WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiling radio stations

  1. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107....107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant to No. 1492 of Article 13 and Section F of Appendix 3 to the international Radio Regulations (Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations...

  2. DID INSTAGRAM KILLED THE MYSTERY OF RADIO? USE OF INSTAGRAM IN TURKISH RADIO STATIONS AND RADIO HOSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Kuyucu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Turning voice into imagination, radio translated imagination into reality with social media. The radio audience imagined there were people inside the receiver and wondered what kind of people those people were. This convergence between radio and the new media ensured realization of this imagination. The new media established communication between the people inside that radio receiver and the audience. Social media platform Instagram is the latest step in turning the radio from an image into reality. Are radio stations revealing themselves by throwing away the mystery via Instagram or do they still remain mysterious? The purpose of this study is to carry out a research directed at Instagram use of radio stations in Turkey and makes observations with regards to the existence of radio medium in Instagram. The existence of ten Turkish radio stations with the highest ratings among radio stations and ten radio hosts in Instagram was studied within this scope. The messages shared by the radio stations and hosts on their Instagram accounts were examined and an analysis was made intended at use of Instagram through these messages. The Instagram account activities of radio stations between 01 June – 31 December 2015 were reviewed within this scope and Instagram’s contribution to public relations activities of radio stations carried out by social media was scrutinized. The question “Did Instagram unveiled the mystery of radio?” was discussed and how radio is revealed by means of Instagram was underlined in this study.

  3. Antenna unit and radio base station therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Mikio; Doi, Nobukazu; Suzuki, Toshiro; Ishida, Yuji; Inoue, Takashi; Niida, Sumaru

    2007-04-10

    Phase and amplitude deviations, which are generated, for example, by cables connecting an array antenna of a CDMA base station and the base station, are calibrated in the baseband. The base station comprises: an antenna apparatus 1; couplers 2; an RF unit 3 that converts a receive signal to a baseband signal, converts a transmit signal to a radio frequency, and performs power control; an A/D converter 4 for converting a receive signal to a digital signal; a receive beam form unit 6 that multiplies the receive signal by semi-fixed weight; a despreader 7 for this signal input; a time-space demodulator 8 for demodulating user data; a despreader 9 for probe signal; a space modulator 14 for user data; a spreader 13 for user signal; a channel combiner 12; a Tx calibrater 11 for controlling calibration of a signal; a D/A converter 10; a unit 16 for calculation of correlation matrix for generating a probe signal used for controlling an Rx calibration system and a TX calibration system; a spreader 17 for probe signal; a power control unit 18; a D/A converter 19; an RF unit 20 for probe signal; an A/D converter 21 for signal from the couplers 2; and a despreader 22.

  4. Measurement techniques for UMTS signals radiated by radio base stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscaglia, F.; Gianola, P

    2001-07-01

    In the most European countries radio coverage for the third radio mobile generation, i.e. the UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System), will soon be started. In the past few years, national laws specifying limits on exposure to electromagnetic fields have drawn much attention on electromagnetic test bed and measurement procedures for radio mobile equipment/systems. An overview is given of the UMTS system, showing the main characteristics of the radio access network UTRAN (UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access Network). An analysis is also provided as to the measurement techniques and related instrumentation for the electric field intensity radiated by a UMTS radio station. (author)

  5. NUTS: Ground station with GNU Radio and USRP

    OpenAIRE

    Vea, Karl David

    2015-01-01

    Study and describe GNU Radio together with USRP as alternative ground station. Describe and analyze GMSK signal. NGHam link protcol implementation. Simulation on demodulation considering how frequency synchronization can be achieved. Discuss if and how GNU Radio suits the uneversity satellite project.

  6. Designing for cooperation at a Radio Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kensing, F.; Simonsen, Jesper; Bødker, Keld

    1997-01-01

    We address computer support for work and its coordination in one of the radio channels of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. Based upon ethnographically inspired analysis and participatory design techniques, we propose design solutions now implemented or under implementation. We focus...... on cooperative aspects within and among the radio channel's editorial units, and between editorial units and the editorial board. Finally, we discuss technical and organisational aspects of the design, seen in light of recent CSCW concepts....

  7. Greening radio access networks using distributed base station architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardaras, Georgios; Soler, José; Dittmann, Lars

    2010-01-01

    . However besides this, increasing energy efficiency represents a key factor for reducing operating expenses and deploying cost effective mobile networks. This paper presents how distributed base station architectures can contribute in greening radio access networks. More specifically, the advantages...... energy saving. Different subsystems have to be coordinated real-time and intelligent network nodes supporting complicated functionalities are necessary. Distributed base station architectures are ideal for this purpose mainly because of their high degree of configurability and self...

  8. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing... licensees of base stations that provide Specialized Mobile Radio service on a commercial basis of the use of... of the other system will assume the same licensee responsibility for the customer's mobile station(s...

  9. Radio-location of mobile stations in third generation networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Manojle Šunjevarić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile station localization in mobile networks started with simple methods (e.g. Cell-ID method which required only slight modifications of network infrastructures. Principally, it was about network localization by which a localization service became available to all types of mobile phones. Due to low precision, the initiated development of more sophisticated methods has not been finished yet. Among the advanced location-based methods are those based on the measurement of location parameters in the time domain. In this paper the general consideration of radio location methods in 3G (UMTS radio networks is presented. The use of time based measurement methods was analysed in detail. Due to the limited article length, the use of other locating methods in 3G networks (based on power measurements, on radio direction measurement, and on cells identification – Cell ID and global positioning system - GPS are not described. Introduction Mobile station localization within modern cellular networks increases the level of user security and opens wide opportunities for commercial operators who provide this service. The major obstacle for the implementation of this service, which also prevents its practical usage, is the modification of the existing network infrastructure. In general, depending on the infrastructure used, positioning methods can be divided into two groups: integrated and independent. Integrated methods are primarily created for communication networks. A possibility to locate users represents just an additional service within a radio network. Independent methods are totally detached from the communication network in which the user whose location is being determined is. Radio location methods Determining the location of a mobile radio station is performed by determining the intersection of two or more lines of position. These lines represent the position of the set of points at which the mobile station may be located. These lines can be: (a

  10. 29 CFR 793.16 - “Radio or television station.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âRadio or television station.â 793.16 Section 793.16 Labor... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS EXEMPTION OF CERTAIN RADIO AND TELEVISION... Requirements for Exemption § 793.16 “Radio or television station.” The employee must be employed by a “radio or...

  11. Radio frequency electromagnetic field compliance assessment of multi-band and MIMO equipped radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, Björn; Thielens, Arno; Fridén, Jonas; Colombi, Davide; Törnevik, Christer; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, different methods for practical numerical radio frequency exposure compliance assessments of radio base station products were investigated. Both multi-band base station antennas and antennas designed for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) transmission schemes were considered. For the multi-band case, various standardized assessment methods were evaluated in terms of resulting compliance distance with respect to the reference levels and basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Both single frequency and multiple frequency (cumulative) compliance distances were determined using numerical simulations for a mobile communication base station antenna transmitting in four frequency bands between 800 and 2600 MHz. The assessments were conducted in terms of root-mean-squared electromagnetic fields, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) and peak 10 g averaged SAR. In general, assessments based on peak field strengths were found to be less computationally intensive, but lead to larger compliance distances than spatial averaging of electromagnetic fields used in combination with localized SAR assessments. For adult exposure, the results indicated that even shorter compliance distances were obtained by using assessments based on localized and whole-body SAR. Numerical simulations, using base station products employing MIMO transmission schemes, were performed as well and were in agreement with reference measurements. The applicability of various field combination methods for correlated exposure was investigated, and best estimate methods were proposed. Our results showed that field combining methods generally considered as conservative could be used to efficiently assess compliance boundary dimensions of single- and dual-polarized multicolumn base station antennas with only minor increases in compliance distances. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. TURKEY’S MOST POPULAR 10 RADIO STATIONS FACEBOOK USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk INAL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass media is becoming a different structure day by day. When thinking about the use of fire for communicating with the distant, it is surprising that the development of the last century is remarkable. Today's communication systems make it possible for individuals to be active in many places at the same time thanks to mobile phones, computers and different mobile devices, channels and internet-enabled platforms. These platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, have different billions of users from different parts of the world. These structures, which are generally known as social platforms, offer various possibilities not only for individuals but also for institutions and organizations. Today, many institutions and organizations appear to be on social platforms. According to the constructs, the social platforms of these institutions and organizations have varying purposes and forms of use. The sole example of the influence of social platforms in mass communication is the use of these platforms by mass media. In this study, it was emphasized the issue of the extent to which the radion, one of the oldest mass communication tools, used which effect and for what purpose. In this direction, the usage patterns of 10 most heard radio in Turkey are examined in Facebook, which is ahead of other social platforms in terms of user potential and frequency in Turkey. Meanwhile, Facebook profiles usage and content creation styles of the radios are determined. Finally, the link between the rest of the radios and the Facebook movement breakdown was questioned.

  13. [Evaluation of medication advertising broadcast on radio stations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Almária Mariz; Carvalho, Maria Cleide Ribeiro Dantas de

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this paper was to evaluate advertising for medication broadcast on radio stations in Natal, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, from April to September 2008 and from April to September 2010. The advertising was recorded and transcribed in order to conduct legal analysis and content analysis based on the precepts of Laurence Bardin. Both the advertising recorded during the first stage (regulated by RDC 102/00) and the second stage (regulated by RDC 96/08) contained some form of legal violation. Content analysis detected practically the same violations in both stages, namely the lack of information regarding adverse effects of the medication, appeal to consumption, exaggeration of efficiency/effectiveness and abusive exploitation of illness. Despite the inclusion of more modern and restrictive legislation, radio advertising continues to violate the law blatantly, committing abuse and disrespecting the population's entitlement to good health. The study reveals the need for medication advertising to be dealt with in a broader context, in other words to be treated as a public health concern. It must take into consideration the socio-historical scenario in which it evolved, since the legislation alone is insufficient to combat abuse committed to the detriment of public health.

  14. 47 CFR 73.6020 - Protection of stations in the land mobile radio service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... stations in the land mobile radio service. An application for digital operation of an existing Class A TV station or to change the facilities of an existing Class A TV or digital Class A TV station will not be...) of this chapter, Class A TV and digital Class A TV stations must not cause interference to land...

  15. Public Space, Private Face: Audience Construction at a Noncommercial Radio Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Warren

    1998-01-01

    Examines the discursive construction of audience identity at a public radio station in New Mexico by investigating listener letters printed in the radio station's newsletter. Shows how the letters frame the audience in particular ways. Discusses listener letters as an ongoing text, and spatial discourse as metacommunication. (SR)

  16. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  17. 76 FR 7847 - Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... COMMISSION Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN AGENCY... renew the license for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN filed by Glenn A. Baxter should be granted.... Baxter for renewal of his license for Amateur Radio Station K1MAN should be granted. As discussed below...

  18. The impact of staff-poaching among radio stations in the Kumasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poaching key employees from close competitors has become a common phenomenon in Ghana. The study investigates the extent to which staff-poaching has hit the radio industry in Kumasi Metropolis and discusses its impact on the radio stations and their listenership. Relevant data was obtained from three key players in ...

  19. Amateur Radio on the International Space Station: The First Operational Payload on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; McFadin, Lou; Steiner, Mark D.; Conley, Carolynn L.

    2002-01-01

    As astronauts and cosmonauts have adapted to life on the International Space Station (ISS), they have found amateur radio and its connection to life on Earth to be a important on-board companion and a substantial psychological boost. Since its first use in November 2000, the first five expedition crews have utilized the amateur radio station in the Functional Cargo Block (also referred to as the FGB or Zarya module) to talk to thousands of students in schools, to their families on Earth, and to amateur radio operators around the world. This paper will discuss the development, qualification, installation and operation of the amateur radio system. It will also discuss some of the challenges that the amateur radio international team of volunteers overcame to bring its first phase of equipment on ISS to fruition.

  20. Amateur Radio on the International Space Station - the First Operational Payload on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.; McFadin, L.; Steiner, M.; Conley, C. L.

    2002-01-01

    As astronauts and cosmonauts have adapted to life on the International Space Station (ISS), they have found Amateur Radio and its connection to life on Earth to be a constant companion and a substantial psychological boost. Since its first use in November 2000, the first five expedition crews have utilized the amateur radio station in the FGB to talk to thousands of students in schools, to their families on Earth, and to amateur radio operators around the world. Early in the development of ISS, an international organization called ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) was formed to coordinate the construction and operation of amateur radio (ham radio) equipment on ISS. ARISS represents a melding of the volunteer teams that have pioneered the development and use of amateur radio equipment on human spaceflight vehicles. The Shuttle/Space Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) team enabled Owen Garriott to become the first astronaut ham to use amateur radio from space in 1983. Since then, amateur radio teams in the U.S. (SAREX), Germany, (SAFEX), and Russia (Mirex) have led the development and operation of amateur radio equipment on board NASA's Space Shuttle, Russia's Mir space station, and the International Space Station. The primary goals of the ARISS program are fourfold: 1) educational outreach through crew contacts with schools, 2) random contacts with the Amateur Radio public, 3) scheduled contacts with the astronauts' friends and families and 4) ISS-based communications experimentation. To date, over 65 schools have been selected from around the world for scheduled contacts with the orbiting ISS crew. Ten or more students at each school ask the astronauts questions, and the nature of these contacts embodies the primary goal of the ARISS program, -- to excite student's interest in science, technology and amateur radio. The ARISS team has developed various hardware elements for the ISS amateur radio station. These hardware elements have flown to ISS

  1. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shume, Esayas B.; Vergados, Panagiotis; Komjathy, Attila; Langley, Richard B.; Durgonics, Tibor

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents electron number density profiles derived from high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations performed using the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe payload on the high inclination CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE) spacecraft. We have developed and applied a novel inverse Abel transform algorithm on high rate RO total electron content measurements performed along GPS to CASSIOPE radio links to recover electron density profiles. The high-resolution density profiles inferred from the CASSIOPE RO are (1) in very good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over stations nearby to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points; (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC); and (3) in general agreement with density profiles estimated using the International Reference Ionosphere climatological model. Using both CASSIOPE and COSMIC RO observations, we identify, for the first time, that there exist differences in the characteristics of the electron number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit widespread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating over oceans and landmasses.

  2. Space-Based Reconfigurable Software Defined Radio Test Bed Aboard International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Lux, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) recently launched a new software defined radio research test bed to the International Space Station. The test bed, sponsored by the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Office within NASA is referred to as the SCaN Testbed. The SCaN Testbed is a highly capable communications system, composed of three software defined radios, integrated into a flight system, and mounted to the truss of the International Space Station. Software defined radios offer the future promise of in-flight reconfigurability, autonomy, and eventually cognitive operation. The adoption of software defined radios offers space missions a new way to develop and operate space transceivers for communications and navigation. Reconfigurable or software defined radios with communications and navigation functions implemented in software or VHDL (Very High Speed Hardware Description Language) provide the capability to change the functionality of the radio during development or after launch. The ability to change the operating characteristics of a radio through software once deployed to space offers the flexibility to adapt to new science opportunities, recover from anomalies within the science payload or communication system, and potentially reduce development cost and risk by adapting generic space platforms to meet specific mission requirements. The software defined radios on the SCaN Testbed are each compliant to NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture. The STRS Architecture is an open, non-proprietary architecture that defines interfaces for the connections between radio components. It provides an operating environment to abstract the communication waveform application from the underlying platform specific hardware such as digital-to-analog converters, analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, RF attenuators, automatic gain control circuits, FPGAs, general-purpose processors, etc. and the interconnections among

  3. Study of the programming offer of the Spanish regional radio stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sierra-Sánchez, Ph. D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarises and presents the results of a research on the radio programme grid, contents and adaptation to new technologies of a total amount of eleven public radio stations of different Autonomous Regions of Spain. As a result, it is confirmed that all of them cover three areas of special interest: local information, entertainment, and sports. Also, it shows that most of them do not have get adapted to social networks and new Web 2.0.

  4. Amateur Radio on the International Space Station - Phase 2 Hardware System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; McFadin, L.; Bruninga, B.; Watarikawa, H.

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) ham radio system has been on-orbit for over 3 years. Since its first use in November 2000, the first seven expedition crews and three Soyuz taxi crews have utilized the amateur radio station in the Functional Cargo Block (also referred to as the FGB or Zarya module) to talk to thousands of students in schools, to their families on Earth, and to amateur radio operators around the world. Early on, the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) international team devised a multi-phased hardware development approach for the ISS ham radio station. Three internal development Phases. Initial Phase 1, Mobile Radio Phase 2 and Permanently Mounted Phase 3 plus an externally mounted system, were proposed and agreed to by the ARISS team. The Phase 1 system hardware development which was started in 1996 has since been delivered to ISS. It is currently operational on 2 meters. The 70 cm system is expected to be installed and operated later this year. Since 2001, the ARISS international team have worked to bring the second generation ham system, called Phase 2, to flight qualification status. At this time, major portions of the Phase 2 hardware system have been delivered to ISS and will soon be installed and checked out. This paper intends to provide an overview of the Phase 1 system for background and then describe the capabilities of the Phase 2 radio system. It will also describe the current plans to finalize the Phase 1 and Phase 2 testing in Russia and outlines the plans to bring the Phase 2 hardware system to full operation.

  5. Design of ground station receiver for Kongsberg Satellite Services based on Software Defined Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Løfaldli, André

    2016-01-01

    As the space industry keeps growing, the need for low cost solutions increases. This applies not only to the launch vehicles and space segments, but also to the ground station systems. In this report, a software defined radio (SDR) ground station receiver implemented. It features an Ettus Research USRP SDR which converts an analog signal to a digital baseband representation. The baseband signal, is sent to a host computer, which runs an application that demodulates and decodes the...

  6. A Study on the Radio Coverage in Underground Stations of the New Copenhagen Metro System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan, Maria del Carmen de la O; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Mikkelsen, Niels Michael

    2013-01-01

    -tracing tool. Radio coverage results are given for different designs, including different number and types of antennas, their configuration and placement, as well as the dependency on frequency and construction materials and presence of trains on the station platforms. In a practical case like this...

  7. Voice of the Church: A Debate about Religious Radio Stations as Community Broadcasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Velics

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Declaration of the Committee of Ministers on the role of community media in promoting social cohesion and intercultural dialogue passed on 11 February 2009 by the Council of Europe, stations run by religious institutions were explicitly excluded from the community media definition, as being too dependent on the Church. But the reality seems to be far from this definition. In practice, in many countries the religious radio stations officially belong to—or even dominate—this sector. In 2011 a new period began for community broadcasting in Hungary. While most of the former community media broadcasters could not find resources with which to operate, the community media landscape was dramatically overwhelmed by religious broadcasters both on regional and local levels. The legally-recognised third tier of broadcasting in Poland called ‘social broadcasting’ is actively and exclusively used by religious radio—seven stations broadcast locally and one is a powerful nationwide radio station called Radio Maryja. The authors gathered information and points of views from radio experts, organizations and activists living and working in different EU and non-EU states about the place of religious broadcasting in the community media sector. Two case-studies (Hungary and Poland may be of interest for countries considering the introduction or reorganisation of regulations regarding community broadcasting.

  8. GEROS-ISS: GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Cardellach, Estel; Bandeiras, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    GEROS-ISS stands for GNSS REflectometry, radio occultation, and scatterometry onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It is a scientific experiment, successfully proposed to the European Space Agency in 2011. The experiment as the name indicates will be conducted on the ISS. The main focus...

  9. 47 CFR 101.135 - Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....135 Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service. Licensees of Private... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shared use of radio stations and the offering of private carrier service. 101.135 Section 101.135 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...

  10. Assessment of Atmospheric Wet Profiles Obtained from COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirong Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmosperic profiles derived from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC radio occultation (RO measurements make up for the lack of operational radiosonde soundings with a high spatiotemporal distribution, and their performance over China is assessed in this paper. COSMIC-retrieved atmospheric wet profiles from 2014 to 2015 are compared to the contemporaneous radiosonde profiles from 120 stations, and the vertical mean differences are used. The results show that the vertical mean biases of temperature, pressure and vapor pressure are −0.10 K, 0.69 hPa and −0.01 hPa, respectively, and that for refractivity is 0.17 N. Moreover, the temperature differences are positively correlated with station altitude, yet both the pressure and vapor pressure differences are negatively correlated with station latitude, as is the refractivity difference. The large temperature difference arising from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP region may be associated with the complex topography of the area and the limitations in the background model used in the COSMIC profile retrieval. Furthermore, negative refractivity bias between COSMIC and radiosonde data occurs below 5 km and is large in wet southern China, with a value of less than 1%. This result may be related to more humid conditions and super-refraction.

  11. European Union News Themes in Romanian Radio Stations. Case Study: Europa FM and Radio Romania Actualitati

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia-Ioana Matei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With Romania’s integration in the European Union, the media content related to the member states has acquired growing importance. The themes of journalism were enriched with new approaches towards national image in the European context and vice versa. At a first level, the study aims to conduct a quantitative analysis on the news topics broadcasted by Radio Romania Actualitati and Europa FM, for the duration of 32 days. The qualitative component focuses on the topics addressed in radio news in order to see what is the media content which reflects the image of the European Union. The findings show, beyond the numbers, that the editorial policy of the Romanian media is not concerned with the interests of the citizens - from the perspective of common themes - but rather with how can the EU, as a unified body, help member countries solve their problems.

  12. Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) - The First Educational Outreach Program On ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Carolynn Lee; Bauer, Frank H.; Brown, Deborah A.; White, Rosalie

    2002-01-01

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) represents the first educational outreach program that is flying on the International Space Station (ISS). The astronauts and cosmonauts will work hard on the International Space Station, but they plan to take some time off for educational activities with schools. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) Education Division is a major supporter and sponsor of this student outreach activity on the ISS. This meets NASA s educational mission objective: To inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can. The amateur radio community is helping to enrich the experience of those visiting and living on the station as well as the students on Earth. Through ARISS sponsored hardware and activities, students on Earth get a first-hand feel of what it is like to live and work in space. This paper will discuss the educational outreach accomplishments of ARISS, the school contact process, the ARISS international cooperation and volunteers, and ISS Ham radio plans for the future.

  13. The Contribution of the Division of Radiophysics Murraybank Field Station to International Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Harry; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

    During the 1950s Australia was one of the world's foremost astronomical nations owing primarily to the work of the dynamic radio astronomy group within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Radiophysics. Most of the observations were made at the network of field stations maintained by the Division in or near Sydney, and one of these field stations was Murraybank in the north-western suburbs of Sydney. GVaucouleursDe1954Language="En">The Magellanic Clouds and the GalaxyThe Observatory7423311954Obs....74...23DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1954a. The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy. The Observatory, 74, 23-31. GVaucouleursDe1954Language="En">The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy, IIThe Observatory741581641954Obs....74..158DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1954b. The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy, II. The Observatory, 74, 158-164. GVaucouleursDe1961Language="En">Classification and radial velocities of bright southern galaxiesMemoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society6869871961MmRAS..68...69DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1961. Classification and radial velocities of bright southern galaxies. Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 68, 69-87. JDeane2006Vacuum Tube SupercomputerSydneyScience Foundation for Physics and the Australian Computer Museum SocietyDeane, J., 2006. Vacuum Tube Supercomputer. Sydney, Science Foundation for Physics and the Australian Computer Museum Society. NHDeiter1965Language="En">Neutral hydrogen near the galactic polesAstErickson, W.C., Helfer, H.L., and Tatel, H.E., 1959. A survey of neutral hydrogen at high galactic latitudes. In Bracewell, 390-397. MWFeastADThackerayAJWesselink1957Language="En">Radial velocities of southern B stars determined at the Radcliffe Observatory (Paper II) (summary)Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society1175791957MNRAS.117..579FFeast, M.W., Thackeray, A.D., and Wesselink, A.J., 1957. Radial velocities of southern B stars determined at the Radcliffe Observatory (Paper II) (summary). Monthly

  14. Received signal strength and local terrain profile data for radio network planning and optimization at GSM frequency bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Segun I; Atayero, Aderemi A; Faruk, Nasir

    2018-02-01

    The behaviour of radio wave signals in a wireless channel depends on the local terrain profile of the propagation environments. In view of this, Received Signal Strength (RSS) of transmitted signals are measured at different points in space for radio network planning and optimization. However, these important data are often not publicly available for wireless channel characterization and propagation model development. In this data article, RSS data of a commercial base station operating at 900 and 1800 MHz were measured along three different routes of Lagos-Badagry Highway, Nigeria. In addition, local terrain profile data of the study area (terrain elevation, clutter height, altitude, and the distance of the mobile station from the base station) are extracted from Digital Terrain Map (DTM) to account for the unique environmental features. Statistical analyses and probability distributions of the RSS data are presented in tables and graphs. Furthermore, the degree of correlations (and the corresponding significance) between the RSS and the local terrain parameters were computed and analyzed for proper interpretations. The data provided in this article will help radio network engineers to: predict signal path loss; estimate radio coverage; efficiently reuse limited frequencies; avoid interferences; optimize handover; and adjust transmitted power level.

  15. The Impact of Personal Characteristics and Intrinsic Motivation on Creative Behavior among Indonesian Radio Station Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho J. Setiadi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to increase understanding in some personal characteristics affecting creative performance among Indonesian radio station managers’ leadership context. Using creativity-relevant personal characteristics and motivation as input model, the authors identified that both of these two variables are positively related to creative performance. The study hypothesized that Leader-member exchange (LMX moderate the relationship between personal characteristics and creative performance. Among a sample of 283 Indonesian radio station managers, results found that creativity-relevant personal characteristics and intrinsic motivation were positively related to creative performance when managers’ perception of followers’ work contribution toward them (as the second dimension of LMX was high.

  16. The use of Twitter´s Bio in radio programmes. From the profile´s presentation to the transmedia radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa PIÑEIRO OTERO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The jump of conventional radio programs into social media has evolved in new spaces and interaction forms between radio broadcasters and radio listeners. Particularly, twitter community acquires a new dimension due to its public (non privacy status and shareability. From a transmedia perspective, this microblogging platform makes possible to the radio programs offering rich content (access to the tweets of radio show hosts or / and main collaborators, radio channel’s info... to the radio listeners. Although radio listeners can access those profiles on their own, or following real-time references of the program, it’s getting bigger the way radio show hosts use their profiles on twitter to improve synergies between multiple digital channels in order to increase the community engagement. Present article aims to analyze profile twitter bios of the bigger audience Spanish radio programs, in order to determine flow synergies between channels of the radio (brands and radio show hosts on twitter

  17. Clustering Techniques in Load Profile Analysis for Distribution Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOBRIC, E. C.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The demand characteristic is the most important one in analyzing customer information. In a distribution network, there is in any moment certain degree of uncertainty about busses loads, and consequently, about load level of network, busses voltage level, and power losses. Therefore, it is very important to estimate first of all the load profiles of buses, using available data (measurements effectuated in distribution stations. The results obtained for various distribution stations demonstrate the effectiveness of the present method in overcoming the difficulties encountered in optimal planning and operation of distribution networks.

  18. La programación de contenidos propios en las radios universitarias españolas: Ondacampus, UPV Radio, Unirradio Jaén, Radio Universidad y RUAH/Spanish University Radio Stations' Own Content Programming: Ondacampus, UPV Radio, Uniradio Jaén, Radio Universidad and RUAH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Peña Mónica Pérez-Alaejos; Marta Martín-Valiente; Marina Hernández-Prieto

    2016-01-01

      Introduction. The objective of this study is to analyse the programming grids of the university radio stations in the field of Spanish public education, which are already part of the internet environment, in order...

  19. La programación de contenidos propios en las radios universitarias españolas: Ondacampus, UPV Radio, Unirradio Jaén, Radio Universidad y RUAH/Spanish University Radio Stations' Own Content Programming: Ondacampus, UPV Radio, Uniradio Jaén, Radio Universidad and RUAH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Peña Mónica Pérez-Alaejos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this study is to analyse the programming grids of the university radio stations in the field of Spanish public education, which are already part of the internet environment, in order...

  20. Radio science electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere based on the service module of circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Han, S.; Ping, J.; Tang, G.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-09-01

    The existence of lunar ionosphere has been under debate for a long time. Radio occultation experiments had been performed by both Luna 19/22 and SELENE missions and electron column density of lunar ionosphere was provided. The Apollo 14 mission also acquired the electron density with in situ measurements. But the results of these missions don't well-matched. In order to explore the lunar ionosphere, radio occultation with the service module of Chinese circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft has been performing. One coherent S-band and X-band radio signals were recorded by China deep space stations, and local correlation was adopted to compute carrier phases of both signals. Based on the above work, the electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere was obtained and analyzed.

  1. A systems approach for designing a radio station layout for the U.S. National Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boci, Erton S.

    Today's National Airspace System (NAS) is managed using an aging surveillance radar system. Current radar technology is not adequate to sustain the rapid growth of the commercial, civil, and federal aviation sectors and cannot be adapted to use emerging 21st century airspace surveillance technologies. With 87,000 flights to manage per day, America's ground based radar system has hit a growth ceiling. Consequently, the FAA has embarked on a broad-reaching effort called the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) that seeks to transform today's aviation airspace management and ensure increased safety and capacity in our NAS. This dissertation presents a systems approach to Service Volume (SV) engineering, a relatively new field of engineering that has emerged in support of the FAA's Automatic Dependent Surveillance -- Broadcast (ADS-B) Air Traffic Modernization Program. SV Engineering is responsible for radio station layout design that would provide the required radio frequency (RF) coverage over a set of Service Volumes, each which represents a section of controlled airspace that is served by a particular air control facility or service. The radio station layout must be optimized to meet system performance, safety, and interference requirements while minimizing the number of radio station sites required to provide RF coverage of the entire airspace of the Unites States. The interference level requirements at the victim (of interference) receivers are the most important and stringent requirements imposed on the ADS-B radio station layout and configuration. In this dissertation, we show a novel and practical way to achieve this optimality by developing and employing several key techniques such as such as reverse radio line-of-site (RLOS) and complex entity-relationship modeling, to address the greater challenges of engineering this complex system. Given that numerous NAS radar facilities are clustered together in relative close proximity to each other, we

  2. Towards evaluating the intensity of convective systems by using GPS radio occultation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Deep convective systems, also more casually often just called storms, are destructive weather phenomena causing every year many deaths, injuries and damages and accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe, including Europe. Damages are mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain and these parameters are strongly connected to the structure of the storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes which are still mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in-situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or not reliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage. With this study we propose a new method for detecting the convection intensity in terms of rain rate and surface wind speed by using meteorological surface measurements in combination with atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation observations, which are available in essentially all weather conditions and with global coverage. The analysis of models indicated a relationship between the cloud top altitude and the intensity of a storm. We thus use GPS radio occultation bending angle profiles for detecting the storm's cloud top altitude and we correlate this value to the rain rate and wind speed measured by meteorological station networks in two different regions, the WegenerNet climate station network (South-Eastern Styria, Austria) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site (ARM, Southern Great Plains, USA), respectively. The results show a good correlation between the cloud top altitude and the maximum rain rate in the monitored areas, while this is not found for maximum wind speed. We conclude from this

  3. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2015-01-01

    of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get......This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated...... a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise...

  4. vNet Zero Energy for Radio Base Stations- Balearic Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabater, Pere; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Pol, Andreu Moia

    2016-01-01

    The Balearic Islands have one of the best telecommunications infrastructures in Spain, with more than 1500 Radio Base Stations (RBS) covering a total surface of 4.991,66 km². This archipelago has high energy consumption, with high CO2 emissions, due to an electrical energy production system mainly...... based on coal and fossil fuels which is not an environmentally sustainable scenario. The aim of this study is to identify the processes that would reduce the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, designing a target scenario featuring "zero CO2 emissions" and "100% renewable energies" in RBS....... The energy costs, CO2 emissions and data traffic data used for the study are generated by a sample of RBS from the Balearic Islands. The results are shown in terms of energy performance for a normal and net zero emissions scenarios....

