian orders that include small-sized mammals (Pholidota, and Lagomorpha) are comprised of medium- to large-sized mammals that have either lost the capacity for heterothermy, or in which heterothermy has yet to be measured. Mammalian heterothermy seems to be plesiomorphic and probably evolved once in the mammalian lineage. Several categories of endothermy are identified (protoendothermy, plesioendothermy, apoendothermy, basoendothermy, mesoendothermy, supraendothermy, and reversed mesoendothermy) to describe the evolution of endothermy during the Cenozoic. The PAE Model should facilitate the testing of hypotheses using a range of macrophysiological methods

  6. SOIL EROSION FROM AREA IANOVA, TIMIS COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STELA URUIOC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on an area of erosion soils developed in Timis county of North - East of Timisoara. Soil erosion phenomenon intensity over the field of Ianova area is controlled by environment factors: relief, climate (rainfall intensity and runoff, vegetation, lithological substratum and human activity. Slope erosion state on erosion classes show that more than half of slope lands are affected by moderate and strong erosion. Ecopedological indicators of chemical soil characterization present lower values while erosion degree progresses. Thus, humus cantity progressively comes down from soil weak eroded (3,90-2,82% to soil excessive eroded (1,14%-1,11%. Nitrogen content expressed through nitrogen indicator has medium values (1,86-3,04 for weak and moderate eroded soils and small values (0,96-0,21 for excessive eroded soils. Potassium content substantially comes down from weak eroded soils (180ppm till to those excessive eroded (132 ppm. Phosphorus content has small values for all eroded soils (4,70-2,68 ppm. For eroded fields of Ianova area we propose: antierosional developments, agropedoimprovement works, antierosional agrotechnical works.

  7. Dental erosion: causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a commonly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies which explain the problem of dental erosion. For this article, literature was analyzed to find information on the agents which trigger dental erosion, the main diagnosis methods, the most common treatments used nowadays and the interrelationship with dental materials. The etiology of dental erosion is multifactorial, including acids, eating disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, biological factors such as saliva or habits also play a part in the establishment of this condition. In order to establish a reliable diagnosis, clinical appearance becomes decisive. The Basic Index Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE, created in 2008, is an auxiliary diagnosis tool for assessing the status and progress of the erosion. Treatment should be linked to the eradication of the causative agent and it can range from simple observational monitoring of slightly affected teeth to the placement of total crowns in the most severe cases, but this will depend entirely on the extent, severity, symptoms and type of dentition. Regarding dental materials used in the treatment of eroded parts, there are glass ionomer and composite; the latter presents the greatest resistance to biodegradation when interacting with acids. Glass ionomers are the most vulnerable material while resin is seen as the most resistant. In conclusion, dental erosion has become an issue of great importance in the dental practice because of its serious impact on dental structures. Consequently, it is ranked among the most important dental disorders in the present day.

  8. The offshore record of variable Cenozoic sediment flux from Western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    ). This is believed mainly to be a consequence of varying erosion rates and/or changes in sediment catchments in Western Scandinavia. This has previously been interpreted in terms of variable tectonic uplift of the area caused by a hitherto unknown tectonic agent; Neither crustal shortening and thickening or magmatic......, 2005) to glacial. As, furthermore, glacial erosion (the glacial "buzzsaw" Mitchell and Montgomery, 2006; Brozovic et al., 1997; Pedersen et al, 2008) and periglacial processes (Anderson, 2002) are known to possess the potential for producing characteristic low-relief accordant landscapes at high......, given the Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse-icehouse transition, which must have increased the importance of glacial and periglacial erosion and transport processes in the highlands of western Scandinavia, a hypothesis of climate control on erosional and depositional history of western Scandinavia...

  9. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; J. W. Wagenbrenner; R. E. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Rill erosion can be a large portion of the total erosion in disturbed forests, but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were conducted in two forested areas in the northwestern United States on slopes ranging from 18 to 79%. We compared runoff rates, runoff velocities, and sediment flux rates from...

  10. Satellite-based estimation of rainfall erosivity for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Sterk, G.; Jong, S.M. de

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a measure for the erosive force of rainfall. Rainfall kinetic energy determines the erosivity and is in turn greatly dependent on rainfall intensity. Attempts for its large-scale mapping are rare. Most are based on interpolation of erosivity values derived from rain gauge

  11. Profound Endothelial Damage Predicts Impending Organ Failure and Death in Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Maria E; Johansson, Pär I.; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial damage contributes to organ failure and mortality in sepsis, but the extent of the contribution remains poorly quantified. Here, we examine the association between biomarkers of superficial and profound endothelial damage (syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin [sTM], respectively), or...

  12. Visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities: An inventory of visual functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, E.G.C.; Janssen, C.G.C.; van Ramshorst, T.; Deen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities (SPMD) is the subject of considerable debate and is difficult to assess. Methods: In a typical Dutch care organization, all clients with SPMD (n = 76) participated in the study and specific

  13. The Relationship between Communication Problems and Psychological Difficulties in Persons with Profound Acquired Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, John F.; Lansing, Charissa R.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-seven adults with postlingually acquired profound deafness were administered the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired and several tests of psychological functioning and adjustment. Inadequate communication strategies and poor accommodations to deafness were associated with depression, social introversion, loneliness, and social…

  14. The Role of Sound in Residential Facilities for People With Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Kirsten A.; Andringa, Tjeerd C.; Baskent, Deniz; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Attention to the auditory environment of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is limited, both in research and practice. As there is a dynamic interplay between the quality of the auditory environment and well-being, a study was undertaken to test the validity of the

  15. Staff interactive style during multisensory storytelling with persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penne, A.; ten Brug, A.; Munde, V.; van der Putten, A.; Vlaskamp, C.; Maes, B.

    Background Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is an individualised activity for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) in which a story is being told with an emphasis on sensory experiences and social interaction. MSST is a promising approach, but needs more empirical

  16. Staff Interactive Style during Multisensory Storytelling with Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penne, A.; ten Brug, A.; Munde, V.; van der Putten, A.; Vlaskamp, C.; Maes, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multisensory storytelling (MSST) is an individualised activity for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) in which a story is being told with an emphasis on sensory experiences and social interaction. MSST is a promising approach, but needs more empirical research evidence. In general, there is a lack of…

  17. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  18. The Influence of Phonological Mechanisms in Written Spelling of Profoundly Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lucia; Arfe, Barbara; Bronte, Tiziana

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of phonological and working memory mechanisms involved in spelling Italian single words was explored in two groups of children matched for grade level: a group of normally hearing children and a group of pre-verbally deaf children, with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Three-syllable and four-syllable familiar…

  19. The role of attention in the affective life of people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Pieter; De Cock, Paul; Munde, Vera; Neerinckx, Heleen; Petry, Katja; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Maes, Bea

    Although it is shown that attention plays an important role both in the onset and in the regulation of emotions in people without disabilities there is no information about how attention is related to emotions in people with severe or profound intellectual disability (ID). Therefore, in our study,

  20. The impact of medical conditions on the support of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, HP; Vlaskamp, C

    Background The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records

  1. Assessing the Efficacy of an Academic Hearing Peer Tutor for a Profoundly Deaf Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of using a hearing peer tutor to provide daily 20-minute math instruction for a profoundly deaf sixth-grade girl indicated that the peer tutoring intervention was highly successful, with the tutee meeting accuracy criteria for each of 4 curriculum objectives after only a brief period of intervention. (Author/DB)

  2. Profoundly Gifted Girls and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Psychometric Case Study Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Susan G.; Nicpon, Megan Foley; Doobay, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    A case study of the psychometric characteristics of two profoundly gifted girls, one with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the other without ASD, is used to describe the nuances and subtleties most relevant in understanding the relationship between extreme giftedness and social difficulties. Through the presentation of the results from…

  3. Identification Audiometry in an Institutionalized Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ernest J.; And Others

    An audiometric screening survey was conducted on a severely and profoundly mentally retarded population using noise-makers and pure tone audiometry. Of those tested with noise-makers, 83% gave an identifiable response to sound, 7% did not respond, and 10% were considered difficult-to-test. By contrast, 4% passed, 2% failed, and 94% were…

  4. Incidence of Short-Sleep Patterns in Institutionalized Individuals with Profound Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Ann R.; Bihm, Elson M.

    1994-01-01

    Sleep patterns of 103 institutionalized individuals with profound mental retardation were explored. Almost 40% were found to have short-sleep patterns. Short-sleep was predicted by blindness; nonshort-sleep was predicted by diagnosis of cerebral palsy and sodium valproate usage. Techniques for minimizing possible negative consequences of…

  5. What parents find important in the support of a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S. L. G.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    Background The importance of a partnership between parents and professionals in the support of children with disabilities is widely acknowledged and is one of the key elements of family-centred care'. To what extent family-centred principles are also applied to the support of persons with profound

  6. Motor interventions in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities: motor, cognitive and social effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, Suzanne; van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is generally agreed that motor activity promotes motor, cognitive, and social development, but the specific benefits in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities (S-PID) are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to

  7. Multisensory Narrative Tracking by a Profoundly Deaf Subject Using an Electrocutaneous Vocoder and a Vibrotactile Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study assessed the ability to track connected discourse by a congenitally profoundly deaf adult using an electrocutaneous vocoder and/or a vibrotactile aid in conjunction with or without lipreading and aided hearing. Overall, improvement in tracking performance occurred within and across phases of the study. (Author/DB)

  8. Investigating the Relationship between Observed Mood and Emotions in People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, P.; De Cock, P.; Petry, K.; Van Den Noortgate, W.; Maes, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The measurement of subjective well-being in people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities (ID) is a difficult challenge. As they cannot self-report about their life satisfaction, because of severe communicative and cognitive limitations, behavioural observations of their emotions and moods are important in the measurement…

  9. Eptifibatide induced profound thrombocytopenia in a patient with pelvic malignancy: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Squires, Kathryn C.; Guntupalli, Saketh R.; Thaker, Premal H.

    2012-01-01

    ► Eptifibatide is associated with profound thrombocytopenia and thrombosis secondary to a HITT-like mechanism associated with drug-dependant antibodies. ► Caution with eptifibatide use is needed in those pre-disposed to hypercoaguability, particularly those with an underlying malignancy.

  10. The Development of Plato Computer-Based Instruction for the Severely and Profoundly Developmentally Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Martin A.; Clapp, Elizabeth Jane

    The 2 year project (July 1, 1978 through June 30, 1980) sought to determine the viability, attractiveness, and effectiveness of computer based instruction with approximately 225 severely and profoundly mentally handicapped and developmentally disabled institutionalized children and adults. Over 100 instructional formats were developed by staff…

  11. Peer Interactions among children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities during group activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    Background Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the

  12. Profound hypotension after an intradermal injection of indigo carmine for sentinel node mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Mi Geum; Yun, Soon Young; Lee, Kyung Cheon

    2013-03-01

    Intradermal injections of indigo carmine for sentinel node mapping are considered safe and no report of an adverse reaction has been published. The authors described two cases of profound hypotension in women that underwent breast-conserving surgery after an intradermal injection of indigo carmine into the periareolar area for sentinel node mapping.

  13. Profound Hypotension after an Intradermal Injection of Indigo Carmine for Sentinel Node Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Mi Geum; Yun, Soon Young; Lee, Kyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    Intradermal injections of indigo carmine for sentinel node mapping are considered safe and no report of an adverse reaction has been published. The authors described two cases of profound hypotension in women that underwent breast-conserving surgery after an intradermal injection of indigo carmine into the periareolar area for sentinel node mapping.

  14. Extent, Duration, and Content of Day Services' Activities for Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, Carla; Hiemstra, Saskia J.; Wiersma, Linda A.; Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the Dutch government instituted policies that enable persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) to attend day services. Over the past 15 years, surveys have indicated a progressive increase in the number of hours that such adults spend at day activities centers. However, information about how these…

  15. Individual Focus in an Activity Centre: An Observational Study among Persons with Profound and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, S. J.; Vlaskamp, C.; Wiersma, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) are being offered more--and more frequent--day services at activity centres. Little is known about the way direct support persons (DSP) in activity centres divide their time over the various tasks they have to perform and to what extent they are focused on…

  16. Interaction between Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Their Partners: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostyn, Ine; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: High quality interactions are of crucial importance for quality of life of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This literature review describes and synthesises studies addressing the interaction between persons with PIMD and their partners. Method: A computerised literature search using defined…

  17. A functionally focused curriculum for children with profound multiple disabilities : A goal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Reynders, K; Vlaskamp, C; Nakken, H

    Background This study analysed goals formulated in a functionally focused curriculum called Mobility Opportunities Via Education(TM) (MOVE). Method The subjects were 49 children with profound multiple disabilities (PMD) who attended a centre for special education where the MOVE curriculum was

  18. Heart rate and physical activity patterns in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Putten, A.A.J. van der; Stewart, R.E.; Steenbergen, B.; Wijck, R. van; Schans, C.P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  19. Heart rate and physical activity patterns in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Putten, A.A. van der; Stewart, R.E.; Steenbergen, B.; Wijck, R. van; Schans, C.P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  20. The Effects of Governing Board Configuration on Profound Organizational Change in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Ye, Yining; Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2006-01-01

    This study extends the literature on governing boards and organizational change by examining how governing board configurations have influenced profound organizational change in U.S. hospitals, and the conditions under which such change occurs. Hospitals governed by boards that more closely resembled a corporate governance model were more likely…

  1. HEART RATE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN PERSONS WITH PROFOUND INTELLECTUAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, Aly; van der Putten, Annette A. J.; Stewart, Roy E.; Steenbergen, Bert; van Wijck, Ruud; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2013-01-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity

  2. Connections that Count: Brain-Computer Interface Enables the Profoundly Paralyzed to Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a team of researchers in developing a brain-computer interface (BCI) system to help the profoundly paralyzed communicate. Dr. Wolpaw has received support from two NIH Institutes—NIBIB and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development—and the James S. McDonnell Foundation. "For the ...

  3. Making Sense of Bereavement in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: Carer Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah; Hogg, James; Garrard, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities are thought to have a reduced capacity for understanding death. Drawing on cognitive theory, researchers have suggested that those with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities mainly perceive loss as a mismatch between past and present experiences. However, very little research has…

  4. Assessment of Computer-Based Preferences of Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Bishop, Vanessa A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on two studies investigating the use of computer-based stimuli that may then be used to develop activities and programming for students with profound multiple disabilities (PMD). Both studies used an alternating treatments design and systematic assessment strategy to present stimuli sequentially and to measure student…

  5. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  6. The Structure of Informal Social Networks of Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, A.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persons with less severe disabilities are able to express their needs and show initiatives in social contacts, persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however, depend on others for this. This study analysed the structure of informal networks of persons with PIMD. Materials and Methods: Data concerning the…

  7. Social Peer Interactions in Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Maes, Bea

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions may positively influence developmental and quality of life outcomes. Research in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) mostly investigated interactions with caregivers. This literature review focuses on peer interactions of persons with PIMD. A computerized literature search of three databases was…

  8. An Analysis of Snoezelen Equipment to Reinforce Persons with Severe or Profound Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Smalls, Yemonja

    2004-01-01

    Systematically developing methods of reinforcement for persons with severe and profound mental retardation has only recently received a good deal of attention. This topic is important since professionals in the field often have difficulty identifying sufficient numbers of positive stimuli. Snoezelen equipment as reinforcement for individuals with…

  9. Erosivity, surface runoff, and soil erosion estimation using GIS-coupled runoff-erosion model in the Mamuaba catchment, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Richarde; Guimarães Santos, Celso Augusto; Carneiro de Lima Silva, Valeriano; Pereira e Silva, Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluates erosivity, surface runoff generation, and soil erosion rates for Mamuaba catchment, sub-catchment of Gramame River basin (Brazil) by using the ArcView Soil and Water Assessment Tool (AvSWAT) model. Calibration and validation of the model was performed on monthly basis, and it could simulate surface runoff and soil erosion to a good level of accuracy. Daily rainfall data between 1969 and 1989 from six rain gauges were used, and the monthly rainfall erosivity of each station was computed for all the studied years. In order to evaluate the calibration and validation of the model, monthly runoff data between January 1978 and April 1982 from one runoff gauge were used as well. The estimated soil loss rates were also realistic when compared to what can be observed in the field and to results from previous studies around of catchment. The long-term average soil loss was estimated at 9.4 t ha(-1) year(-1); most of the area of the catchment (60%) was predicted to suffer from a low- to moderate-erosion risk (soil erosion was estimated to exceed > 12 t ha(-1) year(-1). Expectedly, estimated soil loss was significantly correlated with measured rainfall and simulated surface runoff. Based on the estimated soil loss rates, the catchment was divided into four priority categories (low, moderate, high and very high) for conservation intervention. The study demonstrates that the AvSWAT model provides a useful tool for soil erosion assessment from catchments and facilitates the planning for a sustainable land management in northeastern Brazil.

  10. Long-term rocky coast erosion: the influence of structural pattern and lithological context, as evidenced in the chalk (NW Normandy) and granitic (SW Brittany) rocks, NW France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperret, Anne; Raimbault, Céline; Duguet, Timothée; Le Gall, Bernard; Costa, Stéphane; Vandycke, Sara

    2017-04-01

    similar onshore and offshore morphologies, with flat and wide superposed plains, limited each one by 10m high scarps. In this case, shore platform extension reaches a few km in width and appears as superposed paleo-shore platforms generated since Pleistocene (Raimbault et al, in press). The erosive process is thus link to a long-term alteration of granitic rocks since Cenozoic, mainly clear and etched during recent past high sea levels. Coastal areas with large bays appear locally to be guided by large-scale Cenozoic fractures. In some places, km-scale fractures favor a spatial concentration of erosion. They are shaping coastline orientation and shore platform ending at km-scale.

  11. Similarities between Silurian and Cenozoic basalts in rock-magnetic properties and its implication for Silurian paleogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, P.; Pruner, P.; Cajz, V.; Tasaryova, Z.; Cizkova, K.; Kletetschka, G.

    2013-05-01

    We compare two groups of basalts produced in similar conditions of environment, but significantly different in age. The younger ones represent the Ústí Fm. volcanics of the České stredohorí Mts., situated inside the Eger Graben; and the others are developed in Silurian of the Prague Basin (Barrandian). Rocks of both groups were usually produced into the wet environs. Hyaloclastite are commonly observable rocks, documenting the environment in the time of their origin. We suppose similar primary composition of magnetic carriers because both groups represent the same petrologic type. The only difference is in their age - during the time, some secondary changes on magnetic carriers could take place. The set of Cenozoic basalts consists of 292 samples (23 locations) and the Silurian set includes 485 samples (32 locations). For the comparison, we have used magnetomineralogical properties like natural remanent magnetization (NRM; Silurian 1.1±3.8 A/m, Cenozoic 2.0±2.1 A/m) , magnetic susceptibility (MS; Silurian 7.0±16.1 x10-3SI, Cenozoic 24.4±11.5 x10-3SI), unblocking temperature (UT; Silurian 200-580°C, Cenozoic 150-580°C), mean destructive field (MDF; Silurian 4-58 mT, Cenozoic 3-60 mT), Königsberger 's parameter Q (Silurian 3.93, Cenozoic 2.05) and K-parameter (precision parameter coming from Fisher statistics; Silurian7-102, Cenozoic14-643). NRM reflects the quantity of ferromagnetic minerals; MS represents total amount of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic minerals; UT is the temperature of the steepest decrease of demagnetisation curve and it is close to transition between para- and ferromagnetic behaviour; MDF represents stability character of NRM during alternating field demagnetization when 50% of initial value is reached; Q-parameter is the ratio of the remanent magnetization to the induced magnetization (product of susceptibility and the Earth's magnetic field strength - a large Q-value indicates that the magnetic material will tend to maintain

  12. Advances in wind erosion modelling in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Pasquale; Lugato, Emanuele; Alewell, Christine; Montanarella, Luca; Panagos, Panos

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion by wind is a serious environmental problem often resulting in severe forms of soil degradation. Wind erosion is also a phenomenon relevant for Europe, although this land degradation process has been overlooked until very recently. The state-of-the-art literature presents wind erosion as a process that locally affects the semi-arid areas of the Mediterranean region as well as the temperate climate areas of the northern European countries. Actual observations, field measurements and modelling assessments, however, are all extremely limited and highly unequally distributed across Europe. As a result, we currently lack comprehensive understanding about where and when wind erosion occurs in Europe, and the intensity of erosion that poses a threat to agricultural productivity. Today's challenge is to integrate the insights of local experiments and field-scale models into a new generation of large-scale wind erosion models. While naturally being less accurate than field-scale models, these large-scale modelling approaches still provide essential knowledge about where and when wind erosion occurs and can disclose the level of risk for agricultural productivity in specific areas. Here, we present a geographic information system (GIS) version of the RWEQ (named GIS-RWEQ) to quantitatively assess soil loss by wind over large study areas (Land Degradation & Development, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2588). The model designed to predict the daily soil loss potential at a ca. 1 km2 spatial resolution shows high consistency with local measurements reported in literature. The average soil loss predicted by GIS-RWEQ for the European arable land totals 62 million Mg yr-1, with an average area-specific soil loss of 0.53 Mg yr-1. The JRC model RUSLE2015, for the same area estimates 295 million Mg yr-1 of soil loss due to water erosion. Notably, soil loss by wind erosion in the European arable land could be as high as 20% of water erosion, even though the areas affected are mainly

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy in both Erosive and Non-erosive Gastritis — A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Quamrul Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a recognized cause of peptic ulcer and gastritis. Persistence of infection is a definite risk factor for gastric malignancy. Healing of gastritis after eradication of H. pylori reduces the risks of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. Objectives: To find out the relationship of H. pylori with erosive and nonerosive gastritis, the effect of anti-H. pylori therapy and to compare the effects of anti-H. pylori therapy between two types of gastritis. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the Gastroenterology department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka from June 2008 to May 2009. One hundred eighty dyspeptic patients were enrolled for the study. Patients with gastritis diagnosed by endoscopy underwent rapid urease test (RUT. RUT positive patients were considered to have H. pylori infection and were treated with triple therapy (omeprazole, amoxycillin and metronidiazole for 14 days. Treatment responses were assessed by clinical history and also by endoscopic biopsy and RUT. Results of endoscopic findings and RUT after treatment were compared with pretreatment status. Results: Seventy patients completed the treatment and finally could be assessed. Endoscopic findings of 70 patients revealed that 56 (80% patients had erosive gastritis and 14 (20% patients had nonerosive gastritis. After treatment, 47 (67.1% lesions became normal, 16 (22.9% remained erosive and 7 (10% non-erosive as before. Out of 14 non-erosive diseases, 7 became normal, while out of 56 erosive diseases 40 became normal. The erosive group responded significantly better than the non-erosive group (c2=32.766, p<0.001. Fifty nine (84.3% patients with gastritis showed negative urease test after treatment. Conclusion: Strong relation between H. pylori infection and gastritis was found. Majority were antral erosive gastritis. Erosive group responded better than non-erosive group.

