WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiling participative residents

  1. A psychological profile of surgeons and surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Neidert, Gregory P M; Brubaker-Rimmer, Ruth; Artalejo, Diana; Caruso, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20 percent of general surgery residents never complete their original residency programs. The psychological, programmatic, and financial costs for this attrition are substantial for both the residents, who spend valuable time and money pursuing incompatible career paths, and the residency programs, which also lose valuable time and money invested in these residents. There is a large amount of information in the field about the performance dimensions and skill sets of surgeons and surgical residents. To date, however, no research has been conducted on important process and content dimensions, which are critical in determining good person-job fit. A research team from the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University and Maricopa Medical Center conducted descriptive research to determine the work-related personality and interest variables of attending surgeons and surgical residents. Sixty-three surgical residents and 27 attending/teaching surgeons completed 2 sections (interests and personality scales) of the World of Work Inventory Online (WOWI Online). This multidimensional assessment was offered to all attending/teaching surgeons and surgical residents at Maricopa Medical Center. All members of the Department of Surgery participated in the trial. Based on the attending/teaching and high-performing resident profiles, a stable interest and personality profile emerged, which highlights the unique characteristics necessary to identify those who would be most satisfied with and suitable for work as surgeons. The profiles of the attending/teaching surgeons and the high-performing residents were similar. This contrasted with the interest and personality profiles of low-performing residents. The differences in the 2 groups' profiles provide insight into low performance and possible incompatibility with surgical residency, and possibly with general surgery as a profession choice. The WOWI Online assessment tool provides a stable profile of successful

  2. Benefits and impact influencing support of participants and residents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed the following: (1) The group model of participants was significantly different from that of residents, though both were of well-adapted models, the extent of effect on various events support variables differed between participants and residents; (2) The participants and residents groups' benefits cognition ...

  3. Motor and Executive Function Profiles in Adult Residents ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Exposure to elevated levels of manganese (Mn) may be associated with tremor, motor and executive dysfunction (EF), clinically resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD research has identified tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor dominant (NTD) profiles. NTD PD presents with bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural sway, and is associated with EF impairment with lower quality of life (QoL). Presence and impact of tremor, motor, and executive dysfunction profiles on health-related QoL and life satisfaction were examined in air-Mn exposed residents of two Ohio, USA towns. Participants and Methods: From two Ohio towns exposed to air-Mn, 186 residents (76 males) aged 30-75 years were administered measures of EF (Animal Naming, ACT, Rey-O Copy, Stroop Color-Word, and Trails B), motor and tremor symptoms (UPDRS), QoL (BRFSS), life satisfaction (SWLS), and positive symptom distress (SCL-90-R). Air-Mn exposure in the two towns was modeled with 10 years of air-monitoring data. Cluster analyses detected the presence of symptom profiles by grouping together residents with similar scores on these measures. Results: Overall, mean air-Mn concentration for the two towns was 0.53 µg/m3 (SD=.92). Two-step cluster analyses identified TD and NTD symptom profiles. Residents in the NTD group lacked EF impairment; EF impairment represented a separate profile. An unimpaired group also emerged. The NTD and EF impairment groups were qualitatively similar, with relatively lo

  4. Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Interest and Participation in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Amy R; Blanchard, May Hsieh; Carson, Sandra A; Peterson, Herbert B; Flynn, Erica B; Ogburn, Tony

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate obstetrics and gynecology resident interest and participation in global health experiences and elucidate factors associated with resident expectation for involvement. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents before the 2015 Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology in-training examination. The 23-item survey gathered demographic data and queried resident interest and participation in global health. Factors associated with resident expectation for participation in global health were analyzed by Pearson χ tests. Of the 5,005 eligible examinees administered the survey, 4,929 completed at least a portion of the survey for a response rate of 98.5%. Global health was rated as "somewhat important" or "very important" by 96.3% (3,761/3,904) of residents. "Educational opportunity" (69.2%) and "humanitarian effort" (17.7%) were cited as the two most important aspects of a global health experience. Residents with prior global health experience rated the importance of global health more highly and had an increased expectation for future participation. Global health electives were arranged by residency programs for 18.0% (747/4,155) of respondents, by residents themselves as an elective for 44.0% (1,828/4,155), and as a noncredit experience during vacation time for 36.4% (1,514/4,155) of respondents. Female gender, nonpartnered status, no children, prior global health experience, and intention to incorporate global health in future practice were associated with expectations for a global health experience. Most obstetrics and gynecology residents rate a global health experience as somewhat or very important, and participation before or during residency increases the perceived importance of global health and the likelihood of expectation for future participation. A majority of residents report arranging their own elective or using vacation time to participate, suggesting that residency programs have

  5. Factors influencing resident participation in the AAOS Political Action Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Roshan P; Froelich, John M; Weinstein, Stuart L; Mehta, Samir

    2013-06-01

    Resident participation in the political action committee (PAC) is important for professional advocacy and for ensuring access to quality musculoskeletal care. The following questions were asked: Would faculty contribution-matching increase donation rates and amounts among orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution? What barriers do residents self-identify that prevent or delay PAC participation? How do residents perceive a faculty contribution-matching program? Residents at 1 institution were encouraged to participate in the PAC before and after the introduction of a faculty contribution-matching program. In addition, telephone follow-up was performed and resident perceptions were assessed regarding the program and barriers to participation. Rates of participation, amounts donated, and perceptions are reported. Resident participation in the PAC increased from 10% to 95% following the introduction of a faculty contribution-matching program. The second group of residents contributed 67 cents for every dollar given by the first group. Significant barriers identified included time constraints and an inability to access the PAC Web portal. Ninety-four percent of the initial nonresponders said that they made joining the PAC a priority after learning about the faculty contribution-matching program. They specifically cite giving greater attention to an issue that the faculty value. Four months after the initial e-mail, 100% of residents had contributed. Residents believe that professional activism is important but ascribe it a lower priority than other professional duties. Residency programs might facilitate resident involvement in the PAC by instituting faculty contribution-matching and by assisting junior residents with their American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons login information. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools - a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-02-01

    Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate this, neighbourhoods should be mapped in a way that is relevant to them. One way to do this is participative neighbourhood auditing. This paper provides an insight into availability and characteristics of participatory neighbourhood audit instruments. A scoping review in scientific and grey literature, consisting of the following steps: literature search, identification and selection of relevant audit instruments, data extraction and data charting (including a work meeting to discuss outputs), reporting. In total, 13 participatory instruments were identified. The role of residents in most instruments was as 'data collectors'; only few instruments included residents in other audit activities like problem definition or analysis of data. The instruments identified focus mainly on physical, not social, neighbourhood characteristics. Paper forms containing closed-ended questions or scales were the most often applied registration method. The results show that neighbourhood auditing could be improved by including social aspects in the audit tools. They also show that the role of residents in neighbourhood auditing is limited; however, little is known about how their engagement takes place in practice. Developers of new instruments need to balance not only social and physical aspects, but also resident engagement and scientific robustness. Technologies like mobile applications pose new opportunities for participative approaches in neighbourhood auditing.

  7. Sports participation, anthropometric and physiological profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sports participation has been adjudged to enhance healthy living. This study described anthropometric and physiological (A-P) profiles of university athletes based on types of sports (ToS) and duration (in years) of participation (DoP). One hundred and twenty-nine athletes (69 males, 60 females), aged l5-36, who had ...

  8. Childhood Sports Participation and Adolescent Sport Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, François; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Bélanger, Mathieu

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to increase understanding of the link between sport specialization during childhood and adolescent physical activity (PA). The objectives were as follows: (1) describe the natural course of sport participation over 5 years among children who are early sport samplers or early sport specializers and (2) determine if a sport participation profile in childhood predicts the sport profile in adolescence. Participants ( n = 756, ages 10-11 years at study inception) reported their participation in organized and unorganized PA during in-class questionnaires administered every 4 months over 5 years. They were categorized as early sport samplers, early sport specializers, or nonparticipants in year 1 and as recreational sport participants, performance sport participants, or nonparticipants in years 2 to 5. The likelihood that a childhood sport profile would predict the adolescent profile was computed as relative risks. Polynomial logistic regression was used to identify predictors of an adolescent sport profile. Compared with early sport specialization and nonparticipation, early sport sampling in childhood was associated with a higher likelihood of recreational participation (relative risk, 95% confidence interval: 1.55, 1.18-2.03) and a lower likelihood of nonparticipation (0.69, 0.51-0.93) in adolescence. Early sport specialization was associated with a higher likelihood of performance participation (1.65, 1.19-2.28) but not of nonparticipation (1.01, 0.70-1.47) in adolescence. Nonparticipation in childhood was associated with nearly doubling the likelihood of nonparticipation in adolescence (1.88, 1.36-2.62). Sport sampling should be promoted in childhood because it may be linked to higher PA levels during adolescence. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Demographic and clinical profile of nursing facility residents with gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowitz, Barbara J; O'Shea, Terrence E

    2013-06-01

    To develop a demographic and clinical profile of nursing facility residents with a diagnosis of gout. Descriptive, retrospective database analysis. U.S. nursing facilities. Nursing facility residents with a diagnosis of gout. Minimum Data Set and prescription claims records of residents served by Omnicare, Inc., with an International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis of gout, for the time period of October 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010, were linked and de-identified. Acute gouty attacks were defined by a proxy measure of a ? 14-day course of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral or injectable steroids, or oral colchicine. In the 138,724 residents (36.8% male: 76.8% white, 11.6% black) evaluated, the incidence of gout was 1.8% (n = 2,487). Of those with gout, males and females were represented relatively equally. There were 1,420 (57.2%) residents 80 years of age or older. Two-thirds of residents with gout required at least extensive assistance with most activities of daily living. Comorbid conditions-hypertension (82.2%), diabetes mellitus (46.6%), arthritis (43.7%), and renal failure (22.4%)-were common. Pain was reported in 68.7% of residents. Allopurinol (60.2%), colchicine (18.6%), febuxostat (2.3%), probenecid (1.1%), and probenecid/colchicine (therapy was received by 75.8% of residents. Acute gouty attacks were noted in 38% of residents; 53%, 25.2%, and 21.8% received short-course treatment with oral or injectable steroids, oral colchicines, or oral NSAIDs, respectively. Despite the limitations of a retrospective database analysis, this study reveals that nursing facility residents with a diagnosis of gout have significant disease burden. Clinicians should be aware of the potential impact of this disease on physical functioning, pain, and falls in this often-frail population.

  10. High Disparity Between Orthopedic Resident Interest and Participation in International Health Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven; Shultz, Paul; Daniels, Alan; Ackelman, Edward; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Few orthopedic surgical residency programs offer international health electives (IHEs). Efforts to expand these programs have been increasing across medical disciplines. Whether orthopedic residents will participate remains unknown. This study quantified and characterized orthopedic resident interest and barriers to IHEs in US residency programs. A web-based survey was administered to residents from 154 US orthopedic residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2014 to 2015. Questions assessed demographics and program background, previous medical experience abroad, barriers to participation, and level of interest in participating in an international health elective during their training and beyond. Twenty-seven (17.5%) residency programs responded. Chi-square analysis showed that residents who expressed interest in participating were significantly more likely to have experience abroad compared with those who expressed no interest (Porthopedic residencies (POrthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e680-e686.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools : a scoping review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, Aafke C.L.; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2017-01-01

    Background: Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To

  12. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools - a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-01-01

    Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate

  13. Resident Participation in International Surgical Missions is Predictive of Future Volunteerism in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chudasama Tannan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInterest in global health and international mission trips among medical student and resident trainees is growing rapidly. How these electives and international mission experiences affect future practice is still being elucidated. No study has identified if participation in international surgical missions during residency is a predictor of participation in international surgical missions in practice after training completion.MethodsAll trainees of our plastic surgery residency program from 1990 to 2011, during the implementation of optional annual international surgical missions, were surveyed to determine if the graduate had gone on a mission as a resident and as a plastic surgeon. Data were compared between graduates who participated in missions as residents and graduates who did not, from 1990 to 2011 and 1990 to 2007.ResultsOf Plastic Surgery graduates from 1990 to 2011 who participated in international missions as residents, 60% participated in missions when in practice, versus 5.9% of graduates participating in missions in practice but not residency (P<0.0001. When excluding last 5 years, graduates participating in international missions in practice after doing so as residents increases to 85.7%, versus 7.41% who participate in practice but not residency P<0.002.ConclusionsResults reveal plastic surgeons who participate in international surgical missions as residents participate in international surgical missions in practice at higher rates than graduates who did not participate in missions during residency. International missions have significant intrinsic value both to trainee and international communities served, and this opportunity should be readily and easily accessible to all plastic surgery residents nationwide.

  14. Factors influencing job satisfaction of new graduate nurses participating in nurse residency programs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Patrice S; Viscardi, Molly Kreider; McHugh, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Nurse residency programs are designed to increase competence and skill, and ease the transition from student to new graduate nurse. These programs also offer the possibility to positively influence the job satisfaction of new graduate nurses, which could decrease poor nursing outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of participation in a nurse residency program on new graduate nurses' satisfaction. This review examines factors that influence job satisfaction of nurse residency program participants. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion, and seven domains influencing new graduate nurses' satisfaction during participation in nurse residency programs were identified: extrinsic rewards, scheduling, interactions and support, praise and recognition, professional opportunities, work environment, and hospital system. Within these domains, the evidence for improved satisfaction with nurse residency program participation was mixed. Further research is necessary to understand how nurse residency programs can be designed to improve satisfaction and increase positive nurse outcomes. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Teachers’ goal orientation profiles and participation in professional development activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, E.M.; van Woerkom, M.; Poell, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Participation in professional development activities is important for teachers to continuously improve their knowledge and skills. However, teachers differ in their attitude towards learning activities. This paper examined how different goal orientation profiles are related to participation in

  16. Perceptions, attitudes, and satisfaction concerning resident participation in health care among dermatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Almohanna, Hind M; Alkeraye, Salim S; Alsaif, Fahad M; Alrasheed, Saleh K

    2014-01-01

    A limited number of published studies have discussed patient attitudes toward resident physicians' participation in dermatology clinics. A literature search failed to identify any such study in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in dermatology outpatient clinics. A self-administered questionnaire focused on patient attitudes toward dermatology resident participation was distributed randomly to all adult outpatients attending dermatology clinics at a university hospital in Saudi Arabia between July and September 2010. The questionnaire was returned by 742 of 900 patients, for an 82% response rate. The mean patient age was 30.58 ± 11.67 years. Forty-two percent (311 of 742) of the respondents were male. The major reason for visiting the hospital was a medical dermatology consultation (80.4%). Only 35% of the patients self-reported an accurate understanding of the "resident" designation. In total, 86.4% of patients were satisfied with the residents' behavior. Furthermore, 98.4% of the patients were satisfied with the medical care provided by the residents. The patients agreed with resident participation in their health care. The majority of the patients expressed their willingness to provide a medical history and receive counseling from residents (87.6% and 86.3%, respectively). There was no gender-associated effect on the understanding of the resident position or the decision to receive a physical examination by a resident. Dermatology outpatients are satisfied and have positive perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in the dermatology clinic.

  17. [Participation of one children hospital residents in scientific and training activities of Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, María Carolina; Domínguez, Paula Alejandra; Martins, Andrea Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, SAP (Argentine Society of Pediatrics) offers courses and scientific activities for pediatricians and residents. We evaluated the participation of Pedro de Elizalde Hospital residents in the scientific and training activities of SAP and assessed the trend of participation throughout the residency; 107 residents were surveyed; 48% were members, and the participation increased significantly throughout the residence (p <0.01). None of the surveyed residents were part of any association; 84% did not know the "Pediatricians in Training Group"; 49% participated in continued training programs, with a growing tendency to participation through-out the residency (p <0.01); 80% considered that the SAP is a friendly entity. We concluded that participation of residents in the SAP is scarce during the first two years of training, and that it shows a growth in the senior residents' group. Encouraging the interest of first and second year residents in the activities is necessary.

  18. Seabed resident event driven profiling system (SREP). Concept, design and tests

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Maurya, P.K.; Fernandes, L.; Madhan, R.; Desa, E.S.; Dabolkar, N.A.; Navelkar, G.S.; Naik, L.; Shetye, V.G.; Shetty, N.B.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Nagvekar, S.; Vimalakumari, D.

    The seabed resident event driven profiling system (SREP) described here offers a novel, optimized approach to profiling in coastal waters from seabed to sea surface during the rough seas encountered in the southwest monsoon season (June...

  19. Psychocentricity and participant profiles: Implications for lexical processing among multilinguals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eLibben

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lexical processing among bilinguals is often affected by complex patterns of individual experience. In this paper we discuss the psychocentric perspective on language representation and processing, which highlights the centrality of individual experience in psycholinguistic experimentation. We discuss applications to the investigation of lexical processing among multilinguals and explore the advantages of using high-density experiments with multilinguals. High density experiments are designed to co-index measures of lexical perception and production, as well as participant profiles. We discuss the challenges associated with the characterization of participant profiles and present a new data visualization technique, that we term Facial Profiles. This technique is based on Chernoff faces developed over forty years ago. The Facial Profile technique seeks to overcome some of the challenges associated with the use of Chernoff faces, while maintaining the core insight that recoding multivariate data as facial features can engage the human face recognition system and thus enhance our ability to detect and interpret patterns within multivariate datasets. We demonstrate that Facial Profiles can code participant characteristics in lexical processing studies by recoding variables such as reading ability, speaking ability, and listening ability into iconically-related relative sizes of eye, mouth, and ear respectively. The balance of ability in bilinguals can be captured by creating composite facial profiles or Janus Facial Profiles. We demonstrate the use of Facial Profiles and Janus Facial Profiles in the characterization of participant effects in the study of lexical perception and production.

  20. Profile and Challenges to Women's participation in Agricultural Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzed the profile and challenges of women participating in agricultural co-operative activities in Maiduguri metropolis, Borno State, Nigeria. Structured interview schedules were used to collect data from women participating in co-operative activities in the study area. One hundred and fifty women co-operative ...

  1. Patient attitudes toward resident participation in cosmetic vs reconstructive outpatient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Katherine H; McMahan, James D; Taylor, Anne; Pearson, Gregory; Tiwari, Pankaj; Kocak, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    The goal of residency programs is to provide trainees with exposure to all aspects of their chosen field so that they exit the program ready to be independent practitioners. However, it is common in some plastic surgery residency training programs to exclude residents from participation in consultations with patients who are seeking cosmetic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cosmetic surgery patients had a different view about resident involvement than reconstructive surgery patients and to evaluate what factors might be linked to patient attitudes on this topic. All new patients older than 18 years presenting to either academic or nonacademic locations were asked to complete the voluntary survey at their initial consultation. The study was conducted at both the Ohio State University (academic) and Advanced Aesthetic and Laser Surgery (private practice) in Columbus, Ohio. The survey asked patients to identify their surgical concern as either cosmetic or reconstructive and to indicate the location on their body where they were having surgery. Additionally, a series of statements regarding resident involvement was presented with a 5-point Likert-type rating system to assess each patient's attitudes about a range of factors, such as resident sex and seniority. In total, 119 patients participated in the study by completing the survey. Of this population, 59.7% (n = 71) were classified as reconstructive surgery patients and 40.3% (n = 48) were classified as cosmetic surgery patients. Based on responses, it was determined that reconstructive surgery patients were more approving of resident involvement in their care than cosmetic surgery patients were. When other factors were analyzed, the patients seeking breast surgery were found to be more apprehensive about resident participation than non-breast surgery patients were. Although there were some differences in the way resident participation was perceived by cosmetic and reconstructive surgery

  2. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities.

  3. Demographics and quality profile of applicants to pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isharani, Sona J; Litch, C Scott; Romberg, Elaine; Wells, Anne; Rutkauskas, John S

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS) data to study the quality and demographic trends for pediatric dentistry residency applicants. PASS data on grade point average (GPA) and National Dental Board Exam, Part I (NBI) scores were used to determine applicant quality. PASS demographic data included: (1) gender; (2) citizenship; (3) ethnicity; (4) previous practice of dentistry; and (5) completion of a residency or internship. GPAs showed a significant increase for the 6 years investigated. NBI scores also indicated a significant increase. Significantly more females than males applied to pediatric dentistry residencies. A significant increase in US/Canadian applicants was found. Ethnicity was similar to that of dental school graduates, with minor exceptions. In several of the years studied, there were significant differences in applicants who previously practiced dentistry or completed a residency/internship vs applicants who had no such previous experience. Significant increases in grade point averages and National Dental Board Exam, Part I scores suggest a high quality of pediatric dentistry residency applicants and this trend seem to be continuing. There are significantly more female than male applicants. More research is warranted on actual acceptance data.

  4. Does resident participation influence otolaryngology-head and neck surgery morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Nicholas B; Reh, Douglas D; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Gourin, Christine G

    2016-10-01

    Patients may perceive resident procedural participation as detrimental to their outcome. Our objective is to investigate whether otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) housestaff participation is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. Case-control study. OHNS patients were analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2006 to 2013 databases. We compared the incidence of 30-day postoperative morbidity, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations in patients operated on by resident surgeons with attending supervision (AR) with patients operated on by an attending surgeon alone (AO) using cross-tabulations and multivariable regression. There were 27,018 cases with primary surgeon data available, with 9,511 AR cases and 17,507 AO cases. Overall, 3.62% of patients experienced at least one postoperative complication. The AR cohort had a higher complication rate of 5.73% than the AO cohort at 2.48% (P < .001). After controlling for all other variables, there was no significant difference in morbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 [0.89 to 1.24]), mortality (OR = 0.91 [0.49 to 1.70]), readmission (OR = 1.29 [0.92 to 1.81]), or reoperation (OR = 1.28 [0.91 to 1.80]) for AR compared to AO cases. There was no difference between postgraduate year levels for adjusted 30-day morbidity or mortality. There is an increased incidence of morbidity, mortality, readmission, and reoperation in OHNS surgical cases with resident participation, which appears related to increased comorbidity with AR patients. After controlling for other variables, resident participation was not associated with an increase in 30-day morbidity, mortality, readmission, or reoperation odds. These data suggest that OHNS resident participation in surgical cases is not associated with poorer short-term outcomes. 3b Laryngoscope, 126:2263-2269, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Development and participant assessment of a practical quality improvement educational initiative for surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Morgan M; Hanson, Kristi; Schuller, Mary; Sherman, Karen; Kelz, Rachel R; Fryer, Jonathan; DaRosa, Debra; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2013-06-01

    As patient-safety and quality efforts spread throughout health care, the need for physician involvement is critical, yet structured training programs during surgical residency are still uncommon. Our objective was to develop an extended quality-improvement curriculum for surgical residents that included formal didactics and structured practical experience. Surgical trainees completed an 8-hour didactic program in quality-improvement methodology at the start of PGY3. Small teams developed practical quality-improvement projects based on needs identified during clinical experience. With the assistance of the hospital's process-improvement team and surgical faculty, residents worked through their selected projects during the following year. Residents were anonymously surveyed after their participation to assess the experience. During the first 3 years of the program, 17 residents participated, with 100% survey completion. Seven quality-improvement projects were developed, with 57% completing all DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) phases. Initial projects involved issues of clinical efficiency and later projects increasingly focused on clinical care questions. Residents found the experience educationally important (65%) and believed they were well equipped to lead similar initiatives in the future (70%). Based on feedback, the timeline was expanded from 12 to 24 months and changed to start in PGY2. Developing an extended curriculum using both didactic sessions and applied projects to teach residents the theory and implementation of quality improvement is possible and effective. It addresses the ACGME competencies of practice-based improvement and learning and systems-based practice. Our iterative experience during the past 3 years can serve as a guide for other programs. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel adjuvant to the resident selection process: the hartman value profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Jeffrey D; Byrum, C Stephen; Payne, Wyatt G; Smith, David J

    2012-01-01

    The goal of resident selection is twofold: (1) select candidates who will be successful residents and eventually successful practitioners and (2) avoid selecting candidates who will be unsuccessful residents and/or eventually unsuccessful practitioners. Traditional tools used to select residents have well-known limitations. The Hartman Value Profile (HVP) is a proven adjuvant tool to predicting future performance in candidates for advanced positions in the corporate setting. No literature exists to indicate use of the HVP for resident selection. The HVP evaluates the structure and the dynamics of an individual value system. Given the potential impact, we implemented its use beginning in 2007 as an adjuvant tool to the traditional selection process. Experience gained from incorporating the HVP into the residency selection process suggests that it may add objectivity and refinement in predicting resident performance. Further evaluation is warranted with longer follow-up times.

  7. Increasing faculty participation in resident education and providing cost-effective self-assessment module credit to faculty through resident-generated didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Malatesta, Theresa M; Anné, Pramila R; McAna, John; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    Board certified radiation oncologists and medical physicists are required to earn self-assessment module (SAM) continuing medical education (CME) credit, which may require travel costs or usage fees. Data indicate that faculty participation in resident teaching activities is beneficial to resident education. Our hypothesis was that providing the opportunity to earn SAM credit in resident didactics would increase faculty participation in and improve resident education. SAM applications, comprising CME certified category 1 resident didactic lectures and faculty-generated questions with respective answers, rationales, and references, were submitted to the American Board of Radiology for formal review. Surveys were distributed to assess main academic campus physician, affiliate campus physician, physicist, and radiation oncology resident impressions regarding the quality of the lectures. Survey responses were designed in Likert-scale format. Sign-test was performed with P didactics (P = .004). Residents reported an increased amount of time required to prepare lectures (P = .008). We are the first department, to our knowledge, to offer SAM credit to clinical faculty for participation in resident-generated didactics. Offering SAM credit at resident lectures is a cost-effective alternative to purchasing SAM resources, increases faculty attendance, and may improve the quality of radiation oncology resident education. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lifestyle Medicine: Lifestyle Profile of Resident Doctors in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lifestyle behavours of Physicians are becoming increasingly important because of the dual benefits of safeguarding the physicians' health and promotion of good patient health outcome. Resident doctors at tertiary institutions provide the bulk of service to patients hence the need to identify their lifestyle behaviours and ...

  9. Social networking profiles and professionalism issues in residency applicants: an original study-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Brent A; Determann, Jason R; Boohaker, Hikel A; Sheppard, Evan; McGwin, Gerald; Theiss, Steven

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of social networking, the degree of information publicly disclosed, and whether unprofessional content was identified in applicants from the 2010 Residency Match. Medical professionalism is an essential competency for physicians to learn, and information found on social networking sites may be hazardous to the doctor-patient relationship and an institution's public perception. No study has analyzed the social network content of applicants applying for residency. Online review of social networking Facebook profiles of graduating medical students applying for a residency in orthopedic surgery. Evidence of unprofessional content was based upon Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. Additional recorded applicant data included as follows: age, United States Medical Licensing Examination part I score, and residency composite score. Relationship between professionalism score and recorded data points was evaluated using an analysis of variance. Nearly half of all applicants, 46% (200/431), had a Facebook profile. The majority of profiles (85%) did not restrict online access to their profile. Unprofessional content was identified in 16% of resident applicant profiles. Variables associated with lower professionalism scores included unmarried relationship status and lower residency composite scores. It is critical for healthcare professionals to recognize both the benefits and risks present with electronic communication and to vigorously protect the content of material allowed to be publically accessed through the Internet. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of providing informed consent or assent for research participation in assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Betty S; Brandt, Jason; Rabins, Peter V; Samus, Quincy M; Steele, Cynthia D; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Rosenblatt, Adam

    2008-01-01

    This study's goal was to identify factors associated with providing either informed consent or assent for research in individuals at high risk for cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional baseline data were used to identify predictors of consent or assent status. The study was conducted at 22 assisted living facilities in Maryland. A stratified random sample of 198 assisted living residents participated in the study. Residents' consent or assent status was documented as providing informed consent, written assent, or verbal assent/no objection. Potential predictors included residents' demographic characteristics, measures of physical and mental health status, and neuropsychological test performance. Most participants provided written assent (32.8%) or verbal assent/no objection (30.3%) rather than informed consent (36.9%). Although many resident characteristics correlated with consent or assent status based on bivariate analyses, few variables distinguished those who provided written assent from those in the verbal assent/no objection group. On the basis of multiple discriminant analysis, the best predictors of consent or assent status were Mini-Mental State Exam scores, impairments in instrumental activities of daily living, and dementia diagnosis, which together classified correctly 63.6% of residents. The relatively small proportion of participants who could provide informed consent highlights the importance of assessing decisional capacity for research in a high-risk population and identifying an appropriate surrogate decision maker to provide proxy consent if needed. Consensus on how to define assent is lacking, and specific measures of assent capabilities are needed to better characterize the assent capacity continuum.

  11. Personal characteristics and participation in dance events of residents from home for the aged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Estanislava Tolocka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing elderly population and an increase in the number of residents of long-stayinstitutions are currently observed. One of the activities that provides benefits to these individualsis dancing, but little is known about this practice in these institutions. The objective of this studywas to identify factors that limit or encourage residents of these institutions to actively participatein dance events. This qualitative and exploratory study involved a group of 30 residents of a longstayinstitution (mean age: 72.6 ± 9.6 years and a group of 30 visitors (mean age: 68.1 ± 10.2years, who had participated in dance events for at least one year. The personal history relatedto dancing was obtained by semistructured interviews. The results showed that most respondersbegan dancing at a young age influenced by their families, attending country dances. However,changes have occurred over the years and these events have been greatly reduced at the institution.Less commitment to participate in activities and greater physical debilitation were observed inthe group of residents of the long-stay institution. These subjects also reported that they makefew friends during the event, receive little praise, and are most of the time only watching othersdancing. It was concluded that it would be necessary to offer activities that permit more activeparticipation, contributing to the development of the personal characteristics of the subjects, inorder to promote this practice which, in turn, could produce health benefits.

  12. Hebei spirit oil spill exposure and subjective symptoms in residents participating in clean-up activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ha, Mina; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was analyzed for metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. To compare the urinary levels of exposure biomarkers, the urine of 39 inland residents who were not directly exposed to the oil spill were analyzed. Residents exposed to oil remnants through clean-up work showed associations between physical symptoms and the exposure levels defined in various ways, including days of work, degree of skin contamination, and levels of some urinary exposure biomarkers of VOCs, metabolites and metals, although no major abnormalities in urinary exposure biomarkers were observed. This study provides evidence of a relationship between crude oil exposure and acute human health effects and suggests the need for follow-up to evaluate the exposure status and long-term health effects of clean-up participants.

  13. Profile of Unsatisfactory Participant Losses from the USAR

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Kathryn M.; Thomas, George W.

    1999-01-01

    This report profiles enlisted personnel leaving USAR drilling TPU status voluntarily, particularly unsatisfactory participants, based on prior service status: nonprior service (no prior Active Duty or Reserve service); prior Active Duty service (18 or more consecutive months); and "other" prior service (less than 18 months Active Duty service or prior Reserve service). Leavers from the 1995-96 transaction files are compared with the 1994 USAR membership. Loss categories include: no shows, uns...

  14. Motor Profile and Drug Treatment of Nursing Home Residents with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, Nico J.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Tissingh, Gerrit; Poels, Petra J. E.; Munneke, Marten; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the clinical characteristics, motor impairments, and drug treatments of nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease (PD). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Nursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. Participants Nursing home residents with PD and a Mini-Mental

  15. Motor profile and drug treatment of nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N.J.; Zuidema, S.U.; Tissingh, G.; Poels, P.J.E.; Munneke, M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the clinical characteristics, motor impairments, and drug treatments of nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease (PD). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Nursing home residents with PD and a

  16. Cholesterol Profile of Adults Resident in Eastern Nigeria | Igweh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The present study aims to determine a cholesterol profile for people living in this part of Eastern Nigeria. This will enable recommendation of a range of normal Cholesterol levels for the people living in this part of the world. Method: Total serum cholesterol, HDL, LDL, VLDL and triglycerides levels were determined ...

  17. Participation in leisure activities after stroke: A survey of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace; Blasu, Cephas

    2016-01-01

    Leisure provides pleasure and relaxation, and has health benefits even after a stressful and life-changing event such as a stroke. This study examined leisure participation among a sample of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria. Fifty-five stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation were consecutively recruited from two government hospitals in Northern Nigeria. Data on pre- and post-stroke participation, and socio-demographic (age, sex, marital, employment, and educational status) and clinical (level of disability, post-stroke duration, stroke type and side of hemiplegia/hemiparesis) attributes of the stroke survivors were obtained. Leisure participation was assessed in four domains of recreational, social, cognitive, and productive/creative activities. Associations between leisure participation and the socio-demographic and clinical variables were examined using bivariate analysis. Mean (SD) age of the stroke survivors was 53.55 (14.39) years. Prevalence of leisure participation was 89.1%. Participation in specific leisure domains however varied thus: social (83.6%), cognitive (60%), recreational (41.8%), productive/creative activities (30.9%). Significant associations were observed between participation in cognitive, productive/creative, and recreational leisure activities, and specific socio-demographic and clinical attributes. Leisure participation was high in a general sense but marginal in recreational and productive/creative activities. The observed socio-demographic and clinical associations with post-stroke leisure participation may assist in providing effective leisure rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Nexus between the participation of residents in house design and residential satisfaction in Akure, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Adeyemi Fakere

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between residents’ level of participation in house design and level of residential satisfaction in Akure, Nigeria. The study was based on the idea that the goal of housing projects is to provide satisfactory environments for users. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 304 household heads in transitional and peripheral zones of the city. Data were obtained through a structured questionnaire and focus group discussions and observations. The obtained data were subsequently subjected to single-factor descriptive analysis, mean satisfaction scoring, and categorical regression analysis. Results showed a positive significant relationship between the level of resident participation in house design and the level of residential satisfaction. The significant participatory predictors of satisfaction were number of bedrooms, general house design, development of the brief for the design, arrangement of interior spaces, and selection of finishing materials. Space size and building materials were not significant predictors in this context. The obtained p-value of 0.000 indicated that the regression model was significant. This study recommends a high level of resident participation in house design to achieve a high level of residential housing satisfaction in Nigeria.

  19. Implementing a pilot leadership course for internal medicine residents: design considerations, participant impressions, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Ken; Fraser, Traci N; Bohnen, Jordan; Zeidman, Jessica; Stone, Valerie E

    2014-11-30

    Effective clinical leadership is associated with better patient care. We implemented and evaluated a pilot clinical leadership course for second year internal medicine residents at a large United States Academic Medical Center that is part of a multi-hospital health system. The course met weekly for two to three hours during July, 2013. Sessions included large group discussions and small group reflection meetings. Topics included leadership styles, emotional intelligence, and leading clinical teams. Course materials were designed internally and featured "business school style" case studies about everyday clinical medicine which explore how leadership skills impact care delivery. Participants evaluated the course's impact and quality using a post-course survey. Questions were structured in five point likert scale and free text format. Likert scale responses were converted to a 1-5 scale (1 = strongly disagree; 3 = neither agree nor disagree; 5 = strongly agree), and means were compared to the value 3 using one-way T-tests. Responses to free text questions were analyzed using the constant comparative method. All sixteen pilot course participants completed the survey. Participants overwhelmingly agreed that the course provided content and skills relevant to their clinical responsibilities and leadership roles. Most participants also acknowledged that taking the course improved their understanding of their strengths and weaknesses as leaders, different leadership styles, and how to manage interpersonal conflict on clinical teams. 88% also reported that the course increased their interest in pursuing additional leadership training. A clinical leadership course for internal medicine residents designed by colleagues, and utilizing case studies about clinical medicine, resulted in significant self-reported improvements in clinical leadership competencies.

  20. [Physical activity during cancer: Can we define participants' profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaron, Charlène; Marqueste, Tanguy; Eisinger, François; Cappiello, Maria Antonietta; Cury, François

    2017-03-01

    Benefits of physical activity during cancer treatment are widely demonstrated, however, most of patients are not active enough. Several studies have analyzed the different variables that would affect the participation to physical activity programs. The aim of our study was to define profiles of patients who agree to participate in a physical activity program in the medical setting according to the hospital structure in which they receive their care, their past and present habits in sports and their temporal perspectives. Forty-six patients treated from two different hospitals (regional hospital denoted CLCC; and local hospital denoted CH), completed a survey consisting of a questionnaire on their past and present habits in physical activity, ZTPI and a demographic questionnaire. Patients could decide to participate or not in a physical activity program in the medical community. T-tests and Chi(2) were performed to compare the two groups. Chi(2) tests have shown that patients cared in CH are significantly more involved in physical activity program than patients cared in CLCC. Our study points out that the past and present patient PA (physical activity) has no influence on their accession to a physical activity program, however the type of hospital providing patient care could influence their participation. These results should lead us to rethink about the different forms of communication made around the physical activity programs in medical contexts, and about different practical arrangements proposed according to each health facility. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Participation by residents as precondition for successful implementation of housing rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sendi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents findings from the research project titled Rehabilitation of housing estates in Ljubljana. The research was conducted in the western part of the Savsko naselje neighbourhood in Ljubljana. The introduction brings a brief description of the theoretical framework of the research. In continuation results of field work are presented, whereby special emphasis is given to the views of residents to rehabilitation and improvements to their living environment. Confrontation of attitudes to issues pertaining to the housing estate with real actions (or non-actions by local authority show that presently there are large, potentially damaging contradictions between the two actors. We can ascertain that at present the municipal departments are accountable for the present conflicts, especially those responsible for housing provision and living quality. We are adamant that present planning and management of housing estates – top-down – is inadequate and inefficient. As soon as possible it should be substituted with contemporary approaches that have been pursued for some time in more developed countries. The hypothesis of the article is that rehabilitation of housing estates is not possible without active resident participation.

  2. Effect of a Community-Based Service Learning Experience in Geriatrics on Internal Medicine Residents and Community Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel K; Michener, Jennifer; Yang, Phyllis; Goldstein, Karen; Groce-Martin, Jennine; True, Gala; Johnson, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Community-based service learning (CBSL) provides an opportunity to teach internal medicine residents the social context of aging and clinical concepts. The objectives of the current study were to demonstrate the feasibility of a CBSL program targeting internal medicine residents and to assess its effect on medical residents and community participants. internal medicine residents participated in a CBSL experience for half a day during ambulatory blocks from 2011 to 2014. Residents attended a senior housing unit or center, delivered a presentation about a geriatric health topic, toured the facility, and received information about local older adult resources. Residents evaluated the experience. Postgraduate Year 3 internal medicine residents (n = 71) delivered 64 sessions. Residents felt that the experience increased their ability to communicate effectively with older adults (mean 3.91 ± 0.73 on a Likert scale with 5 = strongly agree), increased their knowledge of resources (4.09 ± 1.01), expanded their knowledge of a health topic pertinent to aging (3.48 ± 1.09), and contributed to their capacity to evaluate and care for older adults (3.84 ± 0.67). Free-text responses demonstrated that residents thought that this program would change their practice. Of 815 older adults surveyed from 36 discrete teaching sessions, 461 (56%) thought that the medical residents delivered health information clearly (4.55 ± 0.88) and that the health topics were relevant (4.26 ± 0.92). Free-text responses showed that the program helped them understand their health concerns. This CBSL program is a feasible and effective tool for teaching internal medicine residents and older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Training Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology Residents in Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Assessment Gathered from Participants in AANS and ASTRO Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jason; Suh, John H; Kavanagh, Brian; Xu, Zhiyuan; Ren, Lydia; Sheehan, Kimball; Lunsford, L Dade

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents an expanding approach for neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists. We evaluate educational gaps of senior residents drawn from each specialty as part of a focused SRS course. We also evaluate the strengths and limitations of SRS training in current residency programs of the course residents and faculty. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons and American Society of Radiation Oncology jointly held a senior resident course in SRS. Residents were nominated by program directors from across the United States. Thirty residents were chosen to participate in the course. The residents were surveyed before and after the course. Faculty (n = 14) were also surveyed to ascertain their perspectives on current training in SRS. Most (96.7%) of the residents planned to perform SRS when finished, and 94% anticipated SRS indications to expand. Regarding SRS technique, 47% reported average/above average understanding of intracranial SRS; only 17% expressed similar understanding of spinal SRS. Before the course, 76.6% noted below average/average ability to recognize and manage SRS complications. Twenty-three percent of the faculty indicated that graduating residents from their programs were unprepared to perform radiosurgery. Residents' self-assessed understanding of brain SRS indication (P = 0.000693), SRS techniques (P = 0.000021), spinal SRS indications (P = 0.000050), spinal SRS techniques (P = 0.000019), and complication recognition and management (P = 0.00033) significantly improved following the course. Knowledge and training gaps in SRS appear evident to the senior residents and faculty of both specialties. We believe that other educational opportunities for SRS experience are necessary to optimize clinical competency, as well as meet future clinical staffing needs for this expanding, multidisciplinary approach. Further evaluation of gaps in SRS is necessary through a larger, nationwide survey of U.S. neurosurgeons

  4. Attitudes and practices of surgery residency program directors toward the use of social networking profiles to select residency candidates: a nationwide survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Pauline H; Klaassen, Zachary; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether residency program directors (PDs) of general surgery and surgical subspecialties review social networking (SN) websites during resident selection. A 16-question survey was distributed via e-mail (Survey Monkey, Palo Alto, California) to 641 PDs of general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Institutions with ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. PDs of ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. Two hundred fifty (39%) PDs completed the survey. Seventeen percent (n = 43) of respondents reported visiting SN websites to gain more information about an applicant during the selection process, leading 14 PDs (33.3%) to rank an applicant lower after a review of their SN profile. PDs who use SN websites currently are likely to continue (69%), whereas those who do not use SN currently might do so in the future (yes 5.4%, undecided 44.6%). Online profiles displayed on SN websites provide surgery PDs with an additional avenue with which to evaluate highly competitive residency applicants. Applicants should be aware of the expansion of social media into the professional arena and the increasing use of these tools by PDs. SN profiles should reflect the professional standards to which physicians are held while highlighting an applicant's strengths and academic achievements. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring the Experience of Nursing Home Residents Participation in a Hope-Focused Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Moore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative intervention was used to explore how older adults living in a long-term care environment (nursing home understand hope and experience being participants in a group in which a hope intervention was carried out. A group project in which each session focused intentionally on a hope strategy was carried out with a convenience sample of 10 women (ages 75–99 who were members of an existing group. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis of the interviews (conducted before the group intervention was carried out and again at the end, field notes, and collaborative conversations regarding emerging themes. Findings from this study suggest that hope is not static and that it can change over time in response to one’s situations and circumstances. Also evident in this study is the potential for using a group process in long-term care to foster hope in an intentional way to make it more visible in the lives of the residents and their environment suggesting that one is “never too old for hope.”

  6. Cortisol profile and depressive symptoms in older adults residing in Brazil and in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Mai Thanh; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria; Guerra, Ricardo; Alvarado, Beatriz; Guralnik, Jack M

    2013-10-01

    How cortisol, a stress biological marker, differs according to depressive symptoms has mostly been examined in high-income countries. Including low- and middle-income countries in research on this matter would allow examining a wider range of exposure to adversity and improving the estimates of the associations between diurnal cortisol and depression. The aim of this study is to compare the profile of diurnal cortisol and depressive symptoms in 65- to 74-year-old residents of Santa Cruz (in an underdeveloped region, northeast Brazil, n = 64) and Saint-Bruno (a suburban area, QC, Canada, n = 60). Home interviews included assessments of socioeconomic variables, health behaviors, depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D) and Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR: awakening, 30, 60 min afterward), and at 1500 hours and bedtime from saliva collected over 2 days. Mixed linear models were used to estimate the associations between diurnal cortisol and depressive symptoms. Santa Cruz residents had lower cortisol levels upon awakening (β = -1.24, p = 0.04) and elevated bedtime levels (β = 20.29, p Santa Cruz residents (β = -0.19, p = 0.04), while greater diurnal cortisol levels (larger area under the curve), indicative of moderate stress, were observed in Saint-Bruno residents (β = 1.96, p = 0.047). Adverse living conditions in this remote area of Brazil may lead to a state of chronic stress and a different relationship with elevated depressive symptoms from persons aging in a Canadian suburban area.

  7. Urology residents experience comparable workload profiles when performing live porcine nephrectomies and robotic surgery virtual reality training modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Klein, Martina; Schommer, Eric; Thiel, David D; Samavedi, Srinivas; Kumar, Anup; Leveillee, Raymond J; Thomas, Raju; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Su, Li-Ming; Mui, Engy; Smith, Roger; Patel, Vipul

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of improving the quality of residents' education, the Southeastern Section of the American Urological Association (SES AUA) hosts an annual robotic training course for its residents. The workshop involves performing a robotic live porcine nephrectomy as well as virtual reality robotic training modules. The aim of this study was to evaluate workload levels of urology residents when performing a live porcine nephrectomy and the virtual reality robotic surgery training modules employed during this workshop. Twenty-one residents from 14 SES AUA programs participated in 2015. On the first-day residents were taught with didactic lectures by faculty. On the second day, trainees were divided into two groups. Half were asked to perform training modules of the Mimic da Vinci-Trainer (MdVT, Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA) for 4 h, while the other half performed nephrectomy procedures on a live porcine model using the da Vinci Si robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). After the first 4 h the groups changed places for another 4-h session. All trainees were asked to complete the NASA-TLX 1-page questionnaire following both the MdVT simulation and live animal model sessions. A significant interface and TLX interaction was observed. The interface by TLX interaction was further analyzed to determine whether the scores of each of the six TLX scales varied across the two interfaces. The means of the TLX scores observed at the two interfaces were similar. The only significant difference was observed for frustration, which was significantly higher at the simulation than the animal model, t (20) = 4.12, p = 0.001. This could be due to trainees' familiarity with live anatomical structures over skill set simulations which remain a real challenge to novice surgeons. Another reason might be that the simulator provides performance metrics for specific performance traits as well as composite scores for entire exercises. Novice trainees experienced

  8. Comparative Cognitive Profile of Second-Generation Antidepressants in Elderly Nursing Home Residents With Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Vishal; Johnson, Michael L; Chen, Hua; Fleming, Marc L; Holmes, Holly M; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2016-02-01

    Past literature suggests that the use of second-generation antidepressants improves cognition in depressed elderly patients. This study assessed the comparative cognitive profile of commonly used second-generation antidepressant classes in elderly residents with depression. A multiple propensity score adjusted retrospective cohort study was conducted using 2007-2010 Medicare Part D claims and Minimum Data Set (MDS). Elderly nursing home residents (65 years or older) with depression using a new prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and tetracyclics constituted the study cohort. The outcome of interest was cognition, measured using the MDS Cognition Scale. Cognition was measured at each quarterly assessment after antidepressant initiation for a maximum of 1 year. The propensity score-adjusted repeated-measures mixed model was used to evaluate the comparative profile of SSRIs, SNRIs, and tetracyclics with respect to cognition. The study cohort comprised 1518 elderly nursing home residents. Of these, 1081 received SSRIs (71.21%), 320 received tetracyclics (21.08%), and 117 received SNRIs (7.71%). The propensity score-adjusted repeated-measures mixed model did not show any statistically significant difference in cognition with the use of SSRIs (β = -0.14; 95% CI = -0.53, 0.25) or tetracyclics (β = -0.36; 95% CI = -0.80, 0.08) when compared with SNRIs, after controlling for other factors. The cognitive effect of SSRIs, SNRIs, and tetracyclics was similar in elderly nursing home residents with depression. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term cognitive effects of second-generation antidepressants in this vulnerable population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Participating in a Community of Learners enhances resident perceptions of learning in an e-mentoring program: proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Fiona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community learning and e-mentoring, learning methods used in higher education, are not used to any extent in residency education. Yet both have the potential to enhance resident learning and, in the case of community learning, introduce residents to basic lifelong learning skills. We set out to determine whether residents participating in an Internet based e-mentoring program would, with appropriate facilitation, form a community of learners (CoL and hold regular community meetings. We also determined resident and faculty perceptions of CoL and Internet sessions as effective learning experiences. Methods A six-month e-mentoring pilot was offered to 10 Radiology residents in the Aga Khan University Postgraduate Medical Education Program in Nairobi, Kenya (AKUHN with a Professor of Radiology, located at University of Virginia, USA, acting as the e-mentor. Monthly Internet case-based teaching sessions were facilitated by the e-mentor. In addition, residents were coached by a community facilitator to form CoL and collectively work through clinical cases at weekly face-to-face CoL sessions. Event logs described observed resident activity at CoL sessions; exit survey and interviews were used to elicit perceptions of CoL and Internet sessions as effective learning experiences. Results Resident adoption of CoL behaviors was observed, including self-regulation, peer mentoring and collaborative problem solving. Analysis revealed high resident enthusiasm and value for CoL. Surveys and interviews indicated high levels of acceptance of Internet learning experiences, although there was room for improvement in audio-visual transmission technologies. Faculty indicated there was a need for a larger multi-specialty study. Conclusions The pilot demonstrated resident acceptance of community building and collaborative learning as valued learning experiences, addressing one barrier to its formal adoption in residency education curricula. It also

  10. Sport tourism: comparing participant profiles and impact of three one ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    each involving between 13 000 and 27 000 participants. Attention is given to the number of participants who took part in these three events in 2005 and 2007 respectively, as well as to certain demographic data, in order to determine the extent of the infl ux of sport tourists into Cape Town and Durban during these events ...