  5. Low-cost extrapolation method for maximal LTE radio base station exposure estimation: test and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloock, Leen; Joseph, Wout; Gati, Azeddine; Varsier, Nadège; Flach, Björn; Wiart, Joe; Martens, Luc

    2013-06-01

    An experimental validation of a low-cost method for extrapolation and estimation of the maximal electromagnetic-field exposure from long-term evolution (LTE) radio base station installations are presented. No knowledge on downlink band occupation or service characteristics is required for the low-cost method. The method is applicable in situ. It only requires a basic spectrum analyser with appropriate field probes without the need of expensive dedicated LTE decoders. The method is validated both in laboratory and in situ, for a single-input single-output antenna LTE system and a 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output system, with low deviations in comparison with signals measured using dedicated LTE decoders.

  6. The Blog is Dead, Long Live the Blog! Analysis of Blogs on Spanish Radio Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Olivera Zaldua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blogs linked to the various media channels have changed considerably over the last five years as a direct result of the growth of the social networks, and they now occupy a secondary position, at least in terms of visibility. In theory one of the media where you would expect them to be least used is the radio, even if there are no specific studies to the effect. Beginning from this hypothesis, the aim of this work is to analyze the blogs on the major Spanish radio stations with a nationwide audience, both public and private, to quantify and categorize the content, check links to specific programs and gain an understanding of their current activity. With the results obtained it was concluded that the creation of blogs has been maintained in the last three on this list since 2010, with a considerable increase on La COPE; that subject matter is varied, with particular focus on Cultural topics and Sport and that the longest running active blog is ‘El Larguero’ (the crossbar on Cadena SER.

  7. Comparative international analysis of radiofrequency exposure surveys of mobile communication radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jack T; Joyner, Ken H

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of data from surveys of radio base stations in 23 countries across five continents from the year 2000 onward and includes over 173,000 individual data points. The research compared the results of the national surveys, investigated chronological trends and compared exposures by technology. The key findings from this data are that irrespective of country, the year and cellular technology, exposures to radio signals at ground level were only a small fraction of the relevant human exposure standards. Importantly, there has been no significant increase in exposure levels since the widespread introduction of 3G mobile services, which should be reassuring for policy makers and negate the need for post-installation measurements at ground level for compliance purposes. There may be areas close to antennas where compliance levels could be exceeded. Future potential work includes extending the study to additional countries, development of cumulative exposure distributions and investigating the possibility of linking exposure measurements to population statistics to assess the distribution of exposure levels relative to population percentiles.

  8. Music Call-Out Research: The Use by U.S. Radio Stations of Recurrent Surveys of Audience Tastes in Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James E.

    Most often music radio stations use tip sheets and charts in selecting and scheduling music. To overcome the disadvantages of these methods, some radio stations have begun to use music call-out research. Data are obtained through theatre studies, shopping mall intercepts, mail surveys, telephone surveys, or through a combination of these…

  9. Expectations of a local radio station in connection with an emergency situation; Erwartungen eines lokalen Radiosenders im Ereignisfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staerkle, C. [Radio Argovia (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The aspect to be discussed here actually is not what the radio station expects to happen in the event of an emergency, but rather what the population expects the radio station to do as the fastest news medium in the area in the event of a nuclear power plant incident. The radio station has to fulfill the three standard functions of providing information, entertainment, and services for the general public. The inhabitants in the area expect the radio station to broadcast information, helpful hints, and services needed in such a situation. The radio station is obliged to do its best or utmost without hesitation, thus performing one of its very specific tasks in times of an emergency. (There are four NPPs in the broadcasting area of Radio Argovia: Leibstadt, Beznau I, Beznau II, and Goesgen). The population wants information about the incident that happened, the very actual situation and the risks and hazards involved, and expected development of the situation as well as consequences. And they want it within minutes or even seconds, at any time of the day. Information given must be suitably competent, reliable and from authentic sources. This information falling short of the population`s needs or expectations, the population will have recourse to any other help within reach.(Orig./CB) [Deutsch] Es kann bei einem Ereignisfall oder besser `Stoerfall` nicht so sehr von den Erwartungen des schnellsten Mediums gesprochen werden. Vielmehr ist von den Erwartungen der Bevoelkerung an das schnellste Medium, dem Rundfunk, im Stoerfall eines Kernkraftwerkes auszugehen. Dabei hat sich das Radio seiner drei Saeulen Information, Unterhaltung und Service Public zu bedienen. Die vom Ereignis betroffenen Hoererinnen erwarten Informationen, Hilfestellungen und Dienstleistungen jeglicher Art. Diese Aufgaben kommen dem Rundfunk zu. Dieser hat sie ohne `wenn und aber` zu erfuellen. Seine Existenzberechtigung ist vor allem in Kriesenfaellen gegeben. (Im Einzugsgebiet von Radio Argovia

  10. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  11. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  12. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shume, E. B.; Vergados, P.; Komjathy, A.

    2017-01-01

    good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over nearby stations to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points, (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere...... number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit wide-spread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating...

  13. Models of and approaches to the station management of six African community radio broadcasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linje Manyozo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is a political economy critique that contributes to current scholarship on community radio and development by examining the question of the management of six networks from Mali, Mozambique and Uganda. This discussion argues that understanding the models and functions of management committees will go a long way towards contributing to conversations on how community radios could achieve social, institutional, financial and ideological sustainability. The article also examines how management committees approach their work in the age of new Information Communication Technologies (especially mobile phones, computers and the Internet, and whether there is a gender digital divide within such committees. At the centre of thecurrent discussion, therefore, is an attempt to understand the flow and contestation of power within community radio management committees.

  14. Calibration of the logarithmic-periodic dipole antenna (LPDA) radio stations at the Pierre Auger Observatory using an octocopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cobos, A.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fenu, F.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemmerich, N.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lo Presti, D.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Merenda, K.-D.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlín, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-10-01

    An in-situ calibration of a logarithmic periodic dipole antenna with a frequency coverage of 30 MHz to 80 MHz is performed. Such antennas are part of a radio station system used for detection of cosmic ray induced air showers at the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the so-called Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) . The directional and frequency characteristics of the broadband antenna are investigated using a remotely piloted aircraft carrying a small transmitting antenna. The antenna sensitivity is described by the vector effective length relating the measured voltage with the electric-field components perpendicular to the incoming signal direction. The horizontal and meridional components are determined with an overall uncertainty of 7.4+0.9-0.3% and 10.3+2.8-1.7% respectively. The measurement is used to correct a simulated response of the frequency and directional response of the antenna. In addition, the influence of the ground conductivity and permittivity on the antenna response is simulated. Both have a negligible influence given the ground conditions measured at the detector site. The overall uncertainties of the vector effective length components result in an uncertainty of 8.8+2.1-1.3% in the square root of the energy fluence for incoming signal directions with zenith angles smaller than 60°.

  15. Calibration of the Logarithmic-Periodic Dipole Antenna (LPDA) Radio Stations at the Pierre Auger Observatory using an Octocopter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander; et al.

    2017-02-05

    An in-situ calibration of a logarithmic periodic dipole antenna with a frequency coverage of 30 MHz to 80 MHz is performed. Such antennas are part of a radio station system used for detection of cosmic ray induced air showers at the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the so-called Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA). The directional and frequency characteristics of the broadband antenna are investigated using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) carrying a small transmitting antenna. The antenna sensitivity is described by the vector effective length relating the measured voltage with the electric-field components perpendicular to the incoming signal direction. The horizontal and meridional components are determined with an overall uncertainty of 7.4^{+0.9}_{-0.3} % and 10.3^{+2.8}_{-1.7} % respectively. The measurement is used to correct a simulated response of the frequency and directional response of the antenna. In addition, the influence of the ground conductivity and permittivity on the antenna response is simulated. Both have a negligible influence given the ground conditions measured at the detector site. The overall uncertainties of the vector effective length components result in an uncertainty of 9.4^{+1.5}_{-1.6} % in the square root of the energy fluence for incoming signal directions with zenith angles smaller than 60{\\deg}.

  16. Use of the Hualien, Taiwan, dynasonde for surveillance of HF environmental radio and positioning of transmitting stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, L.-C.; Chen, G. H.; Tian, M. H.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Since 2010, a 2nd generation NOAA HF radars, also referred as dynasonde, has been built at Hualien (23.89 N, 121.55 E), Taiwan. The Hualien dynasonde has a new design of ionospheric radar of fully digitizing the complex signal records and using multiple parallel receiver channels for simultaneous measurements of signals from multiple spaced receiving antennas. The Hualien dynasonde utilizes interferometric sounding pulse patterns and a receiving antenna array (including eight receivers connected to different spaced dipole antennas) to receive not only ionospherical echoes but also environmental radio signals. We have applied the Hermite normal form method to solve the phase-measurement aliasing and least squares problem and improve measurements of radio angles of arrival (AOA). The further ray-tracing experiments can be used for the study of radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In this study we present a numerical and step by step ray-tracing method on a phenomenological ionospheric electron density model, the TaiWan Ionospheric Model (TWIM), which is constructed from the FormoSat3 / Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (FS3/COSMIC) ionospheric radio occultation data and global ionosonde foF2 data. The three-dimensional TWIM consists of vertically-fitted α-Chapman-type layers, with distinct F2, F1, E, and D layers, for which the layer parameters such as peak density, peak density height, and scale height are represented by surface spherical harmonics. This way the continuity of Ne and its derivatives is maintained. The methodology is successfully applied to a practical HF transmitter for oblique incidence ray tracing. Then, the AOA data will be used for backward ray tracing in the TWIM model and be used to determine ground-based transmitting station position.

  17. Retrieval of Electron Density Profile for KOMPSAT-5 GPS Radio Occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Kyoung Lee

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The AOPOD (Atmosphere Occultation and Precision Orbit Determination system, the secondary payload of KOMPSAT (KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-5 scheduled to be launched in 2010, shall provide GPS radio occultation data. In this paper, we simulated the GPS radio occultation characteristic of KOMPSAT-5 and retrieved electron density profiles using KROPS (KASI Radio Occultation Processing Software. The electron density retrieved from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload GPS radio occultation data on June 20, 2004 was compared with IRI (International Reference Ionosphere - 2001, PLP (Planar Langmuir Probe, and ionosonde measurements. When the result was compared with ionosonde measurements, the discrepancies were 5 km on the F_2 peak height (hmF_2 and 3×10^{10} el/m^3 on the electron density of the F_2 peak height (NmF_2. By comparing with the Langmuir Probe measurements of CHAMP satellite (PLP, both agrees with 1.6×10^{11} el/m^3 at the height of 365.6 km.

  18. Modelling a reliable wind/PV/storage power system for remote radio base station sites without utility power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlin, Ian F.

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) cells has made steady progress from the early days, when only the USA space program could afford to deploy them, to now, seeing them applied to roadside applications even in our Northern European climes. The manufacturing cost per watt has fallen and the daylight-to-power conversion efficiency increased. At the same time, the perception that the sun has to be directly shining on it for a PV array to work has faded. On some of those roadside applications, particularly for remote emergency telephones or for temporary roadwork signage where a utility electrical power connection is not practical, the keen observer will spot, usually in addition to a PV array, a small wind-turbine and an electrical cabinet quite obviously (by virtue of its volume) containing a storage battery. In the UK, we have the lions share (>40%) of Europe's entire wind power resource although, despite press coverage of the "anti-wind" lobby to the contrary, we have hardly started to harvest this clean and free energy source. Taking this (established and proven) roadside solution one step further, we will consider higher power applications. A cellular phone system is one where a multitude of remote radio base stations (RBS) are required to provide geographical coverage. With networks developing into the so called "3G" technologies the need for base stations has tripled, as each 3G cell covers only 1/3 the geographical area of its "2G" counterpart. To cover >90% of the UK's topology (>97% population coverage) with 3G cellular technology will requires in excess of 12,000 radio base stations per operator network. In 2001, there were around 25,000 established sites and, with an anticipated degree of collocation by necessity, that figure is forecast to rise to >47,000. Of course, the vast majority of these sites have a convenient grid connection. However, it is easy to see that the combination of wind and PV power generation and an energy storage system may be an

  19. Exposure of farm workers to electromagnetic radiation from cellular network radio base stations situated on rural agricultural land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascuzzi, Simone; Santoro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field (EMF) levels generated by mobile telephone radio base stations (RBS) situated on rural-agricultural lands were assessed in order to evaluate the exposure of farm workers in the surrounding area. The expected EMF at various distances from a mobile telephone RBS was calculated using an ad hoc numerical forecast model. Subsequently, the electric fields around some RBS on agricultural lands were measured, in order to obtain a good approximation of the effective conditions at the investigated sites. The viability of this study was tested according to the Italian Regulations concerning general and occupational public exposure to time-varying EMFs. The calculated E-field values were obtained with the RBS working constantly at full power, but during the in situ measurements the actual power emitted by RBS antennas was lower than the maximum level, and the E-field values actually registered were much lower than the calculated values.

  20. Radio Mariackie

    OpenAIRE

    Tytko, Marek Mariusz

    1993-01-01

    Tekst dotyczy początków katolickiego Radia Mariackiego w Krakowie w 1993 r. The text concerns the begining of the Mariackie Radio [The Mariackie Broadcasting, the Maria's Radio Station, the Maria's Broadcasting, the Maria's Radio) in Cracow 1993.

  1. Magnetic fields of AM band radio broadcast signals at theRichmond Fiel d Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Alex; Frangos, William

    1998-12-01

    Non-invasive sensing of the shallow subsurface is necessary for detection and delineation of buried hazardous wastes, monitoring of the condition of clay containment caps, and a variety of other purposes. Electromagnetic methods have proven to be effective in environmental site characterization where there is a need for increased resolution in subsurface characterization. Two considerations strongly suggest the use of frequencies between 100 kHz and 100 MHz for such applications: 1) the induction response of many targets is small due to small size, and 2) a need to determine both the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity which are related to chemistry and hydrology. Modeling and physical parameter studies confirm that measurements at frequencies between 1 and 100 MHz can resolve variations in subsurface conductivity and permittivity. To provide the necessary technology for shallow subsurface investigations, we propose to exploit the concept of electromagnetic impedance, the ratio of orthogonal horizontal electric and magnetic fields. Prior to assembling the equipment for measuring surface impedance using controlled, local source it was felt prudent to measure the surface impedance of geological materials at the University of California at Berkeley's Richmond Field (RFS) using ambient energy in the broadcast band. As a first step toward this intermediate goal, we have examined and characterized local AM band radio signals in terms of both signal strength and polarization of the magnetic component as received at RFS. In addition, we have established the viability of a commercial radio-frequency magnetic sensor.

  2. UWB antenna system for mobile bearing finder of radio and television stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyryliuk V.A.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research discusses the problem of development and manufacturing of the ultra-wideband (UWB antenna element and antenna system on the basis of such element for mobile bearing finder of radio and television signals with the use of direction bearing quasi Doppler method. Due to the research results the mobile ultra-wideband antenna system was suggested. Its elements are new ultra-wideband emitters, which can belong to disco-cone antenna class. Ultra-wideband emitters are provided by foil form of the antenna element. The round function of the AS element, obtained by theoretical modeling and confirmed by practical experiments, has an exponential form. The fifth degree polynomial provides the required accuracy approximation. The combination of the radiator elements, their alignment and soldering is carried out by means of specially designed equipment. Checking of the transmitter parameter is done by proportional constant measuring of standing wave, which takes the meaning less than three values in the frequency range from 95 to 900 MHz. This satisfies the requirements of the ultra-wideband antenna direction bearing finder sources of radio signals. The basic parameters and design features of AS are presented.

  3. Heat flows and energetic behavior of a telecommunication radio base station

    CERN Document Server

    Petraglia, Antonio; Vetromile, Carmela; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Lubritto, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows a study on energetic consumption of BTSs (Base Transceiver Stations) for mobile communication, related to conditioning functions. An energetic "thermal model" of a telecommunication station is proposed and studied. The results have been validated with a BTS in central Italy, showing good agreement. Findings show a substantial high internal-external temperature difference in the containing shelter, particularly during daytime and warm months, due to sources of heat (equipment, external temperature and sun radiation) and to the difficulty in spread the warmth out. The necessity to keep the operating temperatures within a given range for the correct functioning of the electronic equipment requires the use of conditioning setups, and this significantly increases the energetic demand of the whole system. The analysis of thermal flows across the shelter can help to gather further data on its temperature behavior and to devise practical measures to lower the power demand, while keeping the operating...

  4. Installation Restoration Program Preliminary Assessment, Big Mountain Radio Relay Station, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    are not as abundant as tuffs or lava flows. 3 Soil formation and development largely dates from the close of the Wisconsin Glaciation, when glaciers...environmental contamination that may have an adverse impact on public health or the environment and to select a remedial action through preparation of...Telephone Switching Station (ATSS-4A) capabilities were added to Big Mountain RRS, Kalakaket Creek RRS, Pedro Dome RRS, and Neklasson Lake RRS. These

  5. Modeled and Perceived Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields From Mobile-Phone Base Stations and the Development of Symptoms Over Time in a General Population Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Astrid L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375286063; Slottje, Pauline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299345351; Timmermans, Danielle R M; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Reedijk, Marije|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319431; Vermeulen, Roel C H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Smid, Tjabe

    2017-01-01

    We assessed associations between modeled and perceived exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile-phone base stations and the development of nonspecific symptoms and sleep disturbances over time. A population-based Dutch cohort study, the Occupational and Environmental

  6. Mobile phone base stations and adverse health effects: phase 2 of a cross-sectional study with measured radio frequency electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Blettner, M; Kowall, B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that exposure to continuous low-level radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) emitted from mobile phone base stations was related to various health disturbances. METHODS: For the investigation people living mainly...

  7. Errors in GNSS radio occultation data: relevance of the measurement geometry and obliquity of profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Foelsche

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric profiles retrieved from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation (RO measurements are increasingly used to validate other measurement data. For this purpose it is important to be aware of the characteristics of RO measurements. RO data are frequently compared with vertical reference profiles, but the RO method does not provide vertical scans through the atmosphere. The average elevation angle of the tangent point trajectory (which would be 90° for a vertical scan is about 40° at altitudes above 70 km, decreasing to about 25° at 20 km and to less than 5° below 3 km. In an atmosphere with high horizontal variability we can thus expect noticeable representativeness errors if the retrieved profiles are compared with vertical reference profiles. We have performed an end-to-end simulation study using high-resolution analysis fields (T799L91 from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF to simulate a representative ensemble of RO profiles via high-precision 3-D ray tracing. Thereby we focused on the dependence of systematic and random errors on the measurement geometry, specifically on the incidence angle of the RO measurement rays with respect to the orbit plane of the receiving satellite, also termed azimuth angle, which determines the obliquity of RO profiles. We analyzed by how much errors are reduced if the reference profile is not taken vertical at the mean tangent point but along the retrieved tangent point trajectory (TPT of the RO profile. The exact TPT can only be determined by performing ray tracing, but our results confirm that the retrieved TPT – calculated from observed impact parameters – is a very good approximation to the "true" one. Systematic and random errors in RO data increase with increasing azimuth angle, less if the TPT is properly taken in to account, since the increasing obliquity of the RO profiles leads to an increasing sensitivity to departures from horizontal

  8. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in radio and TV broadcasting stations workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Gadzicka, Elżbieta; Szymczak, Wiesław; Zmyślony, Marek

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the mechanism of cardiovascular impairments in workers exposed to UHF-VHF radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF). Heart rate variability (HRV) was analysed using 512 normal heart beats registered at rest. The analysis concerned time-domain (STD R-R) and frequency-domain (VLF, LF, HF) parameters of HRV. Fifty nine workers (group I) with low-level and 12 workers (group II) with high-level exposure were examined. The mean age of the subjects was 47 ± 9 years and 41 ± 14 years, and mean exposure duration 19.1 ± 8.8 years and 13 ± 4 years, in groups I and II, respectively. The groups were divided according to: E(max), E(dose), E(mean) for frequencies UHF, VHF and UHF+VHF: The control group consisted of 42 non-exposed subjects, aged 49 ± 8 years. Statistical analysis comprised one-way analysis of variance, covariance analysis and logistic regression models. In the exposed groups, the heart rate was higher than in the control one. Standard deviation of R-R intervals (STD R-R) was found to be significantly (p = 0.0285) lower in group I (42.5 ± 24.7 ms) compared to the control group (62.9 ± 53.5 ms). The risk of lowered STD R-R was significantly increased (OR = 2.37, p = 0.023) in group II. Both exposed groups presented significantly higher VLF and LF values than the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.0025, respectively). The EMF-exposed groups were characterised by the dominance of the sympathetic system (LF/HF 1.3 ± 0.35). The results indicate that exposure to radiofrequency EMF may affect the neurovegetative regulation.

  9. The origin and development of extragalactic radio astronomy: the role of CSIRO's Division of Radiophysics Dover Heights Field Station in Sydney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Robertson, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Initial post-war developments in non-solar radio astronomy were inspired by Hey, Phillips and Parson’s report in 1946 of an intense source of radio emission in Cygnus. This so-called ‘radio star’ was unique, and questions immediately were raised about its true nature. But it did not remain unique for long. Observing from Sydney, John Bolton, Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee followed up the Cygnus discovery with more radio star detections, beginning what would evolve into a long-term multi-faceted research program and one of the mainstays of the CSIRO’s Division of Radiophysics. But more than this, these early discoveries in England and in Sydney opened up a whole new field of investigation, extragalactic radio astronomy, which has remained a major area of investigation through to the present day. This paper focusses on the early years of this program when the observations were carried out at Dover Heights Field Station in Sydney, and the ways in which new developments in instrumentation that allowed a major expansion of the program eventually led to the closure of Dover Heights and the founding of the Fleurs Field Station.

  10. Radio Capacity Estimation for Millimeter Wave 5G Cellular Networks Using Narrow Beamwidth Antennas at the Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlMuthanna Turki Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents radio frequency (RF capacity estimation for millimeter wave (mm-wave based fifth-generation (5G cellular networks using field-level simulations. It is shown that, by reducing antenna beamwidth from 65° to 30°, we can enhance the capacity of mm-wave cellular networks roughly by 3.0 times at a distance of 220 m from the base station (BS. This enhancement is far much higher than the corresponding enhancement of 1.2 times observed for 900 MHz and 2.6 GHz microwave networks at the same distance from the BS. Thus the use of narrow beamwidth transmitting antennas has more pronounced benefits in mm-wave networks. Deployment trials performed on an LTE TDD site operating on 2.6 GHz show that 6-sector site with 27° antenna beamwidth enhances the quality of service (QoS roughly by 40% and more than doubles the overall BS throughput (while enhancing the per sector throughput 1.1 times on average compared to a 3-sector site using 65° antenna beamwidth. This agrees well with our capacity simulations. Since mm-wave 5G networks will use arbitrary number of beams, with beamwidth much less than 30°, the capacity enhancement expected in 5G system when using narrow beamwidth antennas would be much more than three times observed in our simulations.

  11. Green Networking in Cellular HetNets: A Unified Radio Resource Management Framework with Base Station ON/OFF Switching

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2016-12-07

    In this paper, the problem of energy efficiency in cellular heterogeneous networks (HetNets) is investigated using radio resource and power management combined with the base station (BS) ON/OFF switching. The objective is to minimize the total power consumption of the network while satisfying the quality of service (QoS) requirements of each connected user. We consider the case of co-existing macrocell BS, small cell BSs, and private femtocell access points (FAPs). Three different network scenarios are investigated, depending on the status of the FAPs, i.e., HetNets without FAPs, HetNets with closed FAPs, and HetNets with semi-closed FAPs. A unified framework is proposed to simultaneously allocate spectrum resources to users in an energy efficient manner and switch off redundant small cell BSs. The high complexity dual decomposition technique is employed to achieve optimal solutions for the problem. A low complexity iterative algorithm is also proposed and its performances are compared to those of the optimal technique. The particularly interesting case of semi-closed FAPs, in which the FAPs accept to serve external users, achieves the highest energy efficiency due to increased degrees of freedom. In this paper, a cooperation scheme between FAPs and mobile operator is also investigated. The incentives for FAPs, e.g., renewable energy sharing and roaming prices, enabling cooperation are discussed to be considered as a useful guideline for inter-operator agreements.

  12. The effect of electromagnetic radiation from the Skrunda Radio Location Station on Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magone, I. [Faculty of Biology, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    1996-02-11

    The effect of electromagnetic radiation from the Skrunda Radio Location Station was studied on the vegetative growth and morphology of the duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden plant in the next generation. The impact of plant development stage and length of the exposure period were examined. The effect of short-term (5-day) exposures of Spirodela cultures depended on the stage of development at the time of exposure. Generally, the vegetative reproduction rate was accelerated in the first 20 days after the end of exposure. Exposure of plants just beginning formation lowered the vegetative growth rate. Eighty-eight-hour exposure caused the appearance of some abnormal individuals after 30 days of growth. At 55 days, various morphological and developmental abnormalities appeared in 6-10 daughter plants from 10 exposed mother plants, compared with 0.1 plants per 10 in the control condition. Plants developed completely to daughter fronds under exposure from the electromagnetic field had a shorter life-span (67 days compared to 87 days in the control) and fewer subsequent daughters (total eight compared to 10 in the control group)

  13. In situ radio-frequency heating for soil remediation at a former service station: case study and general aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huon, G.; Simpson, T.; Maini, G. [Ecologia Environmental Solutions Ltd., Sittingbourne, Kent (United Kingdom); Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.D.; Roland, U. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany); Will, F. [Total UK, Watford (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    In situ radio-frequency heating (ISRFH) was successfully applied during remediation of a former petrol station. Using a three-electrode array in combination with extraction wells for soil vapor extraction (SVE), pollution consisting mainly of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and mineral oil hydrocarbons (in total about 1100 kg) was eliminated from a chalk soil in the unsaturated zone. Specially designed rod electrodes allowed selective heating of a volume of approximately 480 m{sup 3}, at a defined depth, to a mean temperature of about 50 C. The heating drastically increased the extraction rates. After switching off ISRFH, SVE remained highly efficient for some weeks due to the heat-retaining properties of the soil. Comparison of an optimized regime of ISRFH/SVE with conventional ''cold'' SVE showed a reduction of remediation time by about 80 % while keeping the total energy consumption almost constant. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Development of a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) for continuous temperature profiling upto lower stratospheric altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2012-07-01

    The Gadanki (13.46°N, 79.17°E) MST radar is a high power VHF pulsed coherent Doppler radar established for remote probing of atmospheric phenomena in the Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere regions. Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) was developed using this radar to obtain height profiles of atmospheric temperature up to lower stratospheric altitudes. RASS uses the effect of temperature on the speed of sound in air as a means to sense the atmospheric temperature. It is the combination of a Doppler radar and acoustic exciters. The radar was augmented with acoustic exciters that were designed and constructed for this purpose. The Doppler radar profiles the speed of refractive index perturbations induced by the acoustic source. RASS has been demonstrated to be a reliable ground-based remote profiling technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature, Tv over the past two decades. This work describes the design of the system and its application to the observation of height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature up to and beyond tropical tropopause altitudes. Observations were made during 2007, 2008 and 2009 over periods extending up to 72 hours. These observations demonstrate temperature profiling capability up to about 18 km in altitude, though on an occasion height coverage upto 22.8km was obtained briefly; lowest height covered is from about 1.5km onwards. During the period of the RASS observations simultaneous data from radiosonde was used to validate the temperature measurements. Simultaneous satellite-based measurement of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) and precipitation from ground-based instruments was used to study the atmospheric phenomena of gravity waves and atmospheric stability during a convection event.

  15. A New Stand-Alone Hybrid Power System with Wind Turbine Generator and Photovoltaic Modules for a Small-Scale Radio Base Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shigeo; Yachi, Toshiaki; Tani, Tatsuo

    This paper proposes a new stand-alone hybrid power system with a wind turbine generator and photovoltaic modules for a small-scale radio base station. We studied the system characteristics by simulation of operation on Yonaguni Island, where wind speed exceeds 4.0m/s throughout the year, and average annual wind speed is about 7.0m/s. The results of simulation show that, to attain a system operation rate of 100%, the base station equipment requires a wind turbine generator output power of 8kW, a photovoltaic output power of 7.6kW, and 3-day backup storage batteries.

  16. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    CERN Document Server

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  17. Low-cost approach for a software-defined radio based ground station receiver for CCSDS standard compliant S-band satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, M. A.; Butt, B. M.; Klinkner, S.

    2016-10-01

    A major concern of a university satellite mission is to download the payload and the telemetry data from a satellite. While the ground station antennas are in general easy and with limited afford to procure, the receiving unit is most certainly not. The flexible and low-cost software-defined radio (SDR) transceiver "BladeRF" is used to receive the QPSK modulated and CCSDS compliant coded data of a satellite in the HAM radio S-band. The control software is based on the Open Source program GNU Radio, which also is used to perform CCSDS post processing of the binary bit stream. The test results show a good performance of the receiving system.

  18. Modeling of temporal variation of very low frequency radio waves over long paths as observed from Indian Antarctic stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Basak, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2017-07-01

    Characteristics of very low frequency (VLF) signal depends on solar illumination across the propagation path. For a long path, solar zenith angle varies widely over the path and this has a significant influence on the propagation characteristics. To study the effect, Indian Centre for Space Physics participated in the 27th and 35th Scientific Expedition to Antarctica. VLF signals transmitted from the transmitters, namely, VTX (18.2 kHz), Vijayanarayanam, India, and NWC (19.8 kHz), North West Cape, Australia, were recorded simultaneously at Indian permanent stations Maitri and Bharati having respective geographic coordinates 70.75°S, 11.67°E, and 69.4°S, 76.17°E. A very stable diurnal variation of the signal has been obtained from both the stations. We reproduced the signal variations of VLF signal using solar zenith angle model coupled with long wavelength propagation capability (LWPC) code. We divided the whole path into several segments and computed the solar zenith angle (χ) profile. We assumed a linear relationship between the Wait's exponential model parameters effective reflection height (h'), steepness parameter (β), and solar zenith angle. The h' and β values were later used in the LWPC code to obtain the VLF signal amplitude at a particular time. The same procedure was repeated to obtain the whole day signal. Nature of the whole day signal variation from the theoretical modeling is also found to match with our observation to some extent.

  19. The power of vertical geolocation of atmospheric profiles from GNSS radio occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwärz, Marc; Leroy, Stephen S

    2017-02-16

    High-resolution measurements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provide atmospheric profiles with independent information on altitude and pressure. This unique property is of crucial advantage when analyzing atmospheric characteristics that require joint knowledge of altitude and pressure or other thermodynamic atmospheric variables. Here we introduce and demonstrate the utility of this independent information from RO and discuss the computation, uncertainty, and use of RO atmospheric profiles on isohypsic coordinates-mean sea level altitude and geopotential height-as well as on thermodynamic coordinates (pressure and potential temperature). Using geopotential height as vertical grid, we give information on errors of RO-derived temperature, pressure, and potential temperature profiles and provide an empirical error model which accounts for seasonal and latitudinal variations. The observational uncertainty of individual temperature/pressure/potential temperature profiles is about 0.7 K/0.15%/1.4 K in the tropopause region. It gradually increases into the stratosphere and decreases toward the lower troposphere. This decrease is due to the increasing influence of background information. The total climatological error of mean atmospheric fields is, in general, dominated by the systematic error component. We use sampling error-corrected climatological fields to demonstrate the power of having different and accurate vertical coordinates available. As examples we analyze characteristics of the location of the tropopause for geopotential height, pressure, and potential temperature coordinates as well as seasonal variations of the midlatitude jet stream core. This highlights the broad applicability of RO and the utility of its versatile vertical geolocation for investigating the vertical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  20. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  1. Radio Stalin as an example of the Czech pirate radio

    OpenAIRE

    Prágrová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Diploma thesis "Radio Stalin as an example of Czech piracy radio broadcast" is aimed to complexly present radio station Radio Stalin which was broadcasting in October 1990 in Prague. Radio Stalin is presented in the context of events of that time and related changes in politics, economy, society and media and in the context of piracy radio broadcast. First of all the emphasis is put on media transformation and changes in legislative framework of radio broadcasting after 1989. Radio Stalin is ...