  14. Annotated bibliography on soil erosion and erosion control in subarctic and high-latitude regions of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Slaughter; J.W. Aldrich

    1989-01-01

    This annotated bibliography emphasizes the physical processes of upland soil erosion, prediction of soil erosion and sediment yield, and erosion control. The bibliography is divided into two sections: (1) references specific to Alaska, the Arctic and subarctic, and similar high-latitude settings; and (2) references relevant to understanding erosion, sediment production...

  15. Predicting surfacing internal erosion in moraine core dams

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnqvist, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Dams that comprise broadly and widely graded glacial materials, such as moraines, have been found to be susceptible to internal erosion, perhaps more than dams of other soil types. Internal erosion washes out fine-grained particles from the filling material; the erosion occurs within the material itself or at an interface to another dam zone, depending on the mode of initiation. Whether or not internal erosion proceeds depend on the adequacy of the filter material. If internal erosion is allo...

  16. IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF BEDROCK EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rieke-Zapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are – if at all available – based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest

  17. Insights into preventive measures for dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Magalhães

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is defined as the loss of tooth substance by acid exposure not involving bacteria. The etiology of erosion is related to different behavioral, biological and chemical factors. Based on an overview of the current literature, this paper presents a summary of the preventive strategies relevant for patients suffering from dental erosion. Behavioral factors, such as special drinking habits, unhealthy lifestyle factors or occupational acid exposure, might modify the extent of dental erosion. Thus, preventive strategies have to include measures to reduce the frequency and duration of acid exposure as well as adequate oral hygiene measures, as it is known that eroded surfaces are more susceptible to abrasion. Biological factors, such as saliva or acquired pellicle, act protectively against erosive demineralization. Therefore, the production of saliva should be enhanced, especially in patients with hyposalivation or xerostomia. With regard to chemical factors, the modification of acidic solutions with ions, especially calcium, was shown to reduce the demineralization, but the efficacy depends on the other chemical factors, such as the type of acid. To enhance the remineralization of eroded surfaces and to prevent further progression of dental wear, high-concentrated fluoride applications are recommended. Currently, little information is available about the efficacy of other preventive strategies, such as calcium and laser application, as well as the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. Further studies considering these factors are required. In conclusion, preventive strategies for patients suffering from erosion are mainly obtained from in vitro and in situ studies and include dietary counseling, stimulation of salivary flow, optimization of fluoride regimens, modification of erosive beverages and adequate oral hygiene measures.

  18. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Stacy; S. C. Hart; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; A. A. Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Lateral movement of organic matter (OM) due to erosion is now considered an important flux term in terrestrial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets, yet most published studies on the role of erosion focus on agricultural or grassland ecosystems. To date, little information is available on the rate and nature of OM eroded from forest ecosystems. We present annual...

  19. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; W. J. Elliot; J. W. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    The decision of whether or not to apply post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatments, and if so, where these treatments are most needed, is a multi-step process. Land managers must assess the risk of damaging runoff and sediment delivery events occurring on the unrecovered burned hillslope. We developed the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) to address this need...

  20. Does a more sophisticated storm erosion model improve probabilistic erosion estimates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Callaghan, D.; Roelvink, D.

    2013-01-01

    The dependency between the accuracy/uncertainty of storm erosion exceedance estimates obtained via a probabilistic model and the level of sophistication of the structural function (storm erosion model) embedded in the probabilistic model is assessed via the application of Callaghan et al.'s (2008)

  1. Advances in Predicting Soil Erosion After Fire Using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Osama Z.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Nearing, Mark A.; Williams, C. Jason; Hernandez, Mariano; Boll, Jan; Nouwakpo, Sayjro; Weltz, Mark A.; Spaeth, Kenneth E.

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of overland flow and erosion processes. For undisturbed conditions, sediment is mainly detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in bare batches, but sediment generally only travels a short distance before deposition. On recently disturbed sites (e.g., after fire), bare ground is more extensive and runoff and erosion rates are higher relative to undisturbed conditions. Increased erosion following disturbance occurs largely due to a shift from splash-sheet to concentrated-flow-dominated processes. On long-disturbed sites (e.g., after woody plant encroachment), years of soil loss can limit sediment availability and soil erosion. In contrast, recently burned landscapes typically have ample sediment available and generate high erosion rates. This presentation highlights recent advancements in hillslope erosion prediction by the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) that accommodate recently burned conditions. The RHEM tool is a process-based model that was developed specifically for predicting hillslope runoff and erosion on rangeland ecosystems. The advancements presented here include development of empirical equations to predict erodibility parameters for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is limited (by runoff or sediment availability) and an erodibility parameter for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is the dominant erosion mechanism and sediment is amply available (burned conditions). The data used for developing and evaluating the erodibility parameter equations were obtained from rainfall simulation databases maintained by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service. The data span undisturbed, long-disturbed, and recently burned conditions. For undisturbed and long-disturbed conditions, a regression analysis was applied to derive the relationship between splash

  2. Study on the standard of soil erosion gradation based on erosive daily rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Ye, Suigao; Shen, Zhaowei; Lu, Fangchun; Zhang, Jinjuan

    2017-11-01

    This paper took Yuyao city as the research area. the daily rainfall data of 30-year was collected from the typical rainfall station. And the daily rainfall power function model was used to calculate the rainfall erosivity. The weight that the rainfall erosivity of the rainfall less than 30mm accounted for the total annual rainfall erosivity was calculated and analyzed. A method for soil erosion intensity gradation based on daily rainfall was proposed. At the same time, according to People’s Republic of China water conservancy industry standard “the standards for classification and gradation of soil erosion”, the weight value was used to establish the gradation standard of soil erosion intensity. The daily soil loss tolerance was 7 t/km2 calculated by this method.

  3. Potential for monitoring soil erosion features and soil erosion modeling components from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langran, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil erosion and its effects on soil productivity are essential in agricultural decision making and planning from the field scale to the national level. Erosion models have been primarily developed for designing erosion control systems, predicting sediment yield for reservoir design, predicting sediment transport, and simulating water quality. New models proposed are more comprehensive in that the necessary components (hydrology, erosion-sedimentation, nutrient cycling, tillage, etc.) are linked in a model appropriate for studying the erosion-productivity problem. Recent developments in remote sensing systems, such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), etc., can contribute significantly to the future development and operational use of these models.

  4. Oral Communication Development in Severe to Profound Hearing Impaired Children After Receiving Aural Habilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Farin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication, cognition, language, and speech are interrelated and develop together. It should come as no surprise to us that the key to intervention with deaf children is to establish, as early as possible, a functional communication system for the child and the parents. Early intervention programs need to be multidisciplinary, technologically sound and most important, it should take cognizance of the specific context (community, country in which the child and family function. The main aim of this study was to obtain oral communication development regarding current status of the intervention (aural habilitation and speech therapyfor children with severe to profound hearing impairment in Iran. A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken on a consecutive group of children with severe to profound deafness. Nine severe to profound hearing-impaired children out of the primer 42 cases, who were detected below two years old, had been selected in the previous study to receive aural habilitation. The average of their speech intelligibility scores was near 70% at age 6, which was accounted as poor oral communication and only two of them were able to communicate by spoken language. An integrated intervention services continued again for one year and their oral communication skill was assessed by their speech intelligibility. The intelligibility test of children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read 10 questions such as where is your home. This can be answered only in one word. Each tape was presented to10 normal hearing listeners, and their task was to write down, the answers in Persian orthography. At the beginning (at age 6 the average speech intelligibility score of these children was 72% and only two of them had score of 90% and 100%. At age 7, all of the severe groups were over 90%, and only two profound ones achieved the score of 48% and 62%. All of severe groups develop oral communication, but profound ones had a semi-intelligible speech

  5. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  6. Evaluation of the serum zinc level in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, N; Mehdipour, M; Najafi, Sh; Bahramian, A; Garjani, Sh; Khoeini Poorfar, H

    2014-06-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immunologic-based disease involving skin and mucosa. This disease is generally divided into two categories: erosive and non-erosive. Many etiologic factors are deliberated regarding the disease; however, the disorders of immune system and the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and monocytes are more highlighted. Zinc is an imperative element for the growth of epithelium and its deficiency induces the cytotoxic activity of T-helper2 cells, which seems to be associated with lichen planus. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of serum zinc in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) and to compare it with the healthy control group to find out any feasible inference. A total of 22 patients with erosive oral lichen planus, 22 patients with non erosive OLP and 44 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited in this descriptive-comparative study. All the participants were selected from the referees to the department of oral medicine, school of dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Serum zinc level was examined for all the individuals with liquid-stat kit (Beckman Instruments Inc.; Carlsbad, CA). Data were analyzed by adopting the ANOVA and Tukey tests, using SPSS 16 statistical software. The mean age of patients with erosive and non-erosive LP was 41.7 and 41.3 years, respectively. The mean age of the healthy control group was 34.4 years .The mean serum zinc levels in the erosive and non erosive lichen planus groups and control groups were 8.3 (1.15), 11.15 (0.92) and 15.74 (1.75) μg/dl respectively. The difference was statistically significant (plichen planus. This finding may probably indicate the promising role of zinc in development of oral lichen planus.

  7. Controls on Erosion in the Western Tarim Basin: Implications for the Uplift of Northwest Tibet and Pamirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, P. D.; Zheng, H.; Carter, A.; Böning, P.; Jonell, T. N.; Pahnke, K.

    2016-12-01

    While the processes controlling erosion on the southern monsoon-influenced side of the Tibetan Plateau have been explored, those that dominate the drier regions north of the plateau are less well understood. We use a multiproxy approach to quantify erosion and assess variability in three rivers, the Hotan River draining the North Kunlun Block, the Yarkand River originating from the Karakoram, and the Kashgar River that flows from the eastern Pamirs. U-Pb zircon dating of modern river sands points to a strong control by topography and precipitation mediated through glaciation on erosion intensity in the Yarkand. Apatite fission track ages are younger in the Hotan River than in the Kashgar. Both rivers yield younger ages and faster exhumation rates than in the Transhimalaya and the western edge of the Tibetan Plateau. Exhumation rates are estimated at 1000 m/m.y in the North Kunlun and 500 m/m.y. in the eastern Pamirs, which are exhuming more slowly than the western Pamirs in the recent past. Our data indicate the Yarkand drainage system is relatively young as no sediment similar to the modern Yarkand River is found in older Cenozoic foreland sedimentary rocks. Uplift of the North Kunlun is interpreted to have started by 17 Ma, somewhat after uplift of the Pamirs and Songpan Garze in NW Tibet, which started before 24 Ma. Sediment eroded from the Kunlun reached the foreland basin between 14 and 11 Ma. Uplift appears to be propagating north through time with North Kunlun exhumation accelerating before 3.7 Ma, likely linked to enhanced rock uplift at that time.

  8. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-12-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar-Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2-555.3 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0-44,010.7 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar-Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  9. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion -- lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-01-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar–Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m−2 d−1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2–555.3 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0–44,010.7 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar–Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  10. A high-resolution multi-proxy record of late Cenozoic environment change from central Taklimakan Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Sun, D. H.; Wang, F.; Li, B. F.; Wu, S.; Guo, F.; Li, Z. J.; Zhang, Y. B.; Chen, F. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Taklimakan Desert in the Tarim Basin is the largest desert in Central Asia, and is regarded as one of the main dust sources to the Northern Hemisphere. Late Cenozoic sedimentary sequences with intercalated in-situ aeolian dune sands in this area preserve direct evidence for the Asian desertification. Herein, we report a high-resolution multi-proxy climatic record from the precise magnetostratigraphic dated Hongbaishan section in the central Taklimakan Desert. Our results show that a fundamental climate change, characterised by significant cooling, enhanced aridity, and intensified atmospheric circulation, occurred at 2.8 Ma. Good correlations between paleo-environmental records in the dust sources and downwind areas suggest a broadly consistent climate evolution of northwestern China during the late Cenozoic, which is probably driven by the uplift of the Tibet Plateau and the Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  11. An Experimental Simulation Method of Erosion Process on Gully Erosion in Loess Plateau in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianen; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2017-04-01

    In view of simulation difficultment of the field gully erosion process because of complex of rainfall runoff erosion mechanism and gully geometry a design means and experimentation technology and its verification test were given based on similarity theory and hydrodynamic principles. The basic ideas was that the erosion process of the field erosion gully was forecast by constructing similar model. The model and antetype should be in obedience to the same physical equations of rainfall, runoff, erosion, sediment transport, bed deformation and Soil water transport. The geometric, kinematical and dynamic similarity must be obeyed for these models. The primary similarity scale relation expressions were the ones of the geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion sediment transport and soil water movement similarity etc. The similarity of the hydraulic boundary was the necessary and sufficient condition between the model and the prototype. The gully prototype is one of Majiagou of Ansai county of Yanan City of Shaanxi Province in China. Its location is 36°53'55.75"N and 109°13'39.08"E. The model experiment wan carried out in State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dry land Farming On the Loess Plateau in Institute of Soil and Water Conservation of Northwest A&F University. First soil was selected by starting velocity similar. Second, the normal and scale 10 experiment model was built under complying with the similarities of geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion production sediment transport and bed deformation etc. The model hydraulic boundary from the prototype was the factor of the test process of rainfall. The experiment results indicated that the extreme rainstorm gully erosion process of the prototype could be reappeared. The equivalent rainfall process of gully prototype were that the rainfall intensity was 1.25 mm/min and the lasting time was 508 min and precipitation was 636mmn. Both the erosion amount and the erosion gully topography of the scale model were successfully

  12. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  13. Mechanism behind Erosive Bursts In Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, R.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    Erosion and deposition during flow through porous media can lead to large erosive bursts that manifest as jumps in permeability and pressure loss. Here we reveal that the cause of these bursts is the reopening of clogged pores when the pressure difference between two opposite sites of the pore surpasses a certain threshold. We perform numerical simulations of flow through porous media and compare our predictions to experimental results, recovering with excellent agreement shape and power-law distribution of pressure loss jumps, and the behavior of the permeability jumps as a function of particle concentration. Furthermore, we find that erosive bursts only occur for pressure gradient thresholds within the range of two critical values, independent of how the flow is driven. Our findings provide a better understanding of sudden sand production in oil wells and breakthrough in filtration.

  14. Exhuming the Meso–Cenozoic Kyrgyz Tianshan and Siberian Altai-Sayan: A review based on low-temperature thermochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn Glorie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermochronological datasets for the Kyrgyz Tianshan and Siberian Altai-Sayan within Central Asia reveal a punctuated exhumation history during the Meso–Cenozoic. In this paper, the datasets for both regions are collectively reviewed in order to speculate on the links between the Meso–Cenozoic exhumation of the continental Eurasian interior and the prevailing tectonic processes at the plate margins. Whereas most of the thermochronological data across both regions document late Jurassic–Cretaceous regional basement cooling, older landscape relics and dissecting fault zones throughout both regions preserve Triassic and Cenozoic events of rapid cooling, respectively. Triassic cooling is thought to reflect the Qiangtang–Eurasia collision and/or rifting/subsidence in the West Siberian basin. Alternatively, this cooling signal could be related with the terminal terrane-amalgamation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. For the Kygyz Tianshan, late Jurassic–Cretaceous regional exhumation and Cenozoic fault reactivations can be linked with specific tectonic events during the closure of the Palaeo-Tethys and Neo-Tethys Oceans, respectively. The effect of the progressive consumption of these oceans and the associated collisions of Cimmeria and India with Eurasia probably only had a minor effect on the exhumation of the Siberian Altai-Sayan. More likely, tectonic forces from the east (present-day coordinates as a result of the building and collapse of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogen and rifting in the Baikal region shaped the current Siberian Altai-Sayan topography. Although many of these hypothesised links need to be tested further, they allow a first-order insight into the dynamic response and the stress propagation pathways from the Eurasian margin into the continental interior.

  15. A high-resolution multi-proxy record of late Cenozoic environment change from central Taklimakan Desert, China

    OpenAIRE

    X Wang; Sun, D. H.; Wang, F; Li, B F; Wu, S.; Guo, F.; Li, Z. J.; Zhang, Y. B.; F. H. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The Taklimakan Desert in the Tarim Basin is the largest desert in Central Asia, and is regarded as one of the main dust sources to the Northern Hemisphere. Late Cenozoic sedimentary sequences with intercalated in-situ aeolian dune sands in this area preserve direct evidence for the Asian desertification. Herein, we report a high-resolution multi-proxy climatic record from the precise magnetostratigraphic dated Hongbaishan section in the central Taklimakan Desert. Our results...

  16. Mean Annual Precipitation Explains Spatiotemporal Patterns of Cenozoic Mammal Beta Diversity and Latitudinal Diversity Gradients in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, D; Hassall, C; Gorelick, R; Rybczynski, N

    2014-01-01

    Spatial diversity patterns are thought to be driven by climate-mediated processes. However, temporal patterns of community composition remain poorly studied. We provide two complementary analyses of North American mammal diversity, using (i) a paleontological dataset (2077 localities with 2493 taxon occurrences) spanning 21 discrete subdivisions of the Cenozoic based on North American Land Mammal Ages (36 Ma--present), and (ii) climate space model predictions for 744 extant mammals under eigh...

  17. Cenozoic Mammals and Climate Change: The Contrast between Coarse-Scale versus High-Resolution Studies Explained by Species Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Prothero

    2012-01-01

    Many paleontologists have noticed the broadly similar patterns between the changes in Cenozoic mammalian diversity and taxonomic dominance and climate changes. Yet detailed studies of fossil population samples with fine-scale temporal resolution during episodes of climate change like the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the White River Group, and the late Pleistocene at Rancho La Brea tar pits, demonstrates that most fossil mammal species are static and show no significant microevolutionary res...

  18. A high-resolution multi-proxy record of late Cenozoic environment change from central Taklimakan Desert, China

    OpenAIRE

    X Wang; Sun, D. H.; Wang, F; Li, B F; Wu, S.; Guo, F.; Li, Z. J.; Zhang, Y. B.; F. H. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The Taklimakan Desert in the Tarim Basin is the largest desert in Central Asia, and is regarded as one of the main dust sources to the Northern Hemisphere. Late Cenozoic sedimentary sequences with intercalated in-situ aeolian dune sands in this area preserve direct evidence for the Asian desertification. Herein, we report a high-resolution multi-proxy climatic record from the precise magnetostratigraphic dated Hongbaishan section in the central Taklimakan Desert. Our results show that ...

  19. Affect attunement in communicative interactions between adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and support workers

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Sheridan Lee

    2017-01-01

    The quality of life of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is affected by many factors, including health status, involvement in activities, and social networks; but most critical is the quality of interaction experienced by the person on a daily basis. For many people with PIMD, most of whom reside in residential services where they receive 24-hour support, the primary people for interaction are paid disability support workers (DSWs). Quality interaction is ...