  11. [The effects of wearing protective devices among residents and volunteers participating in the cleanup of the Hebei Spirit oil spill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Ha, Mina; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Park, Seok Gun; Kwon, Hojang; Hong, Yun-Chul; Ha, Eun-Hee; Lee, Jong Seung; Chung, Bong Chul; Lee, Jeongae; Im, Hosub; Choi, Yeyong; Cho, Yong-Min; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2009-03-01

    To assess the protective effects of wearing protective devices among the residents and volunteers who participated in the cleanup of the Hebei Spirit oil spill. A total of 288 residents and 724 volunteers were surveyed about symptoms, whether they were wearing protective devices and potential confounding variables. The questionnaires were administered from the second to the sixth week following the accident. Spot urine samples were collected and analyzed for metabolites of 4 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), 2 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 6 heavy metals. The association between the wearing of protective devices and various symptoms was assessed using a multiple logistic regression adjusted for confounding variables. A multiple generalized linear regression model adjusted for the covariates was used to test for a difference in least-square mean concentration of urinary biomarkers between residents who wore protective devices and those who did not. Thirty nine to 98% of the residents and 62-98% of volunteers wore protective devices. Levels of fatigue and fever were higher among residents not wearing masks than among those who did wear masks (odds ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval 1.23-19.86). Urinary mercury levels were found to be significantly higher among residents not wearing work clothes or boots (plevels between people who wore protective devices and those who did not, except for mercury, whose biological half-life is more than 6 weeks.

  12. Cardiovascular risk profiles of world masters games participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climstein, Mike; Walsh, Joe; Debeliso, Mark; Heazlewood, Tim; Sevene, Trish; Adams, Kent

    2016-10-11

    Increasing evidence indicates adherence to exercise throughout life is concurrent with improved health. World masters games (WMG) have more participants than any other international sporting competition and is under investigated, particularly with regard to indices of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, we chose to investigate selected cardiovascular risk factors in WMG participants. This was a cross-sectional, observational study which utilized a web-based questionnaire to survey cardiovascular risk factors of WMG participants. The survey consisted of three sections: basic demographics, medical history and physiological parameters which included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), resting blood pressure (BP) and lipids (total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL)). A total of 1,435 participants, 872 male, aged 27-91yrs (mean age 54.99yrs) participated in the study. Key findings included significant differences (p<0.05) between genders in BMI (17.7%, p<0.001), WC (10.6%, p<0.001), resting SBP (5.8%, p<0.001) and resting DBP (4.8%, p<0.001). Significant differences were also found between genders in HDLs (15.2%, p<0.001), TC:HDL ratio (17.2%, p<0.001) and LDL:HDL ratio (19.0%, p<0.001). Significant differences (p<0.001) were also identified when comparing WMG lipid results to the Australian general population (TC p<0.001; HDLs p<0.001; LDLs p<0.001). A high percentage of WMG participants demonstrated optimal values in a number of CVD risk factors when compared to the general population, female WMG participants had better values as compared to males. This reflected a decreased CVD in WMG participants and supports our hypothesis of enhanced health characteristics in an active, but aged cohort.

  13. Surgery resident participation in short-term humanitarian international surgical missions can supplement exposure where program case volumes are low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Asha G; Sifri, Ziad C

    2016-01-01

    General surgery training programs face declining case volume and diversity. We wanted to determine if resident participation in international surgical missions would increase exposure to cases underrepresented in our program case mix. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education program data from 2008 to 2011 (University of Medicine and Dentistry-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ) were analyzed to identify categories where volume was below national average. This was compared with case logs from 3 missions conducted by International Surgical Health Initiatives between 2011 and 2012. All chief residents completed more than minimum required index cases. Categories head and neck, alimentary tract, abdomen, and endocrine showed percentile below national average. Seven residents participated in 3 missions to Philippines and Sierra Leone. Sixty-five percent of the operations performed were in the 4 low-volume categories. International surgery missions expose residents to a high volume and variety of cases. Participation can be one way to increase case volume and diversity during training. Cases completed on missions with board certified surgeons should be considered for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education credit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic profiling of residents in the vicinity of a petrochemical complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Tzu-Hsuen; Chung, Ming-Kei [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ching-Yu [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shu-Ting; Wu, Kuen-Yuh [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chan, Chang-Chuan, E-mail: ccchan@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-01

    No previous studies have simultaneously measured the biomarkers of environmental exposure and metabolome perturbation in residents affected by industrial pollutants. This study aimed to investigate the metabolic effects of environmental pollutants such as vanadium and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on residents in the vicinity of a petrochemical complex. The study subjects were 160 residents, including 80 high-exposure subjects exposed to high levels of vanadium and PAHs and 80 age- and gender-matched low-exposure subjects living within a 40-km radius of a petrochemical complex. The exposure biomarkers vanadium and 1-hydroxypyrene and four oxidative/nitrosative stress biomarkers were measured in these subjects. Plasma samples from the study subjects were also analyzed using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy for metabolic profiling. The results showed that the urinary levels of vanadium and 1-hydroxypyrene in the high-exposure subjects were 40- and 20-fold higher, respectively, than those in the low-exposure subjects. Higher urinary levels of stress biomarkers, including 8-OHdG, HNE-MA, 8-isoPF2α, and 8-NO{sub 2}Gua, were also observed among the high-exposure subjects compared with the low-exposure subjects. Partial least squares discriminant analysis of the plasma metabolome demonstrated a clear separation between the high- and low-exposure subjects; the intensities of amino acids and carbohydrate metabolites were lower in the high-exposure subjects compared with the low-exposure subjects. The exposure to vanadium and PAHs may cause a reduction in the levels of amino acids and carbohydrates by elevating PPAR and insulin signaling, as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress. - Highlights: • Metabolic effects when exposure to pollutants near a petrochemical complex • V and PAHs exposure associated with elevated oxidative/nitrosative stress responses • V and PAHs exposure related to reduced amino acid and carbohydrate levels • V and PAHs affect metabolic

  15. Association between Pesticide Profiles Used on Agricultural Fields near Maternal Residences during Pregnancy and IQ at Age 7 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Eric; Gunier, Robert; Bradman, Asa; Harley, Kim; Kogut, Katherine; Molitor, John; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2017-05-09

    We previously showed that potential prenatal exposure to agricultural pesticides was associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children, yet the effects of joint exposure to multiple pesticides is poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate associations between the joint distribution of agricultural use patterns of multiple pesticides (denoted as "pesticide profiles") applied near maternal residences during pregnancy and Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) at 7 years of age. Among a cohort of children residing in California's Salinas Valley, we used Pesticide Use Report (PUR) data to characterize potential exposure from use within 1 km of maternal residences during pregnancy for 15 potentially neurotoxic pesticides from five different chemical classes. We used Bayesian profile regression (BPR) to examine associations between clustered pesticide profiles and deficits in childhood FSIQ. BPR identified eight distinct clusters of prenatal pesticide profiles. Two of the pesticide profile clusters exhibited some of the highest cumulative pesticide use levels and were associated with deficits in adjusted FSIQ of -6.9 (95% credible interval: -11.3, -2.2) and -6.4 (95% credible interval: -13.1, 0.49), respectively, when compared with the pesticide profile cluster that showed the lowest level of pesticides use. Although maternal residence during pregnancy near high agricultural use of multiple neurotoxic pesticides was associated with FSIQ deficit, the magnitude of the associations showed potential for sub-additive effects. Epidemiologic analysis of pesticides and their potential health effects can benefit from a multi-pollutant approach to analysis.

  16. Exercise class participation among residents in low-level residential aged care could be enhanced: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Michelle; Mackintosh, Shylie; Fryer, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    What do residents in low-level residential care perceive as motivators and barriers to participating in exercise classes at the facility? Qualitative study using focus groups. Residents, nursing staff and allied health staff of a low-level residential care facility. Key motivators for residents to attend the exercise classes included personal benefits, such as improved health and opportunities to socialise, and the support and encouragement that they received from family members and health professionals. The barriers to participating in the exercise classes included: health issues like pain, incontinence, and hearing impairments; external constraints such as the location of the classes and the early morning time; and internal constraints associated with a lack of knowledge about the classes and the benefits of exercising. While the key themes that arose from this study are consistent with findings from studies of community-dwelling adults, several of the barrier subthemes were unique. Recommendations from our findings to enhance exercise class participation include careful consideration of: class scheduling; class location; social aspects associated with exercise classes; support of social networks and health providers; health issues perceived to limit exercise; and marketing of classes.

  17. Levels and profiles of persistent organic pollutants in resident and migratory birds from an urbanized coastal region of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang Hee; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Ha, Sung Yong; Jang, Mi; Rani, Manviri; Hong, Sunwook; Yeo, Gwang Yeong

    2014-02-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) levels in resident and migratory birds collected from an urbanized coastal region of South Korea were investigated. As target species, resident birds that reside in different habitats-such as inland and coastal regions-were selected and their POP contamination status and accumulation features evaluated. Additionally, winter and summer migratory species were analysed for comparison with resident birds. Black-tailed gull and domestic pigeon were selected as the coastal and inland resident birds, respectively, and pacific loon and heron/egret were selected as the winter and summer migratory birds, respectively. The overall POP concentrations (unit: ng/g lipid) in resident birds were 14-131,000 (median: 13,400) for PCBs, 40-284,000 (11,200) for DDTs, resident birds, the overall level of POPs was higher in seagull compared to pigeon. The stable isotope ratio of nitrogen and carbon indicates that seagull occupies a higher trophic position in the environment than pigeon. However, the POP accumulation profiles in these species differed. Pigeon tends to accumulate more recently used POPs such as PBDEs than seagull. The high-brominated BDE congeners, γ-HBCDs and γ-HCH (also called lindane) were enriched in pigeon compared to seagull, implying the widespread use of Deca-BDE, technical HBCDs, and lindane in the terrestrial environment of South Korea. The different accumulation profile of POPs in both resident species would be related to their habitat difference and trophic positions. For urban resident bird such as pigeon, an intentional intake of dust or soils during feeding is likely to be an additional route of exposure to POPs. Resident birds generally accumulated higher POPs concentrations than migratory birds, the exceptions being relatively volatile compounds such as HCB, PeCB and HCHs. © 2013.

  18. Assessing the interest to participate in a dengue vaccine efficacy trial among residents of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guerra, Carmen L; Rodríguez-Acosta, Rosa L; Soto-Gómez, Eunice; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Peña-Orellana, Marisol; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Reinaldo; Cruz, R Rhode; Ramírez, Viani; Tomashek, Kay M; Dayan, Gustavo

    2012-07-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, is a major public health problem. Vaccines are thought the best means to prevent dengue because vector control alone has been largely ineffective. We implemented qualitative studies in 2006 and 2010 to determine the acceptability of conducting placebo-controlled dengue vaccine efficacy trials in Puerto Rican children. Key informant interviews and focus groups with parents and children were conducted in municipalities with high dengue incidence. We used structured open-ended questions to determine motivators and attitudes regarding vaccine trial participation. Knowledge about dengue risk and prevention, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding vaccines and vaccine trials were assessed. Using grounded theory, we conducted content analysis and established categories and sub-categories of participant responses. All participants were knowledgeable about dengue prevention and perceived children as most affected age groups. Participants were aware of vaccines benefits and they thought a vaccine could prevent dengue. However, most would not allow their children to participate in a placebo-controlled vaccine trial. Barriers included lack of trust in new vaccines and vaccine trial procedures; fear of developing dengue or side effects from the vaccine and lack of information about candidate dengue vaccines. Participants thought information, including results of previous trials might overcome barriers to participation. Motivators for participation were altruism, protection from dengue, free medical attention, and compensation for transportation and participation. Parents would consider children participation if accurate vaccine trial information is provided.

  19. Selection bias: Examining the feasibility, utility, and participant receptivity to incorporating simulation into the general surgery residency selection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Steffes, Christopher P; Nepomnayshy, Dmitry; Nicholas, Cate; Widmann, Warren D; Fitzgibbons, Shimae C; Dunkin, Brian J; Jones, Daniel B; Paige, John T

    2017-06-01

    Opportunities exist to revise the current residency selection process to capture desirable candidate competencies. We examined the extent to which components of the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education simulation-based medical student curriculum combined with a teamwork activity could be used as potential screening method. Students participated in a workshop consisting of training/evaluation of knot tying, suturing, airway management, gowning/gloving, and teamwork. Surveys were given to medical students (MS) and faculty/resident/staff (FRS) to examine their opinions about the residency screening process, the most critical competencies to assess, and the effectiveness of each station for candidate evaluation. Communication (FRS, 4.86 ± .35; MS, 4.93 ± .26), leadership (FRS, 4.41 ± .80; MS, 4.5 ± .76), judgment (FRS, 4.62 ± .74; MS, 4.67 ± .62), professionalism (FRS, 4.64 ± .73; MS, 5.00 ± .00), integrity (FRS, 4.71 ± .78; MS, 4.87 ± .35), and grit/resilience (FRS, 4.71 ± .78; MS, 4.53 ± .74) were considered most valuable for candidate screening. The simulation-based curriculum for evaluation of residency candidates was rated lowest by both groups. Open response comments indicated positive perceptions of this process. Employing simulation to assess candidates may be most beneficial for examining nontechnical attributes. Future work should continue to explore this area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The profiling of university of Ljubljana students according to their motives for exercise participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerar Katja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main research objective is the analysis of the grouping of the students of the University of Ljubljana, with respect to the intensity of different types of exercise participation motives, their gender, discipline and year of study, level of physical activity, status of physical education class, organization of physical activities during study, and place of residence.

  1. Integration of mobile technology in educational materials improves participation: creation of a novel smartphone application for resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Christiana M; Tan, Sanda A

    2015-01-01

    Traditional education consists of didactics and book learning. Recently, technology has been integrated into graduate medical education, primarily in the form of simulation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate if a novel smartphone application using technology to engage learners would improve participation in an educational activity when compared with a daily e-mail format and how this use translated to performance on standardized testing. The UF Surgery App (App), which is a smartphone application, was developed to deliver 2 questions from a general surgery educational database every weekday from October to February 2013. The App, developed for iOS, featured a notification alarm and a reminder icon to actively engage the learner. Learners who used the App responded to multiple-choice questions and were provided instantaneous feedback in the form of a correct answer with an explanation. The response rate and answers were collected prospectively and compared with the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination score. University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, a university teaching hospital. A total of 46 general surgical residents were enrolled in a university training program. Participation was voluntary. Overall, 26 of 46 (57%) residents participated. Of the users, 70% answered more than 20% of the questions, while 46% responded to more than 70% of questions. The percentage of correct answers on the App was positively correlated with standardized score (p = 0.005), percentage correct (p = 0.02), and percentile (p = 0.034) on the ABSITE examination. Technology can be used to actively engage residents. Deployment of this novel App improved participation over a daily question-answer e-mail format, and answers correlated with standardized test performance. The effect of the App on overall education is unclear, and a multi-institutional study has been initiated. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All

  2. Ethical challenges in nursing homes--staff's opinions and experiences with systematic ethics meetings with participation of residents' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Schmidt, Gerda; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Heller, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Many ethical problems exist in nursing homes. These include, for example, decision-making in end-of-life care, use of restraints and a lack of resources. The aim of the present study was to investigate nursing home staffs' opinions and experiences with ethical challenges and to find out which types of ethical challenges and dilemmas occur and are being discussed in nursing homes. The study used a two-tiered approach, using a questionnaire on ethical challenges and systematic ethics work, given to all employees of a Norwegian nursing home including nonmedical personnel, and a registration of systematic ethics discussions from an Austrian model of good clinical practice. Ninety-one per cent of the nursing home staff described ethical problems as a burden. Ninety per cent experienced ethical problems in their daily work. The top three ethical challenges reported by the nursing home staff were as follows: lack of resources (79%), end-of-life issues (39%) and coercion (33%). To improve systematic ethics work, most employees suggested ethics education (86%) and time for ethics discussion (82%). Of 33 documented ethics meetings from Austria during a 1-year period, 29 were prospective resident ethics meetings where decisions for a resident had to be made. Agreement about a solution was reached in all 29 cases, and this consensus was put into practice in all cases. Residents did not participate in the meetings, while relatives participated in a majority of case discussions. In many cases, the main topic was end-of-life care and life-prolonging treatment. Lack of resources, end-of-life issues and coercion were ethical challenges most often reported by nursing home staff. The staff would appreciate systematic ethics work to aid decision-making. Resident ethics meetings can help to reach consensus in decision-making for nursing home patients. In the future, residents' participation should be encouraged whenever possible. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring

  3. Understanding of Statistical Terms Routinely Used in Presentations: A Survey among Residents who participate at a Summer School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina-Ioana BONDOR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to investigate the understanding of statistical terms commonly used in lectures presented at summer schools for residents and young specialists. Material and Method: A survey was distributed to all the participants at the “Diabetic neuropathy from theory to practice” Summer School, 2014. The program was addressed to residents or young specialists in diabetes, neurology, surgery, and orthopedic from Romania. The survey consists of 6 multiple-choice questions and the first four questions evaluate the understanding of statistical terms. Results: There were 51 (42.5% participants who completed the questionnaires. From 204 total questions 81 (39.7% had correct answers. At the question 1, where relative risk was evaluated, only 3 (5.9% respondents answered correctly while at the question 2 (number need to treat about 78.4% (40 of answers were correct. At the question 3 (sensitivity, 22 (43.1% respondents answer correct while at the question 4 (Receiver Operating Characteristic curves only 16 (31.4% respondents provided a correct answer. The overall mean score of correct answers was 1.56±0.91. Conclusion: Our study showed that young specialists who participated to the survey were not familiarized with simple statistical terms commonly used in presentations.

  4. Delving into Participants' Profiles and Use of Social Tools in MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario-Hoyos, Carlos; Pérez-Sanagustin, Mar; Delgado-Kloos, Carlos; Parada G., Hugo A.; Muñoz-Organero, Mario

    This paper presents an in-depth empirical analysis of a nine-week MOOC. This analysis provides novel results regarding participants' profiles and use of built-in and external social tools. The results served to detect seven participants' patterns and conclude that the forum was the social tool preferred to contribute to the MOOC.

  5. Delving into Participants' Profiles and Use of Social Tools in MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario-Hoyos, Carlos; Pérez-Sanagustin, Mar; Delgado-Kloos, Carlos; Parada G., Hugo A.; Muñoz-Organero, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an in-depth empirical analysis of a nine-week MOOC. This analysis provides novel results regarding participants' profiles and use of built-in and external social tools. The results served to detect seven participants' patterns and conclude that the forum was the social tool preferred to contribute to the MOOC.

  6. A study on the feasibility and a possible form of local residents participation in nuclear safety regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Son, Moon Kyu [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Sook [Shila Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    It is expected that the results of this study will help policy makers in the government and nuclear industry enhance the confidence of local residents and citizens in the safety of nuclear energy. It is also believed that the citizen confidence on the nuclear energy will help them implement nuclear policies more efficiently and more safely. Considering that the newly sworn-in government is to involve citizens in wide variety of policy areas, this study fits with the policy directions of the new government. Most importantly, desirable citizen participation in public decision-making is to contribute to the enhancement of the working democracy.

  7. Royal Decree No. 1339/1987 on channels of institutional participation for Spaniards resident abroad, 30 October 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This Decree establishes Councils of Resident Spaniards in consular districts with at least 700 absent voters. The activities of the Councils are to be developed around 1) civil and labor rights of Spaniards in consular districts under international law; 2) the insertion of Spanish students in the country's educational system, actions that under local or international law can be undertaken to ensure the maintenance of cultural ties to Spain, and, in general, typical activities abroad that provide education about Spain; 3) the participation of Spanish residents in the political life of Spain, in conformity with Spanish legislation, legislation of the country of residence, and international law; and 4) social and cultural actions favoring Spaniards. The Decree also sets forth the structure and functions of the General Emigration Council, which was established by Article 8.5 of Royal Decree No. 530/1985 of 8 April 1985. Among its functions are the following: 1) to carry out research on questions and problems affecting emigrants; 2) to formulate proposals and recommendations with respect to the objectives and the application of the principles inspiring migration policy; 3) to keep informed of the actions of administrative agencies competent in this matter; and 4) to approve regulations for the functioning of the Council. full text

  8. Forecasting outdoor recreation participation: a cohort-component projection model for Illinois residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer

    1995-01-01

    Population projections for Illinois predicts lower growth, an older population, and increased racial diversity. If percent of the population participating in outdoor recreation activities by age and race remains at present levels, cohort-component projection models suggest that with projected changes in the population between 1990 and 2025, the number of Illinois...

  9. Demographic profile of physician participants in short-term medical missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldron, Paul H; Impens, Ann; Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim

    2016-12-07

    The US is the leading sending country for short term medical missions (STMMs), an unregulated and unsanctioned, grass roots form of direct medical service aid from richer countries to low and middle income countries. The objective of this study is to profile US physicians who go on such missions by means of a survey sample of the US physician population. An online survey solicited information on physician participation in STMMS as well as demographic and professional features. Responses were descriptively tabulated and multivariate regressions were performed to model for physician profiles related to STMM participation. Physician participants in STMMs are more likely to be a surgeon, anesthesiologist or pediatrician, married with few or no children at home, later in their career and have an income of $200-250 K. Specialty is the strongest predictor of participation. STMM participation does not differ by race, ethnicity nor religion. Descriptive statistics further provide a limited profile of participants. Direct expenses may have less influence on participation than opportunity costs. Potential clues about motivation that may be inferred from the features of the profile are discussed.

  10. The profiling of university of Ljubljana students according to their motives for exercise participation

    OpenAIRE

    Cerar Katja; Kondrič Miran; Sindik Joško

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The main research objective is the analysis of the grouping of the students of the University of Ljubljana, with respect to the intensity of different types of exercise participation motives, their gender, discipline and year of study, level of physical activity, status of physical education class, organization of physical activities during study, and place of residence. Methods Data were collected using personal data sheets during enrolling students at the University of...

  11. Association between Pesticide Profiles Used on Agricultural Fields near Maternal Residences during Pregnancy and IQ at Age 7 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Coker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that potential prenatal exposure to agricultural pesticides was associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children, yet the effects of joint exposure to multiple pesticides is poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate associations between the joint distribution of agricultural use patterns of multiple pesticides (denoted as “pesticide profiles” applied near maternal residences during pregnancy and Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ at 7 years of age. Among a cohort of children residing in California’s Salinas Valley, we used Pesticide Use Report (PUR data to characterize potential exposure from use within 1 km of maternal residences during pregnancy for 15 potentially neurotoxic pesticides from five different chemical classes. We used Bayesian profile regression (BPR to examine associations between clustered pesticide profiles and deficits in childhood FSIQ. BPR identified eight distinct clusters of prenatal pesticide profiles. Two of the pesticide profile clusters exhibited some of the highest cumulative pesticide use levels and were associated with deficits in adjusted FSIQ of −6.9 (95% credible interval: −11.3, −2.2 and −6.4 (95% credible interval: −13.1, 0.49, respectively, when compared with the pesticide profile cluster that showed the lowest level of pesticides use. Although maternal residence during pregnancy near high agricultural use of multiple neurotoxic pesticides was associated with FSIQ deficit, the magnitude of the associations showed potential for sub-additive effects. Epidemiologic analysis of pesticides and their potential health effects can benefit from a multi-pollutant approach to analysis.

  12. Profiling the lymphoid-resident T cell pool reveals modulation by age and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Aurélie; Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Guichard, Vincent; Mattiuz, Raphaël; Delpoux, Arnaud; Hamon, Pauline; Bonilla, Nelly; Rivière, Matthieu; Delon, Jérôme; Martin, Bruno; Auffray, Cédric; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Lucas, Bruno

    2018-01-04

    Despite being implicated in non-lymphoid tissues, non-recirculating T cells may also exist in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). However, a detailed characterization of this lymphoid-resident T cell pool has not yet been done. Here we show that a substantial proportion of CD4 regulatory (Treg) and memory (Tmem) cells establish long-term residence in the SLOs of specific pathogen-free mice. Of these SLOs, only T cell residence within Peyer's patches is affected by microbiota. Resident CD4 Treg and CD4 Tmem cells from lymph nodes and non-lymphoid tissues share many phenotypic and functional characteristics. The percentage of resident T cells in SLOs increases considerably with age, with S1PR1 downregulation possibly contributing to this altered homeostasis. Our results thus show that T cell residence is not only a hallmark of non-lymphoid tissues, but can be extended to secondary lymphoid organs.

  13. Examining the Sensory Profiles of At-Risk Youth Participating in a Pre-employment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kwan Shea Ph.D., OTR/L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to use Dunn’s model of sensory processing to investigate the sensory profiles of youth participating in a community-based occupational therapy pre-employment program. The youth participants had been involved in the juvenile justice system and were placed on probation. The studyanalyzed data from the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP questionnaires (Brown & Dunn, 2002 completed by 79 youth participants. Analysis of the participants’ scores on the AASP showed statistically significant differences from the norm in two quadrants; the delinquent youth scored lower in Sensation Seeking and higher in Sensation Avoiding. The delinquent youth participants demonstrated a high prevalence of atypical sensory processing patterns. Implications for further investigation and practice are discussed.

  14. Developing Guidance Material To Uncover a Mathematics Profile of Adult Participants on a Crane Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenskov, Lena

    This paper reports on a pilot study in the Danish "Profile in Mathematics" project implemented by the Directorate General for Employment, Placement and Vocational Training and the Ministry of Education. The pilot study develops and tests specific guidance materials to guide participants and teachers through a course for crane workers…

  15. The influence of temperament and character profiles on specialty choice and well-being in medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sievert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Multiple factors influence the decision to enter a career in medicine and choose a specialty. Previous studies have looked at personality differences in medicine but often were unable to describe the heterogeneity that exists within each specialty. Our study used a person-centered approach to characterize the complex relations between the personality profiles of resident physicians and their choice of specialty. Methods 169 resident physicians at a large Midwestern US training hospital completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS. Clusters of personality profiles were identified without regard to medical specialty, and then the personality clusters were tested for association with their choice of specialty by co-clustering analysis. Life satisfaction was tested for association with personality traits and medical specialty by linear regression and analysis of variance. Results We identified five clusters of people with distinct personality profiles, and found that these were associated with particular medical specialties Physicians with an “investigative” personality profile often chose pathology or internal medicine, those with a “commanding” personality often chose general surgery, “rescuers” often chose emergency medicine, the “dependable” often chose pediatrics, and the “compassionate” often chose psychiatry. Life satisfaction scores were not enhanced by personality-specialty congruence, but were related strongly to self-directedness regardless of specialty. Conclusions The personality profiles of physicians were strongly associated with their medical specialty choices. Nevertheless, the relationships were complex: physicians with each personality profile went into a variety of medical specialties, and physicians in each medical specialty had variable personality profiles. The plasticity and resilience of physicians were more important for their life

  16. Cardiovascular risk factor profiles of recent immigrants vs long-term residents of Ontario: a multi-ethnic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Maria; Austin, Peter C; Manuel, Douglas G; Tu, Jack V

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cardiovascular risk profiles differ markedly across Canada's 4 major ethnic groups, namely White, South Asian, Chinese, and Black; however, the impact of long-term Canadian residency on cardiovascular risk within and across these ethnic groups is unknown. Using pooled data from Statistics Canada's National Population and Canadian Community Health Surveys (1996-2007), we compared the age- and sex-standardized prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and diseases between recent immigrants (ethnic groups living in Ontario. We also calculated ethnic-specific attributable fraction (AF), defined as the proportion of risk that can be attributed to long-term Canadian residency. For all ethnic groups, cardiovascular risk factor profiles (ie, the percentage of people with ≥ 2 major cardiovascular risk factors, ie, smoking, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension) were worse among those with longer duration of residency in Canada. The greatest change in recent immigrants vs long-term residents was observed in the Chinese group (2.2% vs 5.2%; AF 0.47) followed by the White (6.5% vs 10.3%; AF 0.36), Black (9.2% vs 12.1%; AF 0.17), and South Asian (7.7% vs 8.2%; AF 0.03) groups. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease did not differ significantly between recent immigrants and long-term residents, irrespective of ethnic group. Our results suggest that cardiovascular disease prevention strategies must consider not only ethnicity, but also the level of acculturation within each ethnic group. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  18. Developing resident learning profiles: Do scientific evidence epistemology beliefs, EBM self-efficacy beliefs and EBM skills matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Nancy J.

    This study investigated resident scientific evidence epistemology beliefs, evidence based medicine (EBM) self-efficacy beliefs, and EBM skills. A convenience sample of fifty-one residents located in six U.S. based residency programs completed an online instrument. Hofer's epistemology survey questionnaire was modified to test responses based on four types of scientific evidence encountered in medical practice (Clinical Trial Phase 1, Clinical Trial Phase 3, Meta-analysis and Qualitative). It was hypothesized that epistemology beliefs would differ based on the type of scientific evidence considered. A principal components analysis produced a two factor solution that was significant across type of scientific evidence suggesting that when evaluating epistemology beliefs context does matter. Factor 1 is related to the certainty of research methods and the certainty of medical conclusions and factor 2 denotes medical justification. For each type of scientific evidence, both factors differed on questions comprising the factor structure with significant differences found for the factor 1 and 2 questions. A justification belief case problem using checklist format was triangulated with the survey results, and as predicted the survey and checklist justification z scores indicated no significant differences, and two new justification themes emerged. Modified versions of Finney and Schraw's statistical self-efficacy and skill instruments produced expected significant EBM score correlations with unexpected results indicating that the number of EBM and statistics courses are not significant for EBM self-efficacy and skill scores. The study results were applied to the construction of a learning profile that provided residents belief and skill feedback specific to individual learning needs. The learning profile design incorporated core values related to 'Believer' populations that focus on art, harmony, tact and diplomacy. Future research recommendations include testing context

  19. Impact of the Surgical Research Methodology Program on surgical residents' research profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhyar, Forough; Amin, Nalin; Dath, Deepak; Bhandari, Mohit; Kelly, Stephan; Kolkin, Ann M; Gill-Pottruff, Catherine; Skot, Martina; Reid, Susan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether implementing the formal Surgical Research Methodology (SRM) Program in the surgical residency curriculum improved research productivity compared with the preceding informal Research Seminar Series (RSS). The SRM Program replaced the RSS in July 2009. In the SRM Program, the curriculum in Year-1 consisted of 12 teaching sessions on the principles of clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, whereas the focus in Year-2 was on the design, conduct, and presentation of a research project. The RSS consisted of 8 research methodology sessions repeated annually for 2 years along with the design, conduct, and presentation of a research project. Research productivity was measured as the number of peer-reviewed publications and the generation of studies with higher levels of evidence. Outcome measures were independently assessed by 2 authors to avoid bias. Student t test and chi-square test were used for the analysis. Frequencies, mean differences with 95% CI, and effect sizes have been reported. In this study, 81 SRM residents were compared with 126 RSS residents. The performance of the SRM residents was superior on all metrics in our evaluation. They were significantly more productive and published more articles than the RSS residents (mean difference = 1.0 [95% CI: 0.5-1.5], p research performance improved 11.0 grades (95% CI: 8.5%-13.5%, p research methodology is crucial to appropriately apply evidence-based findings in clinical practice. The SRM Program has significantly improved the research productivity and performance of the surgical residents from all disciplines. The implementation of a similar research methodology program is highly recommended for the benefit of residents' future careers and ultimately, evidence-based patient care. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The relationship between apathy and participation in therapeutic activities in nursing home residents with dementia: Evidence for an association and directions for further research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Julie M; Doyle, Colleen J; Selvarajah, Suganya

    2016-07-01

    Apathy is one of the most frequent and early symptoms of dementia. Because apathy is characterised by lack of initiative and motivation, it leads to considerable burden being placed on carers to ensure that the person living with dementia has a reasonable quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between apathy and participation in therapeutic activities for older people with dementia living in nursing homes. Ninety residents were recruited into the study, and apathy was measured by nursing home staff using the Apathy Evaluation Scale Clinician version. Staff also compiled data on each resident's involvement in therapeutic activities. Among this sample, the mean age was 84.8 years, and mean length of stay in the nursing home was 1.8 years. The mean apathy score was 50.4, indicating that on average the residents had a moderate level of apathy. Overall, residents participated in six activities per week and those residents who were involved in the most activities had the lowest levels of apathy. This paper provides evidence that residents involved in therapeutic activities have lower levels of apathy. Further research should be conducted on the direction of causality, whether apathy levels can be changed through participation in therapeutic activities, the relationship between dementia severity and modifiability of apathy, and the intensity of therapeutic activities required to maintain functioning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Profile and evaluation of participants in distance learning continuing education courses about inclusive practices in education

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    Vera Lúcia Messias Fialho Capellini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses aspects related to a continuing education course about Inclusive and Special Education in the area of Mental Disabilities offered to 20 (twenty groups of teachers by the Ministry of Education. The Distance Course was offered in different regions of Brazil with a 180 (a hundred and eighty hours workload. The research included the profile of the participants, an evaluation of the course by the participants and the analysis of the dropout causes. The aspects of the course under evaluation received a positive evaluation by most of the participants. The most frequent reason for the dropout rates include participants’ limitations in terms of meeting deadlines, personal reasons and difficulties in using computers. It was concluded that Distance Education seems to be a relevant tool for the acquisition of knowledge about inclusive practice.

  2. A process evaluation of a Psychomotor Dance Therapy Intervention (DANCIN) for behavior change in dementia: attitudes and beliefs of participating residents and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Robinson, Lisa; Rochester, Lynn; James, Ian A; Hughes, Julian C

    2017-02-01

    In a previous paper, we presented results from a 12-week study of a Psychomotor DANCe Therapy INtervention (DANCIN) based on Danzón Latin Ballroom that involves motor, emotional-affective, and cognitive domains, using a multiple-baseline single-case design in three care homes. This paper reports the results of a complementary process evaluation to elicit the attitudes and beliefs of home care staff, participating residents, and family members with the aim of refining the content of DANCIN in dementia care. An external researcher collected bespoke questionnaires from ten participating residents, 32 care home staff, and three participants' family members who provided impromptu feedback in one of the care homes. The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 (BCTTv1) provided a methodological tool for identifying active components of the DANCIN approach warranting further exploration, development, and implementation. Ten residents found DANCIN beneficial in terms of mood and socialization in the care home. Overall, 78% of the staff thought DANCIN led to improvements in residents' mood; 75% agreed that there were improvements in behavior; 56% reported increased job satisfaction; 78% of staff were enthusiastic about receiving further training. Based on participants' responses, four BCTTv1 labels-Social support (emotional), Focus on past success and verbal persuasion to boost self-efficacy, Restructuring the social environment and Habit formation-were identified to describe the intervention. Residents and staff recommended including additional musical genres and extending the session length. Discussions of implementing a supervision system to sustain DANCIN regularly regardless of management or staff turnover were suggested. Care home residents with mild to moderate dementia wanted to continue DANCIN as part of their routine care and staff and family members were largely supportive of this approach. This study argues in favor of further dissemination of DANCIN in care homes

  3. Personal characteristics and participation in dance events of residents from home for the aged DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n4p295

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    Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing elderly population and an increase in the number of residents of long-stay institutions are currently observed. One of the activities that provides benefits to these individuals is dancing, but little is known about this practice in these institutions. The objective of this study was to identify factors that limit or encourage residents of these institutions to actively participate in dance events. This qualitative and exploratory study involved a group of 30 residents of a longstay institution (mean age: 72.6 ± 9.6 years and a group of 30 visitors (mean age: 68.1 ± 10.2 years, who had participated in dance events for at least one year. The personal history related to dancing was obtained by semistructured interviews. The results showed that most responders began dancing at a young age influenced by their families, attending country dances. However, changes have occurred over the years and these events have been greatly reduced at the institution. Less commitment to participate in activities and greater physical debilitation were observed in the group of residents of the long-stay institution. These subjects also reported that they make few friends during the event, receive little praise, and are most of the time only watching others dancing. It was concluded that it would be necessary to offer activities that permit more active participation, contributing to the development of the personal characteristics of the subjects, in order to promote this practice which, in turn, could produce health benefits.

  4. Differential metabolic profiles associated to movement behaviour of stream-resident brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oromi, Neus; Jové, Mariona; Pascual-Pons, Mariona; Royo, Jose Luis; Rocaspana, Rafel; Aparicio, Enric; Pamplona, Reinald; Palau, Antoni; Sanuy, Delfi; Fibla, Joan; Portero-Otin, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms that can contribute in the fish movement strategies and the associated behaviour can be complex and related to the physiology, genetic and ecology of each species. In the case of the brown trout (Salmo trutta), in recent research works, individual differences in mobility have been observed in a population living in a high mountain river reach (Pyrenees, NE Spain). The population is mostly sedentary but a small percentage of individuals exhibit a mobile behavior, mainly upstream movements. Metabolomics can reflect changes in the physiological process and can determine different profiles depending on behaviour. Here, a non-targeted metabolomics approach was used to find possible changes in the blood metabolomic profile of S. trutta related to its movement behaviour, using a minimally invasive sampling. Results showed a differentiation in the metabolomic profiles of the trouts and different level concentrations of some metabolites (e.g. cortisol) according to the home range classification (pattern of movements: sedentary or mobile). The change in metabolomic profiles can generally occur during the upstream movement and probably reflects the changes in metabolite profile from the non-mobile season to mobile season. This study reveals the contribution of the metabolomic analyses to better understand the behaviour of organisms.

  5. Differential metabolic profiles associated to movement behaviour of stream-resident brown trout (Salmo trutta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Oromi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that can contribute in the fish movement strategies and the associated behaviour can be complex and related to the physiology, genetic and ecology of each species. In the case of the brown trout (Salmo trutta, in recent research works, individual differences in mobility have been observed in a population living in a high mountain river reach (Pyrenees, NE Spain. The population is mostly sedentary but a small percentage of individuals exhibit a mobile behavior, mainly upstream movements. Metabolomics can reflect changes in the physiological process and can determine different profiles depending on behaviour. Here, a non-targeted metabolomics approach was used to find possible changes in the blood metabolomic profile of S. trutta related to its movement behaviour, using a minimally invasive sampling. Results showed a differentiation in the metabolomic profiles of the trouts and different level concentrations of some metabolites (e.g. cortisol according to the home range classification (pattern of movements: sedentary or mobile. The change in metabolomic profiles can generally occur during the upstream movement and probably reflects the changes in metabolite profile from the non-mobile season to mobile season. This study reveals the contribution of the metabolomic analyses to better understand the behaviour of organisms.

  6. Motor and Executive Function Profiles in Adult Residents Environmentally Exposed to Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Exposure to elevated levels of manganese (Mn) may be associated with tremor, motor and executive dysfunction (EF), clinically resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD research has identified tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor dominant (NTD) profiles. NTD PD pres...

  7. How canola and sunflower oils affect lipid profile and anthropometric parameters of participants with dyslipidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Sedigheh; Noroozi, Mona; Khosrotabar, Naghmeh; Mazandarani, Shadi; Ghadrdoost, Behshid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Restricted intakes of saturated and trans-fatty acids and replacement with poly or monounsaturated fatty acids are emphasized in healthy diets. This study evaluates the effects of a six-month consumption of canola oil compared to sunflower oil on lipid profile and anthropometric parameters of people affected by dyslipidemia. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 96 patients with dyslipidemia, who were randomly assigned into canola oil or the sunflower oil groups. The participants were instructed to record the contents of their daily meals, beverages, fruits, and snacks a day before treatment, at the second clinic visit, in the third month, and at the end of study (i.e., six months). Lipid profile and anthropometric parameters were compared between the two groups. Student t-test or Mann Whitney U test was used for statistical comparisons of variables between groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to adjust the confounding factor effects. Results: Of the enrolled participants, 44 (45.8%) were on sunflower oil diet and 52 (54.2%) on canola oil diet. We observed no change in anthropometric parameters and thus no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Significant reductions in LDL-C (psunflower oil. Conclusion: Dietary fats in the form of canola oil or sunflower oil effectively lower the serum cholesterol, LDL-C and triglyceride concentrations. They also result in an increase in serum concentration of HDL-C. These oils, however, did not modify general anthropometric parameters. PMID:28638812

  8. Self-Assessment of Skills and Competencies among Residents Participating in a Pediatric Hospice and Palliative Medicine Elective Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossfeld, Zachary M; Tumin, Dmitry; Humphrey, Lisa M

    2018-02-01

    To describe our institutional experience with a four-week pediatric HPM elective rotation and its impact on residents' self-rated competencies. In the spirit of bolstering primary hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) skills of all pediatricians, it is unclear how best to teach pediatric HPM. An elective rotation during residency may serve this need. An anonymous online survey was distributed to pediatric and internal medicine/pediatrics residents at a single, tertiary academic children's hospital. Respondents were asked to rate education, experience, and comfort with five aspects of communication with families of children with terminal illnesses and six domains of managing the symptoms of terminal illnesses. Self-ratings were recorded on a 1-5 scale: none, minimal, moderate, good, or excellent. Demographic data, including details of training and prior HPM training, were collected. Respondents completed a set of six questions gauging their attitude toward palliative care in general and at the study institution specifically. All respondents desire more HPM training. Those residents who self-selected to complete a pediatric HPM elective rotation had significantly higher self-ratings in 10 of 11 competency/skill domains. Free-text comments expressed concern about reliance on the specialty HPM team. A pediatric HPM elective can significantly increase residents' self-rated competency. Such rotations are an under-realized opportunity in developing the primary HPM skills of pediatricians, but wider adoption is restricted by the limited availability of pediatric HPM rotations and limited elective time during training.

  9. Landing biomechanics in participants with different static lower extremity alignment profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J

    2015-05-01

    Whereas static lower extremity alignment (LEA) has been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about its influence on joint motion and moments commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. To cluster participants according to combinations of LEA variables and compare these clusters in hip- and knee-joint kinematics and kinetics during the landing phase of a drop-jump task. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. A total of 141 participants (50 men: age = 22.2 ± 2.8 years, height = 177.9 ± 9.3 cm, weight = 80.9 ± 13.3 kg; 91 women: age = 21.2 ± 2.6 years, height = 163.9 ± 6.6 cm, weight = 61.1 ± 8.7 kg). Static LEA included pelvic angle, femoral anteversion, quadriceps angle, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, tibial torsion, and navicular drop. Cluster analysis grouped participants according to their static LEA profiles, and these groups were compared on their hip- and knee-joint kinematics and external moments during the landing phase of a double-legged drop jump. Three distinct clusters (C1-C3) were identified based on their static LEAs. Participants in clusters characterized with static internally rotated hip and valgus knee posture (C1) and externally rotated knee and valgus knee posture (C3) alignments demonstrated greater knee-valgus motion and smaller hip-flexion moments than the cluster with more neutral static alignment (C2). Participants in C1 also experienced greater hip internal-rotation and knee external-rotation moments than those in C2 and C3. Static LEA clusters that are positioned anatomically with a more rotated and valgus knee posture experienced greater dynamic valgus along with hip and knee moments during landing. Whereas static LEA contributes to differences in hip and knee rotational moments, sex may influence the differences in frontal-plane knee kinematics and sagittal-plane hip moments.

  10. Sociodemographic profile and level of burden of dementia patients' caregivers who participate in a support group

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    Lusiêni Diel

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brazilian Alzheimer's Association recommend the dementia patient's caregiver to attend group meetings which aim to give information and enable them to express and share feelings with individuals who are facing similar difficulties. Objectives: To identify the sociodemographic profile of the individuals who attend the Support Group for Family Members of Individuals with Alzheimer's disease at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, and to verify the degree of burden associated to the care given to this kind of patient. Methods: Forty-eight participants were sub-divided into two groups: 23 non-caregivers and 25 caregivers. All participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire, and the caregivers also answered the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI. Student's t test was used for comparison of parametric data, and Chi-square test for categorical data between caregivers and non-caregivers. Spearman's rho correlation analysis was performed for the ZBI and the studied variables. Results: Participants were predominantly women. Only age differentiated one subgroup from the other. The mean score on the ZBI was 35.1 (14.7, and most of the caregivers presented up to moderate burden. Conclusions: Women attended the Support Group either as caregiver or non-caregiver. The level of burden among caregivers of high educational attainment was relatively high besides the short time as caregiver (up to a year.

  11. A computer literacy skills profile of pharmacists residing in two counties of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Rutter, Paul M

    2008-12-01

    Pharmacy is an information intensive profession and a pharmacist has to be proficient in health care information management. The advance in information technology and the use of computers to access, retrieve and analyse this information is increasingly important. Yet little is known about pharmacists' computer literacy or information technology skills. To gain a better understanding of pharmacists' basic computer skills and their ability to use standard software. Self-administered postal survey to 747 registered pharmacists residing in two counties of England. A total of 386 (52%) pharmacists responded after two mailings. Most responding pharmacists used computers at work and at home. They believed their basic computing skills to be high, although acknowledged that they were skill deficient in using certain software packages. Internet use at work was low (43%) as too was awareness and use of online medical databases; this was reflected in online medical database training being identified as of greatest need. Pharmacists were confident in operating computer systems but identified a training need for particular software applications. Of concern is the limited knowledge they possessed and access they had on medical databases.

  12. Next generation leadership: a profile of self-rated competencies among administrative resident and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, Brad; Cherlin, Emily; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare executives and program faculty have voiced concerns that early careerists lack needed competencies for future leadership in the increasingly complex healthcare industry. However, empirical studies of early careerists' competency levels are limited. We sought to describe administrative fellows' and residents' (n = 78, response rate 73.6%) self-rated competency in several key areas and assess how these ratings differed by individuals' gender, age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program. Respondents rated their competence particularly high (41.7% of respondents rated themselves "A") in the domain of interpersonal and emotional intelligence, which included being an effective team leader and member, coaching and developing others, self-awareness, and self-regulation. Lower ratings were in the domains of facilities management and in development and fundraising. Compared to males, females rated their competency in the financial skills domain lower (P-value = 0.04). Age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program were not significantly associated with self-rated competency in any area. These results provide early evidence that may help program faculty and preceptors consider pedagogical approaches that reflect students' vocalized needs and may help to design strategies that effectively cultivate next generation leadership.