  2. Design, Development and Pre-Flight Testing of the Communications, Navigation, and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (Connect) to Investigate Software Defined Radio Architecture on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Ann P.; Barrett, Michael J.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Free, James M.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2011-01-01

    The Communication Navigation and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) is a NASA-sponsored mission, which will investigate the usage of Software Defined Radios (SDRs) as a multi-function communication system for space missions. A softwaredefined radio system is a communication system in which typical components of the system (e.g., modulators) are incorporated into software. The software-defined capability allows flexibility and experimentation in different modulation, coding and other parameters to understand their effects on performance. This flexibility builds inherent redundancy and flexibility into the system for improved operational efficiency, real-time changes to space missions and enhanced reliability/redundancy. The CoNNeCT Project is a collaboration between industrial radio providers and NASA. The industrial radio providers are providing the SDRs and NASA is designing, building and testing the entire flight system. The flight system will be integrated on the Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the International Space Station (ISS) after launch on the H-IIB Transfer Vehicle in 2012. This paper provides an overview of the technology research objectives, payload description, design challenges and pre-flight testing results.

  3. A BROADBAND RADIO STUDY OF THE AVERAGE PROFILE AND GIANT PULSES FROM PSR B1821-24A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pennucci, T. T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Demorest, P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Ransom, S. M., E-mail: a.bilous@science.ru.nl [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    We present the results of a wideband (720–2400 MHz) study of PSR B1821–24A (J1824–2452A, M28A), an energetic millisecond pulsar (MSP) visible in radio, X-rays and γ-rays. In radio, the pulsar has a complex average profile that spans ≳85% of the spin period and exhibits strong evolution with observing frequency. For the first time we measure phase-resolved polarization properties and spectral indices of radio emission throughout almost all of the on-pulse window. We synthesize our findings with high-energy information to compare M28A to other known γ-ray MSPs and to speculate that M28A’s radio emission originates in multiple regions within its magnetosphere (i.e., both in the slot or outer gaps near the light cylinder and at lower altitudes above the polar cap). M28A is one of a handful of pulsars that are known to emit giant radio pulses (GRPs)—short, bright radio pulses of unknown nature. We report a drop in the linear polarization of the average profile in both windows of GRP generation and also a “W”-shaped absorption feature (resembling a double notch), partly overlapping with one of the GRP windows. The GRPs themselves have broadband spectra consisting of multiple patches with Δν/ν ∼ 0.07. Although our time resolution was not sufficient to resolve the GRP structure on the μs scale, we argue that GRPs from this pulsar most closely resemble the GRPs from the main pulse of the Crab pulsar, which consist of a series of narrowband nanoshots.

  4. Assessment of NOAA NUCAPS upper air temperature profiles using COSMIC GPS radio occultation and ARM radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, M. L.; Borg, L.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.; Gambacorta, A.

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently began operational processing to derive vertical temperature profiles from two new sensors, Cross-Track Infrared Sounder and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, which were developed for the next generation of U.S. weather satellites. The NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) has been developed by NOAA to routinely process data from future Joint Polar Satellite System operational satellites and the preparatory Suomi-NPP satellite. This paper assesses the NUCAPS vertical temperature profile product from the upper troposphere into the middle stratosphere using radiosonde and GPS radio occultation (RO) data. Radiosonde data from the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are=] compared to both the NUCAPS and GPS RO temperature products to evaluate bias and RMS errors. At all three fixed ARM sites for time periods investigated the NUCAPS temperature in the 100-40 hPa range is found to have an average bias to the radiosondes of less than 0.45 K and an RMS error of less than 1 K when temperature averaging kernels are applied. At a 95% confidence level, the radiosondes and RO were found to agree within 0.4 K at the North Slope of Alaska site and within 0.83 K at Southern Great Plains and Tropical Western Pacific. The GPS RO-derived dry temperatures, obtained from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission, are used as a common reference for the intercomparison of NUCAPS temperature products to similar products produced by NASA from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and by European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites from MetOp-B Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). For seasonal and zonal scales, the NUCAPS agreement with AIRS and IASI is less than 0.5 K after application of averaging kernels.

  5. Wind profiler observations of a monsoon low-level jet over a tropical Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. R. Kalapureddy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-year high-resolution wind observations of the wind profiler have been utilized to characterize the diurnal and seasonal features of the monsoon Low-Level Jet (LLJ over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, with a focus on the diurnal variability of low-level winds. The Boreal summer monsoon winds show a conspicuously strong westerly LLJ with average wind speed exceeding 20 m s−1. The L-band wind profiler measurements have shown an advantage of better height and time resolutions over the conventional radiosonde method for diurnal wind measurements. An interesting diurnal oscillation of LLJ core has been observed. It is varying in the height range of 1.8±0.6 km with the maximum and minimum intensity noticed during the early morning and afternoon hours, respectively. The jet core (wind maxima height is observed to coincide with the inversion height. Strong wind shears are normally located beneath the LLJ core. The sole wind profiler observations are capable of identifying the monsoon phases, such as onset, break and active spells, etc. The mutual influence between the LLJ and the boundary layer has been discussed. One notices that the observed LLJ diurnal structures depend on the local convective activity, wind shears and turbulence activity associated with boundary layer winds. The day-to-day change in the LLJ structure depends on the latitudinal position of the LLJ core.

  6. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE ON DISTRIBUTION OF RADIO WAVES IN CITY OF PROFILE OF HIS BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zatuchny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N this article influence is investigated on distribution of radio waves in the municipal terms of height and building closeness. A model over of distribution of radio waves is brought from an aircraft side. Charts over of dependence of probability of arrival of signal are brought from airship from the height of flight and middle number of building.

  7. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  8. STRATEGY OF TRAINING TO ACHIEVE A NON SEXIST MEDIA SPEECH IN CHAPARRA RADIO STATION / ESTRATEGIA DE CAPACITACIÓN PARA LOGRAR UN DISCURSO MEDIÁTICO NO SEXISTA EN RADIO CHAPARRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Silveira Fonseca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has as objective to design a training strategy to diminish the sexism in the media speech of Chaparra Radio Station. It is pertinent for the paper the play of mass-media in the social construction of the imaginary. In spite of being the women those that more listens the programming, they are off in the media speech. The investigator considered that besides the influence of the patriarchal culture in the media speech, another of the causes of the sexism in the talkative products is the training lack. Of there the necessity to orchestrate in Chaparra Radio Station the action 23 of those that correspond to the means of massive diffusion in the Plan of National Action of Pursuit to the Conference of Beijing referred to the training. With the application of this strategy it was possible to qualify to 15 students credited as a graduate degree of the International Institute of Journalism José Martí.

  9. Analysis of Lease versus Buy Options for Procurement of Radio Assets for the Marine Corps Air Station at Yuma, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    most common manufacturers of this type cf radio being Motorola, General Electric and RCA. To date there is considerable controversy as to whether...than the estimated future cost. The further into the future the tiae period, the » nailer the present value of any cost to be incurred in that period

  10. Strategies for improvement of spectrum capacity for WiMax cellular systems by Cognitive Radio Technology supported by Relay Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Flemming Bjerge; Prasad, Ramjee

    2007-01-01

    Methods to enhance the use of the frequency spectrum by automatical spectrum sensing plus spectrum sharing in a cognitive radio technology context will be presented and discussed in this paper. Ideas to improve the wireless transmission by orthogonal OFDM-based communication and to increase the c...

  11. [The electromagnetic fields of the base stations of mobile radio communication and ecology. The estimation of danger of the base station EMF for population and for bioecosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, K A

    2005-01-01

    The estimation of the danger for the population and for the bioecosistems of the electromagnetic conditions around of the base stations was given. The insufficiency of the scientific knowledge does not allow to guarantee the safety of the population and of the bioecosystems in the conditions of a round-the-clock long-term influence of EMF RF. WHO recommends to use "Precautionary principle".

  12. RFI profiles of prime candidate sites for the first radio astronomical telescope in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Bahari Ramadzan Syed Adnan, Syed; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2010-03-01

    Radio astronomy is a very young research field in South East Asia. There has not been a research-grade radio telescope built in this part of the world yet. A plan has been proposed by the University of Malaya's Radio Cosmology Research Laboratory to build a medium-sized radio telescope in order to eventually join the global projects of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network and Square Kilometer Array (SKA). Main parameters taken into consideration in finding the main prime candidate sites involves features that produce Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). These features are mainly telecommunication and satellite navigation signals and population density. Other important features considered are rainfall level, land contour and availability for future collaboration with institutions at the chosen sites. In this paper we described the experimental procedure and the RFI measurement on our five prime candidate's sites in Malaysia, covering frequency band from 1 MHz to 2000 MHz. The levels and sources of RFI on these sites were monitored and analyzed. The RFI level in Langkawi showed the lowest average of -100.33dBm(4.4×106Jy). These RFI have been found to fluctuate relatively lowly (between 1 dB m and 2 dB m). This site is also ideally located close to the Langkawi National Observatory and we recommend that this site as the best site to build the first research-grade radio telescope in this region.

  13. Dielectric properties of dried vegetable powders and their temperature profile during radio frequency heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, Salmonella contamination was identified in low-moisture foods including dried vegetable powder. Radio Frequency (RF) dielectric heating is a potential alternative pasteurization method with short heating time. Dielectric properties of broccoli powder with 6.9, 9.1, 12.2, and 14.9%, w. b....

  14. Net community production at Ocean Station Papa observed with nitrate and oxygen sensors on profiling floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Joshua N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Coletti, Luke J.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    Six profiling floats equipped with nitrate and oxygen sensors were deployed at Ocean Station P in the Gulf of Alaska. The resulting six calendar years and 10 float years of nitrate and oxygen data were used to determine an average annual cycle for net community production (NCP) in the top 35 m of the water column. NCP became positive in February as soon as the mixing activity in the surface layer began to weaken, but nearly 3 months before the traditionally defined mixed layer began to shoal from its winter time maximum. NCP displayed two maxima, one toward the end of May and another in August with a summertime minimum in June corresponding to the historical peak in mesozooplankton biomass. The average annual NCP was determined to be 1.5 ± 0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 using nitrate and 1.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 using oxygen. The results from oxygen data proved to be quite sensitive to the gas exchange model used as well as the accuracy of the oxygen measurement. Gas exchange models optimized for carbon dioxide flux generally ignore transport due to gas exchange through the injection of bubbles, and these models yield NCP values that are two to three time higher than the nitrate-based estimates. If nitrate and oxygen NCP rates are assumed to be related by the Redfield model, we show that the oxygen gas exchange model can be optimized by tuning the exchange terms to reproduce the nitrate NCP annual cycle.

  15. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  16. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  17. NODC Standard Product: Oceanographic station profile time series (NODC Accession 0095191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanographic Data Center and the World Data Center-A for Oceanography compiled from the NODC Oceanographic Station Data File a set of oceanographic...

  18. Evaluation of Refractivity Profiles from CHAMP and SAC-C GPS Radio Occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Paul; Ao, Chi On; Joiner, Joanna; delaTorreJuarez, Manuel; Hoff, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    The GeoForschungsZentrum's Challenging Minisatellite Payload for Geophysical Research and Application (CHAMP, Germany-US) and the Comision Nacional de Actividades Especiales' Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C, Argentina-US) missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation Blackjack Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS Meteorology experiment (GPS/MET). Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) 6-hour forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We show statistics of the differences as well as histograms of the differences.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars (Pilia+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Oslowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; Ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brueggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Roettgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-04-01

    The observed sample of pulsars was loosely based on a selection of the brightest objects in the LOFAR-visible sky (declination >-30°), using the ATNF Pulsar Catalog1 (Manchester et al., 2005AJ....129.1993M) for guidance. We observed 100 pulsars using the high-band antennas (HBAs) in the six central "Superterp" stations (CS002-CS007) of the LOFAR core. (3 data files).

  20. A new retrieval algorithm for tropospheric temperature, humidity and pressure profiling based on GNSS radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, Gottfried; Li, Ying; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Schwärz, Marc; Schwarz, Jakob; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    2017-04-01

    The GNSS radio occultation (RO) technique is an important remote sensing technique for obtaining thermodynamic profiles of temperature, humidity, and pressure in the Earth's troposphere. However, due to refraction effects of both dry ambient air and water vapor in the troposphere, retrieval of accurate thermodynamic profiles at these lower altitudes is challenging and requires suitable background information in addition to the RO refractivity information. Here we introduce a new moist air retrieval algorithm aiming to improve the quality and robustness of retrieving temperature, humidity and pressure profiles in moist air tropospheric conditions. The new algorithm consists of four steps: (1) use of prescribed specific humidity and its uncertainty to retrieve temperature and its associated uncertainty; (2) use of prescribed temperature and its uncertainty to retrieve specific humidity and its associated uncertainty; (3) use of the previous results to estimate final temperature and specific humidity profiles through optimal estimation; (4) determination of air pressure and density profiles from the results obtained before. The new algorithm does not require elaborated matrix inversions which are otherwise widely used in 1D-Var retrieval algorithms, and it allows a transparent uncertainty propagation, whereby the uncertainties of prescribed variables are dynamically estimated accounting for their spatial and temporal variations. Estimated random uncertainties are calculated by constructing error covariance matrices from co-located ECMWF short-range forecast and corresponding analysis profiles. Systematic uncertainties are estimated by empirical modeling. The influence of regarding or disregarding vertical error correlations is quantified. The new scheme is implemented with static input uncertainty profiles in WEGC's current OPSv5.6 processing system and with full scope in WEGC's next-generation system, the Reference Occultation Processing System (rOPS). Results from

  1. Radio-sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells by Monensin Treatment and its associated Gene Expression Profiling Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Radio-resistant or recurrent prostate cancer represents a serious health risk for approximately 20%-30% of patients treated with primary radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Here, we investigated the effect of monensin on sensitizing radiation mediated cell killing of two radio-resistant prostate cell lines Lncap (P53+ and AR+) and PC3 (P53- and AR-). Treatment with monensin alone (5 micromoles-20 micromoles) showed a significant direct cell killing of Lncap (10-30%), but not PC3 cells. Monensin was also shown to successfully sensitize Lncap cells to X-ray radiation (2Gy-10Gy) mediated cell death, up to 50% of killing with the combined treatment. To better understand the mechanisms of radio-resistance of these two cell lines and their different response to monensin, the apoptosis related gene expression profiles in both cell lines were analyzed using cDNA PCR array. Without any treatment, PC3 showed a much higher expression level of antiapoptosis genes than Lncap in the BCL2 family, the caspase/card family and the TNF ligand/receptor family. At 2 hr after 20 micormolar monensin treatment alone, only the TRAF and CIDE family showed a greater induction in Lncap cells than in PC3. Exposures to 10 Gy X-rays alone of Lncap cells significantly induced gene expression levels in the death and death receptor domain family, the TNF ligand and receptor family, and apoptotic group of BCL2 family; whereas exposures of PC3 induced only the expression of genes in the anti-apoptosis group of CASP and CARD family. Furthermore, we selectively suppressed the expression of several anti-apoptosis genes (BCL-xl, Bcl2A1, BIRC2, BIRC3 and CASP2) in PC3 cells by using the siRNA treatment. Exposure to 10Gy X-rays alone showed an enhanced cell killing (about 15%) in BCL-x1 silenced cells, but not in cells with siRNA treatment targeting other anti-apoptosis genes. We also exposed PC3 cells to protons in the Bragg peak region to compare the effectiveness of cell killing

  2. SURVEY PERILAKU MENDENGARKAN RADIO DI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Dewi Sri Ratna Sari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is to find out the profile of radio broadcasting’s content in Jakarta and to look for measured data as the parameter to assess radio broadcasting programs and the radio listeners profile in DKI Jakarta. The research methodology is survey with 1000 respondents as the sample with 2.24% margin of error and 95% credibility level. The sampling method used is Multistage Random Sampling from 5 out of 6 DKI Jakarta Province areas, except Thousand Islands Regency. Data collection technique used is face to face personal interview by giving gift to the respondents. Research result describes the profile of radio listeners is middle class productive age working men and women whose prime reason listening to radio is music as their pastime. Respondents are categorized as medium listeners with 1.87 hour as their average of listening to radio. Nevertheless, the prime time is covering the whole day both while they are listening at home and while they are mobile. Research found that respondents are already satisfied by the radio programs in Jakarta. The competition of radio stations in Jakarta based on their listeners is Gen FM at the top with 44.6%, followed by Bens Radio, Elshinta, I-Radio, Prambors, CBB, and so on. An interesting finding is that radio’s function to deliver social communication is fulfilled by placing religious speech and information as the second and the third most preferable programs with 9.8% and 8.0% below music program.   Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui profil isi siaran radio yang selama ini bersiaran di Jakarta sekaligus mencari data terukur sebagai parameter untuk melakukan penilaian terhadap program isi siaran radio, termasuk pola mendengarkan radio pendengar radio seperti durasi dan tempat di provinsi DKI Jakarta. Metode penelitian berupa survei dengan sampel yang diambil sebanyak 1000 responden, margin of error 2.24% dan tingkat kepercayaan 95%. Metode pengambilan sampel dalam penelitian ini adalah dengan

  3. Compilation of ozonesonde profiles from the Antarctic Georg-Forster-Station from 1985 to 1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. König-Langlo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available On 22 May 1985 the first balloon-borne ozonesonde was successfully launched by the staff of Georg-Forster-Station (70°46' S, 11°41' E. The subsequent weekly ozone soundings mark the beginning of a continuous investigation of the vertical ozone distribution in the southern hemisphere by Germany.

    The measurements began the year the ozone hole was discovered. They significantly contribute to other measurements made prior to and following 1985 at other stations. The regular ozone soundings from 1985 until 1992 are a valuable reference data set since the chemical ozone loss became a significant feature in the southern polar stratosphere.

    The balloon-borne soundings were performed at the upper air sounding facility of the neighbouring station Novolazarevskaya, just 2 km from Georg-Forster-Station. Until 1992, ozone soundings were taken without interruption. Thereafter, the ozone sounding program was moved to Neumayer-Station (70°39' S, 8°15' W 750 km further west.

  4. Profile Station Data Received from the British Hydrographic Office (November 1989 - December 1994) as Part of Data-Center-to-Data-Center Exchange (NODC Accession 9600017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains Profile Station Data Received from the British Hydrographic Office collected between November 3, 1989 to December 26, 1994 as Part of...

  5. The use of Twitter´s Bio in radio programmes. From the profile´s presentation to the transmedia radio

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teresa PIÑEIRO OTERO

    2014-01-01

    .... Particularly, twitter community acquires a new dimension due to its public (non privacy status) and shareability. From a transmedia perspective, this microblogging platform makes possible to the radio programs offering rich content...

  6. Multi-frequency Radio Profiles of PSR B1133+16: Radiation Location and Particle Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. G.; Du, Y. J.; Hao, L. F.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Lee, K. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Shang, L. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, R. X.; Yue, Y. L.; Zhi, Q. J.

    2016-01-01

    The pulse profile of PSR B1133+16 is usually regarded as a conal double structure. However, its multi-frequency profiles cannot simply be fitted with two Gaussian functions, and a third component is always needed to fit the bridge region (between two peaks). This would introduce additional, redundant parameters. In this paper, through a comparison of five fitting functions (Gaussian, von Mises, hyperbolic secant, square hyperbolic secant, and Lorentz), it is found that the square hyperbolic secant function can best reproduce the profile, yielding an improved fit. Moreover, a symmetric 2D radiation beam function, instead of a simple 1D Gaussian function, is used to fit the profile. Each profile with either well-resolved or not-so-well-resolved peaks could be fitted adequately using this beam function, and the bridge emission between the two peaks does not need to be a new component. Adopting inclination and impact angles based on polarization measurements, the opening angle ({θ }μ 0) of the radiation beam in a certain frequency band is derived from beam-function fitting. The corresponding radiation altitudes are then calculated. Based on multi-frequency profiles, we also computed the Lorentz factors of the particles and their dispersion at those locations in both the curvature-radiation and inverse-Compton-scattering models. We found that the Lorentz factors of the particles decrease rapidly as the radiation altitude increases. Besides, the radiation prefers to be generated in an annular region rather than the core region, and this needs further validation.

  7. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilla, M.; Stappers, B.W.; Falcke, H.; Avruch, I.M.; Bell, E.; Gunst, A.W.; Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2016-01-01

    Context: LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10−240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such

  8. Relative drifts and stability of satellite and ground-based stratospheric ozone profiles at NDACC lidar stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Nair

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The long-term evolution of stratospheric ozone at different stations in the low and mid-latitudes is investigated. The analysis is performed by comparing the collocated profiles of ozone lidars, at the northern mid-latitudes (Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeißenberg, Haute-Provence Observatory, Tsukuba and Table Mountain Facility, tropics (Mauna Loa Observatory and southern mid-latitudes (Lauder, with ozonesondes and space-borne sensors (SBUV(/2, SAGE II, HALOE, UARS MLS and Aura MLS, extracted around the stations. Relative differences are calculated to find biases and temporal drifts in the measurements. All measurement techniques show their best agreement with respect to the lidar at 20–40 km, where the differences and drifts are generally within ±5% and ±0.5% yr−1, respectively, at most stations. In addition, the stability of the long-term ozone observations (lidar, SBUV(/2, SAGE II and HALOE is evaluated by the cross-comparison of each data set. In general, all lidars and SBUV(/2 exhibit near-zero drifts and the comparison between SAGE II and HALOE shows larger, but insignificant drifts. The RMS of the drifts of lidar and SBUV(/2 is 0.22 and 0.27% yr−1, respectively at 20–40 km. The average drifts of the long-term data sets, derived from various comparisons, are less than ±0.3% yr−1 in the 20–40 km altitude at all stations. A combined time series of the relative differences between SAGE II, HALOE and Aura MLS with respect to lidar data at six sites is constructed, to obtain long-term data sets lasting up to 27 years. The relative drifts derived from these combined data are very small, within ±0.2% yr−1.

  9. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary....

  10. The LOFAR radio environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; van Diepen, G.; Martinez-Ruby, O.; Labropoulos, P.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Jelic, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R. F.; Schaye, J.; Vedantham, H.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brueggen, M.; Butcher, H.; Conway, J.; de Vos, M.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Frieswijk, W.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J.D.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Norden, M.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Roettgering, H. J. A.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; van Ardenne, A.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Mellema, G.

    Aims. This paper discusses the spectral occupancy for performing radio astronomy with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), with a focus on imaging observations. Methods. We have analysed the radio-frequency interference (RFI) situation in two 24-h surveys with Dutch LOFAR stations, covering 30-78 MHz

  11. Writing for Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  12. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  13. Avaliação da propaganda de medicamentos veiculada em emissoras de rádio Evaluation of medication advertising broadcast on radio stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almária Mariz Batista

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar propagandas de medicamentos veiculadas em emissoras de rádio em Natal (RN, Brasil, nos períodos de abril a setembro de 2008 e abril a setembro de 2010. As propagandas foram captadas, gravadas e transcritas para se efetuar uma análise legal e uma de conteúdo baseada nos preceitos de Laurence Bardin. Tanto as captadas no primeiro período (sob égide da RDC 102/00, quanto às do segundo (sob égide da RDC 96/08, apresentaram algum tipo de infração legal. A análise de conteúdo detectou, em ambos os períodos, praticamente os mesmos vícios como ausência de informações negativas sobre o medicamento, apelo ao consumo, exaltação da eficiência/eficácia e exploração abusiva de enfermidades. Apesar da mudança para uma legislação mais moderna e mais restritiva, as propagandas de medicamentos, no rádio, continuam a infringir frontalmente a legislação, cometendo abusos e desrespeitando o direito à saúde da população. O estudo aponta para a necessidade do tema propaganda de medicamentos ser tratado em um contexto mais amplo, ou seja, discutido como questão de saúde pública, considerando-se o cenário histórico-social em que se desenvolveu, uma vez que só a legislação não é suficiente para coibir abusos praticados em detrimento da saúde pública.The scope of this paper was to evaluate advertising for medication broadcast on radio stations in Natal, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, from April to September 2008 and from April to September 2010. The advertising was recorded and transcribed in order to conduct legal analysis and content analysis based on the precepts of Laurence Bardin. Both the advertising recorded during the first stage (regulated by RDC 102/00 and the second stage (regulated by RDC 96/08 contained some form of legal violation. Content analysis detected practically the same violations in both stages, namely the lack of information regarding adverse effects of the

  14. STEM on the radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  15. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  16. On the evaluation of Web Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, A.N.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    We develop an evaluation method for Web radio, and perform it to see what we can be learnt about seven prominent Web radio sites. We also evaluate a commercial FM radio station for control purposes. We present a taxonomy of Web radio, and we give our observations and conclusions on this evaluation.

  17. 76 FR 67375 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Various Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Various Locations AGENCY: Federal Communications..., Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio Division... the new application procedures for radio stations to change their communities of license. However...

  18. Strategi Komunikasi Pemasaran Program Interaktif di Media Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Rusdi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of radio stations today is involving the audiences through the interactive program. This changes is related with the reformation order, particularly in developing public sphere, meaning that society is more open than before. Some of the radio stations create this interactive program as their main positioning. In the competition among the radio station, marketing communication strategy is needed. This article discuss about how the station radio using the marketing communication strategy to win the competition.

  19. The history of low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 7: Philip Hamilton, Raymond Haynes and the University of Tasmania's Penna Field Station near Hobart

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Wielebinski, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Following initial experiments near Hobart by Graeme Ellis, Grote Reber and Gordon Newstead from 1955 to 1957, the University of Tasmania established several sites for the study of low frequency radio astronomy, beginning in 1961. This paper describes the antenna array that was constructed at Penna, to the east northeast of Hobart. Between 1962 and 1967 it was used to produce maps of the southern sky at the frequencies of 4.7 and 10.02 MHz and contributed to an overall study of the low frequency emission from the Galaxy. Because of the proximity of the array to the town of Sorell, it was also referred to the 'Sorell Radio Telescope'.

  20. Initial validation of ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY columnar CO by FTIR profile retrievals at the Ground-Truthing Station Zugspitze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide vertical profile retrievals from ground-based solar FTIR measurements at the Permanent Ground-Truthing Station Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2964m a.s.l., Germany are used to validate columnar CO retrieved from ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY spectra (WFM-DOAS version 0.4. The WFM-DOAS retrievals of CO include an empirical column scaling factor of 0.5. Therefore, not absolute column levels are validated, but the proper response of the SCIAMACHY retrievals to the atmospheric inter-annual variability is quantitatively assessed in comparison to the Zugspitze FTIR results. Although CO WFM-DOAS data for only 33 days were available for this study (data covering January-October 2003, it is possible to retrieve information on the CO annual cycle (≈10% amplitude in a statistically significant fit out of the scatter of the SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS data. To obtain this, all pixels within a minimum radius of 2000km around Zugspitze had to be averaged for each day.

  1. Case Study: Using The OMG SWRADIO Profile and SDR Forum Input for NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.; Hall, Steve C.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) standard is a Software Defined Radio (SDR) architecture standard developed by NASA. The goal of STRS is to reduce NASA s dependence on custom, proprietary architectures with unique and varying interfaces and hardware and support reuse of waveforms across platforms. The STRS project worked with members of the Object Management Group (OMG), Software Defined Radio Forum, and industry partners to leverage existing standards and knowledge. This collaboration included investigating the use of the OMG s Platform-Independent Model (PIM) SWRadio as the basis for an STRS PIM. This paper details the influence of the OMG technologies on the STRS update effort, findings in the STRS/SWRadio mapping, and provides a summary of the SDR Forum recommendations.

  2. Development of a Ranging System for the Forward Scattering Meteor Radio Echo Observation Using a GPS-Synchronized Multiple Receiving Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, T.; Yoshida, H.; Miyamoto, H.; Yaguchi, N.; Terasawa, T.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2012-05-01

    We are developing an instrument for teaching purpose to determine the trajectory of a meteor with the Ham-band Radio Observations(HRO) . In this work, we describe newly developed ranging system with using Frequency Modulated signals and show some results.

  3. Options in Education: Program No. 88. Sex and Sexism in Education, Part II. Transcripts of a Weekly Series Broadcast by Member Stations of National Public Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Public Radio, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is a transcription of a program from the radio series, "Options in Education." It is part 2 of a two-part series dealing with sexism in education. It deals with sex discrimination in various aspects of public education, including textbooks, teacher promotion, sports programs and children's literature. There is also a…

  4. A comparison between GPS Radio Occultation technique and radio sounds data for atmospheric corrections in InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirboroon, S.; Safavian, S.

    2012-12-01

    Fluctuation in atmospheric conditions is a major source of error in repeat-pass interferometry, which can seriously compromise the accuracy of InSAR data. An accurate estimation of atmospheric parameters is therefore necessary for reliable InSAR measurements. The GPS Radio Occultation method is an innovative remote sensing technique for indirect measurement of atmospheric parameters using signals broadcast by GPS satellites. The GPS signals are influenced by the atmospheric refractivity field, resulting in a time delay and bending of the signal, which are analyzed to obtain temperature profile, pressure and water vapor in the atmosphere. In this study, we use GPS Radio Occultation data from the COSMIC mission, extract atmospheric parameters, and apply them to correct differential interferograms affected by atmospheric artifact. Moreover, to estimate the accuracy and efficacy of GPS Radio Occultation method, we assimilate the Radio sounds data for the nearest stations, then compare the results. GPS Radio Occultation profiles show better corrections than Radio sounds and could be used in interferograms atmospheric corrections.

  5. Balloon-borne Ozonesonde Profile Measurements at South Pole Station, Antarctica During the Ozone Hole of 2015 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.; Cullis, P.; Sterling, C. W.; Mcconville, G.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Balloon-borne ozonesondes released by NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration) from South Pole Station, Antarctica began in 1986. The 30 year record showed that the 2015 ozone hole was average in ozone loss. Total column ozone dropped from a winter time average of 260 Dobson Units (DU) during June 1- August 15 to a minimum of 112 DU on October 15, 2015 (15th lowest minimum in 30 year record). However, the season was unique in the record number of days the stratospheric vortex air over South Pole remained undisturbed, especially within the main ozone altitude layer from 14-21 km. The ozone loss rates during the month of September in the 14-21 km layer from 1986 to 1990 have averaged 2.3 ± 0.2 DU/day. Since 1991, the ozone loss rate has remained higher at 3.4 ± 0.3 DU/day. 2015 showed a slightly lower loss rate of 3.2 DU/day during September, reaching a minimum of 5 DU on October 12 with complete ozone depletion (zero ozone) observed from 14-18 km. For the next 2 months, ozone slowly increased by about 1 Dobson Unit every 2 days with no sudden increases in ozone or stratospheric temperatures until after December 8, when total column ozone increased by over 100 Dobson Units to 288 DU with much warmer stratospheric air over a broad layer above 15 km, indicating the late arrival of mid-latitude air over South Pole. A consistent decrease in the year-to-year September loss rate within the 14-21 km layer and returning to the 1986-1990 average loss rate of 2.4 ± 0.2 DU/day will be an indicator of long term ozone recovery over South Pole. The 2016 South Pole ozone hole column loss rates and minimum ozone profile measured will be updated in the long term analysis and compared to the total column ozone measurements from the Dobson spectrophotometer record at South Pole.