  20. Epidemiology of fractures in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, N.R.; Fischer, M.H.; Heisey, D.M.; Leverson, G.E.; Mann, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fractures are more prevalent among people with severe and profound developmental disabilities than in the general population. In order to characterize the tendency of these people to fracture, and to identify features that may guide the development of preventive strategies, we analyzed fracture epidemiology in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities who lived in a stable environment. Data from a 23-year longitudinal cohort registry of 1434 people with severe and profound developmental disabilities were analyzed to determine the effects of age, gender, mobility, bone fractured, month of fracture, and fracture history upon fracture rates. Eighty-five percent of all fractures involved the extremities. The overall fracture rate increased as mobility increased. In contrast, femoral shaft fracture risk was substantially higher in the least mobile [relative risk (RR), 10.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.29-32.66] compared with the most mobile group. Although the overall fracture rate was not associated with age, the femoral shaft fractures decreased but hand/foot fractures increased with age. Overall fracture risk declined in August and September (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89), being especially prominent for tibial/fibular fractures (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.13-0.70). Gender was not a factor in fracture risk. Two primary fracture mechanisms are apparent: one, largely associated with lack of weight-bearing in people with the least mobility, is exemplified by femoral fractures during non-traumatic events as simple as diapering or transfers; the other, probably due to movement- or fall-related trauma, is exemplified by hand/foot fractures in people who ambulate. The fracture experience of people with severe and profound developmental disabilities is unique and, because it differs qualitatively from postmenopausal osteoporosis, may require population-specific methods for assessing risk, for improving bone integrity, and for reduction of falls and accidents

  1. Not all SCN1A epileptic encephalopathies are Dravet syndrome: Early profound Thr226Met phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Mountier, Emily I; Gill, Deepak; Davis, Suzanne; Joshi, Charuta; DeVile, Catherine; Kurian, Manju A; Mandelstam, Simone; Wirrell, Elaine; Nickels, Katherine C; Murali, Hema R; Carvill, Gemma; Myers, Candace T; Mefford, Heather C; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-09-05

    To define a distinct SCN1A developmental and epileptic encephalopathy with early onset, profound impairment, and movement disorder. A case series of 9 children were identified with a profound developmental and epileptic encephalopathy and SCN1A mutation. We identified 9 children 3 to 12 years of age; 7 were male. Seizure onset was at 6 to 12 weeks with hemiclonic seizures, bilateral tonic-clonic seizures, or spasms. All children had profound developmental impairment and were nonverbal and nonambulatory, and 7 of 9 required a gastrostomy. A hyperkinetic movement disorder occurred in all and was characterized by dystonia and choreoathetosis with prominent oral dyskinesia and onset from 2 to 20 months of age. Eight had a recurrent missense SCN1A mutation, p.Thr226Met. The remaining child had the missense mutation p.Pro1345Ser. The mutation arose de novo in 8 of 9; for the remaining case, the mother was negative and the father was unavailable. Here, we present a phenotype-genotype correlation for SCN1A. We describe a distinct SCN1A phenotype, early infantile SCN1A encephalopathy, which is readily distinguishable from the well-recognized entities of Dravet syndrome and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. This disorder has an earlier age at onset, profound developmental impairment, and a distinctive hyperkinetic movement disorder, setting it apart from Dravet syndrome. Remarkably, 8 of 9 children had the recurrent missense mutation p.Thr226Met. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Profound Effects of Population Density on Fitness-Related Traits in an Invasive Freshwater Snail

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Zachar; Maurine Neiman

    2013-01-01

    Population density can profoundly influence fitness-related traits and population dynamics, and density dependence plays a key role in many prominent ecological and evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we evaluated how individual-level changes in population density affect growth rate and embryo production early in reproductive maturity in two different asexual lineages of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail that is an important model system for ecotoxicology and the evolution o...

  3. The effects of an environmental "enrichment" program on the behavior of institutionalized profoundly retarded children.

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, R D

    1980-01-01

    This study determined the effects of procedures designed to "enrich" the physical and social environment of an institutional ward on the "adaptive" and "maladaptive" child, adult, self, and object-directed behaviors of five profoundly retarded ambulatory females. Behavior observed in two treatment conditions, an environment "enriched" with toys and objects and an "enriched" environment coupled with differential reinforcement of adaptive behavior, was compared to behavior occurring in correspo...

  4. Speech timing and working memory in profoundly deaf children after cochlear implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Burkholder, Rose A.; Pisoni, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-seven profoundly deaf children between 8- and 9-years-old with cochlear implants and a comparison group of normal-hearing children were studied to measure speaking rates, digit spans, and speech timing during digit span recall. The deaf children displayed longer sentence durations and pauses during recall and shorter digit spans compared to the normal-hearing children. Articulation rates, measured from sentence durations, were strongly correlated with immediate memory span in both norm...

  5. Reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia: sugammadex versus neostigmine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmens Hendrikus JM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cannot rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block. Sugammadex, a selective relaxant binding agent, reverses the effects of rocuronium and vecuronium by encapsulation. This study assessed the efficacy of sugammadex compared with neostigmine in reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Patients aged ≥18 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1-4, scheduled to undergo surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this phase III, multicenter, randomized, safety-assessor blinded study. Sevoflurane anesthetized patients received vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg for intubation, with maintenance doses of 0.015 mg/kg as required. Patients were randomized to receive sugammadex 4 mg/kg or neostigmine 70 μg/kg with glycopyrrolate 14 μg/kg at 1-2 post-tetanic counts. The primary efficacy variable was time from start of study drug administration to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9. Safety assessments included physical examination, laboratory data, vital signs, and adverse events. Results Eighty three patients were included in the intent-to-treat population (sugammadex, n = 47; neostigmine, n = 36. Geometric mean time to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9 was 15-fold faster with sugammadex (4.5 minutes compared with neostigmine (66.2 minutes; p Conclusions Recovery from profound vecuronium-induced block is significantly faster with sugammadex, compared with neostigmine. Neostigmine did not rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block (Trial registration number: NCT00473694.

  6. An epidemiological and genetic study of congenital profound deafness in Tunisia (governorate of Nabeul).

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Arab, S; Bonaïti-Pellié, C.; Belkahia, A

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological and genetic study of profound deafness has been undertaken in the governorate of Nabeul in Tunisia. This paper deals with sensorineural deafness with no associated abnormalities. The prevalence was estimated to be 0.0007 and four clusters could be identified, two of which represent 51% and 34% respectively of the total number of cases. Segregation analysis performed in 29 pedigrees containing 415 subjects with 129 affected cases provided evidence for simple recessive inheri...

  7. A Vibrotactile Interface to Motivate Movement for Children with Severe to Profound Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Morrison, Ann; Larsen, Jeppe Veirum

    2014-01-01

    V-Sense is a vibrotactile interface that encourages children with severe or profound cognitive, sensory and physical impairments to move. The interface makes use of touch, in particular vibrations, as a supportive function to motivate users' actions. Specifically, we propose a vibrotactile...... interface on the arm and around the shoulder using the saltation perceptual illusion to induce movement of the corresponding joint. In this paper we describe the design principles of the interface and the proposed experimental design to evaluate it....

  8. Cenozoic evolution of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, Michael S.

    This dissertation is a collection of four papers that investigate deformation along the North America/Pacific plate boundary, geomagnetic field behavior, and aspects of volcanism in the western part of the Basin and Range Province. Active deformation along the America/Pacific plate boundary is distributed eastward across a wide zone of the western margin of the North American plate, from the San Andreas Fault eastward into the western Basin and Range province an area referred to as the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter three and four investigate aspects of deformation that has been transferred inboard of the continental plate boundary since the mid-Cenozoic inception of the system by investigating a key areas of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada (Mina Deflection and southwest Silver Peak Range), where a significant component of the residual strain is being distributed. Deformation in these two areas is being accommodated along a system of late Cenozoic faults with strain partitioned into components of extension, strike slip faulting, and rotation of crustal blocks between the fault systems in the region. The results of this study allow for an assessment of late Tertiary deformation, which leads to a better understanding of the kinematics of deformation in this important part of the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter two investigates the transport direction of the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique. The AMS data are spatially variable across the region and indicate variable transport directions of the three regionally extensive ignimbrite deposits. The AMS fabric data indicate that the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence was erupted from distinct source areas likely separated by several kilometers. Chapter one investigates unusual geomagnetic field behavior at 25.7 Ma and 23.8 Ma preserved in volcanic rocks in the Mina Deflection. Paleomagnetic data indicate that parts of two transitional field records or reversal

  9. Pacific plate slab pull and intraplate deformation in the early Cenozoic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Butterworth

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Large tectonic plates are known to be susceptible to internal deformation, leading to a~range of phenomena including intraplate volcanism. However, the space and time dependence of intraplate deformation and its relationship with changing plate boundary configurations, subducting slab geometries, and absolute plate motion is poorly understood. We utilise a buoyancy-driven Stokes flow solver, BEM-Earth, to investigate the contribution of subducting slabs through time on Pacific plate motion and plate-scale deformation, and how this is linked to intraplate volcanism. We produce a series of geodynamic models from 62 to 42 Ma in which the plates are driven by the attached subducting slabs and mantle drag/suction forces. We compare our modelled intraplate deformation history with those types of intraplate volcanism that lack a clear age progression. Our models suggest that changes in Cenozoic subduction zone topology caused intraplate deformation to trigger volcanism along several linear seafloor structures, mostly by reactivation of existing seamount chains, but occasionally creating new volcanic chains on crust weakened by fracture zones and extinct ridges. Around 55 Ma, subduction of the Pacific-Izanagi ridge reconfigured the major tectonic forces acting on the plate by replacing ridge push with slab pull along its northwestern perimeter, causing lithospheric extension along pre-existing weaknesses. Large-scale deformation observed in the models coincides with the seamount chains of Hawaii, Louisville, Tokelau and Gilbert during our modelled time period of 62 to 42 Ma. We suggest that extensional stresses between 72 and 52 Ma are the likely cause of large parts of the formation of the Gilbert chain and that localised extension between 62 and 42 Ma could cause late-stage volcanism along the Musicians volcanic ridges. Our models demonstrate that early Cenozoic changes in Pacific plate driving forces only cause relatively minor changes in Pacific

  10. Thermal-Mechanical Regime beneath Tarim Basin, Northwestern China and its Implications for Cenozoic Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Wang, L.

    2005-12-01

    As one of the super-large scale sedimentary basins in China, the Tarim basin is also the strategic basement for Chinese `Natural gas transportation from west to east' project. To know its thermal regime is vital for understanding the deformation and oil gas resource in Tarim basin. Integrated the abundant data of geotemperature and rock thermophysical parameters collected and measured in the basin with corresponding geothermal modeling, here we present the characteristics of geotemperature field, thermal evolution and lithospheric thermo-rheological structure of the Tarim basin, along with the implications for formation and deformation of basin and hydrocarbon reservoir. Our results show that the average present-day heat flow of the basin is about 45 mW/m2 and 18-20°/km for geotemperature gradient, respectively. The basin is characterized by lower temperature in a whole. Lateral heterogeneities exist for the distribution of geotemperature field in the basin. The structural units of basin differ much in the geothermal features; generally, the depression areas are of relatively low geotemperature while high for those uplifts and highs in the basin. Thermal evolution modeling of the basin indicated that it has experienced four different phases since basin formation as follows: high heat flow phase from Sinian to Ordovician, thermal attenuation phase during Silurian to late Paleozoic, then stable thermal evolution phase in Mesozoic, and flexural deformation of lithosphere in Cenozoic. The thickness of the thermal lithosphere of basin is 168-192 km, and 25-28km for the crustal brittle-ductile transition depth; the total lithospheric strength is 1.6-7.8*10**13 N/m. The lithosphere beneath basin is characterized by the rigid block with low temperature but large strength, and deform in a whole. Responded to the far field effect of the Cenozoic India-Eurasia collision, the lithosphere beneath Tarim basin is characterized by flexure deformation, resulting in the intensive

  11. Mesozoic and Cenozoic exhumation history of the SW Iberian Variscides inferred from low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Vílchez, Mercedes; Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Azor, Antonio; Stuart, Finlay; Persano, Cristina; Alonso-Chaves, Francisco M.; Martín-Parra, Luis Miguel; Matas, Jerónimo; García-Navarro, Encarnación

    2015-11-01

    The post-Paleozoic tectonothermal evolution of the SW Iberian Variscides is poorly known mainly due to the scarce low-temperature geochronological data available. We have obtained new apatite fission-tracks and apatite (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of this portion of the Iberian Massif located just north of the Betic-Rif Alpine orogen. We have obtained nine apatite fission-track ages on samples from Variscan and pre-Variscan granitoids. These ages range from 174.4 (± 10.8) to 54.1 (± 4.9) Ma, with mean track lengths between 10.3 and 13.9 μm. We have also performed 5 (U-Th)/He datings on some of the same samples, obtaining ages between 74.6 (± 1.6) and 18.5 (± 1.4) Ma. Time-temperature path modeling of these low-temperature geochronological data leads us to envisage four post-Paleozoic tectonically controlled exhumation episodes in the SW Iberian Variscides. Three of these episodes occurred in Mesozoic times (Middle Triassic to Early Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous) at rates of ≈ 1.1 to 2.5 °C Ma- 1, separated by periods with almost no cooling. We relate these Mesozoic cooling events to the formation of important marginal reliefs during the rifting and opening of the central and northern Atlantic realm. The fourth exhumation episode occurred in Cenozoic times at rates of ≈ 3.2 to 3.6 °C Ma- 1, being only recorded in samples next to faults with topographic escarpments. These samples cooled below 80 °C at ≈ 20 Ma at rates of 3-13 °C Ma- 1 due to roughly N-S oriented compressional stresses affecting the whole Iberian plate, which, in the particular case of SW Iberia, reactivated some of the previous Late Paleozoic thrusts.

  12. Cenozoic mean greenhouse gases and temperature changes with reference to the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Cenozoic greenhouse gases (GHG) variations and warming periods underscore the extreme rates of current climate change, with major implications for the adaptability and survivability of terrestrial and marine habitats. Current rise rate of greenhouse gases, reaching 3.3 ppm CO 2 per year during March 2015-2016, is the fastest recorded since the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Event (PETM) when carbon release to the atmosphere was about an order of magnitude less than at present. The ice core evidence of concentration of (GHG) and temperatures in the atmosphere/ocean/cryosphere system over the last 740 kyr suggests that the rate of rise in GHG over the last ~260 years, CO 2 rates rising from 0.94 ppm yr -1 in 1959 (315.97 ppm) to 1.62 ppm yr -1 in 2000 (369.52 ppm) to 3.05 ppm yr -1 in 2015 (400.83 ppm), constitutes a unique spike in the history of the atmosphere. The reliance of pre-740 kyr paleoclimate estimates on multiple proxies, including benthic and plankton fossils, fossil plants, residual organic matter, major and trace elements in fossils, sediments and soils, place limits on the resolution of pre-upper Pleistocene paleoclimate estimates, rendering it likely recorded mean Cenozoic paleoclimate trends may conceal abrupt short-term climate fluctuations. However, as exemplified by the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and earlier GHG and temperature spikes associated with major volcanic and asteroid impact events, the long-term residence time of CO 2 in the atmosphere extends the signatures of abrupt warming events to within detection limits of multiple paleoproxies. The mean post-1750 temperature rise rate (approximately ~0.0034 °C per yr, or ~0.008 °C per yr where temperature is not masked by sulfur aerosols) exceeds those of the PETM (approximately ~0.0008-0.0015 °C per yr) by an order of magnitude and mean glacial termination warming rates (last glacial termination [LGT] ~ 0.00039; Eemian ~0.0004 °C per yr) by near to an order of magnitude

  13. Late Cenozoic lacustrine and climatic environments at Tule Lake, northern Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Bradbury J.

    1992-01-01

    Cores of lake sediment to a depth of 334 m in the town of Tulelake, Siskiyou County, northern California, document the late Cenozoic paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic history of the northwestern edge of the Great Basin. The cores have been dated by radiometric, tephrochronologic and paleomagnetic analyses. Lacustrine diatoms are abundant throughout the record and document a nearly continuous paleolimnologic history of the Tule Lake basin for the last 3 Myr. During most of this time, this basin (Tule Lake) was a relatively deep, extensive lake. Except for a drier (and cooler?) interval recorded by Fragilaria species about 2.4 Ma, the Pliocene is characterized by a dominance of planktonic Aulacoseira solida implying a warm monomictic lake under a climatic regime of low seasonality. Much of the Pleistocene is dominated by Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria species suggesting a cooler, often drier, and highly variable climate. Benthic diatoms typical of alkaline-enriched saline waters commonly appear after 1.0 Ma, and tephrochronology indicates slow deposition and possible hiatuses between about 0.6 and 0.2 Ma. The chronology of even-numbered oxygen isotope stages approximately matches fluctuations in the abundance of Fragilaria since 800 ka indicating that glacial periods were expressed as drier environments at Tule Lake. Glacial and interglacial environments since 150 ka were distinct from, and more variable than, those occurring earlier. The last full glacial period was very dry, but shortly thereafter Tule Lake became a deep, cool lacustrine system indicating a substantial increase in precipitation. Aulacoseira ambigua characterized the latest glacial and Holocene record of Tule Lake. Its distribution indicates that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka in this part of the Great Basin. Diatom concentration fluctuates at 41 000 year intervals between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and at approximately 100 000 year intervals after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene

  14. Constraining Early Cenozoic exhumation of the British Isles with vertical profile modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepke, Daniel; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of research is the Early Cenozoic exhumation history of Ireland and Britain still poorly understood and subject to contentious debate (e.g., Davis et al., 2012 and subsequent comments). One reason for this debate is the difficultly of constraining the evolution of onshore parts of the British Isles in both time and space. The paucity of Mesozoic and Cenozoic onshore outcrops makes direct analysis of this time span difficult. Furthermore, Ireland and Britain are situated at a passive margin, where the amount of post-rift exhumation is generally very low. Classical thermochronological tools are therefore near the edge of their resolution and make precise dating of post-rift cooling events challenging. In this study we used the established apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He techniques, but took advantage of the vertical profile approach of Gallagher et al. (2005) implemented in the QTQt modelling package (Gallagher, 2012), to better constrain the thermal histories. This method allowed us to define the geographical extent of a Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary cooling event and to show that it was centered around the Irish Sea. Thus, we argue that this cooling event is linked to the underplating of hot material below the crust centered on the Irish Sea (Jones et al., 2002; Al-Kindi et al., 2003), and demonstrate that such conclusion would have been harder, if not impossible, to draw by modelling the samples individually without the use of the vertical profile approach. References Al-Kindi, S., White, N., Sinha, M., England, R., and Tiley, R., 2003, Crustal trace of a hot convective sheet: Geology, v. 31, no. 3, p. 207-210. Davis, M.W., White, N.J., Priestley, K.F., Baptie, B.J., and Tilmann, F.J., 2012, Crustal structure of the British Isles and its epeirogenic consequences: Geophysical Journal International, v. 190, no. 2, p. 705-725. Jones, S.M., White, N., Clarke, B.J., Rowley, E., and Gallagher, K., 2002, Present and past influence of the Iceland

  15. Localization training results in individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Static and Dynamic Balance in Congenital Severe to Profound Hearing-Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh HajiHeydari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research conducted since the early 1900s has consistently identified differences between deaf and hearing children on performance of a wide variety of motor tasks, most notably balance. Our study was performed to test static and dynamic balance skills in congenital severe to profound hearing impaired children in comparison with normal age-matched children.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 severe to profound hearing impaired and 40 normal children with age 6 to 10 years old. Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency 2, balance subset with 9 parts was used for evaluation of balance skills.Results: Hearing-impaired children showed 16.7 to 100% fail results in 7 parts of the balance subset. In normal children fail result was revealed just in 3 parts of the balance subset from 2.5 to 57.5%, and differences between two groups were significant (p<0.0001. There was a significant difference between two groups in two static balance skills of standing on one leg on a line and standing on one leg on a balance beam with eyes closed (p<0.0001.conclusion: It seems that development of static balance skills are longer than dynamic ones. Because severe to profound hearing-impaired children showed more weakness than normal children in both static and dynamic balance abilities, functional tests of balance proficiency can help to identify balance disorders in these children.