  13. Mandarin (Simplified) Chinese Version of the Voice Activity and Participation Profile: Adaptation and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Ma, Estella P-M; Ren, Jia; Pu, Dai; Yang, Hui; Yiu, Edwin M-L

    2017-10-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Mandarin (simplified) Chinese version of Voice Activity and Participation Profile (MC-VAPP) in mainland China. This study enrolled 786 subjects from February 2015 to March 2017, including 456 individuals with voice disorders (dysphonic group) and 330 vocally healthy individuals (nondysphonic group). The internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficient), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]), and differences in the MC-VAPP scores were compared between the two groups. Exploratory factor analysis was performed. The receiver operating characteristic curve and cutoff point were calculated. The MC-VAPP had a high internal consistency. Cronbach alpha coefficients for the subsection scores were from 0.86 and 0.96, with 0.98 for the total score. Test-retest reliability was high for the total score (ICC = 0.98). The four factors' cumulative contribution was determined to be 74.68%. The dysphonic participants displayed significantly higher total score and subsection scores than the nondysphonic participants (P <0.001). There were significant differences in total activity limitation scores and the total participation restriction scores between the two groups (P <0.001). The cutoff point for screening between the two groups was 36.5, with a sensitivity of 76.80% and specificity of 80.30%. The MC-VAPP is a reliable and valid instrument for the evaluation of voice-related quality of life in Chinese-speaking individuals. It is also recommended that the MC-VAPP would be a useful tool for screening individuals with and without voice disorders based on the cutoff value of 36.5. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychometric Properties of Voice Activity Participation Profile-Persian Version (VAPPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faham, Maryam; Anaraki, Zahra Ghayoumi; Ahmadi, Akram; Ebadi, Abbas; Silverman, Erin Pearson

    2017-10-31

    Individuals with voice disorders may experience limits in activity and restricted participation in daily activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Voice Activity Participation Profile-Persian Version (VAPPP), a questionnaire which specifically investigates activity limitation and participation restriction in Persian-speaking individuals with voice disorders. We completed a translation procedure according to World Health Organization guidelines, prior to administering the questionnaire to 208 participants (156 patients with dysphonia and 52 controls), each of whom completed the questionnaire. We examined various psychometric properties including item analysis, factor analysis, internal consistency, discriminant validity, criterion-related validity, and test-retest reliability were investigated for this questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 27 items on the VAPPP were distributed across four factors and that the first question, which assesses self-perceived dysphonia severity, was grouped separately. All the four subscales and total VAPPP have high internal consistency and test-retest reliability based on Cronbach's alpha coefficients and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Job effects (α = 0.85; ICC = 0.96), daily communication effects (α = 0.96; ICC = 0.83), social communication effects (α = 0.91; ICC = 0.93), emotional effects (α = 0.94; ICC = 0.76), and total score (α = 0.97; ICC = 0.88) are presented. VAPPP scores in patients with dysphonia were significantly different from those of the healthy control group (P < 0.001). The VAPPP total score has a high correlation to the Voice Handicap Index (r = 0.86; P < 0.001) CONCLUSION: The VAPPP is a reliable and valid tool for evaluating the quality of life of patients with dysphonia in Iran. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Voice activity and participation profile - VAPP administered in two different scales of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Marcela Dutra Esteves; Oliveira, Gisele; Behlau, Mara

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two types of rating scales using the Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP) self-assessment questionnaire, in order to check their influence on the results obtained by the same instrument. Participants were 32 individuals with vocal complaints of both genders, with ages between 15 and 58 years. All subjects answered the vocal self-assessment questionnaire VAPP using with two different rating scales, randomly presented: an 11-point numerical scale (NS) and a 10-cm long (or 100 points) visual analogue scale (VAS). Response time was registered and there was a two-week interval between applications. At the end of the task, participants were asked about the difficulties found in the task to answer each rating scale version, and also to indicate their preference. The mean VAPP scores were similar in both scales. Differences were found only in partial scores, referring to Activity Limitation and Effects on Emotion, with higher mean score in the numerical scale (p=0.008), however with no clinical impact. The order in which the scales were answered did not affect the results obtained, except for the aspect Effects on Social Communication, which presented lower scores with the visual analogue scale in the group of subjects that answered the numeric scale first (p=0.049). Finally, most participants answered faster to the questionnaire when using the numerical scale (p=0.003). The scores obtained in the VAPP by the two different rating scales were similar. The questionnaire with the numeric scale takes less time to be answered, which may be useful for clinical practice.

  16. Collection of profiles on all the editorial projects that participated in the I SOBRE Conference, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Equipo SOBRE Lab

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In December 2014, the SOBRE Lab team (www.sobrelab.com organized the I SOBRE Conference on Artistic Practices and Editorial Policies, held at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Granada. The principal aim of the conference was to establish a relational map of the different initiatives linking contemporary editorial and art projects. The design of the event took into account the geopolitical context of this university and the professional and/or research links between the team members and Andalusia, setting this region as the primary geographical focus. The experience brought together groups and individuals including professionals, associations, teaching staff and students, and created areas of common interest based on a series of case studies that were presented and debated, together with question-and-answer dialogue. Thanks to this event, participants were able to share experiences characterized by investigating and communicating the effects and affects that emerge when artistic output is interrelated with knowledge-dissemination – emphasizing the political–relational dimension of current editorial forms and systems. An open access database is being prepared that captures the key data and basic profile for each participant/speaker and the different initiatives related to this field. Here we present the first entries to this database.

  17. Five-year institutional bibliometric profiles for 103 US neurosurgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas R; Venable, Garrett T; Jones, G Morgan; Lepard, Jacob R; Roberts, Mallory L; Saleh, Nabil; Sidiqi, Said K; Moore, Andrew; Khan, Nickalus; Selden, Nathan R; Michael, L Madison; Klimo, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Various bibliometric indices based on the citations accumulated by scholarly articles, including the h-index, g-index, e-index, and Google's i10-index, may be used to evaluate academic productivity in neurological surgery. The present article provides a comprehensive assessment of recent academic publishing output from 103 US neurosurgical residency programs and investigates intradepartmental publishing equality among faculty members. Each institution was considered a single entity, with the 5-year academic yield of every neurosurgical faculty member compiled to compute the following indices: ih(5), cumulative h, ig(5), ie(5), and i10(5) (based on publications and citations from 2009 through 2013). Intradepartmental comparison of productivity among faculty members yielded Gini coefficients for publications and citations. National and regional comparisons, institutional rankings, and intradepartmental publishing equality measures are presented. The median numbers of departmental faculty, total publications and citations, ih(5), summed h, ig(5), ie(5), i10(5), and Gini coefficients for publications and citations were 13, 82, 716, 12, 144, 23, 16, 17, 0.57, and 0.71, respectively. The top 5 most academically productive neurosurgical programs based on ih(5)-index were University of California, San Francisco, University of California, Los Angeles, University of Pittsburgh, Brigham & Women's Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University. The Western US region was most academically productive and displayed greater intradepartmental publishing equality (median ih[5]-index = 18, median Ginipub = 0.56). In all regions, large departments with relative intradepartmental publishing equality tend to be the most academically productive. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified the ih(5)-index as the only independent predictor of intradepartmental publishing equality (Ginipub ≤ 0.5 [OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.20-1.40, p = 0.03]). The ih(5)-index is a novel, simple, and intuitive

  18. Socio-Environmental and Hematological Profile of Landfill Residents (São Jorge Landfill–Sao Paulo, Brazil

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    Vivianni Palmeira Wanderley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are experiencing an unprecedented urbanization process that, alongside physical, social and economic developments, has been having a significant impact on a population’s health. Due to the increase in pollution, violence and poverty, our modern cities no longer ensure a good quality of life so they become unhealthy environments. This study aims to assess the effect of social, environmental and economic factors on the hematologic profile of residents of Santo André’s landfill. In particular, we will assess the effect of social, economic, and environmental factors on current and potential disease markers obtained from hematological tests. The research method is the observational type, from a retrospective cohort, and by convenience sampling in Santo André in the Greater ABC (municipalities of Santo André, São Bernardo do Campo and São Caetano do Sul, southeast part of the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil. The study determined a socio-environmental profile and the hematologic diseases screening related to a close location to the landfill. The disease manifests itself within a broad spectrum of symptoms that causes changes in blood count parameters. The objective of this work is to show that there is an association between social, environmental and economic factors and a variety of serious disease outcomes that may be detected from blood screening. A causal study of the effect of living near the landfill on these disease outcomes would be a very expensive and time-consuming study. This work we believe is sufficient for public health officials to consider policy and attempt remediation of the effects of living near a landfill.

  19. Socio-Environmental and Hematological Profile of Landfill Residents (São Jorge Landfill-Sao Paulo, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira Wanderley, Vivianni; Affonso Fonseca, Fernando Luiz; Vala Quiaios, André; Nuno Domingues, José; Paixão, Susana; Figueiredo, João; Ferreira, Ana; de Almeida Pinto, Cleonice; da Silva, Odair Ramos; Alvarenga, Rogério; Machi Junior, Amaury; Luiz Savóia, Eriane Justo; Daminello Raimundo, Rodrigo

    2017-01-11

    We are experiencing an unprecedented urbanization process that, alongside physical, social and economic developments, has been having a significant impact on a population's health. Due to the increase in pollution, violence and poverty, our modern cities no longer ensure a good quality of life so they become unhealthy environments. This study aims to assess the effect of social, environmental and economic factors on the hematologic profile of residents of Santo André's landfill. In particular, we will assess the effect of social, economic, and environmental factors on current and potential disease markers obtained from hematological tests. The research method is the observational type, from a retrospective cohort, and by convenience sampling in Santo André in the Greater ABC (municipalities of Santo André, São Bernardo do Campo and São Caetano do Sul, southeast part of the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil). The study determined a socio-environmental profile and the hematologic diseases screening related to a close location to the landfill. The disease manifests itself within a broad spectrum of symptoms that causes changes in blood count parameters. The objective of this work is to show that there is an association between social, environmental and economic factors and a variety of serious disease outcomes that may be detected from blood screening. A causal study of the effect of living near the landfill on these disease outcomes would be a very expensive and time-consuming study. This work we believe is sufficient for public health officials to consider policy and attempt remediation of the effects of living near a landfill.

  20. Effects on Weight, Blood Lipids, Serum Fatty Acid Profile and Coagulation by an Energy-Dense Formula to Older Care Residents: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylner, Sara; Cederholm, Tommy; Faxén-Irving, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake in frail old adults is often lower than estimated needs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an energy-dense oral supplement on nutritional status, food intake, and physical function in residents living in care residential homes. Randomized controlled intervention trial with a crossover design. Five care residential homes in the southern Stockholm area. Older people living at care residential homes: age 65 or older, malnourished or at risk of malnutrition according to Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Energy-dense formula (oleic and linoleic acid emulsion enriched with protein and micronutrients) (Calogen Extra, Nutricia) 30 mL distributed 3 times daily for 6 weeks. Body weight, 3-day food and fluid record, appetite rating, and physical function (ie, Short Physical Performance Battery, grip strength, and peak expiratory flow). Biochemical indicators of nutritional status, blood lipids, and serum phospholipid fatty acid (FA) profile. Twenty-eight participants completed the 2 phases of the crossover study; group A (n = 14, 87 ± 6 years, 50% women) and group B (n = 14, 82 ± 8 years, 71% women). The intervention periods combined resulted in significantly (P acid based fat emulsion enriched with protein and micronutrients (Calogen Extra) 3 times daily to old people in care residential homes improved nutritional status, had positive effects on fatty acid profile and blood lipids, and a potential antithrombotic effect. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01259999. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking sources to early effects by profiling urine metabolome of residents living near oil refineries and coal-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Hsin Sally; Yuan, Tzu-Hsuen; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2017-05-01

    This study aims at identifying metabolic changes linking external exposure to industrial air toxics with oxidative stress biomarkers. We classified 252 study subjects as 111 high vs. 141 low exposure subjects by the distance from their homes to the two main emission sources, oil refineries and coal-fired power plants. We estimated individual's external exposure to heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by dispersion and kriging models, respectively. We measured urinary levels of heavy metals and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) as biomarkers of internal exposure, and 8-OHdG, HNE-MA, 8-isoPGF 2α , and 8-NO 2 Gua as biomarkers of early health effects. We used two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify urine metabolomics. We applied "meet-in-the-middle" approach to identify potential metabolites as putative intermediate biomarkers linking multiple air toxics exposures to oxidative stress with plausible exposures-related pathways. High exposure subjects showed elevated ambient concentrations of vanadium and PAHs, increased urine concentrations of 1-OHP, vanadium, nickel, copper, arsenic, strontium, cadmium, mercury, and thallium, and higher urine concentrations of all four urine oxidative stress biomarkers compared to low exposure subjects. We identified a profile of putative intermediate biomarkers that were associated with both exposures and oxidative stress biomarkers in participants. Urine metabolomics identified age-dependent biological pathways, including tryptophan metabolism and phenylalanine metabolism in children subjects (aged 9-11), and glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism in elderly subjects (aged>55), that could associate multiple exposures with oxidative stress. By profiling urine biomarkers and metabolomics in children and elderly residents living near a petrochemical complex, we can link their internal exposure to oxidative stress biomarkers through biological pathways associated with common complex

  2. Age-Related Changes in the Cardiometabolic Profiles in Singapore Resident Adult Population: Findings from the National Health Survey 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Ping Loh

    Full Text Available We describe the centile trends of the blood pressure, glycemia and lipid profiles as well as renal function of a representative population who participated in the Singapore National Health Survey in 2010. Representative survey population was sampled in two phases, first using geographical/ residential dwelling type stratification, followed up ethnicity. 2,407 survey participants without any self-reported medical or medication history for diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia were included in this analysis. All biochemistry analyses were performed on Roche platforms. After excluding outliers using Tukey's criteria, the results of the remaining participants were subjected to lambda-mu-sigma (LMS analysis. In men, systolic blood pressure increased linearly with age. By contrast, an upward inflection around late 40s was seen in women. The diastolic blood pressure was highest in men in the late 30s-50s age group, and in women in the late 50s-60s age group. All glycemia-related parameters, i.e. fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose and HbA1c concentrations increased with age, although the rate of increase differed between the tests. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations increased with age, which became attenuated between the early 30s and late 50s in men, and declined thereafter. In women, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations gradually increased with age until late 30s, when there is an upward inflection, plateauing after late 50s. Our findings indicate that diagnostic performance of laboratory tests for diabetes may be age-sensitive. Unfavourable age-related cardiovascular risk profiles suggest that the burden of cardiovascular disease in this population will increase with aging population.

  3. Nestin- and Doublecortin-Positive Cells Reside in Adult Spinal Cord Meninges and Participate in Injury-Induced Parenchymal Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury. Stem Cells 2011;29:2062–2076. PMID:22038821

  4. Adult Community Orchestras in Texas: Activity and Background Profiles of Participants with a Report of Organizational Standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn Dharlene

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and assess Texas community orchestras and create a demographic and musical profile of participants. This was accomplished through use of two online questionnaires. A director survey questionnaire determined the organizational status of each orchestra. The directors surveyed were leaders in these…

  5. Profiles and portfolios of adolescent school-based extracurricular activity participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A F; Matjasko, J L

    2007-04-01

    The current study presented a new description of adolescent school-based activity participation, in the form of mutually exclusive activity portfolios, and described the kinds of youth that participate in each portfolio. These portfolios included (1) Sports Only, (2) Academics Only, (3) School Only, (4) Performance Only, (5) Multiple Activities, and (6) Non-Participation. Findings indicated that youth demographic characteristics and school size differentiated between different kinds of activity participation as well as nonparticipation. More detailed activity portfolios were also identified that were complex and demonstrate the difficulty of examining participation beyond larger, more inclusive groupings. The Multiple Activity portfolio emerged as a unique group worthy of further examination. Characteristics of non-participators included: lower socioeconomic status, lower grades, and attended larger schools. Hispanic adolescents were also less likely to participate in school-based extracurricular activities. Findings from this study inform ecological models of adolescent development as well as school and social policy.

  6. The Maastricht social participation profile: development and clinimetric properties in older adults with a chronic physical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Godelief M J; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Post, Marcel W M; Proot, Ireen M; Mesters, Ilse; van Eijk, Jacques T M

    2009-11-01

    To develop and test the Maastricht Social Participation Profile (MSPP), an instrument measuring the actual social participation by older adults with a chronic physical illness, in accordance with their own definition of social participation. The development process consisted of a number of steps, ending with a field test in two waves (n = 412 and n = 125) among a random sample of people older than 59 years with either COPD or diabetes mellitus. Reproducibility was evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and smallest real differences at group level (SRDs(group)). Convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated with Pearson correlation coefficients between the MSPP and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI). The MSPP consists of four indices: consumptive participation, formal social participation, informal social participation-acquaintances and informal social participation-family. Each index measured diversity and frequency of participation. ICCs ranged between 0.63 and 0.83. SRDs(group) ranged between 0.05 and 0.09. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported by the correlations between the MSPP(frequency) and the FAI. The MSPP has good validity and acceptable reproducibility. Its distinguishing features are its focus on actual social participation and the possibility to calculate both diversity and frequency scores.

  7. Profiles and Portfolios of Adolescent School-Based Extracurricular Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A. F.; Matjasko, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The current study presented a new description of adolescent school-based activity participation, in the form of mutually exclusive activity portfolios, and described the kinds of youth that participate in each portfolio. These portfolios included (1) Sports Only, (2) Academics Only, (3) School Only, (4) Performance Only, (5) Multiple Activities,…

  8. Place of Residence Modifies the Association Between Acculturation and Dietary Tools Knowledge Among Latina WIC Participants: A Multi-State Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, David Sheng; Taylor, Christopher Alan; Mejia, Alfredo; Melgar-Quiñonez, Hugo; Balcazar, Hector G.; Anders, Robert L.; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Duarte-Gardea, Maria O.; Ibarra, Jorge M.

    2010-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed: (a) awareness and knowledge of federal dietary tools (MyPyramid, Food Guide Pyramid (FGP), and food labels (FL)), and (b) the influence of acculturation and state of residence on FGP knowledge (FGPK) indicators among low-income Latina WIC participants (N = 479) living in Connecticut, Ohio, Texas, and California. Participants were familiar with FGP but only 37% recognized MyPyramid. FGPK was highest for fruits (71%) and lowest for the ‘breads and cereals’ group (12%). Less than half (47%) used FL’s when grocery shopping. Living in OH, was associated with the lowest FGPK. Multivariate analyses showed that more acculturated individuals living in CT/CA had better FGPK than participants living in TX and their less acculturated counterparts in CT/CA. The forthcoming revised federal dietary tools need to be adequately disseminated among Latinos, with special emphasis on those with lower acculturation levels, living in rapid emerging Latino communities or in the US–Mexico border. PMID:20549357

  9. Molecular risk assessment of BIG 1-98 participants by expression profiling using RNA from archival tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Giobbie-Hurder Anita; Thürlimann Beat; Oberli Andrea; Baltzer Anna; Wirapati Pratyaksha; Delorenzi Mauro; Popovici Vlad; Antonov Janine; Viale Giuseppe; Altermatt Hans; Aebi Stefan; Jaggi Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the work reported here is to test reliable molecular profiles using routinely processed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from participants of the clinical trial BIG 1-98 with a median follow-up of 60 months. Methods RNA from fresh frozen (FF) and FFPE tumor samples of 82 patients were used for quality control, and independent FFPE tissues of 342 postmenopausal participants of BIG 1-98 with ER-positive cancer were analyzed by measuring prospect...

  10. The effect of motivation profile and participative budgeting on budget goal commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandalgaard, Niels; Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    2009-01-01

    The effect of participative budgeting on motivation is often considered in management accounting research. In this study we focus on dispositional factors of motivation rooted in personality that affect budgeting. Especially we focus on the effect of personality traits in the form of achievement......, power and affiliation motives on budget goal commitment in interaction with participative budgeting. The study is based on a survey among bank managers at different organizational levels of a Scandinavian regional bank and the results indicate that the effect of participative budgeting on budget goal...... commitment is moderated by the implicit power motivation of the bank manager....

  11. Analyse statistique des profils et de l’activité des participants d’un MOOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Bar-Hen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available L’acronyme MooC (Massive online open Course est utilisé pour désigner les plateformes d’enseignement en ligne qui proposent des cours ouverts et qui peuvent s’adresser à des centaines, des milliers, voire des dizaines de milliers d’étudiants simultanément. Le but du présent article n’est pas de proposer une analyse du phénomène MooC dans sa généralité, mais d’offrir une vision originale d’un MooC, au travers de ses étudiants, de leur profil et de leur activité lors du cours. Pour ce faire, nous analysons les données collectées lors d’un des premiers cours lancés sur la plateforme française FUN, le cours « Fondamentaux en statistique ». Nous y décrivons la communauté des étudiants, leur profil socioéconomique, leurs motivations, leur activité sur le forum du cours. Nous étudierons comment les échanges sur le forum se structurent lors du cours.

  12. Reproductive and hormonal risk profile according to language acculturation and country of residence in the Ella Binational Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Gallo, Linda; Cooper, Renee; Wertheim, Betsy C; Natarajan, Loki; Thompson, Patricia A; Komenaka, Ian K; Brewster, Abenaa; Bondy, Melissa; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, María Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Martínez, María Elena

    2014-06-01

    We compared the distribution of breast cancer reproductive and hormonal risk factors by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. To compare the distribution of breast cancer reproductive and hormonal risk factors by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent, taking into account level of education, we analyzed data on 581 Mexican and 620 Mexican American (MA) women with a history of invasive breast cancer from the Ella Binational Breast Cancer Study. An eight-item language-based acculturation measure was used to classify MA women. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test associations between language acculturation, country of residence, and reproductive and hormonal risk factors. After adjustment for age and education, compared to women residing in Mexico, English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have an earlier age at menarche (education. Results support continued efforts to educate Mexican and MA women on screening and early detection of breast cancer along with promotion of modifiable factors, such as breastfeeding.

  13. A snapshot of residents in medical oncology in Turkey: A Nationwide survey on profile and key problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinc Nayir

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Recognition of the subspecialty residents who are the future of medical oncology, and determination of their needs, and problems will contribute to the development of recommendations for their solution. In our country their main problems are medical conscription, inadequate education, and burnout.

  14. Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas, Anne-Marie; Boisvert, Isabelle; Tourigny, Marc; Lemieux, Annie; Tremblay, Claudia; Gagnon, Mélanie M

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to verify if a history of maltreatment may predict the psychosocial profile of children who participated in an intervention program aiming at reducing sexual behavior problems. Data were collected at both the beginning and the end of the intervention program using a clinical protocol and standardized tests selected on the basis of the intervention targets. In general, the results indicate that children who had experienced maltreatment display a psychosocial profile that is similar to that of children who had not experienced maltreatment. However, children who had experienced psychological abuse or neglect may display greater externalized or sexualized behaviors, whereas children who have a parent who had been a victim of sexual abuse may display fewer sexualized behaviors.

  15. Identifying profiles of actual and perceived motor competence among adolescents: associations with motivation, physical activity, and sports participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, An; Maes, Jolien; Stodden, David; Cardon, Greet; Goodway, Jacqueline; Lenoir, Matthieu; Haerens, Leen

    2016-11-01

    The present study identified adolescents' motor competence (MC)-based profiles (e.g., high actual and low perceived MC), and accordingly investigated differences in motivation for physical education (PE), physical activity (PA) levels, and sports participation between profiles by using regression analyses. Actual MC was measured with the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. Adolescents (n = 215; 66.0% boys; mean age = 13.64 ± .58 years) completed validated questionnaires to assess perceived MC, motivation for PE, PA-levels, and sports participation. Actual and perceived MC were only moderately correlated and cluster analyses identified four groups. Two groups of overestimators (low - overestimation, average - overestimation) were identified (51%), who particularly displayed better motivation for PE when compared to their peers who accurately estimated themselves (low - accurate, average - accurate). Moreover, adolescents with low actual MC, but high perceived MC were significantly more active than adolescents with low actual MC who accurately estimated themselves. Results pointed in the same direction for organised sports participation. Underestimators were not found in the current sample, which is positive as underestimation might negatively influence adolescents' motivation to achieve and persist in PA and sports. In conclusion, results emphasise that developing perceived MC, especially among adolescents with low levels of actual MC, seems crucial to stimulate motivation for PE, and engagement in PA and sports.

  16. Profile of GMAT® Testing: Residence Report. Testing Years 2010 through 2014. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes five-year global GMAT testing trends and includes: (1) GMAT exams taken by residence; (2) GMAT exams taken by gender; (3) Mean age of GMAT examinees; (4) Mean GMAT Total score; and (5) GMAT score-sending breakdowns by program type (MBA, non-MBA master's, and doctoral/other), TY 2014. This data brief can be used to help build…

  17. The relationships of calculated percent body fat, sports participation, age, and place of residence on menstrual patterns in healthy adolescent girls at an independent New England high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C; Emans, S J; Mansfield, J; Podolsky, C; Grace, E

    1984-10-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to determine normal menstrual patterns in healthy girls in an independent high school and assess the effects of exercise (type and hours per day), age (chronologic and gynecologic), calculated estimate of body fat, and place of residence (boarding and day students) on menstrual function. Three hundred twenty-seven girls (means age 15.5 +/- 1.1 years) answered a questionnaire on menstrual history; 306 (93.6%) were postmenarchal and 21 (6.4%) premenarchal. Calculated estimate of percent body fat was significantly lower in premenarchal than postmenarchal girls (22.4% versus 27.3% p less than 0.0001). Ninety-three percent of adolescents reported flow lasting 4-7 days; 59.7% dysmenorrhea; and 63% premenstrual symptoms. There was no correlation between estimated body fat or hours per day of exercise and the regularity of menses, duration of flow, or dysmenorrhea. With the exception of gymnastics and dancing, sports participation had little or no impact on menstrual patterns. Follow up questionnaires and menstrual calendars were obtained from 87 girls eight to fifteen months after the initial questionnaires. All girls whose cycles had changed from regular to irregular were boarding students, confirming previous anecdotal reports that separation from home may be a significant stress for adolescents.

  18. Decomposing the profile of PM in two low polluted German cities--mapping of air mass residence time, focusing on potential long range transport impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to decompose the profile of particulates in Karlsruhe and Potsdam (Germany), focusing on the localization of PM potential transboundary sources. An air mass cluster analysis was implemented, followed by a study of air mass residence time on a grid of a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution. Particulate/gaseous daily air pollution and meteorological data were used to indicate PM local sources. Four Principal Component Analysis (PCA) components were produced: traffic, photochemical, industrial/domestic and particulate. PM2.5/PM10 ratio seasonal trends, indicated production of PMCOARSE (PM10-PM2.5) from secondary sources in Potsdam during warm period (WP). The residing areas of incoming slow moving air masses are potential transboundary PM sources. For Karlsruhe those areas were mainly around the city. An air mass residence time secondary peak was observed over Stuttgart. For Potsdam, areas with increased dwelling time of the arriving air parcels were detected particularly above E/SE Germany. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Readiness-to-change cluster profiles among adults with mental illness who were homeless participating in a life skills intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christine A; Chan, Dara V; Simpson, Emily K; Sabol, Peggy

    2012-12-01

    This longitudinal study examined differences in intervention outcomes based on readiness-to-change cluster profiles among 73 adults with a mental illness at risk for homelessness participating in a manualized life skills intervention. Intervention topics included money management, food management, safe community participation, and room- and self-care. Life skill knowledge and readiness-to-change, measured using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment, was examined at baseline, post-intervention, and 3-6 months later. Two scoring patterns emerged for readiness-to-change at each time point: Pre-Engaged and Engaged. Participants who were Engaged at the time of assessment scored significantly better than Pre-Engaged on post-intervention life skill testing, however group identification changed over time. Baseline readiness-to-change did not predict future performance or attrition, and therefore may not provide accurate indication of client investment for future learning or participation. Further investigation is needed to determine what factors contribute to Engaged membership.

  20. Psyllium supplementation in adolescents improves fat distribution & lipid profile: a randomized, participant-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bock, Martin; Derraik, José G B; Brennan, Christine M; Biggs, Janene B; Smith, Greg C; Cameron-Smith, David; Wall, Clare R; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effects of psyllium supplementation on insulin sensitivity and other parameters of the metabolic syndrome in an at risk adolescent population. This study encompassed a participant-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Subjects were 47 healthy adolescent males aged 15-16 years, recruited from secondary schools in lower socio-economic areas with high rates of obesity. Participants received 6 g/day of psyllium or placebo for 6 weeks, with a two-week washout before crossing over. Fasting lipid profiles, ambulatory blood pressure, auxological data, body composition, activity levels, and three-day food records were collected at baseline and after each 6-week intervention. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the Matsuda method using glucose and insulin values from an oral glucose tolerance test. 45 subjects completed the study, and compliance was very high: 87% of participants took >80% of prescribed capsules. At baseline, 44% of subjects were overweight or obese. 28% had decreased insulin sensitivity, but none had impaired glucose tolerance. Fibre supplementation led to a 4% reduction in android fat to gynoid fat ratio (p = 0.019), as well as a 0.12 mmol/l (6%) reduction in LDL cholesterol (p = 0.042). No associated adverse events were recorded. Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome) in an at risk population of adolescent males. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000888268.

  1. Psyllium supplementation in adolescents improves fat distribution & lipid profile: a randomized, participant-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin de Bock

    Full Text Available AIMS: We aimed to assess the effects of psyllium supplementation on insulin sensitivity and other parameters of the metabolic syndrome in an at risk adolescent population. METHODS: This study encompassed a participant-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Subjects were 47 healthy adolescent males aged 15-16 years, recruited from secondary schools in lower socio-economic areas with high rates of obesity. Participants received 6 g/day of psyllium or placebo for 6 weeks, with a two-week washout before crossing over. Fasting lipid profiles, ambulatory blood pressure, auxological data, body composition, activity levels, and three-day food records were collected at baseline and after each 6-week intervention. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the Matsuda method using glucose and insulin values from an oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: 45 subjects completed the study, and compliance was very high: 87% of participants took >80% of prescribed capsules. At baseline, 44% of subjects were overweight or obese. 28% had decreased insulin sensitivity, but none had impaired glucose tolerance. Fibre supplementation led to a 4% reduction in android fat to gynoid fat ratio (p = 0.019, as well as a 0.12 mmol/l (6% reduction in LDL cholesterol (p = 0.042. No associated adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome in an at risk population of adolescent males. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000888268.

  2. Leadership training for radiologists: a survey of opportunities and participants in MBA and MPH programs by medical students, residents, and current chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen; Daginawala, Naznin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine opportunities for students and trainees to obtain an MPH or MBA degree during either medical school or radiology residency and to determine the prevalence of such degree possession by chairpersons in radiology. All allopathic medical schools in the United States were surveyed to chart the number of MD/MPH and MD/MBA degree programs available to students. Program directors were contacted to assess the number of MPH or MBA courses of study administratively related to their residencies. Also, an e-mail survey was sent to all members of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments inquiring whether each chairperson had earned an additional degree. Currently, 81 allopathic medical schools in the United States offer MD/MPH degrees, and 52 offer MD/MBA degrees. Six residencies provide access to MPH programs, and 3 residencies provide the opportunity to pursue an MBA in conjunction with residency. Of these, only 1 MPH program and no MBA programs had trainees enrolled at present. Twenty-six percent of the chairpersons surveyed possessed advanced degrees other than MDs. There has been rapid growth in the number of MD/MPH and MD/MBA programs available to medical students. However, there is a scarcity of similar programs accessible to trainees during or just after residency training. To assist motivated radiologists interested in leading our profession, opportunities should expand both in formal degree-granting programs and through certificate-sanctioned course series to address relevant issues of leadership and management pertinent to our specialty. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... not limited to the following: Providing medical direction and management of the patient; nursing... eligibility, election, and duration of benefits. Medicare patients receiving hospice services and residing in... are to communicate with each other and document such communications to ensure that the needs of...

  4. The impact of a nutritional intervention on the nutritional status and anthropometric profile of participants in the health Gym Programme in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Deus, Raquel Mendonça; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Jaime, Patrícia Constante; Lopes, Aline Cristine Souza

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an intervention implemented under the Programa Academia da Saúde (Health Gym Programme) of Belo Horizonte, MG on the nutritional status and anthropometric profile of participants. Intervention study involving participants in the Health Gym Programme which encompasses group food and nutrition education activities over a period of 11 months combined with regular physical activity. Impact was assessed by comparing nutritional and anthropometric indicators in women participants who were divided into two groups according to their participation rate in the intervention. A total of 124 women were evaluated, results showed an increase in the number of daily meals (pnutritional interventions with physical activity to ensure positive impacts on the nutritional status and anthropometric profile of participants in the Health Gym Programme.

  5. Molecular risk assessment of BIG 1-98 participants by expression profiling using RNA from archival tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giobbie-Hurder Anita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the work reported here is to test reliable molecular profiles using routinely processed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues from participants of the clinical trial BIG 1-98 with a median follow-up of 60 months. Methods RNA from fresh frozen (FF and FFPE tumor samples of 82 patients were used for quality control, and independent FFPE tissues of 342 postmenopausal participants of BIG 1-98 with ER-positive cancer were analyzed by measuring prospectively selected genes and computing scores representing the functions of the estrogen receptor (eight genes, ER_8, the progesterone receptor (five genes, PGR_5, Her2 (two genes, HER2_2, and proliferation (ten genes, PRO_10 by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR on TaqMan Low Density Arrays. Molecular scores were computed for each category and ER_8, PGR_5, HER2_2, and PRO_10 scores were combined into a RISK_25 score. Results Pearson correlation coefficients between FF- and FFPE-derived scores were at least 0.94 and high concordance was observed between molecular scores and immunohistochemical data. The HER2_2, PGR_5, PRO_10 and RISK_25 scores were significant predictors of disease free-survival (DFS in univariate Cox proportional hazard regression. PRO_10 and RISK_25 scores predicted DFS in patients with histological grade II breast cancer and in lymph node positive disease. The PRO_10 and PGR_5 scores were independent predictors of DFS in multivariate Cox regression models incorporating clinical risk indicators; PRO_10 outperformed Ki-67 labeling index in multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses. Conclusions Scores representing the endocrine responsiveness and proliferation status of breast cancers were developed from gene expression analyses based on RNA derived from FFPE tissues. The validation of the molecular scores with tumor samples of participants of the BIG 1-98 trial demonstrates that such scores can serve as independent prognostic

  6. Molecular risk assessment of BIG 1-98 participants by expression profiling using RNA from archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Janine; Popovici, Vlad; Delorenzi, Mauro; Wirapati, Pratyaksha; Baltzer, Anna; Oberli, Andrea; Thürlimann, Beat; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Viale, Giuseppe; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Aebi, Stefan; Jaggi, Rolf

    2010-02-09

    The purpose of the work reported here is to test reliable molecular profiles using routinely processed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from participants of the clinical trial BIG 1-98 with a median follow-up of 60 months. RNA from fresh frozen (FF) and FFPE tumor samples of 82 patients were used for quality control, and independent FFPE tissues of 342 postmenopausal participants of BIG 1-98 with ER-positive cancer were analyzed by measuring prospectively selected genes and computing scores representing the functions of the estrogen receptor (eight genes, ER_8), the progesterone receptor (five genes, PGR_5), Her2 (two genes, HER2_2), and proliferation (ten genes, PRO_10) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) on TaqMan Low Density Arrays. Molecular scores were computed for each category and ER_8, PGR_5, HER2_2, and PRO_10 scores were combined into a RISK_25 score. Pearson correlation coefficients between FF- and FFPE-derived scores were at least 0.94 and high concordance was observed between molecular scores and immunohistochemical data. The HER2_2, PGR_5, PRO_10 and RISK_25 scores were significant predictors of disease free-survival (DFS) in univariate Cox proportional hazard regression. PRO_10 and RISK_25 scores predicted DFS in patients with histological grade II breast cancer and in lymph node positive disease. The PRO_10 and PGR_5 scores were independent predictors of DFS in multivariate Cox regression models incorporating clinical risk indicators; PRO_10 outperformed Ki-67 labeling index in multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses. Scores representing the endocrine responsiveness and proliferation status of breast cancers were developed from gene expression analyses based on RNA derived from FFPE tissues. The validation of the molecular scores with tumor samples of participants of the BIG 1-98 trial demonstrates that such scores can serve as independent prognostic factors to estimate disease free survival (DFS) in

  7. Macro-Level Profile of Hawai'i's Schools Participating in the Significant Bilingual Instructional Features Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavieres, Milagros; And Others

    This document contains six chapters: (1) The introduction discusses the State of Hawaii, its residents, and major industries. (2) "Education in Hawaii" presents the state's education plan, Department of Education rules and regulations, and student services. (3) "Bilingual Education Program Data" describes Hawaii's bilingual…

  8. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by SEAS program participating vessels, November 2001 - January 2002 (NODC Accession 0000661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 22 November 2001 to 23 January 2002....

  9. The profile of performance skills and emotional factors in the context of participation among young children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Lihi; Ratzon, Navah; Bart, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Participation is a person's involvement in daily activities in a variety of environments, roles and life situations. Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) experience difficulties in gaining academic achievements or in their engagement in activity of daily living. Motor difficulties have a negative effect on the ability to participate, as well as on various affective components. Senses of coherence, effort and hope have not yet been assessed, within the context of participation, in children with DCD. The purpose of the present study is to look into the relations between participation and senses of coherence, effort and hope among children with DCD, in comparison to typically developed children. Fifty subjects aged 5-6 years participated in the study, 25 of whom are children diagnosed with DCD, the other 25 being typical children. The DCD diagnosis was established according to the DSM-IV criteria and the M-ABC test. All children completed the coherence questionnaire for children as well as the children's questionnaire on effort and hope. Parents completed the Children Participation Questionnaire (CPQ), and the Performance Skills Questionnaire (PSQ). Children with DCD had lower performance skills, lower sense of coherence, hope, and effort than their peers. They less enjoy their participation and their parents are less satisfied in comparison to control group. Significant correlations were found between sense of coherence and hope to participation. Process skills were found to be the main predictor for explaining child's participation. While treating children with DCD we have to consider also socio-psychological aspects that may be weakened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cohort profile: the lidA Cohort Study-a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-12-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  11. Distinct risk profiles for human infections with the Influenza A(H7N9 virus among rural and urban residents: Zhejiang Province, China, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan He

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the risk factors and source of infection leading to human infections with the Influenza A(H7N9 virus in urban and rural areas. METHODS: We conducted a case-control investigation to identify potential exposures and risk factors. Controls were randomly selected from the same community as the cases using random digit dialing. We used exact conditional logistic regression to evaluate the exposures and risk factors, stratified by urban and rural residence. RESULTS: Buying live or freshly slaughtered poultry from a market was significantly associated with illness onset among both urban [48% of 25 case-patients and 12% of 125 control-persons, adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 19, 95% CI: 2.3-929] and rural (33% of 18 case-patients and 8.9% of 90 control-persons, AOR = 13, 95% CI:1.5-∞ residents. In rural area, tending to home-raised poultry (56% of 18 case-patients and 10% of 90 control-persons, AOR = 57, 95% CI: 7.5-∞ and existence of a poultry farm in the vicinity of the residence (28% of 18 case-patients and 5.6% of 90 control-persons, AOR = 37, 95% CI: 3.8-∞ were also significantly associated with disease onset. Presence of underlying medical conditions was a significant risk factor for urban residents (76% of 25 case-patients and 13% of 125 control-persons, AOR = 49, 95% CI: 7.1-2132. CONCLUSIONS: Buying live or freshly slaughtered poultry from a market is a risk factor for both urban and rural residents, tending to home-raised poultry and existence of a poultry farm in the vicinity of the residence are risk factors unique for rural residents. The virus might have been in stealth circulation in the poultry population before infecting humans. We recommend strict poultry market management and multisectoral collaboration to identify the extent of poultry infection in China.

  12. The relationship between customer satisfaction and the demographic profile of participants in the exercise programs of health and fitness clubs for municipal youth and sport organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA TRIPOLITSIOTI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the satisfaction of participants in the offered programs of exercise of health and fitness clubs for municipal Youth and Sport organizations. A random sample of 320 participants was selected from 18 closed halls and responded to a questionnaire that was pre-checked for reliability, validity and objectivity (Chen, 2001. The questionnaire included questions related to demographics, participant satisfaction from the exercise programs and from the level of organisation these have, the quality of equipment the athletic halls have and the variety of services offered. Data was analysed statistically to determine the relationships and differences between the mean value of the different variables. Results show that the profile of the major customer segment is women from 26 to 35 years old with University education. Also, statistical analysis shows that there are significant differences between the average values in all 5 dimensions of participant satisfaction: the prices of exercise programs, program content, the quality of hall equipment, public relations and employee performance. Also, there are statistically significant differences between the demographic variables (age, sex, income and the 5 participant satisfaction dimensions. However, the dimensions that present statistically significant differences vary according to the demographic variable analysed. This shows that municipal sports centres should differentiate their offers according to the dimensions of satisfaction that are more important for each customer segment as these are formed based on age, income or sex.

  13. Evaluation of the role of Care Sport Connectors in connecting primary care, sport, and physical activity, and residents' participation in the Netherlands: study protocol for a longitudinal multiple case study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, E; Leenaars, K E F; Wagemakers, M A E; Molleman, G R M; Koelen, M A; van der Velden, J

    2015-11-23

    The number of people with one or more chronic diseases is increasing, but this trend could be reduced by promoting physical activity. Therefore, in 2012, the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Sport introduced Care Sport Connectors (CSCs), to whom a broker role has been ascribed. The defined outcome of CSCs role is an increased number of residents participating in local sports facilities and being physically active in their own neighbourhood. To realize this, primary care and sports professionals need to collaborate, and local sports facilities and neighbourhoods need to offer accessible physical activities for people in the locality, including people with one or more chronic diseases or at increased risk of chronic disease(s). Adequate scientific research is needed to assess CSCs' impact on: 1) connecting primary care, sport, and physical activity and 2) increasing the number of residents who engage in physical activity to promote their health. To study the role and the impact of CSCs, a longitudinal multiple case study will be conducted, in nine municipalities spread over the Netherlands, from 2014 until 2017. A mixed methodology will be used to perform action research and process evaluation. Study I focuses on the expected alliances of CSCs and the preconditions that facilitate or hinder CSCs in the formation of these alliances. The study population will consist of intermediary target groups. A literature review, interviews, focus groups, and document analysis will be undertaken. Study II will concentrate on lifestyle program participants to identify health and physical activity behavior changes. For this purpose, interviews, literature studies, a Delphi study, fitness tests, and questionnaires will be used. Linking and integrating results gained by multiple methods, at different levels, will provide a validated assessment of CSCs' impact on connecting the primary care and sports sectors. This will reveal changes in residents' physical activity behavior, and

  14. The National Spina Bifida Patient Registry: profile of a large cohort of participants from the first 10 clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Kathleen J; Liu, Tiebin; Ward, Elisabeth; Thibadeau, Judy; Schechter, Michael S; Soe, Minn M; Walker, William

    2015-02-01

    To use data from the US National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR) to describe variations in Contexts of Care, Processes of Care, and Health Outcomes among individuals with spina bifida (SB) receiving care in 10 clinics. Reported here are baseline cross-sectional data representing the first visit of 2172 participants from 10 specialized, multidisciplinary SB clinics participating in the NSBPR. We used descriptive statistics, the Fisher exact test, χ(2) test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test to examine the data. The mean age was 10.1 (SD 8.1) years with slightly more female subjects (52.5%). The majority was white (63.4%) and relied upon public insurance (53.5%). One-third had sacral lesions, 44.8% had mid-low lumbar lesions, and 24.9% had high lumbar and thoracic lesions. The most common surgery was ventricular shunt placement (65.7%). The most common bladder-management technique among those with bladder impairment was intermittent catheterization (69.0%). Almost 14% experienced a pressure ulcer in the last year. Of those ages 5 years or older with bowel or bladder impairments, almost 30% were continent of stool; a similar percentage was continent of urine. Most variables were associated with type of SB diagnosis. The NSBPR provides a cross section of a predominantly pediatric population of patients followed in specialized SB programs. There were wide variations in the variables studied and major differences in Context of Care, Processes of Care, and Health Outcomes by type of SB. Such wide variation and the differences by type of SB should be considered in future analyses of outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  16. Scalable and Cost-Effective Assignment of Mobile Crowdsensing Tasks Based on Profiling Trends and Prediction: The ParticipAct Living Lab Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellavista

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, sensor-rich smartphones potentially enable the harvesting of huge amounts of valuable sensing data in urban environments, by opportunistically involving citizens to play the role of mobile virtual sensors to cover Smart City areas of interest. This paper proposes an in-depth study of the challenging technical issues related to the efficient assignment of Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS data collection tasks to volunteers in a crowdsensing campaign. In particular, the paper originally describes how to increase the effectiveness of the proposed sensing campaigns through the inclusion of several new facilities, including accurate participant selection algorithms able to profile and predict user mobility patterns, gaming techniques, and timely geo-notification. The reported results show the feasibility of exploiting profiling trends/prediction techniques from volunteers’ behavior; moreover, they quantitatively compare different MCS task assignment strategies based on large-scale and real MCS data campaigns run in the ParticipAct living lab, an ongoing MCS real-world experiment that involved more than 170 students of the University of Bologna for more than one year.

  17. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  18. Penalized linear discriminant analysis and Discrete AdaBoost to distinguish human hair metal profiles: The case of adolescents residing near Mt. Etna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzo, A; Tamburo, E; Varrica, D; Dongarrà, G; Mineo, A

    2016-06-01

    The research focus of the present paper was twofold. First, we tried to document that human intake of trace elements is influenced by geological factors of the place of residence. Second, we showed that the elemental composition of human hair is a useful screening tool for assessing people's exposure to potentially toxic substances. For this purpose, we used samples of human hair from adolescents and applied two robust statistical approaches. Samples from two distinct geological and environmental sites were collected: the first one was characterized by the presence of the active volcano Mt. Etna (ETNA group) and the second one lithologically made up of sedimentary rocks (SIC group). Chemical data were statistically processed by Penalized Linear Discriminant Analysis (pLDA) and Discrete AdaBoost (DAB). The separation between the two groups turned out well, with few overlaps accounting for less than 5%. The chemical variables that better distinguished ETNA group from SIC group were As, Cd, Co, Li, Mo, Rb, Sr, U and V. Both pLDA and DAB allowed us to characterize the elements most closely related to the volcanic contribution (As, U and V) and those (Cd, Co, Li, Mo, Rb and Sr) prevalently influenced by the geology of the area where SIC samples were collected. We conclude that the geological characteristics of the area of residence constitute a key factor in influencing the potential exposure to trace elements. Hair analysis coupled with robust statistical methods can be effectively used as a screening procedure to identify areas at great environmental risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining disparate surgical residencies into one: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, John J; Longo, Walter E; Lebastchi, Amir H; Nadzam, Geoffrey S; Yoo, Peter S

    2015-10-01

    Attitudes, career goals, and educational experiences of general surgery residents are profiled during the acquisition of a community residency program by an academic residency program. The study population included all general surgery residents postgraduate years 2-5 in a tertiary academic medical center divided into community program matriculants (CPM) or academic program matriculants (APM). A survey compared perceptions before and after residency amalgamation in seven training categories as follows: relationships among residents, relationships with faculty, systems interactions, clinical training, surgical training, scholarship, and career plans. Responses were recorded on a Likert scale. Fisher exact test and one-sided t-test were applied. Thirty-five trainees (83%) participated, 23 APM (66%) and 12 CPM (34%). Neither cohort reported significant negative perceptions regarding surgical training, career planning, or scholarship (P > 0.05). There was a greater likelihood of significant negative perceptions regarding inter-resident relationships among CPM (P acquisition. There was a nearly significant trend toward CPM perceiving greater access to competitive specialties after acquisition. Overall, CPM perceptions were affected more often after acquisition; however, when affected, APM were less likely to be positively affected (odds ratio, 2.9). Acquisition of a community surgery residency by an academic program does not seem to negatively affect trainees' perceptions regarding training. The effect of such acquisition on CPMs' decision to pursue competitive fellowships remains ill defined, but CPM perceived improved research opportunities, faculty networking, and programmatic support to pursue a career in academic surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse C Cnossen

    Full Text Available The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI study.We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions.All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%, designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68% and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%. The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57% had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU, 36 (51% had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45 of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers.Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches.