  6. Emission and profile characteristic of volatile organic compounds emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant in Liaoning Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwu; Deng, Hao; Bai, Zhipeng; Kong, Shaofei; Wang, Xiuyan; Hao, Jiming; Han, Xinyu; Ning, Ping

    2015-05-15

    107 kinds of C₂-C₁₂ volatile organic compound (VOC) mass concentrations and profiles for four types of coal-fired stationary sources in Liaoning Province were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method, which are of significant importance with regard to VOC emissions in northeast of China. The results showed that there were some differences among these VOC source profiles. The total mass concentrations of analyzed 107 VOC species varied from 10,917 to 19,652 μg m(-3). Halogenated hydrocarbons exhibited higher mass percentages for the VOC source profiles of iron smelt (48.8%) and coke production plant (37.7%). Aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant in heating station plant (69.1%). Ketones, alcohols and acetates held 45.0% of total VOCs in thermal power plant. For non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), which are demanded for photochemical assessment in the USA, toluene and n-hexane were the most abundant species in the iron smelt, coke production and thermal power plant, with the mass percentages of 64.8%, 52.7% and 38.6%, respectively. Trimethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene and o,m-ethyltoluene approximately accounted for 70.0% in heating station plant. NMHCs emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant listed above presented different chemical reactivities. The average OH loss rate of NMHCs from heating station, was 4 to 5.6 times higher than that of NMHCs from iron smelt, coke production and power plant, which implies that VOCs emitted from heating station in northeast of China should be controlled firstly to avoid photochemical ozone pollution and protect human health. There are significant variations in the ratios of benzene/toluene and m, p-xylene/ethylbenzene of these coal-fired source profiles. The representativeness of the coal-fired sources studied and the VOC samples collected should be more closely examined. The accuracy of VOC source profiles related to coal-fired processes is highly dependent on

  7. Música e infância no rádio: o programa Serelepe na Rádio UFMG - Educativa Music and childhood on radio: the Serelepe program at UFMG - Educativa station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio Tadeu Pereira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como eixo temático a música infantil no rádio e faz uma reflexão a partir das experiências do programa Serelepe: uma pitada de música infantil, na Rádio UFMG Educativa, 104,5 FM, apresentado desde agosto de 2005 em Belo Horizonte. Seu caráter experimental é derivado da tentativa em integrar as áreas de teatro, música e comunicação, juntamente à proposta de difusão musical.The main theme of this article is childhood music on the radio. It reflects about the experiences of Serelepe: uma pitada de música infantil (Serelepe: a pinch of kid's music, a program broadcasted at 104.5 FM of the UFMG Educativa Radio Station, since august 2005, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Its experimental outline is derived from an attempt to integrate the areas of Drama, Music and Communication, within the music broadcast proposal.

  8. Los programas radiofónicos españoles de prime time en Facebook y Twitter: Sinergias entre la radio convencional y las redes sociales/Spanish primetime radio shows in Facebook and Twitter: Synergies between on-air radio broadcasting and social networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Gutiérrez; J M Martí; I Ferrer; B Monclús; X Ribes

    2014-01-01

    ...: To define the synergies between conventional radio broadcasting and social networks in Spanish talk radio based on the analysis of four primetime radio shows, which are the flagship programmes of their radio stations. Method...

  9. 47 CFR 80.1075 - Radio records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio records. 80.1075 Section 80.1075 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... incidents connected with the radio-communication service which appear to be of importance to safety of life...

  10. Radio Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  11. GLL RPT IONOSPHERE PROFILES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Radio Propagation Team Ionosphere Profile data set is small number of electron density profiles derived from radio occultation data collected while...

  12. Microtremor exploration for shallow S-wave velocity profiles at stations in local strong motion network in Bursa, Yalova, and Kocaeli in north-western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özmen, Özgür Tuna; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Chimoto, Kosuke; Çeken, Ulubey; Alkan, Mehmet Akif; Tekin, Kudret; Ateş, Erkan

    2017-05-01

    We conducted microtremor array surveys for shallow S-wave velocity profiles at 20 sites in Bursa, Yalova and Kocaeli provinces in the north-western part of Turkey to provide fundamental data to assess the seismic hazard in the area. All of the measurement sites were positioned very close to strong motion stations belonging to the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD) in order to further understand site amplification factors in strong motion records. Of the 20 study sites, two were located in Yalova, four in Bursa and 14 in Kocaeli. We temporarily installed two small arrays to obtain simultaneous records of vertical microtremors. Then, the spatial autocorrelation method was applied to retrieve Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves in a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz from the array records. The phase velocities in the western part of the Kocaeli area are low across a wide frequency range, while relatively high phase velocities are found in the eastern part of the Kocaeli province. The phase velocities in the Yalova and Bursa provinces are widely distributed suggesting large variations in soil conditions. The observed phase velocity curve at each site was inverted to a one-dimensional (1D) S-wave velocity profile to a depth of 100 m, using a hybrid heuristic inversion method. All the S-wave velocity profiles in the eastern Kocaeli area are similar; however, the sites in the western Kocaeli and Yalova-Bursa areas have profiles with different features from the others. Finally, we discuss amplification factors for S-waves using the inverted profiles. The dominant fundamental periods of the amplification factors were distributed in a frequency range from 0.7 to 5 Hz. The profiles obtained are also used to map average S-wave velocities in the study area, with an addition of existing data at strong motion stations of the AFAD.

  13. Profil hormonal chez l’homme en cas d’infertilité au laboratoire de radio immunologie de l’institut des radioisotopes de Niamey

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, D.; Soumana, A.; S.M. Amadou; I. Soli; I. Tahirou; Ali, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectif: le but de l’étude est de déterminer les paramètres sociodémographiques et le profil hormonal de l’homme consultant pour infertilité. Malades et méthodes: Ont été inclus dans notre étude, tous les patients consultant pour infertilité datant d’au moins deux ans, avec un spermogramme anormal et dont le bilan hormonal comportait les dosages des quatre paramètres à savoir la FSH, la LH, la PRL et la Testostérone au laboratoire de radio Immuno dosages du service de médecine nucléaire. ...

  14. 47 CFR 95.119 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... station identification is the call sign assigned to the GMRS station or system. (c) A unit number may be... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 95.119 Section 95.119... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.119 Station identification. (a) Except as provided in...

  15. 47 CFR 25.206 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 25.206 Section 25.206... Technical Standards § 25.206 Station identification. The requirement for transmission of station identification is waived for all radio stations licensed under this part with the exception of satellite uplinks...

  16. 47 CFR 95.1305 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 95.1305 Section 95.1305... SERVICES Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) General Provisions § 95.1305 Station identification. A MURS station is not required to transmit a station identification announcement. ...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1205 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 95.1205 Section 95.1205... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1205 Station identification. A station is not required to transmit a station identification announcement. ...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1005 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 95.1005 Section 95.1005... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1005 Station identification. An LPRS station is not required to transmit a station identification announcement. ...

  19. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1973-02-12 to 1973-03-23 (NODC Accession 7300813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station,temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 12 February 1973 to 23 March 1973. Data...

  20. Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data from bottle and XBT from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-01-09 to 1974-01-12 (NODC Accession 7400287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 09 January 1974 to 12...

  1. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1976-08-28 to 1976-09-21 (NODC Accession 7700036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 28 August 1976 to 21 September 1976. Data were...

  2. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-04-01 to 1974-05-09 (NODC Accession 7400626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 01 April 1974 to 09 May 1974. Data were...

  3. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1977-01-18 to 1977-05-22 (NODC Accession 7800595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 18 January 1977 to 22 May 1977. Data were...

  4. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-04-17 to 1976-02-07 (NODC Accession 7600888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 17 April 1975 to 07 February 1976. Data were...

  5. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-12-03 to 1975-12-06 (NODC Accession 7600754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 03 December 1975 to 06 December 1975. Data were...

  6. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-08-13 to 1974-09-18 (NODC Accession 7400814)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 13 August 1974 to 18 September 1974. Data...

  7. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-01-17 to 1975-04-10 (NODC Accession 7500672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 17 January 1975 to 10 April 1975. Data...

  8. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-08-31 to 1975-09-19 (NODC Accession 7600375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 31 August 1975 to 19 September 1975. Data were...

  9. Profil Jurnalis di Era Reformasi: Studi Kualitatif dengan Pendekatan Sense Making tentang Profil Sumber Daya Manusia di Media Cetak, Radio, dan Televisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atie Rachmiatie

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu bentuk kinerja profesi dapat diukur dari produktivitas, yakni bentuk dan target produksi informasi serta waktu yang dibutuhkan untuk menghasilkan suatu produk. Selain itu, kinerja mencerminkan pula prestasi kerja yang diukur dari prioritas kerja, penghargaan atau sanksi yang pernah diperoleh. Berdasarkan penemuan penelitian di lapangan, bentuk produk informasi yang dihasilkan wartawan media cetak relatif hampir sama, yakni berupa berita, artikel, kolom opini, atau depth reporting. Untuk wartawan televisi dan radio, terdapat nuansa yang berbeda, yakni bahwa bentuk acara yang dihasilkannya lebih berupa bentuk-bentuk semacam talkshow, siaran reguler, filler/opini, spot iklan, ulasan berita, atau bentuk publikasi lainnya. Waktu yang dibutuhkan untuk menghasilkan karya jurnalistik, ternyata cukup beragam, sedangkan target produksi yang harus dicapai pada dasarnya ditentukan oleh motivasi kerja pribadi atau keinginan “atasan”.

  10. 47 CFR 73.210 - Station classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station classes. 73.210 Section 73.210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM... forth in § 73.211. If a station has an ERP and an antenna HAAT such that it cannot be classified using...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1507 - Station Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station Identification. 95.1507 Section 95.1507 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO... Identification. A DSRCS On-Board Unit is not required to transmit an FCC station identification announcement. ...

  12. Diurnal and seasonal variability of TKE dissipation rate in the ABL over a tropical station using UHF wind profiler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kalapureddy, MCR

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the diurnal and seasonal variation of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) dissipation rate (ε) in the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer (ABL) over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) in India. Doppler spectral width measurements...

  13. Validation of Refractivity Profiles Retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Soundings: Preliminary Results of Statistical Comparisons Utilizing Balloon-Borne Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroo Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The GPS radio occultation (RO soundings by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Taiwan¡¦s Formosa Satellite Misssion #3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate satellites launched in mid-April 2006 are compared with high-resolution balloon-borne (radiosonde and ozonesonde observations. This paper presents preliminary results of validation of the COSMIC RO measurements in terms of refractivity through the troposphere and lower stratosphere. With the use of COSMIC RO soundings within 2 hours and 300 km of sonde profiles, statistical comparisons between the collocated refractivity profiles are erformed for some tropical regions (Malaysia and Western Pacific islands where moisture-rich air is expected in the lower troposphere and for both northern and southern polar areas with a very dry troposphere. The results of the comparisons show good agreement between COSMIC RO and sonde refractivity rofiles throughout the troposphere (1 - 1.5% difference at most with a positive bias generally becoming larger at progressively higher altitudes in the lower stratosphere (1 - 2% difference around 25 km, and a very small standard deviation (about 0.5% or less for a few kilometers below the tropopause level. A large standard deviation of fractional differences in the lowermost troposphere, which reaches up to as much as 3.5 - 5%at 3 km, is seen in the tropics while a much smaller standard deviation (1 - 2% at most is evident throughout the polar troposphere.

  14. Comparing the Activity Profiles of Wheelchair Rugby Using a Miniaturised Data Logger and Radio-Frequency Tracking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Mason

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study assessed the validity and reliability of a miniaturised data logger (MDL against a radio-frequency-based indoor tracking system (ITS for quantifying key aspects of mobility performance during wheelchair rugby. Eleven international wheelchair rugby players were monitored by both devices during four wheelchair rugby matches. MDL data were averaged over both 1-second (MDL-1 and 5-second (MDL-5 intervals to calculate distance, mean, and peak speeds. The results revealed no significant differences between devices for the distance covered or mean speeds, although random errors of 10% and 12%, respectively, were identified in relation to the mean values. No significant differences in peak speed were revealed between ITS (3.91±0.32 m·s−1 and MDL-1 (3.85±0.45 m·s−1. Whereas peak speeds in MDL-5 (2.75±0.29  m·s−1 were significantly lower than ITS. Errors in peak speed led to large random errors in time and distance spent in speed zones relative to peak speed, especially in MDL-5. The current study revealed that MDL provide a reasonable representation of the distance and mean speed reported during wheelchair rugby. However, inaccuracy in the detection of peak speeds limits its use for monitoring performance and prescribing wheelchair rugby training programmes.

  15. Comparing the activity profiles of wheelchair rugby using a miniaturised data logger and radio-frequency tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barry; Lenton, John; Rhodes, James; Cooper, Rory; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The current study assessed the validity and reliability of a miniaturised data logger (MDL) against a radio-frequency-based indoor tracking system (ITS) for quantifying key aspects of mobility performance during wheelchair rugby. Eleven international wheelchair rugby players were monitored by both devices during four wheelchair rugby matches. MDL data were averaged over both 1-second (MDL-1) and 5-second (MDL-5) intervals to calculate distance, mean, and peak speeds. The results revealed no significant differences between devices for the distance covered or mean speeds, although random errors of 10% and 12%, respectively, were identified in relation to the mean values. No significant differences in peak speed were revealed between ITS (3.91 ± 0.32 m·s(-1)) and MDL-1 (3.85 ± 0.45 m·s(-1)). Whereas peak speeds in MDL-5 (2.75 ± 0.29 m·s(-1)) were significantly lower than ITS. Errors in peak speed led to large random errors in time and distance spent in speed zones relative to peak speed, especially in MDL-5. The current study revealed that MDL provide a reasonable representation of the distance and mean speed reported during wheelchair rugby. However, inaccuracy in the detection of peak speeds limits its use for monitoring performance and prescribing wheelchair rugby training programmes.

  16. A comparative study of structure of vertical motions in the lower troposphere over Pune, a tropical Indian station in March 2004 and 2005 using Wind Profiler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Deshpande

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available An extended heat wave condition affected Pune (18.31° N, 73.58° E, India and surrounding region during the pre-monsoon month of March 2004, when surface temperatures were observed to be above normal. In contrast, March 2005 showed a long spell of below normal temperatures. The vertical velocity measurements from UHF (404 MHz Wind Profiler at Pune have been used to understand the role of vertical motions in the lower troposphere in maintenance of long spells of above (in March 2004 and below (in March 2005 normal surface temperatures over the station. The altitude profiles of vertical wind velocities showed different behavior in the two contrasting years 2004 and 2005. It is observed that for a major part of the month and at all heights, downward motions (subsidence dominate during March 2004. Strong downward motions persisted for spells of 2 to 3 days when high surface temperatures (above 38°C were recorded over this station. A positive relation between surface temperature anomalies and depth of subsidence points to the role of subsidence. March 2005 showed the persistence of upward motion for longer time duration during morning hours which prevented the surface temperatures from reaching high values with weak subsidence during afternoon hours. This is supported by observation of more frequent and organized thermal plumes extending right into the free troposphere. There are distinct episodes of advective warmings during March 2004 while March 2005 showed weak or absence of temperature advection from north. Hence a combination of meridional transport of heat and persistent subsidence in the lower troposphere seemed to have led to recording of above normal surface temperatures during March 2004 over the station.

  17. Application of 50 MHz doppler radar wind profiler to launch operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Robin S.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Smith, Steve A.; Wilfong, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where a significant wind shift, not detected by jimspheres, was detected by the 50 MHz DRWP (Doppler Radar Wind Profiler) and evaluated to be acceptable prior to the launch of a Shuttle. This case study illustrates the importance of frequent upper air wind measurements for detecting significant rapidly changing features as well as for providing confidence that the features really exist and are not due to instrumentation error. Had the release of the jimsphere been timed such that it would have detected the entire wind shift, there would not have been sufficient time to release another jimsphere to confirm the existence of the feature prior to the scheduled launch. We found that using a temporal median filter on the one minute spectral estimates coupled with a constraining window about a first guess velocity effectively removes nearly all spurious signals from the velocity profile generated by NASA's 50 MHz DRWP while boosting the temporal resolution to as high as one profile every 3 minutes. The higher temporal resolution of the 50 MHz DRWP using the signal processing algorithm described in this paper ensures the detection of rapidly changing features as well as provides the confidence that the features are genuine. Further benefit is gained when the profiles generated by the DRWP are examined in relation to the profiles measured by jimspheres and/or rawinsondes. The redundancy offered by using two independent measurements can dispel or confirm any suspicion regarding instrumentation error or malfunction and wind profiles can be examined in light of their respective instruments' strengths and weaknesses.

  18. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-13

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2 were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22 than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34 (p = 0.007. Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016 relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. 76 FR 20249 - Update Station License Expiration Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Update Station License Expiration Dates AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... reflect the current license expiration dates for radio and television broadcast stations. The current version of the rule specifies license expiration dates from 2011 through 2014 for radio stations and 2012...

  1. 47 CFR 95.25 - Land station description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO... Line C, and the station transmits with no more than 5 watts ERP (effective radiated power). (e) A small... than 5 watts ERP. (f) Each base station and each control station with an antenna height greater than 6...

  2. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  3. 47 CFR 101.213 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 101.213 Section 101.213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Operational Requirements § 101.213 Station identification. Stations in these services are exempt...

  4. Comments on Meo et al. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 14519–14528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Mortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With great interest and enthusiasm, we have read the article by Meo et al. entitled “Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus” that is published in the latest issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [1].[...

  5. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  6. Reconfigurable Power-Aware EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) radio system is a pivotal technology for the successful support of the International Space Station beyond 2020 and future...

  7. Japanese radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    Japanese principal radio telescopes available for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are overviewed, and their characteristics and performances are summarized. Three fixed stations, Usuda, Nobeyama, and Kashima, and one 5-m mobile station use a hydrogen master-frequency standard, while other stations use an ultrastable X'tal oscillator locked to a cesium frequency standard. The 64-m telescope in Usuda developed for tracking satellites of deep-space missions is outlined, as well as the Kashima 34-m telescope covering a frequency range from 300 MHz to 49 GHz with 11 receivers. Attention is given to the Nobeyama 45-m telescope as a major telescope in Japan working in an international mm-VLBI network.

  8. DNA strand breaks are not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, N; Komatsubara, Y; Takeda, H; Hirose, H; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale in vitro study focused on the effects of low level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system in order to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields may act as a DNA damaging agent. First, we evaluated the responses of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced different levels of DNA damage. Human glioblastoma A172 cells and normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to mobile communication frequency radiation to investigate whether such exposure produced DNA strand breaks in cell culture. A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 2 and 24 h, while IMR-90 cells were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiations at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for the same time periods. Under the same RF field exposure conditions, no significant differences in the DNA strand breaks were observed between the test groups exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham exposed negative controls, as evaluated immediately after the exposure periods by alkaline comet assays. Our results confirm that low level exposures do not act as a genotoxicant up to a SAR of 800 mW/kg.

  9. The Fascinating World of Radio Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Wayne, Ed.

    Intended mainly for the amateur radio operator, or "ham," this book outlines some of the pleasures to be had in amateur radio, including DXing (calling distant stations) and helping in emergencies. The steps in starting out on this hobby, including getting Citizens' Band (CB) gear, a CB license, and a receiver and antenna, are described.…

  10. Nganyi Community Resource Centre: Community radio station ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... ... in Africa program (jointly funded by IDRC and the UK's Department for International Development—DFID), which brought together communities, institutions, and individuals in Vihiga County, western Kenya, to build their capacity to manage climate risk. The resource centre is a legacy of that initiative.

  11. Participatory Design at a Radio Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kensing, Finn; Simonsen, Jesper; Bødker, Keld

    1998-01-01

    We address design of computer support for work and its coordination at the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. We propose design solutions based upon participatory design techniques and ethnographically inspired analysis within a full scale design project. The project exemplifies an ambitious, yet...

  12. Verzet vanuit de verte : De behoedzame koers van Radio Oranje

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, Onno

    2009-01-01

    This study is about Radio Oranje (Radio Orange), the official broadcasting station of the Dutch government in exile during the Second World War. It describes the aims of Radio Oranje, the way these aims were pursued through its broadcasts, the limitations imposed on their execution and the impact of

  13. 47 CFR 97.407 - Radio amateur civil emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio amateur civil emergency service. 97.407... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Providing Emergency Communications § 97.407 Radio amateur civil emergency... may be the control operator of an amateur station transmitting in RACES unless that person holds a FCC...

  14. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  15. 78 FR 50340 - Travelers' Information Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... thereby prohibit the ``integration'' of NOAA weather radio or NOAA radio all- hazards information into TIS....'' AAIRO opposes a name change as it does not favor changing the fundamental nature of the service. We will... project to determine the effects on AM stations, under a variety of scenarios (power output, spacing...

  16. 47 CFR 73.621 - Noncommercial educational TV stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noncommercial educational TV stations. 73.621... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.621 Noncommercial educational TV stations... telecommunications service in § 73.646 are applicable to noncommercial educational TV stations. (g) Non-program...

  17. 47 CFR 73.624 - Digital television broadcast stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital television broadcast stations. 73.624... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.624 Digital television broadcast stations. (a) Digital television (“DTV”) broadcast stations are assigned channels 6 MHz wide. Initial...

  18. Phosphorylation and gene expression of p53 are not affected in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW or W-CDMA modulated radiation allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, H; Sakuma, N; Kaji, N; Suhara, T; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-09-01

    A large-scale in vitro study focusing on low-level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system was conducted to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields induce apoptosis or other cellular stress response that activate p53 or the p53-signaling pathway. First, we evaluated the response of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole-body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced apoptosis or any signs of stress. Human glioblastoma A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg, and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 24 or 48 h. Human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiation at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for 28 h. Under the RF field exposure conditions described above, no significant differences in the percentage of apoptotic cells were observed between the test groups exposed to RF signals and the sham-exposed negative controls, as evaluated by the Annexin V affinity assay. No significant differences in expression levels of phosphorylated p53 at serine 15 or total p53 were observed between the test groups and the negative controls by the bead-based multiplex assay. Moreover, microarray hybridization and real-time RT-PCR analysis showed no noticeable differences in gene expression of the subsequent downstream targets of p53 signaling involved in apoptosis between the test groups and the negative controls. Our results confirm that exposure to low-level RF signals up to 800 mW/kg does not induce p53-dependent apoptosis, DNA damage, or other stress response in human

  19. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noersomadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved temperature (T profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20–27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt–Väisälä frequency squared (N2 near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a 90–150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b 170–230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR. We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30–50° N in region (a, and 50–70° N in region (b, which was related to the topography. At 30–50° N in region (b, EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to

  20. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  1. 76 FR 55388 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License. AGENCY... proposals to change the community of license: CBS Radio East Inc., Station WLZL, Facility ID 72177, BPH-20110812ACL, from Annapolis, MD, to Bowie, MD; Indiana Community Radio Corporation, Station WYER, Facility ID...

  2. 78 FR 9915 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal..., From GOSHEN, AL, To BRANTLEY, AL; AZALEA RADIO CORPORATION, Station NEW, Facility ID 183371, BMPH- 20121206ACO, From ROUNDUP, MT, To LEWISTOWN HEIGHTS, MT; COLONIAL RADIO GROUP, INC. Station WBYB, Facility ID...

  3. The popular music heritage of the Dutch pirates: illegal radio and cultural identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. van der Hoeven (Arno)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis article explores how cultural identities are negotiated in relation to the heritage of illegal radio in the Netherlands. The term ‘pirate radio’ commonly refers to the offshore radio stations that were broadcasting during the 1960s. These stations introduced commercial radio and

  4. 75 FR 1621 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... ELDON, MO, To ST. THOMAS, MO; COX RADIO, INC., Station WALR-FM, Facility ID 48728, BPH-20091124ABA, From... 8438, BMP-20091125ABD, From ASHLAND, VA, To POWHATAN, VA; HAMPTONS COMMUNITY RADIO CORPORATION, Station...

  5. 47 CFR 73.6011 - Protection of TV broadcast stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of TV broadcast stations. 73.6011 Section 73.6011 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6011 Protection of TV broadcast...

  6. 47 CFR 97.213 - Telecommand of an amateur station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Telecommand of an amateur station. 97.213 Section 97.213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.213 Telecommand of an amateur station. An amateur...

  7. The Medicina Station Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfei, Alessandro; Orlati, Andrea; Maccaferri, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    General information about the Medicina Radio Astronomy Station, the 32-m antenna status, and the staff in charge of the VLBI observations is provided. In 2012, the data from geodetic VLBI observations were acquired using the Mark 5A recording system with good results. Updates of the hardware were performed and are briefly described.

  8. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  9. Radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Alder, Berni

    1975-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 14: Radio Astronomy is devoted to the role of the digital computer both as a control device and as a calculator in addressing problems related to galactic radio noise. This volume contains four chapters and begins with a technical description of the hardware and the special data-handling problems of using radioheliography, with an emphasis on a selection of observational results obtained with the Culgoora radioheliograph and their significance to solar physics and to astrophysics in general. The subsequent chapter examines interstellar dispersion, i

  10. Preventive brain radio-chemotherapy alters plasticity associated metabolite profile in the hippocampus but seems to not affect spatial memory in young leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Moritz D; Brandt, Kalina; Werner, Annett; Schönfeld, Robby; Loewenbrück, Kai; Donix, Markus; Schaich, Markus; Bornhäuser, Martin; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Leplow, Bernd; Storch, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal plasticity leading to evolving reorganization of the neuronal network during entire lifespan plays an important role for brain function especially memory performance. Adult neurogenesis occurring in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus represents the maximal way of network reorganization. Brain radio-chemotherapy strongly inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice leading to impaired spatial memory. To elucidate the effects of CNS radio-chemotherapy on hippocampal plasticity and function in humans, we performed a longitudinal pilot study using 3T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and virtual water-maze-tests in 10 de-novo patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia undergoing preventive whole brain radio-chemotherapy. Patients were examined before, during and after treatment. CNS radio-chemotherapy did neither affect recall performance in probe trails nor flexible (reversal) relearning of a new target position over a time frame of 10 weeks measured by longitudinal virtual water-maze-testing, but provoked hippocampus-specific decrease in choline as a metabolite associated with cellular plasticity in (1)H-MRS. Albeit this pilot study needs to be followed up to definitely resolve the question about the functional role of adult human neurogenesis, the presented data suggest that (1)H-MRS allows the detection of neurogenesis-associated plasticity in the human brain.

  11. development development of base transceiver station selection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    save cost and reduce the number of people who are at risk of radiation in BTSs located places as compared to each ... Keywords: Keywords: absolute radio frequency channel number; base transceiver station; collocation; radiation; spectral ..... [5] Singh R.K., “Assessment of Electromagnetic Radiation from Base Station ...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1181 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station identification. 80.1181 Section 80.1181... MARITIME SERVICES Voluntary Radio Installations On-Board Communications § 80.1181 Station identification...; or (2) The communications are likely to be received aboard another vessel. (b) Identification, when...

  13. Radio Telescope Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Jacob W. M.; Kärcher, Hans J.

    2017-11-01

    This book demonstrates how progress in radio astronomy is intimately linked to the development of reflector antennas of increasing size and precision. The authors describe the design and construction of major radio telescopes as those in Dwingeloo, Jodrell Bank, Parkes, Effelsberg and Green Bank since 1950 up to the present as well as millimeter wavelength telescopes as the 30m MRT of IRAM in Spain, the 50m LMT in Mexico and the ALMA submillimeter instrument. The advances in methods of structural design and coping with environmental influences (wind, temperature, gravity) as well as application of new materials are explained in a non-mathematical, descriptive and graphical way along with the story of the telescopes. Emphasis is placed on the interplay between astronomical and electromagnetic requirements and structural, mechanical and control solutions. A chapter on management aspects of large telescope projects closes the book. The authors address a readership with interest in the progress of engineering solutions applied to the development of radio telescope reflectors and ground station antennas for satellite communication and space research. The book will also be of interest to historians of science and engineering with an inclination to astronomy.

  14. Digitale radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst, Roelof; Zondervan, L.

    2007-01-01

    Als eerste in Europa heeft Nederland begin december 2006 de omschakeling van analoge naar digitale ethertelevisie gemaakt. Voor de analoge FM-radio is er ook een digitale variant, T-DAB. T-DAB staat voor 'Terrestrial Digital Audio Broadcasting'. Dit artikel gaat verder in op deze techniek en de

  15. RADIO WITHOUT A LISTENER: "MAYAK"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The singularity of this article is that it is entirely based on a critical analysis of only one live musical radio program on the Mayak radio station and dedicated to the life and work of the famous British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. In principle, the article can be considered a scientific review of the media product. Based on his analysis, the author comes to the paradoxical conclusion that the presence of a listener becomes unnecessary for modern broadcasting. This is stated by many principles of the conduct of the air, presented in the radio program, where all the information load is placed on the guest in the studio, where there is no preparatory work of the DJs, where their inability to navigate the genres of journalism violates communication norms and colloquial ethics, where an obvious deconstructive approach to the material offered for the listener. In addition, the phenomenon of being the DJs in the radio studio exclusively "for themselves" is emphasized by the sound design of the radio program, which runs counter to the logic of auditory perception (for example, the sequence of jingles, as well as the incompetent selection of musical material, which undoubtedly repels professional radio listeners-musicians.

  16. Ionosonde Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ionograms are recorded tracings of reflected high frequency radio pulses generated by an ionosonde. Unique relationships exist between the sounding frequency and the...

  17. The Experiment of High-Speed Data Transfer on 4800bps and 9600bps between Land Base Station and Land Mobile Station

    OpenAIRE

    小妻, 勝; 高山, 久明; 山口, 恭弘

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the necessity of exchange information by a radio line between a land base station and mobile station is increasing to improve efficiency of business. The data transmission used by a radio line has the merit that the information sent from a moving station can be received directly and quickly. An electric wave, however, is apt to be influenced by own quality and the condition of atmosphere. Since the radio channel numbers are also limited, the transferring speed should be as quick as ...

  18. Social media usage by teen segmented commercial private radio in Bandung

    OpenAIRE

    Tri Lestari Martha; Purnama Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Radio is one of mass media which functions to inform, to educate, to entertain and to influence. In Indonesia, private commercial broadcast radios are the biggest in numbers with more than 700 radio stations throughout indonesia. Some of the private commmercial radio stations select audience segmentation of young people or teenagers. This is due to fact that numbers of young people dominate the whole population. Social media nowadays has become a primary need for most of its users, especially...

  19. Intelligent Cognitive Radio Models for Enhancing Future Radio Astronomy Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Abiola Periola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio astronomy organisations desire to optimise the terrestrial radio astronomy observations by mitigating against interference and enhancing angular resolution. Ground telescopes (GTs experience interference from intersatellite links (ISLs. Astronomy source radio signals received by GTs are analysed at the high performance computing (HPC infrastructure. Furthermore, observation limitation conditions prevent GTs from conducting radio astronomy observations all the time, thereby causing low HPC utilisation. This paper proposes mechanisms that protect GTs from ISL interference without permanent prevention of ISL data transmission and enhance angular resolution. The ISL transmits data by taking advantage of similarities in the sequence of observed astronomy sources to increase ISL connection duration. In addition, the paper proposes a mechanism that enhances angular resolution by using reconfigurable earth stations. Furthermore, the paper presents the opportunistic computing scheme (OCS to enhance HPC utilisation. OCS enables the underutilised HPC to be used to train learning algorithms of a cognitive base station. The performances of the three mechanisms are evaluated. Simulations show that the proposed mechanisms protect GTs from ISL interference, enhance angular resolution, and improve HPC utilisation.

  20. Station Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Stations are often limiting the capacity of railway networks. This is due to extra need of tracks when trains stand still, trains turning around, and conflicting train routes. Although stations are often the capacity bottlenecks, most capacity analysis methods focus on open line capacity. Therefore......, this paper presents methods to analyze station capacity. Four methods to analyze station capacity are developed. The first method is an adapted UIC 406 capacity method that can be used to analyze switch zones and platform tracks at stations that are not too complex. The second method examines the need...... the probability of conflicts and the minimum headway times into account. The last method analyzes how optimal platform tracks are used by examining the arrival and departure pattern of the trains. The developed methods can either be used separately to analyze specific characteristics of the capacity of a station...

  1. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  2. 47 CFR 73.23 - AM broadcast station applications affected by international agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM broadcast station applications affected by international agreements. 73.23 Section 73.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.23 AM broadcast station...