  17. Frequency compression hearing aid for severe-to-profound hearing impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, S; Goto, K; Tateno, M; Kaga, K

    2000-10-01

    Objective of this study is to know how a frequency compression hearing aid with new concepts is beneficial for severe-to-profound hearing impairments. (2) Clinical trials of this hearing aid were conducted for 11 severe-to-profound hearing impaired listeners. These 11 wore the frequency compression hearing aid in their daily life and reported subjectively on its performance. Speech recognition tests with five listeners and audio-visual short sentence recognition tests with three listeners were also conducted. This hearing aid can separately adjust the fundamental frequency from the spectral envelope of input speech and can adjust frequency response by use of a post-processing digital filter. (3) Five listeners out of these 11 came to prefer this hearing aid in their daily life and are still wearing it. The results of the speech recognition tests show that the speech recognition scores were not improved for all listeners and the results of the audio-visual short sentence recognition tests do that the audio-visual recognition scores were improved for two listeners. (4) There were some severe-to-profound hearing impaired listeners who preferred the frequency compression hearing aid finally. It is also suggested that the benefits of this hearing aid may be evaluated correctly using not only speech but also visual materials.

  18. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  19. Middle Prut plain's erosion susceptibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor CASTRAVEȚ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The given article is dedicated to Middle Prut Plain’s erosion susceptibility evaluation  using factorial analysis and methodology of principal component analysis implemented byGeographical Informational System GRASS. Susceptibility evaluation is executed in a qualitative mode, and the results have preliminary character, for further quantitative andmore precise study. This type of natural hazards analysis offers information on probable localization and severity of erosion phenomena, as well as their manifestation probabilityin a given place.

  20. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal was to aut......Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal...

  1. Contribution of bank erosion to the sediment budget of a drained agricultural lowland catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdan, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Vandromme, Rosalie; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Gay, Aurore; Landemaine, Valentin; Evrard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Following the shift towards more intensive agriculture in cultivated lowlands in Europe, field sizes have increased and stream valley meanderings have been removed and realigned along new straight field borders. These modifications have led to profound alterations of the hydromorphology of the streams. To test the impact of these modifications, the long-term and current volumes of sediment originating from stream banks were calculated as they provided potential sources of sediment in a large pond located at the outlet of a small agricultural lowland basin under strong anthropogenic pressure. Bank erosion was measured using several methodologies, i) over a short period using a set of erosion pins along a small stream (1400 m long) to quantify the material exported during a single winter season (2012/2013); ii) over the last 69 years using an original approach involving the comparison of a compilation of three-dimensional historical stream redesign plans from 1944 vs. new measurements conducted in 2013 (DGPS and LiDAR data); iii) over several decades by using tracers (137Cs) that can differentiate between surface and subsoil erosion. At the catchment scale, total sediment exports were estimated from 1945 to 2013 combining seismic imagery and core dating in the lake. Sediment exports decreased with time, from 300 t. km-2.yr-between 1954 and 1980 to 95 t. km-2.yr-1 between 1980 and 2013. Today, erosion rates recorded at the outlet of the catchment vary between 90-102 t.km-2.yr-1. Therefore, the order of magnitude of the mean export rate is approximately 180 t. km-2.yr-1 for the last 70 years. The contribution of channel banks to this sediment export was the highest ( 30%) between 1954 and 1980 when the ditches were constructed. For the entire period since the landscape modification, the contribution of bank erosion is lower but still reaches 20%. Bank erosion can therefore be considered as a significant contributor to the sediment budget of the lowland catchments that

  2. Research Ethics Committees and the Benefits of Involving People with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, Kathy; Ralph, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in service user involvement in research, such involvement rarely extends to people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. New developments in visual methodologies offer the potential for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities to be included in research. At the same time, however,…

  3. Taxonomic review of the late Cenozoic megapodes (Galliformes: Megapodiidae) of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2017-01-01

    Megapodes are unusual galliform birds that use passive heat sources to incubate their eggs. Evolutionary relationships of extant megapode taxa have become clearer with the advent of molecular analyses, but the systematics of large, extinct forms (Progura gallinacea, Progura naracoortensis) from the late Cenozoic of Australia has been a source of confusion. It was recently suggested that the two species of Progura were synonymous, and that this taxon dwarfed into the extant malleefowl Leipoa ocellata in the Late Pleistocene. Here, we review previously described fossils along with newly discovered material from several localities, and present a substantial taxonomic revision. We show that P. gallinacea and P. naracoortensis are generically distinct, describe two new species of megapode from the Thylacoleo Caves of south-central Australia, and a new genus from Curramulka Quarry in southern Australia. We also show that L. ocellata was contemporaneous with larger species. Our phylogenetic analysis places four extinct taxa in a derived clade with the extant Australo-Papuan brush-turkeys Talegalla fuscirostris, L. ocellata, Alectura lathami and Aepypodius bruijnii. Therefore, diversity of brush-turkeys halved during the Quaternary, matching extinction rates of scrubfowl in the Pacific. Unlike extant brush-turkeys, all the extinct taxa appear to have been burrow-nesters. PMID:28680676

  4. The mechanisms underpinning Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in eastern Australia: Insights from seismic tomography and geodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, N.; Davies, D. R.; Pilia, S.

    2017-10-01

    Cenozoic intraplate volcanism is widespread throughout much of eastern Australia and manifests as both age-progressive volcanic tracks and non-age-progressive lava fields. Various mechanisms have been invoked to explain the origin and distribution of the volcanism, but a broad consensus remains elusive. We use results from seismic tomography to demonstrate a clear link between lithospheric thickness and the occurrence, composition, and volume of volcanic outcrop. Furthermore, we find that non-age-progressive lava fields overlie significant cavities in the base of the lithosphere. Based on numerical simulations of mantle flow, we show that these cavities generate vigorous mantle upwellings, which likely promote decompression melting. However, due to the intermittent nature of the lava field volcanics over the last 50 Ma, it is probable that transient mechanisms also operate to induce or enhance melting. In the case of the Newer Volcanics Province, the passage of a nearby plume appears to be a likely candidate. Our results demonstrate why detailed 3-D variations in lithospheric thickness, plate motion, and transient sources of mantle heterogeneity need to be considered when studying the origin of non age-progressive volcanism in continental interiors.

  5. Timing, distribution, amount, and style of Cenozoic extension in the northern Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christopher D.; McGrew, Allen J.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Snoke, Arthur W.; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    This field trip examines contrasting lines of evidence bearing on the timing and structural style of Cenozoic (and perhaps late Mesozoic) extensional deformation in northeastern Nevada. Studies of metamorphic core complexes in this region report extension beginning in the early Cenozoic or even Late Cretaceous, peaking in the Eocene and Oligocene, and being largely over before the onset of “modern” Basin and Range extension in the middle Miocene. In contrast, studies based on low-temperature thermochronology and geologic mapping of Eocene and Miocene volcanic and sedimentary deposits report only minor, localized extension in the Eocene, no extension at all in the Oligocene and early Miocene, and major, regional extension in the middle Miocene. A wealth of thermochronologic and thermobarometric data indicate that the Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex (RMEH) underwent ~170 °C of cooling and 4 kbar of decompression between ca. 85 and ca. 50 Ma, and another 450 °C cooling and 4–5 kbar decompression between ca. 50 and ca. 21 Ma. These data require ~30 km of exhumation in at least two episodes, accommodated at least in part by Eocene to early Miocene displacement on the major west-dipping mylonitic zone and detachment fault bounding the RMEH on the west (the mylonitic zone may also have been active during an earlier phase of crustal extension). Meanwhile, Eocene paleovalleys containing 45–40 Ma ash-flow tuffs drained eastward from northern Nevada to the Uinta Basin in Utah, and continuity of these paleovalleys and infilling tuffs across the region indicate little, if any deformation by faults during their deposition. Pre–45 Ma deformation is less constrained, but the absence of Cenozoic sedimentary deposits and mappable normal faults older than 45 Ma is also consistent with only minor (if any) brittle deformation. The presence of ≤1 km of late Eocene sedimentary—especially lacustrine—deposits and a low-angle angular

  6. Paleogene equatorial penguins challenge the proposed relationship between biogeography, diversity, and Cenozoic climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julia A.; Ksepka, Daniel T.; Stucchi, Marcelo; Urbina, Mario; Giannini, Norberto; Bertelli, Sara; Narváez, Yanina; Boyd, Clint A.

    2007-01-01

    New penguin fossils from the Eocene of Peru force a reevaluation of previous hypotheses regarding the causal role of climate change in penguin evolution. Repeatedly it has been proposed that penguins originated in high southern latitudes and arrived at equatorial regions relatively recently (e.g., 4–8 million years ago), well after the onset of latest Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and increases in polar ice volume. By contrast, new discoveries from the middle and late Eocene of Peru reveal that penguins invaded low latitudes >30 million years earlier than prior data suggested, during one of the warmest intervals of the Cenozoic. A diverse fauna includes two new species, here reported from two of the best exemplars of Paleogene penguins yet recovered. The most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of Sphenisciformes to date, combining morphological and molecular data, places the new species outside the extant penguin radiation (crown clade: Spheniscidae) and supports two separate dispersals to equatorial (paleolatitude ≈14°S) regions during greenhouse earth conditions. One new species, Perudyptes devriesi, is among the deepest divergences within Sphenisciformes. The second, Icadyptes salasi, is the most complete giant (>1.5 m standing height) penguin yet described. Both species provide critical information on early penguin cranial osteology, trends in penguin body size, and the evolution of the penguin flipper. PMID:17601778

  7. A stable isotope record of late Cenozoic surface uplift of southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Nicholas S.; Mix, Hari T.; Clark, Peter U.; Reilly, Sean P.; Jensen, Britta J. L.; Benowitz, Jeffrey A.

    2018-01-01

    Although the timing of an acceleration in late-Cenozoic exhumation of southern Alaska is reasonably well constrained as beginning ∼5-∼6 Ma, the surface uplift history of this region remains poorly understood. To assess the extent of surface uplift relative to rapid exhumation, we developed a stable isotope record using the hydrogen isotope composition (δD) of paleo-meteoric water over the last ∼7 Ma from interior basins of Alaska and Yukon Territory. Our record, which is derived from authigenic clays (δDclay) in silicic tephras, documents a ∼50-60‰ increase in δD values from the late Miocene (∼6-∼7 Ma) through the Plio-Pleistocene transition (∼2-∼3 Ma), followed by near-constant values over at least the last ∼2 Ma. Although this enrichment trend is opposite that of a Rayleigh distillation model typically associated with surface uplift, we suggest that it is consistent with indirect effects of surface uplift on interior Alaska, including changes in aridity, moisture source, and seasonality of moisture. We conclude that the δDclay record documents the creation of a topographic barrier and the associated changes to the climate of interior Alaska and Yukon Territory.

  8. Tropical seaways played a more important role than high latitude seaways in Cenozoic cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the Early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, ~55–50 Ma, climate deteriorated and gradually changed the earth from a greenhouse into an icehouse, with major cooling events at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (∼34 Ma and the Middle Miocene (∼15 Ma. It is believed that the opening of the Drake Passage had a marked impact on the cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Based on an Early Eocene simulation, we study the sensitivity of climate and ocean circulation to tectonic events such as the closing of the West Siberian Seaway, the deepening of the Arctic-Atlantic Seaway, the opening of the Drake Passage, and the constriction of the Tethys and Central American seaways. The opening of the Drake Passage, together with the closing of the West Siberian Seaway and the deepening of the Arctic-Atlantic Seaway, weakened the Southern Ocean Deep Water (SODW dominated ocean circulation and led to a weak cooling at high latitudes, thus contributing to the observed Early Cenozoic cooling. However, the later constriction of the Tethys and Central American Seaways is shown to give a strong cooling at southern high latitudes. This cooling was related to the transition of ocean circulation from a SODW-dominated mode to the modern-like ocean circulation dominated by North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW.

  9. First fossil evidence of Connaraceae R. Br. from Indian Cenozoic and its phytogeographical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahasin Ali; Bera, Subir

    2016-07-01

    Fossil leaflet impression described here as a new species Rourea miocaudata sp. nov., showing close resemblance with the modern leaflets of Rourea caudata Planch. (Connaraceae R. Br.), has been recorded from the lower part of the Siwalik sediments (Dafla Formation, middle-upper Miocene) exposed at the road-cutting section of Pinjoli area in West Kameng district, Arunachal Pradesh. The important morphological characters of the fossil are its narrow elliptic leaflet, cuneate base, long caudate apex, entire margin, eucamptodromous to brochidodromous secondary veins, presence of intersecondary veins, percurrent and reticulate tertiary veins and orthogonally reticulate quaternary veins. This is the first authentic record of the occurrence of leaflet comparable to R. caudata of Connaraceae from the Cenozoic sediments of India and abroad. At present R. caudata does not grow in India and is restricted only in southeast Asia especially in China and Myanmar. This taxon probably migrated to these southeast Asian regions after lower Siwalik sedimentation (middle-upper Miocene) due to climatic change caused by post-Miocene orogenic movement of the Himalaya. The recovery of this species and other earlier-described evergreen taxa from the same formation, suggests the existence of a tropical, warm and humid climatic conditions during the depositional period.

  10. Spatial and temporal variation of Cenozoic surface elevation in the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T.W.; Sjostrom, D.J.; Abruzzese, M.J.; Poage, M.A.; Waldbauer, J.R.; Hren, M.; Wooden, J.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    The surface uplift of mountain belts caused by tectonism plays an important role in determining the long-term climate evolution of the Earth. However, the general lack of information on the paleotopography of mountain belts limits our ability to identify the links and feedbacks between topography, tectonics, and climate change on geologic time-scales. Here, we present a ??18O and ??D record of authigenic minerals for the northern Great Basin that captures the timing and magnitude of regional surface uplift and subsidence events in the western United States during the Cenozoic. Authigenic calcite, smectite, and chert ??18O values suggest the northern Great Basin region experienced ???2km of surface uplift between the middle Eocene and early Oligocene followed by ???1 to 2km of surface subsidence in the southern Great Basin and/or Sierra Nevada since the middle Miocene. These data when combined with previously published work show that the surface uplift history varied in both space and time. Surface uplift migrated from north to south with high elevations in southern British Columbia and northeastern Washington in the middle Eocene and development of surface uplift in north and central Nevada in the Oligocene. This pattern of north to south surface uplift is similar to the timing of magmatism in the western Cordillera, a result that supports tectonic models linking magamtism with removal of mantle lithosphere and/or a subducting slab.

  11. Paleogene equatorial penguins challenge the proposed relationship between biogeography, diversity, and Cenozoic climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julia A; Ksepka, Daniel T; Stucchi, Marcelo; Urbina, Mario; Giannini, Norberto; Bertelli, Sara; Narváez, Yanina; Boyd, Clint A

    2007-07-10

    New penguin fossils from the Eocene of Peru force a reevaluation of previous hypotheses regarding the causal role of climate change in penguin evolution. Repeatedly it has been proposed that penguins originated in high southern latitudes and arrived at equatorial regions relatively recently (e.g., 4-8 million years ago), well after the onset of latest Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and increases in polar ice volume. By contrast, new discoveries from the middle and late Eocene of Peru reveal that penguins invaded low latitudes >30 million years earlier than prior data suggested, during one of the warmest intervals of the Cenozoic. A diverse fauna includes two new species, here reported from two of the best exemplars of Paleogene penguins yet recovered. The most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of Sphenisciformes to date, combining morphological and molecular data, places the new species outside the extant penguin radiation (crown clade: Spheniscidae) and supports two separate dispersals to equatorial (paleolatitude approximately 14 degrees S) regions during greenhouse earth conditions. One new species, Perudyptes devriesi, is among the deepest divergences within Sphenisciformes. The second, Icadyptes salasi, is the most complete giant (>1.5 m standing height) penguin yet described. Both species provide critical information on early penguin cranial osteology, trends in penguin body size, and the evolution of the penguin flipper.

  12. A universal driver of macroevolutionary change in the size of marine phytoplankton over the Cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Z V; Sebbo, J; Feist-Burkhardt, S; Irwin, A J; Katz, M E; Schofield, O M E; Young, J R; Falkowski, P G

    2007-12-18

    The size structure of phytoplankton assemblages strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling in the ocean. We determined the macroevolutionary trajectory in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts to compare with the macroevolutionary size change in other plankton groups. We found the median size of the dinoflagellate cysts generally decreases through the Cenozoic. Diatoms exhibit an extremely similar pattern in their median size over time, even though species diversity of the two groups has opposing trends, indicating that the macroevolutionary size change is an active response to selection pressure rather than a passive response to changes in diversity. The changes in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts are highly correlated with both deep ocean temperatures and the thermal gradient between the surface and deep waters, indicating the magnitude and frequency of nutrient availability may have acted as a selective factor in the macroevolution of cell size in the plankton. Our results suggest that climate, because it affects stratification in the ocean, is a universal abiotic driver that has been responsible for macroevolutionary changes in the size structure of marine planktonic communities over the past 65 million years of Earth's history.

  13. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  14. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Gavrovo and Ionian zones in NW Peloponnesos (Western Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tsaila-Monopoli

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural deformation of Mesozoic-Tertiary sediments of the Ionian and Gavrovo zones in NW Peloponnesos is related to the propagation of a fold-thrust system during the Cenozoic. The sediments of the Gavrovo zone have been deformed by high angle reverse faulting generating an imbricate fan. Skolis mountain represents the Gavrovo thrust front. The detachment occurred in the underlying flysch of the Ionian zone. The Ionian zone has also been affected by shortening above a detachment horizon situated in the lower horizons of Triassic evaporites. The main compressional structure of the Ionian zone is a broad anticline revealed by a seismic survey west of Skolis mountain. The Gavrovo-sheet emplacement caused the downthrow and bending of the eastern part of the Ionian zone followed by halokinesis of Triassic evaporites to the west. Post-compressional normal faulting has predominated since the Pliocene, resulting in the formation of the Kato Achaia and Simopoulo basins in the peripheral area of Skolis mountain. Diapirs of Triassic evaporites occur in the mentioned basins that complicate the tectonic pattern in front of the Skolis thrust.

  15. The propagation model of NE Pamir syntaxis constraining from Cenozoic deformation and sedimentary characteristic in Southwestern Tarim basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Cheng, X. G.; Lin, X.; Li, K.; Chen, X.

    2016-12-01

    Pamir sytaxis has been being a focus for geologist to understand orogenic process and its response. Relying on the interpretation of seismic exploration data, sedimentological correlation of Cenozoic section, this paper analyzes Cenozoic deformation characteristics and process, sedimentary evolution and shifting of sedimentary center in SW Tarim basin and put forward a propagation model of NE Pamir syntaxis according to the Cenozoic deformation and sedimentary characteristic etc.. The Cenozoic deformation in Southwestern Tarim basin and adjacent area is dominated by transpressoinal stress and dextral strike-slip. Dextral Kashi-Ycheng Transfer System (KYTS) and Yangdaman Fault orienting in NNW direction control the formation of several en-echolon folds systems, such as Yingjisha Anticline and Qibei structure etc.. The Qimugen and Puxi area are featured by strike-slip-related half flower structure in NEE direction which is late than the fault in NNW direction. The Neocene sediment varies in spatial and temporal. The Anjuan Formation (N1) shows strong lithofacies variations. The Anjuan Formation is characterized by alluvial conglomerates in the Heshilafu-Aertashi area, while is featured by lacustrine mudstone in other area, which may indicate the activity of dextral Kashi-Ycheng Transfer System. Deposition of Artux Formation (N2) and Xiyu Formation (Q) is dominated by alluvial conglomerates, while it does not change much in front of NE Pamir syntaxis, which may indicate the intense northward-indention of Pamir syntaxis into the Tarim Basin since the Pleiocene. Based on the Cenozoic deformation and sedimentary characteristic etc., this paper puts forward a three stage propagation model for NE Pamir syntaxis: a) In the Oligocene, radial-thrusting exist both along the west and the east flank of the Pamir, clockwise rotation took place in the NE Pamir which is indicated by paleomagnetic data, b) In the Miocene, dextral KYTS accommodate the variant displacements of the NE

  16. Coastal erosion project, Diani beach, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballot, J.; Hoyng, C.; Kateman, I.; Smits, M.; De Winter, R.

    2006-01-01

    Master project report. Since the seventies, the establishment of hotels and other facilities has increased the pressure on the Kenyan coast. During the last decade, hotel managers and residents in Diani Beach have been experiencing problems with erosion. The only measures taken to address the

  17. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from

  18. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiorov M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  19. Natural Erosion of Sandstone as Shape Optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanin, Igor; Safonov, Alexander; Oseledets, Ivan

    2017-12-11

    Natural arches, pillars and other exotic sandstone formations have always been attracting attention for their unusual shapes and amazing mechanical balance that leave a strong impression of intelligent design rather than the result of a stochastic process. It has been recently demonstrated that these shapes could have been the result of the negative feedback between stress and erosion that originates in fundamental laws of friction between the rock's constituent particles. Here we present a deeper analysis of this idea and bridge it with the approaches utilized in shape and topology optimisation. It appears that the processes of natural erosion, driven by stochastic surface forces and Mohr-Coulomb law of dry friction, can be viewed within the framework of local optimisation for minimum elastic strain energy. Our hypothesis is confirmed by numerical simulations of the erosion using the topological-shape optimisation model. Our work contributes to a better understanding of stochastic erosion and feasible landscape formations that could be found on Earth and beyond.