  1. Clinical and demographic profile of users of a mental health system for medical residents and other health professionals undergoing training at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fagnani Neto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A postgraduate and resident trainee mental health assistance center was created in September 1996 within our university. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical and demographic profile of its users. TYPE OF STUDY: Retrospective. SETTING: Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp-EPM. METHODS: The study was carried between September 1996 and November 2002, when 233 semi-structured registration forms were filled out either by the psychologist or the psychiatrist during their first contact with the trainees, who were medical and nursing residents, and postgraduate students at specialization, master or doctoral levels. The registration forms included demographic, occupational and clinical data. RESULTS: The trainees were predominantly young (mean of 27 years old, single (82.0% of cases, women (79.4%, seeking help especially during the first year of training (63.1%. In 70.8% of the cases, they came to the service spontaneously. Such individuals showed greater adherence to the treatment than those who were referred by supervisors (p < 0.05. In 30% of the cases, the trainee sought psychological guidance or support at the service due to specific situational conflicts. Depression and anxiety disorders were the most frequent diagnoses; 22.3% of the trainees followed up mentioned a tendency towards suicidal thoughts. In comparison with other trainees, there was a higher prevalence of males among the medical residents (p < 0.01, with more cases of sleep disorders (p < 0.05, a smaller number of individuals refraining from the use of alcohol (p < 0.05 and a higher number of trainees requiring leave of absence (p < 0.001. DISCUSSION: The first year of training in health sciences is the most stressful, especially for women. Depression and anxiety symptoms are common, reflecting transitory self-limited deadaptation. However, the severity of the cases can also be evaluated in view of the large number of trainees who mentioned

  2. [Health education and people's participation in health in Nicaragua: research on the profile, role and function of the "brigadistas populares" in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, L; Mori, M

    1989-01-01

    The Nicaraguan democratic government has been building, since the defeat of somozism in 1979, a very extensive and uniform health system in the whole country, giving special attention to the problems of prevention and health education, promoting and utilizing a wide participation of the population. The most emblematic representative of the Nicaraguan model of participation is the Brigadista Popular en Salud, a voluntary figure in urban and rural areas, working along side the Sole National Health System. The work and role of the Brigadista is integrated in a health education action defined "Educaciòn Popular en Salud", intended as a dialogue through which the educator and educated, beginning with the specific political and economical social reality, accomplish work of observation, analysis and syntesis of the different phenomena that deal with health-sickness. The Brigadista is a member of the community that works voluntarily for the community to carry out health actions, in coordination with the "Puesto de Salud" of the community. The authors refer to a research study done in the field in 1987, geared to study the profile, role and activities of the Brigadista. The research was done in the "Las Segovias" Region, in the Northern part of the country, in two Health Areas, involving three urban centers and six rural communities: 73 Brigadistas were interviewed, of which 50 (predetermined) of urban centers and 23 (total population) in rural communities. The article represents in a comparative manner the operative Brigadista respectively, in urban areas on the one hand and in rural areas on the other. The article examines: sex; age; schooling; work activity; social-cultural background; collective systems background; participation in Literacy Campaigns; motivation; length and continuity of activities; relationship with the territory; activities done. The Brigadista that works in rural areas seems actually to be more attached, even to the formal image of his role, that

  3. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low–energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. Methods The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Results Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (− 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (− 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (− 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (− 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Conclusions Weight loss and improvements

  4. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low-energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (- 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (- 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (- 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (- 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Weight loss and improvements in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein

  5. Mentoring in psychiatric residency programs: a survey of chief residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Lea DeFrancisci; Wood, William C; Petkova, Eva; Shatkin, Jess

    2009-01-01

    Mentorship is an important component of graduate education. This study assessed the perceptions of general psychiatry chief residents regarding the adequacy of mentorship provided during training. The authors surveyed 229 chief residents participating in the APA National Chief Residents Leadership Program in 2004 and 2005. The survey assessed domains such as work hours, didactics, home and family life, and mentorship. Of the chief psychiatric residents surveyed, 49% reported that they did not have a clearly defined career development mentor, and 39% reported that they did not feel adequately mentored. Gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, moonlighting, medical school (American versus international), and type of residency program (academic versus community based) did not show significant association with either "having a clearly defined mentor" or "feeling adequately mentored," based on chi-squared tests for independence. Chief residents who had authored peer-reviewed publications were significantly more likely to report having a clearly defined mentor and to feel adequately mentored than those who did not author publications. Logistic regression analysis showed that having a clearly defined mentor was associated with twice the odds for feeling well prepared to practice psychiatry upon graduation compared with those who did not have a clearly defined mentor, even after controlling for gender, race, medical school, and residency program type. Half of the psychiatric chief residents surveyed reported the lack of a clearly defined career development mentor. In addition, a chief resident's response of lacking a clear mentor was associated with the perception of being less prepared to practice psychiatry upon graduation. Psychiatric residency training programs may benefit from further clarification and implementation of effective mentorship programs.

  6. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  7. The social and community opportunities profile social inclusion measure: Structural equivalence and differential item functioning in community mental health residents in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Peter John; Chan, Kara; Chiu, Marcus; Ma, Yanni; Gaze, Sarah; Evans, Sherrill

    2016-03-01

    China's future major health problem will be the management of chronic diseases - of which mental health is a major one. An instrument is needed to measure mental health inclusion outcomes for mental health services in Hong Kong and mainland China as they strive to promote a more inclusive society for their citizens and particular disadvantaged groups. To report on the analysis of structural equivalence and item differentiation in two mentally unhealthy and one healthy sample in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. The mental health sample in Hong Kong was made up of non-governmental organisation (NGO) referrals meeting the selection/exclusion criteria (being well enough to be interviewed, having a formal psychiatric diagnosis and living in the community). A similar sample in the United Kingdom meeting the same selection criteria was obtained from a community mental health organisation, equivalent to the NGOs in Hong Kong. Exploratory factor analysis and logistic regression were conducted. The single-variable, self-rated 'overall social inclusion' differs significantly between all of the samples, in the way we would expect from previous research, with the healthy population feeling more included than the serious mental illness (SMI) groups. In the exploratory factor analysis, the first two factors explain between a third and half of the variance, and the single variable which enters into all the analyses in the first factor is having friends to visit the home. All the regression models were significant; however, in Hong Kong sample, only one-fifth of the total variance is explained. The structural findings imply that the social and community opportunities profile-Chinese version (SCOPE-C) gives similar results when applied to another culture. As only one-fifth of the variance of 'overall inclusion' was explained in the Hong Kong sample, it may be that the instrument needs to be refined using different or additional items within the structural domains of inclusion.

  8. A new measure of the cognitive, metacognitive, and experiential aspects of residents' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rudolph; Regan-Smith, Martha; Fisher, Melissa A; Knox, Isabella; Lambert, David R

    2009-07-01

    Psychometric data are presented for the Cognitive Behavior Survey: Residency Level (rCBS), a survey that profiles cognitive, metacognitive, and experiential aspects of residents' learning. The authors asked 963 residents from seven medicine residencies of large academic medical centers to participate in their study and gathered data from the respondents during a three-year period, 2000-2002. A factor analysis cross-validation design guided the development of rCBS's seven scales: memorization, conceptualization, reflection, independent learning, critical thinking, meaningful learning experience, and attitude toward educational experience. Interscale correlations and MANOVA provided preliminary evidence of scale construct validity. A total of 424 residents (44%) responded. With several minor exceptions, items for each scale loaded .40 or higher. Memorization did not correlate with any other scale, except correlating negatively with critical thinking. Higher-order thinking scales (conceptualization, reflection, independent learning, critical thinking) correlated with one another and with meaningful learning experience and attitude toward educational experience. The one exception: conceptualization did not correlate with critical thinking. MANOVA results reveal that residents who scored in the top 20% on the reflection scale conceptualized, learned independently, and thought critically more than did the bottom 20%. Results provide preliminary support for scale reliability and construct validity. As residencies seek to meet expectations of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Outcome Project, rCBS could prove useful in program evaluation, residents' self-assessment, and assessment by serving as a means to explore how residents learn, how residency programs affect learning behavior, and how clinically strong and weak residents differ in learning behaviors.

  9. Allergy education in otolaryngology residency: a survey of program directors and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah E; Franzese, Christine; Lin, Sandra Y

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey program directors of the accredited otolaryngology residency programs and resident attendees of the 2013 American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Basic/MOC Course regarding resident education and participation as well as assessment of competency in otolaryngic allergy and immunotherapy. A multiple-choice questionnaire was sent to all accredited otolaryngology residency training programs in the United States as part of resident attendance at the 2013 AAOA CORE Basic/MOC Course. Following this, a similar multiple-choice survey was sent to all resident attendees from the programs that responded positively. Program directors reported that 73% of their academic institutions offer allergy testing and immunotherapy. More PDs than residents indicated that residents participate in allergy practice and perform/interpret skin testing and in vitro testing, and more residents (85%) than program directors (63%) reported inadequate or no allergy training. Program directors and residents equally indicated that residents do not calculate immunotherapy vial formulations or administer immunotherapy injections. The majority of program directors indicated that resident competency in allergy was assessed through direct observation, whereas residents more commonly perceived that no assessment of competency was being performed for any portion of allergy practice. This survey demonstrates a discrepancy between program directors and residents regarding resident involvement and adequacy of training in the allergy practice. Although the majority of otolaryngology residencies report offering otolaryngic allergy services and education, the vast majority of residents report inadequate allergy training and less participation in an allergy practice compared to the majority of program directors. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. What Works? A Blast from the Past. Project Profiles from the 60s and 70s...Social Marketing, Community Media, Mass Campaigns, Interactive Radio, Gender Equity, Participation, the Media & More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    The Academy for Educational Development (AED) has been in the social marketing, communication, and participation business for some 40 years. This book profiles 82 projects carried out in the 1960s and 1970s in countries around the world. These projects were researched and documented by AED under its Clearinghouse on Development Communication. It…

  11. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  12. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O.; Staton, Lisa J.; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K.; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). Conclusion The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs. PMID:25147630

  13. Use of social media by residency program directors for resident selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Scott, Doneka R; Smith, Kelly

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacy residency program directors' attitudes and opinions regarding the use of social media in residency recruitment and selection were studied. A 24-item questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, revised, and sent to 996 residency program directors via SurveyMonkey.com. Demographic, social media usage, and opinions on social media data were collected and analyzed. A total of 454 residency program directors completed the study (response rate, 46.4%). The majority of respondents were women (58.8%), were members of Generation X (75.4%), and worked in a hospital or health system (80%). Most respondents (73%) rated themselves as either nonusers or novice users of social media. Twenty percent indicated that they had viewed a pharmacy residency applicant's social media information. More than half (52%) had encountered e-professionalism issues, including questionable photos and posts revealing unprofessional attitudes, and 89% strongly agreed or agreed that information voluntarily published online was fair game for judgments on character, attitudes, and professionalism. Only 4% of respondents had reviewed applicants' profiles for residency selection decisions. Of those respondents, 52% indicated that the content had no effect on resident selection. Over half of residency program directors were unsure whether they will use social media information for future residency selection decisions. Residency program directors from different generations had different views regarding social media information and its use in residency applicant selections. Residency program directors anticipated using social media information to aid in future decisions for resident selection and hiring.

  14. Dietary fat and total energy intake modifies the association of genetic profile risk score on obesity: evidence from 48 170 UK Biobank participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-Morales, C A; Lyall, D M; Gray, S R; Steell, L; Anderson, J; Iliodromiti, S; Welsh, P; Guo, Y; Petermann, F; Mackay, D F; Bailey, M E S; Pell, J P; Gill, J M R; Sattar, N

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial condition influenced by both genetics and lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the association between a validated genetic profile risk score for obesity (GPRS-obesity) and body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) was modified by macronutrient intake in a large general population study. This study included cross-sectional data from 48 170 white European adults, aged 37-73 years, participating in the UK Biobank. Interactions between GPRS-obesity and macronutrient intake (including total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate and dietary fibre intake) and its effects on BMI and WC were investigated. The 93-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) GPRS was associated with a higher BMI (β: 0.57 kg m - 2 per s.d. increase in GPRS (95% confidence interval: 0.53-0.60); P=1.9 × 10 -183 ) independent of major confounding factors. There was a significant interaction between GPRS and total fat intake (P ( interaction) =0.007). Among high-fat-intake individuals, BMI was higher by 0.60 (0.52, 0.67) kg m -2 per s.d. increase in GPRS-obesity; the change in BMI with GPRS was lower among low-fat-intake individuals (β: 0.50 (0.44, 0.57) kg m -2 ). Significant interactions with similar patterns were observed for saturated fat intake (high β: 0.66 (0.59, 0.73) versus low β: 0.49 (0.42, 0.55) kg m -2 , P ( interaction) =2 × 10 -4 ) and for total energy intake (high β: 0.58 (0.51, 0.64) versus low β: 0.49 (0.42, 0.56) kg m -2 , P ( interaction) =0.019), but not for protein intake, carbohydrate intake and fibre intake (P ( interaction) >0.05). The findings were broadly similar using WC as the outcome. These data suggest that the benefits of reducing the intake of fats and total energy intake may be more important in individuals with high genetic risk for obesity.

  15. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  16. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships program, December 2000 - September 2001 (NODC Accession 0000589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SKOGAFOSS and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 27 December 27, 2000 to 19 September...

  17. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, July - November 2001 (NODC Accession 0000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected by from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 12 July 2001 to 27 November 2001....

  18. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, August - December 2001 (NODC Accession 0000635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the ENTERPRISE and other vessels from a world-wide distribution from 01 August 2001 to 03 December 2001. Data...

  19. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, November 2000 - October 2001 (NODC Accession 0000596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — emperature profiles were collected by from XBT from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 13 November 2000 to 12 October 2001. Data...

  20. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessel in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, June - August 2001 (NODC Accession 0000574)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 14 June 2001 to 20 August 2001. Data...

  1. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident rent. 582.310 Section 582... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.310 Resident rent. (a) Amount of rent. Each participant must pay rent in accordance with section 3(a)(1) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937...

  3. 24 CFR 1003.604 - Citizen participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citizen participation. 1003.604... Requirements § 1003.604 Citizen participation. (a) In order to permit residents of Indian tribes and Alaska.... Meetings shall be scheduled in ways and at times that will allow participation by residents. (3) Developing...

  4. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Predictors of radiation oncology resident research productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutovich, Jordan M; Den, Robert B; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Dicker, Adam P; Lawrence, Yaacov R

    2013-03-01

    Academic research is an essential part of residency training, yet resident productivity in research seems to be highly variable. The aim of this study was to determine the factors, both individual and institutional, that contribute to research output among radiation oncology residents. Newly practicing radiation oncologists and current senior residents were identified and invited via e-mail to complete a web-based survey. The survey addressed demographic factors, previous academic accomplishments, and residency program structure. The end point, research productivity, was defined as the number of first-author papers produced or research grants awarded on the basis of work initiated during residency. Ninety-seven of the 232 senior residents and recently graduated radiation oncologists surveyed responded (a 42% response rate). The median number of publications produced on the basis of work during residency was 3 (range, 0-7). Twenty-one respondents indicated that they had received 1 or more grants. Forty-four respondents completed research, while 53 completed ≥6 months of research. Univariate analysis revealed that a scientific college major and the amount of designated research time were positively correlated (P research at an international meeting before residency, participation in the Holman Research Pathway, female gender, publications before residency, and the amount of designated research time were positively correlated (P research grant. On multivariate regression analysis, the amount of designated research time was the sole determinant of first-author papers (P research grants awarded (P research time during residency training is the sole independent predictor of research productivity as measured by publications. Participation in the Holman Pathway is the sole detected item shown to be an independent predictor of achieving a peer-reviewed grant. Residency program structure has a major impact on the productivity of residents. Copyright © 2013 American

  6. Assessment of medical residents technology readiness for an online residents-as-teachers curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Débora; Lewis, Kadriye O

    2014-06-01

    The University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine has a need to expand the current Residents-as-Teachers workshops into a comprehensive curriculum. One way to do so is to implement an online curriculum, but prior to this, the readiness of the medical residents to participate in such a curriculum should be assessed. Our objective was to determine whether the residents at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine are prepared to engage in an online Residents-as-Teachers program. This was a descriptive, mixed-method-design study that collected qualitative and quantitative data using an online survey and a focus-group interview. The study was conducted with students from 11 of the residency programs at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. More than 80% of the participating residents had the technical knowledge to engage in an online program; 90.5% thought an online Residents-as-Teachers course would be a good alternative to what was currently available; 87.5% would be willing to participate in an online program, and 68.6% of the residents stated that they preferred an online course to a traditional one. Determinants of readiness for online learning at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine were identified and discussed. Our results suggest that the majority of the residents who participated in this study are ready to engage in an online Residents-as-Teachers program. The only potential barrier found was that one-third of the residents still preferred a traditional curriculum, even when they thought an online Residents-as-Teachers curriculum was a good alternative and were willing to participate in the course or courses forming part of such a curriculum. Therefore, prior to wide-spread implementation of such a curriculum, a pilot test should be conducted to maximize the presumed and eventual success of that curriculum.

  7. Temperature Profile Data Collected by Participating Ships in NOAA's Shipboard Environmental Data Acquisition System Program from 17 June 2000 to 23 February 2001 (NODC Accession 0000417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT and other data were collected from the COLUMBUS COROMANDEL and other platforms participating in NOAA's Shipboard Environmental Data Acquisition System (SEAS)...

  8. Reentry to Pediatric Residency After Global Health Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Marton, Stephanie; Gillespie, Susan L; Schutze, Gordon E; Gill, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Although nonphysician reentry transitions have been characterized in literature, little is known about the reentry physicians in general, or residents in particular. We conducted a qualitative study to explore pediatric residents' reentry, using reverse culture shock as a conceptual framework. Eighteen pediatric residents who completed global health experiences in Africa (9 categorical residents with 1-month elective, 9 global child health residents with 12-month training) participated in interviews that included a card-sort to solicit emotional responses consistent with the conceptual framework. Data in the form of interview transcripts were coded and analyzed according to principles of grounded theory. All pediatric residents, despite variable time abroad, reported a range of emotional responses on reentry to residency. Global child health residents felt disconnection and frustration more intensely than categorical residents, whereas categorical residents felt invigoration more intensely than global child health residents. Although residents met with program leadership after their return, no resident described these meetings as a formal debriefing, and few described a deliberate strategy for processing emotions on reentry. Consistent with reverse culture shock, pediatric residents felt a range of emotions as they move toward a steady state of acculturating back into their residency program. Residency programs might consider creating safety nets to help cultivate support for residents when they reenter training. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  10. Cohort profiles of the cross-sectional and prospective participant groups in the second Diabetes MILES-Australia (MILES-2) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browne, Jessica L; Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    and social aspects of diabetes. The aim of the MILES-2 study was to provide a (1) longitudinal follow-up of the original MILES 2011 study cohort; (2) cross-sectional assessment of a new cohort. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants were English-speaking Australians with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, aged 18....... The final sample included N=2342 eligible respondents (longitudinal cohort: n=504; 2015 new cohort: n=1838); 54% had type 2 diabetes. FINDINGS TO DATE: Survey respondents were from an advantaged socioeconomic background compared to the general population. Respondents with type 1 diabetes were over......-represented in the new cohort (45%) relative to the planned stratification (40% type 1 diabetes, 60% type 2 diabetes). Respondents with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes were under-represented in the new cohort relative to the stratified sampling (42% invited vs 50% response). Participants who completed both the 2011...

  11. Burnout in nursing residents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years...

  12. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  13. Cohort profiles of the cross-sectional and prospective participant groups in the second Diabetes MILES-Australia (MILES-2) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browne, Jessica L; Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    and social aspects of diabetes. The aim of the MILES-2 study was to provide a (1) longitudinal follow-up of the original MILES 2011 study cohort; (2) cross-sectional assessment of a new cohort. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants were English-speaking Australians with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, aged 18....... The final sample included N=2342 eligible respondents (longitudinal cohort: n=504; 2015 new cohort: n=1838); 54% had type 2 diabetes. FINDINGS TO DATE: Survey respondents were from an advantaged socioeconomic background compared to the general population. Respondents with type 1 diabetes were over...

  14. The overall health and risk factor profile of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants from the 45 and up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubhaju, Lina; McNamara, Bridgette J; Banks, Emily; Joshy, Grace; Raphael, Beverley; Williamson, Anna; Eades, Sandra J

    2013-07-17

    Despite large disparities in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians, detailed evidence on the health and lifestyle characteristics of older Aboriginal Australians is lacking. The aim of this study is to quantify socio-demographic and health risk factors and mental and physical health status among Aboriginal participants from the 45 and Up Study and to compare these with non-Aboriginal participants from the study. The 45 and Up Study is a large-scale study of individuals aged 45 years and older from the general population of New South Wales, Australia responding to a baseline questionnaire distributed from 2006-2008. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of self-reported responses from the baseline questionnaire for Aboriginal versus non-Aboriginal participants relating to socio-demographic factors, health risk factors, current and past medical and surgical history, physical disability, functional health limitations and levels of current psychological distress were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, with adjustments for age and sex. Overall, 1939 of 266,661 45 and Up Study participants examined in this study identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (0.7%). Compared to non-Aboriginal participants, Aboriginal participants were significantly more likely to be: younger (mean age 58 versus 63 years); without formal educational qualifications (age- and sex- adjusted OR=6.2, 95% CI 5.3-7.3); of unemployed (3.7, 2.9-4.6) or disabled (4.6, 3.9-5.3) work status; and with a household incomediabetes [2.1, 1.8-2.4]; depression [1.6, 1.4-1.8] and stroke [1.8, 1.4-2.3]), have care-giving responsibilities (1.8, 1.5-2.2); have a major physical disability (2.6, 2.2-3.1); have severe physical functional limitation (2.9, 2.4-3.4) and have very high levels of psychological distress (2.4, 2.0-3.0). Aboriginal participants from the 45 and Up Study experience greater levels of disadvantage and have greater health needs

  15. Activity profile of 10-12-year-old Danish school girls participating in “FIFA 11 for Health” for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørntoft, Christina Øyangen; Madsen, Mads; Lind, Rune Rasmussen

    Introduction: To evaluate activity profile of the girls in the health education programme, “FIFA 11 for Health” for Europe and to examine potential differences between girls involved in leisure-time sports club activities, i.e. football and other sports, and non-sport-club active girls. The 22...... sessions were delivered during school time by trained teachers over 11-week-period, 2x45 min per week. Methods: A total of 34 girls were monitored. The activity profile was monitored using the ZXY tracking system (ChyronHego, Norway), during 4 of the 22 “FIFA 11 for Health” in Europe sessions for a total...... of 34 girls of which 8 were football club active, 15 were involved in other leisure-time sports and 11 were non-sport-club active. Distance covered in various speed zones (Walking (0-4 km/h), jogging (4.1-8.0 km/h), running (8.1-12.0 km/h), high intensity running (12.1-16.0 km/h) and sprinting (>16 km...

  16. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  17. 24 CFR 964.415 - Resident board members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident board members. 964.415... DEVELOPMENT TENANT PARTICIPATION AND TENANT OPPORTUNITIES IN PUBLIC HOUSING Resident Board Members § 964.415 Resident board members. (a) General. Except as provided in §§ 964.405(b) and 964.425, the membership of the...

  18. Intensive lifestyle intervention in general practice to prevent type 2 diabetes among 18 to 60-year-old South Asians: 1-year effects on the weight status and metabolic profile of participants in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wanda M; Vlaar, Everlina M; Nierkens, Vera; Holleman, Frits; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Stronks, Karien; van Valkengoed, Irene G M

    2013-01-01

    To study 1-year effectiveness of an intensive, culturally targeted lifestyle intervention in general practice for weight status and metabolic profile of South-Asians at risk of type 2 diabetes. 536 South-Asians at risk of type 2 diabetes were randomized to an intervention (n = 283) or control (n = 253) group. The intervention, which was targeted culturally to the South-Asian population, consisted of individual lifestyle counselling, a family session, cooking classes, and supervised physical activity programme. All components of the intervention were carried out by professionals as part of their daily clinical practice. The control group received generic lifestyle advice. Change in weight status and metabolic profile were assessed after 1 year. After 1 year, 201 participants were lost to follow-up. Remaining participants in intervention (n = 177) and control (n = 158) group had similar baseline characteristics. Weight loss in the intervention group was 0.2±3.3 kg, weight gain in the control group was 0.4±3.1 kg (p = 0.08). Changes in other weight-related measurements did not differ significantly between groups. Furthermore, there were no differences between groups in changes of metabolic profile. All results remained similar after repeating analyses in a multiple imputed dataset. An intensive, culturally targeted, lifestyle intervention of 1 year did not improve weight status and metabolic profile of South-Asians at risk of type 2 diabetes. The laborious recruitment, high drop-out, and lack of effectiveness emphasise the difficulty of realising health benefits in practice and suggest that this strategy might not be the optimal approach for this population. Nederlands Trial Register NTR1499.

  19. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  20. Citizen Participation: A Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lede, Naomi W.; Dixon, Hortense W.

    Citizen participation in Model Cities programs in ten southwestern cities is analyzed to determine the impact of federal assistance on housing in urban areas. The first section of the study provides a functional analysis of citizen participation in Model Cities, with special emphasis on performance criteria of resident involvement. Section two…

  1. Relationships among residence environment and individual levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study explored the relationship among urban and rural residence living and level of exercise in the Republic of Korea. The study analysed the data from the 2012 Korean Survey of Citizens' Sports Participation project with a total of 4,479 males and 4,521 females participating. The sampling method used the ...

  2. Effects of rifampin, cyclosporine A, and probenecid on the pharmacokinetic profile of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Vaccaro, Nicole; Murphy, Joe; Curtin, Christopher; Mamidi, Rao N V S; Weiner, Sveta; Wang, Shean-Sheng; Ariyawansa, Jay; Stieltjes, Hans; Wajs, Ewa; Di Prospero, Nicholas A; Rothenberg, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is metabolized by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) 1A9 and UGT2B4, and is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Canagliflozin exposures may be affected by coadministration of drugs that induce (e.g., rifampin for UGT) or inhibit (e.g. probenecid for UGT; cyclosporine A for P-gp) these pathways. The primary objective of these three independent studies (single-center, open-label, fixed-sequence) was to evaluate the effects of rifampin (study 1), probenecid (study 2), and cyclosporine A (study 3) on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin in healthy participants. Participants received; in study 1: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 and 10), rifampin 600 mg (days 4-12); study 2: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1-17), probenecid 500 mg twice daily (days 15-17); and study 3: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1-8), cyclosporine A 400 mg (day 8). Pharmacokinetics were assessed at prespecified intervals on days 1 and 10 (study 1); on days 14 and 17 (study 2), and on days 2-8 (study 3). Rifampin decreased the maximum plasma canagliflozin concentration (Cmax) by 28% and its area under the curve (AUC) by 51%. Probenecid increased the Cmax by 13% and the AUC by 21%. Cyclosporine A increased the AUC by 23% but did not affect the Cmax. Coadministration of canagliflozin with rifampin, probenecid, and cyclosporine A was well-tolerated. No clinically meaningful interactions were observed for probenecid or cyclosporine A, while rifampin coadministration modestly reduced canagliflozin plasma concentrations and could necessitate an appropriate monitoring of glycemic control.

  3. Personal health care of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Anonymous mailed survey. Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt sick but did not

  4. Pediatric Resident Training in Prepubertal Vulvar Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Monica; Alaniz, Veronica I; Kobernik, Emily K; Booms, Stephanie; Smith, Yolanda R; Quint, Elisabeth H

    2017-09-14

    To assess pediatric resident training in diagnosing and managing prepubertal gynecologic conditions. Voluntary 32-question survey emailed to participants. Email contact through the American Academy of Pediatrics listserve. 7075 U.S. pediatrics and combined internal medicine-pediatric residents. Descriptive analysis including Chi-square tests was performed on survey results. Residents' training experiences and comfort, confidence, and knowledge in evaluating pediatric gynecologic concerns. In the 866 of 7075 (12%) completed surveys, a greater proportion of residents reported they were "very" or "extremely" comfortable talking to parents about general pediatric topics compared to gynecologic topics (88.5% versus 30.4%, pgeneral pediatric conditions compared to prepubertal gynecologic conditions (87.6% versus 32.8%, pdidactics (34.7%), and conferences, meetings, and workshops (24.1%). Confidence examining, diagnosing, and treating vulvovaginits was associated with participation in any learning activity and exposure to greater than five patients with this concern. Additional education or training in prepubertal vulvovaginal conditions was requested by 97% of residents. Our findings suggest that pediatric residents are lacking in comfort, confidence, and knowledge of prepubertal vulvovaginal conditions, especially when compared to general pediatric topics. Although this improves during training, it remains low, and more education is indicated and desired by residents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Increasing Resident Wellness Through a Novel Retreat Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Angela; Cornelius, Brian G; Edens, Mary Ann

    2017-07-28

    Background Because of their arduous schedules, residents are susceptible to burnout, fatigue, and depression. In 2015, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) launched a campaign to foster physician wellness, in response to the suicides of three residents during the previous year. The campaign calls for strategies to developing resiliency, identify problems, and promote well-being. One of the suggested methods to promote well-being was a residency retreat. Objective To implement a novel retreat curriculum that emphasizes team building between residents and faculty, with which residents expressed high satisfaction. Methods We created an "Amazing Race" style retreat involving five activity stations set up in a neighborhood park in which 25 of our 34 residents participated. These stations implemented team building, faculty-resident bonding and resident-resident bonding. An anonymous survey was administered to the 25 participating emergency medicine (EM) residents after the retreat, of whom 21 returned the survey. The survey consisted of questions to assess the resident's perception of the team building activities, their satisfaction with each of the five activity stations and overall retreat satisfaction. Results Of the 25 residents who participated in the retreat, 21 (84%) returned the post-retreat survey (one participant returned a survey leaving the ranking questions incomplete). This low-cost event received high satisfaction ratings in regard to team-building, resident bonding, and faculty-resident bonding. Conclusions This novel retreat proved to be a low-cost and easily implemented activity with which the residents expressed high levels of satisfaction.

  6. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  7. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Residents work for between 80 and 168 hours per week (median, 92 hours), excluding call duty. Sixty-two ... of the current training program and the working conditions in the country, consultants should make .... introduction of the 1-year elective posting abroad. This elective posting had helped bridge the gap between our ...

  8. Management Styles and Leadership Behavior Within a Residence Life Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, James Y. K.; Hales, Loyde W.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the leadership behavior of Residence Life staff members, the management styles of the organization and their relationship to each other. Staff members and students within the Residence Life Program at Ohio University comprised the sample used. Staff perceptions on the Profile on Organizational…

  9. Anesthesiology resident personality type correlates with faculty assessment of resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Randall M; Dilorenzo, Amy N; Li, Hsin-Fang; Fragneto, Regina Y; Bowe, Edwin A; Hessel, Eugene A

    2012-11-01

    To study the association between anesthesiology residents' personality preference types, faculty evaluations of residents' performance, and knowledge. Convenience sample and prospective study. Academic department of anesthesiology. Consenting anesthesiology residents (n = 36). All participants completed the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). All residents' 6-month summation of daily focal evaluations completed by faculty [daily performance score (DPS); 1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = needs improvement, 3 = meets expectations, 4 = exceeds expectations], as well as a global assessment of performance (GAP) score based on placement of each resident into perceived quartile compared with their peers (ie,1 = first, or top, quartile) by senior faculty (n = 7) who also completed the MBTI, were obtained. The resident MBTI personality preferences were compared with the DPS and GAP scores, the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) I and II scores, and faculty MBTI personality type. There was no association between personality preference type and performance on standardized examinations (USMLE I, II). The mean GAP score was better (higher quartile score) for Extraverts than Introverts (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0047) and for Sensing versus Intuition (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0206) preference. Faculty evaluator MBTI preference type did not influence the GAP scores they assigned residents. Like GAP, the DPS was better for residents with Sensing versus Intuition preference (median 3.5 vs 3.3, P = 0.0111). No difference in DPS was noted between Extraverts and Introverts. Personality preference type was not associated with resident performance on standardized examinations, but it was associated with faculty evaluations of resident performance. Residents with Sensing personality preference were evaluated more favorably on global and focal faculty evaluations than those residents who chose the Intuition preference. Extraverted residents were evaluated more favorably on

  10. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  11. Evaluating a novel resident role-modelling programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternszus, Robert; Steinert, Yvonne; Bhanji, Farhan; Andonian, Sero; Snell, Linda S

    2017-05-09

    Role modelling is a fundamental method by which students learn from residents. To our knowledge, however, resident-as-teacher curricula have not explicitly addressed resident role modelling. The purpose of this project was to design, implement and evaluate an innovative programme to teach residents about role modelling. The authors designed a resident role-modelling programme and incorporated it into the 2015 and 2016 McGill University resident-as-teacher curriculum. Influenced by experiential and social learning theories, the programme incorporated flipped-classroom and simulation approaches to teach residents to be aware and deliberate role models. Outcomes were assessed through a pre- and immediate post-programme questionnaire evaluating reaction and learning, a delayed post-programme questionnaire evaluating learning, and a retrospective pre-post questionnaire (1 month following the programme) evaluating self-reported behaviour changes. Thirty-three of 38 (87%) residents who participated in the programme completed the evaluation, with 25 residents (66%) completing all questionnaires. Participants rated the programme highly on a five-point Likert scale (where 1 = not helpful and 5 = very helpful; mean score, M = 4.57; standard deviation, SD = 0.50), and showed significant improvement in their perceptions of their importance as role models and their knowledge of deliberate role modelling. Residents also reported an increased use of deliberate role-modelling strategies 1 month after completing the programme. Resident-as-teacher curricula have not explicitly addressed resident role modelling DISCUSSION: The incorporation of resident role modelling into our resident-as-teacher curriculum positively influenced the participants' perceptions of their role-modelling abilities. This programme responds to a gap in resident training and has the potential to guide further programme development in this important and often overlooked area. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  12. Who Participates and Why: Building a Process Model of Citizen Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Fishman, Pennie G.; Pierce, Steven J.; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    Initiating and sustaining sufficient levels of participation among residents in low-income and urban neighborhoods have become significant focuses of many initiatives that strive to develop healthy communities. This study examines the factors associated with citizen participation levels in resident leaders and followers in seven low-income…

  13. Conceptualizing Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Bruun Jensen, Bjarne

    Although participation is not a new issue, it would be fair to say that consequential participation, which implies young people engaging in meaningful dialogue with adults and institutions and influencing decision-making processes in matters that concern them, is still in its infancy. This document...... aims to set the scene for discussing young people's participation in different domains that have an impact on their lives. It outlines the meaning and different interpretations of the concept of "participation" before reviewing why participation is an important issue in relation to young people...... and society. It then describes different forms, modes or qualities of participation and proposes a specific model of facilitating participatory work with young people - the IVAC approach (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change). The concept of action, types of actions aimed at initiating change and corresponding...

  14. Cosmetic dermatology training in residency: results of a survey from the residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group, Ashley; Philips, Rebecca; Kelly, Erica

    2012-12-01

    Dermatologists are expected to be experts in the evaluation and treatment of their patient's cosmetic concerns. It has been reported that some dermatology residents do not feel adequately trained in this field. To assess how dermatology residents are being trained in cosmetic dermatology. A survey was e-mailed to 473 third-year dermatology residents. One hundred eighteen surveys were returned (24.9%), representing 45% of programs. Most residents have assigned reading (70.7%) and lectures (81.4%) in cosmetic dermatology. To learn technical skills, 79.7% participate in formal training sessions, and 73% have an apprenticeship model. Most residents have the opportunity to perform botulinum toxin injections, laser surgery, fillers, chemical peels, and sclerotherapy. More than 58% of programs have an encouraging or somewhat encouraging attitude toward teaching cosmetics, whereas 22% were somewhat discouraging or discouraging. Most residents (75.4%) plan to incorporate cosmetics into their practice. Residents do not feel less prepared (94.9%) or less interested (97.4%) in medical dermatology as a result of their cosmetic training. Residents are being trained in cosmetic dermatology through a variety of methods. Residency programs should periodically assess and adapt their curricula to ensure adequate training in this field. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [A motivational approach of cognitive efficiency in nursing home residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Evelyne; Vivicorsi, Bruno; Altintas, Emin; Guerrien, Alain

    2014-06-01

    Despite a widespread concern with self-determined motivation (behavior is engaged in "out of pleasure" or "out of choice and valued as being important") and psychological adjustment in later life (well-being, satisfaction in life, meaning of life, or self-esteem), very little is known about the existence and nature of the links between self-determined motivation and cognitive efficiency. The aim of the present study was to investigate theses links in nursing home residents in the framework of the Self-determination theory (SDT) (Deci & Ryan, 2002), in which motivational profile of a person is determined by the combination of different kinds of motivation. We hypothesized that self-determined motivation would lead to higher cognitive efficiency. Participants. 39 (32 women and 7 men) elderly nursing home residents (m= 83.6 ± 9.3 year old) without any neurological or psychiatric disorders (DSM IV) or depression or anxiety (Hamilton depression rating scales) were included in the study. Methods. Cognitive efficiency was evaluated by two brief neuropsychological tests, the Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and the Frontal assessment battery (FAB). The motivational profile was assessed by the Elderly motivation scale (Vallerand & 0'Connor, 1991) which includes four subscales assessing self- and non-self determined motivation to engage oneself in different domains of daily life activity. Results. The neuropsychological scores were positively and significantly correlated to self-determined extrinsic motivation (behavior is engaged in "out of choice" and valued as being important), and the global self-determination index (self-determined motivational profile) was the best predictor of the cognitive efficiency. Conclusion. The results support the SDT interest for a qualitative assessment of the motivation of the elderly people and suggest that a motivational approach of cognitive efficiency could help to interpret cognitive performances exhibited during neuropsychological

  16. Implementation of a "Flipped Classroom" for Neurosurgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2018-01-01

    Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, pflipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

  17. Assessment of otolaryngic knowledge in primary care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Error, Marc E; Wilson, Kevin F; Ward, P Daniel; Gale, Derrick C; Meier, Jeremy D

    2013-03-01

    (1) Determine the amount of exposure to otolaryngology in medical training of non-otolaryngology residents. (2) Evaluate the general otolaryngic knowledge in these residents. Cross-sectional survey. Academic medical center. A 10-question multiple-choice quiz was given to residents in family practice, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and internal medicine during scheduled educational conferences. Residents were also asked if they ever participated in an otolaryngology rotation during medical school or residency. Medical students and otolaryngology residents completed the quiz to act as controls. A total of 98 examinations were analyzed (49 non-otolaryngology residents, 10 otolaryngology residents, and 39 second-year medical students). Only 24% of the non- otolaryngology residents had an otolaryngology rotation during medical school. The same amount (24%) had a rotation during residency. The average percentage correct on the quiz was 48%, 56%, and 92% for medical students, non-otolaryngology, and otolaryngology residents, respectively (P medical school or residency. This nonvalidated questionnaire also suggested significant deficiencies in basic otolaryngic knowledge in these residents. Identifying mechanisms to improve exposure to otolaryngology in the medical training curriculum is needed.

  18. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  19. Disaster Olympics: A Model for Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, P; Gist, R; Grock, A; Kohlhoff, S; Roblin, P; Arquilla, B

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe an educational method teaching Disaster Medicine to American Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians and to evaluate knowledge attainment using this method. This was an observational study using a pre-test and a post-test. A full-scale disaster exercise (FSE) was conducted at a large academic center with two hospitals in Brooklyn, New York (USA). Eighty-two EM residents (physicians in training, post medical school) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria for study participation was all EM residents training at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate at the time of the study. There were no exclusion criteria. The exercise was a disaster drill designed as "Olympic Games." Participants in the exercise took a pre-test and a post-test. The primary outcome of the study was the mean difference between pre-test and post-test scores of the study participants using independent sample t-tests. Secondary outcomes of the study were percent of critical actions met by the residents and the hospitals as measured by direct observation of trained study personnel during the exercise. Mean resident post-test scores were higher than pre-test scores to a degree that was statistically significant (62% versus 53%; P =.002). The residents' performances ranged from 48% to 63% of objectives met. The hospitals' performances met 50% to 100% of their objectives. The use of an Olympic Games format was an effective model for disaster education for physicians. The model allowed for evaluation of performance and protocols of participants and hospital systems, respectively, and may be used objectively to evaluate for areas of improvement. The Disaster Olympics drill was found to improve emergency preparedness knowledge in the population studied and may constitute a novel and efficacious methodology in disaster training. Daniel P , Gist R , Grock A , Kohlhoff S , Roblin P , Arquilla B . Disaster Olympics: a model for resident education. Prehosp

  20. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  1. Authoring Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Papazu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear. By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate, material participation locates participation in everyday practice and work. On Samsø, the islanders’ participation was not an add-on to the project, it was an indispensable resource in itself. Building on extensive fieldwork I analyse how the islanders came to invest their time and resources in the Renewable Energy Island project, highlighting how, by materializing energy in concrete, local projects, energy and climate change-related projects can gain community-strengthening potentialities reaching beyond goals of energy self-sufficiency.

  2. Authoring Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public...... participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear....... By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate...

  3. A survey of attitude and opinions of endodontic residents towards regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Ansari, Mohammed Irfan; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this survey was to study the level of awareness, current state of knowledge and opinions towards regenerative endodontic treatments amongst the endodontic residents of India. Settings and Design: Questionnaire based survey was designed. Materials and Methods: After approval from the organizing committee of 26th Federation of Operative Dentistry of India and 19th Indian Endodontic Society National conference 2011, 200 copies of the questionnaire were circulated amongst the endodontic residents in conservative dentistry and endodontics at various colleges across the country about regenerative endodontic procedures. The survey included profile of the respondents and consisted of 23 questions about their knowledge, attitude and opinions regarding use of these procedures as part of future dental treatment. Results: The survey showed that half the participants (50.6%) had received continued education in stem cells and/or regenerative dental treatments. The majority of participants were of the opinion (86.6%) that regenerative therapy should be incorporated into dentistry, and most of them (88%) were willing to acquire training in learning this new treatment strategy. The results indicated that half of the participants (52.6%) were already using some type of regenerative therapy in their clinical practice; however, with a majority of these limited to use of membranes, scaffolds or bioactive materials. Conclusions: These results reflect that endodontic residents are optimistic about the use of regenerative endodontic procedures; however, a need for more research and training was felt. PMID:23956532

  4. A Professionalism Curricular Model to Promote Transformative Learning Among Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, Cecile M; Mehdi, Ali; Bierer, S Beth; Traboulsi, Elias I; Isaacson, J Harry; Spencer, Abby; Calabrese, Cassandra; Burkey, Brian B

    2017-06-01

    Using the frameworks of transformational learning and situated learning theory, we developed a technology-enhanced professionalism curricular model to build a learning community aimed at promoting residents' self-reflection and self-awareness. The RAPR model had 4 components: (1) Recognize: elicit awareness; (2) Appreciate: question assumptions and take multiple perspectives; (3) Practice: try new/changed perspectives; and (4) Reflect: articulate implications of transformed views on future actions. The authors explored the acceptability and practicality of the RAPR model in teaching professionalism in a residency setting, including how residents and faculty perceive the model, how well residents carry out the curricular activities, and whether these activities support transformational learning. A convenience sample of 52 postgraduate years 1 through 3 internal medicine residents participated in the 10-hour curriculum over 4 weeks. A constructivist approach guided the thematic analysis of residents' written reflections, which were a required curricular task. A total of 94% (49 of 52) of residents participated in 2 implementation periods (January and March 2015). Findings suggested that RAPR has the potential to foster professionalism transformation in 3 domains: (1) attitudinal, with participants reporting they viewed professionalism in a more positive light and felt more empathetic toward patients; (2) behavioral, with residents indicating their ability to listen to patients increased; and (3) cognitive, with residents indicating the discussions improved their ability to reflect, and this helped them create meaning from experiences. Our findings suggest that RAPR offers an acceptable and practical strategy to teach professionalism to residents.

  5. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand...... in a healthcare system. From our perspective, further sociological and pedagogical investigations in educational cultures across settings and specialties could inform our understanding of and knowledge about pitfalls in residents’ and doctors’ socialization into the healthcare system....

  6. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  7. Residents as teachers: residents' perceptions before and after receiving instruction in clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtel, Julie K; Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Smith, Amy B; Weaver, Kevin R; Kane, Bryan G

    2013-01-01

    Residents play an integral role in educating junior residents, medical students, and patients. To determine how residents describe their training, proficiency, and comfort level in teaching before and after receiving instruction in clinical teaching. Emergency medicine residents at a 980-bed suburban hospital system filled out a 12-question survey on their training as teachers and their self-perceptions of themselves as teachers. The residents then participated in a 2-hour education session on adult learning principles, methods of clinical teaching, and how to give effective feedback. After the session, participants completed a second, 11-question survey on the effectiveness of the session. Thirty-seven residents completed the presession survey and 33 completed the postsession survey. In the presession survey, 23 residents (62%) identified their proficiency as a teacher and ability to give feedback as that of a novice or beginner. Fourteen (38%) felt competent or proficient as teachers. Twenty-six (70%) reported never receiving instruction in clinical teaching during their residency, and 33 (89%) were interested in learning these skills. In the postsession survey, 28 (85%) described the teaching module as very helpful to their training, and 33 (100%) reported feeling more prepared to teach. Twenty-six (79%) stated they were very likely to teach students more often, and 33 (100%) reported a better understanding of how to give effective feedback. The majority of the residents surveyed expressed an interest in learning teaching skills and felt that completing the training was helpful to their education. After instruction, this cohort of residents felt more prepared and reported they were more likely to teach.

  8. Sports Participation, Anthropometric and Physiological Profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    female athletes needed treatment for their eating disorders with additional 58% that were at high risk for developing eating disorder behaviours. The average BMI of 25.07±4.42 kg/m2 (table 1) obtained was on the high side (overweight) not only for athletes but also for general good health (CDC;. Konin and Koike, 2008).

  9. Program for developing leadership in pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Patrick D

    2012-07-15

    An innovative, structured approach to incorporating leadership development activities into pharmacy residency training is described. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) has called for increased efforts to make leadership development an integral component of the training of pharmacy students and new practitioners. In 2007, The Nebraska Medical Center (TNMC) took action to systematize leadership training in its pharmacy residency programs by launching a new Leadership Development Series. Throughout the residency year, trainees at TNMC participate in a variety of activities: (1) focused group discussions of selected articles on leadership concepts written by noted leaders of the past and present, (2) a two-day offsite retreat featuring trust-building exercises and physical challenges, (3) a self-assessment designed to help residents identify and use their untapped personal strengths, (4) training on the effective application of different styles of communication and conflict resolution, and (5) education on the history and evolution of health-system pharmacy, including a review and discussion of lectures by recipients of ASHP's Harvey A. K. Whitney Award. Feedback from residents who have completed the series has been positive, with many residents indicating that it has stimulated their professional growth and helped prepared them for leadership roles. A structured Leadership Development Series exposes pharmacy residents to various leadership philosophies and principles and, through the study of Harvey A. K. Whitney Award lectures, to the thoughts of past and present pharmacy leaders. Residents develop an increased self-awareness through a resident fall retreat, a StrengthsFinder assessment, and communication and conflict-mode assessment tools.

  10. Emotional intelligence, perceived stress and burnout among resident doctors: an assessment of the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, M K; Mathur, D M; Pushp, B K

    2013-01-01

    Burnout is an increasing problem among the medical fraternity, especially resident doctors. We assessed the relationship between burnout, emotional intelligence and perceived stress in an attempt to explore a probable solution. Residents in the departments of medicine (n=29) and surgery (n=27) were assessed with a specially designed proforma consisting of participant's profile sheet, Shirom-Melamed Burnout Measure (SMBM), Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Correlation and mediational analysis were used to analyse the data. The findings showed a positive correlation of burnout with perceived stress and a negative correlation with trait emotional intelligence (EI). Perceived stress also showed a negative correlation with trait EI. Mediation analysis showed that perceived stress mediates the effect of trait EI on burnout. Enhancing EI through training may be an important intervention for targeting burnout. Copyright 2013, NMJI.

  11. 24 CFR 964.135 - Resident involvement in HA management operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management operations. 964.135 Section 964.135 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Tenant Participation § 964.135 Resident involvement in HA management operations. Residents shall be... responsibility for management operations, it shall ensure strong resident participation in all issues and facets...

  12. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  13. Adapting residency training. Training adaptable residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, J L

    1998-05-01

    Graduate medical education has been criticized for failing to adequately prepare young physicians to enter the workforce upon completion of their training. In addressing this criticism, the author makes arguments both for and against this assertion. Broad qualitative changes (graduate medical education training position allocation, subspecialists' role in health care delivery, educational quality, faculty development, and faculty promotion) that graduate medical education has undergone and is undergoing are discussed. Population health management, clinical resource management, teamwork, continuous quality improvement, ethics, and evidence-based medicine are addressed as important curricular elements for residency training. Innovations in graduate medical education that are being introduced as well as those that should be tried are discussed. Finally, the author asserts that although residency education should not be vocationally driven by the needs of managed care organizations, a powerful opportunity exists for collaborative educational research between academic medicine and managed care organizations. In a health care environment undergoing rapid changes, the primary goals of graduate medical education have not significantly changed: to produce compassionate physicians with a passion for lifelong learning who have leadership skills, are critical thinkers, skilled at self-assessment, and able to adapt to the needs of the health care marketplace.

  14. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Reber, Kris M; Trittmann, Jennifer K B; Huang, Hong; Tomblin, Jordanna; Moorehead, Pamela A; Bauer, John A; Smith, Charles V; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience. This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey. The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, pteaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education. While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both resident and fellow learning and satisfaction. Further investigation into the value of utilizing fellows as a positive force in

  15. Sport participation motivesof Kenyan female university athletes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected through participation motivation questionnaire (PMQ) from 132 female athletes participating in university sport championship. ... gender, athletes' sexual orientation, student athletes'residence and as well as the influence of friends/family, could affect participation of female athletes in university sport.