  3. 47 CFR 73.6026 - Broadcast regulations applicable to Class A television stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... television stations. 73.6026 Section 73.6026 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6026 Broadcast regulations applicable to Class A television stations. The following rules are applicable to Class A...

  4. La Radio et ses publics

    OpenAIRE

    Glévarec, Hervé; Pinet, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Média ancien, fortement ancré dans les routines et les activités de la vie quotidienne, la radio est l’objet d’un fort investissement de la part des Français. Pourtant, l’intérêt scientifique à l’endroit des publics de la radio est relativement récent. On ne sait pas grand-chose de la structuration de cet univers qui offre en France une diversité remarquable de stations, privées musicales jeunes (NRJ, Fun radio, Skyrock…), adultes (Nostalgie, Virgin, RTL2…), généralistes (RTL, Europe 1), de s...

  5. Amtrak Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Updated database of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) Amtrak Station database. This database is a geographic data set containing Amtrak intercity railroad...

  6. Radiowave propagation, building databases, and GIS: anything in common? A radio engineer's viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Frédéric Wagen; Karim Rizk

    2003-01-01

    Mobile cellular communication has already entered the mass market, and mobile Internet services will soon become a reality. The frequent use of mobile radio technologies wherever people are has a direct impact on the deployment of base stations or radio access points, including antennas. Put simply, to serve an increasing number of users requires an increasing number of base stations. Thus, operators must carefully plan the deployment and configurations of radio base stations in order to supp...

  7. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  8. Options in Education, Program No. 80, May 30, 1977. Learning from the Past: Oral History. Program Transcripts of a Weekly Series Broadcast by Member Stations of National Public Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    The transcript of a National Public Radio "Options in Education" program explores the relationship of oral history to traditionally written, documented history. A number of kinds of oral history are discussed, such as folk telling, family interviews, social history, and sound portraits. Program staff interview a variety of individuals, including a…

  9. Localization and cooperative communication methods for cognitive radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Olivier

    We study localization of nearby nodes and cooperative communication for cognitive radios. Cognitive radios sensing their environment to estimate the channel gain between nodes can cooperate and adapt their transmission power to maximize the capacity of the communication between two nodes. We study the end-to-end capacity of a cooperative relaying scheme using orthogonal frequency-division modulation (OFDM) modulation, under power constraints for both the base station and the relay station. The relay uses amplify-and-forward and decode-and-forward cooperative relaying techniques to retransmit messages on a subset of the available subcarriers. The power used in the base station and the relay station transmitters is allocated to maximize the overall system capacity. The subcarrier selection and power allocation are obtained based on convex optimization formulations and an iterative algorithm. Additionally, decode-and-forward relaying schemes are allowed to pair source and relayed subcarriers to increase further the capacity of the system. The proposed techniques outperforms non-selective relaying schemes over a range of relay power budgets. Cognitive radios can be used for opportunistic access of the radio spectrum by detecting spectrum holes left unused by licensed primary users. We introduce a spectrum holes detection approach, which combines blind modulation classification, angle of arrival estimation and number of sources detection. We perform eigenspace analysis to determine the number of sources, and estimate their angles of arrival (AOA). In addition, we classify detected sources as primary or secondary users with their distinct second-orde one-conjugate cyclostationarity features. Extensive simulations carried out indicate that the proposed system identifies and locates individual sources correctly, even at -4 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In environments with a high density of scatterers, several wireless channels experience nonline-of-sight (NLOS

  10. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  11. Oceanographic profile biochemical measurements collected using a net from the ARLIS II (ARCTIC RESEARCH LABORATORY ICE STATION) in the Arctic in 1964 (NODC Accession 0000978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Thirty-nine plankton samples were collected at the Drift Station "Arlis II" at the north of Greenland in the Arctic Ocean during the period from June to December,...

  12. Depth, temperature, oxygen and salinity profile data from repetitive occupation of a hydrographic station off St. George's, Bermuda from 1954 through 1984 (NODC Accession 0000650)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, bottle, and other data were collected from the PANULIRUS and other platforms from repetitive occupations of a hydrographic station off St. George's, Bermuda....

  13. 47 CFR 74.705 - TV broadcast analog station protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV broadcast analog station protection. 74.705... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.705 TV broadcast analog station protection. (a) The TV broadcast...

  14. 47 CFR 74.706 - Digital TV (DTV) station protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital TV (DTV) station protection. 74.706... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.706 Digital TV (DTV) station protection. (a) For purposes of this...

  15. Cognitive Radio MAC Protocol for WLAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qi; Fitzek, Frank H.P.; Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2008-01-01

    To solve the performance degradation issue in current WLAN caused by the crowded unlicensed spectrum, we propose a cognitive radio (CR) media access protocol, C-CSMA/CA. The basic idea is that with cognitive radio techniques the WLAN devices can not only access the legacy WLAN unlicensed spectrum...... hole; moreover, it designs dual inband sensing scheme to detect primary user appearance. Additionally, C-CSMA/CA has the advantage to effectively solve the cognitive radio self-coexistence issues in the overlapping CR BSSs scenario. It also realizes station-based dynamic resource selection...

  16. Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data from bottle and XBT from the DOLPHIN and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-10-23 to 1973-11-16 (NODC Accession 7400207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN and other platforms from 23...

  17. Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-05-15 to 1973-05-27 (NODC Accession 7400065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 15 May 1973 to 27 May 1973....

  18. Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data from CTD and XBT casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-06-25 to 1983-08-04 (NODC Accession 8300119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data were collected from CTD and XBT casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II and other platforms from...

  19. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the ALMIRANTE IRIZAR and other platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / International Ocean Studies / First Dynamic Response and Kinematics Experiment in the Drake Passage (IDOE/ISOS/FDRAKE) from 1975-01-18 to 1982-11-06 (NODC Accession 8700110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the ALMIRANTE IRIZAR and other platforms from 18 January 1975 to 06...

  20. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT, CTD, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-03-13 to 1975-05-12 (NODC Accession 7600874)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT, CTD, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 13 March 1974 to 12 May 1975....

  1. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from CTD, XBT, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1972-07-01 to 1972-08-13 (NODC Accession 7201299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station,temperature profiles, and other data were collected from CTD, XBT, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II from 01 July 1972 to 13 August...

  2. Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the ARGUS and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-10-18 to 1978-09-19 (NODC Accession 8500103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profile, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the ARGUS and other platforms from 18...

  3. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the COCHRANE and other platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Controlled Ecosystem Pollution Experiment (IDOE/CEPEX) from 1973-10-28 to 1975-01-29 (NODC Accession 7500529)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the COCHRANE and other platforms from 28 October 1973 to 29 January...

  4. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from CTD, XBT, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1973-01-01 to 1973-03-29 (NODC Accession 7300686)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from CTD, XBT, and bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms from 01 January...

  5. Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-07-13 to 1972-08-08 (NODC Accession 7300271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II from 13 July 1972 to 08...

  6. Citizen Science Opportunity With the NASA Heliophysics Education Consortium (HEC)-Radio JOVE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, S. F.; Higgins, C.; Thieman, J.; Garcia, L. N.; Young, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Radio JOVE project has long been a hands-on inquiry-based educational project that allows students, teachers and the general public to learn and practice radio astronomy by building their own radio antenna and receiver system from an inexpensive kit that operates at 20.1 MHz and/or using remote radio telescopes through the Internet. Radio JOVE participants observe and analyze natural radio emissions from Jupiter and the Sun. Within the last few years, several Radio JOVE amateurs have upgraded their equipment to make semi-professional spectrographic observations in the frequency band of 15-30 MHz. Due to the widely distributed Radio JOVE observing stations across the US, the Radio JOVE observations can uniquely augment observations by professional telescopes, such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) . The Radio JOVE project has recently partnered with the NASA Heliophysics Education Consortium (HEC) to work with students and interested amateur radio astronomers to establish additional spectrograph and single-frequency Radio JOVE stations. These additional Radio JOVE stations will help build a larger amateur radio science network and increase the spatial coverage of long-wavelength radio observations across the US. Our presentation will describe the Radio JOVE project within the context of the HEC. We will discuss the potential for citizen scientists to make and use Radio JOVE observations to study solar radio bursts (particularly during the upcoming solar eclipse in August 2017) and Jovian radio emissions. Radio JOVE observations will also be used to study ionospheric radio scintillation, promoting appreciation and understanding of this important space weather effect.

  7. Radio Access Sharing Strategies for Multiple Operators in Cellular Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2015-01-01

    deployments (required for coverage enhancement), increased base station utilization, and reduced overall power consumption. Today, network sharing in the radio access part is passive and limited to cell sites. With the introduction of Cloud Radio Access Network and Software Defined Networking adoption......Mobile operators are moving towards sharing network capacity in order to reduce capital and operational expenditures, while meeting the increasing demand for mobile broadband data services. Radio access network sharing is a promising technique that leads to reduced number of physical base station...... to the radio access network, the possibility for sharing baseband processing and radio spectrum becomes an important aspect of network sharing. This paper investigates strategies for active sharing of radio access among multiple operators, and analyses the individual benefits depending on the sharing degree...

  8. Kajian implementasi radio siaran digital di Indonesia [Study of digital radio broadcasting implementation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amry Daulat Gultom

    2015-12-01

    significant developments related to the implementation, so it is necessary to review potential of digital broadcast radio, the readiness of government, operator, public, and obstacles that faced and to formulate strategies to overcome them. Analytical method used are qualitative SWOT and TOWS from interviews and literature studies data. The results shows that radio station is ready for digitization of radio broadcasting, government has not been so ready because of the absence of digital radio standards supporting regulations, and the public is also not ready due to lack of socialization and digital radio broadcast receiver in market. The integration of digital radio receivers in automobiles and mobile phones can increase the existence of digital radio broadcast receiver devices.

  9. Universe APP radio. Estudy in contrast of Radio España FM and Radio Nacional de España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta HERNANDO LERA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile applications are being an important revolution for users and also for radio listeners. In Spain we can findseveral examples of them which allow us to listen the radio through different radio stations or on-demand content.Smartphones and tablets are starting to be the axis of a new market which has to adapt its contents to this kind ofdevices. This piece wants to show the big picture regarding the features and content of different radio mobile applications, taking Radio España FM and Radio Nacional de España en Directo as object of study. Through them wewill discover their main advantages and disadvantages, and use them as a starting point and to reflect on the aspectsthey have developed or should provide to the radio media on mobile applications.

  10. IA-Regional-Radio - Social Network for Radio Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziczkowski, Grzegorz; Bougueroua, Lamine; Wegrzyn-Wolska, Katarzyna

    This chapter describes the functions of a system proposed for the music hit recommendation from social network data base. This system carries out the automatic collection, evaluation and rating of music reviewers and the possibility for listeners to rate musical hits and recommendations deduced from auditor's profiles in the form of regional Internet radio. First, the system searches and retrieves probable music reviews from the Internet. Subsequently, the system carries out an evaluation and rating of those reviews. From this list of music hits, the system directly allows notation from our application. Finally, the system automatically creates the record list diffused each day depending on the region, the year season, the day hours and the age of listeners. Our system uses linguistics and statistic methods for classifying music opinions and data mining techniques for recommendation part needed for recorded list creation. The principal task is the creation of popular intelligent radio adaptive on auditor's age and region - IA-Regional-Radio.

  11. Increased protein synthesis by cells exposed to a 1,800-MHz radio-frequency mobile phone electromagnetic field, detected by proteome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Christopher; Haudek, Verena; Schandl, Ulla; Bayer, Editha; Gundacker, Nina; Hutter, Hans Peter; Mosgoeller, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    To investigate whether or not low intensity radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure (RF-EME) associated with mobile phone use can affect human cells, we used a sensitive proteome analysis method to study changes in protein synthesis in cultured human cells. Four different cell kinds were exposed to 2 W/kg specific absorption rate in medium containing 35S-methionine/cysteine, and autoradiography of 2D gel spots was used to measure the increased synthesis of individual proteins. While short-term RF-EME did not significantly alter the proteome, an 8-h exposure caused a significant increase in protein synthesis in Jurkat T-cells and human fibroblasts, and to a lesser extent in activated primary human mononuclear cells. Quiescent (metabolically inactive) mononuclear cells, did not detectably respond to RF-EME. Since RF exposure induced a temperature increase of less than 0.15 degrees C, we suggest that the observed cellular response is a so called "athermal" effect of RF-EME. Our finding of an association between metabolic activity and the observed cellular reaction to low intensity RF-EME may reconcile conflicting results of previous studies. We further postulate that the observed increased protein synthesis reflects an increased rate of protein turnover stemming from protein folding problems caused by the interference of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with hydrogen bonds. Our observations do not directly imply a health risk. However, vis-a-vis a synopsis of reports on cells stress and DNA breaks, after short and longer exposure, on active and inactive cells, our findings may contribute to the re-evaluation of previous reports.

  12. Columnar Radio Refractivity Of The Troposphere At Ashodi And Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial-temporal, distributions of columnar radio refractive index in the troposphere of two tropical stations – Kano and Oshodi are considered. Monthly means of radio refractivity have been shown for the atmospheric columns, 0 – 3km (the lower atmosphere), 0- 10km (the first 10km column), and 3-10km (the upper ...

  13. The Role of Radio in the Rwandan Genocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellow, Christine L.; Steeves, H. Leslie

    1998-01-01

    Examines and interprets the role of the government-controlled radio-television station in the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Considers historical and political contexts of the genocide and analyzes excerpts from radio broadcasts and observational accounts. Interprets, via several strands of communication, scholarship related to collective reaction effects…

  14. Four Decades of Space-Borne Radio Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    A review is given of the 38 rocket, satellite, and planetary payloads dedicated to ionospheric/magnetospheric radio sounding since 1961. Between 1961 and 1995, eleven sounding-rocket payloads from four countries evolved from proof-of-concept flights to sophisticated instruments. Some involved dual payloads, with the sounder transmitter on one and the sounder receiver on the other. The rocket sounders addressed specific space-plasma-wave questions, and provided improved measurements of ionospheric electron-density (N(sub e)) field-aligned irregularities (FAI). Four countries launched 12 ionospheric topside-sounder satellites between 1962 and 1994, and an ionospheric sounder was placed on the Mir Space Station in 1998. Eleven magnetospheric radio sounders, most of the relaxation type, were launched from 1977 to 2000. The relaxation sounders used low-power transmitters, designed to stimulate plasma resonances for accurate local Ne determinations. The latest magnetospheric sounder designed for remote sensing incorporated long antennas and digital signal processing techniques to overcome the challenges posed by low Ne values and large propagation distances. Three radio sounders from three countries were included on payloads to extraterrestrial destinations from 1990 to 2003. The scientific accomplishments of space-borne radio sounders included (1) a wealth of global N(sub e) information on the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere, based on vertical and magnetic-field-aligned N(sub e) profiles; (2) accurate in-situ N(sub e) values, even under low-density conditions; and (3) fundamental advances in our understanding of the excitation and propagation of plasma waves, which have even led to the prediction of a new plasma-wave mode.

  15. Bottom side profiles for two close stations at the southern crest of the EIA: Differences and comparison with IRI-2012 and NeQuick2 for low and high solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, L.; Venkatesh, K.; Pillat, V. G.; Pezzopane, M.; Fagundes, P. R.; Ezquer, R. G.; Cabrera, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Bottom side electron density profiles for two stations at the southern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 314.5°E, dip latitude 19.8°S; Brazil) and Tucumán (26.9°S, 294.6°E, dip latitude 14.0°S; Argentina), located at similar latitude and separated by only 20° in longitude, have been compared during equinoctial, winter and summer months under low (year 2008, minimum of the solar cycle 23/24) and high solar activity (years 2013-2014, maximum of the solar cycle 24) conditions. An analysis of parameters describing the bottom side part of the electron density profile, namely the peak electron density NmF2, the height hmF2 at which it is reached, the thickness parameter B0 and the shape parameter B1, is carried out. Further, a comparison of bottom side profiles and F-layer parameters with the corresponding outputs of IRI-2012 and NeQuick2 models is also reported. The variations of NmF2 at both stations reveal the absence of semi-annual anomaly for low solar activity (LSA), evidencing the anomalous activity of the last solar minimum, while those related to hmF2 show an uplift of the ionosphere for high solar activity (HSA). As expected, the EIA is particularly visible at both stations during equinox for HSA, when its strength is at maximum in the South American sector. Despite the similar latitude of the two stations upon the southern crest of the EIA, the anomaly effect is more pronounced at Tucumán than at São José dos Campos. The differences encountered between these very close stations suggest that in this sector relevant longitudinal-dependent variations could occur, with the longitudinal gradient of the Equatorial Electrojet that plays a key role to explain such differences together with the 5.8° separation in dip latitude between the two ionosondes. Furthermore at Tucumán, the daily peak value of NmF2 around 21:00 LT during equinox for HSA is in temporal coincidence with an impulsive enhancement of hmF2

  16. Ionospheric inversion of the Venus Express radio occultation data observed by Shanghai 25 m and New Norcia 35 m antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Su-jun; Li, Jin-ling; Ping, Jin-song; Chen, Cong-yan; Zhang, Ke-fei

    2015-01-01

    Electron density profiles of the Venus' ionosphere are inverted from the Venus Express (VEX) one-way open-loop radio occultation experiments carried out by Shanghai 25 m antenna from November 2011 to January 2012 at solar maximum conditions and by New Norcia 35 m antenna from August 2006 to June 2008 at solar intermediate conditions. The electron density profile (from 110 km to 400 km) retrieved from the X-band egress observation at Shanghai station, shows a single peak near 147 km with a peak density of about $2 \\times 10^4 \\rm{cm}^{-3}$ at a solar zenith angle of 94$^{\\circ}$. As a comparison, the VEX radio science (VeRa) observations at New Norcia station were also examined, including S-, X-band and dual-frequency data in the ingress mode. The results show that the electron density profiles retrieved from the S-band data are more analogous to the dual-frequency data in the profile shape, compared with the X-band data. Generally, the S-band results slightly underestimate the magnitude of the peak density, w...

  17. Sound velocity profiles collected in the Great Lakes and one station in Galveston Bay by NOAA Navigation Response Team 4, April - August 2006 (NODC Accession 0002823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sound velocity profiles were collected using sound velocimeter in the Great Lakes and Galveston Bay from NOAA NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 4 from 11 April 2006 to 04...

  18. 76 FR 72705 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: DOUGLAS BROADCASTING, INC., Station KLNQ, Facility ID161152, BMP-20111107ALX... 90498, BPED-20111103AGS, From LOWELL, IN, To WANATAH, IN; RADIO LICENSE HOLDING CBC, LLC, Station KSMB...

  19. 78 FR 41062 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal...-20130509ABB, From SMITHS GROVE, KY, To HISEVILLE, KY; HOG RADIO, INC., Station KCYT, Facility ID 51098, BPH- 20130603AES, From OZARK, AR, To FAYETTEVILLE, AR; JOY BROADCASTING, INC., Station WXGN, Facility ID 32338...

  20. 77 FR 62512 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License. AGENCY... BROADCASTING ASSOCIATION, Station KLXM, Facility ID 184961, BMPED-20120823AAP, From WEATHERFORD, OK, To ARAPAHO, OK; COMMUNITY RADIO PROJECT, Station KZET, Facility ID 173810, BPED-20120914AEF, From CORTEZ, CO, To...

  1. 77 FR 8869 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: BBC BROADCASTING, INC, Station KPRI, Facility ID 21416, BP-20090226AAF, From..., BMPED-20120131ALI, From RIDGEVILLE, SC, To ST. GEORGE, SC; RADIO LICENSE HOLDING II, LLC, Station WYAY...

  2. 75 FR 66098 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: GRACE PUBLIC RADIO, Station KFKB, Facility ID 174471, BMPED-20100803AAM...-20101012ACO, From THOMSON, GA, To NORWOOD, GA; NORTH AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC., Station WTDA...

  3. 76 FR 22704 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: CEDAR COVE BROADCASTING, INC., Station KAVI, Facility ID 173643, BMPED..., BMPED-20110302ABD, From DANBURY, NC, To MADISON, NC; COX RADIO, INC., Station WHIO-FM, Facility ID 73908...

  4. The Institutional Context of Industry Consolidation: Radio Broadcasting in the United States, 1920-1934

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Shortly after the first commercial radio broadcast in 1920, the medium's popularity exploded and the number of stations on the dial grew tremendously. By 1930, however, a mere 10 years after the first radio broadcast occurred, the industry was dominated by large, commercial stations who sold advertising time in a variety of forms and were operated…

  5. Radio ECCA: A Distance Learning System in the Canary Islands. DERG Papers, Number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Luis Espina

    The Cultural Radio Station of the Canary Islands (Radio ECCA), a distance learning system, is described. Various Spanish institutions have introduced the ECCA system of teaching into their respective provinces by collaborative agreements with Radio ECCA. The total enrollment of ECCA students in Spain (including the Canary Islands) reached 28,505…

  6. 76 FR 6788 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License. AGENCY... 3338, BPH- 20101222ABD, From MARLOW, OK, To LAWTON, OK; FISHER RADIO REGIONAL GROUP, INC., Station KQDI-FM, Facility ID 32386, BPH-20101222ABO, From GREAT FALLS, MT, To HIGHWOOD, MT; THE MONTANA RADIO...

  7. Integrating radio and e-media in national agricultural policy: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper argues that, if both the existing and potential Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), that include radio and e-media services and providers of the same (radio production studios, private, public and community radio stations, telecentres, mobile phones, and internet-resident platforms), were properly ...

  8. Observation Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  9. 47 CFR 74.102 - Uses of experimental broadcast stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Uses of experimental broadcast stations. 74.102 Section 74.102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Experimental...

  10. 47 CFR 74.101 - Experimental broadcast station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Experimental broadcast station. 74.101 Section 74.101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Experimental...

  11. Comparative mRNA and microRNA profiling during acute myocardial infarction induced by coronary occlusion and ablation radio-frequency currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Tadeu Santana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery is the most commonly used experimental model to induce myocardial infarction (MI in rodents. A high mortality in the acute phase and the heterogeneity of the size of the MI obtained are drawbacks recognized in this model. In an attempt to solve the problem, our group recently developed a new MI experimental model which is based on application of myocardial ablation radio-frequency currents (AB-RF that yielded MI with homogeneous sizes and significantly reduce acute mortality. In addition, cardiac structural and functional changes aroused by AB-RF were similar to those seen in animals with MI induced by coronary artery ligation. Herein, we compared mRNA expression of genes that govern post-MI milieu in occlusion and ablation models. We analyzed 48 mRNAs expressions of 9 different signal transduction pathways (cell survival and metabolism signs, matrix extracellular, cell cycle, oxidative stress, apoptosis, calcium signaling, hypertrophy markers, angiogenesis and inflammation in rat left ventricle 1 week after MI ‘generated by both coronary occlusion and AB-RF. Furthermore, high-throughput miRNA analysis was also assessed in both MI procedures. Interestingly, mRNA expression levels and miRNA expressions showed strong similarities between both models after MI, with few specificities in each model, activating similar signal transduction pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first comparison of genomic alterations of mRNA and miRNA contents after two different MI procedures and identifies key signaling regulators modulating the pathophysiology of these two models that might culminate in heart failure. Furthermore, these analyses may contribute with the current knowledge concerning transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes of AB-RF protocol, arising as an alternative and effective MI method that reproduces most changes seem in coronary occlusion.

  12. Radio Wave Propagation Scene Partitioning for High-Speed Rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio wave propagation scene partitioning is necessary for wireless channel modeling. As far as we know, there are no standards of scene partitioning for high-speed rail (HSR scenarios, and therefore we propose the radio wave propagation scene partitioning scheme for HSR scenarios in this paper. Based on our measurements along the Wuhan-Guangzhou HSR, Zhengzhou-Xian passenger-dedicated line, Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan passenger-dedicated line, and Beijing-Tianjin intercity line in China, whose operation speeds are above 300 km/h, and based on the investigations on Beijing South Railway Station, Zhengzhou Railway Station, Wuhan Railway Station, Changsha Railway Station, Xian North Railway Station, Shijiazhuang North Railway Station, Taiyuan Railway Station, and Tianjin Railway Station, we obtain an overview of HSR propagation channels and record many valuable measurement data for HSR scenarios. On the basis of these measurements and investigations, we partitioned the HSR scene into twelve scenarios. Further work on theoretical analysis based on radio wave propagation mechanisms, such as reflection and diffraction, may lead us to develop the standard of radio wave propagation scene partitioning for HSR. Our work can also be used as a basis for the wireless channel modeling and the selection of some key techniques for HSR systems.

  13. Radio Refractivity Gradient over Nigeria using CM-SAF Satellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations of radio refractivity gradients at the low level, mid-level and upper level of the atmosphere are presented for 26 stations in Nigeria using NOAA 15, 16 and 18 satellite data retrieved from the Department of Satellite Application Facilities on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF), DWD, Germany. The selected stations were ...

  14. Social Responsibility through the Spanish University Radio Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Pinto Zúñiga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available College radio is built with mechanisms through which students can approach to the labor market, but it is also built as a media in which civil society can take an active part. The objective that we plant is to analyze the need to introduce and preserve the concept of social responsibility in the Spanish university radio stations for attaining the integration between the social system and the university. We designed a methodology based on interviews with those responsible for the Spanish college radio stations that broadcast regularly. Somehow, most of the radio stations analyzed have been incorporating this way of working to their daily basis, making the future professionals in the communication field to contemplate as usual and needed the citizens’ cooperation in order to build the radiophonic speeches, which will revert into a more conciliatory future between people and media.

  15. Auction based spectrum management of cognitive radio networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, H. B.; Chen, K.-C.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) technology is considered as an effective solution to enhance overall spectrum efficiency, especially primary radio network (PRN) typically having relatively low spectrum utilization. However, to realize CR concept, it is essential to provide enough incentives to PRN and extra...... profit to the service provider so that cognitive radio mobile stations (CR-MSs) may utilize PRN spectrum accordingly, which provides a new challenge for spectrum management. In this paper, we consider a PRN consisting of a primary system base station (PS-BS) and multiple primary system mobile stations...... (PS-MSs), and we therefore construct a cognitive radio network (CRN) consisting of a PRN with multiple CR-MSs. We propose a spectrum management policy framework such that CR-MSs can compete in utilization of the PRN spectrum bands available to opportunistic transmission of CR-MSs by Vickrey auction...

  16. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  17. 47 CFR 73.4163 - Noncommercial nature of educational broadcast stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noncommercial nature of educational broadcast stations. 73.4163 Section 73.4163 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4163...

  18. 47 CFR 73.801 - Broadcast regulations applicable to LPFM stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to LPFM stations. 73.801 Section 73.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.801 Broadcast...

  19. Las radios católicas españolas. Historia, desarrollo y programación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Santos Diez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radio attracted the interest of the Catholic Church from the beginning due to its potential as a universal communications medium for propagating religious content and spreading the message of the gospel. This article deals with the study and analysis of Spanish Catholic radio stations (COPE, Radio Santa Maria de Toledo, Radio Estel of Barcelona and Radio Maria, focusing on the content included in their programming schedules and the strategies employed to make these broadcasts succeed and remain on the air.

  20. 47 CFR 73.4101 - Financial qualifications, TV stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Financial qualifications, TV stations. 73.4101 Section 73.4101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES..., TV stations. See Public Notice, FCC 79-299, dated May 11, 1979. 72 F.C.C. 2d 784; 44 FR 29160, May 18...

  1. An automated remote marshland water-sampling station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Station may be made to turn on and off remotely in response to radio, audio, photo, or other suitable signals, as well as by hard-wire switching. Station will remain operational under conditions of 4-foot tidal variations, along with 4-foot wave action, and will withstand hurricane-force winds without toppling over.

  2. 47 CFR 74.709 - Land mobile station protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Land mobile station protection. 74.709 Section 74.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... translator station field strength is calculated from the proposed effective radiated power (ERP) and the...

  3. Impact of cognitive radio on radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, A.J.; Baan, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of new communication techniques requires an increase in the efficiency of spectrum usage. Cognitive radio is one of the new techniques that fosters spectrum efficiency by using unoccupied frequency spectrum for communications. However, cognitive radio will increase the transmission

  4. Advanced Multimode Radio for Wireless & Mobile Broadband Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardaras, Georgios; Lanzani, Christian

    2009-01-01

    standards, known as remote radio heads (RRH). The key feature of remote radio heads is the extended software configurability which enables the deployment of more flexible and energy-efficient radio solutions. This paper describes a modern multi-mode radio system reference architecture and the major digital...... building blocks that when combined together enable multi-mode and more power efficient operation. It concentrates on blocks which can efficiently run multi-rate digital signal processing and blocks that increase radio power efficiency by linearizing the power amplifier output stage. The importance......Distributed base station architectures represent the new trend that operators follow in order to resolve cost, performance and efficiency challenges when deploying 4G networks. Main components of such architectures are multimode radios capable of operating according to GSM, HSPA, WiMAX and LTE...

  5. Leaving home [radio drama

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Conan

    2014-01-01

    A 50 minute Radio Drama tracing the stories of Amy, Edie and Barnard Beechey as they prepare for the First World War and the changes it brings to their lives. Broadcast on BBC Radio Lincolnshire, 4th August, 2014.

  6. Fast Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    28

    FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and Rotating Radio. Transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the ...

  7. MARS PATHFINDER RADIO TRACKING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Radio Science (RS) data archive contains both raw radio tracking data collected during the surface lifetime of the MPF Lander and results...

  8. Dosimetry analysis of distributions radials dose profiles of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicators using the MCNP-4C code and radio chromium films; Analise dosimetrica de perfis de distribuicoes radias de doses relativas de um aplicador de betaterapia de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y utilizando o codigo MCNP-4C e filmes radiocromicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Talita S.; Yoriyaz, Helio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: tasallesc@gmail.co [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Radioterapia; Louzada, Mario J.Q. [UNESP, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Medicina Veterinaria

    2011-07-01

    Although they are no longer manufactured, the applicators of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y acquired in the decades of 1990 are still in use, by having half-life of 28.5 years. These applicators have calibration certificate given by their manufacturers, where few have been re calibrated. Thus it becomes necessary to accomplish thorough dosimetry of these applicators. This paper presents a dosimetric analysis distribution radial dose profiles for emitted by an {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicator, using the MCNP-4C code to simulate the distribution radial dose profiles and radio chromium films to get them experimentally . The results with the simulated values were compared with the results of experimental measurements, where both curves show similar behavior, which may validate the use of MCNP-4C and radio chromium films for this type of dosimetry. (author)

  9. Distribution profile, health risk and elimination of model atmospheric SVOCs associated with a typical municipal garbage compressing station in Guangzhou, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiying; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhengyong; An, Taicheng; Hu, Jianfang

    2013-09-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) air pollution caused by municipal garbage compressing process was investigated at a garbage compressing station (GCS). The most abundant contaminants were phthalate esters (PAEs), followed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organic chlorinated pesticides (OCPs). ∑16PAHs concentrations ranged from 58.773 to 68.840 ng m-3 in gas and from 6.489 to 17.291 ng m-3 in particulate phase; ∑20OCPs ranged from 4.181 to 5.550 ng m-3 and from 0.823 to 2.443 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase, respectively; ∑15PAEs ranged from 46.498 to 87.928 ng m-3 and from 414.765 to 763.009 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase. Lung-cancer risk due to PAHs exposure was 1.13 × 10-4. Both non-cancer and cancer risk levels due to OCPs exposure were acceptable. Non-cancer hazard index of PAEs was 4.57 × 10-3, suggesting safety of workers as only exposure to PAEs at GCS. At pilot scale, 60.18% of PAHs, 70.89% of OCPs and 63.2% of PAEs were removed by an integrated biotrickling filter-photocatalytic reactor at their stable state, and health risk levels were reduced about 50%, demonstrating high removal capacity of integrated reactor.