  20. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); C.E. Essed; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); N. Bom (Klaas); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and

  1. Erosion and lateral surface processes 2432

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Erosion can cause serious agricultural and environmental hazards. It can generate severe damage to the landscape, lead to significant loss of agricultural land and consequently to reduction in agricultural productivity, induce surface water pollution due to the transport of sediments and suspende...

  2. Slope stability and erosion control: Ecotechnological solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, J.E.; Stokes, A.; Mickovski, S.B.; Cammeraat, E.; van Beek, R.; Nicoll, B.C.; Achim, A.

    2008-01-01

    This book is designed to assist the civil and geotechnical engineer, geomorphologist, forester, landscape architect or ecologist in choosing ecotechnological solutions for slopes that are prone to a variety of mass movements e.g. shallow failure or erosion. Within this book, the 'engineer' is used

  3. Experiments for understanding soil erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion processes are usually quantified by observation and measurement of their related forms. Rill, and gullies, moulds or sediment sinks are often used to estimate the soil loss. These forms are generally related directly to different types of processes, thus are also used to identify the dominant processes on a certain type of land-use. Nevertheless, the direct observation of erosion processes is constrained by their temporal and spatial erratic occurrence. As a consequence, the process understanding is generally deduced by analogies. Another possibility is to reproduce processes in experiments in both, the lab and in the field. Laboratory experiments are implemented when we want to have full control over all parameters we think are relevant for the process in our focus. So are very useful for identification of parameters influencing processes and their intensities, but also as physical models of the processes and process interactions in our focus. Therefore, we can use them to verify our concepts, and to define relevant parameters. Field experiments generally only simulate with controlled driving forces, this is the rain or the runoff, but dealing with the uncertainty of our study object, the soil. This enables two things: 1) similar as with lab experiments, we are able to identify processes and process interactions and so, to get a deeper understanding of soil erosion; 2) experiments are suitable for providing data about singular processes in the field and thus, to provide data suitable for model parametrisation and calibration. These may be quantitative data about erodibility or soil resistance, sediment detachment or transport. The Physical Geography Group at Trier University has a long lasting experience in the application of experiments in soil erosion research in the field, and has become lead in the further development conception and of devices and procedures to investigate splash detachment and initial transport of soil particles by wind and water

  4. Factors affecting soil erosion in Beijing mountain forestlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Cenozoic Era to Archean Eon and igneous rock in different periods, with a complicated geological structure. In addition, most parts of the plain are covered by quaternary sediments (Huo, 1998). Beijing has complex landform types, a diversity of plants, and obvious vertical differences in climate. Long-term ...

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of erosive esophagitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Lin Ou

    2012-02-01

    Conclusion: The current prevalence of erosive esophagitis in Taiwan is 17.3%. Male sex, smoking, obesity, and hiatus hernia are four independent risk factors for the development of erosive esophagitis in the Taiwanese population.

  6. Thermomechanical Erosion Modelling of Baydaratskaya Bay, Russia with COSMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, S.G.; Lubbad, R; Le, T.M.H.; Nairn, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Rapid coastal erosion threatens Arctic coastal infrastructure, including communities and industrial installations. Erosion of permafrost depends on numerous processes, including thermal and mechanical behaviour of frozen and unfrozen soil, nearshore hydrodynamics, atmospheric forcing, and the

  7. Automated Erosion System to Protect Highway Bridge Crossings at Abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    A new instrument (Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin, or PEEP) was examined in collecting field data and remotely monitoring bank erosion near bridge abutments during floods. The performance of PEEPs was evaluated through a detailed field study to determin...

  8. Categorization of erosion control matting for slope applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-25

    Erosion control is an important aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural waterways having been well documented. Selection of a proper erosion c...

  9. Investigation of erosion rates of field samples using FDOT's enhanced sediment erosion rate flume (SERF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The first part of this project was to enhance and improve the Florida Department of Transportations : Sediment Erosion Rate Flume (SERF) device. Notable improvements include a pump repair, laser : system enhancement, installation of a digital vide...

  10. Water erosion of dystrophic Red Latosols (Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Ernesto Bernardes Ayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In their natural state, Latosols (Oxisols present great stability and resistance to erosion, being the most abundant and used soils for farming and cattle raising activities in southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. However, along the last one hundred years, they have been submitted to intensive cultivation and managements which favor water erosion. This study aimed to estimate the water erosion rates of dystrophic Red Latosols from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, compared with the soil loss tolerance limits, and assess the impact on water erosion of the managements more common in the region, by alternative conservation management simulation. Soil loss tolerance limits ranged from 8.94 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 9.99 Mg ha-1 year-1, with the study area presenting a susceptibility of soil loss of 23.86 Mg year-1, with an average rate of 8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1, corresponding to 34.80 % of the area with values above the soil loss tolerance limit. The biggest annual losses occur in areas with use and management of eucalyptus grown downhill (30.67 Mg ha-1 year-1 and pasture under continuous occupancy (11.10 Mg ha-1 year-1. However, when the average loss per type of use is considered, the areas more susceptible to water erosion are those with potato and eucalyptus crops, grown downhill, and those in bare soil. Nevertheless, in the simulated conservation management scenario, the average losses would be drastically reduced (8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 2.84 Mg ha-1 year-1 and only 4.00 % of the area with soil loss would remain above the tolerance limits.

  11. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    OpenAIRE

    E. Stacy; Hart, S. C.; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; BERHE, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion plays important roles in organic matter (OM) storage and persistence in dynamic landscapes. The biogeochemical implication of soil erosion has been a focus of a growing number of studies over the last two decades. However, most of the available studies are conducted in agricultural systems or grasslands, and hence very little information is available on rate and nature of soil organic matter (SOM) eroded from forested upland ecosystems. In the southern parts of the Sierr...

  12. Surface erosion assessment using 137 Cs: examples from New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Basher, L. R.

    2000-01-01

    The 137Cs technique has provided the first quantitative, medium-term data on rates of soil redistribution by surface erosion on both cropland and rangeland in New Zealand. Use of the technique has demonstrated: high rates of soil redistribution by water erosion at two cropland sites under intensive vegetable production; a slow rate of net loss of soil by wind erosion associated with arable farming; a strong association between vegetation depletion and wind erosion on grazed rangeland. Re...

  13. Maturation of the mitochondrial redox response to profound asphyxia in fetal sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Drury

    Full Text Available Fetal susceptibility to hypoxic brain injury increases over the last third of gestation. This study examined the hypothesis that this is associated with impaired mitochondrial adaptation, as measured by more rapid oxidation of cytochrome oxidase (CytOx during profound asphyxia.Chronically instrumented fetal sheep at 0.6, 0.7, and 0.85 gestation were subjected to either 30 min (0.6 gestational age (ga, n = 6, 25 min (0.7 ga, n = 27 or 15 min (0.85 ga, n = 17 of complete umbilical cord occlusion. Fetal EEG, cerebral impedance (to measure brain swelling and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived intra-cerebral oxygenation (ΔHb = HbO(2 - Hb, total hemoglobin (THb and CytOx redox state were monitored continuously. Occlusion was associated with profound, rapid fall in ΔHb in all groups to a plateau from 6 min, greatest at 0.85 ga compared to 0.6 and 0.7 ga (p<0.05. THb initially increased at all ages, with the greatest rise at 0.85 ga (p<0.05, followed by a progressive fall from 7 min in all groups. CytOx initially increased in all groups with the greatest rise at 0.85 ga (p<0.05, followed by a further, delayed increase in preterm fetuses, but a striking fall in the 0.85 group after 6 min of occlusion. Cerebral impedance (a measure of cytotoxic edema increased earlier and more rapidly with greater gestation. In conclusion, the more rapid rise in CytOx and cortical impedance during profound asphyxia with greater maturation is consistent with increasing dependence on oxidative metabolism leading to earlier onset of neural energy failure before the onset of systemic hypotension.

  14. Effect of profound normovolemic hypotension and moderate hypothermia on circulating cytokines and adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D; Bogatzki, S; Syben, R; Bechrakis, N E; Dopjans, D; Spies, C; Welte, M; Schaffartzik, W

    1999-11-01

    Hypotension caused by hypovolemic, hemorrhagic shock induces disturbances in the immune system that may contribute to an increased susceptibility to sepsis. The effect of chemically induced hypotension on circulating cytokines and adhesion molecules has not been investigated yet. In 21 patients scheduled for resection of malignant choroidal melanoma of the eye the perioperative serum levels of the cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and the adhesion molecules sE-Selectin and sICAM-1 were investigated. Moderate hypothermia of 32 degrees C was induced in all patients. In 14 patients profound hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure 35-40 mmHg, hypotension group) was induced by enalapril and nitroglycerin for a mean duration of 71 min. In 7 patients the tumor was not resectable, and hypotension was not induced (controls). We did not detect significant differences in serum levels of cytokines or sE-Selectin perioperatively in patients with profound hypotension compared with controls. In both groups IL-6 serum levels increased significantly and reached a maximum after rewarming (17 +/- 6 and 16 +/- 5 pg/dL, respectively, P < 0.001). IL-1beta, IL-10, and TNF-alpha did not change perioperatively in both groups. On the first postoperative day sICAM-1 serum levels were significantly increased in both groups (mean increase of 96 and 54 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). We conclude from this study that profound normovolemic arterial hypotension does not seem to have effects on serum levels of circulating IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and sE-Selectin. Perioperative moderate hypothermia may be the reason for the postoperative increase in sICAM-1 levels independent of the blood pressure.

  15. Acute profound thrombocytopenia associated with readministration of eptifibatide: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kimberly N; Schnabel, Joseph G; Rochetto, Richard P; Tanner, Matthew C

    2009-07-01

    The glycoprotein IIb-IIIa inhibitor eptifibatide has been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Case reports of acute profound thrombocytopenia have been reported with eptifibatide, yet the true incidence of this reaction is unknown. We describe a 50-year-old woman with severe coronary artery disease who developed acute profound thrombocytopenia after readministration of eptifibatide. Eptifibatide was administered through hospital day 3, when it was discontinued in preparation for coronary angiography and PCI; the drug was restarted on day 5. On hospital day 6, she was noted to have a platelet count below 5 x 10(3)/mm,(3) indicating a profound decrease from a baseline of 456 x 10(3)/mm(3) on admission. Eptifibatide, heparin, vancomycin, and clopidogrel were potential causative agents. Anticoagulation and vancomycin were stopped, and her platelet count increased to 30 x 10(3)/mm(3) on day 7. Subsequent reexposure to heparin and vancomycin yielded no adverse effects. The patient's platelet count increased over the remainder of her hospitalization, and she was discharged home on day 19. Based on clinical presentation and negative heparin platelet factor 4 antibody test, eptifibatide was the most likely cause of thrombocytopenia. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that eptifibatide was the probable cause of thrombocytopenia (score of 5); scores of 1 (possible) or 0 (doubtful) were derived with heparin, vancomycin, and clopidogrel. We conducted a literature search and compiled information from published case reports to describe the pattern of onset and recovery of eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia. In all patients receiving eptifibatide, routine platelet counts should be monitored at baseline and within 2-6 hours after starting the drug.

  16. The Differential Effects of Attentional Focus in Children with Moderate and Profound Visual Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W. T. McNamara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been consistently reported that an external focus of attention leads to better motor performance than an internal focus, but no research to date has explored this effect in a population with visual impairments (VI. External focus statements typically reference something in the environment (e.g., target that may be difficult to conceptualize for people with VI since they cannot generate a visual representation of the object of focus. Internal focus statements could be more closely identifiable with proprioception that is not impaired in this population. Recent studies have reported that sighted adults with temporarily obstructed vision are able to receive an external focus benefit when performing discrete tasks (i.e., golf putt and vertical jump, however, it is unclear if those with VI would experience the same benefit. The purpose of this investigation was to compare how an internal focus and external focus impact the balance of children with VI. Eighteen children with VI were grouped into a moderate (n = 11 and a profound VI group (n = 7. Participants completed a familiarization trial, an internal focus trial (i.e., focusing on feet and an external focus trial (i.e., focusing on markers in a counterbalanced order. The moderate VI group had a lower root mean square error while using an external focus (p = 0.04, while the profound VI group did not differ between conditions (p > 0.05. These results suggest that while performing a task reliant on sensory feedback, an external focus benefit may be dependent on the severity of VI. Further research is needed to examine whether external focus statements can be presented in a way that may be more intuitive to those with profound VI. These findings may help to influence how professionals in health-related fields (e.g., physical therapist and physical educators give instructions on motor performance to populations with VI.

  17. A new methodology for hydro-abrasive erosion tests simulating penstock erosive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumelas, V.; Maj, G.; Le Calvé, P.; Smith, M.; Gambiez, B.; Mourrat, X.

    2016-11-01

    Hydro-abrasive resistance is an important property requirement for hydroelectric power plant penstock coating systems used by EDF. The selection of durable coating systems requires an experimental characterization of coating performance. This can be achieved by performing accelerated and representative laboratory tests. In case of severe erosion induced by a penstock flow, there is no suitable method or standard representative of real erosive flow conditions. The presented study aims at developing a new methodology and an associated laboratory experimental device. The objective of the laboratory apparatus is to subject coated test specimens to wear conditions similar to the ones generated at the penstock lower generatrix in actual flow conditions. Thirteen preselected coating solutions were first been tested during a 45 hours erosion test. A ranking of the thirteen coating solutions was then determined after characterisation. To complete this first evaluation and to determine the wear kinetic of the four best coating solutions, additional erosion tests were conducted with a longer duration of 216 hours. A comparison of this new method with standardized tests and with real service operating flow conditions is also discussed. To complete the final ranking based on hydro-abrasive erosion tests, some trial tests were carried out on penstock samples to check the application method of selected coating systems. The paper gives some perspectives related to erosion test methodologies for materials and coating solutions for hydraulic applications. The developed test method can also be applied in other fields.

  18. Shallow-source aeromagnetic anomalies observed over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet compared with coincident bed topography from radar ice sounding - New evidence for glacial "removal" of subglacially erupted late Cenozoic rift-related volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Blankenship, D.D.; Morse, D.L.; Bell, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding results from the 1991-1997 Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey over part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and subglacial area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system have enabled detailed examination of specific anomaly sources. These anomalies, previously interpreted as caused by late Cenozoic subglacial volcanic centers, are compared to newly available glacial bed-elevation data from the radar ice sounding compilation of the entire area of the aeromagnetic survey to test this hypothesis in detail. We examined about 1000 shallow-source magnetic anomalies for bedrock topographic expression. Using very conservative criteria, we found over 400 specific anomalies which correlate with bed topography directly beneath each anomaly. We interpret these anomalies as indicative of the relative abundance of volcanic anomalies having shallow magnetic sources. Of course, deeper source magnetic anomalies are present, but these have longer wavelengths, lower gradients and mostly lower amplitudes from those caused by the highly magnetic late Cenozoic volcanic centers. The great bulk of these >400 (40-1200-nT) anomaly sources at the base of the ice have low bed relief (60-600 m, with about 80%10 million years ago. Eighteen of the anomalies examined, about half concentrated in the area of the WAIS divide, have high-topographic expression (as great as 400 m above sea level) and high bed relief (up to 1500 m). All of these high-topography anomaly sources at the base of the ice would isostatically rebound to elevations above sea level were the ice removed. We interpret these 18 anomaly sources as evidence of subaerial eruption of volcanoes whose topography was protected from erosion by competent volcanic flows similar to prominent volcanic peaks that are exposed above the surface of the WAIS. Further, we infer these volcanoes as possibly erupted at a time when the WAIS was absent. In contrast, at the other extreme

  19. Spider Silk Violin Strings with a Unique Packing Structure Generate a Soft and Profound Timbre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Shigeyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We overcome the difficulties in pulling long draglines from spiders, twist bundles of dragline filaments, and succeed in preparing violin strings. The twisting is found to change the cross section shapes of filaments from circular to polygonal and to optimize the packing structure with no openings among filaments providing mechanically strong and elastic strings. The spider string signal peaks of overtones for the violin are relatively large at high frequencies, generating a soft and profound timbre. Such a preferable timbre is considered to be due to the unique polygonal packing structure which provides valuable knowledge for developing new types of materials.

  20. A profound case of neurally mediated syncope with asystole after septoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Douglas S; Ramsey, Mitchell J; Ruffin, David M

    2012-06-01

    Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is an alarming yet benign condition that may present postoperatively for the first time in otherwise healthy patients. Although VVS is associated anecdotally with nasal manipulation, no data have been found to quantify this incidence with otolaryngology surgeries. We present a case of profound, recurrent syncope and documented asystole with an initial diagnosis of glossopharyngeal neuralgia. We conclude with a discussion of neurally mediated syncope particular to the perioperative setting. It is essential to recognize neurocardiogenic etiology to differentiate it from other more concerning causes of syncope and asystole. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Developmental dysgraphia with profound hearing impairment: intervention by auditory methods enabled by cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kawasaki, Akihiro; Nagayasu, Rie; Kunisue, Kazuya; Maeda, Yukihide; Kariya, Shin; Kataoka, Yuko; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2008-06-01

    Learning disability combined with hearing impairment (LDHI) is a poor prognostic factor for the language development of hearing impaired children after educational intervention. A typical example of a child with LDHI and effective interventions provided by cochlear implants are presented in this report. A case of congenital cytomegaloviral infection that showed dysgraphia as well as profound deafness was reported and an underlying visual processing problem diagnosed in the present case caused the patient's dysgraphia. The dysgraphia could be circumvented by the use of auditory memory fairly established by a cochlear implant.

  2. Lemierre’s Syndrome Associated with Mechanical Ventilation and Profound Deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Birkner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is a rare disorder that is characterized by anaerobic organisms inducing a thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV following a course of oropharyngeal infection. It often occurs in young and healthy patients. Clinicians continuously misinterpret early symptoms until infection disseminates systematically and life-threatening sepsis transpires. We report the case of a 58-year-old female developing Lemierre’s syndrome accompanied by invasive ventilation support and a profound deafness requiring the implementation of a cochlear implant. This is one of two reported cases of Lemierre’s syndrome associated with mechanical ventilation support and the only case associated with a cochlear implant.

  3. Measuring low rates of erosion from forest fuel reduction operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Ina Sue Miller

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate three methods for measuring low levels of hillside soil erosion associated with forest fuel management activities, and to measure erosion from cable logging and skid trails. The tipping bucket device with a sediment basin appears to be a better tool for this application than silt fences or rillmeter analysis. The greatest erosion...

  4. Using WEPP technology to predict erosion and runoff following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Ina Sue Miller; Brandon D. Glaza

    2006-01-01

    Erosion following wildfire can be as much as 1000 times the erosion from an undisturbed forest. In August, 2005, the largest fire in the lower 48 states occurred in the Umatilla National Forest in Southeast Washington. Researchers from the Rocky Mountain Research Station assisted the forest in estimating soil erosion using three different applications of the WEPP model...

  5. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-07

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  6. Multivariate erosion risk assessment of lateritic badlands of Birbhum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Birbhum district is an indicative of excessive soil loss in the monsoonal wet-dry type of climate. Slope erosion and channel erosion ... gorize the gully-catchments into different magnitude of erosion risk using several multivariate statistical techniques. 1. ...... implementation of 'Bhatina Watershed Manage- ment Program' the ...

  7. Acoustic measurements of soil-pipeflow and internal erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can lead to embankment failures, landslides, and gully erosion. Therefore, non-intrusive methods are needed to detect and monitor soil pipeflow and the resulting internal erosion. This paper presents a laboratory study using both active and passive acoustic techniques ...

  8. Assessing soil erosion risk in the Tillabery landscape, Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that soil erosion output scenarios predict greater soil erosion in the study area from 2070 onwards. They suggest that human disturbance and topographic factors are the main impact factors in the affected areas. Key words: Tillabéry landscape (Niger), sheet and rill erosion modelling, data mining.

  9. Erosion of a copper cathode in a negative corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asinovskiĭ, É. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Samoylov, I. S.

    2008-02-01

    The pulsed-periodic regime of a negative corona (Trichel pulses) in atmospheric-pressure air, which leads to explosion emission mechanisms (ecton generation) of pointed cathode erosion, is investigated. The jet erosion process at the copper cathode is discovered, and micrometer dendritelike structures formed by erosion products returning to the cathode are detected.