  16. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  17. Variability in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Resident Case Log System practices among orthopaedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Dane; Schiff, Adam; Mitchell, Erika; Hopkinson, William

    2014-02-05

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Resident Case Log System is designed to be a reflection of residents' operative volume and an objective measure of their surgical experience. All operative procedures and manipulations in the operating room, Emergency Department, and outpatient clinic are to be logged into the Resident Case Log System. Discrepancies in the log volumes between residents and residency programs often prompt scrutiny. However, it remains unclear if such disparities truly represent differences in operative experiences or if they are reflections of inconsistent logging practices. The purpose of this study was to investigate individual recording practices among orthopaedic surgery residents prior to August 1, 2011. Orthopaedic surgery residents received a questionnaire on case log practices that was distributed through the Council of Orthopaedic Residency Directors list server. Respondents were asked to respond anonymously about recording practices in different clinical settings as well as types of cases routinely logged. Hypothetical scenarios of common orthopaedic procedures were presented to investigate the differences in the Current Procedural Terminology codes utilized. Two hundred and ninety-eight orthopaedic surgery residents completed the questionnaire; 37% were fifth-year residents, 22% were fourth-year residents, 18% were third-year residents, 15% were second-year residents, and 8% were first-year residents. Fifty-six percent of respondents reported routinely logging procedures performed in the Emergency Department or urgent care setting. Twenty-two percent of participants routinely logged procedures in the clinic or outpatient setting, 20% logged joint injections, and only 13% logged casts or splints applied in the office setting. There was substantial variability in the Current Procedural Terminology codes selected for the seven clinical scenarios. There has been a lack of standardization in case

  18. Ambivalent participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom...... they could not give open accounts about sexual practice. Attempting to overcome these barriers, I participated in excessive nightlife activities, and as a consequence they began viewing me as a more accepting and reliable person. Although breaking down these barriers provided invaluable insight...... into their sexual culture, it also caused anxiety and troubling desires vis-à-vis informants. I discuss how anthropologists, through fieldwork are transformed from powerful seducers of informants to objects of informants' seduction. This creates dilemmas for the anthropologist whose fieldwork depends on informants...

  19. Applicants’ Choice of an Ophthalmology Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Salman J.; Kwagyan, John; Jones, Leslie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the factors most important to applicants when selecting an ophthalmology residency program. Design Cross-sectional survey. Participants All 595 applicants who submitted a rank list to the Ophthalmology Residency Matching Program for the 2012 match. Methods Participants anonymously completed a 25-item questionnaire after the submission of their rank lists. A multiple-choice format and ordinal scale were used to query applicants on demographics, career plans, and the importance of factors related to program characteristics. One question allowed a free text response to identify factors that caused the applicant to rank a program lower than other programs or not at all (i.e., “red flag”). Main Outcome Measures Factors important to applicants when creating their rank lists. Results The response rate was 37% (218/595). The 3 most important factors affecting rank lists were resident–faculty relationships, clinical and surgical volume, and diversity of training. The fourth most important was the interview experience with faculty; poor interview experience was the most frequently cited “red flag.” Age, gender, and marital status did not affect how applicants rated factors. Applicants planning a post-residency fellowship or an academic career placed greater importance on opportunities for resident research and a program's prestige (Pophthalmology residency program. Future career plans and demographic factors influenced the rating of specific factors. The results of this study provide a useful resource to programs preparing for the match. PMID:23084123

  20. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M.; Lee, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency. PMID:24172053

  1. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods: As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results: Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9 and military personnel (n=2,433 as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001 in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions: A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  2. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M; Lee, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership 'Basic Training' is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this 'Basic Training'. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (pleadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on 'Basic Training'. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  3. The Role of Regional Conferences in Research Resident Career Development: The California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterman, Aaron D; Williams, Jody K; Reus, Victor I; Pato, Michele T; Voglmaier, Susan M; Mathews, Carol A

    2017-04-01

    For psychiatry research resident career development, there is a recognized need for improved cross-institutional mentoring and networking opportunities. One method to address this need is via regional conferences, open to current and recently graduated research residents and their mentors. With this in mind, we developed the biennial California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat (CPRRR) and collected feedback from participants to 1) Assess resident satisfaction, 2) Determine the utility of the retreat as a networking and mentorship tool, and 3) Identify areas for improvement. We gathered survey data from resident attendees at the two first CPRRRs. We analyzed the data to look for trends in satisfaction as well as areas that need improvement. Thirty-two residents from five California training programs attended the CPRRR in 2013 while 33 attended from six programs in 2015. The residents were from all years of training, but concentrated in their second and third years. Approximately 41% and 49% of the attendees were female and 53% and 39% had an MD/PhD in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Twenty-four and 32 residents provided anonymous feedback in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Mean feedback scores were very high (> 4/5) for overall satisfaction, peer- and faculty-networking, the keynote speaker and the flash talks for both years. Mean feedback scores for the ethics debates and mentoring sessions were somewhat lower (≤ 4/5), however, both showed significant improvement from 2013 to 2015. The CPRRRs appear to be an effective mechanism for providing psychiatry research residents with a meaningful cross-institutional opportunity for networking and mentorship. Feedback-driven changes to the CPRRRs improved participant satisfaction for several components of the conference. Future efforts will be aimed at broadening mentorship and networking opportunities, optimizing teaching approaches for research ethics, and considering different feedback-gathering approaches to allow for

  4. Personal characteristics of residents may predict competency improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, EunMi; Ha, Patrick K; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Kim, Young J

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that personal characteristics of residents may affect how well competency is attained in a surgical residency. To this end, we examined two concepts of global trait emotional intelligence and learner autonomy profile and their factor relationship with competency outcomes in a residency program in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. A cohort study prospectively gathered competency change scores for 1 year and retrospectively analyzed the factor associations. We measured two personal characteristics using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form and Learner Autonomy Profile-Short Form between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary otolaryngology-head and neck residency program. We prospectively examined faculty-rated resident competency scores monitored in the same time period and correlated the personal attributes with cumulative competency improvement scores. Statistical analyses included factor correlations and univariate regression. With a response rate of 64% (N = 16/25), we identified two statically significant predictors of competency improvement outcome attained by the end of the year. Regression analyses showed that emotionality factor of global trait emotional intelligence (P = .04) and learner autonomy profile (P < .01) were significant predictors for the higher improvement of aggregate competency outcome. Personal factors of individual residents can affect their improvement of overall competency. Practicing competency-based education should, therefore, include assessing individual resident factors as well as teaching clinical knowledge and technical skills. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1746-1752, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Claiming Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  6. Effects of a Short Video-Based Resident-as-Teacher Training Toolkit on Resident Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Hope A; Freret, Taylor S; Aluko, Ashley; McKeon, Bri Anne; Haviland, Miriam J; Newman, Lori R

    2017-10-01

    To pilot a short video-based resident-as-teacher training toolkit and assess its effect on resident teaching skills in clinical settings. A video-based resident-as-teacher training toolkit was previously developed by educational experts at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School. Residents were recruited from two academic hospitals, watched two videos from the toolkit ("Clinical Teaching Skills" and "Effective Clinical Supervision"), and completed an accompanying self-study guide. A novel assessment instrument for evaluating the effect of the toolkit on teaching was created through a modified Delphi process. Before and after the intervention, residents were observed leading a clinical teaching encounter and scored using the 15-item assessment instrument. The primary outcome of interest was the change in number of skills exhibited, which was assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Twenty-eight residents from two academic hospitals were enrolled, and 20 (71%) completed all phases of the study. More than one third of residents who volunteered to participate reported no prior formal teacher training. After completing two training modules, residents demonstrated a significant increase in the median number of teaching skills exhibited in a clinical teaching encounter, from 7.5 (interquartile range 6.5-9.5) to 10.0 (interquartile range 9.0-11.5; Passessed, there were significant improvements in asking for the learner's perspective (P=.01), providing feedback (P=.005), and encouraging questions (P=.046). Using a resident-as-teacher video-based toolkit was associated with improvements in teaching skills in residents from multiple specialties.

  7. Teaching psychodynamic therapy to hardworking psychiatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    In practice, the classroom teaching of sequentially developing elements of theory and practice in psychodynamic psychiatry to hardworking residents can founder on residents' frequent absences, on-call pages, late arrivals, and early departures. These obstacles can be partially overcome by focusing narrowly on topics that can be explored within the length of a single lecture. Introduction to dynamic psychiatry can be accomplished in this teaching milieu through application of pedagogical techniques of humor, sharply delineated case material, surprise, group participation, demonstrated immediacy of application, theater, and an avoidance of arcane terminology or nuanced theoretical differences.

  8. An Informed Consent Program Enhances Surgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Sarah E; Moore, Ryan F; Goldberg, Michael B; Zhang, Jeanette; Yu, Daohai; Conklin, Charles B; Milner, Richard E; Goldberg, Amy J

    First-year residents often obtain informed consent from patients. However, they typically receive no formal training in this area before residency. We wished to determine whether an educational program would improve residents' comfort with this process. Our institution created an informed consent educational program, which included a didactic component, a role-play about informed consent, and a simulation exercise using standardized patients. Residents completed surveys before and after the intervention, and responses to survey questions were compared using the signed-rank test. This study took place at Temple University Hospital, a tertiary care institution in Philadelphia, PA. First-year surgery and emergency medicine residents at Temple University Hospital in 2014 participated in this study. Thirty-two residents completed the preintervention survey and 27 residents completed the educational program and postintervention survey. Only 37.5% had ever received formal training in informed consent before residency. After participating in the educational program, residents were significantly more confident that they could correctly describe the process of informed consent, properly fill out a procedure consent form, and properly obtain informed consent from a patient. Their comfort level in obtaining informed consent significantly increased. They found the educational program to be very effective in improving their knowledge and comfort level in obtaining informed consent. In all, 100% (N = 27) of residents said they would recommend the use of the program with other first-year residents. Residents became more confident in their ability to obtain informed consent after participating in an educational program that included didactic, role-play, and patient simulation elements. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric Residents as Health Educators: The Reactions of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Joel L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Pediatrics at the Framingham Union Hospital, in conjunction with the Boston University Department of Pediatrics, requires pediatric residents to participate in a school health experience. Two such activities and their effects on children are described. (CJ)

  11. Community size and sport participation across 22 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balish, S M; Rainham, D; Blanchard, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine, across 22 countries, the association between community size and individual sport, team sport, and exercise participation. Hierarchal non-linear Bernoulli modeling is used to examine the association between community size (100,000-10,000; sport, (b) team sport, and (c) exercise participation. After controlling for country-level clustering and demographic variables, those residing a community with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents are more likely to participate in individual sport [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.23] while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is unrelated (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.96-1.19). Those residing in communities with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents were more likely to participate in team sport (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.01-1.45) while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is unrelated (OR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.88-1.18). Residing in a community with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents is unrelated to exercise participation (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.89-1.7), while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is negatively related to exercise participation (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.93). These findings provide novel evidence that communities between 100,000 and 10,000 residents are related to increased sport participation, particularly team sport participation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Facebook Use between College Resident Advisors' and Their Residents: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacvinsky, Lauren E; Moreno, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    Facebook use is nearly ubiquitous among college students. Studies have shown links between Facebook displays of depression or problem drinking and risk of these problems. This project aimed to determine whether Facebook could be used to help Resident Advisors (RAs) identify college students at risk for depression or problem drinking. Interviews were conducted with college freshmen to investigate whether they were Facebook "friends" with their RA. Focus groups were conducted with RAs to determine their views on Facebook friending their dormitory residents and using Facebook to help identify at-risk students. 72 freshmen were interviewed and 25 RAs participated in focus groups; both agreed it is common for RAs and residents to be Facebook friends. RAs commonly noted references to depression and problem drinking on residents' Facebook pages, which often led to in-person discussions with the resident. This study provides support that RAs use Facebook to identify issues that may impact their student residents. RAs emphasized benefits of in-person interactions in order to provide support and obtain additional details about the situation. Universities could consider whether providing RA education about Facebook interactions with residents merits encouragement within their existing RA training programs.

  13. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman Palabindala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health.Anonymous mailed survey.Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States.We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt

  14. An analytic decision support tool for resident allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talay-Değirmenci, Işılay; Holmes, Casey J; Kuo, Paul C; Jennings, Otis B

    2013-01-01

    Moving residents through an academic residency program is complicated by a number of factors. Across all residency programs the percentage of residents that leave for any reason is between 3.4% and 3.8%.(1) There are a number of residents that participate in research. To avoid discrepancies in the number of residents at the all levels, programs must either limit the number of residents that go into the lab, the number that return to clinical duties, or the number of interns to hire. Traditionally this process consists of random selection and trial and error with names on magnetic strips moved around a board. With the matrix that we have developed this process is optimized and aided by a Microsoft Excel macro (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, Washington). We suggest that a residency program would have the same number of residents at each residency stage of clinical practice, as well as a steady number of residents at each research stage. The program consists of 2 phases, in the first phase, an Excel sheet called the "Brain Sheet," there are simple formulas that we have prepared to determine the number of interns to recruit, residents in the research phase, and residents that advance to the next stage of training. The second phase of the program, the macro, then takes the list of current resident names along with the residency level they are in, and according to the formulas allocates them to the relevant stages for future years, creating a resident matrix. Our macro for resident allocation would maximize the time of residency program administrators by simplifying the movement of residents through the program. It would also provide a tool for planning the number of new interns to recruit and program expansion. The application of our macro illustrates that analytical techniques can be used to minimize the time spent and avoid the trial and error while planning resident movement in a program. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  15. Non-cognitive variables and residency choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neral, Susan M; Collins, Joyce; Gandy, Michael J; Hampton, Harriet L; Morrison, John C

    2008-11-01

    The objective for this study was to determine a means of using non-cognitive variables to target undergraduate efforts towards likely candidates for specific residency choice. APPROACH AND MATERIALS: Over a three year spread, a volunteer cohort of freshmen medical students was assessed for the non-cognitive variable of personality preference using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to determine its accuracy in predicting the choice of specialty training. Of the 98 participants, 13 ultimately chose a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN). Four had scores which classified them with the personality preference ESFP (Extroverted, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving), representing a ratio of 3.5 to 1 when compared to students expressing other personality preferences among the total sample of subjects. These preliminary findings indicated that classification of personality preference among freshmen medical students is a statistically reliable means of predicting future residency choices.

  16. Current leadership training in dermatology residency programs: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, David S; Soldanska, Magdalena; Anderson, Bryan; Miller, Jeffrey J

    2012-04-01

    Residents and physicians frequently find themselves in leadership roles. Current residency curricula focus on the development of clinical knowledge and technical skills. A previous survey of Penn State Dermatology graduates demonstrated the perceived need and benefit of a formalized leadership curriculum in this selected group. We sought to identify and measure the perceived need and benefit of formalized leadership training and investigate opinions regarding leadership theory from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors and chief residents nationally. A survey containing 26 questions related to leadership theory and training were mailed to all US dermatology residency programs. In all, 91% of program directors and chief residents agreed that leadership skills could be taught through observation and training. A total of 78% of respondents agreed that leadership training is important during dermatology residency training. In all, 66% agreed that a formalized leadership curriculum would help residents become better resident supervisors and physicians. Only 13% reported having a formalized leadership curriculum. Participants most frequently reported learning leadership through observation and modeled behavior. A total of 15% of chief residents believed their faculty did not effectively model leadership, whereas only 2% of the program directors believed the same (P = .01). In all, 62% (68/109) of programs surveyed returned at least one response from the program director or chief resident. A total of 39% (42/109) had responses from both the program director and the chief resident. Because of the voluntary nature of the survey, response bias could not be excluded. Most program directors and chief residents believe leadership skills can be cultivated through observation and training. Leadership curriculum is not part of most residency programs. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anesthesiology Residents-as-Teachers Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey S; Daneshpayeh, Negin; Sherman, Marian; Gaba, Nancy; Keller, Jennifer; Perel, Leon; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie

    2012-12-01

    The role of residents as teachers has grown over time. Programs have been established within various specialties to formally develop these skills. Anesthesiology residents are frequently asked to provide supervision for novice learners and have numerous opportunities for teaching skills and clinical decision making. Yet, there are no educational programs described in the literature to train anesthesiology residents to teach novice learners. To explore whether a resident-as-teacher program would increase anesthesiology residents' self-reported teaching skills. An 8-session interactive Anesthesiology Residents-as-Teachers (ART) Program was developed to emphasize 6 key teaching skills. During a 2-year period, 14 anesthesiology residents attended the ART program. The primary outcome measure was resident self-assessment of their teaching skills across 14 teaching domains, before and 6 months after the ART program. Residents also evaluated the workshops for quality with a 9-item, postworkshop survey. Paired t testing was used for analysis. Resident self-assessment led to a mean increase in teaching skills of 1.04 in a 5-point Likert scale (P < .001). Residents reported the greatest improvement in writing/using teaching objectives (+1.29, P < .001), teaching at the bedside (+1.57, P  =  .002), and leading case discussions (+1.64, P  =  .001). Residents rated the workshops 4.2 out of 5 (3.9-4.7). Residents rated their teaching skills as significantly improved in 13 of 14 teaching domains after participation in the ART program. The educational program required few resources and was rated highly by residents.

  18. Resident versus faculty member simulation debriefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Traci; Newton, Chad; Patel, Hetal; Sulistio, Melanie; Tomlinson, Andrew; Lee, Won

    2017-11-16

    Near-peer teaching is effective in graduate medical education, but it has not been compared with faculty member teaching in resident simulation. In this study, we sought to compare debriefing sessions of internal medicine (IM) intern simulation sessions led by academic faculty doctors with those led by senior IM residents in order to measure the effectiveness of near-peer teaching in this setting. Near-peer teaching is effective in graduate medical education, but has not been compared with faculty member teaching in resident simulation METHOD: Internal medicine interns participated in four simulation cases, two of which were debriefed by faculty members and two of which were debriefed by residents. Pre-simulation knowledge assessment was completed prior to the case. Following each debriefing, interns completed a Debriefing Assessment for Simulation in Healthcare (DASH) survey. Post-simulation knowledge assessments were completed 6 months after simulation. Debriefings were recorded and transcribed. Each statement made during debriefing was classified as either correct or erroneous by blinded reviewers. Fifty interns participated in simulation, and the response rate on the DASH survey was 88%. There was no difference between DASH scores (p = 0.13), post-simulation knowledge assessments or error rates during debriefing (p = 0.31) for faculty member and resident instructors. Our study suggests that residents and faculty members provide a similar quality of simulation instruction based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  19. Resident training and the dictated operative report: a national perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Lawrence M.; Vergis, Ashley; Hardy, Krista; Park, Jason; Taylor, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Using a nationwide survey, we aimed to determine the current status of operative dictation training in Canada. Methods Residents and program directors in general surgery programs in Canada participated in this survey. Results In all, 274 residents and 11 program directors responded to the survey (70% and 79% response rates, respectively). Among residents, 73% reported that their dictations were in need of improvement, and 56% reported never receiving feedback about their dictations. Most residents (80%) stated that they learned to dictate by reading old operative dictations, 75% reported that their program did not use any formal methods to help improve dictations, and 70% requested further training in dictation. In all, 91% of program directors felt that residency programs should include formal training in dictation but half could not identify any formal methods currently used in their programs. Conclusion There appears to be a marked deficiency in resident training in operative dictation nationwide. PMID:20646398

  20. Comparison of participants and non-participants to the ORISCAV-LUX population-based study on cardiovascular risk factors in Luxembourg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkerwi Ala'a

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor response is a major concern in public health surveys. In a population-based ORISCAV-LUX study carried out in Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg to assess the cardiovascular risk factors, the non-response rate was not negligible. The aims of the present work were: 1 to investigate the representativeness of study sample to the general population, and 2 to compare the known demographic and cardiovascular health-related profiles of participants and non-participants. Methods For sample representativeness, the participants were compared to the source population according to stratification criteria (age, sex and district of residence. Based on complementary information from the "medical administrative database", further analysis was carried out to assess whether the health status affected the response rate. Several demographic and morbidity indicators were used in the univariate comparison between participants and non-participants. Results Among the 4452 potentially eligible subjects contacted for the study, there were finally 1432 (32.2% participants. Compared to the source population, no differences were found for gender and district distribution. By contrast, the youngest age group was under-represented while adults and elderly were over-represented in the sample, for both genders. Globally, the investigated clinical profile of the non-participants was similar to that of participants. Hospital admission and cardiovascular health-related medical measures were comparable in both groups even after controlling for age. The participation rate was lower in Portuguese residents as compared to Luxembourgish (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.48-0.69. It was also significantly associated with the professional status (P Conclusion The 32.2% participation rate obtained in the ORISCAV-LUX survey represents the realistic achievable rate for this type of multiple-stage, nationwide, population-based surveys. It corresponds to the expected rate upon which the

  1. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  2. The urology residency matching program in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichman, J M; Anderson, K D; Dorough, M M; Stein, C R; Optenberg, S A; Thompson, I M

    2000-06-01

    We evaluate behaviors and attitudes among resident applicants and program directors related to the American Urological Association (AUA) residency matching program and recommend changes to improve the match. Written questionnaires were mailed to 519 resident applicants and 112 program directors after the 1999 American Urological Association match. Subjects were asked about their observations, behaviors and opinions towards the match. Questionnaires were returned by 230 resident applicants and 94 program directors (44% and 83% response rates, respectively.) Of the resident applicants 75% spent $1,001 to $5,000 for interviewing. Of the program directors 47% recalled that applicants asked how programs would rank the applicant and 61% of applicants recalled that program directors asked applicants how they would rank programs. Dishonesty was acknowledged by 31% of program directors and 44% of resident applicants. Of program directors 82% thought applicants "lied", while 67% of applicants thought that programs "lied" (quotations indicate questionnaire language). Participants characterized their own dishonesty as "just playing the game" or they "did not feel badly." Of program directors 81% and of applicants 61% were "skeptical" or "did not believe" when informed they were a "high" or "number 1" selection. Being asked about marital status was recalled by 91% of male and 100% of female (p = 0. 02), if they had children by 53% of male and 67% of female, (p = 0. 03), and intent to have children by 25% of male and 62% of female (p gender. Interviews are costly for applicants. We recommend that 1) programs adopt policies to enhance fairness, 2) applications be filed electronically, 3) programs assist resident applicants with interview accommodation to reduce financial burden and 4) a post-interview code of limited or noncommunication be adopted.

  3. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Jenna; Gillan, Caitlin; Caissie, Amanda; Davis, Carol-Anne; Liszewski, Brian; McNiven, Andrea; Giuliani, Meredith

    2017-06-01

    To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adleman, Jenna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gillan, Caitlin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Caissie, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada); Davis, Carol-Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Liszewski, Brian [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McNiven, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giuliani, Meredith, E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. Results: An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. Conclusions: This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs.

  5. Measuring pediatric resident competencies in adolescent medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Paritosh; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen; Rosenberg, Adam; Barley, Gwyn

    2014-08-01

    To compare third-year pediatric resident competence on an adolescent medicine with competence in treating younger children. The participants were third-year residents (2010 [n = 24] and 2011 [n = 23]) at University of Colorado School of Medicine. Resident competence was measured in the domains of professionalism, communication, and history-taking skills in a multicase Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Percent correct scores in professionalism, history-taking, and communication skills on the adolescent case ranked in the bottom half of cases in both years. T-tests comparing mean score difference between the adolescent case and pediatric cases combined were statistically significant for professionalism (79.57 ± 4.15 vs. 89.51 ± 14.14, p = .01) and history taking (66.27 ± 11.02 vs. 75.10 ± 18.40, p = .05). Resident's history taking addressed immediate issues but not public health issues with adolescents. The professionalism findings suggest that residents engage in less patient-centered care when caring for adolescents, even while their communication skills remain on par. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Burt, Lindsay M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Morris, Zachary S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Walker, Amanda J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Miller, Seth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bhavsar, Shripal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Integris Cancer Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kim, Miranda B. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. Conclusions: This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period

  7. Dedicated research time in urology residency: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Charles C; Badlani, Gopal H

    2014-04-01

    To gauge the importance of dedicated research time during urology residency and how this influences rank-list preferences when applying for residency. An American Urological Association survey was emailed to US resident members. The online form consisted of 14 questions addressing demographics, career plans, and training program characteristics. Two additional Likert-scale question series evaluated rank-list preferences and the value of dedicated research time during residency. A total of 263 of 956 urology residents (27.5%) responded to the survey. More than 70% responders valued the opportunity to be involved with scholarly research and agreed that doing so will enhance their education and/or training. About 88.2% interviewed with at least 1 program with a dedicated research year. About 33.5% preferred or were indifferent to applying to 6-year programs with dedicated research time vs a traditional 5-year program. About 76.4% residents preferred doing an extra year of research in fellowship as opposed to residency. Dedicated research time is one of many components influencing rank-list preference. Residents value the opportunity to participate in research, but there is limited interest in an additional year during residency. However, one-third of applicants favor or are willing to accept an additional year of research in urology residency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolving attitudes toward robotic surgery among Canadian urology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jennifer; Robinson, Michael; MacNeily, Andrew; Goldenberg, S Larry; Black, Peter C

    2017-07-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RAS) has not been adopted as rapidly or widely in Canada as in the U.S. In 2011, Canadian urology residents felt that RAS represented an expanding field that could potentially negatively impact their training. We re-evaluate trainee exposure and attitudes to RAS in Canadian residency training five years later. All Canadian urology residents were asked to participate in an online survey designed to assess current resident exposure to and perception of RAS. The response rate was 39% (61/157). Seventy-seven percent of residents reported being involved in at least one RAS procedure (52% in 2011), and the majority had exposure to <10 cases. For those in hospitals with access to RAS, 96% desired more console time, while only 50% of those without access wanted more console experience. Of all residents, 50% felt that RAS will become the gold standard in certain urological surgeries (34% in 2011), but only 28% felt that RAS would play an increasingly important role in urology (59% in 2011). Despite an increase in exposure to RAS in residency programs over the past five years, console experience remains limited. Although these residents desire more access to RAS, many voice uncertainty of the role of RAS in Canada. We cannot conclude whether RAS is perceived by residents to be beneficial or detrimental to their training nationwide. Moving forward in the robotic era, it will be important to either modify residency curricula to address RAS experience or to limit RAS to fellowship training.

  9. Teaching immigrant and refugee health to residents: domestic global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Smith, Clyde Lanford; Sckell, Blanca; Paccione, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Half a million immigrants enter the United States annually. Clinical providers generally lack training in immigrant health. We developed a curriculum with didactic, clinical, and analytic components to advance residents' skills in immigrant and travel health. The curriculum focused on patients and their countries of origin and encompassed (a) societal, cultural, economical, and human rights profiles; (b) health system/ policies/resources/statistics, and environmental health; and (c) clinical manifestations, tropical and travel health. Residents evaluated sociocultural health beliefs and human rights abuses; performed history and physical examinations while precepted by faculty; developed specific care plans; and discussed patients in a dedicated immigrant health morning report. We assessed resident satisfaction using questionnaires and focus groups. Residents (n=20) found clinical, sociocultural, and epidemiological components the most helpful. Morning reports reinforced peer education. The immigrant health curriculum was useful for residents. Multiple teaching modules, collaboration with grassroot organizations, and an ongoing clinical component were key features.

  10. Preparing Residents for Teaching Careers: The Faculty for Tomorrow Resident Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Gordon, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Progress toward growing the primary care workforce is at risk of being derailed by an emerging crisis: a critical shortage of family medicine faculty. In response to the faculty shortage, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) launched a 2-year initiative called "Faculty for Tomorrow" (F4T). The F4T Task Force created a workshop designed to increase residents' interest in, and prepare them for, careers in academic family medicine. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of this workshop. Participants were family medicine residents who preregistered for and attended the F4T Resident Workshop at the 2016 STFM Annual Spring Conference. The intervention was a full-day, 9-hour preconference workshop delivered by a multi-institutional faculty team. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and immediately after the workshop. Data collected included demographics, residency program characteristics, future career plans, self-reported confidence in skills, and general knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. A total of 75 participants attended the workshop. The proportion of those who were "extremely likely" to pursue a career in academic family medicine increased from 58% to 72%. Participants reported statistically significant improvements in their confidence in clinical teaching, providing feedback to learners, writing an effective CV, knowledge about the structure of academic family medicine, and knowledge about applying for a faculty position. The STFM F4T Resident Workshop was effective at increasing participants' interest in academic careers, as well as self-reported confidence in skills and knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. The data collected from participants regarding their career plans may inform future interventions.

  11. Resident laser refractive surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Assumpta A; Ali, Tofik

    2010-07-01

    The Residency Review Committee Ophthalmology of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has recently established guidelines pertaining to the minimum operative requirements for training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery. Despite being one of the most frequently performed ophthalmic surgical procedures, there is a paucity of literature on residency training in refractive surgery. Moreover, the literature indicates that only half of training programs offer surgical exposure to trainees. The purpose of this article is to review recent research on training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery and offer an approach to incorporating laser refractive surgery curriculum in residency education. Kwon et al. performed a national survey to evaluate current trends in resident laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) training in the USA. The result shows that 54% of respondents had resident-performed LASIK surgery with 9.1% of surveyed programs not offering any LASIK experience. In addition, residents in the study performed a mean of 4.4 LASIK surgeries (range 1-10) during residency training starting during the second year. The data emerging from the survey show that refractive surgery experience is fundamental to the education of the ophthalmology resident. Although the demand for refractive surgery continues to gain pace with millions of such procedures performed worldwide, only a little over half of ophthalmology residency programs offer residents the opportunity to gain surgical experience. With the current mandate, programs must now look for strategies to provide laser refractive surgical experience to residents.

  12. The Fundamentals of Resident Dismissal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenarts, Paul J; Langenfeld, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Residents have the rights and responsibilities of both students and employees. Dismissal of a resident from a training program is traumatic and has lasting repercussions for the program director, the faculty, the dismissed resident, and the residency. A review of English language literature was performed using PUBMED and OVID databases, using the search terms, resident dismissal, resident termination, student dismissal, student and resident evaluation, legal aspects of education, and remediation. The references of each publication were also reviewed to identify additional appropriate citations. If the Just Cause threshold has been met, educators have the absolute discretion to evaluate academic and clinical performance. Legal opinion has stated that it is not necessary to wait until a patient is harmed to dismiss a resident. Evaluations should be standard and robust. Negative evaluations are not defamatory as the resident gave consent to be evaluated. Provided departmental and institutional polices have been followed, a resident can be dismissed without a formal hearing. Residencies are entitled to modify academic requirements and dismissal is not considered a breach of contract. Although there is anxiety regarding resident dismissal, the courts have uniformly supported faculty having this role. When indicated, failure to dismiss a resident also places the program director and the faculty at risk for educational malpractice.

  13. The State of Sleep Medicine Education in North American Psychiatry Residency Training Programs in 2013: Chief Resident's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Imran S; Dickmann, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Thomas D; Thuras, Paul D; Feinstein, Robert E; Douglass, Alan B; Lee, Elliott Kyung

    2017-08-31

    To assess the current state of sleep medicine educational resources and training offered by North American psychiatry residency programs. In June 2013, a 9-item peer-reviewed Sleep Medicine Training Survey was administered to 39 chief residents of psychiatry residency training programs during a meeting in New York. Thirty-four percent of the participating programs offered an elective rotation in sleep medicine. A variety of innovative approaches for teaching sleep medicine were noted. The majority of the chief residents felt comfortable screening patients for obstructive sleep apnea (72%), half felt comfortable screening for restless legs syndrome (53%), and fewer than half were comfortable screening for other sleep disorders (47%). This is the first report in the last decade to provide any analysis of current sleep medicine training in North American psychiatry residency training programs. These data indicate that sleep medicine education in psychiatry residency programs is possibly in decline.

  14. Mobbing Exposure of Anaesthesiology Residents in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Gülnihal; Efe, Esra Mercanoğlu; Bayraktar, Selcan; Şentürk, Sinem; Başeğmez, İrem; Özkumit, Özlem; Kabak, Elmas; Yavaşçaoğlu, Belgin; Bilgin, Hülya

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, psychological problems that are caused by working conditions, like burn out syndrome, are more commonly observed. In our study, we aimed to evaluate mobbing exposure, factors causing mobbing and precautions for mobbing in residency students who are educated in anaesthesiology and reanimation clinics in Turkey. After obtaining consent from the ethics committee, we sent our questionnaires to the secretariats of the departments by postal mail. Completed questionnaires were collected in our department's secretariat blindly and randomly mixed. One hundred and one participants were returned the questionnaires. Data was statistically analysed in SPSS 21.0 software programme. During residency programme, sated to have experienced mobbing one or more time. Interestingly, 5.9% participants complained of physical mobbing. Mobbing exposure was more common in females. The most serious new onset psychosomatic symptoms stated during residency were committing suicide (2%), addiction (16%), severe depression (18%), panic attack (8%), more accidents (7%) and tendency of violence (15%). In mobbing group there was statistically significant dissatisfaction rate. In professions where mobbing is common, incidences of psychiatric diseases and suicide attempts are high are increased. Who are under risk for experiencing mobbing should be noticed carefully to ensure good judgement and problems should be inspected objectively in a detailed manner. Anesthesiology societies and other medical professional societies should establish mobbing committees. Thus, mobbing problems can be resolved and healthy career oppurtunities can be presented to residents.

  15. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  16. Factors affecting sports participation among female students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary aim of this study was to examine factors affecting sport participation among resident and non- resident female students at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT), Pretoria, South Africa. The study targeted all students participating in 12 registered sports but due to the fact that only a limited number of the total ...

  17. Progressive Entrustment to Achieve Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: A National Qualitative Study With General Surgery Faculty and Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Gurjit; Magas, Christopher P; Robinson, Adina B; Scally, Christopher P; Minter, Rebecca M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify behaviors that faculty and residents exhibit during intraoperative interactions, which support or inhibit progressive entrustment leading to operative autonomy. In the operating room, a critical balance is sought between direct faculty supervision and appropriate increase in resident autonomy with indirect faculty supervision. Little is known regarding perspectives of faculty and residents about how attendings increasingly step back and safely delegate autonomy to trainees. Understanding the context in which these decisions are made is critical to achieving a safe strategy for imparting progressive responsibility. A qualitative study was undertaken from January 2014 to February 2015. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 37 faculty and 59 residents from 14 and 41 institutions, respectively. Participants were selected using stratified random sampling from general surgery residency programs across the United States to represent a range of university, university-affiliated, and community programs, and geographic regions. Audio recordings of interviews were transcribed, iteratively analyzed, and emergent themes identified. Six themes were identified as influencing progressive entrustment in the operating room: optimizing faculty intraoperative feedback; policies and regulations affecting role of resident in the operating room; flexible faculty teaching strategies; context-specific variables; leadership opportunities for resident in the case; and safe struggle for resident when appropriate. Perspectives of faculty and residents while overlapping were different in emphasis. Better understanding faculty-resident interactions, individual behaviors, contextual influences, and national regulations that influence intraoperative education have the potential to significantly affect progressive entrustment in training paradigms.

  18. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  19. Status of anesthesiology resident research education in the United States: structured education programs increase resident research productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shireen; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; McCarthy, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The enhancement of resident research education has been proposed to increase the number of academic anesthesiologists with the skills and knowledge to conduct meaningful research. Program directors (PDs) of the U.S. anesthesiology residency programs were surveyed to evaluate the status of research education during residency training and to test the hypothesis that structured programs result in greater resident research productivity based on resident publications. Survey responses were solicited from 131 anesthesiology residency PDs. Seventy-four percent of PDs responded to the survey. Questions evaluated department demographic information, the extent of faculty research activity, research resources and research funding in the department, the characteristics of resident research education and resident research productivity, departmental support for resident research, and perceived barriers to resident research education. Thirty-two percent of programs had a structured resident research education program. Structured programs were more likely to be curriculum based, require resident participation in a research project, and provide specific training in presentation and writing skills. Productivity expectations were similar between structured and nonstructured programs. Forty percent of structured programs had > 20% of trainees with a publication in the last 2 years compared with 14% of departments with unstructured programs (difference, 26%; 99% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%; P = 0.01). The percentage of programs that had research rotations for ≥2 months was not different between the structured and the nonstructured programs. A research rotation of >2 months did not increase the percentage of residents who had published an article within the last 2 months compared with a research rotation of research in structured compared with unstructured research education. In programs with research, 15% reported >20% of residents with a publication in the last 2 years compared

  20. Participative Mindscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Katan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In parallel with my social activism, I introduced architecture into my kinetic art and participatory activism into my architecture. Flexibility and participation in architectural design has been a permanent feature of my practice, bringing new opportunities for self-expression in urban living. To form follows function I opposed form follows movement because it is man oriented while function is object oriented. After my 1962–1964 Mecanographs, machine-made images based on an interaction between the movement, the artist and the machine, I joined forces with Len Lye to determine what kind of positive attributes a Museum of Kinetic Art should have, defining three aspects of kinetic movement: illumination, sound, and physical movement. Vasarely and other kinetic artists put their mark on their time by promoting a form of social art, accessible to all, suggesting movement without actual movement. Walking through my medieval village can be a kinetic experience. The sense of wonder you feel at every corner compares with that of optical art. In the past decade, I moved toward a new form of participatory kinetic expression using state-of-the-art technology (plastics, LED, wireless devices. I view my kinetic work as an architectural experience and architecture as a stimulating kinetic experience.

  1. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croley JA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Croley,1 C Helen Malone,1 Brandon P Goodwin,1 Linda G Phillips,2 Eric L Cole,2 Richard F Wagner1 1Department of Dermatology, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA Background: Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents’ ability to plan surgical reconstructions.Materials and methods: The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale.Results: Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50–2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00–3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant

  2. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, Julie A; Malone, C Helen; Goodwin, Brandon P; Phillips, Linda G; Cole, Eric L; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents' ability to plan surgical reconstructions. The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50-2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00-3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant-reported likelihoods of performing flaps and grafts in the future increased 0.25-0.50 Likert scale points among all residents participating in the educational activity and 0.50-1.00 Likert scale points in the dermatology resident subset. All residents participating in the educational activity somewhat or completely agreed

  3. What opportunities are available for resident involvement in national orthopedic and subspecialty societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Parks, Michael L; Green, Daniel W

    2011-10-05

    As physician involvement in health policy grows, there will be an increasing need for future leaders in orthopedics. Interested orthopedic residents may be unaware of opportunities for leadership involvement in professional and subspecialty organizations. This article investigates whether national and subspecialty organizations offer membership to residents, allow residents to participate in committees, and provide opportunities for scholarly activity and mentorship. The authors surveyed 20 national orthopedic professional and subspecialty societies to evaluate the availability and cost of resident membership, meeting attendance and participation, research funding, committee membership, and mentorship opportunities. Each society's Web site was reviewed, and societies were contacted by phone if further inquiry was needed. Of the 20 orthopedic societies surveyed, 11 allowed resident membership. Five of 20 societies allowed residents to serve on committees, with a total of 14 total positions for residents. Four organizations provided formalized mentorship programs to residents. Although opportunities for resident involvement in subspecialty and professional societies are available in the majority of groups surveyed, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Society for Surgery of the Hand provided the most comprehensive collection of opportunities. Residents should also pursue involvement in other organizations that may be more readily accessible, such as local, state, and regional orthopedic and medical societies. Increased resident participation in these organizations may help in increasing the 14 nationally available committee positions for orthopedic residents. Our orthopedic profession and societies should encourage motivated residents to pursue involvement and leadership at the national level. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. 24 CFR 964.105 - Role of the jurisdiction-wide resident council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Role of the jurisdiction-wide resident council. 964.105 Section 964.105 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and... Participation § 964.105 Role of the jurisdiction-wide resident council. (a) Jurisdiction-wide resident council...

  5. Perceptions about Residence Hall Wingmates and Alcohol-Related Secondhand Effects among College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Bush, Elizabeth N.; Novik, Melinda G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the secondhand effects among college freshmen of others' alcohol use and related student characteristics, and perceptions about residence hallmates. Participants: The authors surveyed 509 incoming freshmen residing in predominantly freshman residence halls. Methods: The authors administered a Web-based survey 2…

  6. An Examination of Mentoring Relationships and Leadership Capacity in Resident Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Sherry L.

    2016-01-01

    The leadership capacity of resident assistants can be impacted by many experiences, including involvement in mentoring relationships. The purpose of this study was to examine if and how resident assistants' leadership capacities are influenced by participating in these relationships. A sample of 6,006 resident assistants was analyzed using data…

  7. Perspectives on healthy eating among Appalachian residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M; Swanson, Mark; Grosh, Christopher; Bardach, Shoshana

    2013-08-01

    Extensive attention has been focused on improving the dietary intake of Americans. Such focus is warranted due to increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and other dietary-related disease. To address suboptimal dietary intake requires an improved, contextualized understanding of the multiple and intersecting influences on healthy eating, particularly among those populations at greatest risk of and from poor diet, including rural residents. During 8 focus groups (N = 99) and 6 group key informant interviews (N = 20), diverse Appalachian rural residents were queried about their perceptions of healthy eating, determinants of healthy food intake, and recommendations for improving the dietary intake of people in their communities. Participants included church members and other laypeople, public health officials, social service providers, health care professionals, and others. Participants offered insights on healthy eating consistent with the categories of individual, interpersonal, community, physical, environmental, and society-level influences described in the socioecological model. Although many participants identified gaps in dietary knowledge as a persistent problem, informants also identified extraindividual factors, including the influence of family, fellow church members, and schools, policy, advertising and media, and general societal trends, as challenges to healthy dietary intake. We highlight Appalachian residents' recommendations for promoting healthier diets, including support groups, educational workshops, cooking classes, and community gardening. We discuss the implications of these findings for programmatic development in the Appalachian context. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  8. Promoting careers in academic research to psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S; Stitzer, Maxine L; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2014-04-01

    With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists and to promote careers in academic research. The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth-year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum's participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3 and 2 years, respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Results suggest that it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, causes little disruption to the residents' schedule and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training.

  9. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  10. Residents' Satisfaction With the PRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K L; Ticknor, C B

    1989-09-01

    Examinations are an integral part of resident and program evaluation, but they are considered particularly stressful on residents. The department of psychiatry of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio administered the Psychiatry Resident-in-Training Examination (PRTTE) every other year to minimize stress and anxiety among residents. When questioned about their satisfaction with the PRTTE and its administration, the residents reported high levels of satisfaction and a desire to take the examination yearly. Dissatisfaction was limited to the physical environment in which the exam was administered.

  11. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jordan S; Patten, Scott

    2005-06-22

    Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. In total 415 (51 %) residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  12. Utility of a Systematic Approach to Teaching Photographic Nasal Analysis to Otolaryngology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitschek, Jon; Dresner, Harley; Hilger, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Photographic nasal analysis constitutes a critical step along the path toward accurate diagnosis and precise surgical planning in rhinoplasty. The learned process by which one assesses photographs, analyzes relevant anatomical landmarks, and generates a global view of the nasal aesthetic is less widely described. To discern the common pitfalls in performing photographic nasal analysis and to quantify the utility of a systematic approach model in teaching photographic nasal analysis to otolaryngology residents. This prospective observational study included 20 participants from a university-based otolaryngology residency program. The control and intervention groups underwent baseline graded assessment of 3 patients. The intervention group received instruction on a systematic approach model for nasal analysis, and both groups underwent postintervention testing at 10 weeks. Data were collected from October 1, 2015, through June 1, 2016. A 10-minute, 11-slide presentation provided instruction on a systematic approach to nasal analysis to the intervention group. Graded photographic nasal analysis using a binary 18-point system. The 20 otolaryngology residents (15 men and 5 women; age range, 24-34 years) were adept at mentioning dorsal deviation and dorsal profile with focused descriptions of tip angle and contour. Areas commonly omitted by residents included verification of the Frankfort plane, position of the lower lateral crura, radix position, and ratio of the ala to tip lobule. The intervention group demonstrated immediate improvement after instruction on the teaching model, with the mean (SD) postintervention test score doubling compared with their baseline performance (7.5 [2.7] vs 10.3 [2.5]; P Otolaryngology residents demonstrated proficiency at incorporating nasal deviation, tip angle, and dorsal profile contour into their nasal analysis. They often omitted verification of the Frankfort plane, position of lower lateral crura, radix depth, and ala-to-tip lobule

  13. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Resident Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dana T; Liebert, Cara A; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N; Salles, Arghavan

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing recognition that physician wellness is critical; it not only benefits the provider, but also influences quality and patient care outcomes. Despite this, resident physicians suffer from a high rate of burnout and personal distress. Individuals with higher emotional intelligence (EI) are thought to perceive, process, and regulate emotions more effectively, which can lead to enhanced well-being and less emotional disturbance. This study sought to understand the relationship between EI and wellness among surgical residents. Residents in a single general surgery residency program were surveyed on a voluntary basis. Emotional intelligence was measured using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form. Resident wellness was assessed with the Dupuy Psychological General Well-Being Index, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form. Emotional intelligence and wellness parameters were correlated using Pearson coefficients. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors predictive of well-being. Seventy-three residents participated in the survey (response rate 63%). Emotional intelligence scores correlated positively with psychological well-being (r = 0.74; p emotional exhaustion (r = -0.69; p emotional exhaustion (β = -0.63; p Emotional intelligence is a strong predictor of resident well-being. Prospectively measuring EI can identify those who are most likely to thrive in surgical residency. Interventions to increase EI can be effective at optimizing the wellness of residents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Goals of Care Ambulatory Resident Education: Training Residents in Advance Care Planning Conversations in the Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Stephen H; Camargo, Marianne; Meier, Diane E; Yuen, Jacqueline K

    2017-12-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) discussions often occur in the inpatient setting when patients are too ill to participate in decision making. Although the outpatient setting is the preferred time to begin these discussions, few physicians do so in practice. Many internal medicine (IM) residents report inadequate training as a barrier to having outpatient ACP discussions. To assess whether a novel curriculum entitled Goals of Care Ambulatory Resident Education (GOCARE) improved resident physicians' understanding of and preparedness for conducting ACP discussions in the outpatient setting. The curriculum was delivered over four weekly three-hour small group sessions to IM residents. Each session included didactics, a demonstration of skills, and a simulated patient communication laboratory that emphasized deliberate practice. IM residents from an urban, academic ambulatory care practice. Impact of the intervention was evaluated using a retrospective pre-post design. Residents completed surveys immediately after the course and six months later. Forty-two residents participated in the curriculum and 95% completed the postcourse survey. Residents' self-rated level of preparedness increased for ACP discussions overall (4.0 pre vs. 5.2 post on 7-point Likert scale) and for communication steps involved in ACP (p skills (p skills in outpatient ACP discussions.

  15. Finding Value in Surgical Didactics: Longitudinal Resident Feedback From Case-Based and Traditional Lectures in an Orthopaedic Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Jonathan C; Halvorson, Jason J; Teasdall, Robert D; Carroll, Eben A

    To evaluate orthopedic resident perceptions of a didactic curriculum presented in traditional and case-based formats. Prospective cohort study using anonymous web-based survey after each conference evaluating resident perceptions of faculty participation, didactic delivery, content, and overall conference value. Conferences were structured as primarily case-based or traditional lecture. Logistic analysis was performed to determine factors predictive of rating a conference as valuable time spent. Orthopedic residency training program at single institution over an academic year. Orthopedic residents in postgraduate training year 1 to 5 attending mandatory didactic conference. Cased-based conferences received higher Likert ratings on residents' perception of faculty participation, instructor delivery, and improvement in topic understanding when compared to traditional lecture-based conferences (p didactic sessions. Junior levels residents are not perceived as effective as senior residents and faculty in presenting material in either format. These methods allow for a dynamic approach to identifying strengths and weaknesses in a resident curriculum as a well as a means for more focused and real-time improvements. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Useful but Different: Resident Physician Perceptions of Interprofessional Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, Travis P; O'Brien, Bridget C; Henry, Duncan M; van Schaik, Sandrijn M

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Based on recently formulated interprofessional core competencies, physicians are expected to incorporate feedback from other healthcare professionals. Based on social identity theory, physicians likely differentiate between feedback from members of their own profession and others. The current study examined residents' experiences with, and perceptions of, interprofessional feedback. In 2013, Anesthesia, Obstetrics-Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry residents completed a survey including questions about frequency of feedback from different professionals and its perceived value (5-point scale). The authors performed an analysis of variance to examine interactions between residency program and profession of feedback provider. They conducted follow-up interviews with a subset of residents to explore reasons for residents' survey ratings. Fifty-two percent (131/254) of residents completed the survey, and 15 participated in interviews. Eighty percent of residents reported receiving written feedback from physicians, 26% from nurses, and less than 10% from other professions. There was a significant interaction between residency program and feedback provider profession, F(21, 847) = 3.82, p feedback provider profession, F(7, 847) = 73.7, p feedback from attending physicians higher than feedback from others, and anesthesia residents rated feedback from other professionals significantly lower than other residents. Ten major themes arose from qualitative data analysis, which revealed an overall positive attitude toward interprofessional feedback and clarified reasons behind residents' perceptions and identified barriers. Insights: Residents in our study reported limited exposure to interprofessional feedback and valued such feedback less than intraprofessional feedback. However, our data suggest opportunities exist for effective utilization of interprofessional feedback.