  10. Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) comprises a network of ground-based high-frequency vertical sounding sensors, ionosondes, with instrument installations in 27 countries and a central Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) for data acquisition and assimilation, including 46 real-time data streams as of August 2014. The LGDC implemented a suite of technologies for post-processing, modeling, analysis, and dissemination of the acquired and derived data products, including: (1) IRI-based Real-time Assimilative Model, "IRTAM", that builds and publishes every 15-minutes an updated "global weather" map of the peak density and height in the ionosphere, as well as a map of deviations from the classic IRI climate; (2) Global Assimilative Model of Bottomside Ionosphere Timelines (GAMBIT) Database and Explorer holding 15 years worth of IRTAM computed maps at 15 minute cadence;. (3) 17+ million ionograms and matching ionogram-derived records of URSI-standard ionospheric characteristics and vertical profiles of electron density; (4) 10+ million records of the Doppler Skymaps showing spatial distributions over the GIRO locations and plasma drifts; (5) Data and software for Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID) diagnostics; and (6) HR2006 ray tracing software mated to the "realistic" IRTAM ionosphere. In cooperation with the URSI Ionosonde Network Advisory Group (INAG), the LGDC promotes cooperative agreements with the ionosonde observatories of the world to accept and process real-time data of HF radio monitoring of the ionosphere, and to promote a variety of investigations that benefit from the global-scale, prompt, detailed, and accurate descriptions of the ionospheric variability.

  11. Social media usage by teen segmented commercial private radio in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Lestari Martha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio is one of mass media which functions to inform, to educate, to entertain and to influence. In Indonesia, private commercial broadcast radios are the biggest in numbers with more than 700 radio stations throughout indonesia. Some of the private commmercial radio stations select audience segmentation of young people or teenagers. This is due to fact that numbers of young people dominate the whole population. Social media nowadays has become a primary need for most of its users, especially young people. The usage of social media as a tool in virtual social interaction, has also been used by many radio stations, especially whose target audience are teenagers. The usage of social media by teen segmented radio stations is not only for on-air activities, but also to support off-air activities. How the use of social media by teen segmented radio stations in Bandung, to support on-air and off-air activities, is the focus of this research. Through qualitative research with descriptive method, it is hoped to describe more comprehensively about the usage of social media by teen segmented private radio stations in Bandung.

  12. PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES FOR THE RADIO IN THE DIGITAL ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francisco Magnoni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Radio is the communication vehicle that most people use to receive information and entertainment every day. Portability, the proximity of broadcasters to their audiences and low-cost receivers have for many decades sustained radio's popularity. More recently, the radio has benefited from the growth of the automotive fleet and the huge amount of cellphones, which free radio receivers. A survey carried out in 2010 by the Radio Professionals Groups (GPR on radio consumption by Brazilians, pointed out that 74% of them listen to Radio in traditional receivers, 63% listen on the internet, 61% on car radio, 37% Cellular, 21% through devices such as MP3, MP4 and IPhone; 12% through cable TV audio channels and 3% via mobile internet. The GPR survey presents significant numbers of listeners in each type of radio reception device. These are clear indications that the same listener is regularly tuning in to their favorite stations on more than one type of radio receiver. The new variable demonstrates that the digitalization of production, transmission and reception, besides turning the radio into a vehicle with multimedia language, has also added the possibility of multi-tuning. In other words, the radio messages were received by the listeners in several terminals, all endowed with multimedia tools and resources for interactivity. It is the evidence that radio has definitely entered the binary and converging territory of cyberspace. From now on, the formation of the various professional careers for radio production will have to take into account the transformations of the vehicle in the digital era.

  13. Characterising Radio Emissions in Cosmic Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. O.

    2014-02-01

    A growing number of radio studies probe galaxy clusters into the low-power regime in which star formation is the dominant source of radio emission. However, at the time of writing no comparably deep observations have focused exclusively on the radio populations of cosmic filaments. This thesis describes the ATCA 2.1 GHz observations and subsequent analysis of two such regions - labelled Zone 1 (between clusters A3158 and A3125/A3128) and Zone 2 (between A3135 and A3145) - in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Source count profiles of both populations are discussed and a radio luminosity function for Zone 1 is generated. While the source counts of Zone 2 appear to be consistent with expected values, Zone 1 exhibits an excess of counts across a wide flux range (1 mJy< S_1.4 < 200 mJy). An excess in radio activity at the lower extent of this range (log P_1.4 < 22.5; within the SF-dominated regime) is also suggested by the radio luminosity function for that region, and brief colour analysis suggests that such an excess is indeed predominantly associated with a starforming population. The differences between the two filamentary zones is attributed to cosmic variation. The regions are both small (~ 1 degree square), and are significantly separated in the HRS. Further radio observations of filaments are required and the results combined into a larger sample size in order to arrive at a generalised model filamentary population.

  14. Ham radio for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, H Ward

    2013-01-01

    An ideal first step for learning about ham radio Beyond operating wirelessly, today's ham radio operators can transmit data and pictures; use the Internet, laser, and microwave transmitters; and travel to places high and low to make contact. This hands-on beginner guide reflects the operational and technical changes to amateur radio over the past decade and provides you with updated licensing requirements and information, changes in digital communication (such as the Internet, social media, and GPS), and how to use e-mail via radio. Addresses the critical use of ham radio for replacing downe

  15. Onboard Photo: Astronauts Use Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-56) onboard photo of Pilot Stephen S. Oswald (wearing a headset) uses the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) while sitting at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck. Oswald smiled from behind the microphone as he talks to amateur radio operators on Earth via the SAREX equipment. SAREX cables and the interface module freefloat in front of Oswald. The anterna located in the forward flight deck window is visible in the background. SAREX was established by NASA, the American Radio League/Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Amateur Radio Club to encourage public participation in the space program through a program to demonstrate the effectiveness of conducting short-wave radio transmissions between the Shuttle and ground-based radio operators at low-cost ground stations with amateur and digital techniques.

  16. Radiography of Spanish Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Emma Rodero Antón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In its eighty years of existence, radio has been always characterized to adapt to the social, cultural and technological transformations. Thus it has been until this moment. Nevertheless, some years ago, the authors and professionals of this medium have been detecting a stagnation that affects to its structure. At a time in continuous technological evolution, radio demands a deep transformation. For that reason, from the conviction of which the future radio, public and commercial, will necessarily have to renew itself, in this paper we establish ten problems and their possible solutions to the radio crisis in order to draw an x-ray of radio in Spain. Radio has future, but it is necessary to work actively by it. That the radio continues being part of sound of our life, it will depend on the work of all: companies, advertisers, professionals, students, investigators and listeners.

  17. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  18. Final Report: The self Reliance Foundation and Hispanic Radio Network Collaborative, September 30, 1995 - January 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multedo, Molly

    1998-09-30

    The Self Reliance Foundation, through its production subcontractor, Hispanic Radio Network, produced daily 1-3 minute radio capsules on science, education, and the environment. The programs were broadcast on over 100 U.S. Spanish-language radio stations from 1995-1998, reaching 2 million weekly listeners.

  19. Measurement of cosmic ray air showers using MHz radio-detection techniques at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleifges, M.

    2013-08-01

    The measurement of radio signals from air showers is studied in detail with the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The first stage of AERA is in operation since March 2011 and consists of 24 autonomous radio detector stations. The design of the stations including the radio antennas, the electronics system and the communications system is presented. In the next 12 months AERA will grow to a size of 125 stations covering an area of about 16 km2. First results and improvements for this next stage of AERA will be discussed.

  20. Comparison of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR CH volume mixing ratio vertical profiles with those measured by ACE-FTS, ESA MIPAS, IMK-IAA MIPAS, and 16 NDACC stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Olsen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary instrument on the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT is the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations (TANSO Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS. TANSO-FTS uses three short-wave infrared (SWIR bands to retrieve total columns of CO2 and CH4 along its optical line of sight and one thermal infrared (TIR channel to retrieve vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 volume mixing ratios (VMRs in the troposphere. We examine version 1 of the TANSO-FTS TIR CH4 product by comparing co-located CH4 VMR vertical profiles from two other remote-sensing FTS systems: the Canadian Space Agency's Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment FTS (ACE-FTS on SCISAT (version 3.5 and the European Space Agency's Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat (ESA ML2PP version 6 and IMK-IAA reduced-resolution version V5R_CH4_224/225, as well as 16 ground stations with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. This work follows an initial inter-comparison study over the Arctic, which incorporated a ground-based FTS at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL at Eureka, Canada, and focuses on tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements made at middle and tropical latitudes between 2009 and 2013 (mid-2012 for MIPAS. For comparison, vertical profiles from all instruments are interpolated onto a common pressure grid, and smoothing is applied to ACE-FTS, MIPAS, and NDACC vertical profiles. Smoothing is needed to account for differences between the vertical resolution of each instrument and differences in the dependence on a priori profiles. The smoothing operators use the TANSO-FTS a priori and averaging kernels in all cases. We present zonally averaged mean CH4 differences between each instrument and TANSO-FTS with and without smoothing, and we examine their information content, their sensitive altitude range, their correlation, their a priori dependence, and the

  1. Comparison of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS TIR CH volume mixing ratio vertical profiles with those measured by ACE-FTS, ESA MIPAS, IMK-IAA MIPAS, and 16 NDACC stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kevin S.; Strong, Kimberly; Walker, Kaley A.; Boone, Chris D.; Raspollini, Piera; Plieninger, Johannes; Bader, Whitney; Conway, Stephanie; Grutter, Michel; Hannigan, James W.; Hase, Frank; Jones, Nicholas; de Mazière, Martine; Notholt, Justus; Schneider, Matthias; Smale, Dan; Sussmann, Ralf; Saitoh, Naoko

    2017-10-01

    The primary instrument on the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations (TANSO) Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). TANSO-FTS uses three short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands to retrieve total columns of CO2 and CH4 along its optical line of sight and one thermal infrared (TIR) channel to retrieve vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) in the troposphere. We examine version 1 of the TANSO-FTS TIR CH4 product by comparing co-located CH4 VMR vertical profiles from two other remote-sensing FTS systems: the Canadian Space Agency's Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment FTS (ACE-FTS) on SCISAT (version 3.5) and the European Space Agency's Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat (ESA ML2PP version 6 and IMK-IAA reduced-resolution version V5R_CH4_224/225), as well as 16 ground stations with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). This work follows an initial inter-comparison study over the Arctic, which incorporated a ground-based FTS at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Canada, and focuses on tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements made at middle and tropical latitudes between 2009 and 2013 (mid-2012 for MIPAS). For comparison, vertical profiles from all instruments are interpolated onto a common pressure grid, and smoothing is applied to ACE-FTS, MIPAS, and NDACC vertical profiles. Smoothing is needed to account for differences between the vertical resolution of each instrument and differences in the dependence on a priori profiles. The smoothing operators use the TANSO-FTS a priori and averaging kernels in all cases. We present zonally averaged mean CH4 differences between each instrument and TANSO-FTS with and without smoothing, and we examine their information content, their sensitive altitude range, their correlation, their a priori dependence, and the variability within

  2. Chautauqua notebook: appropriate technology on radio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, B.

    1981-01-01

    Experiences in establishing and maintaining a regional call-in information-exchange radio show (Chautauqua) on energy conservation, appropriate technology, renewable energy sources, and self-reliance are discussed. Information is presented on: appropriate technology; the Chautauquaa concept; topics discussed; research performed; guests; interviewing tips; types of listeners; program features; where to find help; promotion and publicity; the technical and engineering aspects; the budget and funding; and station policies. (MCW)

  3. Radio In Social Messaging Environment and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Judhariksawan

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has changed the world. At the same time, the Internet established a revolutionary open model for its own development and governance, encompassing all stakeholders, including broadcasting radio station. Fundamentally, the Internet is a ???network of networks??? whose protocols are designed to allow networks to interoperate. In the beginning, these networks represented different academic, government, and research communities whose members needed to cooperate to de...

  4. Bases of Radio Direction Finding. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-22

    communications radio stations. The equipment, adjustable aboard, is simple in operation and it is reliable . Durla; the use of ground-based radii direction finders...lirectios finder receptors (interference shielding, sensitivity, the accuracy of installation and maintenam=e of frequency, reliability , etc.). In...diffuGeOsum of the minimum. Page 222. Examined wilL be requirements for installation the four-antenna of goniometri : system. The conclusions about the

  5. Radio and Gamma-ray Emission from Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.

    The radiation of pulsars have been observed for many years. A few pulsars are discovered to have both radio and gamma-ray emission. Many models on pulsar radiation have been developed, but so far we are still lacking an elaborate model which can explain the emission from radio to gamma-rays in detail. In this paper we present a joint model for radio and gamma-ray emission, in which both the dominate emission mechanisms are inverse Compton scattering. The pulse profiles at radio and gamma-ray bands are reproduced for the Crab-like, Vela-like and Geminga-like pulsars, in good agreement with observations.

  6. 47 CFR 73.6014 - Protection of digital Class A TV stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of digital Class A TV stations. 73... be accepted if it fails to protect authorized digital Class A TV stations and applications for... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6014 Protection of digital...

  7. Luxation radio carpienne ouverte pure: à propos d'un cas | El Alaoui ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiography's front and profile views of the left wrist, showed a pure left posterior radio carpal dislocation (B). The patient was operated 2 hours after the trauma, under locoregional anesthesia. After the reduction of the radiocarpal dislocation, the patient received a plug-lunar radio and radio-scaphoid then a transverse ...

  8. The Use of Bending Angle Retrieved By GPS Radio Occultation Technique For The Measurement of The Atmospheric Water Vapour Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespe, F.; Benedetto, C.; Pacione, R.

    In the last decade the use of GPS radio occultation technique (GPS RO) has been deeply and widely investigated for retrieving physical and chemical Earth atmospheric parameters. The technique proved to be particularly precise in retrieving temperature profiles with an high vertical resolution (air) in 2 unknown (hydrostatic pressure and temperature). The system cannot be solved for lower troposphere because the water vapour pressu re is not negligible. So we are forced to include some other information such as the humidity computed by the models (ECMWF or NEP) or adding another observable in the system as the zenith troposphere delays estimated by the GPS ground stations. In this work we will investigate the possibility to retrieve humidity using only the bending angles achieved by the GPS RO. In particular, the humidity profiles are extracted differentiating the true bending angle profiles, retrieved by the GPS RO, with the dry ones, obtained by fitting and extrapolating the outer layers bending angles in a dry atmosphere model (exponential or Hopfield). The bending angles will be retrieved by CHAMP and SAC-C GPS RO data. Then the humidity profiles obtained with the proposed technique will be compared and validated with those retrieved with radio-sounding balloons over two sites at different latitudes: Brindisi (Italy) and Singapore (Japan).

  9. The radio structure of radio-quiet quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leipski, C.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bennert, N.; Hüttemeister, S.

    2006-01-01

    Aims.We investigate the radio emitting structures of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with an emphasis on radio-quiet quasars to study their connection to Seyfert galaxies.
    Methods: .We present and analyse high-sensitivity VLA radio continuum images of 14 radio-quiet quasars and six Seyfert

  10. Senior radio listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    media platforms, not the least when listening to radio. The elder generation is no exception from this. Recently, for instance, the Danish public broadcast DR has carried out an exodus of programmes targeted for the senior segment. These programmes are removed from regular FM and sent to DAB receivers......Radiobroadcasting and the hardware materialization of radio have during the 20th century changed significantly, which means that senior radio listeners have travelled along with this evolution from large, impressive radio furnitures to DAB and small, wireless, mobile devices, and from grave...... and solemn radio voices to lightharted, laughing and chatting speakers. Senior radio listerners have experienced the development and refinements of technique, content and genres. It is now expected of all media users that they are capable of crossing media, combining, juggling and jumping between various...

  11. Forthcoming Occultations of Astrometric Radio Sources by Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor; Malkin, Zinovy; Tsekmeister, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Astrometric observations of radio source occultations by solar system bodies may be of large interest for testing gravity theories, dynamical astronomy, and planetary physics. In this paper, we present an updated list of the occultations of astrometric radio sources by planets expected in the coming years. Such events, like solar eclipses, generally speaking can only be observed in a limited region. A map of the shadow path is provided for the events that will occurr in regions with several VLBI stations and hence will be the most interesting for radio astronomy experiments.

  12. A Zynq-based Cluster Cognitive Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Rooks, Kurtis M.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional hardware radios provide very rigid solutions to radio problems. Intelligent software defined radios, also known as cognitive radios, provide flexibility and agility compared to hardware radio systems. Cognitive radios are well suited for radio applications in a changing radio frequency environment, such as dynamic spectrum access. In this thesis, a cognitive radio is demonstrated where the system self reconfigures to dem...

  13. Simultaneous optical carrier and radio frequency re-modulation in radio-over-fiber systems employing reflective SOA modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassar, Carvalho; Calabretta, Nicola; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate an innovative full-duplex radio-over-fibre transmission system employing a reflective SOA to perform simultaneous reusing of the optical carrier and data re-modulation, thus avoiding the use of local radiofrequency oscillator at the station sites.......We demonstrate an innovative full-duplex radio-over-fibre transmission system employing a reflective SOA to perform simultaneous reusing of the optical carrier and data re-modulation, thus avoiding the use of local radiofrequency oscillator at the station sites....

  14. Capabilities and Present Status of The Sicaya Radio Telescope in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, J. K.; Kobayashi, H.; Miyoshi, M.

    2017-07-01

    The private telephone company, Telefónica del Perú, stopped operations of the Sicaya Intelsat Station in 2000, we knew that they were looking for some institution to own the Station in 2002 and begun conversations. Finally in 2008, the whole communications station with a 32-meters parabolic antenna was donated to the Geophysical Institute of Peru. Many things have happened since that, but finally we are almost ready to have a radio telescope. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan contributed enormously to set up the radio telescope. Initially as a single dish radio telescope, it will observe methanol maser at 6.7 GHz of young stellar objects. In the near future, equipping for VLBI observations is in the scope. Sicaya is situated on the central part of Peru at 3,370 meters of altitude and the weather is benign for radio astronomical observations, also humidity is low and allows have radio telescopes free of rust.

  15. Linked Station Neighbors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — This file that is a subset of the Linked-Station Set file. This file specifies, for each U.S. or impeding Canadian station part of a linked station set, the set of...

  16. Radio Graceful Hamming Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedzialomski Amanda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For k ∈ ℤ+ and G a simple, connected graph, a k-radio labeling f : V (G → ℤ+ of G requires all pairs of distinct vertices u and v to satisfy |f(u − f(v| ≥ k + 1 − d(u, v. We consider k-radio labelings of G when k = diam(G. In this setting, f is injective; if f is also surjective onto {1, 2, . . . , |V (G|}, then f is a consecutive radio labeling. Graphs that can be labeled with such a labeling are called radio graceful. In this paper, we give two results on the existence of radio graceful Hamming graphs. The main result shows that the Cartesian product of t copies of a complete graph is radio graceful for certain t. Graphs of this form provide infinitely many examples of radio graceful graphs of arbitrary diameter. We also show that these graphs are not radio graceful for large t.

  17. Uranus radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael L.

    An overview of the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument observations of the planet Uranus is presented. From these observations, a number of inferences have been made including the rotation period of the interior of the planet and the source locations of several of the radio components.

  18. Radio Surveys: an Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morganti, Raffaella

    Radio astronomy has provided important surveys that have made possible key (and sometimes serendipitous) discoveries. I will briefly mention some of the past continuum and line (HI) radio surveys as well as new, on-going surveys and surveys planned for the near future. This new generation of large

  19. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The upperionosphere is used for radio communication and navigationas it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Sincesolar radiation is the main cause of the existence of ionosphere,any variation in the radiations can affect the entireradio communication system. This article attempts to brieflyintroduce the ...

  20. Valuing commercial radio licences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerste, M.; Poort, J.; van Eijk, N.

    2015-01-01

    Within the EU regulatory framework, licensees for commercial radio broadcasting may be charged a fee to ensure optimal allocation of scarce resources but not to maximize public revenues. While radio licence renewal occurs in many EU countries, an objective, model-based approach for setting licence

  1. WWVB: A Half Century of Delivering Accurate Frequency and Time by Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Michael A; Nelson, Glenn K

    2014-01-01

    In commemoration of its 50th anniversary of broadcasting from Fort Collins, Colorado, this paper provides a history of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) radio station WWVB. The narrative describes the evolution of the station, from its origins as a source of standard frequency, to its current role as the source of time-of-day synchronization for many millions of radio controlled clocks. PMID:26601026

  2. Modeling Diffusion of Many Innovations via Multilevel Diffusion Curves: Payola in Pop Music Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, Gabriel; Chiu, Ming Ming; Mol, Joeri

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new statistical method – multilevel diffusion curves – to model how multiple innovations spread through an industry. Specifically, we analyze when radio stations begin broadcasting 534 pop singles. Ordinarily radio stations imitate one another, an endogenous process producing a characteristic “s-curve.” However, payola can dwarf this process and produce a characteristic negative exponential curve, controlling for the song artist's number of successful songs in the past year. Th...

  3. 78 FR 16816 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Munds Park, Wickenburg, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Munds Park... Media Bureau grants a Counterproposal filed by Grenax Broadcasting II, LLC, for a new FM allotment on... filed by Univision Radio License Corporation for an increase in existing service by Station KHOV-FM...

  4. 77 FR 66839 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License AGENCY: Federal... MCCALL, ID, To HUNTINGTON, OR; GATEWAY RADIO WORKS, INC., Station WKYN, Facility ID 23345, BPH...

  5. 75 FR 74732 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License AGENCY: Federal..., Facility ID 46969, BPH-20091230AAY, from Titusville, FL, to Deltona, FL; Hawaii Public Radio, Inc., Station KIPM, Facility ID 172438, BMPED-20101019ACS, from Hana, HI, to Waikapu, HI; Huron Broadcasting, LLC...

  6. Native Radio Broadcasting in North America: An Overview of Systems in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce L.; Brigham, Jerry C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the development of Native American (i.e., Indian, Inuit or Eskimo, and Aleut) radio broadcasting in Canada and the United States. Underlying cultural concerns are discussed, funding sources are explored, and further research is suggested. A directory of Native American radio stations in the United States is…

  7. 77 FR 45352 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal...-20120530AFQ, From ROCKY MOUNT, NC, To ELM CITY, NC; SIERRA RADIO, INC., Station KVXX, Facility ID 31618, BPH...

  8. 77 FR 5406 - Amateur Radio Use of the Allocation at 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 97 Amateur Radio Use of the Allocation at 5 MHz AGENCY: Federal Communications... efficient and effective use by the Amateur Radio Service of five channels in the 5330.5-5406.4 kHz band (the... the maximum authorized power amateur stations may transmit in this band, and authorizes amateur...

  9. Energy estimation of cosmic rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allekott, I.; Allison, P.; Docters, W.; Messina, S.; Scholten, O.; van den Berg, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the

  10. RADIO REFRACTIVITY RADIO REFRACTIVITY STUDY IN AKURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The basic parameters that describe the troposphere region are pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Variations in these conditions within the troposphere cause changes in the refractive index of air and large scale changes of refractive index with height cause radio waves to be refracted and the effect can be quite.

  11. Programmable Ultra-Lightweight System Adaptable Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The programmable ultra-lightweight system adaptable radio (PULSAR) is a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center transceiver designed for the CubeSat market, but has the potential for other markets. The PULSAR project aims to reduce size, weight, and power while increasing telemetry data rate. The current version of the PULSAR has a mass of 2.2 kg and a footprint of 10.8 cm2. The height depends on the specific configuration. The PULSAR S-Band Communications Subsystem is an S- and X-band transponder system comprised of a receiver/detector (receiver) element, a transmitter element(s), and related power distribution, command, control, and telemetry element for operation and information interfaces. It is capable of receiving commands, encoding and transmitting telemetry, as well as providing tracking data in a manner compatible with Earthbased ground stations, near Earth network, and deep space network station resources. The software-defined radio's (SDR's) data format characteristics can be defined and reconfigured during spaceflight or prior to launch. The PULSAR team continues to evolve the SDR to improve the performance and form factor to meet the requirements that the CubeSat market space requires. One of the unique features is that the actual radio design can change (somewhat), but not require any hardware modifications due to the use of field programmable gate arrays.

  12. Software-Defined Ground Stations - Enhancing Multi-Mission Support Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 1 proposal to NASA requests $99,055.69 to enhance multiple mission support in ground stations through the use of software defined radios and virtual...

  13. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  14. Unlocking radio broadcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Skov, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This poster reports the preliminary results of a user study uncovering the information seeking behaviour of humanities scholars dedicated to radio research. The study is part of an interdisciplinary research project on radio culture and auditory resources. The purpose of the study is to inform...... the design of information architecture and interaction design of a research infrastructure that will enable future radio and audio based research. Results from a questionnaire survey on humanities scholars’ research interest and information needs, preferred access points, and indexing levels are reported...

  15. Shoestring Budget Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, John E.

    2017-06-01

    The commercial exploitation of microwave frequencies for cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth, HDTV, and satellite digital media transmission has brought down the cost of the components required to build an effective radio telescope to the point where, for the cost of a good eyepiece, you can construct and operate a radio telescope. This paper sets forth a family of designs for 1421 MHz telescopes. It also proposes a method by which operators of such instruments can aggregate and archive data via the Internet. With 90 or so instruments it will be possible to survey the entire radio sky for transients with a 24 hour cadence.

  16. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  17. Voice of the Voiceless: Women Enlightenment, BOU and Community Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Zobaida

    2010-01-01

    The Community broadcasting system poised for start-up in Bangladesh. Long run media-based NGOs, along with other NGOs and the private sector, were attempting to introduce community radio (CR) in Bangladesh. Both the public and private university are also considering a CR station on campus. In CR what will be new and attractive to the learners is…

  18. Community radio and peace-building in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In December 2007, violence broke out after the disputed general election in Kenya, which resulted in the death of 1100 Kenyans and left more than 660,000 displaced. Reports criticised media, especially vernacular media, for inflating the violence by using hate speech and incitement to violence......, and suggested that Kenya would benefit from more community media to prevent history from repeating itself. This article focuses on how Koch FM and Pamoja FM, two community radio stations in Nairobi, Kenya, worked during the 2007–08 tumult and 2013 general election. The article is based on observations...... and interviews with community radio practitioners conducted between 2007 and 2013, and addresses the following questions: How do the community radio stations work during elections – times of increased tensions? How do they discourage ethnic violence in their community? How is participation used in order to bring...

  19. Distributed opportunistic spectrum sharing in cognitive radio networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hawa, Mohammed

    2016-05-19

    In cases where the licensed radio spectrum is underutilized, cognitive radio technology enables cognitive devices to sense and then dynamically access this scarce resource making the most out of it. In this work, we introduce a simple and intuitive, yet powerful and efficient, technique that allows opportunistic channel access in cognitive radio systems in a completely distributed fashion. Our proposed method achieves very high values of spectrum utilization and throughput. It also minimizes interference between cognitive base stations and the primary users licensed to use the spectrum. The algorithm responds quickly and efficiently to variations in the network parameters and also achieves a high degree of fairness between cognitive base stations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A joint model of pulsar radio and gamma ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G.

    The radiation of radio pulsars have been observed from radio to gamma -rays for many years. Observations present abundance infor-mation. Theoretical models for radio and gamma-rays are presented separately. Until now we do not found a model can show emission from radio to gamma -rays at the same time detailedly. For a certain pul-sar, the emission from radio to gamma-rays can be observed at the same time (such as Crab pulsar and so on). So a reasonable model should present the emission from radio to gamma - rays at the same time more detailedly. A joint model for emission from radio to gamma -rays is presented in this paper. Which can show emission characters for both radio and gamma -ray emission band. Such as core and cone emis -s i o n beams at radio emission band, and gamma - rays for Geminga-like, Crab-like and Vela - like emission beams can be shown at the same time. First of all, an inverse Compton scattering model(ICS model, partly see ICS I A &A 1998; ICS II A &A 2001; ICS III ApJ 2000) of radio pulsars will be introduced more detailedly. Then a new model for gamma - ray emission will be introduced. In this model both radio and gamma-ray emission mechanisms are jointed, and the emission beams from radio to gamma -rays can be presented. Various kind of pulse profiles and other observational characteristics can be shown and the theory in agreement with observations well.

  1. Electromagnetic compatibility fundamentals applied to spacecraft radio communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, F.; Celebiler, M.; Weil-Malherbe, C.

    1971-01-01

    A design guide for minimizing electromagnetic interference in aerospace communication equipment for ground stations is presented. Specifically treated are the mechanisms of generating unwanted radio emissions that may affect station operations as well as other communications services, the mechanisms by which sensitive receivers become susceptible to interference, means for reducing interference, standard methods of measurement, and the problems of site selection. The sources of interference are viewed primarily as originating from communications transmitters aboard spacecraft and aircraft, ground transmitters within and outside the ground stations, and other electrical sources on the ground that are not intended to radiate.

  2. 47 CFR 74.780 - Broadcast regulations applicable to translators, low power, and booster stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to translators... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.780 Broadcast...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1692 - Broadcast station construction near or installation on an AM broadcast tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broadcast station construction near or installation on an AM broadcast tower. 73.1692 Section 73.1692 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast...

  4. Modelling indoor electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phone base stations for epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, J.; Vermeulen, R.; van Eijsden, M.; van Strien, R.; Bürgi, A.; Loomans, E.; Guxens, M.; Kromhout, H.; Huss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile phone base stations can be reliably modelled for outdoor locations, using 3D radio wave propagation models that consider antenna characteristics and building geometry. For exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, however, it is

  5. Music, radio and mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Morten; Krogh, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Mediatization has become a key concept for understanding the relations between media and other cultural and social fields. Contributing to the discussions related to the concept of mediatization, this article discusses how practices of radio and music(al life) influence each other. We follow Deacon......’s and Stanyer’s advice to supplement the concept of mediatization with ‘a series of additional concepts at lower levels of abstraction’ and suggest, in this respect, the notion of heterogeneous milieus of music–radio. Hereby, we turn away from the all-encompassing perspectives related to the concept...... of mediatization where media as such seem to be ascribed agency. Instead, we consider historical accounts of music–radio in order to address the complex nonlinearity of concrete processes of mediatization as they take place in the multiple meetings between a decentred notion of radio and musical life....

  6. The digital sport radio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilario José ROMERO BEJARANO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Radio has been immersed in recent years in a phase of technological integration and business of multimedia, as well as diversification of systems and channels for broadcasting. In addition, Internet has been consolidated as the platform of digital radio that more has evolved as a result of its continued expansion. However, the merger radio-Internet must be understood as a new form of communication, and not solely as a new complementary medium. In this context, it is of great interest to analyze that transformations in the way of reception, contents, languages, programs and schedules, has brought with it for the radio that integration. To this end is taken as main reference the sports areas, a key aspect and broadly representative of the current broadcasting landscape.

  7. Social cognitive radio networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents research results on social cognitive radio networks, a transformational and innovative networking paradigm that promotes the nexus between social interactions and cognitive radio networks. Along with a review of the research literature, the text examines the key motivation and challenges of social cognitive radio network design. Three socially inspired distributed spectrum sharing mechanisms are introduced: adaptive channel recommendation mechanism, imitation-based social spectrum sharing mechanism, and evolutionarily stable spectrum access mechanism. The brief concludes with a discussion of future research directions which ascertains that exploiting social interactions for distributed spectrum sharing will advance the state-of-the-art of cognitive radio network design, spur a new line of thinking for future wireless networks, and enable novel wireless service and applications.

  8. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  9. Everyday Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Pranshu; Kumar, Pratik; Yelikar, Anjali; Soni, Kanchan; T, Vineeth Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an affordable, portable college level radio telescope for amateur radio astronomy which can be used to provide hands-on experience with the fundamentals of a radio telescope and an insight into the realm of radio astronomy. With our set-up one can measure brightness temperature and flux of the Sun at 11.2 GHz and calculate the beam width of the antenna. The set-up uses commercially available satellite television receiving system and parabolic dish antenna. We report the detection of point sources like Saturn and extended sources like the galactic arm of the Milky way. We have also developed python pipeline, which are available for free download, for data acquisition and visualization.