  10. Climate change as a mechanism for reducing coastal erosion rates

    OpenAIRE

    A. Barkwith; Limber, P.; Thomas, C.W.; A. B. Murray

    2013-01-01

    The Holderness coast of eastern Yorkshire, England, is the most rapidly eroding coastline in Europe. Erosion currently threatens local communities and infrastructure, including nationally important gas installations. Interventions to restrict local erosion usually result in enhanced erosion in adjacent, unprotected sections of coast, mirroring morphology seen on the large scale. Simulation of the morphology has previously been undertaken using cliff stability models...

  11. 10 CFR 960.4-2-5 - Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erosion. 960.4-2-5 Section 960.4-2-5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-5 Erosion. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall allow the underground... consider the climatic, tectonic, and geomorphic evidence of rates and patterns of erosion in the geologic...

  12. Validation of a probabilistic post-fire erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pete Robichaud; William J. Elliot; Sarah A. Lewis; Mary Ellen Miller

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire increases of runoff and erosion often occur and land managers need tools to be able to project the increased risk. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model as the underlying processor. ERMiT predicts the probability of a given amount of hillslope sediment delivery from a single rainfall or...

  13. Experiments on Erosion of Mud from the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, C.; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on erosion and consolidation of natural cohesive sediments from the harbour of Esbjerg located in the Danish Watten Sea were conducted using a rotating annular flume. The objective of the paper is to describe the erosion rate of deposited beds and relate the erosion rate...

  14. A longitudinal study of tooth erosion in adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidi, H El; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Incidence studies on tooth erosion among adolescents are scarce. This longitudinal study aimed at estimating the prevalence, incidence, progression, and distribution of erosion in young adolescents over a 1.5-year period. Erosion at baseline was present in 32.2% of the 622 children (mean age, 11.9

  15. Genetic erosion in crops: concept, research results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouw, van de M.J.; Kik, C.; Hintum, van T.J.L.; Treuren, van R.; Visser, L.

    2010-01-01

    The loss of variation in crops clue to the modernization of agriculture has been described as genetic erosion The current paper discusses the different views that exist on the concept of genetic erosion in crops Genetic erosion of cultivated diversity is reflected in a modernization bottleneck in

  16. Evaluation of Rainfall Erosivity Index for Abuja, Nigeria Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall erosivity index is one of the important factors influencing soil erosion. Erosivity index for Abuja, Nigeria was evaluated using the Lombadi method. Twelve (12) years rainfall data (2001 – 2012) used was obtained from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET) Abuja. Daily kinetic energy – intensity interaction was ...

  17. Paleo-erosion rates versus paleo-erosion processes from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in sedimentary archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildgen, Taylor; Garcin, Yannick; Savi, Sara; Tofelde, Stefanie; Wittmann, Hella; Strecker, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Paleo-erosion rates derived from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in sedimentary archives are commonly observed to differ from modern rates, in some cases by several orders of magnitude. However, the meaning of these rates can be unclear when we consider the averaging timescale (and presumed lag) of the cosmogenic nuclide technique in recording erosion rates, grain-size dependencies in nuclide concentrations, and assumptions inherent to the detrital approach. These issues can complicate our ability to interpret landscape response to past climate change from cosmogenic nuclides. In general, the cosmogenic nuclide concentration in sediment is inversely related to the catchment mean erosion rate. However, several studies, including ours from the Central Andes, have suggested that low nuclide concentrations from fill terrace sediment coupled with a strong grain-size dependence in nuclide concentrations point to a greater importance of landslide activity in the past. In such settings, cosmogenic nuclide concentrations may provide clear signals of changes in erosion processes, but are difficult to interpret in terms of changes in erosion rates. These complications may be reduced in low-relief catchments, where landsliding is unlikely. Such is the case for the semi-arid Baragoi catchment of East Africa, which was affected by a wetter climate during the African Humid Period (ca. 15-6 cal. kyr BP). From that time period, we calculate paleo-erosion rates from cosmogenic nuclides within deltaic sediments that are up to 7x faster than modern rates. Moreover, erosion rates rise rapidly near the onset of wetter climate conditions, then drop to near-modern rates well before the return to semi-arid conditions. Given that the averaging timescale of our samples is 8 to 46 kyr, to match the rapid observed rise in erosion rates with a 1D model of cosmogenic nuclide accumulation requires an increase in erosion rates several hundred times higher than the initial (pre-delta formation

  18. Active faults paragenesis and the state of crustal stresses in the Late Cenozoic in Central Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sankov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy tectonic saddle region in Central Mongolia are studied by space images interpretation, relief analysis, structural methods and tectonic stress reconstruction. The study results show that faults activation during the Late Cenozoic stage was selective, and a cluster pattern of active faults is typical for the study region. Morphological and genetic types and the kinematics of faults in the Hangay-Hentiy saddle region are related the direction of the ancient inherited structural heterogeneities. Latitudinal and WNW trending faults are left lateral strike-slips with reverse or thrust component (Dzhargalantgol and North Burd faults. NW trending faults are reverse faults or thrusts with left lateral horizontal component. NNW trending faults have right lateral horizontal component. The horizontal component of the displacements, as a rule, exceeds the vertical one. Brittle deformations in fault zones do not conform with the Pliocene and, for the most part, Pleistocene topography. With some caution it may be concluded that the last phase of revitalization of strike slip and reverse movements along the faults commenced in the Late Pleistocene. NE trending disjunctives are normal faults distributed mainly within the Hangay uplift. Their features are more early activation within the Late Cenozoic and the lack of relation to large linear structures of the previous tectonic stages. According to the stress tensor reconstructions of the last phase of deformation in zones of active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy saddle using data on tectonic fractures and fault displacements, it is revealed that conditions of compression and strike-slip with NNE direction of the axis of maximum compression were dominant. Stress tensors of extensional type with NNW direction of minimum compression are reconstructed for the Orkhon graben. It is concluded that the activation of faults in Central Mongolia in the Pleistocene-Holocene, as well as

  19. Paleoclimate from fossil plants and application to the early Cenozoic Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Wladimir Köppen called vegetation "crystallized, visible climate," and his metaphor encouraged paleobotanists to climb the chain of inference from fossil plants to paleovegetation to paleoclimate. Inferring paleovegetation from fossils has turned out to be very difficult, however, and today most paleobotanical methods for inferring paleoclimate do not try to reconstruct paleovegetation as a first step. Three major approaches are widely use to infer paleoclimate from plant fossils: 1) phylogenetic inferences rely on the climatic distributions of extant relatives of fossils, 2) morphological inferences use present-day correlations of climate with plant morphology (e.g, leaf shape, wood anatomy), and 3) chemical inferences rely on correlations between climate and the stable isotopic composition of plants or organic compounds. Each approach makes assumptions that are hard to verify. Phylogenetic inference depends on accurate identification of fossils, and also assumes that evolution and/or extinction has not shifted the climatic distributions of plant lineages through time. On average this assumption is less valid for older time periods, but probably it is not radically wrong for the early Cenozoic. Morphological approaches don't require taxonomic identification of plant fossils, but do assume that correlations between plant form and climate have been constant over time. This assumption is bolstered if the ecophysiological cause of the morphology-climate correlation is well understood, but often it isn't. Stable isotopic approaches assume that present-day correlations between isotopic composition and climate apply to the past. Commonly the chemical and physiological mechanisms responsible for the correlation are moderately well known, but often the variation among different taxonomic and functional groups of plants is poorly characterized. In spite of limitations and uncertainties on all methods for inferring paleoclimate from fossil plants, broad patterns emerge from

  20. Nature and History of Cenozoic Polar Ice Covers: The Case of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielhagen, R.; Thiede, J.

    2009-04-01

    The nature of the modern climate System is characterized by steep temperature gradients between the tropical and polar climatic zones and finds its most spectacular expression in the formation of ice caps in high Northern and Southern latitudes. While polar regions of Planet Earth have been glaciated repeatedly in the long course of their geological history, the Cenozoic transition from a „greenhouse" to an „icehouse" has in fact produced a unique climatic scenario with bipolar glacation, different from all previous glacial events. The Greenland ice sheet is a remainder of the Northern Hemisphere last glacial maximum ice sheets and represents hence a spectacular anomaly. Geological records from Tertiary and Quaternary terrestrial and oceanic sections have documented the presence of ice caps and sea ice covers both on the Southern as well on the Northern hemisphere since Eocene times, aqpprox. 45 Mio. years ago. While this was well known in the case of Antarctica already for some time, previous ideas about the origin of Northern hemisphere glaciation during Pliocene times (approx. 2-3 Mio. years ago) have been superceded by the dramatic findings of coarse, terrigenous ice rafted detritus in Eocene sediments from Lomonosov Ridge (close to the North Pole) apparently slightly older than the oldest Antarctic records of ice rafting.The histories of the onset of Cenozoic glaciation in high Northern and Southern latitudes remain enigmatic and are presently subjects of international geological drilling projects, with prospects to reveal some of their secrets over the coming decades. By virtue of the physical porperties of ice and the processes controlling the dynamics of the turn-over of the ice-sheets only young records of glacial ice caps on Antarctica and on Greemnland have been preserved, on Greenland with ice probably not older than a few hundred thousand years, on Antarctica potentially as old as 1.5-2 Mio. years. Deep-sea cores with their records od ice

  1. Active faults paragenesis and the state of crustal stresses in the Late Cenozoic in Central Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sankov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy tectonic saddle region in Central Mongolia are studied by space images interpretation, relief analysis, structural methods and tectonic stress reconstruction. The study results show that faults activation during the Late Cenozoic stage was selective, and a cluster pattern of active faults is typical for the study region. Morphological and genetic types and the kinematics of faults in the Hangay-Hentiy saddle region are related the direction of the ancient inherited structural heterogeneities. Latitudinal and WNW trending faults are left lateral strike-slips with reverse or thrust component (Dzhargalantgol and North Burd faults. NW trending faults are reverse faults or thrusts with left lateral horizontal component. NNW trending faults have right lateral horizontal component. The horizontal component of the displacements, as a rule, exceeds the vertical one. Brittle deformations in fault zones do not conform with the Pliocene and, for the most part, Pleistocene topography. With some caution it may be concluded that the last phase of revitalization of strike slip and reverse movements along the faults commenced in the Late Pleistocene. NE trending disjunctives are normal faults distributed mainly within the Hangay uplift. Their features are more early activation within the Late Cenozoic and the lack of relation to large linear structures of the previous tectonic stages. According to the stress tensor reconstructions of the last phase of deformation in zones of active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy saddle using data on tectonic fractures and fault displacements, it is revealed that conditions of compression and strike-slip with NNE direction of the axis of maximum compression were dominant. Stress tensors of extensional type with NNW direction of minimum compression are reconstructed for the Orkhon graben. It is concluded that the activation of faults in Central Mongolia in the Pleistocene-Holocene, as well as

  2. Cenozoic basin thermal history reconstruction and petroleum systems in the eastern Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mauricio; Mora, Andres; Ketcham, Richard A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Almendral, Ariel

    2017-04-01

    Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic retro-arc foreland basins along the eastern margin of the Andes in South America host the world's best detrital record for the study of subduction orogenesis. There, the world's most prolific petroleum system occur in the northernmost of these foreland basin systems, in Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, yet over 90% of the discovered hydrocarbons there occur in one single province in norteastern Venezuela. A successful industry-academy collaboration applied a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the north Andes with the aim of investigating both, the driving mechanisms of orogenesis, and its impact on hydrocarbon accumulation in eastern Colombia. The Eastern Cordillera is an inversion orogen located at the leading edge of the northern Andes. Syn-rift subsidence favored the accumulation of km-thick organic matter rich shales in a back-arc basin in the early Cretaceous. Subsequent late Cretaceous thermal subsidence prompted the accumulation of shallow marine sandstones and shales, the latter including the Turonian-Cenomanian main hydrocarbon source-rock. Early Andean uplift since the Paleocene led to development of a flexural basin, filled with mainly non-marine strata. We have studied the Meso-Cenozoic thermal evolution of these basins through modeling of a large thermochronometric database including hundreds of apatite and zircon fission-track and (U-Th)/He data, as well as paleothermometric information based on vitrinite reflectance and present-day temperatures measured in boreholes. The detrital record of Andean construction was also investigated through detrital zircon U-Pb geochronometry in outcrop and borehole samples. A comprehensive burial/exhumation history has been accomplished through three main modeling strategies. First, one-dimensional subsidence was used to invert the pre-extensional lithospheric thicknesses, the magnitude of stretching, and the resulting heat flow associated to extension. The amount of eroded section and

  3. The Bhutan Erosion Mystery: Climate or tectonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, B. A.; Whipple, K. X.; Heimsath, A. M.; Hodges, K.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of the Shillong Plateau south of the Himalayan mountain ranges provides an opportunity to test models regarding the interaction of climate, surface processes and tectonics. The orographic lifting associated with the 1.5 km high plateau has concentrated the rains of the Indian Summer Monsoon along the Shillong Plateau's southern flank, but also creates a rain shadow on part of the Himalaya to the northwest. The plateau has shielded the Himalayan range from much larger amounts of precipitation starting ca 4 Ma (Biswas et al., 2007). It has been suggested that this shielding manifests as an east-west gradient in long-term erosion rates of the Bhutan Himalaya around 90°E. We test the strength of the influence of this rain shadow on erosion rates in the Bhutan Himalaya by measuring millennial-scale erosion rates as a function of topographic relief and modern rainfall. We have collected a suite of river sediments from basins within the Bhutan Himalaya that cover a broad regional expanse, and a wide range of both channel steepness values and annual precipitation amounts. From these samples we have obtained basin-average erosion rates using terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide techniques. Our preliminary data for samples in the relatively dry interior of Bhutan (annual precipitation ~ 1m/yr) show a range of erosion rates of 28-412 m/Myr from basins that span channel steepness values of 97-379. These data imply a relatively low erosional efficiency (similar to the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau) that may reflect the influence of the Shillong Plateau rain shadow. Analyses of additional samples spanning a wide range in annual precipitation (i.e., including basins in the foreland and outside of the rain shadow) are critical to determining the strength of the climatic influence and are currently underway. New detrital 10Be concentrations enable us to evaluate the potential for spatial gradients in erosion rate to be driven by both spatial and temporal

  4. Transrectal Mesh Erosion Requiring Bowel Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Marta Maria; Slim, Karem; Rabischong, Benoît; Bourdel, Nicolas; Canis, Michel; Botchorishvili, Revaz

    To report a case of a transrectal mesh erosion as complication of laparoscopic promontofixation with mesh repair, necessitating bowel resection and subsequent surgical interventions. Sacrocolpopexy has become a standard procedure for vaginal vault prolapse [1], and the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity owing to more rapid recovery and less morbidity [2,3]. Mesh erosion is a well-known complication of surgical treatment for prolapse as reported in several negative evaluations, including a report from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011 [4]. Mesh complications are more common after surgeries via the vaginal approach [5]; nonetheless, the incidence of vaginal mesh erosion after laparoscopic procedures is as high as 9% [6]. The incidence of transrectal mesh exposure after laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is roughly 1% [7]. The diagnosis may be delayed because of its rarity and variable presentation. In addition, polyester meshes, such as the mesh used in this case, carry a higher risk of exposure [8]. A 57-year-old woman experiencing genital prolapse, with the cervix classified as +3 according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system, underwent laparoscopic standard sacrocolpopexy using polyester mesh. Subtotal hysterectomy and bilateral adnexectomy were performed concomitantly. A 3-year follow-up consultation demonstrated no signs or symptoms of erosion of any type. At 7 years after the surgery, however, the patient presented with rectal discharge, diagnosed as infectious rectocolitis with the isolation of Clostridium difficile. She underwent a total of 5 repair surgeries in a period of 4 months, including transrectal resection of exposed mesh, laparoscopic ablation of mesh with digestive resection, exploratory laparoscopy with abscess drainage, and exploratory laparoscopy with ablation of residual mesh and transverse colostomy. She recovered well after the last intervention, exhibiting no signs of vaginal or rectal fistula and no recurrence

  5. High-porosity Cenozoic carbonate rocks of South Florida: Progressive loss of porosity with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Schmoker, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Porosity measurements by borehole gravity meter in subsurface Cenozoic carbonates of south Florida reveal an extremely porous mass of limestone and dolomite which is transitional in total pore volume between typical porosity values for modern carbonate sediments and ancient carbonate rocks. A persistent decrease of porosity with depth, similar to that of chalks of the Gulf Coast, occurs in these rocks. We make no attempt to differentiate depositional or diagenetic facies which produce scatter in the porosity-depth relationship; the dominant data trends thus are functions of carbonate rocks in general rather than of particular carbonate facies. Carbonate strata with less than 20% porosity are absent from the rocks studied here.Aquifers and aquicludes cannot be distinguished on the basis of porosity. Although aquifers are characterized by great permeability and well-developed vuggy and even cavernous porosity in some intervals, they are not exceptionally porous when compared to other Tertiary carbonate rocks in south Florida. Permeability in these strata is governed more by the spacial distribution of pore space and matrix than by the total volume of porosity present.Dolomite is as porous as, or slightly less porous than, limestones in these rocks. This observation places limits on any model proposed for dolomitization and suggests that dolomitization does not take place by a simple ion-for-ion replacement of magnesium for calcium. Dolomitization may be selective for less porous limestone, or it may involve the incorporation of significant amounts of carbonate as well as magnesium into the rock.The great volume of pore space in these rocks serves to highlight the inefficiency of early diagenesis in reducing carbonate porosity and to emphasize the importance of later porosity reduction which occurs during the burial or late near-surface history of limestones and dolomites.

  6. Determination of trace elements in volcanic rock samples collected from cenozoic lava eruption sites using LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Nasr, Mohamed M; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Yamani, Zain H

    2009-04-01

    Trace elements of environmental significance present in the volcanic rock samples collected from sites of the Cenozoic era flood basalt flows and eruptions were detected using locally developed laser-induced breakdown spectrometer. For spectro-chemical analysis of these samples, the plasma was generated by focusing a pulsed Nd: YAG laser radiation at 1064 nm wavelength on the target rock samples. These samples were collected from four widely separated locations surrounding the volcanic eruption sites belonging to the Harrat Hutaymah volcanic field in the vicinity of Taba town, situated to the east of Hail city of northern Saudi Arabia. These samples represent the scoria basalt lava flows as well as a large tuff-ring crater and it contains xenoliths. These flows occur widespread over the Earth's surface in this region, and their contained xenoliths are brought up from depths of a few tens of kilometers. This volcanic field has received much less attention in the previous geological studies; and consequently, its effects on the environment are not well defined. The concentration of different elements of environmental significance like Cr, Pb, Mn, Cd, Sr and other trace metals like Cu, Al, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ti and Fe in these rock samples were determined by spectral analysis. Parametric dependence for improvement of LIBS sensitivity for detection of these elements was also carried out. The highest concentration detected of environmentally significant elements like Cr, Mn, Pb, Sr and Ni are 1910, 1399, 90.5, 12412 and 461.5 ppm, respectively in four different lava samples which are considered to be much higher than the safe permissible limits. The LIBS results were compared with the results obtained using other analytical techniques such as the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  7. The coal-bearing Cenozoic As Pontes Basin (northwestern Spain): geological influence on coal characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, L.; Hagemann, H.W.; Pickel, W.; Saez, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Geologia Dinamica, Geofisica i Paleontologia

    1995-03-01

    Lignite deposits in the Cenozoic As Pontes strike-slip basin (northwestern Spain) were formed as a function of specific paleoclimatic conditions and tectonic evolution of the basin. During the early evolutionary stages, the presence of active normal faults and thrusts inside the basin resulted in two subbasins with distinct differences in sedimentary records, with respect to lignite seam occurrence, thickness, areal extent and lithotype development. In contrast, during the late evolutionary stages the basin was not split and a more homogeneous sedimentary record in terms of coal seam occurrence and lithotype characteristics developed. A total of 26 lignite samples, distributed along the basin infill, were analyzed by organic petrography and geochemistry. All are lignite B (ASTM). The lignites deposited during lower basin infill sedimentation (unit 1 and 2) are dark, matrix-rich, mainly huminitic brown coals, with minor bright, liptinitic-rich coal lithotypes. The dark huminitic coals in these units show sedimentological and paleontological evidence of lacustrine influence. Lignites in the upper basin infill (Unit 4) are almost exclusively matrix-rich, huminitic brown coals. The overall coal petrological data trend recorded from the lower to the upper basin infill units agrees with the stratigraphic and sedimentological data, which show a trend of increasingly drier conditions. Development of bright, liptinite-enriched lignite layers was widespread during the early basin evolutionary stages and was influenced by punctuated water-table oscillations. Sedimentological, petrological and organic geochemical data suggest that, although the paleoenvironments where peat deposition took place did not undergo dramatic changes, they were affected by distinguishable variations, linked mostly to the evolution of basin morphology and basin water balance. 52 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Hot Spot Induced Cenozoic Volcanism in the Upper Rajang Valley, Sarawak - Is Borneo Rifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Upper Rajang Valley covers a large area in the northern interior of the island of Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sarawak . It is underlain by the Cretaceous to Late Eocene deep to shallow marine sediments of the Rajang Group. Within this area are several Cenozoic volcanic edifices, which to date have been sparsely studied. Two distinct episodes of volcanism are recognized - the first, dated early Eocene, consists of K-rich basalts, and is represented by the Bukit Mersing volcanics, which were erupted conformably onto deep water turbidites of the Rajang Group. The second, far more extensive, is dated Pliocene to Quaternary, and is bimodal, consisting mainly of early dacite and rhyodacite tuffs, with a smaller amount of later basalt, forming several volcanic plateaus and massifs (Hose Mountains, Usun Apau, Linau-Balui, Nieuwenhuis Mountains and others). They lie unconformably over pre-Miocene sediments, the Linau-Balui basalts having been erupted onto Quaternary river terraces. Mantle-normalized REE and incompatible trace element spider plots reveal that the Bukit Mersing basalts have geochemical affinity with Oceanic Island Basalts (OIB) and rift basalts, being enriched in LREEs and Most Incompatible Elements, and no Eu anomaly. Preliminary trace element data for several basalt samples from Usun Apau also show Oceanic Island/Rift affinity. Bimodal volcanism is most often associated with rift environments. Efforts are being made to radiometrically date the volcanics, in part to determine the possibility of future eruptions. The Upper Rajang Valley is remote, covered in tropical rainforest and is very sparsely populated. At this time, there is no information concerning signs of imminent volcanism, such as hot springs and microseismicity.