  17. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  18. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Arzu; Topsever, Pinar; Unluoglu, Ilhami; Caylan, Ayse; Dagdeviren, Nezih; Uncu, Yesim; Mazicioğlu, Mumtaz; Ozçakir, Alis; Ozdemir, Hakan; Ersoy, Fusun

    2010-04-15

    Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27) and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11) by e-mail and by personal contact. A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%). Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e-learning. Participation in courses and congresses was considered

  19. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience.This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey.The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, p<0.05 and overall resident learning (3.60 out of 5 versus 4.61, p<0.001. Fellows rated the acquisition of teaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education.While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both

  20. Engaging Postgraduate Year-2 Pharmacy Residents in Formal Co-evaluation of Platform Presentations at a Regional Residency Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, William Allan; Ives, Amy L; Huntress, Jeff; Johnson, Mark S

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To implement and assess the perceived impact of a program designed to engage postgraduate year-2 (PGY2) pharmacy residents in formal co-evaluation of platform presentations at a regional residency conference. Design. A PGY2 formal co-evaluator program was designed and conducted over two years. Postgraduate year-2 residents were paired with a preceptor for modeling, coaching, and facilitating. To assess the perceived usefulness of this program, a 2-question presurvey and an 11-question postsurvey were distributed to participating residents. Assessment. Eighty-two residents completed the program and pre/postsurveys (response rate=94.3%). The percentage of residents who rated themselves as skilled in critically evaluating a platform presentation increased from 56.1% to 100%, while the percentage of residents who rated themselves as skilled in providing constructive feedback increased from 67.1% to 98.8%. Conclusion. This novel program, which was designed to engage PGY2 pharmacy residents in formal platform presentation co-evaluation, was well received and improved resident self-reported skills.

  1. A national survey of Canadian emergency medicine residents' comfort with geriatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Tristan; Melady, Don; Costa, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric patients represent a large and complex subgroup seen in emergency departments (EDs). Competencies in geriatric emergency medicine (EM) training have been established. Our objectives were to examine Canadian postgraduate year (PGY)-5 EM residents' comfort with the geriatric EM competency domains, assess whether Canadian EM residents become more comfortable through residency, and determine whether geriatric educational exposures are correlated with resident comfort with geriatric EM. A national, cross-sectional study of PGY-1 and PGY-5 Royal College EM residents was conducted to determine their comfort in geriatric EM clinical competency domains. Residents reported their level of comfort in satisfying each competency domain using a seven-point Likert scale. Residents were also asked about the location of their medical education as well as the type and number of different geriatric exposures that they had received to date. Of the 141 eligible residents from across Canada, 77% (109) consented to participate. None of the PGY-1 EM residents and 34% (14) of PGY-5 EM residents reported that they were comfortable with all eight geriatric EM competency domains. PGY-5 EM residents were significantly more comfortable than PGY-1 EM residents. Residents reported a highly variable range of geriatric educational exposures obtained during training. No relationship was found between resident-reported comfort and the nature or number of geriatric exposures that they had received. Current Royal College EM residency training in Canada may not be adequately preparing graduates to be comfortable with defined competencies for the care of older ED patients.

  2. Urban food environments and residents' shopping behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuscio, Carolyn C; Tappe, Karyn; Hillier, Amy; Buttenheim, Alison; Karpyn, Allison; Glanz, Karen

    2013-11-01

    Food environments may promote or undermine healthy behaviors, but questions remain regarding how individuals interact with their local food environments. This study incorporated an urban food environment audit as well as an examination of residents' food shopping behaviors within that context. In 2010, the research team audited the variety and healthfulness of foods available in 373 Philadelphia stores, using the validated Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores (NEMS-S); higher scores indicate more diverse and healthful food inventories. The team also surveyed urban residents (n=514) regarding their food shopping. Descriptive and multivariate analyses (conducted in 2012) assessed variation in retail food environments and in shoppers' store choices. Corner and convenience stores were common (78.6% of food retail outlets) and had the lowest mean NEMS-S scores of any store type. Most participants (94.5%) did their primary food shopping at higher-scoring chain supermarkets, and the majority of participants did not shop at the supermarket closest to home. Supermarket offerings varied, with significantly fewer healthful foods at supermarkets closest to the homes of disadvantaged residents. In multivariate analyses, participants were significantly more likely to shop at supermarkets closest to home if those supermarkets had higher NEMS-S scores. These data suggest that, when possible, shoppers chose supermarkets that offered more variety and more healthful foods. Findings from this study also reinforce concern regarding unhealthy immediate food environments for disadvantaged residents, who disproportionately relied on nearby stores with more limited food items. Interventions to improve nutrition and health should address not only food store proximity but also diversity of healthful foods available. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  3. [Motivation and learning strategies in pediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Carrada-Legaria, Sol; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is an internal mood that moves individuals to act, points them in certain directions, and maintains them in activities, playing a very important role in self-regulated learning and academic performance. Our objective was to evaluate motivation and self-regulation of knowledge in pediatric residents in a third-level hospital, and to determine if there are differences according to the type of specialty and sociodemographic variables. All residents who agreed to participate responded to the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Cronbach alpha was performed to determine reliability. The mean value of each subscale was compared with Student's t test or ANOVA, correlation of subscales with Pearson test. A value of p≤0.05 was considered significant. We included 118 residents. The questionnaire was highly reliable (α=0.939). There were no significant differences in motivation or learning strategies according to sex, marital status, or age. Those residents studying a second or third specialization had significantly higher scores in elaboration, critical thinking, and peer learning. There were significant correlations between intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy with the development of knowledge strategies such as elaboration, critical thinking, and metacognitive self-regulation. Our students present average-to-high scores of motivation and knowledge strategies, with a significant difference according to type of specialization. There is a high correlation between motivation and knowledge strategies.

  4. Emergency Medicine Resident Rotations Abroad: Current Status and Next Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Morris, MD, MPH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: International rotations for residents are increasingly popular, but there is a dearth of evidence to demonstrate that these rotations are safe and that residents have appropriate training and support to conduct them. Methods: A survey was sent to all U.S. emergency medicine (EM residencies with publicly available e-mail addresses. The survey documents and examines the training and support that emergency medicine residents are offered for international rotations and the frequency of adverse safety events. Results: 72.5% of program director responded that their residents are participating in rotations abroad. However, only 15.4% of programs reported offering training specific to working abroad. The results point to an increased need for specific training and insurance coverage. Conclusion: Oversight of international rotations should be improved to guarantee safety and education benefit.

  5. Improving methods of resident selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Jeremy D; Myer, Charles M; Hayes, Kay M; Myer, Charles M; Pensak, Myles L

    2010-12-01

    Applying the concept of the ACGME general competencies, it is possible to define the essential job objectives and competencies of a junior otolaryngology resident. The objective of this study is to incorporate commercially available tools of business in the identification of competencies specific to the junior otolaryngology resident and develop behavioral-based interview questions and techniques designed to identify these qualities in candidates for residency. Institution of a pilot program involving a focus group within an otolaryngology department, a professional development consultant, commercial business software for occupational analysis and personnel selection, and an interview technique training seminar for faculty and residents. In coordination with a university-based professional development consultant, a formal job analysis was conducted to define the job objectives and competencies of a junior otolaryngology resident. These results were used to generate behavioral-based interview questions for use in the resident selection process. All interviewing faculty and residents were trained in behavioral-based interviewing. Occupational objectives for the junior resident position specific to a particular university department of otolaryngology were identified. Additionally, the essential skills, areas of knowledge, and competencies were identified. Behavioral-based questions specific to the competencies were created and incorporated into the current resident selection interview. Using tools of occupational analysis and personnel selection, a list of job objectives and competencies for the junior otolaryngology resident can be created. Using these results, behavioral-based interviews may be implemented to complement traditional interviews with the ultimate goal of improving candidate selection.

  6. Multisource feedback in professionalism for anesthesia residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Ricardo; Kimatian, Stephen; Castro, Pilar; Dhumak, Vipul; Honar, Hooman; Mascha, Edward J; Sessler, Daniel I

    2016-11-01

    To assess professionalism in anesthesiology residents, it is important to obtain evaluations from people with whom they interact on daily basis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a Multisource feedback (MSF) on resident's professional behavior and to assess the effect of faculty feedback on resident performance. This study was a two-group randomized clinical trial. Residents were recruited from Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital. Participants included twenty eight residents doing a two-month rotation in Pediatric Anesthesia. Multisource feedback questionnaires were developed and then validated using face and content validity. Residents were randomly assigned to a feedback group or a control group. Both groups received the MSF evaluation. Only the group assigned to feedback had a 'coaching meeting' every month creating strategies for improvement. MSF questionnaires were validated using a face validation and expert content validity. The effect of MSF on a professionalism questionnaire was assessed using analysis of covariance and linear mixed effects regression models. Observed test-retest agreement was greater than 0.90 for all items, with more than half of kappa statistics greater than 0.50. Cronbach's alpha was 0.71.The MSF increased the self-assessment score with an estimated effect of 0.21 (95% CI 0.06, 0.37), P=.015. There was no detected effect on patient family evaluation, with mean difference (CI) in change from baseline of 0.03 (-0.15, 0.21), P=.77, faculty evaluation, 0.21 (-0.02, 0.44), P=.08, or coworker evaluation 0.13 (-0.11, 0.37). Our new multi-source feedback questionnaire to assess professionalism had good reliability and internal consistency. Using our validated questionnaire we assessed the effect of a monthly feedback to improve professionalism in anesthesia residents. While we did see improvement in anesthesiology residents' self-assessment, we did not see a similar effect on patient family, faculty or coworker

  7. Practice management education during surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kory; Lebron, Ricardo A; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2008-12-01

    Surgical education has undergone radical changes in the past decade. The introductions of laparoscopic surgery and endovascular techniques have required program directors to alter surgical training. The 6 competencies are now in place. One issue that still needs to be addressed is the business aspect of surgical practice. Often residents complete their training with minimal or no knowledge on coding of charges or basic aspects on how to set up a practice. We present our program, which has been in place over the past 2 years and is designed to teach the residents practice management. The program begins with a series of 10 lectures given monthly beginning in August. Topics include an introduction to types of practices available, negotiating a contract, managed care, and marketing the practice. Both medical and surgical residents attend these conferences. In addition, the surgical residents meet monthly with the business office to discuss billing and coding issues. These are didactic sessions combined with in-house chart reviews of surgical coding. The third phase of the practice management plan has the coding team along with the program director attend the outpatient clinic to review in real time the evaluation and management coding of clinic visits. Resident evaluations were completed for each of the practice management lectures. The responses were recorded on a Likert scale. The scores ranged from 4.1 to 4.8 (average, 4.3). Highest scores were given to lectures concerning negotiating employee agreements, recruiting contracts, malpractice insurance, and risk management. The medical education department has tracked resident coding compliance over the past 2 years. Surgical coding compliance increased from 36% to 88% over a 12-month period. The program director who participated in the educational process increased his accuracy from 50% to 90% over the same time period. When residents finish their surgical training they need to be ready to enter the world of business

  8. Competency-Based Medical Education: Can Both Junior Residents and Senior Residents Achieve Competence After a Sports Medicine Training Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sara; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-02

    Competency-based medical education as a resident-training format will move postgraduate training away from time-based training, to a model based on observable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether junior residents and senior residents could demonstrate clinical skills to a similar level, after a sports medicine rotation. All residents undertaking a three-month sports medicine rotation had to pass an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. The stations tested the fundamentals of history-taking, examination, image interpretation, differential diagnosis, informed consent, and clinical decision-making. Performance at each station was assessed with a binary station-specific checklist and an overall global rating scale, in which 1 indicated novice, 2 indicated advanced beginner, 3 indicated competent, 4 indicated proficient, and 5 indicated expert. A global rating scale was also given for each domain of knowledge. Over eighteen months, thirty-nine residents (twenty-one junior residents and eighteen senior residents) and six fellows (for a total of forty-five participants) completed the examination. With regard to junior residents and senior residents, analysis using a two-tailed t test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in both total checklist score and overall global rating scale; the mean total checklist score (and standard deviation) was 56.15% ± 10.99% for junior residents and 71.87% ± 8.94% for senior residents, and the mean global rating scale was 2.44 ± 0.55 for junior residents and 3.79 ± 0.49 for senior residents. There was a significant difference between junior residents and senior residents for each knowledge domain, with a significance of p < 0.05 for history-taking and p < 0.01 for the remainder of the domains. Despite intensive teaching within a competency-based medical education model, junior residents were not able to demonstrate knowledge as well as senior residents, suggesting that overall clinical experience

  9. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  10. [Competence perception survey among residents of orthopedics and trauma in a hospital of Yucatán México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, G; Escalante-Magaña, J R; Vargas-Mena, R

    2014-01-01

    The competence model states that what is most important is to have the elements to solve problems since abstract training does not provide enough tools to solve them. Therefore, it uses key and auxiliary competences that are linked to values such as attitudes. This study was performed to explore these competences. This is a cross sectional, observational and descriptive trial. An anonymous survey with profile data of Orthopedics and Trauma residents was given, it contained 14 questions for residents of different academic levels. 24 residents participated out of the 35 registered in the course. 100% agreed to answer the survey, 54% was in the second year, 29% in the first year and 17% in the fourth year. 75% expressed auxiliary competences, 13% did not respond, 8% developed key competences and 4% don't know. Three main factors that are a negative influence to improve the knowledge of orthopedics were expressed. The most relevant is that residents describe a bad attitude from attending physicians, lack of willingness to teach and, poor interpersonal relationships. Awareness should be raised among orthopedics specialists so they understand that having the knowledge and skills is not enough to approach health issues in a comprehensive manner for each patient and the development of better competences should be fostered, especially key competences.

  11. Introduction of handheld computing to a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Goutham

    2002-01-01

    Handheld computers are valuable practice tools. It is important for residency programs to introduce their trainees and faculty to this technology. This article describes a formal strategy to introduce handheld computing to a family practice residency program. Objectives were selected for the handheld computer training program that reflected skills physicians would find useful in practice. TRGpro handheld computers preloaded with a suite of medical reference programs, a medical calculator, and a database program were supplied to participants. Training consisted of four 1-hour modules each with a written evaluation quiz. Participants completed a self-assessment questionnaire after the program to determine their ability to meet each objective. Sixty of the 62 participants successfully completed the training program. The mean composite score on quizzes was 36 of 40 (90%), with no significant differences by level of residency training. The mean self-ratings of participants across all objectives was 3.31 of 4.00. Third-year residents had higher mean self-ratings than others (mean of group, 3.62). Participants were very comfortable with practical skills, such as using drug reference software, and less comfortable with theory, such as knowing the different types of handheld computers available. Structured training is a successful strategy for introducing handheld computing to a residency program.

  12. Residents' perspectives on the final year of medical school

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Bridget C.; Brian Niehaus; Arianne Teherani; Young, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize junior residents' perspectives on the purpose, value, and potential improvement of the final year of medical school. Methods: Eighteen interviews were conducted with junior residents who graduated from nine different medical schools and who were in internal medicine, surgery, and psychiatry programs at one institution in the United States. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed inductively for themes. Results: Participants' descriptions of the purpose of the...

  13. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  14. Contributions of nursing residency in professional practice of graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Severi Zanoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the contributions of nursing residence in professional practice of graduates. It is a descriptive study with a quantitative approach, which was to research participant nurses who attended the residence in nursing a public university located in southern Brazil. Inclusion criteria were: having completed the course in nursing residence in the study institution (2006-2011 and agree to participate in the study, approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the institution having CAAE no 0246.0.268.000-11. Data were collected through an online form, sent to graduates via email, with open and closed questions. By 2011, 90 nurses were trained in the residence arrangements in nursing offered, mostly young and newly formed. Of these, 65 (72.2% answered the form, 86.1% reported to be working, divided into care activities (64%, management (30%, education (25% and research (13%. Cited skills acquired in residence as critical view, be a transforming agent, acting as a team, using the nursing process, work in management, develop research, act ethically, among others. Highlighted suggestions for possible changes in the specialization program in order to meet the shortcomings faced. The residence proved to be of great contribution to the development of most of the professional skills required of nurses, and therefore a training service offering educational support and various practices, making the resident a critical professional, capable of resolving more solutions and to provide the dissemination of knowledge through scientific production.

  15. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one's work is valued and rotations in family medicine. The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors.

  16. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Joseph A; Daniels, Alan H; Akelman, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training.

  17. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  18. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  19. Effect of minimally invasive surgery fellowship on residents' operative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Frenkel, Catherine; Scriven, Richard; Thornton, Deborah; Halbert, Caitlin; Talamini, Mark; Telem, Dana A; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased need for surgical trainees to acquire advanced laparoscopic skills as laparoscopy becomes the standard of care in many areas of general surgery. Since the introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) fellowships, there has been a continuing debate as to whether these fellowships adversely affect general surgery resident exposure to laparoscopic cases. The aim of our study was to examine whether the introduction of an MIS fellowship negatively impacts general surgery residents' experience at a single academic center. We describe the changes following establishment of MIS fellowship at an academic center. Resident case log system from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was queried to obtain all PGY 1-5 resident operative case logs. Two-year time period preceding and following the institution of an MIS fellowship at our institution in 2012 was compared. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Following initiation of the MIS fellowship, an MIS service was established. The service comprised of a fellow, midlevel resident, and intern. Operative experience was examined. From 2010-2012 to 2012-2014, residents logged a total of 272 and 585 complex laparoscopic cases, respectively. There were 43 residents from 2010 to 2013 and 44 residents from 2013 to 2014. When the two time periods were compared, a trend of increased numbers for all procedures was noted, except laparoscopic GYN/genito-urinary procedures. Average percent increase in complex general surgery procedures was 249 ± 179.8 %. Following establishment of a MIS fellowship, reported cases by residents were higher or similar to those reported nationally for laparoscopic procedures. Institution of an MIS fellowship had a favorable effect on general surgery resident operative education at a single academic training center. Residents may benefit from the presence of a fellowship at an academic center because they are able to participate in an

  20. Factors affecting orthopedic residency selection: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelzow, Jason; Petretta, Robert; Broekhuyse, Henry M

    2017-06-01

    Annually, orthopedic residency programs rank and recruit the best possible candidates. Little evidence exists identifying factors that potential candidates use to select their career paths. Recent literature from nonsurgical programs suggests hospital, social and program-based factors influence program selection. We sought to determine what factors influence the choice of an orthopedic career and a candidate's choice of orthopedic residency program. We surveyed medical student applicants to orthopedic programs and current Canadian orthopedic surgery residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-5). The confidential online survey focused on 3 broad categories of program selection: educational, program cohesion and noneducation factors. Questions were graded on a Likert Scale and tailed for mean scores. In total, 139 residents from 11 of 17 Canadian orthopedic programs (49% response rate) and 23 medical student applicants (88% response rate) completed our survey. Orthopedic electives and mandatory rotations were reported by 71% of participants as somewhat or very important to their career choice. Collegiality among residents (4.70 ± 0.6), program being the "right fit" (4.65 ± 0.53) and current resident satisfaction with their chosen program (4.63 ±0.66) were ranked with the highest mean scores on a 5-point Likert scale. There are several modifiable factors that residency programs may use to attract applicants, including early availability of clerkship rotations and a strong mentorship environment emphasizing both resident-resident and resident-staff cohesion. Desirable residency programs should develop early access to surgical and operative skills. These must be balanced with a continued emphasis on top-level orthopedic training.

  1. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  2. Incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Natalie; Snider, Holly; Edgerton, Lisa; Whalin, Laurie

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs at a community teaching hospital is described. New Hanover Regional Medical Center, a community teaching hospital in southeastern North Carolina, fully adopted a lean culture in 2010. Given the success of lean strategies organizationally, this methodology was used to assist with the evaluation and development of its pharmacy residency programs in 2014. Lean tools and activities have also been incorporated into residency requirements and rotation learning activities. The majority of lean events correspond to the required competency areas evaluating leadership and management, teaching, and education. These events have included participation in and facilitation of various lean problem-solving and communication tools. The application of the 4 rules of lean has resulted in enhanced management of the programs and provides a set of tools by which continual quality improvement can be ensured. Regular communication and direct involvement of all invested parties have been critical in developing and sustaining new improvements. In addition to program enhancements, lean methodology offers novel methods by which residents may be incorporated into leadership activities. The incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs has translated into a variety of realized and potential benefits for the programs, the preceptors and residents, and the health system. Specific areas of growth have included quality-improvement processes, the expansion of leadership opportunities for residents, and improved communication among program directors, preceptors, and residents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. U.S. medical resident familiarity with national tuberculosis guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakousis, Petros C; Sifakis, Frangiscos G; de Oca, Ruben Montes; Amorosa, Valerianna C; Page, Kathleen R; Manabe, Yukari C; Campbell, James D

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability of medical residents training at U.S. urban medical centers to diagnose and manage tuberculosis cases has important public health implications. We assessed medical resident knowledge about tuberculosis diagnosis and early management based on American Thoracic Society guidelines. Methods A 20-question tuberculosis knowledge survey was administered to 131 medical residents during a single routinely scheduled teaching conference at four different urban medical centers in Baltimore and Philadelphia. Survey questions were divided into 5 different subject categories. Data was collected pertaining to institution, year of residency training, and self-reported number of patients managed for tuberculosis within the previous year. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to detect differences in median percent of questions answered correctly based on these variables. Results The median percent of survey questions answered correctly for all participating residents was 55%. Medical resident knowledge about tuberculosis did not improve with increasing post-graduate year of training or greater number of patients managed for tuberculosis within the previous year. Common areas of knowledge deficiency included the diagnosis and management of latent tuberculosis infection (median percent correct, 40.7%), as well as the interpretation of negative acid-fast sputum smear samples. Conclusion Many medical residents lack adequate knowledge of recommended guidelines for the management of tuberculosis. Since experience during training influences future practice pattterns, education of medical residents on guidelines for detection and early management of tuberculosis may be important for future improvements in national tuberculosis control strategies. PMID:17678548

  4. Introducing resident doctors to complexity in ambulatory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Beckman, Thomas J; Thomas, Kris G; Thompson, Warren G

    2008-08-01

    Medical education instructional methods typically imply one 'best' management approach. Our objectives were to develop and evaluate an intervention to enhance residents' appreciation for the diversity of acceptable approaches when managing complex patients. A total of 124 internal medicine residents enrolled in a randomised, crossover trial. Residents completed four web-based modules in ambulatory medicine during continuity clinic. For each module we developed three 'complex cases'. Cases were intended to be complex (numerous variables, including psychosocial and economic barriers) and to suggest multiple acceptable management strategies. Several experienced faculty members described how they would manage each case. Residents reviewed each case, answered the same questions, and compared their responses with expert responses. Participants were randomly assigned to complete two modules with, and two modules without complex cases. A total of 76 residents completed 279 complex cases. Residents agreed that complex cases enhanced their appreciation for the diversity of 'correct' options (mean +/- standard error of the mean 4.6 +/- 0.2 [1 = strongly disagree, 6 = strongly agree]; P complex cases (95% confidence interval for difference - 4.0 to 0.3; P = 0.09). Resident comments suggested that lack of time and cognitive overload impeded learning. Residents felt complex cases made a valuable contribution to their learning, although preference was neutral and knowledge scores were not affected. Methods to facilitate trainee comfort in managing medically complex patients should be further explored.

  5. Residents' perception of skill decay during dedicated research time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Ray, Rebecca D; Jenewein, Caitlin G; Jones, Grace F; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-11-01

    Surgery residents may take years away from clinical responsibilities for dedicated research time. As part of a longitudinal project, the study aim was to investigate residents' perceptions of clinical skill reduction during dedicated research time. Our hypothesis was that residents would perceive a greater potential reduction in skill during research time for procedures they were less confident in performing. Surgical residents engaged in dedicated research training at multiple training programs participated in four simulated procedures: urinary catheterization, subclavian central line, bowel anastomosis, and laparoscopic ventral hernia (LVH) repair. Using preprocedure and postprocedure surveys, participants rated procedures for confidence and difficulty. Residents also indicated the perceived level of skills reduction for the four procedures as a result of time in the laboratory. Thirty-eight residents (55% female) completed the four clinical simulators. Participants had between 0-36 mo in a laboratory (M = 9.29 mo, standard deviation = 9.38). Preprocedure surveys noted lower confidence and higher perceived difficulty for performing the LVH repair followed by bowel anastomosis, central line insertion, and urinary catheterization (P perception for urinary catheterization (P perception and may provide a mechanism for maintaining skills and keeping confidence grounded in experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [How are resident physicians evaluated? The residents' computerized activity record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador; Artigau Nieto, Eva; Rebasa Cladera, Pere; Hernando Tavira, Rubén; Moreno Matías, Juan; Aparicio Rodríguez, Oscar; Hermoso Bosch, Judit; Montmany Vioque, Sandra

    2006-09-01

    Because of the developments that have occurred in surgery in the last few years, updates are required not only in the content of resident physicians' training but also in evaluation of the knowledge acquired. The present article aims to present our experience of an integral evaluation model. This model is based on evaluation of theoretical knowledge and surgical skills. The training program for resident physicians (medico interno residente [MIR]) has four main branches: clinical work, continuing training, research (doctorate) and evaluation of the activity performed (computerized activity record). This record allows the theoretical knowledge and skills acquired to be evaluated at the end of each rotation. Through 6-monthly evaluations, each resident's activity can be quantified over time and compared with that of other residents. The system was introduced in July 2004. Each resident was given his or her own database. All the activities performed were then introduced into the database. The results of overall activity and that of each resident are presented. The method used allows residents' integral progress to be followed-up and a completely objective evaluation to be made at the end of each year and at the end of the residency period. Widespread use of this system, or a similar system, would enable comparisons with other centers to be made under similar premises. This system could also help to unify criteria and identify deviations in training.

  7. No time to think: making room for reflection in obstetrics and gynecology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Abigail F; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Mark J; Ratan, Rini B

    2010-12-01

    Reflective practice may help physicians identify and connect with what they value and find meaningful in their work. There are many practical obstacles in teaching narrative skills and reflection to residents in surgical subspecialties. We aimed to assess the feasibility of designing and implementing a writing workshop series within an obstetrics and gynecology curriculum. Between 2008 and 2009, a reflective writing workshop series was introduced into the didactic curriculum of an obstetrics and gynecology residency program. The course included reading fiction and creative writing. Workshops focused on topics residents identified. Residents answered a subjective questionnaire and also completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Interpersonal Reactivity Index to assess burnout and empathy. Six 1-hour reflective writing workshops took place within the dedicated didactic time for residents. Of the 20 residents in the program, 10 junior residents and 8 senior residents evaluated the workshops. Ten residents participated in more than one workshop, an average of 3.6 workshops. Residents felt that the workshops were enjoyable, and some felt that they influenced their experience of residency, but few felt that it affected their work with patients. Trends in Maslach Burnout Inventory and Interpersonal Reactivity Index scores did not show statistical significance. A practical curriculum for introducing reflective practice to obstetrics and gynecology residents is described. This model may be useful to educators looking to incorporate reflective practice into residency curricula and lead to collaborative work that may assess the impact of this work on the experience of residents and their patients.

  8. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  9. The Urology Residency Program in Israel—Results of a Residents Survey and Insights for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Lavi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Urology practice has undergone several changes in recent years mainly related to novel technologies introduced. We aimed to get the residents’ perspective on the current residency program in Israel and propose changes in it. Methods A web-based survey was distributed among urology residents. Results 61 residents completed the survey out of 95 to whom it was sent (64% compliance. A total of 30% replied that the 9 months of mandatory general surgery rotation contributed to their training, 48% replied it should be shortened/canceled, and 43% replied that the Step A exam (a mandatory written certifying exam in general surgery was relevant to their training. A total of 37% thought that surgical exposure during the residency was adequate, and 28% considered their training “hands-on.” Most non-junior residents (post-graduate year 3 and beyond reported being able to perform simple procedures such as circumcision and transurethral resections but not complex procedures such as radical and laparoscopic procedures. A total of 41% of non-junior residents practice at a urology clinic. A total of 62% of residents from centers with no robotics replied its absence harmed their training, and 85% replied they would benefit from a robotics rotation. A total of 61% of residents from centers with robotics replied its presence harmed their training, and 72% replied they would benefit from an open surgery rotation. A total of 82% of the residents participated in post-graduate courses, and 81% replied they would engage in a clinical fellowship. Conclusion Given the survey results we propose some changes to be considered in the residency program. These include changes in the general surgery rotation and exam, better surgical training, possible exchange rotations to expose residents to robotic and open surgery (depending on the availability of robotics in their center, greater out-patient urology clinic exposure, and possible changes in the basic science

  10. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  11. The Preferred Learning Styles of Neurosurgeons, Neurosurgery Residents, and Neurology Residents: Implications in the Neurosurgical Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2014-01-01

    To delineate the learning style that best defines a successful practitioner in the field of neurosurgery by using a validated learning style inventory. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, a validated assessment tool, was administered to all practicing neurosurgeons, neurosurgical residents, and neurology residents employed at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, an institution that provides primary and tertiary clinical care in 3 locations, Linkou, Kaohsiung, and Chiayi. There were 81 participants who entered the study, and all completed the study. Neurosurgeons preferred the assimilating learning style (52%), followed by the diverging learning style (39%). Neurosurgery residents were slightly more evenly distributed across the learning styles; however, they still favored assimilating (32%) and diverging (41%). Neurology residents had the most clearly defined preferred learning style with assimilating (76%) obtaining the large majority and diverging (12%) being a distant second. The assimilating and diverging learning styles are the preferred learning styles among neurosurgeons, neurosurgery residents, and neurology residents. The assimilating learning style typically is the primary learning style for neurosurgeons and neurology residents. Neurosurgical residents start off with a diverging learning style and progress toward an assimilating learning style as they work toward becoming practicing neurosurgeons. The field of neurosurgery has limited opportunities for active experimentation, which may explain why individuals who prefer reflective observation are more likely to succeed in this field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  13. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  14. Residents' response to bleeding during a simulated robotic surgery task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica L; Nathwani, Jay N; Mohamadipanah, Hossein; Laufer, Shlomi; Jocewicz, Frank F; Gwillim, Eran; Pugh, Carla M

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess performance measurement validity of our newly developed robotic surgery task trainer. We hypothesized that residents would exhibit wide variations in their intercohort performance as well as a measurable difference compared to surgeons in fellowship training. Our laboratory synthesized a model of a pelvic tumor that simulates unexpected bleeding. Surgical residents and fellows of varying specialties completed a demographic survey and were allowed 20 minutes to resect the tumor using the da Vinci robot and achieve hemostasis. At a standardized event in the simulation, venous bleeding began, and participants attempted hemostasis using suture ligation. A motion tracking system, using electromagnetic sensors, recorded participants' hand movements. A postparticipation Likert scale survey evaluated participants' assessment of the model's realism and usefulness. Three of the seven residents (postgraduate year 2-5), and the fellow successfully resected the tumor in the allotted time. Residents showed high variability in performance and blood loss (125-700 mL) both within their cohort and compared to the fellow (150 mL blood). All participants rated the model as having high realism and utility for trainees. The results support that our bleeding pelvic tumor simulator has the ability to discriminate resident performance in robotic surgery. The combination of motion, decision-making, and blood loss metrics offers a multilevel performance assessment, analyzing both technical and decision-making abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reviewing residents' competence: a qualitative study of the role of clinical competency committees in performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; Chesluk, Benjamin; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric; Baron, Robert B; Boscardin, Christy K; Cate, Olle Ten; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2015-08-01

    Clinical competency committees (CCCs) are now required in graduate medical education. This study examined how residency programs understand and operationalize this mandate for resident performance review. In 2013, the investigators conducted semistructured interviews with 34 residency program directors at five public institutions in California, asking about each institution's CCCs and resident performance review processes. They used conventional content analysis to identify major themes from the verbatim interview transcripts. The purpose of resident performance review at all institutions was oriented toward one of two paradigms: a problem identification model, which predominated; or a developmental model. The problem identification model, which focused on identifying and addressing performance concerns, used performance data such as red-flag alerts and informal information shared with program directors to identify struggling residents.In the developmental model, the timely acquisition and synthesis of data to inform each resident's developmental trajectory was challenging. Participants highly valued CCC members' expertise as educators to corroborate the identification of struggling residents and to enhance credibility of the committee's outcomes. Training in applying the milestones to the CCC's work was minimal.Participants were highly committed to performance review and perceived the current process as adequate for struggling residents but potentially not for others. Institutions orient resident performance review toward problem identification; a developmental approach is uncommon. Clarifying the purpose of resident performance review and employing efficient information systems that synthesize performance data and engage residents and faculty in purposeful feedback discussions could enable the meaningful implementation of milestones-based assessment.

  16. [Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Young-Mee; Chang, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Ae-Ri

    2015-09-01

    The core curriculum in graduate medical education (GME) is an educational program that covers the minimum body of knowledge and skills that is required of all residents, regardless of their specialty. This study examined the opinions of stakeholders in GME regarding the core curriculum. A questionnaire was administered at three tertiary hospitals that were affiliated with one university; 192 residents and 61 faculty members and attending physicians participated in the survey. The questionnaire comprised six items on physician competency and the needs for a core curriculum. Questions on subjects or topics and adequate training years for each topics were asked only to residents. Most residents (78.6%) and faculty members (86.9%) chose "medical expertise" as the "doctor's role in the 21st century." In contrast, communicator, manager, and collaborator were recognized by less than 30% of all participants. Most residents (74.1%) responded that a core curriculum is "necessary but not feasible," whereas 68.3% of faculty members answered that it is "absolutely needed." Regarding subjects that should be included in the core curriculum, residents and faculty members had disparate preferences- residents preferred more "management of a private clinic" and "financial management," whereas faculty members desired "medical ethics" and "communication skills." Residents and faculty members agree that residents should develop a wide range of competencies in their training. However, the perception of the feasibility and opinions on the contents of the core curriculum differed between groups. Further studies with larger samples should be conducted to define the roles and professional competencies of physicians and the needs for a core curriculum in GME.

  17. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Assessment of Grit, Conscientiousness, and Self-Control in Applicants Interviewing for Residency Positions and Current Orthopaedic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne M; Townsend, Kimberly W; Davis, Shauna; Nouryan, Lola; Bostrom, Mathias P G; Felix, Karla J

    2017-09-27

    The purpose of this study was to quantify grit, conscientiousness, and self-control in orthopaedic residency applicants and current orthopaedic surgery residents. As part of a continual reassessment of the selection process, this study will help to improve this process by assessing the introduction of these non-cognitive assessments. This is the first study to both evaluate and compare the applicants' scores to those of current residents. This introduction will allow selection of not only the current top performers but those who have the wherewithal (read grit) to sustain their efforts throughout their residency. A cross-sectional study composed of a confidential electronic survey consisting of a 17-item Grit scale, 10-item Self-control scale, and 9-item Conscientiousness scale was completed by medical school applicants and orthopaedic residents. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery. Fifty-six (100%) medical student applicants (mean age = 27) were invited to participate in our study following a full day of interviews. Forty-five residents (mean age = 31) were asked and 32 (72%) completed the same surveys 4 months later. There was a significant difference in grit for medical students (M = 4.19, SD = 0.34) and residents (M =3.86, SD = 0.48); t(86) = 3.76, p = 0.000. All grit subscales were also significantly different for medical students versus residents. Medical students (conscientiousness M = 4.60, SD = 0.41; self-control M = 3.51, SD = 0.30) and residents (conscientiousness M = 4.42, SD = 0.53; self-control M = 3.31, SD = 0.73) scored similarly in the conscientiousness t(86) = 1.75, p = 0.084 and self-control scales t(86) = 1.74, p = 0.086. Academic performance indicators such as the USMLE scores and residency ranking were also compared among medical student applicants. The similar and above average levels of conscientiousness and self-control demonstrate the persevering nature of the individual who elects to pursue an orthopaedic

  19. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  20. Do changes in residents' fear of crime impact their walking? Longitudinal results from RESIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Sarah; Knuiman, Matthew; Hooper, Paula; Christian, Hayley; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2014-05-01

    To examine the influence of fear of crime on walking for participants in a longitudinal study of residents in new suburbs. Participants (n=485) in Perth, Australia, completed a questionnaire about three years after moving to their neighbourhood (2007-2008), and again four years later (2011-2012). Measures included fear of crime, neighbourhood perceptions and walking (min/week). Objective environmental measures were generated for each participant's neighbourhood, defined as the 1600 m road network distance from home, at each time-point. Linear regression models examined the impact of changes in fear of crime on changes in walking, with progressive adjustment for other changes in the built environment, neighbourhood perceptions and demographics. An increase in fear of crime was associated with a decrease in residents' walking inside the local neighbourhood. For each increase in fear of crime (i.e., one level on a five-point Likert scale) total walking decreased by 22 min/week (p=0.002), recreational walking by 13 min/week (p=0.031) and transport walking by 7 min/week (p=0.064). This study provides longitudinal evidence that changes in residents' fear of crime influence their walking behaviours. Interventions that reduce fear of crime are likely to increase walking and produce public health gains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Profile of chloroquine - induced pruritus in Nigerian children resident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroquine is still the first-line drug in the treatment of malaria in Nigeria and West- Africa sub-region. A major drawback to the use of chloroquine is pruritus. We studied a total of 175 children aged 1–15 years with a view to assessing some factors that may influence chloroquine induced pruritus and the possible impact on ...

  2. National Survey Regarding the Importance of Leadership in PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jonathan C; Girnys, Jonathan P

    2015-11-01

    Leadership is considered a professional obligation for all pharmacists. It is important to integrate leadership training in residency programs to meet the leadership needs and requirements of the profession. To evaluate the importance of leadership development during postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy practice residency training as perceived by new practitioners. A 15-question online survey was distributed to residency-trained new practitioners to assess (1) amount of time dedicated to leadership training during residency training, (2) different leadership tools utilized, (3) residents' participation in various committees or councils, (4) perceived benefit of increased leadership training, (5) importance of having a mentor, (6) understanding of the residency organization's strategic objectives, (7) discussion of Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) during residency training, and (8) adequacy of leadership training in preparation to become a pharmacy practice leader. Although the majority of resident respondents had less than 20% of their residency devoted to leadership, nearly all survey participants acknowledged that leadership is an important component of PGY1 residency training. Residents agreed that their residency experience would have benefited from increased leadership opportunities. Most residents were knowledgeable about their organization's strategic objectives but did not have a full understanding of pharmacy initiatives such as the PPMI. Feedback from residents indicates that an optimal dedication to leadership training would range between 20% and 30% of the residency year. Increased focus on PPMI, mentorship, and expanded use of leadership tools can serve as a way to help meet the future leadership needs of the pharmacy profession and help to better prepare residents to become pharmacy practice leaders.

  3. Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the socio-cultural factors influencing women's participation in sports as perceived by female undergraduates in the University of Ilorin. Two hundred female undergraduate students residing in school halls of residence were involved in the study. These were selected using simple randomsampling.

  4. SMART-R: A Prospective Cohort Study of a Resilience Curriculum for Residents by Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukos, Deanna; Chad-Friedman, Emma; Mehta, Darshan H; Byerly, Laura; Celik, Alper; McCoy, Thomas H; Denninger, John W

    2017-11-02

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of a resident-led resiliency curriculum developed by residents, for residents. The Stress Management and Resiliency Training Program for Residents (SMART-R) is a 6-h group-based curriculum that teaches meditation, behavioral skills, and positive perspective-taking strategies. SMART-R was implemented for all medicine and psychiatry interns at a large US teaching hospital during the first 6 months of internship. Risk and resilience factors for burnout were assessed before and after the curriculum. A wearable health-tracking device was used to assess feasibility of wearables for studying resident health behaviors. All 73 medicine and 17 psychiatry interns participated in the SMART-R curriculum. Seventy-five of 85 interns (88%) consented to be in the study. Thirty-one of 75 (41%) completed both baseline and post surveys of risk and resilience factors for burnout. Preliminary curriculum feedback was enthusiastic. Twenty-five of 62 (40%) wore the health tracker more than half the time in the first 3 months of the study. Implementation of a resident-led resiliency curriculum for internal medicine and psychiatry interns at an academic medical center during the most challenging first months of internship is feasible. Future controlled studies are needed to determine efficacy of SMART-R on risk and resilience factors. Over the first 6 months of internship, we observed an expected increase in burnout, fatigue, and depression, though other key risk and resilience factors were unchanged.

  5. Opening Residents' Notes to Patients: A Qualitative Study of Resident and Faculty Physician Attitudes on Open Notes Implementation in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Bradley H; Anselmo, Melissa; Clarke, Deserae N; Famiglio, Linda M; Flier, Lydia; Green, Jamie A; Leveille, Suzanne; Mejilla, Roanne; Stametz, Rebecca A; Thompson, Michelle; Walker, Jan; Bell, Sigall K

    2016-03-01

    OpenNotes is a growing national initiative inviting patients to read clinician progress notes (open notes) through a secure electronic portal. The goals of this study were to (1) identify resident and faculty preceptor attitudes about sharing notes with patients, and (2) assess specific educational needs, policy recommendations, and approaches to facilitate open notes implementation. This was a qualitative study using focus groups with residents and faculty physicians who supervise residents, representing primary care, general surgery, surgical and procedural specialties, and nonprocedural specialties, from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Geisinger Health System in spring 2013. Data were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, then coded and organized into themes. Thirty-six clinicians (24 [66.7%] residents and 12 [33.3%] faculty physicians) participated. Four main themes emerged: (1) implications of full transparency, (2) note audiences and ideology, (3) trust between patients and doctors, and (4) time pressures. Residents and faculty discussed how open notes might yield more engaged patients and better notes but were concerned about the time needed to edit notes and respond to patient inquiries. Residents were uncertain how much detail they should share with patients and were concerned about the potential to harm the patient-doctor relationship. Residents and faculty offered several recommendations for open notes implementation. Overall, participants were ambivalent about resident participation in open notes. Residents and faculty identified clinical and educational benefits to open notes but were concerned about potential effects on the patient-doctor relationship, requirements for oversight, and increased workload and burnout.

  6. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Syed T.; Crawford, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates. PMID:28725766

  7. General surgery training and robotics: Are residents improving their skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Brendan M; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Aronova, Anna; Fahey, Thomas J; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2016-02-01

    While robotic-assisted operations have become more prevalent, many general surgery residencies do not have a formal robotic training curriculum. We sought to ascertain how well current general surgery training permits acquisition of robotic skills by comparing robotic simulation performance across various training levels. Thirty-six participants were categorized by level of surgical training: eight medical students (MS), ten junior residents (JR), ten mid-level residents (MLR), and eight senior residents (SR). Participants performed three simulation tasks on the da Vinci (®) Skills Simulator (MatchBoard, EnergyDissection, SutureSponge). Each task's scores (0-100) and cumulative scores (0-300) were compared between groups. There were no differences in sex, hand dominance, video gaming history, or prior robotic experience between groups; however, SR was the oldest (p surgery residency show minimal improvement during the course of training, although laparoscopic experience is correlated with advanced robotic task performance. Changes in residency curricula or pursuit of fellowship training may be warranted for surgeons seeking proficiency.

  8. Communication skills of residents to families with Down syndrome babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Derya G; Kutluturk, Yesim; Kivilcim, Meltem; Canaloglu, Sinem K

    2016-12-01

    Generally, pediatricians are the first health caregivers to deliver initial diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS) to the families. However, most of the parents are not satisfied with the contents and how they receive information when their child is born with DS. Pediatric residents should target educational interventions to help parents to overcome with these issues and to provide accurate information. The objective is to assess comfort levels and training requirements of pediatric residents to communicate with parents of babies born with Down syndrome. Diagnostic Situations Inventory (DSI) is a rating scale which included ten questions to assess discomfort level. A survey was sent via mobile, websites and all the social media which were available to all pediatrics residents in the country. Socio-demographic factors including information about training requirement were collected as well. From the 326 participants, total mean discomfort level was 30.22 in DSI out of 50 which was the highest score. Discomfort level was significantly increased in female participants (p= 0.033). Being female (p= 0.014), having less residency level (p= 0.028), examining less number of patients with Down syndrome (p= 0.025) and having higher discomfort levels (p= 0.001) were found to be related with increased training requirement. From the residents, 84% declared the need for additional training. This study showed that pediatric residents had a high level of discomfort when communicating with parentes of newborn with Down Syndrome. Female residentes had a discomfort level significantly higher than male residentes.

  9. [Experiences of bullying in medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-León, Silvia; Jaimes-Medrano, Aurora Leonila; Tafoya-Ramos, Silvia Aracely; Mujica-Amaya, María Luisa; Olmedo-Canchola, Víctor Hugo; Carrasco-Rojas, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Harassment and abuse are forms of persistent intimidating behavior against a person and in medical practice those are accepted and justified at all levels of education and are considered specific to the hospital culture. To identify the frequency of harassment and some factors related to its existence on residents of medical specialties in Mexico City. A linear study was carried out in which a total of 260 interns pertaining to the following medical specialties: surgery, internal medicine, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics participated. The study took place in three general hospitals in Mexico City. Two evaluations with Leymann Inventory of Psychological-Terrorization (LIPT-60) with 6 months between assessments were performed. Comparison between the first and second evaluations did not show differences in any of the harassment measurements obtained. Of all residents, 265 (98.5%) claimed to have experienced some type of harassing behavior against them at least once during the previous 6 months, with a 1.4 (±0.5) average intensity, showing no difference between men and women. Women received a higher grade than men on the communication block scale. Harassing behaviors that obtained the highest average values were evident intimidation and occupational discredit. Among all harassment measurements, the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics showed the highest grade. The hospital influenced the reported harassment. The most common harassing behaviors were occupational discredit, verbal threats, shouting, and mockery. The high frequency of harassment that medical residents experience during their hospital training deserves our attention.

  10. Communication skills training for emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Orhan; Ak, Mehmet; Sutcigil, Levent; Congologlu, Emel Dovyap; Canbaz, Hayri; Kilic, Erden; Ozmenler, Kamil Nahit

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of a communication skills training program on emergency medicine residents and patient satisfaction. Twenty emergency medicine residents attended a 6-week psychoeducation program that was intended to improve their communication skills. The first three sessions of the psychoeducation program consisted of theoretical education on empathy and communication. Other sessions covered awareness, active communication, and empathic skills on a cognitive behavioral basis using discussion, role play, and homework within an interactive group. The effects of the program were assessed using a communication skills scale, empathy scale, and patient satisfaction survey and were reflected by the reduction in the number of undesirable events between doctors and patients in the emergency department. The mean communication skills score increased from 178.7±19 to 189.2±16 after training (Pkindness, and thoughtfulness (90.3±10.8-94.1±16.5; P<0.01); individualized attention (86.7±9.4-93.9±11.1; P<0.01); devotion of adequate time to listening (88.6±12.3-90.8±14.1; P=0.04); and counseling and information delivery (90.1±11.3-92.2±11.7; P=0.02). The number of undesirable events between doctors and patients decreased 75% from 12 to three. Participation in a communication skills training program was associated with improved communication skills of emergency medicine residents, increased patient satisfaction, and decreased complaints.

  11. MOTIVES FOR PARTICIPATION IN SPORT ACTIVITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Pori; Primož Pori

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research was to establish the rankings of motives for participation in sport activities in Slovenia. In order to attain as representative opinions of the Slovenes as possible, we used an adjusted quota sample (n = 1685), corresponding to the Slovene population with respect to the place of residence, gender, age, and education. The data was obtained with direct surveying. The subjects were asked the question of importance of individual motives (n = 25) for participation in...