  10. Wireless radio a history

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    ""Informative...recommended""--Choice; ""interesting...a good read...well worth reading""--Contact Magazine. This history first looks at Marconi's wireless communications system and then explores its many applications, including marine radio, cellular telephones, police and military uses, television and radar. Radio collecting is also discussed, and brief biographies are provided for the major figures in the development and use of the wireless.

  11. Survey on Cloud Radio Access Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeta Chhatani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing wireless network will face the challenge of data tsunami in the near future. Densification of network will deal huge data traffic but will increase the interferences and network cost. At the same time, the existing wireless network is underutilized due to dynamic traffic. To deal with this adverse scenario, a change in the current network architecture is required. Based on virtualization, Cloud Radio Access Network (CRAN was proposed for wireless network. In CRAN the functionality of base station will be distributed into base band unit (BBU and remote radio heads (RRH which will achieve benefits of centralization. This paper presents a survey on CRAN centring on optimized resource allocation, energy efficiency and throughput maximization under fronthaul capacity. The existing solution and future opportunities in CRAN are also summarized.

  12. Resource Allocation in Heterogeneous Buffered Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Awoyemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resources available for operation in cognitive radio networks (CRN are generally limited, making it imperative for efficient resource allocation (RA models to be designed for them. However, in most RA designs, a significant limiting factor to the RA’s productivity has hitherto been mostly ignored, the fact that different users or user categories do have different delay tolerance profiles. To address this, in this paper, an appropriate RA model for heterogeneous CRN with delay considerations is developed and analysed. In the model, the demands of users are first categorised and then, based on the distances of users from the controlling secondary user base station and with the assumption that the users are mobile, the user demands are placed in different queues having different service capacities and the resulting network is analysed using queueing theory. Furthermore, to achieve optimality in the RA process, an important concept is introduced whereby some demands from one queue are moved to another queue where they have a better chance of enhanced service, thereby giving rise to the possibility of an improvement in the overall performance of the network. The performance results obtained from the analysis, particularly the blocking probability and network throughput, show that the queueing model incorporated into the RA process can help in achieving optimality for the heterogeneous CRN with buffered data.

  13. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  14. Architectural Implementation of NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kenneth J.; Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Duncan, Courtney B.

    2012-01-01

    This software demonstrates a working implementation of the NASA STRS (Space Telecommunications Radio System) architecture specification. This is a developing specification of software architecture and required interfaces to provide commonality among future NASA and commercial software-defined radios for space, and allow for easier mixing of software and hardware from different vendors. It provides required functions, and supports interaction with STRS-compliant simple test plug-ins ("waveforms"). All of it is programmed in "plain C," except where necessary to interact with C++ plug-ins. It offers a small footprint, suitable for use in JPL radio hardware. Future NASA work is expected to develop into fully capable software-defined radios for use on the space station, other space vehicles, and interplanetary probes.

  15. High Dynamic Range Cognitive Radio Front Ends: Architecture to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Arun; Subbiah, Iyappan; Varga, Gabor; Schrey, Moritz; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Advent of TV white space digitization has released frequencies from 470 MHz to 790 MHz to be utilized opportunistically. The secondary user can utilize these so called TV spaces in the absence of primary users. The most important challenge for this coexistence is mutual interference. While the strong TV stations can completely saturate the receiver of the cognitive radio (CR), the cognitive radio spurious tones can disturb other primary users and white space devices. The aim of this paper is to address the challenges for enabling cognitive radio applications in WLAN and LTE. In this process, architectural considerations for the design of cognitive radio front ends are discussed. With high-IF converters, faster and flexible implementation of CR enabled WLAN and LTE are shown. The effectiveness of the architecture is shown by evaluating the CR front ends for compliance of standards namely 802.11b/g (WLAN) and 3GPP TS 36.101 (LTE).

  16. Session 21.3 - Radio and Optical Site Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefako, Ramotholo

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in radio technology means that radio astronomy has to share the radio spectrum with many other non-astronomical activities, majority of which increase radio frequency interference (RFI), and therefore detrimentally affecting the radio observations at the observatory sites. Major radio facilities such as the SKA, in both South Africa and Australia, and the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) in China will be very sensitive, and therefore require protection against RFI. In the case of optical astronomy, the growing urbanisation and industrialisation led to optical astronomy becoming impossible near major cities due to light and dust pollution. Major optical and IR observatories are forced to be far away in remote areas, where light pollution is not yet extreme. The same is true for radio observatories, which have to be sited away from highly RFI affected areas near populated regions and major cities. In this review, based on the Focus Meeting 21 (FM21) oral presentations at the IAU General Assembly on 11 August 2015, we give an overview of the mechanisms that have evolved to provide statutory protection for radio astronomy observing, successes (e.g at 21 cm HI line), defeats and challenges at other parts of the spectrum. We discuss the available legislative initiatives to protect the radio astronomy sites for large projects like SKA (in Australia and South Africa), and FAST against the RFI. For optical protection, we look at light pollution with examples of its effect at Xinglong observing station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Ali Observatory in Tibet, and Asiago Observatory in Italy, as well as the effect of conversion from low pressure sodium lighting to LEDs in the County of Hawaii.

  17. 76 FR 65192 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: Eastern Sierra Broadcasting, Station KCWK, Facility ID 160324, BMP..., BNPH-20110929AGK, from Rotan, TX, to Roscoe, TX; Everglades City Broadcasting Company, Inc., Station...

  18. 78 FR 23565 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License. AGENCY... BROADCASTING, INC., Station KAKS, Facility ID 69858, BPH- 20130318AGJ, From HUNTSVILLE, AR, To GOSHEN, AR; CARROLL COUNTY BROADCASTING, INC., Station KTHS, Facility ID 35668, BP-20130318AGK, From BERRYVILLE, AR...

  19. 75 FR 51812 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-20912] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM... BROADCASTING CORPORATION, Station KWBC, Facility ID 40912, BP-20100712ABU, From NAVASOTA, TX, To COLLEGE..., OR, To ALOHA, OR; IORIO BROADCASTING, INC., Station WNAE-FM, Facility ID 164188, BPH-20100728ABK...

  20. 76 FR 50732 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... the community of license: ALELUYA BROADCASTING NETWORK, Station NEW, Facility ID 123270, BMPED..., Facility ID 170991, BPH-20110620AGF, From HAMILTON, TX, To HICO, TX; NORMIN BROADCASTING CO., Station NEW...

  1. 77 FR 4817 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License AGENCY: Federal..., BMPED- 20120117AEC, From FREEMAN, MO, To ADRIAN, MO; COCHISE BROADCASTING LLC, Station KZXQ, Facility ID... BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC., Station WTDA, Facility ID 60099, BPH-20101004ACN, From WESTERVILLE, OH, To...

  2. Special radio call signal, HW6SPS, used on the SPS Inauguration Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Sagnell, Bengt

    1977-01-01

    CERN had been given a special French call sign for the occasion - HW6SPS - which was used over the weekend to contact a large number of amateur stations in Europe and world-wide to spread the happy message. The stations were manned by ~10 licensed amateur radio operators in SPS.

  3. Exploring Cognition Using Software Defined Radios for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA missions typically operate using a communication infrastructure that requires significant schedule planning with limited flexibility when the needs of the mission change. Parameters such as modulation, coding scheme, frequency, and data rate are fixed for the life of the mission. This is due to antiquated hardware and software for both the space and ground assets and a very complex set of mission profiles. Automated techniques in place by commercial telecommunication companies are being explored by NASA to determine their usability by NASA to reduce cost and increase science return. Adding cognition the ability to learn from past decisions and adjust behavior is also being investigated. Software Defined Radios are an ideal way to implement cognitive concepts. Cognition can be considered in many different aspects of the communication system. Radio functions, such as frequency, modulation, data rate, coding and filters can be adjusted based on measurements of signal degradation. Data delivery mechanisms and route changes based on past successes and failures can be made to more efficiently deliver the data to the end user. Automated antenna pointing can be added to improve gain, coverage, or adjust the target. Scheduling improvements and automation to reduce the dependence on humans provide more flexible capabilities. The Cognitive Communications project, funded by the Space Communication and Navigation Program, is exploring these concepts and using the SCaN Testbed on board the International Space Station to implement them as they evolve. The SCaN Testbed contains three Software Defined Radios and a flight computer. These four computing platforms, along with a tracking antenna system and the supporting ground infrastructure, will be used to implement various concepts in a system similar to those used by missions. Multiple universities and SBIR companies are supporting this investigation. This paper will describe the cognitive system ideas under consideration and

  4. history and operational capability of the ethiopian seismic station

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Alemaya (ALME), Asmera (ASME), Dessie (DESE) and. Wendogenet (WNDE). Later on, the portacorders were replaced by Lennartz analog recorders with time marks made by internal clocks and synchronized daily to radio-broadcast time. Substantial amount of data were collected with the old station network and bulletins ...

  5. 47 CFR 73.213 - Grandfathered short-spaced stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 73.213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... application for authority to operate a Class A station with no more than 3000 watts ERP and 100 meters antenna HAAT (or equivalent lower ERP and higher antenna HAAT based on a class contour distance of 24 km) must...

  6. A Model of Pulsar Radio and Gamma-ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.

    2007-06-01

    A joint model for a pulsar's radio and γ-ray emission is introduced in this paper. This model is informed by two main concepts. One is inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanism for radio emission. The other one is an inner annular region for high energy radiation. In the model the geometry of both radio and γ-ray emission beams can be reproduced. Various morphologies of the radio and γ-ray pulse profiles can also be reproduced by this model. At the radio band, the core and conal emission components are natural results. For the γ-ray band the Geminga-like, Crab-like and Vela-like gamma-ray pulse profiles and their phase shifts relative to radio pulse profiles can be reproduced. There are also some observations, which cannot be understood by traditional models, such as the observed ``bi-drifting'' phenomenon of PSR J0815+09 which can be well understand in this model. It is also pointed out that pulsars as neutron stars or alternately as strange stars may be tested through radiation.

  7. Water Level Station History

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Images contain station history information for 175 stations in the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON). The NWLON is a network of long-term,...

  8. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  9. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  10. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  11. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  12. Streamflow Gaging Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  13. Newport Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Newport Research Station is the Center's only ocean-port research facility. This station is located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center,...

  14. Big Game Reporting Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Point locations of big game reporting stations. Big game reporting stations are places where hunters can legally report harvested deer, bear, or turkey. These are...

  15. Reference Climatological Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Reference Climatological Stations (RCS) network represents the first effort by NOAA to create and maintain a nationwide network of stations located only in areas...

  16. Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsed Emission from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Y. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Chen, D.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed γ-ray emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) has been detected by the sensitive Fermi space telescope, which sheds light on studies of the emission region and its mechanism. In particular, the specific patterns of radio and γ-ray emission from PSR J0101-6422 challenge the popular pulsar models, e.g., outer gap and two-pole caustic models. Using the three-dimensional annular gap model, we have jointly simulated radio and γ-ray light curves for three representative MSPs (PSR J0034-0534, PSR J0101-6422, and PSR J0437-4715) with distinct radio phase lags, and present the best simulated results for these MSPs, particularly for PSR J0101-6422 with complex radio and γ-ray pulse profiles, and for PSR J0437-4715 with a radio interpulse. We have found that both the γ-ray and radio emission originate from the annular gap region located in only one magnetic pole, and the radio emission region is not primarily lower than the γ-ray region in most cases. In addition, the annular gap model with a small magnetic inclination angle instead of an "orthogonal rotator" can account for the MSPs' radio interpulse with a large phase separation from the main pulse. The annular gap model is a self-consistent model not only for young pulsars but also MSPs, and multi-wavelength light curves can be fundamentally explained using this model.

  17. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This 6th edition of “Tools of Radio Astronomy”, the most used introductory text in radio astronomy, has been revised to reflect the current state of this important branch of astronomy. This includes the use of satellites, low radio frequencies, the millimeter/sub-mm universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background and the increased importance of mm/sub-mm dust emission. Several derivations and presentations of technical aspects of radio astronomy and receivers, such as receiver noise, the Hertz dipole and  beam forming have been updated, expanded, re-worked or complemented by alternative derivations. These reflect advances in technology. The wider bandwidths of the Jansky-VLA and long wave arrays such as LOFAR and mm/sub-mm arrays such as ALMA required an expansion of the discussion of interferometers and aperture synthesis. Developments in data reduction algorithms have been included. As a result of the large amount of data collected in the past 20 years, the discussion of solar system radio astronomy, dust em...

  18. Radio Galaxy Zoo: A Search for Hybrid Morphology Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapińska, A. D.; Terentev, I.; Wong, O. I.; Shabala, S. S.; Andernach, H.; Rudnick, L.; Storer, L.; Banfield, J. K.; Willett, K. W.; de Gasperin, F.; Lintott, C. J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Schawinski, K.; Seymour, N.; Simmons, B.

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid morphology radio sources (HyMoRS) are a rare type of radio galaxy that display different Fanaroff-Riley classes on opposite sides of their nuclei. To enhance the statistical analysis of HyMoRS, we embarked on a large-scale search of these sources within the international citizen science project, Radio Galaxy Zoo (RGZ). Here, we present 25 new candidate hybrid morphology radio galaxies. Our selected candidates are moderate power radio galaxies ({L}{median}=4.7× {10}24 W Hz-1 sr-1) at redshifts 0.14 1 Mpc) radio galaxies, one resides at the center of a galaxy cluster, and one is hosted by a rare green bean galaxy. Although the origin of the hybrid morphology radio galaxies is still unclear, this type of radio source starts depicting itself as a rather diverse class. We discuss hybrid radio morphology formation in terms of the radio source environment (nurture) and intrinsically occurring phenomena (nature; activity cessation and amplification), showing that these peculiar radio galaxies can be formed by both mechanisms. While high angular resolution follow-up observations are still necessary to confirm our candidates, we demonstrate the efficacy of the RGZ in the pre-selection of these sources from all-sky radio surveys, and report the reliability of citizen scientists in identifying and classifying complex radio sources.

  19. VOICE OF THE VOICELESS: Women Enlightenment, BOU and Community Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobaida AKHTER

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community broadcasting system is on the way to start in Bangladesh. The CR installation Operation and Broadcasting Policy-2008 has been announced on 12 March this year. The application for the permission of setting up community radio have been asked through advertisement since 18 March 2008.A total of 400 application form were sold and 178 applicants submitted to The Ministry of Information for the permission of the community radio set up, about 50 community radio station are expected to start soon in Bangladesh and then rest of the 66 station will get permission to start their CR station. Recently Bangladesh Government has approved the regulation of the community radio in Bangladesh To inform the general mass of the country, it has been published in the website of The Ministry of Information. Since long run media based NGOs along with other NGOs and private sector were trying their best to introduce CR in Bangladesh. They have started advocacy in the policy making level. Many studies have been conducted based on the experience of other South Asian country to make it fruitful and more pragmatic to the people of Bangladesh. Total 116 institutions are expected to get this opportunity for two years pilot phase. Initially some of them will start broadcasting their programs for four hours; gradually they have a plan to broadcast their programs for 24 hours depending on the needs and feasibility of the community people. At present the frequency will cover 17 km radius.

  20. Galactic radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This book is a concise primer on galactic radio astronomy for undergraduate and graduate students, and provides wide coverage of galactic astronomy and astrophysics such as the physics of interstellar matter and the dynamics and structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies. Radio astronomy and its technological development have led to significant progress in galactic astronomy and contributed to understanding interstellar matter and galactic structures. The book begins with the fundamental physics of radio-wave radiation, i.e., black body radiation, thermal emission, synchrotron radiation, and HI and molecular line emissions. The author then gives overviews of ingredients of galactic physics, including interstellar matter such as the neutral (HI), molecular hydrogen, and ionized gases, as well as magnetic fields in galaxies. In addition, more advanced topics relevant to the Galaxy and galaxies are also contained here: star formation, supernova remnants, the Galactic Center and black holes, galactic dynamics...

  1. Radio frequency spectrum management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujdak, E. J., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This thesis is a study of radio frequency spectrum management as practiced by agencies and departments of the Federal Government. After a brief introduction to the international agency involved in radio frequency spectrum management, the author concentrates on Federal agencies engaged in frequency management. These agencies include the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). Based on an analysis of Department of Defense frequency assignment procedures, recommendations are given concerning decentralizing military frequency assignment by delegating broader authority to unified commanders. This proposal includes a recommendation to colocate the individual Service frequency management offices at the Washington level. This would result in reduced travel costs, lower manpower requirements, and a common tri-Service frequency management data base.

  2. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 08 October 1967 to 03 November 1967 (NODC Accession 6700465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 September 1969 to 04 October 1969 (NODC Accession 6900780)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 22 November 1972 to 20 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the United...

  5. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1966-07-03 to 1966-07-31 (NODC Accession 6600142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BARATARIA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 August 1965 to 01 September 1965 (NODC Accession 6500979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BARATARIA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 February 1970 to 07 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 December 1961 to 06 January 1962 (NODC Accession 6100391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 July 1970 to 05 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7000900)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the Spencer within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 15 May 1970 to 06 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the United...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 November 1972 to 14 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 July 1962 to 02 August 1962 (NODC Accession 6200220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the GRESHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 February 1972 to 01 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7200488)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the GRESHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 February 1977 to 18 February 1977 (NODC Accession 7700208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 July 1967 to 19 July 1967 (NODC Accession 6700331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 August 1977 14 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7700733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 October 1973 to 19 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 December 1975 to 16 January 1976 (NODC Accession 7600328)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the VANCOUVER from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 30 October to 01 December 1968 (NODC Accession 6900711)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the VANCOUVER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 July 1970 to 19 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7000910)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data were...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 February 1974 to 11 March 1974 (NODC Accession 7400247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 January 1971 to 02 February 1971 (NODC Accession 7100301)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data were...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 September 1975 to 03 October 1975 (NODC Accession 7500970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 November 1967 to 03 December 1967 (NODC Accession 6700603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 November 1976 to 09 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7700004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CONNOLE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 September 1974 to 01 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7400754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CONNOLE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the US...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 August 1974 to 08 September 1974 (NODC Accession 7400651)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the ABSECON and other platforms from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWs-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 October 1966 to 03 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7000953)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ABSECON, CHINCOTEAGUE, GRESHAM, and ROCKAWAY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 August 1973 to 23 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7301000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BELKNAP and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 03 February 1969 to 18 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7000904)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BELKNAP and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N 03530W), D...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 February 1974 to 27 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 December 1976 to 12 January 1977 (NODC Accession 7700090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1974 to 16 April 1974 (NODC Accession 7400368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the VANCOUVER from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1968-08-12 to 1968-09-22 (NODC Accession 6900709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the VANCOUVER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 13 November 1963 to 08 December 1963 (NODC Accession 6300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1961-10-19 to 1961-11-12 (NODC Accession 6100264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1969-06-29 to 1969-07-31 (NODC Accession 6900621)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 July 1966 to 24 August 1966 (NODC Accession 6600282)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 February 1967 to 16 March 1967 (NODC Accession 6700092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (56305N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 30 September 1971 to 20 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7101329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CIRRUS and CUMULUS from Ocean Weather Station K (OWS-K) and M (OWS-M) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 January 1969 to 16 January 1970 (NODC Accession 7000939)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CIRRUS and CUMULUS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station K (4500N 01600W), M (6600N 00200E), and in transit....

  2. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BARATARIA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 01 May 1969 to 26 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BARATARIA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the VANCOUVER from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 10 December 1967 to 13 January 1968 (NODC Accession 6900710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the VANCOUVER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 September 1961 to 01 October 1961 (NODC Accession 6100139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the VANCOUVER from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 11 January 1969 to 26 February 1969 (NODC Accession 6900708)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the VANCOUVER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the MACKINAC from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 March 1967 to 11 April 1967 (NODC Accession 6700119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the MACKINAC within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 March 1963 to 27 April 1963 (NODC Accession 6300056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the GRESHAM from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1955-12-08 to 1956-01-04 (NODC Accession 5500035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the GRESHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 1963-03-28 to 1963-04-23 (NODC Accession 6300119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 March 1965 to 06 April 1965 (NODC Accession 6500777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Participation in radio programmes and immigration. The Romanian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia González Aldea, Ph. D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish social reality has evolved during the last years into a multicultural society, but these “new citizens” are very poorly represented on the media. They rarely become protagonists of any piece of news and when they do, the limitations of informative programming promote an stereotyped discourse.Romanians lead the ranking of immigration by country of origin in Spain and their ethnic media are numerous. Along with these, other multicultural media give voice to the immigrants and deal more deeply with the different identities to promote integration and coexistence.Based on the hypothesis that the participation of the Romanians in radio programmes is scarce, as well as contents referring to this ethnic group, the aim of this research is to undertake a longitudinal analysis of radio consumption, the form of participation of Romanians in radio programming, and the Romanian image transmitted by these contents. Four radio programmes are analyzed: ‘Nuevos Ciudadanos’ (‘New Citizens’ from Punto Radio; ‘Otros Acentos’ (‘Other Accents’ from RNE Radio Exterior; ‘Rumano en el Mundo’ (Romanian in the World from Radio Tentación; and ‘Buenas Tardes Rumania’ (Good Afternoon Romania from Integración Radio.In the discussion and conclusion section we highlight the low consumption of radio news and two predominant forms of participation: the legal queries and musical dedications, particularly on ethnic stations, which in this way reinforce their identitary character. Furthermore, with the end of the labour moratorium for Romanians and Bulgarians since January 2009 and the free movement of these workers, the presence of this community on the programming mentioned above has decreased.

  12. INTERACT Station Catalogue - 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    INTERACT stations are located in all major environmental envelopes of the Arctic providing an ideal platform for studying climate change and its impact on the environment and local communities. Since alpine environments face similar changes and challenges as the Arctic, the INTERACT network also...... includes some alpine stations located outside the Arctic. The INTERACT research stations provide an ideal platform for circumarctic research and monitoring. Activities span from small short term research projects to larger long term monitoring programmes. The stations are thus visited by many researchers...... and research groups. Therefore, INTERACT has produced a catalogue of research stations including descriptions of the physical setting, facilities and services offered at the stations. It is our hope that this catalogue will help researchers identify research stations that suit their specific needs. The 2015...

  13. Ionosphere monitoring with polish LOFAR station PL610

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothkaehl, Hanna; Pożoga, Mariusz; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Przepiórka, Dorota; Wronowski, Roman; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Grzesiak, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    LOFAR the Low-Frequency Array is very powerful tool not only for the radio astronomy but also for space weather monitoring. Single station consists of two groups of antennas LBA (Low Band Antenna) and HBA (High Band Antenna) working in different frequency ranges from 10-90 MHz and 110-250 MHz. LOFAR has a multi-arm log-spiral geometry that provides a well filled U,V plane and individual sharp beams that can be digitally steered independently. All this features are very useful for ionospheric studies and allow for local and global analysis of ionospheric plasma characteristic over whole teloscope and single station. Here we present new approach of using LOFAR radio observations from polish station PL610 in Borówiec as a complementary tool for ionospheric diagnostic and space weather monitoring.

  14. La radio glocal cross-media: la alternativa ante la reducción de espacios de proximidad local en la radio convencional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Chomón Serna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Palabras clave: Información, Proximidad, Radio-periódico, Inmediatez, Cross-media, Transmedia ResumenLas cadenas radiofónicas españolas, Ser, Onda Cero, Cope y RNE (Radio 5 Todo Noticias compiten por la reducción de la proximidad local, sin reparar en las consecuencias y fijando como objetivo los recortes económicos.Las cadenas radiofónicas, mediante un proceso de mimetismo, aplican una misma pauta de programación local, y tienden a instaurar un nuevo modelo radiofónico: la “radio-periódico”. Este modelo supone la pérdida de dos de las principales características de la radio: la inmediatez y la cercanía.La estrategia de reducción de contenidos locales no supone en este contexto una contradicción si se compensa mediante las herramientas que propicien que el “prosumer” acceda a contenidos “glocales”, facilitando la actividad cross-media  y el relato transmedia. Keywords: Information, Proximity, Radio-newspaper, Immediacy, Cross-media, Transmedia AbstractThe Spanish radio stations Ser, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE (Radio 5 Todo Noticias compete for the reduction of local proximity, without thinking about the consequences and setting the economic cutbacks as the only objective.The radio stations, through a mimicry process, make use of the same pattern of local schedule, having established a new radio model: the radio-newspaper. This model means the loss of two of the main radio features: The immediacy and the nearness.The reduction of local content strategy does not mean, in this context, a contradiction if it is offsetting by the tools that propitiate the access of the "prosumer" to "glocal" contents, making easier the cross-media activity and the transmedia stories.

  15. A reconfigurable radio architecture for Cognitive Radio in emergency networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive Radio has been proposed as a promising technology to solve today’s spectrum scarcity problem. Cognitive Radio is able to sense the spectrum to find the free spectrum, which can be optimally used by Cognitive Radio without causing interference to the licensed user. In the scope of the

  16. Radio spectra of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, WH; Barthel, PD; ODea, CP

    A well defined sample of 72 Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio sources is compiled, having turnover frequencies in the range of 0.5 - 10 GHz. Using this sample, the canonical GPS radio spectrum is constructed, which is found to have a constant shape, independent of AGN type, redshift or radio

  17. Spectrum management and radio resource management considering cognitive radio systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, J.C.; Wieweg, Lasse; Huschke, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    International fora and some national administrations define a cognitive radio (CR) as a pioneering radio communication system that would be capable of altering and adapting its transmitter and receiver parameters based on communication and the exchange of information with related detectable radio

  18. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY: Federal... of Engineering and Technology, (202) 418-7506, e-mail: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR 23032...

  19. Radio occultation bending angle anomalies during tropical cyclones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, S.

    2011-01-01

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The aim of this work is to better understand these processes and to investigate if severe storms leave a significant...... signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS radio occultation missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 h and a space window of 300 km from the eye...

  20. A History of Radio Communications in the Baltimore District

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-30

    1950 picture he is still using the original AM radio equipment of WWII vintage. B-85 WUB48 (cont’d) The slalom starts just downstream from the dam...WUB48 (cont’d) Boat dock at East Sidney Lake. Water skiing is a favorite sport. B-88 WUB48 (cont’d) Bead dam operator’s house. Radio station is in...cont’d) ’"- , In July 1972 qualifying slalom races were held on Savage River prior to Olympic tryouts. This 1973 picture shows a canoeist going through

  1. Radio Frequency Energy Harvesting for Long Lifetime Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    , harvesting energy from the radio frequency (RF) waves gives the lowest system design. Previous research on RF energy harvesting is based on the model that the radio energy is omnidirectional in the air. In this paper, a directional transmission/receiving model is proposed which can further overcome the path...... loss of the RF signals. On the node level, a virtual floating gate based CMOS biasing is used for the energy conversion circuit. With the proposed technique, the sensor node is able to harvest the energy from base station up to 30 meters....

  2. On Radio over Fiber for Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, M. Tahir; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the radio over fiber (RoF) technology and its potential use in heterogeneous wireless networks. Wireless communications have seen a huge growth in the last decade. It has been estimated that five in every six people in the entire world will have a mobile phone...... provisioning - FUTON) based on RoF technology has been introduced. The project adopts centralized processing of radio signals for number of wireless base stations can enhance the network performance in terms of bandwidth, and QoS parameters. The simplified remote access units (RAU) are expected to not only...

  3. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array – performance and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallgren Allan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays at ∼1020 eV is still unknown. Ultra-high energy neutrinos from the GZK process should provide information on the sources and their properties. A promising and cost effective method for observing GZK-neutrinos is based on detection of Askaryan radio pulses with antennas installed in ice. The ARIANNA project aims at instrumenting a 36*36 km2 large area on the Ross Ice Shelf with an array of radio detection stations. The deployment of a test system for ARIANNA, the Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA, was completed in December 2014. The three first stations were installed in 2012. Solar panels are used to drive the < 10 W stations. The system hibernated at sunset in April and all stations returned to operation in September. The site is essentially free of anthropogenic noise. Simple cuts eliminate background and provides for efficient selection of neutrino events. Prospects for the sensitivity of the full ARIANNA array to the flux of GZK neutrinos are shown.

  4. STS-35 Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) equipment stowed on middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) window antenna is shown in its stowage location (inside the window shade and filter kit) on the middeck of JSC's Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. The antenna was built at no cost to the government by the Motorola Amateur Radio Club in Schaumburg, Illinois. SAREX was designed to conduct shortwave radio transmissions between ground amateur radio operators and a licensed onboard operator (in this case, Parise). Parise's call letters are WA4SIR. SAREX will communicate with amateur stations in Line-of-Site (LOS) of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, in one of four transmission modes: voice, Slow Scan Television (SSTV), data or (uplink only) Fast Scan Television (FSTV). SAREX is a jont effort of NASA and the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) / Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation (AMSAT).

  5. STS-35 Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) equipment held by R. Parise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) window antenna is held by Payload Specialist Ronald A. Parise outside the JSC Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in the Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. The antenna was built at no cost to the government by the Motorola Amateur Radio Club in Schaumburg, Illinois. SAREX was designed to conduct shortwave radio transmissions between ground amateur radio operators and a licensed onboard operator (in this case, Parise). Parise's call letters are WA4SIR. SAREX will communicate with amateur stations in Line-of-Site (LOS) of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, in one of four transmission modes: voice, Slow Scan Television (SSTV), data or (uplink only) Fast Scan Television (FSTV). SAREX is a jont effort of NASA and the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) / Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation (AMSAT).

  6. CLUSTERED RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC CALIBRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi, S.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an amendment to radio interferometric calibration of sources below the noise level. The main idea is to employ the information of the stronger sources' measured signals as a plug-in criterion to solve for the weaker ones. For this purpose, we construct a number of source

  7. Educational Broadcasting--Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Uvais; Grimmett, George

    This manual is intended for those who must conduct educational radio broadcasting training courses in Asia-Pacific countries without the resources of experienced personnel, as well as for individuals to use in self-learning situations. The selection of material has been influenced by the need to use broadcasting resources effectively in programs…

  8. Radio Broadcast Technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Radio Broadcast Technology. Harsh Vardhan. General Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 53-63. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/01/0053-0063. Keywords. Hertzian ...

  9. Division x: Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Russ; Chapman, Jessica; Rendong, Nan; Carilli, Christopher; Giovannini, Gabriele; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prajval

    This triennium has seen a phenomenal investment in development of observational radio astronomy facilities in all parts of the globe at a scale that significantly impacts the international community. This includes both major enhancements such as the transition from the VLA to the EVLA in North

  10. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  11. Valuing commercial radio licences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerste, M.; Poort, J.; van Eijk, N.

    2011-01-01

    Within the EU Regulatory Framework, licensees for commercial radio broadcasting may be charged a fee to ensure optimal allocation of scarce resources but not to maximize public revenues. In this paper, it is described how such a fee can be determined for the purpose of licence renewal or extension.

  12. Digital Low Frequency Radio Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Soula, S.; van der Velde, O.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Gaffet, S.; Pincon, J.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution reports the design, realization and operation of a novel digital low frequency radio camera towards an exploration of the Earth's electromagnetic environment with particular emphasis on lightning discharges and subsequent atmospheric effects such as transient luminous events. The design of the digital low frequency radio camera is based on the idea of radio interferometry with a network of radio receivers which are separated by spatial baselines comparable to the wavelength of the observed radio waves, i.e., ~1-100 km which corresponds to a frequency range from ~3-300 kHz. The key parameter towards the realization of the radio interferometer is the frequency dependent slowness of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere with respect to the speed of light in vacuum. This slowness is measured with the radio interferometer by using well documented radio transmitters. The digital low frequency radio camera can be operated in different modes. In the imaging mode, still photographs show maps of the low frequency radio sky. In the video mode, movies show the dynamics of the low frequency radio sky. The exposure time of the photograhps, the frame rate of the video, and the radio frequency of interest can be adjusted by the observer. Alternatively, the digital radio camera can be used in the monitoring mode, where a particular area of the sky is observed continuously. The first application of the digital low frequency radio camera is to characterize the electromagnetic energy emanating from sprite producing lightning discharges, but it is expected that it can also be used to identify and investigate numerous other radio sources of the Earth's electromagnetic environment.

  13. Extragalactic radio continuum surveys and the transformation of radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ray P.

    2017-10-01

    Next-generation radio surveys are about to transform radio astronomy by discovering and studying tens of millions of previously unknown radio sources. These surveys will provide fresh insights for understanding the evolution of galaxies, measuring the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate, and rivalling traditional techniques in the measurement of fundamental cosmological parameters. By observing a new volume of observational parameter space, they are also likely to discover unexpected phenomena. This Review traces the evolution of extragalactic radio continuum surveys from the earliest days of radio astronomy to the present, and identifies the challenges that must be overcome to achieve this transformational change.

  14. INOVASI RADIO KAMPUS (RANCANG BANGUN RADIO UDINUS DENGAN INOVASI TEKNOLOGI @RADIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellia Shinta Sari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan Teknologi Informasi dan Komunikasi (TIK memaksa industri penyiaran untuk ikut menyesuaikan diri. Radio konvensional bisa jadi akan tertinggal jika tidak melakukan inovasi teknologi yang ada. Begitu juga dengan radio kampus, yang keberadaannya sangat dibutuhkan sebagai wadah kreativitas dan sarana pembelajaran di sebuah universitas, apalagi yang memiliki program studi penyiaran. Radio kampus Suara Dian yang masih konvensional sehingga hampir kehilangan eksistensinya harus segera dibenahi dan dihidupkan kembali dengan mengikuti perkembangan teknologi di era konvergensi. Metode Inovasi teknologi yang bisa dilakukan adalah dengan menggunakan teknologi @Radio Streaming, yang bukan sekedar streaming, tapi juga optimalisasi teknologi yang terintegrasi dinamis melalui RISE (Radio Broadcasting Integrated System. Dengan berbagai fitur unggul dari inovasi teknologi tersebut, maka diharapkan Radio kampus Udinus ”Suara Dian” dapat kembali hidup, berkembang dan lebih kompetitif ditengah industri penyiaran Radio. Kata kunci : radio, kampus, konvergensi, streaming.

  15. Configurable SDR Operation for Cognitive Radio Applications using GNU Radio and the Universal Software Radio Peripheral

    OpenAIRE

    Scaperoth, David Alan

    2007-01-01

    With interoperability issues plaguing emergency responders throughout the country, Cognitive Radio (CR) offers a unique solution to streamline communication between police, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), and military officers. Using Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology, a flexible radio platform can be potentially configured using a Cognitive Engine (CE) to transmit and receive many different incompatible radio standards. In this thesis, an interface between a Cognitive Engine and...

  16. Shock Acceleration Model with Postshock Turbulence for Giant Radio Relics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung

    2017-08-01

    We explore the shock acceleration model for giant radio relics, in which relativistic electrons are accelerated via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) by merger-driven shocks in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. In addition to DSA, turbulent acceleration by compressive MHD modes downstream of the shock are included as well as energy losses of postshock electrons due to Coulomb scattering, synchrotron emission, and inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation. Considering that only a small fraction of merging clusters host radio relics, we favor a reacceleration scenario in which radio relics are generated preferentially by shocks encountering the regions containing low-energy (γ_{e} ≲ 300) cosmic ray electrons (CRe). We perform time-dependent DSA simulations of spherically expanding shocks with physical parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic, and calculate the radio synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe. We find that significant level of postshock turbulent acceleration is required in order to reproduce broad profiles of the observed radio flux densities of the Sausage relic. Moreover, the spectral curvature in the observed integrated radio spectrum can be explained, if the putative shock should have swept up and exited out of the preshock region of fossil CRe about 10 Myr ago.

  17. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  18. Amtrak Rail Stations (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Updated database of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) Amtrak Station database. This database is a geographic data set containing Amtrak intercity railroad...

  19. Space Station operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An evaluation of the success of the Space Station will be based on the service provided to the customers by the Station crew, the productivity of the crew, and the costs of operation. Attention is given to details regarding Space Station operations, a summary of operational philosophies and requirements, logistics and resupply operations, prelaunch processing and launch operations, on-orbit operations, aspects of maintainability and maintenance, habitability, and questions of medical care. A logistics module concept is considered along with a logistics module processing timeline, a habitability module concept, and a Space Station rescue mission.

  20. Hekinan thermal power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Hekinan thermal power station is situated at the port of Kinuura in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. Unit 1 began commercial operation in October 1991, Unit 2 in June 1992 and Unit 3 in April 1993. This brochure gives the specification of the main facilities of the power station, shows its layout; illustrates its pollution control equipment, gives specifications of its flue gas treatment systems and of its large steam turbine, describes its coal handling facilities and gives their specifications, and mentions the power station`s automated control system.

  1. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  2. DCFRN: a radio network for small farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amt, W

    1986-01-01

    The Developing Countries Farm Radio Network (DCFRN), a media group founded in 1979, is committed to assisting small farmers to increase their food supplies by using established radio stations along with other local communication channels to spread agricultural information. The success of this effort is evident in the fact that over 500 broadcasters or organizations in over 100 countries disseminate DCFRN information to an estimated 100,000,000 listeners in about 100 languages. 9 packets have been produced and distributed thus far. Information is gathered on appropriate and inexpensive technologies grassroots level farmers use in developing countries to increase food production, decrease post harvest losses and to make more efficient use of food. The source of this information is on-site interviews with small farmers, farm broadcasters, extension workers, health workers, scientists, and university and government officials; printed materials; and feedback from questionnaires that are included in each information packet. Information on agricultural or nutritional innovations must be developed, tested, and proven in the developing world and must be adaptable in other developing countries in order to be put on tape and then be disseminated by DCFRN. The radio scripts are prepared in a culturally and religiously neutral style. The scripts cover a wide variety of agricultural or health and nutrition issues. Each packet contains "The Blue Sheet," DCFRN's newsletter for participants in the Network. It provides current information about the Network and also covers other development issues not included in the radio scripts. DCFRN information also has been used in newspaper articles, posters, classroom teaching, video tapes, television shows, loudspeaker broadcasts, and puppet shows.

  3. Analisis Propagasi Gelombang Radio Menggunakan DLink 624 pada Jurusan Teknik Elektro Universitas Syiah Kuala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Syahrial

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunication technology nowadays tries to implement Personal Communication System (PCS which has Personal Mobility (PM and Terminal Mobility (TM. PCS can be define as radio technology that uses Radio Frequency (RF as a transmission medium, which is small and light, and can be implemented indoor and outdoor. One equipment that implements this technology is called D-Link. The application of D-Link is to communicate among users either indoor or outdoor. Research methodology includes deciding the parameters and calculating the path loss between base station and portable station at the second floor of Electrical Engineering Department Syiah Kuala University. The final result was that the communication between the base station and portable station in the rooms at the second floor could exist but the process is rather slow and can experience discontinuity. Those were happenbecause the receiver’s power was below the threshold of the portable station level, i.e.. -40 dB.

  4. The Concept of 'Radio Music'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    , educational and didactic effort which would enlighten all of society. For a while it seemed that radio music was considered a genre of its own. To fulfil its function, radio music had to consider technical limitations as well as the educational level and listening modes of the new mass audience. Public radio......, as discussed by Kurt Weill and Paul Hindemith, was at first greeted with great expectations, but soon a more realistic attitude prevailed. Weill, himself a radio critic as well, composed Der Lindberghflug (1929) as a piece of ‘radio music theatre’, but then changed some of its features in order to turn...... it into a didactical play for amateurs, a so-called Lehrstück. The article will present the concept of ‘radio music’ developed within German Neue Sachlichkeit and discuss the relevance of such a concept for current research in the field of radio and music....

  5. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CIRRUS and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 06 December 1967 to 04 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7101080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CIRRUS and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  6. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ARNEB and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 28 August 1951 to 10 April 1964 (NODC Accession 6900232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ARNEB and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  7. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The recent years have seen breathtaking progress in technology, especially in the receiver and digital technologies relevant for radio astronomy, which has at the same time advanced to shorter wavelengths. This is the updated and completely revised 5th edition of the most used introductory text in radio astronomy. It presents a unified treatment of the entire field from centimeter to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Topics covered include instruments, sensitivity considerations, observational methods and interpretations of the data recorded with both single dishes and interferometers. This text is useful to both students and experienced practicing astronomers. Besides making major updates and additions throughout the book, the authors have re-organized a number of chapters to more clearly separate basic theory from rapidly evolving practical aspects. Further, problem sets have been added at the end of each chapter.

  8. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture. Part 1; Tutorial - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Louis M.; Briones, Janette C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard provides a NASA standard for software-defined radio. STRS is being demonstrated in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed formerly known as Communications, Navigation and Networking Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT). Ground station radios communicating the SCaN testbed are also being written to comply with the STRS architecture. The STRS Architecture Tutorial Overview presents a general introduction to the STRS architecture standard developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), addresses frequently asked questions, and clarifies methods of implementing the standard. The STRS architecture should be used as a base for many of NASA s future telecommunications technologies. The presentation will provide a basic understanding of STRS.

  9. Radio Frequency Spectrum Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    limits, emmission standards, etc., cover many pages. Other available non-technical policy statements are of the motherhood-and-apple-pie ilk. Further...and 2) by allowing the onscene commander who is acutely aware of the radio frequency emmission environment in his area to make assignments. The author...need for investment in specific human capi- tal vice on the job experience, it will never eliminate it. Rather vice education and training in

  10. Programme driven music radio

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Conor; Cunningham, Padraig; Clerkin, Patrick; Grimaldi, Marco

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of and research behind a networked application for the delivery of personalised streams of music at Trinity College Dublin. Smart Radio is a web based client-server application that uses streaming audio technology and recommendation techniques to allow users build, manage and share music programmes. While it is generally acknowledged that music distribution over the web will dramatically change how the music industry operates, there are ...

  11. Acoustic characteristics of male commercial and public radio broadcast voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Samantha; McCabe, Patricia; Yiu, Edwin; Heard, Robert; Madill, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Radio broadcasters need to have a voice that suits the station, which employs them. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any acoustic measures that reflect differences between male broadcasters, who use their voices on commercial and public radio stations, and nonbroadcasting, male controls. Male commercial (n = 4) and public (n = 11) broadcasters and two groups of male, age-matched controls were recorded while reading the "Rainbow Passage" as if presenting on radio. Reading productions were analyzed for equivalent sound level (L(eq)), two measures of the long-term average spectrum and two measures of cepstral peak prominence. A two-group (ie, commercial vs public) by two-paired (broadcaster/matching control) analysis of variance was performed for each measure. An interaction effect was observed such that commercial broadcasters had a higher peak in speaker's formant (SF) region and lower alpha ratio (AR) (lower level difference between 0 and 1 k Hz and 1 and 4 kHz ranges) than public broadcasters and controls. Post hoc discriminant function analyses showed that AR could predict whether a radio performer worked on commercial or public radio network to 81% accuracy (R(2) = 0.810, P broadcasters have a more prominent peak in the SF region and smaller AR than public broadcasters and controls, similar to levels documented in actors. Given these features were not found in the public broadcasters and either control group, these results indicate that voice quality requirements for broadcasters may distinctly differ based on their station of employment. Further research with a larger sample size is required to validate this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Danmarks Radios stemmer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna

    kanalspeakerne kändisser, hvis fortalelser i æteren såvel som private gøren og laden blev fulgt nøje i dagspressen. Anna Lawaetz har med ph.d.-afhandlingen Danmarks Radios stemmer med udgangspunkt i kanalspeakerne på P1 i perioden 1925-2012 gennem empiriske studier kortlagt fortællingen om institutionens stemmer...... – nøje udvalgte ikke-fiktionsstemmer i Danmarks Radio igennem tiden. Samtidig har hun lavet en konkret analyse af stemmerne baseret på både akustiske målinger og kategorisering af oplevelsen af stemmerne. Fx taler kanalspeakerne på P1 i dag ikke hurtigere end tidligere, men pauserne er blevet kortere...... datamængder kræver udvikling af nye metoder. Den metodiske udvikling har her været baseret på optagelser af stemmer for at undersøge hvordan man videnskabeligt kan arbejde med optagelser af stemmer som mere end teksttransskriptioner inden for det kulturvidenskabelige felt med afsæt i Danmarks Radios...

  13. La radio universitaria como formadora de profesionales. Análisis de la relación entre los títulos de grado y la radio universitaria española/College radio as coaching professional. Analysis of the relationship between the degrees and Spanish university radio

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Regina Pinto Zúñiga; Daniel Martín-Pena; Agustín Vivas Moreno

    2016-01-01

      College radio is subject to constant transformation. The rise of information and communications technologies has allowed its development and modernization as well as the proliferation of new professional profiles...

  14. La radio universitaria como formadora de profesionales. Análisis de la relación entre los títulos de grado y la radio universitaria española/College radio as coaching professional. Analysis of the relationship between the degrees and Spanish university radio

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Regina Pinto Zúñiga

    2016-01-01

    College radio is subject to constant transformation. The rise of information and communications technologies has allowed its development and modernization as well as the proliferation of new professional profiles...

  15. Secure base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Brusilovsky, Alec; McLellan, Rae; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of the third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) base station router (BSR) and fourth generation (4G) base stations, such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) Evolved Node B (eNB), it has become important to

  16. Station Climatic Summaries, Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    274 MALAYSIA SINGAPORE APRT 486940 8505 (OCDS) ................................................... 278 NORTH KOREA CHANGJON/ONSEIRI 470610 6809 (CB...526 BURSA 171160 8709 (OCDS) ................................................... 528 CIGLI/IZMIR 172180...SUMMARY * STATION: SINGAPORE AIRPORT, MALAYSIA STATION #: 486940 ICAO ID: WSSS LOCATION: 01022N, 10400E ELEVATION (FEET): 21 LST - GMT +8 PREPARED BY

  17. "Inventive" Learning Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Learning stations can be used for myriad purposes--to teach concepts, integrate subject matter, build interest, and allow for inquiry--the possibilities are limited only by the imagination of the teacher and the supplies available. In this article, the author shares suggestions and a checklist for setting up successful learning stations. In…

  18. SPS rectifier stations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The first of the twelves SPS rectifier stations for the bending magnets arrived at CERN at the end of the year. The photograph shows a station with the rectifiers on the left and in the other three cubicles the chokes, capacitors and resistor of the passive filter.

  19. The geometry of a radio pulsar beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.

    2017-10-01

    Taxonomy of radio pulsar profiles is mostly based on a system of Ptolemaic artificiality, consisting of separated rings and a core, arbitrarily located at disparate altitudes in the magnetosphere. Diversity of observed profile shapes clearly exceeds the interpretive capability of such conal model. Moreover, bifurcated features observed in pulsar profiles imply a system of fan beams radially extending away from the dipole axis. The bifurcations can be understood as the imprint of the elementary radiation pattern of the long-sought radio emission mechanism, thus identifying the latter. Their size, however, is several times larger than implied by the curvature of magnetic dipole lines. Here, I show that the illusion of disconnected rings and the size of bifurcated features can be explained through a natural geometry that combines the properties of both the cone and the fan beam. It is a flaring spiral that makes several revolutions around the dipole axis on its way to leave the magnetosphere. Such geometry is consistent with a stream of outflowing and laterally drifting plasma. The bifurcated components are so wide because the curvature on such a spiral is larger than that of the dipolar magnetic field, and hence they are consistent with the extraordinary mode curvature radiation.

  20. Radio News Source Preference by Residents of UYO Urban, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLES OBOT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to broadcast news by audience members is part of human information processing.  Radio is believed to be a major source of news on many local and national issues for many people in many countries. But it was uncertain whether the assumption was tenable in Nigeria. Selectivity plays significant role in audience members’ exposure to broadcast news.  The study set out to investigate which radio station(s residents of Uyo residents tune to for news on important local and national issues. It also studied what factors influence their choice of radio station for news on socio-political crises in Nigeria. The findings showed that majority of the respondents prefer foreign radio stations – Voice of America (VOA and British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC for news on socio-political crises in Nigeria. The survey also revealed that media credibility exerted great influence on audience exposure to broadcast news and choice of broadcast medium for news. It is the submission of this work that the continuous presentation of one-sided point of view, whether in government-controlled media or privately-owned ones not only makes the audience hold their news content suspect but also makes such mass medium to rank low in terms of perceived credibility. One of the implications of that situation is that mass mobilization through such media would be difficult to achieve.  Consequently, it is the submission of this research that if broadcast media in Nigeria are to be reckoned trustworthy and reliable, diverse and balanced views on all issues in the news should always be presented.

  1. Central Station Design Options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    . The work identifies the architecture, sizing and siting of prospective Central Stations in Denmark, which can be located at shopping centers, large car parking lots or gas stations. Central Stations are planned to be integrated in the Danish distribution grid. The Danish island of Bornholm, where a high...... penetration of wind power is present, is considered as special case. The distribution grid in Denmark is built using larger secondary distribution transformers (e.g. 630 kVA) which in general allows higher flexibility for the installation of Central Stations, compared to Bornholm’s distribution grid...... kWh battery-EV is not feasible in Bornholm at the 0.4 kV level, due to predominantly small size secondary distribution transformers, in the range of 100 - 200 kVA. This is possible at the 10kV level (MV level), if the Fast Charging station is equipped with its own dedicated transformer. With DC...

  2. [STEM on Station Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundebjerg, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    The STEM on Station team is part of Education which is part of the External Relations organization (ERO). ERO has traditional goals based around BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal). The BHAG model is simplified to a saying: Everything we do stimulates actions by others to advance human space exploration. The STEM on Station education initiate is a project focused on bringing off the earth research and learning into classrooms. Educational resources such as lesson plans, activities to connect with the space station and STEM related contests are available and hosted by the STEM on Station team along with their partners such as Texas Instruments. These educational activities engage teachers and students in the current happenings aboard the international space station, inspiring the next generation of space explorers.

  3. Capacity at Railway Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    special focus when conducting UIC 406 capacity analyses.This paper describes how the UIC 406 capacity method can be expounded for stations. Commonly for the analyses of the stations it is recommended to include the entire station including the switch zone(s) and all station tracks. By including the switch...... zone(s) the possible conflicts with other trains (also in the opposite direction) are taken into account leading to more trustworthy results. Although the UIC 406 methodology proposes that the railway network should be divided into line sections when trains turn around and when the train order...... is changed, this paper recommends that the railway lines are not always be divided. In case trains turn around on open (single track) line, the capacity consumption may be too low if a railway line is divided. The same can be the case if only few trains are overtaken at an overtaking station. For dead end...

  4. On the inverse Compton scattering model of radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Xu, Ren Xin; Liu, J. F.; Han, J. L.; Zhang, B.

    Some characteristics of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model are reviewed. At least the following properties of radio pulsars can be reproduced in the model: core or central emission beam, one or two hollow emission cones, different emission heights of these components, diverse pulse profiles at various frequencies, linear and circular polarization features of core and cones.

  5. galario: Gpu Accelerated Library for Analyzing Radio Interferometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzari, Marco; Beaujean, Frederik; Testi, Leonardo

    2017-10-01

    The galario library exploits the computing power of modern graphic cards (GPUs) to accelerate the comparison of model predictions to radio interferometer observations. It speeds up the computation of the synthetic visibilities given a model image (or an axisymmetric brightness profile) and their comparison to the observations.

  6. Direct Position Determination of Multiple Radio Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common methods for position determination of radio signal emitters such as communications or radar transmitters are based on measuring a specified parameter such as angle of arrival (AOA or time of arrival (TOA of the signal. The measured parameters are then used to estimate the transmitter's location. Since the measurements are done at each base station independently, without using the constraint that the AOA/TOA estimates at different base stations should correspond to the same transmitter's location, this is a suboptimal location determination technique. Further, if the number of array elements at each base station is , and the signal waveforms are unknown, the number of cochannel simultaneous transmitters that can be localized by AOA is limited to . Also, most AOA algorithms fail when the sources are not well angularly separated. We propose a technique that uses exactly the same data as the common AOA methods but the position determination is direct. The proposed method can handle more than cochannel simultaneous signals. Although there are many stray parameters, only a two-dimensional search is required for a planar geometry. The technique provides a natural solution to the measurements sources association problem that is encountered in AOA-based location systems. In addition to new algorithms, we provide analytical performance analysis, Cramér-Rao bounds and Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate that the proposed approach frequently outperforms the traditional AOA methods for unknown as well as known signal waveforms.

  7. LoFASM: A Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for Radio Transients and Student Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of...different terrestrial radio noise environment (see Fig. 2), allowing observers to discriminate between extraterrestrial radio bursts and those of...local terrestrial origin. Each station comprises 12 dipole antennas in a phased array: the antenna feeds can be combined in such a way as to

  8. La notificación push como estrategia informativa de la radio en el entorno digital

    OpenAIRE

    Luis-Miguel, Pedrero-Esteban; Susana, Herrera-Damas

    2017-01-01

    Given the standardization of the smartphone as the dominant device for access to information in the digital environment, Spanish radio stations have assumed a presence on these devices in order to attract listeners and facilitate listening. One of the most visible and efficient utilities is the push notifications delivered through mobile apps. This paper analyzes the design, content, and structure of the alerts sent by the four main talk-radio networks in Spain –SER, COPE, Onda Cero, and RNE–...

  9. What Works? A Blast from the Past. Project Profiles from the 60s and 70s...Social Marketing, Community Media, Mass Campaigns, Interactive Radio, Gender Equity, Participation, the Media & More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    The Academy for Educational Development (AED) has been in the social marketing, communication, and participation business for some 40 years. This book profiles 82 projects carried out in the 1960s and 1970s in countries around the world. These projects were researched and documented by AED under its Clearinghouse on Development Communication. It…

  10. Physical profile data collected at the University of Puerto Rico's monthly time-series station (denoted CaTS), twenty-six miles off the SW coast of Puerto Rico, June 1994 - November 1996 (NODC Accession 0002698)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using fluorometer and CTD casts in the Caribbean Sea from the ISLA MAGUEYES from 06 June 1994 to 26 November 1996....

  11. Orbit lifetime characteristics for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryder, L.; Kelly, G. M.; Heck, M.

    The factors that influence the orbital lifetime characteristics of the NASA Space Station are discussed. These include altitude, attitude, launch date, ballistic coefficient, and the presence of large articulating solar arrays. Examples from previous program systems studies are presented that illustrate how each factor affects Station orbit lifetime. The effect of atmospheric density models on orbit lifetime predictions is addressed along with the uncertainty of these predictions using current trajectory analysis of the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft. Finally, nominal reboost altitude profiles and fuel requirement considerations are presented for implementing a reboost strategy based on planned Shuttle Orbiter rendezvous strategy and contingency considerations.

  12. Flexible Adaptation in Cognitive Radios

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shujun

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to software-defined radio and cognitive radio, along with methodologies for applying knowledge representation, semantic web, logic reasoning and artificial intelligence to cognitive radio, enabling autonomous adaptation and flexible signaling. Readers from the wireless communications and software-defined radio communities will use this book as a reference to extend software-defined radio to cognitive radio, using the semantic technology described. Readers with a background in semantic web and artificial intelligence will find in this book the application of semantic web and artificial intelligence technologies to wireless communications. For readers in networks and network management, this book presents a new approach to enable interoperability, collaborative optimization and flexible adaptation of network components. Provides a comprehensive ontology covering the core concepts of wireless communications using a formal language; Presents the technical realization of using a ...

  13. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  14. Space station operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kathleen V.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom operations management concepts must be responsive to the unique challenges presented by the permanently manned international laboratory. Space Station Freedom will be assembled over a three year period where the operational environment will change as significant capability plateaus are reached. First Element Launch, Man-Tended Capability, and Permanent Manned Capability, represent milestones in operational capability that is increasing toward mature operations capability. Operations management concepts are being developed to accomodate the varying operational capabilities during assembly, as well as the mature operational environment. This paper describes operations management concepts designed to accomodate the uniqueness of Space Station Freedoom, utilizing tools and processes that seek to control operations costs.

  15. Software defined radio architectures evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Palomo, Alvaro; Villing, Rudi; Farrell, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an performance evaluation of GNU Radio and OSSIE, two open source Software Defined Radio (SDR) architectures. The two architectures were compared by running implementations of a BPSK waveform utilising a software loopback channel on each. The upper bound full duplex throughput was found to be around 700kbps in both cases, though OSSIE was slightly faster than GNU Radio. CPU and memory loads did not differ significantly.

  16. Uzaybimer Radio Telescope Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbay, R.; Öz, G. K.; Arslan, Ö.; Özeren, F. F.; Küçük, İ.

    2016-12-01

    A 13 meters former NATO radar is being converted into a radio telescope. The radio telescope is controlled by a system which has been developed at UZAYBİMER. The Telescope Control System(TCS) has been designed using modern industrial systems. TCS has been developed in LabView platform in which works Windows embedded OS. The position feedback used on radio telescopes is an industrial EtherCAT standard. ASCOM library is used for astronomical calculations.

  17. The paraboloidal reflector antenna in radio astronomy and communication theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Baars, Jacob W M

    2007-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in the microwave and millimeter wavelength domain. Radio astronomers have developed techniques of calibration of large antennas with radio astronomical methods. These have not been comprehensively described. This text aims to fill this gap. The Paraboloidal Reflector Antenna in Radio Astronomy and Communication: Theory and Practice takes a practical approach to the characterization of antennas. All calculations and results in the form of tables and figures have been made with Mathematica by Wolfram Research. The reader can use the procedures for the implementation of his/her own input data. The book should be of use to all who are involved in the design and calibration of large antennas, like ground station managers and engineers, practicing radio astronomers, and finally, graduate students in radio astronomy and communication technology.

  18. Pluralismo, radio e Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Girard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En muchas ocasiones de ha oído hablar que internet y las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación llevarán a la humanidad a un mundo homogeneizado en donde todos compartirán la misa cultura del “ciberespacio” y hablarán el mismo lenguaje. Nuevas iniciativas en América Latina combinan la tecnología de punta y la radio para poner fin a este mito y contribuir a una comunicación más democrática.

  19. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  20. Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the design, manufacture, and test of antenna systems. The facility is also used as an electromagnetic compatibility/radio frequency interference...

  1. Radio-induced brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  2. Radio stars observed in the LAMOST spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Qiang; Lu, Hong-Peng; Han, Xian-Ming L.; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Wang, Yue-Fei; Hou, Yong-Hui; Zi-Huang, Cao

    2017-09-01

    Radio stars have attracted astronomers’ attention for several decades. To better understand the physics behind stellar radio emissions, it is important to study their optical behaviors. The LAMOST survey provides a large database for researching stellar spectroscopic properties of radio stars. In this work, we concentrate on their spectroscopic properties and infer physical properties from their spectra, such as stellar activity and variability. We mined big data from the LAMOST spectral survey Data Release 2 (DR2), published on 2016 June 30, by cross-matching them with radio stars from FIRST and other surveys. We obtained 783 good stellar spectra with high signal to noise ratio for 659 stars. The criteria for selection were positional coincidence within 1.5‧‧ and LAMOST objects classified as stars. We calculated the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ca ii H&K, Hδ, Hγ, Hβ, Hα and Ca ii IRT lines by integrating the line profiles. Using the EWs of the Hα line, we detected 147 active stellar spectra of 89 objects having emissions above the Hα continuum. There were also 36 objects with repeated spectra, 28 of which showed chromospheric activity variability. Furthermore, we found 14 radio stars emitting noticeably in the Ca ii IRT lines. The low value of the EW8542/EW8498 ratio for these 14 radio stars possibly alludes to chromospheric plage regions.

  3. Ionospheric scintilations over the polish LOFAR station PL610

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pożoga, Mariusz; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Grzesiak, Marcin; Przepiórka, Dorota

    2017-04-01

    Using polish station PL610 of international LOFAR interferometer we present here observations of ionospheric scintillation over station. Scintillation phenomenon occurs as a result of variations in the refractive index of the medium through which waves are traveling. In particular Earth's ionosphere is strongly variable medium where high density gradients occure. Scintillation measurements may be successfully used to study the irregular structure of the ionosphere. The LOFAR telescope operates at frequencies from 10 to 240 MHz thus provides good opportunity to broad-band study of ionospheric irregularities. During the local mode periods four strong radio sources (LOFAR bright A-team sources) were observed in order to measure ionospheric scintillations.

  4. Radio-anomalies: tool for earthquakes and tsunami forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straser, Valentino; Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake is the only among the other geophysical events that doesn't lead directly to death. Tsunami are one of the more dramatic consequences of the seism that happen on global scale. Also in this case, tsunami, we need to improve the tools that can help the forecast of this great geophysical event and the reduction of the dramatic effects on human activities. In order to explain this topic it is necessary that several methods of investigation cooperate and create a scientific network among the complementary branches of science. In this study I suggest a new strategy based on the detection of radio-anomalies and the increasing of the geomagnetic background; we can apply this method two days before the earthquake until the last few hours before it. This research and the data collection started in the 2011 and it show us that more than 400 earthquakes, occurred on global scale, were preceded by the increasing value of the geomagnetic background and the emergence of radio-anomalies in the frequency range from Elf to Self band. This last range is not globally accepted by the scientific community and it frequency between 0,001 and 3 Hz is included. The detection of radio-anomalies data, carried out by the monitoring station Radio Emission Project, in Rome (Italy), it lets us predict a strong seismic event on global scale 6 hour before. The tsunami is a great geophysical event that can embrace several areas of Earth, for this reason the detection of radio-anomalies method is useful for the experimentation in operative terms. Another important check about detection of radio-anomalies was carried out before and during the strong earthquake and tsunami occurred in Japan in 2011. The radio-anomalies that take over in this event and the energy released by the seaquake are linked and proportional between them.

  5. TV Analog Station Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This file is an extract from the Consolidated Database System (CDBS) licensed by the Media Bureau. It consists of Analog Television Stations (see Rule Part47 CFR...

  6. ASOS Station Photos

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The images contained in this library are of stations in the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) network. These images were taken between 1998-2001 for the ASOS...

  7. Signal Station Inspection Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Handwritten reports resulting from detailed inspections of US Army Signal Service Stations, 1871-1889. Features reported included instrument exposure and condition,...

  8. Active Marine Station Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  9. Master Station History Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Standard/Legacy MSHR, formally identified as the DSI-9767 dataset, is the legacy dataset/report sorted by NCDC Station ID and period of record. This...

  10. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  11. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  12. USRCRN Station Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Documentation of United States Regional Climate Reference Network (USRCRN) installations in 2009. Installations documented are for USRCRN pilot project stations in...

  13. Station Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following plan is the result of a recent initiative in Region 5 to produce general management guidance based on stated objectives for individual field stations....

  14. "Central Station" Londonis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Londoni galeriis Milch seitsme läti, leedu ja eesti kunstniku projekt "Central Station". Kuraatorid Lisa Panting, Sally Tallant. Eestist osalevad Hanno Soans (Catarina Campinoga koostöös valminud video), Kiwa, Kai Kaljo

  15. Electrostatic pickup station

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic pickup station, with 4 interleaved electrodes, to measure beam position in the horizontal and vertical plane. This type is used in the transfer lines leaving the PS (TT2, TT70, TTL2). See also 7904075.

  16. Mukilteo Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research at the Mukilteo Research Station focuses on understanding the life cycle of marine species and the impacts of ecosystem stressors on anadromous and marine...

  17. Maine Field Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2000 NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service established the Maine Field Station in Orono, ME to have more direct involvement in the conservation of the living...

  18. Routes and Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — he Routes_Stations table is composed of fixed rail transit systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico....

  19. Public Transit Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — fixed rail transit stations within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of transit that are serviced...

  20. FEMA DFIRM Station Start

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This table contains information about station starting locations. These locations indicate the reference point that was used as the origin for distance measurements...