  9. Fossil Cenozoic crassatelline bivalves from Peru: New species and generic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. DeVries

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of new fossil Cenozoic crassatellines in Peru provide a new phylogenetic perspective on “large” Neogene genera, in which four lineages are considered to have arisen independently from different Paleogene Crassatella ancestors. Latest Oligocene and early Miocene species of the new genus Tilicrassatella gen. nov.―T. ponderosa, T. torrens sp. nov., and T. sanmartini sp. nov. from the East Pisco Basin―probably evolved from the late Eocene species, Crassatella rafaeli sp. nov., which itself differed in significant respects from slightly older species of the East Pisco Basin, C. neorhynchus and C. pedroi sp. nov. The paciphilic genus, Hybolophus, is raised to full generic status. Added to its ranks are the East Pisco Miocene species H. maleficae sp. nov., H. terrestris sp. nov., and the oldest species of the genus, the late Eocene or Oligocene H. disenum sp. nov. from the Talara Basin of northern Peru. Kalolophus gen. nov., encompassing circum-Caribbean fossil species, the extant species, K. speciosus, and the trans-isthmus species, K. antillarum, appears to have evolved from the early Oligocene Floridian species, Crassatella portelli sp. nov. The genus Marvacrassatella is a western Atlantic Miocene lineage most likely descended from Kalolophus. The genus Eucrassatella is restricted to Australian and New Zealand taxa. The Eocene New Zealand species, Spissatella media, is transferred to Eucrassatella and deemed a candidate for the most recent common ancestor of younger Eucrassatella and all Spissatella species. In the southern Pacific Ocean, the circum-Caribbean region, and tropical western America, crassatelline lineages developed one or more of the following characters: large resilifers, smooth ventral margins, and an extended left anterior cardinal tooth. Some of these late Paleogene convergent character changes might have countered increased shear forces exerted on the crassatelline valves while burrowing into finer-grained and

  10. Transition from the Cretaceous ocean to Cenozoic circulation in the western South Atlantic - A twofold reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Weber, Tobias; Grützner, Jens; Thomas, Maik

    2017-10-01

    The Cretaceous oceanic circulation has been quite different from the modern with a different distribution of the continents on the globe. This has resulted in a much lower temperature gradient between poles and equator. We have studied seismic reflection data and used numerical simulations of atmosphere and ocean dynamics to identify important steps in modifications of the oceanic circulation in the South Atlantic from the Cretaceous to the Cenozoic and the major factors controlling them. Starting in the Albian we could not identify any traces of an overturning circulation for the South Atlantic although a weak proto-Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) was simulated. No change in circulation was observed for the Paleocene/early Eocene South Atlantic, which indicated that this period has witnessed a circulation similar to the Albian and Cenomanian/Turonian circulation. The most drastic modifications were observed for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary and the Oligocene/early Miocene with the onset of an ACC and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and hence southern sourced deep and bottom water masses in the western South Atlantic. A modern AMOC, which intensified in strength after closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS), and a strong ACC have resulted in current controlled sedimentary features and wide spread hiatusses in the South Atlantic since the middle Miocene. The opening of Drake Passage in early Oligocene times and the closure of the CAS at 6 Ma, i.e., tectonic processes, have been identified as the key triggers for the observed most severe changes in oceanic circulation in the South Atlantic.

  11. Cenozoic intraplate tectonics in Central Patagonia: Record of main Andean phases in a weak upper plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, G. M.; Echaurren, A.; Folguera, A.; Likerman, J.; Encinas, A.; García, H. P. A.; Dal Molin, C.; Valencia, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    Contraction in intraplate areas is still poorly understood relative to similar deformation at plate margins. In order to contribute to its comprehension, we study the Patagonian broken foreland (PBF) in South America whose evolution remains controversial. Time constraints of tectonic events and structural characterization of this belt are limited. Also, major causes of strain location in this orogen far from the plate margin are enigmatic. To unravel tectonic events, we studied the Cenozoic sedimentary record of the central sector of the Patagonian broken foreland (San Bernardo fold and thrust belt, 44°30‧S-46°S) and the Andes (Meseta de Chalia, 46°S) following an approach involving growth-strata detection, U-Pb geochronology and structural modeling. Additionally, we elaborate a high resolution analysis of the effective elastic thickness (Te) to examine the relation between intraplate contraction location and variations in lithospheric strength. The occurrence of Eocene growth-strata ( 44-40 Ma) suggests that contraction in the Andes and the Patagonian broken foreland was linked to the Incaic phase. Detection of synextensional deposits suggests that the broken foreland collapsed partially during Oligocene to early Miocene. During middle Miocene times, the Quechua contractional phase produced folding of Neogene volcanic rocks and olistostrome deposition at 17 Ma. Finally, the presented Te map shows that intraplate contraction related to Andean phases localized preferentially along weak lithospheric zones (Te < 15 km). Hence, the observed strain distribution in the PBF appears to be controlled by lateral variations in the lithospheric strength. Variations in this parameter could be related to thermo-mechanical weakening produced by intraplate rifting in Paleozoic-Mesozoic times.

  12. Late Cenozoic extension and crustal doming in the NE Chinese Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Rasmus C.; Sobel, Edward R.; Chen, Jie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay; Stockli, Daniel; Sudo, Masafumi; Strecker, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    The northward motion of the Pamir indenter with respect to Eurasia has resulted in coeval thrusting, strike-slip and normal faulting. The eastern Pamir is currently deformed by east-west oriented extension, accompanied by uplift and exhumation of the Kongur Shan (7719 m) and Muztagh Ata (7546 m) gneiss domes. Both domes are an integral part of the footwall of the Kongur Shan Extensional System (KES), a 250-km-long, north-south oriented graben. Why active normal faulting within the Pamir is primarily localized along the KES and not distributed more widely throughout the orogen, has remained unclear. In addition, relatively little is known about how deformation has evolved throughout the Cenozoic, despite refined estimates on present-day crustal deformation rates and microseismicity, which indicate where crustal deformation is presently being accommodated. To better constrain the spatiotemporal evolution of faulting along the KES, we present 39 new apatite fission-track, zircon U-Th-Sm/He, and 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages from a series of footwall transects along the KES graben shoulder. Combining this data with, present day topographic relief, 1D thermo-kinematic and exhumational modeling documents successive stages, rather than synchronous deformation and gneiss dome exhumation. While Kongur-Shan-exhumation started during the late Miocene, Muztagh Ata began earlier and has slowed down since the late Miocene. We present a new model, suggesting that thermal and density effects associated with a lithospheric tear fault along the eastern margin of the subducting Alai slab localizes extensional upper-plate deformation along the KES and decouples crustal motion between the Central/Western Pamir and Eastern Pamir/Tarim basin.

  13. Cenozoic Siliciclastic Sediment Budget of Africa, a Record of the Post-Break Uplift and Aridification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C.; Guillocheau, F.; Baby, G.; Calves, G.

    2013-12-01

    Siliciclastic sediment budget measurements was performed along the margins and onshore basins of Africa for Cenozoic times. Our objective was (1) to quantify the ratio between onshore and offshore sediment preservation in the case of a relief with mostly no mountain belt and (2) to understand the factors forcing the sediment supply along the passive margins of Africa, uplift or climate changes (with the major aridification of Africa since Middle Miocene). This study is based on basin-scale regional sections (seismic reflection data from industry and academics, wells correlation), calibrated in age and lithology on different types of wells (industry, DSDP/ODP). Most of the effort was on the revaluation of the ages (calibration and uncertainties). The volumes of sediments and uncertainties on depth conversion velocity laws, lithology and ages were measured using software developed by J. Braun (Grenoble University, France). 1. The sediment preserved onshore (750 000 km3) is one of magnitude less than was is preserved offshore 2. The main deformations controlling the sediment supply are (1) the growth or the domes of the East African rift and (2) the marginal bulge of the central and equatorial segments of the South Atlantic Ocean (from southern Angola to Guinea). 3. The aridification of Africa since at least Middle Miocene is very sensitive in the south (fossilization of the relief of the South African Plateau) and in the northwest, with a sharp decrease of the sediment supply. 4. Some buffer effects are very important, for example for the Nile and the Zambezi, where sediments were first stored in onshore basins, Sudan or Malawi rift, and later drained because of a capture (Nile) or a regional stress change (Zambezi).

  14. Deep sea authigenic clays as a sink for seawater Mg through the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Ramos, D. S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The most enigmatic sink of many elements in the global ocean is the formation of authigenic aluminosilicates. Pelagic clays cover 40% of the seafloor and "reverse weathering" type reactions within this lithology have the potential to be a large sink of seawater Mg and affect carbon cycling in the ocean. We use pelagic clays from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 Site U1366 in the South Pacific Gyre to track authigenic aluminosilicates with two complementary methods: (1) Mg isotopic analyses, and (2) bulk sediment geochemistry with provenance modeling. Mg isotopic analyses of the bulk, unleached clay samples reveal isotopic values significantly heavier than average continental crust (δ26Mg = -0.1 to -0.3%o) indicating significant authigenic uptake. The bulk sediment geochemistry (i.e., major, trace, rare earth element concentrations) and multivariate statistical models of provenance determine the mass fraction of six different sediment sources that mixed to create the sediments: Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, excess Si, dust, and two altered volcanic ashes. A significant correlation between the mass fraction of one of the specific altered ash end-member and the δ26Mg signature allows us to characterize and track the abundance of the authigenic aluminosilicate component downcore. Trends in the provenance models suggest that the elements that compose the authigenic aluminosilicates may originate from volcanic ash, biogenic Si, and/or hydrothermal plume deposits. We examine variations in the spatial and temporal contributions of each of these sources and assess how these variations may have affected the amount of Mg authigenically consumed by deep sea authigenic clays through the Cenozoic. If the authigenic aluminosilicates are created by "reverse weathering" reactions, their formation also has important implications for carbon cycling in the global ocean.

  15. Dust, Volcanic Ash, and the Evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust and volcanic ash play a critical role in past global climate by affecting cloud cover and ocean nutrients as well as responding to changes in tectonics, aridity, and wind. Because the eolian fluxes in the Southern Hemisphere are so low, subtle changes in the absolute flux of dust and volcanic ash may have a disproportionally large impact on climate. Our multi-site record of eolian dust and volcanic ash accumulation in pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG), gathered during IODP Expedition 329, shows that eolian fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over the Cenozoic and correlate with changes of tectonic processes and global climate. We analyzed the concentrations of 37 elements in 138 bulk pelagic clay samples from 6 sites drilled throughout the SPG. Using multivariate statistical modeling of the geochemical dataset (e.g. Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) and a cobalt-based age model, we quantified the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of 6 end-members that comprise the SPG pelagic clay: dust, rhyolite, altered basalt, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, excess Si, and apatite. Our record shows that Australian dust MAR begins at the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum ~50 Ma as global temperatures began to cool and Australia began to tectonically separate from Antarctica. The mid-Miocene has noticeably higher MAR of dust and ash at multiple sites. While a simultaneous increase in production is possible (i.e., more aridity and volcanic activity), the synchronicity may be more indicative of stronger winds in the Southern Hemisphere and increased material in the atmosphere during this time. Heavier Mg isotopes occur at Site U1366 in samples that are composed primarily of hydrothermal deposition, excess Si, and volcanic ash. The Mg isotopic enrichment suggests that these components have undergone alterations to form authigenic aluminosilicates.

  16. Progressive Cenozoic cooling and the demise of Antarctica’s last refugium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John B.; Warny, Sophie; Askin, Rosemary A.; Wellner, Julia S.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Kirshner, Alexandra E.; Livsey, Daniel N.; Simms, Alexander R.; Smith, Tyler R.; Ehrmann, Werner; Lawver, Lawrence A.; Barbeau, David; Wise, Sherwood W.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Weaver, Fred M.; Majewski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is considered to be the last region of Antarctica to have been fully glaciated as a result of Cenozoic climatic cooling. As such, it was likely the last refugium for plants and animals that had inhabited the continent since it separated from the Gondwana supercontinent. Drill cores and seismic data acquired during two cruises (SHALDRIL I and II) in the northernmost Peninsula region yield a record that, when combined with existing data, indicates progressive cooling and associated changes in terrestrial vegetation over the course of the past 37 million years. Mountain glaciation began in the latest Eocene (approximately 37–34 Ma), contemporaneous with glaciation elsewhere on the continent and a reduction in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This climate cooling was accompanied by a decrease in diversity of the angiosperm-dominated vegetation that inhabited the northern peninsula during the Eocene. A mosaic of southern beech and conifer-dominated woodlands and tundra continued to occupy the region during the Oligocene (approximately 34–23 Ma). By the middle Miocene (approximately 16–11.6 Ma), localized pockets of limited tundra still existed at least until 12.8 Ma. The transition from temperate, alpine glaciation to a dynamic, polythermal ice sheet took place during the middle Miocene. The northernmost Peninsula was overridden by an ice sheet in the early Pliocene (approximately 5.3–3.6 Ma). The long cooling history of the peninsula is consistent with the extended timescales of tectonic evolution of the Antarctic margin, involving the opening of ocean passageways and associated establishment of circumpolar circulation. PMID:21709269

  17. Cenozoic climate change shaped the evolutionary ecophysiology of the Cupressaceae conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Stuart, Stephanie A; Dawson, Todd E; Moreau, Astrid

    2012-06-12

    The Cupressaceae clade has the broadest diversity in habitat and morphology of any conifer family. This clade is characterized by highly divergent physiological strategies, with deciduous swamp-adapted genera-like Taxodium at one extreme, and evergreen desert genera-like Cupressus at the other. The size disparity within the Cupressaceae is equally impressive, with members ranging from 5-m-tall juniper shrubs to 100-m-tall redwood trees. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that despite this variation, these taxa all share a single common ancestor; by extension, they also share a common ancestral habitat. Here, we use a common-garden approach to compare xylem and leaf-level physiology in this family. We then apply comparative phylogenetic methods to infer how Cenozoic climatic change shaped the morphological and physiological differences between modern-day members of the Cupressaceae. Our data show that drought-resistant crown clades (the Cupressoid and Callitroid clades) most likely evolved from drought-intolerant Mesozoic ancestors, and that this pattern is consistent with proposed shifts in post-Eocene paleoclimates. We also provide evidence that within the Cupressaceae, the evolution of drought-resistant xylem is coupled to increased carbon investment in xylem tissue, reduced xylem transport efficiency, and at the leaf level, reduced photosynthetic capacity. Phylogenetically based analyses suggest that the ancestors of the Cupressaceae were dependent upon moist habitats, and that drought-resistant physiology developed along with increasing habitat aridity from the Oligocene onward. We conclude that the modern biogeography of the Cupressaceae conifers was shaped in large part by their capacity to adapt to drought.

  18. Evidence of a Cooler Continental Climate in East China during the Warm Early Cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Smith, Thierry; Yang, Jian; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The early Cenozoic was characterized by a very warm climate especially during the Early Eocene. To understand climatic changes in eastern Asia, we reconstructed the Early Eocene vegetation and climate based on palynological data of a borehole from Wutu coal mine, East China and evaluated the climatic differences between eastern Asia and Central Europe. The Wutu palynological assemblages indicated a warm temperate vegetation succession comprising mixed needle- and broad-leaved forests. Three periods of vegetation succession over time were recognized. The changes of palynomorph relative abundance indicated that period 1 was warm and humid, period 2 was relatively warmer and wetter, and period 3 was cooler and drier again. The climatic parameters estimated by the coexistence approach (CA) suggested that the Early Eocene climate in Wutu was warmer and wetter. Mean annual temperature (MAT) was approximately 16°C and mean annual precipitation (MAP) was 800-1400 mm. Comparison of the Early Eocene climatic parameters of Wutu with those of 39 other fossil floras of different age in East China, reveals that 1) the climate became gradually cooler during the last 65 million years, with MAT dropping by 9.3°C. This cooling trend coincided with the ocean temperature changes but with weaker amplitude; 2) the Early Eocene climate was cooler in East China than in Central Europe; 3) the cooling trend in East China (MAT dropped by 6.9°C) was gentler than in Central Europe (MAT dropped by 13°C) during the last 45 million years.

  19. Evidence of a Cooler Continental Climate in East China during the Warm Early Cenozoic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Zhang

    Full Text Available The early Cenozoic was characterized by a very warm climate especially during the Early Eocene. To understand climatic changes in eastern Asia, we reconstructed the Early Eocene vegetation and climate based on palynological data of a borehole from Wutu coal mine, East China and evaluated the climatic differences between eastern Asia and Central Europe. The Wutu palynological assemblages indicated a warm temperate vegetation succession comprising mixed needle- and broad-leaved forests. Three periods of vegetation succession over time were recognized. The changes of palynomorph relative abundance indicated that period 1 was warm and humid, period 2 was relatively warmer and wetter, and period 3 was cooler and drier again. The climatic parameters estimated by the coexistence approach (CA suggested that the Early Eocene climate in Wutu was warmer and wetter. Mean annual temperature (MAT was approximately 16°C and mean annual precipitation (MAP was 800-1400 mm. Comparison of the Early Eocene climatic parameters of Wutu with those of 39 other fossil floras of different age in East China, reveals that 1 the climate became gradually cooler during the last 65 million years, with MAT dropping by 9.3°C. This cooling trend coincided with the ocean temperature changes but with weaker amplitude; 2 the Early Eocene climate was cooler in East China than in Central Europe; 3 the cooling trend in East China (MAT dropped by 6.9°C was gentler than in Central Europe (MAT dropped by 13°C during the last 45 million years.

  20. Permian to late Cenozoic evolution of northern Patagonia: Main tectonic events, magmatic activity, and depositional trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliana, M. A.; Biddle, K. T.

    The late Paleozoic to late Cenozoic evolution of northern Patagonia was influenced significantly by events that occurred while the area was part of the South American sector of Gondwanaland. Late Paleozoic to Middle Triassic subduction along the edge of the supercontinent formed a broad convergent-margin system that is the underpinning of northern Patagonia. Deformation (Gondwanidian orogeny) associated with the subduction is recognized in both the forearc and the convergent backarc areas. Regional extension, accompanied by bimodal volcanism, began in the Late Triassic and led to the formation of a number of north-northwest trending rift basins in Patagonia, which generally followed the Gondwanidian basement grain. Continued extension in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous led to the opening of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin in southern Chile and, ultimately, to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Once oceanic crust began to form, faulting and volcanism declined in Patagonia. During the late Early Cretaceous to the Late Cretaceous, sags over the rift basins coalesced to form a broad backarc basin behind the volcanic arc to the west. These sags are suggestive of thermally driven subsidence. Subsidence of the evolving Atlantic margin allowed extensive marine transgressions to take place from the east. The stratigraphic record of northern Patagonia reflects these events. The upper Paleozoic to upper Mesozoic sedimentary sequences were deposited in basins directly associated with convergent activity along the margin of Gondwanaland or in rift basins created during its breakup. Even though the Tertiary evolution of Patagonia was dominated by events along the western margin of South America, the patterns of sediment transport, thickness, and general shoreline position were still influenced by the locations of the Mesozoic rifts formed during the breakup of Gondwanaland.