  12. Residents' and faculty's beliefs about the ideal clinical teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiromi; Hitchcock, Maurice A

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine how residents and faculty in family medicine compare in their beliefs about ideal clinical teaching. We studied 205 residents and 148 faculty in family medicine who completed the Clinical Teaching Perception Inventory (CTPI) online between April 2001 and July 2008. The participants ranked 28 single-word descriptors that characterized clinical teachers along a 7-point-scale ranging from "least like my ideal teacher" to "most like my ideal teacher." Both residents and faculty indicated that the ideal clinical teachers should be stimulating, encouraging, competent, and communicating and should not be conventional, cautious, or controlling. However, residents rated probing and innovative significantly lower than did faculty. Clinical faculty and residents in family medicine have a shared view of the ideal clinical teacher. However, residents and faculty differed in their ratings on the descriptors "Probing" and "Innovative." This difference might at least in part stem from where residents and faculty are located along a continuum from novice to mature expert.

  13. A patient safety education program in a medical physics residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Nyflot, Matthew; Spraker, Matthew B; Kane, Gabrielle; Hendrickson, Kristi R G

    2017-11-01

    Education in patient safety and quality of care is a requirement for radiation oncology residency programs according to accrediting agencies. However, recent surveys indicate that most programs lack a formal program to support this learning. The aim of this report was to address this gap and share experiences with a structured educational program on quality and safety designed specifically for medical physics therapy residencies. Five key topic areas were identified, drawn from published recommendations on safety and quality. A didactic component was developed, which includes an extensive reading list supported by a series of lectures. This was coupled with practice-based learning which includes one project, for example, failure modes and effect analysis exercise, and also continued participation in the departmental incident learning system including a root-cause analysis exercise. Performance was evaluated through quizzes, presentations, and reports. Over the period of 2014-2016, five medical physics residents successfully completed the program. Evaluations indicated that the residents had a positive experience. In addition to educating physics residents this program may be adapted for medical physics graduate programs or certificate programs, radiation oncology residencies, or as a self-directed educational project for practicing physicists. Future directions might include a system that coordinates between medical training centers such as a resident exchange program. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. [The burnout syndrome in medical residents working long periods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Morales, Arturo; González-Velázquez, Felipe; Morales-Guzmán, Margarita Isabel; Espinoza-Martínez, Carlos Ernesto

    2007-01-01

    to evaluate the burnout syndrome in medical residents with working periods longer than 80 hours per week. an analytical cross-sectional study was conducted with medical residents working at Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social hospital in Veracruz, México. The residents were classified in two groups. One group working for > or = 80 h per week (study group, SG) and another group working < 80 h per week (comparison group, CG) were studied. Participants were selected by simple random sampling. The clinical evaluation instrument was the scale of Maslach burnout inventory. 143 medical residents were included in the sample (SG n = 72, CG n = 71); the average age was 29.6 +/- 2.5 years, 65 % were males and 51 % were unmarried. Their length of service was 2.2 +/- 0.7 years. The mean working time was 100.5 +/- 7.2 hours per week for the SG and 64.4 +/- 9.3 hours for the CG. Burnout syndrome was present in 46 (63.8 %) medical residents with long workdays (p = 0.002); it was observed more frequently in those residents that were on call 3 times per week (p = 0.002) and among surgery residents (p = 0.035). working periods longer than 80 h per week are related to the appearance of burnout syndrome.

  15. An assessment of emotional intelligence in emergency medicine resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Linder, Kathryn; Shah, Anuj; London, Kory Scott; Chandra, Shruti; Naples, Robin

    2017-12-27

    To define the emotional intelligence (EI) profile of emergency medicine (EM) residents, and identify resident EI strengths and weaknesses. First-, second-, and third-year residents (post-graduate years [PGY] 1, 2, and 3, respectively) of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's EM Program completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i 2.0), a validated instrument offered by Multi-Health Systems. Reported scores included total mean EI, 5 composite scores, and 15 subscales of EI. Scores are reported as means with 95% CIs. The unpaired, two-sample t-test was used to evaluate differences in means. Thirty-five residents completed the assessment (response rate 97.2%). Scores were normed to the general population (mean 100, SD 15). Total mean EI for the cohort was 103 (95%CI,100-108). EI was higher in female (107) than male (101) residents. PGY-2s demonstrated the lowest mean EI (95) versus PGY-1s (104) and PGY-3s (110). The difference in PGY-3 EI (110; 95%CI,103-116) and PGY-1 EI (95, 95%CI,87-104) was statistically significant (unpaired t-test, pself-expression. Further study is required to ascertain if patterns in level of training are idiosyncratic or relate to the natural maturation of residents.

  16. [Competency-based Neurosurgery Residency Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Jiménez Roldan, Luis; Alen, José F; Castaño, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A programme proposal for competency-based Neurosurgery training adapted to the specialization project is presented. This proposal has been developed by a group of neurosurgeons commissioned by the SENEC (Spanish Society of Neurosurgery) and could be modified to generate a final version that could come into force coinciding with the implementation of the specialization programme. This document aims to facilitate the test of the new programme included in the online version of our journal. Total training period is 6 years; initial 2 years belong to the surgery specialization and remaining 4 years belong to core specialty period. It is a competency-based programmed based on the map used by the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) including the following domains of clinical competency: Medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, health systems, interprofessional collaboration and professional and personal development. Subcompetencies map in the domains of Knowledge and Patient care (including surgical competencies) was adapted to the one proposed by AANS and CNS (annex 1 of the programme). A subcompetency map was also used for the specialization rotations. Resident's training is based on personal study (self-learning) supported by efficient use of information sources and supervised clinical practice, including bioethical instruction, clinical management, research and learning techniques. Resident evaluation proposal includes, among other instruments, theoretical knowledge tests, objective and structured evaluation of the level of clinical competency with real or standardised patients, global competency scales, 360-degree evaluation, clinical record audits, milestones for residents progress and self-assessment (annex 2). Besides, residents periodically assess the teaching commitment of the department's neurosurgeons and other professors participating in rotations, and annually

  17. Does rural residence limit access to mental health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Cindy L; Kelly, Karen D; Voaklander, Don

    2011-01-01

    Rural residence may reduce access to specialized mental health services. The objective of this study was to examine the role of rural residence in relation to service utilization. Using Canadian data collected in 2002, service use was examined as a function of the presence of anxiety or mood disorders and rural/urban residence. Use of four different types of professional mental health services was examined in relation to rural residence and additional demographic, social, and health status factors known to predict use of services. Data were obtained from Statistics Canada's Canadian Mental Health Survey Cycle 1.2. Rural residence was defined as living in a rural community with a population of 1000 or less. For all participants, associations between the presence of anxiety or mood disorders, rural/urban residence, and any service use or use of specialized mental health services (psychiatry and psychology) were examined. For participants who had used professional services, associations were examined between 17 predictor variables, including location of residence, and the use of four types of service providers (family doctor or GP; nurse, social worker, counsellor, or psychotherapist; psychiatrist; or psychologist). Predictors included demographic, social, and health status variables. Cross-tabulated counts and adjusted odds ratios with 99% confidence intervals based on bootstrapped variance estimates were used to evaluate predictors. Among the total sample (n = 35 140), 7.9% had used professional mental health services in the previous year. Among people who were likely to have had anxiety or mood disorders, rural or urban residence was not differentially related to past-year use of any professional services or specialized mental health services. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model factors predicting past year use of four different types of professional services. Location of residence was not a significant predictor of service utilization. Age, sex

  18. Medical decisions for troubled breathing in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Lipson, Steven

    2002-07-01

    This paper aims to gain insight into the medical decision-making processes undergone in a nursing home in response to troubled breathing. Participants were 20 residents of a large, nonprofit nursing home, six of whom died by the time of data collection. The mean age was 88 yr, and 70% were female. Diagnostic tests and medication were the most frequently used treatments. The most important considerations reported were the resident's quality of life, family wishes, and the relative effectiveness of alternative treatment options. In 45% of the cases, the physicians reported family involvement. In 30% of cases, the physicians would have wanted less treatment if they were in the resident's condition. Troubled breathing emerges as an end-of-life symptom for many residents. An analysis of the decision-making process and its evaluation could foster improved care of these symptoms.

  19. Unprofessional content on Facebook accounts of US urology residency graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin; Ficko, Zita; Gormley, E Ann

    2017-06-01

    To characterize unprofessional content on public Facebook accounts of contemporary US urology residency graduates. Facebook was queried with the names of all urologists who graduated from US urology residency programmes in 2015 to identify publicly accessible profiles. Profiles were assessed for unprofessional or potentially objectionable content using a prospectively designed rubric, based on professionalism guidelines by the American Urological Association, the American Medical Association, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Content authorship (self vs other) was determined, and profiles were reviewed for self-identification as a urologist. Of 281 graduates, 223 (79%) were men and 267 (95%) held MD degrees. A total of 201 graduates (72%) had publicly identifiable Facebook profiles. Of these, 80 profiles (40%) included unprofessional or potentially objectionable content, including 27 profiles (13%) reflecting explicitly unprofessional behaviour, such as depictions of intoxication, uncensored profanity, unlawful behaviour, and confidential patient information. When unprofessional content was found, the content was self-authored in 82% of categories. Among 85 graduates (42%) who self-identified as a urologist on social media, nearly half contained concerning content. No differences in content were found between men and women, MD and DO degree-holders, or those who did or did not identify as a urologist (all P > 0.05). The majority of recent residency graduates had publicly accessible Facebook profiles, and a substantial proportion contained self-authored unprofessional content. Of those identifying as urologists on Facebook, approximately half violated published professionalism guidelines. Greater awareness of trainees' online identities is needed. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. An investigation of the dynamic processes promoting citizen participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Collins, Charles; Pierce, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    This study expanded the citizen participation literature by examining the dynamic nature of citizen participation and the extent to which the factors associated with citizen participation may be moderated by resident leadership status. Longitudinal survey data collected from 542 residents in one small Midwestern city implementing a community change initiative provide some insight into the challenges surrounding the promotion of an active citizenry. Within this one community, citizenship behaviors of emergent resident leaders and residents uninterested in a leadership role were influenced, to some extent, by different factors and the importance of these factors shifted in only a 2 years time span. Future research is needed to determine if the dynamics uncovered in this study were due to the initiative or to the nature of citizen participation processes.

  1. Single incision laparoscopic proficiency correlates with residency training level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maria Carmen; Wong, Kaitlyn E; Fernandez, Gladys L; Tirabassi, Michael V

    2018-01-01

    With experience, certain psychomotor skills should translate from standard laparoscopy to single-incision laparoscopy (SIL). We proposed to compare all surgical postgraduate year (PGY) levels and determine if experience translated to improved SIL skills. Surgical residents of all PGY levels (1-5) at our institution were included. Baseline surveys were obtained to determine resident level of exposure to both SIL and standard laparoscopic cases. Participants performed the following tasks: running of the bowel, endoloop placement, extracorporeal suture tying, and intracorporeal suture tying. Tasks were performed on a commercially provided simulated inanimate organ model. Participants were given 5 min to complete each task. Data were collected and analyzed by an impartial-certified Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery proctor. A total of 31 residents participated in the study. Overall, there was minimal SIL exposure among all residents. As expected, PGY level correlated with increased ability to complete assigned tasks within the allotted time. There was a statistically significant difference in the number of individuals able to complete a task based on PGY level for all given tasks (P = 0.005). With increased difficulty, the percentage of higher level residents able to complete the task decreased (100% PGY5 completed running of bowel versus 0% intracorporeal knot tying). Certain psychomotor skills did appear to translate to SIL skills. However, further dedicated SIL training may help to better develop certain laparoscopic skills devoted to SIL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of transitioning from residency to pharmacy practice on learning style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter S; Jelescu-Bodos, Anca; Yeung, Janice; Lau, Torey

    2014-10-15

    To describe the evolution of learning styles of pharmacy residents as they transition from residency to practice. Cross-sectional survey and interview-based study. A complete provincial cohort of former pharmacy residents (N=28), who had their learning styles characterized with the Pharmacists' Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS) at the beginning of their residency and, 1 year post-residency, were invited to repeat the PILS. Interviews were administered to consenting participants to gain additional insight. Twenty-seven of the former residents (96%) completed the PILS survey and 16 (59%) completed the post-PILS interview. Thirteen (48%) changed their dominant learning style and 20 (74%) changed their secondary learning style. Six (22%) participants did not change either learning style. The overall proportion of dominant assimilators (59%) and convergers (26%) remained similar to baseline (52% and 26%, respectively), meaning participants had adopted and abandoned different learning style in similar numbers. Change in learning style was associated with being a preceptor (plearning styles gained during their residency. Changing learning style is common for former residents after 1 year in postresidency practice. There is no overall direction to the change; former residents transition into and out of various learning styles with similar frequency and retain preferences for passive/abstract learning approaches over active/concrete ones. The early-career lability in learning style the study demonstrated may reveal an opportunity to guide pharmacists toward more active learning preferences through residency curricula, preceptorship, and mentorship.

  3. Resident Workshop Standardizes Patient Handoff and Improves Quality, Confidence, and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heidi J; Karpinski, Aryn C; Messer, Amanda; Gallois, Julie; Mims, Michelle; Farge, Ashley; Hernandez, Lauren; Steinhardt, Michelle; Sandlin, Chelsey

    2017-09-01

    Residency programs are required to instruct residents in handoff; however, a handoff curriculum endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education does not exist. Although curricula are available, we preferred to use a curriculum that could be taught quickly, was easy to implement, and used a mnemonic that resembled current practices at our institution. We designed and implemented a novel handoff educational workshop intended to improve resident confidence and performance. In this observational study, pediatric residents across postgraduate training years during winter 2014-spring 2015 participated in two study segments: a handoff workshop with questionnaires and handoff observations. Co-investigators developed and led an interactive workshop for residents that emphasized a standardized approach using the SIGNOUT mnemonic (see text for definition). The effect of workshop participation on handoff abilities was evaluated using a validated, handoff evaluation tool administered before and after the workshop. Qualitative feedback was obtained from residents using pre- and postworkshop surveys. Forty-three residents participated in the workshop; 41 residents completed handoff observations. Improvements were noted in clinical judgment ( P = 0.02) and organization/communication ( P = 0.005). Pre- and postworkshop surveys demonstrated self-perceived increases in confidence, comfort, and knowledge ( P workshop we developed can be taught quickly, is easy to implement, is appropriate for all resident training levels, and improves resident confidence and skill. This workshop can be implemented by training programs across all disciplines, possibly leading to improved patient safety.

  4. The use of sleep aids among Emergency Medicine residents: a web based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ali

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleepiness is a significant problem among residents due to chronic sleep deprivation. Recent studies have highlighted medical errors due to resident sleep deprivation. We hypothesized residents routinely use pharmacologic sleep aids to manage their sleep deprivation and reduce sleepiness. Methods A web-based survey of US allopathic Emergency Medicine (EM residents was conducted during September 2004. All EM residency program directors were asked to invite their residents to participate. E-mail with reminders was used to solicit participation. Direct questions about use of alcohol and medications to facilitate sleep, and questions requesting details of sleep aids were included. Results Of 3,971 EM residents, 602 (16% replied to the survey. Respondents were 71% male, 78% white, and mean (SD age was 30 (4 years, which is similar to the entire EM resident population reported by the ACGME. There were 32% 1st year, 32% 2nd year, 28% 3rd year, and 8% 4th year residents. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS showed 38% of residents were excessively sleepy (ESS 11–16 and 7% were severely sleepy (ESS>16. 46% (95 CI 42%–50% regularly used alcohol, antihistamines, sleep adjuncts, benzodiazepines, or muscle relaxants to help them fall or stay asleep. Study limitations include low response and self-report. Conclusion Even with a low response rate, sleep aid use among EM residents may be common. How this affects performance, well-being, and health remains unknown.

  5. A systematic review of resident-as-teacher programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew G; Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Barrow, Mark; Hattie, John

    2009-12-01

    Residents in all disciplines serve as clinical teachers for medical students. Since the 1970s, there has been increasing evidence to demonstrate that residents wish to teach and that they respond positively to formal teacher training. Effective resident-as-teacher (RaT) programmes have resulted in improved resident teaching skills. Current evidence, however, is not clear about the specific features of an effective RaT programme. This study was performed in order to investigate the effectiveness of RaT programmes on resident teaching abilities and to identify the features that ensure success. Methods of assessment used to ascertain the effectiveness of RaT programmes are also explored. The literature search covered the period between 1971 and 2008. Articles focusing on improving resident teaching skills were included. Each study was reviewed by two reviewers and data were collected using a standard abstraction summary sheet. Study outcomes were graded according to a modified Kirkpatrick's model of educational outcomes. Twenty-nine studies met review inclusion criteria. Interventions included workshops, seminars, lectures and teaching retreats. Twenty-six studies used a pre- and post-intervention outcome comparison method. Subjective outcome measures included resident self-evaluation of teaching skills or evaluation by medical students, peers and faculty members. Objective outcome measures included written tests, evaluation of teaching performance by independent raters and utilisation of objective structured teaching examinations. One study objectively measured learning outcomes at the level of medical students, utilising the results of an objective structured clinical examination. Overall resident satisfaction with RaT programmes was high. Participants reported positive changes in attitudes towards teaching. Participant knowledge of educational principles improved. Study methodologies allowed for significant risks of bias. More rigorous study designs and the use of

  6. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  7. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  8. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  9. Osteoporosis management among residents living in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, L M; Jantzi, M; Papaioannou, A; Hirdes, J; Maxwell, C J; Poss, J W

    2009-09-01

    Fractures in long-term care (LTC) residents have substantial economic and human costs. Osteoporosis management in residents with fractures or osteoporosis is low, and certain subgroups are less likely to receive therapy, e.g., those with >5 comorbidities, dementia, and wheelchair use. Many LTC residents who are at risk of fracture are not receiving optimal osteoporosis management. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and predictors of osteoporosis management among LTC residents with osteoporosis or fractures. In a retrospective study, LTC residents of 17 facilities in Ontario and Manitoba, Canada were investigated. The participants were 65+ years old with osteoporosis, history of hip fracture, or recent fracture. Comprehensive assessments were conducted by trained nurse assessors between June 2005 and June 2006 using a standardized instrument, known as the Resident Assessment Instrument 2.0. Among residents (n = 525) with osteoporosis or fractures, 177 (34%) had had a recent fall. Bisphosphonate use was reported in 199 (38%) residents, calcitonin use in six (1%), and raloxifene use in six (1%). Calcium and vitamin D supplementation were reported in 140 (27%) residents. Fifty-four (10.3%) residents were on a bisphosphonate but were not taking vitamin D or multivitamin. Variables negatively associated with osteoporosis therapy [OR (95% CI)]: six or more comorbidities [0.46 (0.28-0.77), p = 0.028], wheelchair use [0.62 (0.40-0.95), p = 0.003], cognitive impairment [0.71 (0.55-0.92), p = 0.009], depression [0.54 (0.34-0.87), p = 0.01], swallowing difficulties [0.99 (0.988-0.999), p = 0.034] or Manitoba residence [0.47 (0.28-0.78), p = 0.004]. Prescription of 10+ medications was positively associated with therapy [3.34 (2.32-4.84), p Osteoporosis management is not optimal among residents at risk of future fracture. Identifying at-risk subgroups of residents that are not receiving therapy may facilitate closing the osteoporosis care gap.

  10. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. The use of error analysis to assess resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Law, Katherine E; Cohen, Elaine R; Greenberg, Jacob A; Kwan, Calvin; Greenberg, Caprice; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess validity of a human factors error assessment method for evaluating resident performance during a simulated operative procedure. Seven postgraduate year 4-5 residents had 30 minutes to complete a simulated laparoscopic ventral hernia (LVH) repair on day 1 of a national, advanced laparoscopic course. Faculty provided immediate feedback on operative errors and residents participated in a final product analysis of their repairs. Residents then received didactic and hands-on training regarding several advanced laparoscopic procedures during a lecture session and animate lab. On day 2, residents performed a nonequivalent LVH repair using a simulator. Three investigators reviewed and coded videos of the repairs using previously developed human error classification systems. Residents committed 121 total errors on day 1 compared with 146 on day 2. One of 7 residents successfully completed the LVH repair on day 1 compared with all 7 residents on day 2 (P = .001). The majority of errors (85%) committed on day 2 were technical and occurred during the last 2 steps of the procedure. There were significant differences in error type (P ≤ .001) and level (P = .019) from day 1 to day 2. The proportion of omission errors decreased from day 1 (33%) to day 2 (14%). In addition, there were more technical and commission errors on day 2. The error assessment tool was successful in categorizing performance errors, supporting known-groups validity evidence. Evaluating resident performance through error classification has great potential in facilitating our understanding of operative readiness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Residents' perspectives on urinary incontinence: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostaszkiewicz, Joan; O'Connell, Bev; Dunning, Trisha

    2012-12-01

    Individuals in residential aged care facilities experience urinary incontinence more than any other single population. Despite these factors, the impact of the condition on their quality of life, their perspectives of living with the condition, and their preferences for care have received little research attention. To provide a descriptive overview of research about; the impact of urinary incontinence on residents' quality of life; residents' perspectives of having urinary incontinence; and their preferences for continence care'. A descriptive review of literature. A broad search was undertaken for qualitative and quantitative research that evaluated residents' quality of life related to urinary incontinence; their perspectives on having urinary incontinence, and their preferences for managing it. Data were displayed in tabular format, summarized, and described. Ten studies were identified and reviewed (six qualitative and four quantitative). They reveal many residents' value having independent bowel and bladder function, but believe that incontinence in inevitable and intractable. Some adopt self management strategies, however considerable barriers hinder their ability to maintain continence and manage incontinence. Residents often have low expectations, and hence decline further evaluation and treatment. Some express satisfaction with continence care even if this care is not consistent with their preferences. Little is known about how cognitively impaired residents perceive their condition. However some individuals with cognitive impairment respond with acute anxiety when carers' attempt to provide continence care. Residents' perspectives on incontinence and preferences for continence care relate to low expectations for improvement. Such misconceptions should be addressed and residents and their family members should be given a range of options from which to choose. As urinary incontinence impacts on residents' quality of life, it is also important that

  13. Introductory TORS training in an otolaryngology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastenberg, Judd H; Gibber, Marc J; Smith, Richard V

    2018-02-07

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is becoming an integral part of the otolaryngology resident experience. While there is widespread agreement that a formal, validated curriculum for TORS training is needed for residents, none presently exists. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate an introductory resident curriculum for TORS training that could be easily adopted at other institutions. This is a prospective study of otolaryngology residents (PGY1-5) in an academic medical center from 2015 to 2016. Trainees completed an introductory TORS training program consisting of online modules, logistic training, and hands-on training consisting of 12 tasks on the da Vinci Skills Simulator (dVSS). The primary outcomes were completion of training and time to completion. The secondary outcomes included resident attitudes regarding TORS as reflected on post-training survey. A total of 20 resident trainees participated in the study. 85% of trainees completed the hands-on robotic training in the allotted 3-h time limit. The average time to completion for those who finished was 91.53 min (SD 33.59 min). There was no statistically significant correlation between time to completion and PGY, number of robotic first assists, or total number of robotic cases. An introductory, resident-directed TORS training curriculum using the dVSS on an active surgical console is feasible in an academic medical center and may contribute to basic robotic competency among residents. Institutions with a dVSS may replicate this training in a resource-efficient manner prior to implementation of more comprehensive training. Robotic skills are likely trainable and independent from surgical skills learned during residency.

  14. Residency Training: Work engagement during neurology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Artemiadis, Artemios K

    2016-08-02

    Work engagement, defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption, can ameliorate patient care and reduce medical errors. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate work engagement among neurology residents in the region of Attica, Greece. In total, 113 residents participated in this study. Demographic and work-related characteristics, as well as emotional exhaustion and personality traits (neuroticism), were examined via an anonymous questionnaire. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The study sample had a mean age of 34.6 ± 3.6 years, ranging from 26 to 45 years. Sixty-two (54.9%) participants were women and 45 (39.8%) were married. After adjusting for sex, emotional exhaustion, and neuroticism, the main factors associated with work engagement were autonomy and chances for professional development. Providing more chances for trainees' professional development as well as allowing for and supporting greater job autonomy may improve work engagement during neurology training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Dental Student, Resident, and Faculty Attitudes Toward Treating Medicaid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying

    2017-11-01

    Failure to receive proper oral health care including both prevention and maintenance is influenced by myriad and complex social, economic, and dental factors, including access to care. Reducing oral health disparities requires changes in the preparation of future dentists as well as measuring and influencing the attitudes and knowledge of practicing dentists. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that future dentists (students and residents) and faculty members at one U.S. dental school would treat Medicaid participants. Attitudes were measured using the Deamonte Driver scenario survey, which assesses factors affecting dentists' participation in Medicaid. In October 2012, all 113 full-time faculty members were invited to participate, and 60 completed the survey, for a response rate of 53.1%. In January and February 2013, all 18 residents in the dental clinics and university hospital were invited to participate, and 16 completed the survey, for a response rate of 88.9%. From 2013 to 2015, all 267 students in three classes were invited to participate: first-year students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 and fourth-year students in the Class of 2015. A total of 255 students completed the survey, for an overall student response rate of 95.5%. The results showed that the students were more likely to participate in caring for Medicaid patients than the faculty and residents. The white and male students had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the females and underrepresented minority students, while residents had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the students and faculty. Overall, the cultural competency skills, beliefs, and attitudes of these faculty members and residents were less developed than those of their students, signaling a need for broad educational and faculty development programs to fully prepare the future dental workforce to care for these patients.

  16. Resuscitation skills of pediatric residents and effects of Neonatal Resuscitation Program training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Ilker; Agin, Hasan; Devrim, Ilker; Apa, Hursit; Tezel, Basak; Ozbas, Sema

    2013-08-01

    The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) is an effective tool in decreasing mortality and morbidity due to birth asphyxia. The aim of the study was to assess the skill and knowledge level of pediatric residents in a teaching hospital and the effects of NRP training. Subjects consisted of pediatric residents of Dr Behcet Uz Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. They were assessed on practice exam scenarios and NRP provider course flow charts. Teams with two members were formed randomly. Each resident was evaluated on a 100 point scale covering all resuscitation steps and interventions. Exam scores were analyzed for two major parameters: resident participation in NRP training (never, within the last 6 months, and ≥6 months previously) and being a senior (>18 months residency). A total of 49 residents enrolled in the study (94.2% of the target group). Twenty-one residents had NRP training (42.9%). Junior residents comprised 46.9% of the study group. The mean skill score was 72.1, and it was significantly higher for senior residents and residents who attended the NRP course (P training significantly increases the resuscitation knowledge and skill of pediatric residents, although this can be achieved by being a senior. Residents should undergo training as soon as possible to achieve a higher level of quality in resuscitating babies. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program's Educational Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergl, Paul A; Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-07-10

    Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation's learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program's educational mission. While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. At the year's end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents' tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program's educational mission. The program's robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media's role in improving residents' educational experiences.

  18. Influence of continuing medical education workshops on participant learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhauser, P; Markert, R J

    1989-01-01

    The challenge of assessing the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME) programs is formidable and intriguing. Two workshops on program factors affecting resident recruitment, conducted at annual meetings of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training, were evaluated for their influence on participant learning. Based on pre- and post-workshop questionnaires, participant perceptions and attitudes changed as a result of the workshop experience. The changes closely paralleled the planned and spontaneous discussion content. In describing the workshop-related changes, factors affecting residency program recruitment and aspects of CME program evaluation are discussed. A suggestion for enhancing workshop evaluations is incorporated.

  19. Objective Assessment of General Surgery Residents Followed by Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas, Becca L; Buckarma, EeeLN H; Mohan, Monali; Pandian, T K; Farley, David R

    Surgical training programs often lack objective assessment strategies. Complicated scheduling characteristics frequently make it difficult for surgical residents to undergo formal assessment; actually having the time and opportunity to remediate poor performance is an even greater problem. We developed a novel methodology of assessment for residents and created an efficient remediation system using a combination of simulation, online learning, and self-assessment options. Postgraduate year (PGY) 2 to 5 general surgery (GS) residents were tested in a 5 station, objective structured clinical examination style event called the Surgical X-Games. Stations were 15 minutes in length and tested both surgical knowledge and technical skills. Stations were scored on a scale of 1 to 5 (1 = Fail, 2 = Mediocre, 3 = Pass, 4 = Good, and 5 = Stellar). Station scores ≤ 2 were considered subpar and required remediation to a score ≥ 4. Five remediation sessions allowed residents the opportunity to practice the stations with staff surgeons. Videos of each skill or test of knowledge with clear instructions on how to perform at a stellar level were offered. Trainees also had the opportunity to checkout take-home task trainers to practice specific skills. Residents requiring remediation were then tested again in-person or sent in self-made videos of their performance. Academic medical center. PGY2, 3, 4, and 5 GS residents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. A total of, 35 residents participated in the Surgical X-Games in the spring of 2015. Among all, 31 (89%) had scores that were deemed subpar on at least 1 station. Overall, 18 (58%) residents attempted remediation. All 18 (100%) achieved a score ≥ 4 on the respective stations during a makeup attempt. Overall X-Games scores and those of PGY2s, 3s, and 4s were higher after remediation (p < 0.05). No PGY5s attempted remediation. Despite difficulties with training logistics and busy resident schedules, it is feasible to objectively

  20. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P oral board examinations during this period. Implementation of the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was not associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or differences in resident examination performance. The implications of these findings should be considered when

  1. The Length of Residence is Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Foreign-English Teachers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiang-Obounou, Brice Wilfried

    2017-12-26

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a group of disorders that involve the heart and blood vessels. Acculturation is associated with CVD risk factors among immigrants in Western countries. In this study, the association between acculturation and CVD risk factors was examined among English teachers from Europe and the USA living in Korea. English teachers were defined as those who reported their profession as "English Teacher". Only English teachers from Europe (UK, and Ireland, n = 81) and North America (Canada and USA, n = 304) were selected. The length of residence and eating Korean ethnic food were used as proxy indicators for acculturation. Gender was associated with hypertension: 17.6% of males self-reported to have the cardiovascular risk factor when compared to females (7.4%). The length of residence in Korea was associated with hypertension ( p = 0.045), BMI ( p = 0.028), and physical inactivity ( p = 0.046). English teachers who had been residing in Korea for more than five years were more likely to report hypertension (OR = 2.16; p = 0.011), smoking (OR = 1.51; p = 0.080), and overweight/obesity (OR = 1.49; p = 0.009) than participants who had been living in Korea for less than five years. This study found evidence of the healthy immigrant effect and less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles among English teachers who have lived in Korea for over five years.

  2. The Length of Residence is Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Foreign-English Teachers in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Wilfried Obiang-Obounou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a group of disorders that involve the heart and blood vessels. Acculturation is associated with CVD risk factors among immigrants in Western countries. In this study, the association between acculturation and CVD risk factors was examined among English teachers from Europe and the USA living in Korea. English teachers were defined as those who reported their profession as “English Teacher”. Only English teachers from Europe (UK, and Ireland, n = 81 and North America (Canada and USA, n = 304 were selected. The length of residence and eating Korean ethnic food were used as proxy indicators for acculturation. Gender was associated with hypertension: 17.6% of males self-reported to have the cardiovascular risk factor when compared to females (7.4%. The length of residence in Korea was associated with hypertension (p = 0.045, BMI (p = 0.028, and physical inactivity (p = 0.046. English teachers who had been residing in Korea for more than five years were more likely to report hypertension (OR = 2.16; p = 0.011, smoking (OR = 1.51; p = 0.080, and overweight/obesity (OR = 1.49; p = 0.009 than participants who had been living in Korea for less than five years. This study found evidence of the healthy immigrant effect and less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles among English teachers who have lived in Korea for over five years.

  3. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  4. Stress and burnout in residents: impact of mindfulness-based resilience training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, Brian E; Kingsolver, Karen; Stinnett, Sandra S; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2015-01-01

    Stress and burnout impact resident physicians. This prospective study tests the hypothesis that a mindfulness-based resilience intervention would decrease stress and burnout in residents. Resident physicians from the Departments of Family Medicine, Psychiatry, and Anesthesia at Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, participated in two or three 1-hour sessions of mindfulness-based resilience activities, which introduced mindful-awareness and included practical exercises for nurturing resilience. Anonymous surveys were distributed before (completed by 47 residents) and after the intervention (both completed by 30 residents); a follow-up survey was distributed 1 month later (seven residents completed all three surveys). The survey included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, 21-question version (DASS-21), the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and ten questions from the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. At baseline, most residents' scores were in the normal range with respect to stress; however, female residents had higher DASS-21 scores than male residents (31.7, females vs 18.4, males; P=0.002). Most residents' burnout scores were in the abnormal range, both with respect to exhaustion (38/47 residents, subscore ≥2.25) and disengagement (37/47 residents, subscore ≥2.1). Higher perceived levels of stress correlated with the instruments. Analysis of the surveys before and after the intervention showed no significant short-term change in stress, burnout, mindful-awareness, or cognitive failure. There was a trend for females and post-medical school graduate year 1 and 2 (PGY1 and PGY2) residents to have a reduction in DASS-21 scores after intervention. There was also a trend of reduced stress and burnout in residents who perceived higher stress. Residents who are female, PGY1 and PGY2, and who perceive residency to be stressful may benefit most from a mindfulness-based resilience intervention.

  5. Emotional intelligence and its correlation to performance as a resident: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Joseph F; Metro, David G; Patel, Rita M; Carney, Patricia; Wetmore, Amy L

    2008-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that emotional intelligence, as measured by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-I) 125 (Multi Health Systems, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) personal inventory, would correlate with resident performance. Prospective survey. University-affiliated, multiinstitutional anesthesiology residency program. Current clinical anesthesiology years one to three (PGY 2-4) anesthesiology residents enrolled in the University of Pittsburgh Anesthesiology Residency Program. Participants confidentially completed the Bar-On EQ-I 125 survey. Results of the individual EQ-I 125 and daily evaluations by the faculty of the residency program were compiled and analyzed. There was no positive correlation between any facet of emotional intelligence and resident performance. There was statistically significant negative correlation (-0.40; P intelligence, as measured by the Bar-On EQ-I personal inventory, does not strongly correlate to resident performance as defined at the University of Pittsburgh.

  6. [Suffering and pleasure in the process of forming multidisciplinary health residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fernandes, Marcelo Nunes; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; Viero, Viviani; Freitas, Paula Hubner; Prestes, Francine Cassol

    2015-12-01

    to identify situations of pleasure and suffering in the process of training multidisciplinary health resident. qualitative research, developed in the Multiprofessional Residence Program in Health at a university from the south of Brazil. Data was collected in 2013 through focus groups with nine residents, and analyzed according to a thematic analysis. The situations of suffering were stimulated by negative situations undergone by the health workers such as difficulties in participating in other professional training activities, excessive number of activities the residents commit to as health workers, lack of knowledge and hindered integration in the areas of Residency. The situations of pleasure were a result of the multiprofessional activities developed and the resident's larning possibility. The situations of pleasure and suffering identified can help in the planning of institutional actions that contribute to a professional training process and the overall wellbeing of the residents.

  7. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  8. RESIDENTS` PERCEPTION TOWARDS URBAN SPORT EVENTS. THE CASE OF eyoWf 2013 - BRASOV, ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Candrea, Adina Nicoleta; Ana ISPAS; CONSTANTIN, Cristinel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our research is to identify Brasov residents` attitudes regarding the role of sport events in local tourism development. The research has been focused on residents` awareness regarding the organization of the European Youth Olympic Winter Festival in Brasov and their intention to actively participate in this process. The outcomes reveal a poor information of local residents especially due to few and late promotional actions performed by local authorities. As people have a positive ...

  9. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  10. Student pharmacist, pharmacy resident, and graduate student perceptions of social interactions with faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongartz, Jenny; Vang, Choua; Havrda, Dawn; Fravel, Michelle; McDanel, Deanna; Farris, Karen B

    2011-11-10

    To describe the perceptions of student pharmacists, graduate students, and pharmacy residents regarding social situations involving students or residents and faculty members at public and private universities. Focus groups of student pharmacists, graduate students, and pharmacy residents were formed at 2 pharmacy schools. Given 3 scenarios, participants indicated if they thought any boundaries had been violated and why. Responses were grouped into similar categories and frequencies were determined. Compared with private university students or pharmacy residents, student pharmacists at a public university were more likely to think "friending" on Facebook violated a boundary. No participants considered reasonable consumption of alcohol in social settings a violation. "Tagging" faculty members in photos on Facebook was thought to be less problematic, but most participants stated they would be conscious of what they were posting. The social interactions between faculty members and students or residents, especially student pharmacists, should be kept professional. Students indicated that social networking may pose threats to maintaining professional boundaries.

  11. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed.

  12. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido Ferreira de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina – Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46, taped interviews (18, and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists.

  13. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves, E-mail: aparecidoliveira@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  14. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  15. Results of a Flipped Classroom Teaching Approach in Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Susan M; Chen, Fei; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Mayer, David C; Fairbanks, Stacy; Moran, Kenneth; Ku, Cindy; Mitchell, John D; Bowe, Edwin A; Royal, Kenneth D; Hendrickse, Adrian; VanDyke, Kenneth; Trawicki, Michael C; Rankin, Demicha; Guldan, George J; Hand, Will; Gallagher, Christopher; Jacob, Zvi; Zvara, David A; McEvoy, Matthew D; Schell, Randall M

    2017-08-01

    In a flipped classroom approach, learners view educational content prior to class and engage in active learning during didactic sessions. We hypothesized that a flipped classroom improves knowledge acquisition and retention for residents compared to traditional lecture, and that residents prefer this approach. We completed 2 iterations of a study in 2014 and 2015. Institutions were assigned to either flipped classroom or traditional lecture for 4 weekly sessions. The flipped classroom consisted of reviewing a 15-minute video, followed by 45-minute in-class interactive sessions with audience response questions, think-pair-share questions, and case discussions. The traditional lecture approach consisted of a 55-minute lecture given by faculty with 5 minutes for questions. Residents completed 3 knowledge tests (pretest, posttest, and 4-month retention) and surveys of their perceptions of the didactic sessions. A linear mixed model was used to compare the effect of both formats on knowledge acquisition and retention. Of 182 eligible postgraduate year 2 anesthesiology residents, 155 (85%) participated in the entire intervention, and 142 (78%) completed all tests. The flipped classroom approach improved knowledge retention after 4 months (adjusted mean = 6%; P  = .014; d  = 0.56), and residents preferred the flipped classroom (pre = 46%; post = 82%; P  flipped classroom approach to didactic education resulted in a small improvement in knowledge retention and was preferred by anesthesiology residents.

  16. Moral distress and burnout in internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Sharareh; Norena, Monica; Wong, Hubert; Dodek, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Residents frequently encounter situations in their workplace that may induce moral distress or burnout. The objective of this study was to measure overall and rotation-specific moral distress and burnout in medical residents, and the relationship between demographics and moral distress and burnout. The revised Moral Distress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Human Service version) were administered to Internal Medicine residents in the 2013-2014 academic year at the University of British Columbia. Of the 88 residents, 45 completed the surveys. Participants (mean age 30+/-3; 46% male) reported a median moral distress score (interquartile range) of 77 (50-96). Twenty-six percent of residents had considered quitting because of moral distress, 21% had a high level of burnout, and only 5% had a low level of burnout. Moral distress scores were highest during Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Clinical Teaching Unit (CTU) rotations, and lowest during elective rotations (pburnout were associated with intention to leave the job. Internal Medicine residents report moral distress that is greatest during ICU and CTU rotations, and is associated with burnout and intention to leave the job.

  17. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  18. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in internal medicine residency – a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gulati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultrasound has become indispensable in medicine for diagnosis and therapeutics. In Internal Medicine Residency Training Program (IMRTP, there is a deficiency of a structured, competency-based musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS training despite its growing popularity. Methods: We conducted a feasibility study for incorporating MSKUS in IMRTP and competency assessment. We recruited internal medicine residents from all training levels. Rheumatology attending with expertise in MSKUS supervised curriculum-design and patient-based assessment. A structured curriculum was developed for knee MSKUS, including training material and a pre- and post-test. An Observed Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE was used for competency assessment. Attending evaluations and participant feedbacks were collected. Results: Fifteen residents participated and 12 completed the OSCE. The pre–post tests showed a statistically significant increase (p<0.001 for all subcomponents (anatomy, pathology, and biophysics. The residents scored high on the OSCE [8.8±1.1 (range 7–10]. Attending evaluations for cognitive and technical skills were rated ‘Excellent’ (66% and ‘Good’ (87%, respectively. The training program was perceived very valuable with regard to time and resources spent by residents and faculty, although some felt a need for more patient assessments. Discussion: The competency assessed with our OSCE and highly positive feedback reflects this preliminary study's importance and sets the platform for future studies of formal ultrasound training in internal medicine.

  19. Status of general medicine training and education in psychiatry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    With the current emphasis on integrated care, the role of psychiatrists is expanding to either directly provide medical care or coordinate its delivery. The purpose of this study was to survey general psychiatry programs on the extent of general medicine training provided during residency. A short web-based survey was sent to 173 residency program directors to recruit participants for a larger survey. Thirty-seven participants were recruited and surveyed, and of these, 12 (32.4%) responded. The survey assessed the extent of general medicine training and didactics during and after the first postgraduate year and attitudes towards enhancing this training in residency. This study was approved by the local institutional review board. Seventy-five percent of programs require only the minimum 4 months of primary care in the first postgraduate year, and didactics during these months is often not relevant to psychiatry residents. Some programs offer elective didactics on chronic medical conditions in the fourth postgraduate year. Respondents are in favor of enhancing general medicine training in psychiatry but indicate some resistance from their institutions. These results suggest that very few programs require additional clinical training in relevant medical illnesses after the first postgraduate year. Respondents indicated favorable institutional support for enhancing training, but also expected resistance. The reasons for resistance should be an area of future research. Also important is to determine if enhancing medical didactics improves patient care and outcomes. The changing role of psychiatrists entails a closer look at resident curricula.

  20. A simulation-based resident-as-teacher program: The impact on teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Sargsyan, Zaven; Heath, Janae K; Kohn, Rachel; Alba, George A; Gordon, James A; Currier, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is charged with improving resident teaching skills. Utilizing simulation in teacher training has unique advantages such as providing a controlled learning environment and opportunities for deliberate practice. We assessed the impact of a simulation-based resident-as-teacher (RaT) program. A RaT program was embedded in an existing 8-case simulation curriculum for 52 internal medicine (IM) interns. Residents participated in a workshop, then served as facilitators in the curriculum and received feedback from faculty. Residents' teaching and feed back skills were measured using a pre- and post-program self-assessment and post-session and post-curriculum evaluations by intern learners. Forty-one second- and third-year residents participated in the study August 2013 to October 2013 at a single center. Pre- and post-program teaching skills were assessed for 34 of 41 resident facilitators (83%) participating in 3.9 sessions on average. Partaking in the program led to improvements in resident facilitators' self-reported teaching and feedback skills across all domains. The most significant improvement was in teaching in a simulated environment (2.81 to 4.16, P model for the development of simulation curricula and RaT programs within IM residencies. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. The importance of international medical rotations in selection of an otolaryngology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Nathan H; Cruz, Raul M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent of interest in international electives among prospective otolaryngology residents and to determine whether the availability of international electives affected students' interest in ranking a particular residency program. A 3-part survey was given to all medical students enrolled in the 2008 otolaryngology match via the Electronic Residency Application Service. Part 1 elicited demographic information. Part 2 explored general interest in international rotations. Part 3 involved ranking several factors affecting students' choice of residency programs. This survey was developed at our institution, with no formal validation. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. A total of 307 students entered the otolaryngology match, and 55 surveys (18%) were completed. Twenty-five of 55 students (55%) had completed an international elective during or prior to medical school, and 51 of 55 respondents (93%) had a "strong" or "very strong" desire to participate in an international elective during residency; 48 of 55 students (87%) had a "strong" or "very strong" desire to participate in international surgical missions after residency. Future practice goals had no correlation with interest in international rotations, either during or after residency training. Respondents ranked 8 factors that had an impact on residency program selection in the following order of importance: operative experience, location, lifestyle, research opportunities, didactics, international electives, prestige of program, and salary. Interest in international medicine among prospective otolaryngologists was high in this subset of respondents but did not appear to affect residency program selection.

  2. Do orthopaedic fracture skills courses improve resident performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egol, Kenneth A; Phillips, Donna; Vongbandith, Tom; Szyld, Demian; Strauss, Eric J

    2015-04-01

    We hypothesized that resident participation in a hands-on fracture fixation course leads to significant improvement in their performance as assessed in a simulated fracture fixation model. Twenty-three junior orthopaedic surgery residents were tasked to treat radial shaft fractures with standard fixation techniques in a sawbones fracture fixation simulation twice during the year. Before the first simulation, 6 of the residents participated in a fraction fixation skills course. The simulation repeated 6 months later after all residents attended the course. Residents also completed a 15-question written examination. Assessment included evaluation of each step of the procedure, a score based on the objective structured assessment of technical skill (OSATS) system, and grade on the examination. Comparisons were made between the two cohorts and the two testing time points. Significant improvements were present in the percentage of tasks completed correctly (64.1% vs 84.3%) the overall OSATS score (13.8 vs 17.1) and examination correct answers (8.6 vs 12.5) for the overall cohort between the two testing time points (pskills course at the time of their initial simulation demonstrated significant improvements in percentage of tasks completed correctly (61.3% vs 81.2%) and OSATS score (12.4 vs 17.0) (pskills course significantly improved practical operative skills as assessed by the simulation. The benefits of the course were maintained to 6 months with residents who completed the training earlier continuing to demonstrate an advantage in skills. Such courses are a valuable training resource which directly impact resident performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do resident's leadership skills relate to ratings of technical skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Samantha J; Law, Katherine E; Ray, Rebecca D; Nathwani, Jay N; DiMarco, Shannon M; D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Pugh, Carla M

    2016-12-01

    This study sought to compare general surgery research residents' survey information regarding self-efficacy ratings to their observed performance during a simulated small bowel repair. Their observed performance ratings were based on their leadership skills in directing their assistant. Participants were given 15 min to perform a bowel repair using bovine intestines with standardized injuries. Operative assistants were assigned to help assist with the repair. Before the procedure, participants were asked to rate their expected skills decay, task difficulty, and confidence in addressing the small bowel injury. Interactions were coded to identify the number of instructions given by the participants to the assistant during the repair. Statistical analyses assessed the relationship between the number of directional instructions and participants' perceptions self-efficacy measures. Directional instructions were defined as any dialog by the participant who guided the assistant to perform an action. Thirty-six residents (58.3% female) participated in the study. Participants who rated lower levels of decay in their intraoperative decision-making and small bowel repair skills were noted to use their assistant more by giving more instructions. Similarly, a higher number of instructions correlated with lower perceived difficulty in selecting the correct suture, suture pattern, and completing the entire surgical task. General surgery research residents' intraoperative leadership skills showed significant correlations to their perceptions of skill decay and task difficulty during a bowel repair. Evaluating resident's directional instructions may provide an additional individualized intraoperative assessment metric. Further evaluation relating to operative performance outcomes is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Burnout and quality of life in medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Miranda, Sergio Emilio; Rodríguez-Gallardo, Gisela Bethsabé; Jiménez-Bernardino, Carlos Alberto; Guerrero-Quintero, Laura Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    burnout and quality of life are poorly studied phenomena in postgraduate students, and its effects are unknown. The aim was to investigate the relationship between quality of life and burnout in medical residents. a longitudinal study was performed. We included medical residents who began their postgraduate studies in 2010. The Spanish version of the Quality of Life Profile for the Chronically Ill (PLC, according to its initials in German), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory specific to physicians were applied at the beginning, and six and 12 months later. Descriptive statistics were used for nominal variables. Chi-square and ANOVA were applied to numerical variables. we included 45 residents, the average age was 26.9 ± 2.93 years, 18 (40 %) were female and 27 (60 %) were male. The PLC survey found significant decrease in four of the six scales assessed in the three measurements. The Maslach Burnout Inventory found high levels of emotional exhaustion in the three tests, low levels of depersonalization and low personal gains at the beginning, rising at six and 12 months. The most affected specialty was Internal Medicine. burnout and impaired quality of life for residents exist in postgraduate physicians and it is maintained during the first year of residency.