  1. Evidence of a Cooler Continental Climate in East China during the Warm Early Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Smith, Thierry; Yang, Jian; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The early Cenozoic was characterized by a very warm climate especially during the Early Eocene. To understand climatic changes in eastern Asia, we reconstructed the Early Eocene vegetation and climate based on palynological data of a borehole from Wutu coal mine, East China and evaluated the climatic differences between eastern Asia and Central Europe. The Wutu palynological assemblages indicated a warm temperate vegetation succession comprising mixed needle- and broad-leaved forests. Three periods of vegetation succession over time were recognized. The changes of palynomorph relative abundance indicated that period 1 was warm and humid, period 2 was relatively warmer and wetter, and period 3 was cooler and drier again. The climatic parameters estimated by the coexistence approach (CA) suggested that the Early Eocene climate in Wutu was warmer and wetter. Mean annual temperature (MAT) was approximately 16°C and mean annual precipitation (MAP) was 800–1400 mm. Comparison of the Early Eocene climatic parameters of Wutu with those of 39 other fossil floras of different age in East China, reveals that 1) the climate became gradually cooler during the last 65 million years, with MAT dropping by 9.3°C. This cooling trend coincided with the ocean temperature changes but with weaker amplitude; 2) the Early Eocene climate was cooler in East China than in Central Europe; 3) the cooling trend in East China (MAT dropped by 6.9°C) was gentler than in Central Europe (MAT dropped by 13°C) during the last 45 million years. PMID:27196048

  2. Wrench-Slip Reversals and Structural Inversions: Cenozoic Slide-Rule Tectonics in Sundaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.D. Tjia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174Most of continental Southeast Asia, that is, Sundaland and Indosinia, achieved a relative tectonic stability by the beginning of the Cenozoic. Since then a strong tectonic activity in Sundaland has been restricted to existing regional fault zones and to regional slow, vertical crustal movements elsewhere that produced small to very large sedimentary basins. On the other hand, regional deformation of Indosinia as a consequence of ductile shearing has continued into the Paleogene. Since the Oligocene, the northern part of Sundaland and Indosinia have been extruded differentially towards southeast along the Red River, Wang Chao (or Mae Ping, or Tonle Sap, and Three Pagodas - Axial Malay fault zones. The initial cause has been attributed to hard collision between Subplate India with Megaplate Eurasia. Plate dynamics in the region have changed substantially since Mid-Miocene as to force wrench-slip reversals along the major fault zones in Sundaland as well as in Indosinia. Concomitant structural inversions are demonstrated on seismic sections. In the core of Sundaland, earlier transtensional wrenching was succeeded by transpressive strike-slip faulting that on major faults of the Malay Basin manifested in reversals of sense. From the Hinge-line fault eastward, the transtensional left wrench slip was succeeded by transpressional dextral slip, while in the region to its west the wrench-slip kinematics was an earlier transtensional right slip followed by transpressional left slip. In the Strait of Malacca and eastern margin of Sumatra, right-lateral wrenching in the Neogene has been common. In certain places it could be established a wrench-slip of transtensional character in Oligocene-Early Miocene, and the transpressional wrench movement occurred mainly during the Middle to Late Miocene. The remarkable coincidence of termination of spreading of the South China Basin in Langhian, and that of the West Philippine and Caroline

  3. Profound loss of neprilysin accompanied by decreased levels of neuropeptides and increased CRP in ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Gök Sargın

    Full Text Available Neprilysin (NEP, CD10 acts to limit excessive inflammation partly by hydrolyzing neuropeptides. Although deletion of NEP exacerbates intestinal inflammation in animal models, its role in ulcerative colitis (UC is not well explored. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate changes in NEP and associated neuropeptides at the same time in colonic tissue. 72 patients with UC and 27 control patients were included. Patients' demographic data and laboratory findings, five biopsy samples from active colitis sites and five samples from uninvolved mucosa were collected. Substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP were extracted from freshly frozen tissues and measured using ELISA. Levels of NEP expression were determined using immunohistochemistry and immunoreactivity scores were calculated. GEBOES grading system was also used. We demonstrated a profound loss (69.4% of NEP expression in UC, whereas all healthy controls had NEP expression. Patients with UC had lower neuronal SP; however non-neuronal SP remained similar. UC patients had also lower neuronal and non-neuronal VIP levels. CGRP were low in general and no significant changes were observed. Additionally, CRP positive patients with UC had higher rates of NEP loss (80% vs 51.9% and lower SP levels when compared with CRP negative patients with UC. Concurrent decreases in SP and VIP with profound loss of NEP expression observed in UC is likely to be one of the factors in pathogenesis. Further studies are required to define the role of neuropeptides and NEP in UC.

  4. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Riahi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3 are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys, in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24, and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*. Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  6. Loss of CIB2 Causes Profound Hearing Loss and Abolishes Mechanoelectrical Transduction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and integrin-binding protein 2 (CIB2 belongs to a protein family with four known members, CIB1 through CIB4, which are characterized by multiple calcium-binding EF-hand domains. Among the family members, the Cib1 and Cib2 genes are expressed in mouse cochlear hair cells, and mutations in the human CIB2 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness DFNB48 and syndromic deafness USH1J. To further explore the function of CIB1 and CIB2 in hearing, we established Cib1 and Cib2 knockout mice using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR-associated Cas9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique. We found that loss of CIB1 protein does not affect auditory function, whereas loss of CIB2 protein causes profound hearing loss in mice. Further investigation revealed that hair cell stereocilia development is affected in Cib2 knockout mice. Noticeably, loss of CIB2 abolishes mechanoelectrical transduction (MET currents in auditory hair cells. In conclusion, we show here that although both CIB1 and CIB2 are readily detected in the cochlea, only loss of CIB2 results in profound hearing loss, and that CIB2 is essential for auditory hair cell MET.

  7. A quantitative review of self-help research with the severely and profoundly mentally retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarski, E A; Diorio, M S

    1985-01-01

    Eighty-seven studies published since 1964 through 1982 on training self-help skills to severely and profoundly mentally retarded persons were analyzed according to 19 parameters reflecting their methodological details. The results showed a steady interest in this research area over time, but 63% of the studies focused on toileting and feeding with fewer studies looking at other self-help skills. Package treatments composed primarily of accelerative techniques were most frequently used to train these skills. Methodologically, it was found that these studies typically involved profoundly mentally retarded people (33% of studies) who were trained by residential staff (69% of studies) in institutional settings (63% of studies). The results also indicated an increase over time in the number of studies rated acceptable on the reliability and design parameters. Finally, very few studies reported assessments of generalization, maintenance, or social validity. It was concluded that, (a) researchers need to broaden their interests in terms of settings, trainers, and behaviors studied to best meet the needs of this population, (b) the experimental quality of this literature is improving, and (c) the social impact of observed behavior changes has yet to be fully explored.

  8. Loss of CIB2 Causes Profound Hearing Loss and Abolishes Mechanoelectrical Transduction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Li, Jie; Yao, Xuerui; Li, Wei; Du, Haibo; Tang, Mingliang; Xiong, Wei; Chai, Renjie; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Calcium and integrin-binding protein 2 (CIB2) belongs to a protein family with four known members, CIB1 through CIB4, which are characterized by multiple calcium-binding EF-hand domains. Among the family members, the Cib1 and Cib2 genes are expressed in mouse cochlear hair cells, and mutations in the human CIB2 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness DFNB48 and syndromic deafness USH1J. To further explore the function of CIB1 and CIB2 in hearing, we established Cib1 and Cib2 knockout mice using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) genome editing technique. We found that loss of CIB1 protein does not affect auditory function, whereas loss of CIB2 protein causes profound hearing loss in mice. Further investigation revealed that hair cell stereocilia development is affected in Cib2 knockout mice. Noticeably, loss of CIB2 abolishes mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) currents in auditory hair cells. In conclusion, we show here that although both CIB1 and CIB2 are readily detected in the cochlea, only loss of CIB2 results in profound hearing loss, and that CIB2 is essential for auditory hair cell MET.

  9. Profound effects of population density on fitness-related traits in an invasive freshwater snail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Zachar

    Full Text Available Population density can profoundly influence fitness-related traits and population dynamics, and density dependence plays a key role in many prominent ecological and evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we evaluated how individual-level changes in population density affect growth rate and embryo production early in reproductive maturity in two different asexual lineages of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail that is an important model system for ecotoxicology and the evolution of sexual reproduction as well as a potentially destructive worldwide invader. We showed that population density had a major influence on individual growth rate and early-maturity embryo production, effects that were often apparent even when comparing treatments that differed in population density by only one individual. While individual growth rate generally decreased as population density increased, we detected a hump-shaped relationship between embryo production and density, with females from intermediate-density treatments producing the most embryos and females from low- and high-density treatments producing the fewest embryos. The two lineages responded similarly to the treatments, indicating that these effects of population density might apply more broadly across P. antipodarum. These results indicate that there are profound and complex relationships between population density, growth rate, and early-maturity embryo production in at least two lineages of this important model system, with potential implications for the study of invasive populations, research on the maintenance of sex, and approaches used in ecotoxicology.

  10. Dynamics of agricultural soil erosion in European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, L. F.; Kiryukhina, Z. P.; Krasnov, S. F.; Dobrovol'skaya, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    Socioeconomic transformation together with climate change in recent decades significantly affected the geography of agricultural erosion in European Russia. Calculations of erosion rate and soil loss from slopes using logical-mathematical erosion models within different landscape zones and administrative regions revealed spatial-temporal regularities in the dynamics of these parameters and made it possible to assess the role of changes in the main natural and anthropogenic factors of erosion. A universal significant reduction in the mass of soil material washed from tilled slopes is revealed on the background of multidirectional changes in erosion rate.

  11. The major-ion composition of Cenozoic seawater: the past 36 million years from fluid inclusions in marine halite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sean T.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Cendon, Dioni I.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusions from ten Cenozoic (Eocene-Miocene) marine halites are used to quantify the major-ion composition (Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Na+, SO42−, and Cl−) of seawater over the past 36 My. Criteria used to determine a seawater origin of the halites include: (1) stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and paleontologic observations; (2) Br− in halite; (3) δ34S of sulfate minerals; (4) 87Sr/86Sr of carbonates and sulfates; and (5) fluid inclusion brine compositions and evaporation paths, which must overlap from geographically separated basins of the same age to confirm a “global” seawater chemical signal. Changes in the major-ion chemistry of Cenozoic seawater record the end of a systematic, long term (>150 My) shift from the Ca2+-rich, Mg2+- and SO42−-poor seawater of the Mesozoic (“CaCl2 seas”) to the “MgSO4 seas” (with higher Mg2+ and SO42−>Ca2+) of the Cenozoic. The major ion composition of Cenozoic seawater is calculated for the Eocene-Oligocene (36-34 Ma), Serravallian-Tortonian (13.5-11.8 Ma) and the Messinian (6-5 Ma), assuming chlorinity (565 mmolal), salinity, and the K+ concentration (11 mmolal) are constant and the same as in modern seawater. Fluid inclusions from Cenozoic marine halites show that the concentrations of Mg2+and SO42− have increased in seawater over the past 36 My and the concentration of Ca2+ has decreased. Mg2+ concentrations increased from 36 mmolal in Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) to 55 mmolal in modern seawater. The Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater has risen from ∼2.3 at the end of the Eocene, to 3.4 and 4.0, respectively, at 13.5 to 11.8 Ma and 6 to 5 Ma, and to 5 in modern seawater. Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) has estimated ranges of SO42− = 14–23 mmolal and Ca2+ = 11–20 mmolal. If the (Ca2+)(SO42−) product is assumed to be the same as in modern seawater (∼300 mmolal2), Eocene-Oligocene seawater had Ca2+ ∼16 mmolal and SO42− ∼19 mmolal. The same estimates of Ca2+ and SO42− for Serravallian

  12. Erosion prediction for alpine slopes: a symbiosis of remote sensing and a physical based erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Haas, Florian; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    As rainfall simulations represent an established tool for quantifying soil detachment on cultivated area in lowlands and low mountain ranges, they are rarely used on steep slopes high mountain ranges. Still this terrain represents productive sediment sources of high morphodynamic. A quantitative differentiation between gravitationally and fluvially relocated material reveals a major challenge in understanding erosion on steep slopes: does solifluction as a result of melting in spring or heavy convective rainstorms during summer cause the essential erosion processes? This paper aims to answer this question by separating gravitational mass movement (solifluction, landslides, mudflow and needle ice) and runoff-induced detachment. First simulated rainstorm experiments are used to assess the sediment production on bare soil on a strongly inclined plot (1 m², 42°) in the northern limestone Alps. Throughout precipitation experiments runoff and related suspended sediments were quantified. In order to enlarge slope length virtually to around 20 m a runoff feeding device is additionally implemented. Soil physical parameters were derived from on-site sampling. The generated data is introduced to the physically based and catchment-scaled erosion model EROSION 3D to upscale plot size to small watershed conditions. Thus infiltration, runoff, detachment, transport and finally deposition can be predicted for single rainstorm events and storm sequences. Secondly, in order to separate gravitational mass movements and water erosion, a LiDAR and structure-from-motion based monitoring approach is carried out to produce high-resolution digital elevation models. A time series analysis of detachment and deposition from different points in time is implemented. Absolute volume losses are then compared to sediment losses calculated by the erosion model as the latter only generates data that is connected to water induced hillside erosion. This methodology will be applied in other watersheds

  13. Monitoring soil erosion processes: The erosion plots at the Geocampus, University of Trier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassu, Tamas; Rodrigo Comino, Jesús; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    Long term monitoring on erosion plots is one of the most reliable methods to quantify the actual soil erosion rates. Although the direct extrapolation of the measured data to regional scale is problematic, due to the high spatial and temporal variability of the soil erosion processes, they provide indispensable experimental data for soil erosion model conception, calibration and validation. At the University Trier in 2013 four test plots were put into practice on colluvial loess loam soil with dimension 3 x 10 m and similar properties. They are representative for the regional conditions. The plots are located 265 m above sea level and they have a general inclination of 12-13°. In 2012 on two plots subsoiling was applied in order to reduce the compaction caused by the heavy machinery used during the construction of the plots. The two other plots were not disturbed and no melioration measures were applied. In the first year of the experiment after the preparation of the parcels, they were left for a spontaneous revegetation. Total runoff and sediment removal data was collected weekly, additionally a meteorological station provides continuously data about climate conditions. The data evaluation of the first year 2013/14 revealed big difference between the single plots. Total runoff was measured between 0 and 4.76 l m-2 (m=0.8 l m-2), total eroded sediment between 0 and 3.86 g m-2 (m=0.21 g m-2) weekly. The higher rates were recorded on the plots without subsoiling. After the first year, total eroded soil was calculated. The results were between 0.03 and 0.17 t ha-1a-1. With the help of the erosion plots at the University of Trier, the impact of the different soil use management concepts and cultivation techniques on runoff and erosion dynamics can be evaluated, additionally reliable data for modeling soil erosion can be generated as well.

  14. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    Human activities exerts an ever growing impact on our environment, and this is undeniably the responsibility of mankind. In spite of this fact there is almost no process in our environment that can be described exactly with complete exactness, and the working of which is known in full extent. Wind erosion is such a process. Although water erosion is mentioned ever more often in scientific circles as a from of erosion, its effect is restrained to a certain region, although it may cause perceptibly damage of a greater extent in short time. Wind erosion, apart from the fact that it may have global impact, may play an important role in the warming of our climate according to recent studies. First of all, wind erosion may cause damage far from its origin in human health, nutrition, or in the environment in general. Today several surveys have proved, that erosion caused by wind significantly contributes to the air pollution of cities, the fine dust carried as drift by the wind may cause severe environmental damage in accumulation zones. Microbes, toxic material may attach themselves to the dust carried this way and carried on and by the wings of the wind they may cause health issues in humans animals and plants as well. In spite of these facts there are almost no measures against wind erosion employed in arable land, although our ever doughtier climate and changes would make these necessary. Reduction of organic matter content presents a great problem in a large part of cultivated land, so the risk of the production of high quality food raises questions of more and more ethical nature. Who is responsible? The fact, that the chemicals used in a growing extent by agriculture may reach many people causing considerable damage to the environment also raises serious ethical questions. More and more periods with extreme weather conditions are experienced in Hungary and Europe as the effect of climate change. Drought periods are longer and more frequent as the intensity of

  15. Noninvasiv behandling af slid og erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; Dijken, Jan van

    2012-01-01

    Slid og erosion af tænder synes i dag at være et voksende problem for mange patienter. I de fleste tilfælde kan tandlægens tidlige diagnostik føre til, at forebyggende tiltag iværksættes i tide, så fortsatte skader ophører, eller progressionen begrænses. Desværre er det ikke altid muligt, og hvis...... restaureret med fuldkroner på alle tænder. Hvis behandlingen udføres med direkte plast, kan det også betyde, at omkostningerne bliver mindre, så flere får mulighed for at få udført en nødvendig rekonstruktion af tandsættet. I det følgende vil forskellige faktorer i forbindelse med tandslid og erosion blive...

  16. [Therapeutic strategies in erosive digital polyarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinbegovic, E; Schett, G

    2011-06-01

    One of the most common forms of osteoarthritis is hand osteoarthritis. A subgroup, termed erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA), shows a highly destructive disease course with involvement of multiple joints, swelling as well as cartilage and bone destruction leading to progressive loss of hand function. EHOA is characterized by subchondral erosions of the finger joints as well as ankylosis. No disease modifying therapy is currently available for the treatment of EHOA and treatment options are confined to the control of symptoms. Acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to treat the signs and symptoms. So far cytokine blocking agents have not shown a convincing therapeutic effect and the effect size of chondroitin sulfate and bisphosphonates in EOHA is small.

  17. Glaucoma Drainage Device Erosion Following Ptosis Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Steven S; Campbell, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    To highlight the potential risk of glaucoma drainage device erosion following ptosis surgery. Case report. A 71-year-old man underwent uncomplicated superotemporal Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in the left eye in 2008. Approximately 8 years later, the patient underwent bilateral ptosis repair, which successfully raised the upper eyelid position. Three months postoperatively, the patient's glaucoma drainage implant tube eroded through the corneal graft tissue and overlying conjunctiva to become exposed. A graft revision surgery was successfully performed with no further complications. Caution and conservative lid elevation may be warranted when performing ptosis repair in patients with a glaucoma drainage implant, and patients with a glaucoma implant undergoing ptosis surgery should be followed closely for signs of tube erosion.

  18. Base Erosion, Profit Shifting and Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Crivelli; De Mooij, Ruud A.; Michael Keen

    2015-01-01

    International corporate tax issues are prominent in public debate, notably with the G20-OECD project addressing Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (‘BEPS’). But while there is considerable empirical evidence for advanced countries on the cross-country fiscal externalities at the heart of these issues, there is almost none for developing countries. This paper uses panel data for 173 countries over 33 years to explore their magnitude and nature, focusing particularly on developing countries a...

  19. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Slager, Cornelis J.; Essed, Catharina E.; Schuurbiers, Johan C.H.; Bom, Nicolaas; Serruys, Patrick W.; Meester, Geert T.

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and documented histologically in vitro from 30 atherosclerotic segments of six human aortic autopsy specimens. Craters with a constant area and a depth that varied according to the duration of application ...

  20. Facial Erosive Pustular Dermatosis After Cosmetic Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervak, Julie E; Gan, Stephanie D; Smith, Emily H; Wang, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Erosive pustular dermatosis (EPD) is a rare condition that typically affects actinically damaged skin of the scalp. Characterized by sterile pustules, erosions, and crusts, EPD is difficult to treat and heals slowly. The exact cause of EPD is unknown, although trauma is an inciting factor. To describe 3 women who presented with prolonged facial erosions after cosmetic resurfacing procedures, specifically fully ablative carbon dioxide laser or medium-depth chemical peel. This case series describes the clinical features, histopathological findings, laboratory results, and treatment of 3 patients with an ultimate diagnosis most consistent with facial EPD. Patients were evaluated between September 10, 2010, and May 6, 2016, in a dermatology clinic in an academic medical center. The patients were 3 women seeking diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic options for nonhealing facial erosions occurring after ablative procedures (carbon dioxide laser resurfacing or Jessner solution/trichloroacetic acid chemical peel). Histologic examination and wound culture from initial presentation as well as clinical follow-up documenting improvement with therapeutic interventions. All 3 patients were women in their 50s or 60s for whom EPD was deemed to be the best diagnosis, after infection, immunobullous disorders, and other pustular dermatoses were considered. Histologic features were nonspecific. Treatment included a combination of topical and systemic therapies, such as corticosteroids, dapsone, isotretinoin, and/or antibiotics. Watchful waiting (tincture of time) appeared to be central to the healing process. After cosmetic resurfacing, patients may develop EPD isolated to the face. As a diagnosis of exclusion that should be considered in patients who have nonhealing wounds following ablative procedures, EPD is challenging to treat and may require the use of anti-inflammatory agents. Recognizing this condition is important, especially as cosmetic procedures become more widespread.