  5. Culinary Arts Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This chart is intended for use in documenting the fact that a student participating in a culinary arts program has achieved the performance standards specified in the Missouri Competency Profile for culinary arts. The chart includes space for recording basic student and instructor information and the student's on-the-job training and work…

  6. Factors Associated with Aggressive Behavior among Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whall, Ann L.; Colling, Kathleen B.; Kolanowski, Ann; Kim, HyoJeong; Hong, Gwi-Ryung Son; DeCicco, Barry; Ronis, David L.; Richards, Kathy C.; Algase, Donna; Beck, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In an attempt to more thoroughly describe aggressive behavior in nursing home residents with dementia, we examined background and proximal factors as guided by the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior model. Design and Methods: We used a multivariate cross-sectional survey with repeated measures; participants resided in nine randomly…

  7. Nonmotor Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents with Parkinson's Disease : Prevalence and Effect on Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, Nico J.; Tissingh, Gerrit; Poels, Petra J. E.; Zuidema, Systse U.; Munneke, Marten; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectivesTo determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in nursing home (NH) residents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to establish the association with quality of life. DesignCross-sectional. SettingNursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. ParticipantsNursing home residents

  8. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  9. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent?" Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized conceptions of…

  10. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent? Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized conceptions of…

  11. Residents' Perceived Social-Economic Impact of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mark; Chen, Li; Lei, Ouyang; Malone, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether the Olympic Games was a catalyst for changes to Beijing residents' quality of life based on social-economic perspectives and how these changes affected their continuous support for the Games. Residents who lived in Beijing 18 months or longer were invited to participate in this survey research (N = 412)…

  12. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  13. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  14. Attitude Amongst Resident Doctors in The Specialty of Anaesthesiology Towards Conferences and Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkarsh Gupta

    2008-01-01

    The audit revealed that most of the residents suggested the making of some form of presentation compulsory during conferences every year (42% SRs and 29% PGs, with financial aid (20% SRs and 25% PGs and special leaves (25% SRs and 28% PGs to encourage active participation among the residents.

  15. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  16. 24 CFR 583.315 - Resident rent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident rent. 583.315 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.315 Resident rent. (a) Calculation of resident rent. Each resident of supportive housing may be required to pay as rent an amount...

  17. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  18. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  19. Simulation-based interpersonal communication skills training for neurosurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Hadani, Moshe; Ziv, Amitai; Berkenstadt, Haim

    2013-09-01

    Communication skills are an important component of the neurosurgery residency training program. We developed a simulation-based training module for neurosurgery residents in which medical, communication and ethical dilemmas are presented by role-playing actors. To assess the first national simulation-based communication skills training for neurosurgical residents. Eight scenarios covering different aspects of neurosurgery were developed by our team: (1) obtaining informed consent for an elective surgery, (2) discharge of a patient following elective surgery, (3) dealing with an unsatisfied patient, (4) delivering news of intraoperative complications, (5) delivering news of a brain tumor to parents of a 5 year old boy, (6) delivering news of brain death to a family member, (7) obtaining informed consent for urgent surgery from the grandfather of a 7 year old boy with an epidural hematoma, and (8) dealing with a case of child abuse. Fifteen neurosurgery residents from all major medical centers in Israel participated in the training. The session was recorded on video and was followed by videotaped debriefing by a senior neurosurgeon and communication expert and by feedback questionnaires. All trainees participated in two scenarios and observed another two. Participants largely agreed that the actors simulating patients represented real patients and family members and that the videotaped debriefing contributed to the teaching of professional skills. Simulation-based communication skill training is effective, and together with thorough debriefing is an excellent learning and practical method for imparting communication skills to neurosurgery residents. Such simulation-based training will ultimately be part of the national residency program.

  20. The Ideal Resident Doctor: A Resident 's Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and patient advocate in this era of managed medical. / care. / The Hippocratic oath suggests that the resi- ... scientific background is for a resident, the present atmosphere in most training pro grammes tends to make the .... American Medical Association(AMA) during the middle years of the twentieth century reveals a num—.

  1. Teaching physics to radiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R

    2009-04-01

    The complexity of diagnostic imaging has expanded dramatically over the past two decades. Over the same period, the time and effort devoted to teaching physics (the science and technology of the discipline) have diminished. This paradox compromises the ability of future radiologists to master imaging technologies so that they are used in an efficient, safe, and cost-effective manner. This article addresses these issues. Efforts involving many professional organizations are under way to resolve the paradox of the expanding complexity of medical imaging contrasted with the declining emphasis on physics in radiology residency programs. These efforts should help to reestablish physics education as a core value in radiology residency programs.

  2. Attitudes and Beliefs of Pathology Residents Regarding the Subspecialty of Clinical Chemistry: Results of a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Mehran; Yared, Marwan; Olano, Juan P; Alexander, C Bruce; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2017-02-01

    -Previous studies suggest that training in pathology residency programs does not adequately prepare pathology residents to become competent in clinical chemistry. -To define the beliefs of pathology residents in the United States regarding their preparation for practicing clinical chemistry in their career, their attitude toward the discipline, and the attractiveness of clinical chemistry as a career. -The residents of all pathology residency programs in the United States were given the opportunity to participate in an online survey. -Three hundred thirty-six pathology residents responded to the survey. Analysis of the survey results indicates that pathology residents are more likely to believe that their income may be lower if they select a career that has a clinical chemistry focus and that their faculty do not value clinical chemistry as much as the anatomic pathology part of the residency. Residents also report that clinical chemistry is not as enjoyable as anatomic pathology rotations during residency or preferable as a sole career path. A large proportion of residents also believe that they will be slightly prepared or not prepared to practice clinical chemistry by the end of their residency and that they do not have enough background and/or time to learn clinical chemistry during their residency programs to be able to practice this specialty effectively post graduation. -Our survey results suggest that many pathology residents do not have a positive attitude toward clinical chemistry and do not experience a supportive learning environment with an expectation that they will become competent in clinical chemistry with a residency alone.

  3. Internal medicine residents' perceived ability to direct patient care: impact of gender and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise; Carnes, Molly

    2008-12-01

    Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation.

  4. Clinical decision-making among new graduate nurses attending residency programs in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the impact of residency programs on clinical decision-making of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. This descriptive study employed a convenience sample (N=98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Clinical decision-making skills were measured using the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale. Descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, and multiple linear regression analysis were utilized to examine the effect of residency programs on new graduate nurses' clinical decision-making skills. On average, resident nurses had significantly higher levels of clinical decision-making skills than non-residents (t=23.25, p=0.000). Enrollment in a residency program explained 86.9% of the variance in total clinical decision making controlling for age and overall grade point average. The findings of this study support evidence in the nursing literature conducted primarily in the US and Europe that residency programs have a positive influence on new graduate nurses' clinical decision-making skills. This is the first study to examine the impact of residency programs on clinical decision-making among new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program. The findings of this study underscore the need for the development and implementation of residency programs for all new nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simulation training for residents focused on mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spadaro, Savino; Karbing, Dan Stieper; Fogagnolo, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    to lag. High-fidelity simulation with a mannequin allows students to interact in lifelike situations; this may be a valuable addition to traditional didactic teaching. The purpose of this study is to compare computer-based and mannequin-based approaches for training residents on MV. METHODS......: This prospective randomized single-blind trial involved 50 residents. All participants attended the same didactic lecture on respiratory pathophysiology and were subsequently randomized into two groups: the mannequin group (n = 25) and the computer screenbased simulator group (n = 25). One week later, each...

  6. Maintaining dignity. The perspective of nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2014-01-01

    body image; feeling recognised and valued as a person of worth; Abilities and opportunities for changing of lifevalues; to exert control; to form and maintain meaningful relationships and to participation in meaningful activity. Conclusion. Although there is no one way to maintain dignity, the themes...... the perspective of the nursing home residents. Method. This qualitative study has an explorative design, based on qualitative individual research interviews. Twenty-eight nursing home residents were included from six nursing homes in Scandi-navia. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by Ricoeur...

  7. Are there enough jobs in cardiothoracic surgery? The thoracic surgery residents association job placement survey for finishing residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jorge D; Lee, Richard; Wheatley, Grayson H; Doty, John R

    2004-11-01

    Applications to cardiothoracic surgery training programs have declined. Anecdotal evidence suggests limited job availability for residents completing cardiothoracic training, which may contribute to this decline. This survey sought to document the experience of current, graduating residents. In June 2003, the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association surveyed residents completing accredited cardiothoracic training or additional subspecialization, utilizing a web-based survey hosted by CTSNet. Resident participation was voluntary and anonymous. Of the estimated 140 graduates, 89 responded. The majority were male (91.0%, n = 81), married (80.0%, n = 71), and had children (61.0%, n = 54). Average age was 36.2 years old, and mean educational debt was less than 50K dollars. Of the 89 respondents, 77 initially sought jobs and 12 sought additional training. For residents seeking jobs, 19.5% (n = 15) received no offers and 13 of these ultimately pursued additional training. Acquired jobs were in private (53.0%, n = 34) or academic practice (47.0%, n = 30), with 73.4% (n = 47) involving general thoracic surgery. Most would again choose cardiothoracic surgery as a career (75.5%, n = 67), and 62.0% (n = 55) would again submit the same match list. However, 87.0% (n = 77) believed that the number of trainees should be decreased, 81.0% (n = 72) believed that reimbursement for cardiothoracic surgery is inadequate, and 77.5% (n = 69) believed that excessively low reimbursement will result in restricted access or decreased quality for patients. Most cardiothoracic residents were successful in finding employment after training. A substantial percentage, however, pursued additional training due to lack of job opportunities. Although most finishing residents were satisfied with training and career choice, significant concerns exist regarding job opportunities and compensation. These conditions may lead to difficulty in recruitment to the specialty.

  8. Potentially modifiable resident characteristics that are associated with physical or verbal aggression among nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Ralph; Tinetti, Mary E; Allore, Heather G; Drickamer, Margaret A

    2006-06-26

    Physical aggression by nursing home residents is a burden to residents and staff. The identification of modifiable correlates would facilitate developing preventive strategies. The objectives of the study were to determine potentially modifiable resident characteristics that are associated with physical aggression and to correlate these characteristics with verbal aggression. This was a cross-sectional study of nursing home residents in 5 states who had at least 1 annual Minimum Data Set assessment completed during 2002. Case subjects were defined as nursing home residents 60 years and older with dementia who were reported to have been physically aggressive in the week before their assessment. Control subjects were all other residents 60 years and older with dementia. The main outcome measure was being physically aggressive during the past week. A total of 103 344 residents met study criteria, of whom 7120 (6.9%) had been physically aggressive in the week before their annual Minimum Data Set assessment. After adjustment for potential confounders, including age, sex, severity of cognitive impairment, and dependence in activities of daily living, physical aggression was associated with depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.3; 99% confidence interval [CI], 3.0-3.6), delusions (AOR, 2.0; 99% CI, 1.7-2.4), hallucinations (AOR, 1.4; 99% CI, 1.1-1.8), and constipation (AOR, 1.3; 99% CI, 1.2-1.5). Urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, fevers, reported pain, and participation in recreational activities were not significantly associated with physical aggression in multivariate analyses (P >.01 for all). Except for constipation, the correlates of verbal aggression were similar to those of physical aggression. If the associations we have estimated are causal, then treatment of depression, delusions, hallucinations, and constipation may reduce physical aggression among nursing home residents.

  9. Impact of Generalist Physician Initiatives on Residency Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Malloy

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To compare the residency selection choices of students who experienced courses resulting from generalist physician initiatives to choices made by students prior to the implementation of those courses and to describe the characteristics of students selecting primary care residencies. Background:In the fall of 1994 a first year Community Continuity Experience course was initiated and in the summer of 1995 a third year Multidisciplinary Ambulatory Clerkship was begun at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. These courses were inserted into the curriculum to enhance and promote primary care education. Design/Methods:We examined the residency selections of cohorts of graduating medical students before (1992-1996 and after (1997-1999 the implementation of the primary care courses. Survey information on career preferences at matriculation and in the fourth year of medical school were available for students graduating after the programs began. We compared the career preferences and characteristics of those students who selected a primary care residency to those who did not. Results:Prior to the implementation of the programs, 45%(425/950 of students graduating selected primary care residencies compared to 45% (210/465 of students participating in the programs (p=0.88. At matriculation, 45% of students had listed a primary care discipline as their first career choice. Among the students who had indicated this degree of primary care interest 61% ended up matching in a primary care discipline. At year 4, 31% of students indicated a primary care discipline as their first career choice and 92% of these students matched to a primary care residency. By univariate analysis, minority students (53% were more likely to select a primary care residency than non-minority students (40%; students in the two lowest grade point average quartiles (55% and 50% selected primary care residencies compared to 37% and 38% of students in the top 2

  10. Improving Orthopedic Resident Knowledge of Documentation, Coding, and Medicare Fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varacallo, Matthew A; Wolf, Michael; Herman, Martin J

    Most residency programs still lack formal education and training on the basic clinical documentation and coding principles. Today's physicians are continuously being held to increasing standards for correct coding and documentation, yet little has changed in the residency training curricula to keep pace with these increasing standards. Although there are many barriers to implementing these topics formally, the main concern has been the lack of time and resources. Thus, simple models may have the best chance for success at widespread implementation. The first goal of the study was to assess a group of orthopedic residents' fund of knowledge regarding basic clinical documentation guidelines, coding principles, and their ability to appropriately identify cases of Medicare fraud. The second goal was to analyze a single, high-yield educational session's effect on overall resident knowledge acquisition and awareness of these concepts. Orthopedic residents belonging to 1 of 2 separate residency programs voluntarily and anonymously participated. All were asked to complete a baseline assessment examination, followed by attending a 45-minute lecture given by the same orthopedic faculty member who remained blinded to the test questions. Each resident then completed a postsession examination. Each resident was also asked to self-rate his or her documentation and coding level of comfort on a Likert scale (1-5). Statistical significance was set at p examination scores were no different between senior and junior residents (p > 0.20). The high-yield teaching session significantly improved the average total examination scores at both sites (p 0.10). The current healthcare environment necessitates better physician awareness regarding clinical documentation guidelines and coding principles. Very few adjustments to incorporate these teachings have been made to most residency training curricula, and the lack of time and resources remains the concern of many surgical programs. We have

  11. Determinants of Idaho Hispanic Female Participation in Adult Vocational Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsching, Teresa; Stenberg, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    In group interviews with 32 Idaho Hispanic females participating in adult vocational education and 31 nonparticipants, length of residency, marital status, and educational attainment predicted participation. Age, barriers, and degree of acculturation related to nonparticipation. (SK)

  12. Projections of Future Participation and Needs in Outdoor Recreation for North Dakota

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Randall S.; Leitch, Jay A.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents projected participation levels in selected outdoor recreation activities for North Dakota residents. It is the fifth study to collect data on recreation participation rates for North Dakota's State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

  13. Improving Care and Education Through a Radiology Resident-driven Clinical Consultation Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Gayle R; Sullivan, Courtney; Holzwanger, Daniel; Giambrone, Ashley E; Min, Robert J; Hentel, Keith D

    2017-09-01

    As health care moves toward bundled payment systems and merit-based incentive models, increasing awareness of the value of the radiologist is essential. A resident-driven clinical imaging rounds (CIR) program initiated at our institution allows radiologists to actively and directly participate in the team-based medical model. A retrospective review of survey data evaluated the qualitative and quantitative effects of CIR on clinical management, communication, and education of referring providers and radiology residents. The initial 10 months of a resident-organized CIR were evaluated in a retrospective study. Twenty radiology residents and 150 internal medicine physicians and medical students participated in imaging rounds. An anonymous survey of participants was performed and results were analyzed. Eighty-five percent of radiology resident participants completed the survey (N = 17). Approximately 30% of internal medicine participants completed the survey (N = 45). There was an overwhelming positive review of imaging rounds, with a large majority of all groups agreeing that imaging rounds improve education, communication, and patient care. Resident-driven imaging rounds provide a valuable opportunity to improve communication, education, and patient care. We have created a CIR with a sustainable workflow that allows direct and regularly scheduled imaging-medicine consultation valued by both radiologists and internal medicine physicians, improving the quality of patient care and providing education to our radiology residents in value-based care. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Speed dating for mentors: a novel approach to mentor/mentee pairing in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Akia D; Schwartzman, Jacob; Kunac, Anastasia

    2017-06-15

    Resident-resident mentoring offers significant benefits. Previous works have shown that the quality of the mentorship pairing is important, but techniques of pairing have seldom been described. We describe a system for mentor-mentee pairing that we call "Speed Dating for Mentors" (SDM). The SDM activity took place in an academic general surgery residency program in the Northeast. Senior residents met with junior residents (JR) in 90-second intervals. On completion of interviews, residents documented their top three choices-this was used to create senior-junior resident pairings. A cross-sectional Likert survey was conducted with univariate analysis of satisfaction with the SDM event. Forty-two surgical residents participated in SDM-23 junior residents and 19 senior residents-resulting in 23 mentor-mentee pairings. Fourteen pairs were generated, where both mentor and mentee were among top three choices, seven pairings generated where either/or was a top three choice, and two pairings were assigned; six pairs were assigned for nonattendees. A total of 36 surveys were completed-28 (78%) respondents participated in SDM compared to eight (22%) who did not. Eighty-five percent of respondents who attended were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their pairing compared to only 12% of nonattendees (P = 0.001). "Speed dating" is a novel approach to forming mentorship pairings and identifying mentors/mentees with similar interests. Residents who attended the event were satisfied with the event and with the outcome of their mentor/mentee pairing. Further investigations are warranted to determine what effects resident mentoring has on resident performance, stress levels, and well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A case-based approach for teaching professionalism to residents with online discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK T. NADEAU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs must demonstrate that their residents are taught and assessed in professionalism. Most programs struggle with finding viable ways to teach and assess this critical competency. UTHSCSA Family and Community Medicine Residency developed an innovative option for interactive learning and assessment of residents in this competency which would be transferrable to other programs and specialties. Methods: The innovative approach uses an asynchronous online format on Blackboard. Threaded discussions on Blackboard require thoughtful reflective writing after case assessment and critical evaluation of other resident posts. Participation, content and progress of all resident postings are monitored by administrative staff and faculty. Faculty can further engage the residents at any point to deepen the discussion and learning. Results: 100% of all senior residents attained the required learning objectives. All were actively engaged in the assignments. Six cases have been developed using a Learning Matrix to demonstrate evaluation areas from the specialty specific competencies. Written feedback from residents verified the validity of case content in context of their current clinical practice. Postings by residents have provided value and insight for the faculty to access the professional development of our Family Medicine residents. The Clinical Competency Committee evaluates all third year residents using this information specific to the professionalism milestones. By using an asynchronous online approach to case discussion, all residents are involved with all aspects of this curriculum. Conclusions: More specific measurable learning outcomes are possible using this approach. Resident participation and engagement is easier to track and monitor than a lecture-based format and easier to capture valuable data than relying on evaluation feedback. Our Annual Review process will identify areas for improvement in the existing cases and help

  16. Training of European urology residents in laparoscopy: results of a pan-European survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furriel, Frederico T. G.; Laguna, Maria P.; Figueiredo, Arnaldo J. C.; Nunes, Pedro T. C.; Rassweiler, Jens J.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the participation of European urology residents in urological laparoscopy, their training patterns and facilities available in European Urology Departments. A survey, consisting of 23 questions concerning laparoscopic training, was published online as well as distributed on paper, during

  17. RESIDENTS' PERSPECTIVES TOWARDS CONSERVATION IN GEORGE TOWN WORLD HERITAGE CITY: A POST-UNESCO LISTING SCENARIO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoke Mui Lim; Suet Leng Khoo; Kean Sing Ch'ng

    2014-01-01

      Being inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage City since 2008, this scenario calls into question the voices, the participation and the aspirations of George Town residents themselves in the process...

  18. Parent Educators Train Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, B. Annye

    1987-01-01

    Describes a training program developed and operated by parent educators at the Children's Health Council that is designed to help pediatric resident medical students at Stanford University in their efforts to understand parents better and give them useful advice on common child rearing questions. (BB)

  19. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  20. Resilience Approach for Medical Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, R.A.; Bos, E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Medical residents are in a vulnerable position. While still in training, they are responsible for patient care. They have a dependent relation with their supervisor and low decision latitude. An intervention was developed to increase individual and system resilience, addressing burnout, patient

  1. Geriatric medicine training for family practice residents in the 21st century: a report from the Residency Assistance Program/Harfford Geriatrics Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of geriatric medicine training for family practice residents is a particular challenge for community-based programs. With support from the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York City, the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) implemented in 1995 a multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. This report summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for residency directors. The goals of the retreats were to build recognition among the residency directors of the skills that future family physicians will require to be successful providers of primary care to older adults and to allow the residency directors to identify and develop solutions to barriers to improving geriatric medicine training for residents. Forty-six program directors participated in the three retreats between February 2000 and February 2001. The participants represented 52 programs and rural tracks in all geographic regions, small and large programs, and urban and rural settings. The program directors developed a consensus on the geriatric medicine knowledge, skills, and attitudes that should be expected of all family practice residency graduates; developed a list of basic, required educational resources for each family practice residency program; and proposed solutions to common obstacles to successful curriculum development.

  2. Educational Intervention to Improve Code Status Discussion Proficiency Among Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Benjamin; Blinderman, Craig; de Meritens, Alexandre Buckley; Chatterjee-Paer, Sudeshna; Ratan, Rini B; Prigerson, Holly G; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Wright, Jason D; Tergas, Ana I

    2017-01-01

    Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents receive little formal training in conducting code status discussions (CSDs). We piloted an educational intervention to improve resident confidence and competence at conducting CSDs. The OB/GYN residents at a single institution participated in a 3-part educational program. First, participants reviewed a journal article and completed an online module. Second, they received a didactic lecture followed by a resident-to-resident mock CSD. Finally, participants had a videotaped CSD with a standardized patient (SP). Pre- and postintervention surveys and performance evaluations were analyzed. A subgroup analysis was performed on those with completed data sets. Participants included 24 residents in postgraduate years (PGY) 1 to 4: 85% were female with a mean age of 29 years; 83% completed the entrance survey; 63% completed the SP CSD; and 42% completed of all parts of the intervention. Residents initially felt most prepared to discuss treatment options (3.3/5 on a Likert scale) and less prepared to discuss hospice, end-of-life care, and code status (2.2/5, 2.2/5, and 2.3/5, respectively). Performance during the resident-to-resident CSD was variable with scores (% of skills achieved) ranging from 27% to 93% (mean 64%). Performance at the SP encounter was similar with scores ranging from 40% to 73% (mean 56%). After intervention, residents felt more prepared for CSDs (3.7/5) and end-of-life care (3.9/5). The subgroup analysis failed to show a significant change in skill performance from the first to the second CSD. Participants found the components of this intervention helpful and reported improved confidence at conducting CSDs.

  3. Noticeable Variations in the Educational Exposure During Residency in Danish Orthopedic Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Eske; Fridberg, Marie; Knudsen, Ulrik Kragegaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the educational exposure during residency in Danish orthopedic departments. DESIGN: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data were gathered from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014 through a nationwide web-based questionnaire....... CONCLUSIONS: A large variation in the educational exposure was found among the Danish orthopedic departments. Numbers indicate that Danish residents, compared with their US counterparts, operate considerably less during residency. Most residents work overtime and many of them work for free to participate...

  4. Interactions between medical residents and drug companies: a national survey after the Mediator® affair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Montastruc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to describe exposure and attitudes of French medical residents towards pharmaceutical industry. The study was performed shortly after the Mediator affair which revealed several serious conflicts of interest inside the French health system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study was implemented among residents from 6 French medical faculties. Independent education in pharmacology, attitudes towards the practices of pharmaceutical sales representatives, opinions concerning the pharmaceutical industry, quality of information provided by the pharmaceutical industry, and opinions about pharmaceutical company sponsorship were investigated through a web-based questionnaire. We also assessed potential changes in resident attitudes following the Mediator affair. The mean value of exposure to drug companies was 1.9 times per month. Global opinions towards drug company information were negative for 42.7% of the residents and positive for only 8.2%. Surprisingly, 81.6% of residents claimed that they had not changed their practices regarding drug information since the Mediator affair. Multivariate analyses found that residents in anesthesiology were less likely to be exposed than others (OR = 0.17 CI95% [0.05-0.61], exposure was significantly higher at the beginning of residence (p<0.001 and residents who had a more positive opinion were more frequently exposed to drug companies (OR = 2.12 CI95% [1.07-4.22]. CONCLUSIONS: Resident exposure to drug companies is around 1 contact every 2 weeks. Global opinion towards drug information provided by pharmaceutical companies was negative for around 1 out of 2 residents. In contrast, residents tend to consider the influences of the Mediator affair on their practice as relatively low. This survey enabled us to identify profiles of residents who are obviously less exposed to pharmaceutical industry. Current regulatory provisions are not sufficient, indicating that

  5. A study of balance, gait and psychotropic drug use in relation to fall risk in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Sterke (Carolyn)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFalls are a major health problem in nursing home residents with dementia. In nursing homes one-third of all falls results in an injury. In order to take tailor-made preventive measures in time, the fall risk profile of each individual nursing home resident should be periodically

  6. How do Perceptions of Autonomy Differ in General Surgery Training Between Faculty, Senior Residents, Hospital Administrators, and the General Public? A Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempenich, Jason W; Willis, Ross E; Rakosi, Robert; Wiersch, John; Schenarts, Paul Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Identify barriers to resident autonomy in today's educational environment as perceived through 4 selected groups: senior surgical residents, teaching faculty, hospital administration, and the general public. Anonymous surveys were created and distributed to senior residents, faculty, and hospital administrators working within 3 residency programs. The opinions of a convenience sample of the general public were also assessed using a similar survey. Keesler Medical Center, Keesler AFB, MS; the University of Texas Health Science of San Antonio, TX; and the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. A total of 169 responses were collected: 32 residents, 50 faculty, 20 administrators, and 67 general public. Faculty and residents agree that when attending staff grant more autonomy, residents' self-confidence and sense of ownership improve. Faculty felt that residents should have less autonomy than residents did (p autonomy at their institution, 47% of residents felt that they had too little autonomy and 38% of faculty agreed. No resident or faculty felt that residents had too much autonomy at their institution. The general public were more welcoming of resident participation than faculty (p = 0.002) and administrators (p = 0.02) predicted they would be. When the general public were asked regarding their opinions about resident participation with complex procedures, they were less welcoming than faculty, administrators, and residents thought (p autonomy as important for resident development. The general public are more receptive to resident participation than anticipated. However, with increasing procedural complexity and resident independence, they were less inclined to have residents involved. The general public also had more concerns regarding quality of care provided by residents than the other groups had. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Teaching home environmental health to resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Greenberg, Stuart; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2011-01-01

    Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The Case Healthy Homes and Patients Program addresses these deficiencies in physician training while providing direct services to high-risk households. Pediatric and family practice resident physicians participate in healthy home inspections and interventions for their primary care patients and follow up on identified risks during health maintenance and acute illness visits.

  8. Patient safety: knowledge between multiprofessional residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João Lucas Campos de; Silva, Simone Viana da; Santos, Pamela Regina Dos; Matsuda, Laura Misue; Tonini, Nelsi Salete; Nicola, Anair Lazzari

    2017-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of multiprofesional residents in health about the security of the patient theme. Cross-sectional study, quantitative, developed with graduate courses/residence specialties of health in a public university of Paraná, Brazil. Participants (n=78) answered a questionnaire containing nine objective questions related to patient safety. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, in proportion measures. The minimum 75% of correct answers was considered the cutoff for positive evaluation. The sample was predominantly composed of young people from medical programs. Almost half of the items evaluated (n=5) achieved the established positive pattern, especially those who dealt with the hand hygiene moments (98.8%) and goal of the Patient Safety National Program (92.3%). The identification of the patient was the worst rated item (37.7%). In the analysis by professional areas, only the Nursing reached the standard of hits established. Knowledge of the residents was threshold. Verificar o conhecimento de residentes multiprofissionais na área da saúde sobre o tema segurança do paciente. Estudo transversal, quantitativo, desenvolvido com pós-graduandos dos cursos/especialidades de residência da área da saúde de uma universidade pública do Paraná. Os participantes (n=78) responderam um questionário contendo nove questões objetivas relacionadas com a segurança do paciente. Os dados foram analisados por estatística descritiva, em medidas de proporção. O mínimo de 75% de acertos foi considerado ponto de corte para avaliação positiva. A amostra foi composta por profissionais predominantemente jovens, oriundos de programas médicos. Quase metade dos itens avaliados (n=5) alcançou o padrão de positividade estabelecido, com destaque para os que trataram dos momentos de higienização das mãos (98,8%) e o objetivo do Programa Nacional de Segurança do Paciente (92,3%). A identificação do paciente foi o pior item avaliado (37,7%). Na an

  9. Oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martina; Kupfer, Ramona; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Köpke, Sascha

    2016-09-30

    3253 nursing home residents in this review; seven of these trials used cluster randomisation. The mean resident age ranged from 78 to 86 years across studies, and most participants were women (more than 66% in all studies). The proportion of residents with dental protheses ranged from 62% to 87%, and the proportion of edentulous residents ranged from 32% to 90% across studies.Eight studies compared educational interventions with information and practical components versus (optimised) usual care, while the ninth study compared educational interventions with information only versus usual care. All interventions included educational sessions on oral health for nursing staff (five trials) or for both staff and residents (four trials), and used more than one active component. Follow-up of included studies ranged from three months to five years.No study showed overall low risk of bias. Four studies had a high risk of bias, and the other five studies were at unclear risk of bias.None of the trials assessed our predefined primary outcomes 'oral health' and 'oral health-related quality of life'. All trials assessed our third primary outcome, 'dental or denture plaque'. Meta-analyses showed no evidence of a difference between interventions and usual care for dental plaque (mean difference -0.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26 to 0.17; six trials; 437 participants; low quality evidence) or denture plaque (standardised mean difference -0.60, 95% CI -1.25 to 0.05; five trials; 816 participants; low quality evidence). None of the studies assessed adverse events of the intervention. We found insufficient evidence to draw robust conclusions about the effects of oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents. We did not find evidence of meaningful effects of educational interventions on any measure of residents' oral health; however, the quality of the available evidence is low. More adequately powered and high-quality studies using relevant outcome

  10. Appalachian residents' experiences with and management of multiple morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Bardach, Shoshana H; Manchikanti, Kavita N; Goodenow, Anne C

    2011-05-01

    Approximately three fourths of middle-aged and older adults have at least two simultaneously occurring chronic conditions ("multiple morbidity," or MM), a trend expected to increase dramatically throughout the world. Rural residents, who tend to have fewer personal and health resources, are more likely to experience MM. To improve our understanding of the ways in which vulnerable, rural residents in the United States experience and manage MM, we interviewed 20 rural Appalachian residents with MM. We identified the following themes: (a) MM has multifaceted challenges and is viewed as more than the sum of its parts; (b) numerous challenges exist to optimal MM self-management, particularly in a rural, underresourced context; however, (c) participants described strategic methods of managing MM, including prioritizing certain conditions and management strategies and drawing heavily on assistance from informal and formal sources.

  11. Variability of physics education in radiation oncology medical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra J; Moskvin, Vadim

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of medical physics education for radiation oncology medical residents. An independent survey regarding physics education was carried out using e-mail. The survey contained 12 questions addressing the duration, length, and quality of education. Responses were tabulated and compared with the recommended educational scheme. Nearly 56% of institutions participated in this survey. Educational patterns were found to be significantly variable among institutions. Some have minimum physics education (10 lectures), and some have 90 lectures per year. In general, two-thirds of the institutions require residents to attend classes up to the third year. Significant variability of physics education for radiation oncology medical residents was observed, contrary to the national recommendations. With advanced treatment techniques, physics education should be given more importance, and the number of lectures should be increased to accommodate every aspect of radiation oncology practice. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  13. Nutritional status and the incidence of pneumonia in nursing home residents: results from the INCUR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaiditi, Eirini; Demougeot, Laurent; Lilamand, Matthieu; Guyonnet, Sophie; Vellas, Bruno; Cesari, Matteo

    2014-08-01

    To examine the predictive value of the Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form (MNA-SF) and its individual items on the incidence of pneumonia. Prospective observational cohort study over 1-year of follow-up. A total of 773 older persons (74.4% women) living in 13 French nursing homes from the Incidence of pNeumonia and related ConseqUences in nursing home Residents (INCUR) study. Nutritional status was assessed using the MNA-SF questionnaire at baseline. Diagnosis of pneumonia was based on clinical conditions retrieved from a medical chart. Cox proportional hazard models were applied to test whether the MNA-SF score and its single components predict pneumonia events over 1 year of follow-up. After 1 year of follow-up, 160 (21%) incident cases of pneumonia were recorded. Mean age of participants was 86.2 (SD 7.5) years. Mean MNA-SF score was 9.8 (SD 2.4), with more than half of the participants (58.7%) being at risk of malnutrition (8-11 points). The total MNA-SF score and its categories did not predict the studied outcome. However, a single component of the MNA-SF score, specifically decreased mobility, was a significant risk factor for pneumonia (hazard ratio 2.289; 95% confidence interval 1.357-3.860; P = .002), independently of potential confounders. The total MNA-SF score did not predict the incidence of pneumonia. However, decreased mobility was a significant risk factor, implying that individual components of the MNA-SF should be more carefully explored to verify whether they might be used for detecting specific declines of the health status in nursing home residents, thus potentially improving the risk profile estimation of such a complex population. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel mentorship programme for residents integrating academic development, clinical teaching and graduate medical education assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Nadel, Eric S

    2016-02-01

    Mentorship fosters career development and growth. During residency training, mentorship should support clinical development along with intellectual and academic interests. Reported resident mentoring programmes do not typically include clinical components. We designed a programme that combines academic development with clinical feedback and assessment in a four-year emergency medicine residency programme. Incoming interns were assigned an advisor. At the conclusion of the intern year, residents actively participated in selecting a mentor for the duration of residency. The programme consisted of quarterly meetings, direct clinical observation and specific competency assessment, assistance with lecture preparation, real-time feedback on presentations, simulation coaching sessions, and discussions related to career development. Faculty participation was recognized as a valuable component of the annual review process. Residents were surveyed about the overall programme and individual components. Over 88 % of the respondents said that the programme was valuable and should be continued. Senior residents most valued the quarterly meetings and presentation help and feedback. Junior residents strongly valued the clinical observation and simulation sessions. A comprehensive mentorship programme integrating clinical, professional and academic development provides residents individualized feedback and coaching and is valued by trainees. Individualized assessment of clinical competencies can be conducted through such a programme.

  15. Perception of Preparedness for Clinical Work Among New Residents: A Cross-sectional Study from Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sinawi, Hamed; Al Alawi, Mohammed; Al Qubtan, Ali; Al Lawati, Jaber; Al Habsi, Assad; Jose, Sachin

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate new residents' perceptions of their own preparedness for clinical practice and examine the associated factors. This is a cross-sectional study conducted on August 20-23, 2016. New residents accepted for postgraduate training by Oman Medical Specialty Board were asked to complete the Preparation for Hospital Practice Questionnaire (PHPQ). Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22. A total of 160 residents were invited to participate in this study. Out of 160, 140 residents participated (87.5%), 70.7% were female and 59.3% were graduates from Sultan Qaboos University (SQU). Ninety-nine percent of the graduates were either 'well prepared' or 'fairly well prepared' for hospital practice. Male residents scored higher in the confidence scale, while residents who did a post-internship general practice placement scored higher in understanding science. Graduates from Oman Medical College felt more prepared compared to graduates from SQU. Most of the new residents were well prepared to clinical work. Factors such as place of undergraduate study, training, and duration of internship significantly influenced the residents' perception of preparedness. Addressing these factors will enhance residents' preparedness for clinical work.

  16. Pharmacy residents' attitudes toward pharmaceutical industry promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashker, Sumer; Burkiewicz, Jill S

    2007-08-15

    The attitudes of pharmacy residents toward pharmaceutical industry promotion and the perceived effects of such promotion on the knowledge and professional practice of the residents were studied. A questionnaire study of current postgraduate year 1 and postgraduate year 2 pharmacy residents was conducted. Questions were adapted from instruments used in studies of medical student or physician attitudes regarding the pharmaceutical industry. The questionnaire requested demographic information about the resident, information regarding the resident's exposure to specific types of pharmaceutical company-related activities, and the resident's perception of whether the residency program or department had policies or guidelines regarding interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. Questions investigated the attitudes toward pharmaceutical industry promotion and the perceived influence of pharmaceutical industry promotion on the professional knowledge and behavior of the residents. Responses were received from 496 pharmacy residents. Nearly all (89%) residents agreed that pharmaceutical company-sponsored educational events enhance knowledge. Almost half (43%) of the respondents reported that information from educational events influences therapeutic recommendations. One quarter (26%) of the pharmacy residents indicated prior training regarding pharmacist-industry interactions, and most (60%) residents indicated that their institution's residencies or departments have policies regarding interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. Most surveyed pharmacy residents believed that educational events sponsored by pharmaceutical companies enhance knowledge. Respondents whose institutions had policies or who had received training about such events were less likely than other respondents to perceive an influence of the events on their knowledge and behavior.

  17. Still under the microscope: can a surgical aptitude test predict otolaryngology resident performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eric J; Price, Daniel L; Van Abel, Kathryn M; Carlson, Matthew L

    2015-02-01

    Application to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency is highly competitive, and the interview process strives to select qualified applicants with a high aptitude for the specialty. Commonly employed criteria for applicant selection have failed to show correlation with proficiency during residency training. We evaluate the correlation between the results of a surgical aptitude test administered to otolaryngology resident applicants and their performance during residency. Retrospective study at an academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency program. Between 2007 and 2013, 224 resident applicants participated in a previously described surgical aptitude test administered at a microvascular surgical station. The composite score and attitudinal scores for 24 consecutive residents who matched at our institution were recorded, and their residency performance was analyzed by faculty survey on a five-point scale. The composite and attitudinal scores were analyzed for correlation with residency performance score by regression analysis. Twenty-four residents were evaluated for overall quality as a clinician by eight faculty members who were blinded to the results of surgical aptitude testing. The results of these surveys showed good inter-rater reliability. Both the overall aptitude test scores and the subset attitudinal score showed reliability in predicting performance during residency training. The goal of the residency selection process is to evaluate the candidate's potential for success in residency and beyond. The results of this study suggest that a simple-to-administer clinical skills test may have predictive value for success in residency and clinician quality. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Effect of Doximity Residency Rankings on Residency Applicants’ Program Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee M. Rolston

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Choosing a residency program is a stressful and important decision. Doximity released residency program rankings by specialty in September 2014. This study sought to investigate the impact of those rankings on residency application choices made by fourth year medical students. Methods: A 12-item survey was administered in October 2014 to fourth year medical students at three schools. Students indicated their specialty, awareness of and perceived accuracy of the rankings, and the rankings’ impact on the programs to which they chose to apply. Descriptive statistics were reported for all students and those applying to Emergency Medicine (EM. Results: A total of 461 (75.8% students responded, with 425 applying in one of the 20 Doximity ranked specialties. Of the 425, 247 (58% were aware of the rankings and 177 looked at them. On a 1-100 scale (100=very accurate, students reported a mean ranking accuracy rating of 56.7 (SD 20.3. Forty-five percent of students who looked at the rankings modified the number of programs to which they applied. The majority added programs. Of the 47 students applying to EM, 18 looked at the rankings and 33% changed their application list with most adding programs. Conclusion: The Doximity rankings had real effects on students applying to residencies as almost half of students who looked at the rankings modified their program list. Additionally, students found the rankings to be moderately accurate. Graduating students might benefit from emphasis on more objective characterization of programs to assess in light of their own interests and personal/career goals

  19. A Simulation-based, cognitive assessment of resident decision making during complex urinary catheterization scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathwani, Jay N; Law, Katherine E; Witt, Anna K; Ray, R D; DiMarco, S M; Pugh, C M

    2017-04-01

    This study explores general surgery residents' decision making skills in uncommon, complex urinary catheter scenarios. 40 residents were presented with two scenarios. Scenario A was a male with traumatic urethral injury and scenario B was a male with complete urinary blockage. Residents verbalized whether they would catheterize the patient and described the workup and management of suspected pathologies. Residents' decision paths were documented and analyzed. In scenario A, 45% of participants chose to immediately consult Urology. 47.5% named five diagnostic tests to decide if catheterization was safe. In scenario B, 27% chose to catheterize with a 16 French Coude. When faced with catheterization failure, participants randomly upsized or downsized catheters. Chi-square analysis revealed no measurable consensus amongst participants. Residents need more training in complex decision making for urinary catheterization. The decision trees generated in this study provide a useful blueprint of residents' learning needs. Exploration of general surgery residents' decision making skills in uncommon, complex urinary catheter scenarios revealed major deficiencies. The resulting decision trees reveal residents' learning needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The craft of writing: a physician-writer's workshop for resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Anna B; Hansen, Helena; Rastegar, Asghar

    2006-10-01

    How can residency programs help trainees address conflicting emotions about their professional roles and cultivate a curiosity about their patients' lives beyond their diseases? We drew on the medical humanities to address these challenges by creating an intensive writing workshop for internal medicine residents. To help participants become better physicians by reflecting on their experiences and on what gives meaning to work and life. This paper describes the workshop and how residents were affected by the focus on the craft of writing. A group of 15 residents from 3 training programs affiliated with 1 institution. We engaged the expertise of physician-writer Abraham Verghese in planning and facilitating the 2 and one-half day workshop. Residents' submissions were discussed with a focus on the effectiveness of the writing. We also conducted a focus group with participants to evaluate the workshop. Themes in the writing included dysphoria, impotence of the physician, and the healing power of compassion. Our focus group data suggested that this workshop served as a creative outlet from the rigors of medicine, created a sense of community among participants, enhanced both self-awareness and awareness of their patients' lives, and increased intra-institutional and extra-institutional interest in writing and the residency program. Teaching creative writing to residents in an intensive workshop may deepen interactions with peers and patients, improve writing skills, and increase interest in writing and the residency program.

  1. Use of a policy debate to teach residents about health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu Q C; Hirsch, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Resident education involves didactics and pedagogic strategies using a variety of tools and technologies in order to improve critical thinking skills. Debating is used in educational settings to improve critical thinking skills, but there have been no reports of its use in residency education. The present paper describes the use of debate to teach resident physicians about health care reform. We aimed to describe the method of using a debate in graduate medical education. Second-year through fourth-year physical medicine and rehabilitation residents participated in a moderated policy debate in which they deliberated whether the United States has one of the "best health care system(s) in the world." Following the debate, the participants completed an unvalidated open-ended questionnaire about health care reform. Although residents expressed initial concerns about participating in a public debate on health care reform, all faculty and residents expressed that the debate was robust, animated, and enjoyed by all. Components of holding a successful debate on health care reform were noted to be: (1) getting "buy-in" from the resident physicians; (2) preparing the debate; and (3) follow-up. The debate facilitated the study of a large, complex topic like health care reform. It created an active learning process. It encouraged learners to keenly attend to an opposing perspective while enthusiastically defending their position. We conclude that the use of debates as a teaching tool in resident education is valuable and should be explored further.

  2. Burnout in Japanese residents and its associations with temperament and character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Ryoei; Matsuo, Hisae; Takeda, Ryuichiro; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    High risk of burnout in healthcare workers has long been recognized. However, there are no methods to predict vulnerability to burnout. We examined whether temperament and character are associated with burnout and depressive state in residents by using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). The TCI was used for residents at the beginning of clinical training and then the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were administered at the beginning of clinical training and after four and ten months. Participants were 85 residents who started clinical training after graduating from the University of Miyazaki Hospital in April 2012 and 2013. After ten months, 23.5% of participants were newly identified with burnout using the MBI-GS and 15.3% of participants were newly diagnosed with depressive state using the SDS. We found that residents with high Cooperativeness were significantly more prone to burnout and that residents with high Harm Avoidance and low Self-Directedness were significantly more prone to depressive states. Our results suggest that the TCI can predict not only the risk for future depressive state but also the risk for future burnout. We feel it is important for the resident education system to identify residents with these temperament and character traits and to help high-risk residents avoid burnout and depressive state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayana Balakrishnan Ph.D and D.Sc. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 6 July 1927. Date of death: 21 April 2010. Specialization: Aquatic Biology & Fisheries and Ecology Last known address: Swathi, Residency Road, Women's College Junction, Thycaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695 014.

  4. Profile of the participants of the “ pregnant women´s interdisciplinary treatment service” Perfil das participantes do “serviço de atendimento interdisciplinar à gestante”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Cristina Hilberath Moreira

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The period of gestation is considered a period of deep changes in the life of a woman. Thus, all the information and knowledge are necessary to lessen the anxieties and anguishes that occur in such period. It is essential an interdisciplinary service that focuses both the psychological and physical aspects in order to assist the pregnant woman in an overall manner. The objective of this study was to outline the profile of the pregnant women who took part of the “Pregnant Women´s Interdisciplinary Treatment Service” carried out at the Physiotherapy Clinic of Northern Paraná Regional University Hospital, Londrina, Paraná State, (HURNPr – UEL, and also to discuss about the use of physiotherapy techniques during the group therapies. Two questionnaires, formulated by the interdisciplinary team, were answered by the women, one in the first meeting and the other during the puerperal period. The target population consisted of 30 pregnant women, with ages between 16 and 42 years old, married, with High School level, workers, with family income superior to 10 minimum wages, first pregnancy and sedentary. The techniques learned in the course were used by just over half of the pregnant women.   O período gestacional apresenta-se como um momento de profundas modificações na vida da mulher. Sendo assim, a informação e o conhecimento são necessários para diminuir as ansiedades e angústias que cercam esse período. É essencial um serviço interdisciplinar que aborde tanto os aspectos psicológicos quanto físicos para que se dê um atendimento global à gestante. O objetivo deste estudo foi traçar o perfil das participantes do “Serviço de Atendimento Interdisciplinar a Gestantes” desenvolvido no Ambulatório de Fisioterapia do Hospital Universitário Regional do Norte do Paraná – Universidade Estadual de Londrina (HURNPr-UEL e, também, discutir a utilização ou não das técnicas treinadas pela fisioterapia. Foram aplicados dois

  5. An app to enhance resident education in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Wayne D; Bent, John P; Moskowitz, Howard S

    2017-12-07

    Technological change is leading to an evolution in medical education. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of a medical knowledge app, called PulseQD, on resident education within our otolaryngology-head and neck surgery department at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Bronx, NY). A prospective cohort study was conducted within the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery from July 2016 to June 2017. All faculty attendings and residents were asked to participate in the study and were included. A Web and mobile-based app, PulseQD, that allowed for collaborative learning was implemented. Questionnaires were given at the beginning and end of the academic year. Otolaryngology Training Exam (OTE) scores were collected RESULTS: A total of 20 residents and 13 faculty members participated in the study. Residents used online sources of medical information significantly more often than faculty (90% and 54%, respectively, P = 0.0179). Residents and faculty felt that PulseQD offered a valuable perspective on clinically relevant medical information (P = 0.0003), was a great way to test clinical and medical knowledge (P = 0.0001), and improved the sharing and discussing of medical knowledge (P academic year. The implementation of a novel mobile app, PulseQD, was well received by residents and faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Preliminary data suggest that app-based learning may lead to improved performance on knowledge-based assessments. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  7. Multidimensional Attitudes of Emergency Medicine Residents Toward Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresita M. Hogan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs, and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods: Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results: 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score. Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY levels. Conclusion: EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:511–517.

  8. Talking about end-of-life care: Perspectives of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towsley, Gail L; Hirschman, Karen B

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe how residents express preferences for end-of-life (EOL) care. For this qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews and completed conventional content analysis to describe how residents' expressed their preferences for care at the end of life. Sixteen residents from four nursing homes (NH) in southeastern Pennsylvania participated in this study. Residents were on average 88 years old, primarily non White, and widowed. Three key domains emerged from the analyses: Preferences for Today, Anticipating the End of My Life, and Preferences for Final Days. Residents linked their everyday living and EOL preferences by using 'if and then' logic to convey anticipation and readiness related to EOL. These findings suggest new strategies to start discussions of EOL care preferences with NH residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  10. A comparison of medical students', residents' and tutors' attitudes towards communication skills learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinuevo, Beatriz; Aradilla-Herrero, Amor; Nolla, Maria; Clèries, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The consensus about the importance of communication skills in patient-care does not guarantee that students and faculty perceive the usefulness of these skills. This study evaluated and compared medical students', residents' and tutors' attitudes towards learning communication skills, and examined the association with gender and year of residency. We conducted a cross-sectional survey with 492 participants (282 second-year students, 131 residents and 79 tutors). They completed the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) and demographic/educational information. In general, participants showed positive attitudes towards learning communication skills. Medical students, residents and tutors did not differ on the Positive Attitudes Scale (CSAS-PAS). Residents scored higher than medical students on the Negative Attitudes Scale (CSAS-NAS) (P learn these communication skills. Attention should be paid to measuring attitudes at all three levels of medical education in the design of communication skills courses.

  11. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors