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Sample records for profiling discriminates cerebral

  1. Le profil entrepreneurial : Facteur discriminant du developpement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A partir de la base de données GEM Algérie, nous montrons que le profil entrepreneurial, en tant qu'ensemble cohérent, est un bien meilleur discriminant du niveau de développement d'une économie que la part des exportations des biens minéraux dans l'exportation totale. Nous avons trouvé qu'il était possible ...

  2. Racial discrimination, racial identity, and impostor phenomenon: A profile approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Donte L; Hoggard, Lori S; Neblett, Enrique W

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the association between racial discrimination and the impostor phenomenon (IP) and the moderating influence of racial identity on this relationship. One hundred fifty-seven African American college students (68% female; mean age = 18.63) completed measures of racial discrimination, racial identity, and IP during 2 waves of data collection. Utilizing latent profile analyses, 4 patterns of racial identity were identified: Undifferentiated, Multiculturalist, Race-Focused, and Humanist. Racial discrimination predicted higher subsequent levels of IP. Racial identity did not moderate the impact of racial discrimination; however, students in the Multiculturalist and Humanist groups reported the lowest and highest levels of IP at Wave 2, respectively. IP is influenced by racial discrimination experiences as well as by the significance and meaning that individuals ascribe to being African American. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Alterations in the Cerebral Microvascular Proteome Expression Profile After Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Johansson, Sara E; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2017-01-01

    . The proteomic profile of the isolated cerebral microvasculature 72 h after GCI (compared to sham) indicated that the main expressional changes could be divided into nine categories: (1) cellular respiration, (2) remodelling of the extracellular matrix, (3) decreased contractile phenotype, (4) clathrin...

  4. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  5. Serum Metabolomic Profiles for Human Pancreatic Cancer Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Itoi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the clinical use of serum metabolomics to discriminate malignant cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC from malignant diseases, such as biliary tract cancer (BTC, intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC, and various benign pancreaticobiliary diseases. Capillary electrophoresismass spectrometry was used to analyze charged metabolites. We repeatedly analyzed serum samples (n = 41 of different storage durations to identify metabolites showing high quantitative reproducibility, and subsequently analyzed all samples (n = 140. Overall, 189 metabolites were quantified and 66 metabolites had a 20% coefficient of variation and, of these, 24 metabolites showed significant differences among control, benign, and malignant groups (p < 0.05; Steel–Dwass test. Four multiple logistic regression models (MLR were developed and one MLR model clearly discriminated all disease patients from healthy controls with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.970 (95% confidential interval (CI, 0.946–0.994, p < 0.0001. Another model to discriminate PC from BTC and IPMC yielded AUC = 0.831 (95% CI, 0.650–1.01, p = 0.0020 with higher accuracy compared with tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, pancreatic cancer-associated antigen (DUPAN2 and s-pancreas-1 antigen (SPAN1. Changes in metabolomic profiles might be used to screen for malignant cancers as well as to differentiate between PC and other malignant diseases.

  6. Discriminant profile of young adulthood driving behavior among Brazilian drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta-Panichi, Renata Maria; Wagner, Adriana; Sarriera, Jorge Castellá

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the driving behavior profile of drivers aged 18 to 25 years old. Four hundred young adults were interviewed, 320 (80%) of them male and 80 (20%) female. Cluster analysis identified a group characterized by sensation-seeking behavior (Cluster 1), a group that did not show any risky driving behavior (Cluster 2), and a group engaged in transgressive behavior and driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs (Cluster 3). Discriminant analysis classified successfully and correctly 81.3% of the young adults into their original profiles. Function 1 distinguished cluster 1 from clusters 2 and 3, on the basis of the following factors: higher frequency of alcohol consumption, intrusive behavior, and motorcycle riding, as well as younger age, more aggressive behavior, and lower education level. Function 2 distinguished cluster 3 from cluster 1 and 2, especially as to higher amounts of alcohol consumption, higher frequency of marijuana use and delinquent behavior, larger number of traffic tickets and motor vehicle accidents, higher paternal education level, which were the variables with discriminant values above .20. Characteristics of vulnerability were identified, especially those related to alcohol consumption, drug use, and externalizing issues.

  7. Profile of Children with Cerebral Palsy Attending Out- patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olusola Ayanniyi

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a major cause of childhood disability. The objective of this study was to investigate the causes ... KEY WORDS: cerebral palsy, jaundice, asphyxia, infections, childhood disabilities. INTRODUCTION. Cerebral palsy (CP) is an ...... The effects of multiple pre- and perinatal risk factors on the occurrence of ...

  8. Tactile sensory abilities in cerebral palsy: deficits in roughness and object discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Jason R; Burton, Harold; Sinclair, Robert J; Brunstrom, Janice E; Damiano, Diane L

    2008-01-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy (CP) have been well documented; however, associated sensory impairment in CP remains poorly understood. We examined tactile object recognition in the hands using geometric shapes, common objects, and capital letters. Discrimination of tactile roughness was tested using paired horizontal gratings of varied groove widths passively translated across the index finger. We tested 17 individuals with hemiplegia (mean 13y 9mo [SD 5y 2mo]; 6 males, 11 females), 21 with diplegia (mean 14y 10mo [SD 7y]; 10 males, 11 females), and 21 without disabilities (mean 14y 10mo [SD 5y 1mo]; 11 males, 10 females). All participants with CP fell within level I or II of the Gross Motor Function Classification System and level I or II of the Manual Abilities Classification System. Individuals with CP were significantly less accurate compared with those without disabilities on all tactile object-recognition tasks using their non-dominant hand. Both groups of patients also had significantly higher thresholds for groove-width differences with both hands compared with those without disabilities. Within the group with diplegia, only roughness discrimination differed between hands, whereas within the group with hemiplegia, significant between-limb differences were present for all tasks. Despite mild motor deficits compared with the entire population of individuals with CP, this sample demonstrated ubiquitous tactile deficits. PMID:18811710

  9. Clinical profile of cerebral malaria at a secondary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral malaria (CM is one of the most common causes for non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. It affects both the urban and rural population. It is a challenge to treat these patients in a resource limited setting; where majority of these cases present. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out from September 2005 to December 2006 at Jiwan Jyoti Christian Hospital in Eastern Uttar Pradesh in India. This is a secondary level care with limited resources. We studied the clinical profile, treatment and outcome of all the patients above the age of 14 years diagnosed with CM. Results: There were a total of 53 patients with CM of which 38 (71.7% of them were females. Among them, 35 (66% patients were less than 30 years of age. The clinical features noted were seizure (39.62%, anemia (84.9%, icterus (16.98%, hypotension (13.2%, bleeding (3.7%, hepatomegaly (5.66%, splenomegaly (5.66%, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (16.98% and renal dysfunction (37.36%. Co-infection with Plasmodium vivax was present in 13 (24.53% of them. Treatment received included artesunin compounds or quinine. Median time of defervescence was 2 (interquartile range1-3. Complete recovery was achieved in 43 (81% of them. Two (3.7% of them died. Conclusion: CM, once considered to be a fatal disease has shown remarkable improvement in the outcome with the wide availability of artesunin and quinine components. To combat the malaria burden, physicians in resource limited setting should be well trained to manage these patients especially in the endemic areas. The key to management is early diagnosis and initiation of treatment based on a high index of suspicion. Anticipation and early recognition of the various complications are crucial.

  10. Airline price discrimination : a practice of yield management or customer profiling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Diercks, Rasha H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Airline ticket prices frequently change, which is usually caused by yield management as price discrimination practice. Recently, buyers of online airline tickets tend to complain about price discrimination based on customer profiling, e.g. by means of cookie data. As cookie data and other directly

  11. Discriminant Profile of Young Internet Dependents: The Role of Family Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michele Terres-Trindade; Clarisse Pereira Mosmann

    2015-01-01

    .... This research aimed to outline a discriminant profile of young people classified as dependent and not dependent on the Internet regarding to socio-biodemographic variables to parenting practices...

  12. Whole blood angiopoietin-1 and -2 levels discriminate cerebral and severe (non-cerebral malaria from uncomplicated malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangpukdee Noppadon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe and cerebral malaria are associated with endothelial activation. Angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1 and angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2 are major regulators of endothelial activation and integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical utility of whole blood angiopoietin (ANG levels as biomarkers of disease severity in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods The utility of whole blood ANG levels was examined in Thai patients to distinguish cerebral (CM; n = 87 and severe (non-cerebral malaria (SM; n = 36 from uncomplicated malaria (UM; n = 70. Comparative statistics are reported using a non-parametric univariate analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test or Chi-squared test, as appropriate. Multivariate binary logistic regression was used to examine differences in whole blood protein levels between groups (UM, SM, CM, adjusting for differences due to ethnicity, age, parasitaemia and sex. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the ANGs in their ability to distinguish between UM, SM and CM. Cumulative organ injury scores were obtained for patients with severe disease based on the presence of acute renal failure, jaundice, severe anaemia, circulatory collapse or coma. Results ANG-1 and ANG-2 were readily detectable in whole blood. Compared to UM there were significant decreases in ANG-1 (p Conclusions These results suggest that whole blood ANG-1/2 levels are promising clinically informative biomarkers of disease severity in malarial syndromes.

  13. Profile of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy at Universitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiologically, there are five types of cerebral palsy1: spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed. Topographically, there are six types1: hemiplegia (one arm and leg on the same side of the body are affected), monoplegia (one limb is affected), diplegia (both legs more affected than arms), quadriplegia (all limbs, body ...

  14. Cerebral activation associated with speech sound discrimination during the diotic listening task: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yumiko; Yahata, Noriaki; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Koeda, Michihiko; Asai, Kunihiko; Okubo, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-05-01

    Comprehending conversation in a crowd requires appropriate orienting and sustainment of auditory attention to and discrimination of the target speaker. While a multitude of cognitive functions such as voice perception and language processing work in concert to subserve this ability, it is still unclear which cognitive components critically determine successful discrimination of speech sounds under constantly changing auditory conditions. To investigate this, we present a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of changes in cerebral activities associated with varying challenge levels of speech discrimination. Subjects participated in a diotic listening paradigm that presented them with two news stories read simultaneously but independently by a target speaker and a distracting speaker of incongruent or congruent sex. We found that the voice of distracter of congruent rather than incongruent sex made the listening more challenging, resulting in enhanced activities mainly in the left temporal and frontal gyri. Further, the activities at the left inferior, left anterior superior and right superior loci in the temporal gyrus were shown to be significantly correlated with accuracy of the discrimination performance. The present results suggest that the subregions of bilateral temporal gyri play a key role in the successful discrimination of speech under constantly changing auditory conditions as encountered in daily life. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Classification of speech and language profiles in 4-year old children with cerebral palsy: A prospective preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Gorton, Kristin; Lee, Jimin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the speech and language abilities of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and there is currently no system for classifying speech and language profiles. Such a system would have epidemiological value and would have the potential to advance the development of interventions that improve outcomes. In this study, we propose and test a preliminary speech and language classification system by quantifying how well speech and language data differentiate among children classified into different hypothesized profile groups. Method Speech and language assessment data were collected in a laboratory setting from 34 children with CP (18 males; 16 females) who were a mean age of 54 months (SD 1.8 months). Measures of interest were vowel area, speech rate, language comprehension scores, and speech intelligibility ratings. Results Canonical discriminant function analysis showed that three functions accounted for 100% of the variance among profile groups, with speech variables accounting for 93% of the variance. Classification agreement varied from 74% to 97% using four different classification paradigms. Conclusions Results provide preliminary support for the classification of speech and language abilities of children with CP into four initial profile groups. Further research is necessary to validate the full classification system. PMID:20643795

  16. Evaluating the Discriminant Validity of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory: Computer Adaptive Test in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Benjamin J; Allar, Benjamin G; Miller, Patricia E; Matheney, Travis H; Snyder, Brian D; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test (PEDI-CAT) is a new clinical assessment for children and youth from birth through 20 years of age. To determine the discriminant validity of the PEDI-CAT according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A prospective convenience cross-sectional sample of 101 school-age children with CP was stratified by GMFCS level. Participants were excluded if they underwent recent surgery (analysis was used to quantify the discriminant validity of the PEDI-CAT domains to distinguish the level of independence in fine and gross motor function. General linear modeling was used to assess discriminant ability across all GMFCS and MACS levels. Mean age was 11 years, 11 months (SD 3.7). Mobility and Daily Activities domains exhibited excellent discriminant validity distinguishing between ambulatory and nonambulatory participants [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.98 and 0.97, respectively] and the Daily Activities domain exhibited excellent discriminant validity distinguishing between independent and dependent hand function (AUC = 0.93). All PEDI-CAT domains were able to discriminate between ambulatory (GMFCS levels I-III) or nonambulatory (GMFCS levels IV-V) as well as manually independent (MACS levels I-II) or manually dependent functional levels (MACS levels III-V) ( P < .001). Our convenience cross-sectional sample included school-age children with primarily Caucasian, middle-income parents and may not be representative of other cultural, socioeconomic backgrounds. Not all participants had a MACS level assigned, however, no differences were found in PEDI-CAT scores between those with and without MACS scores. These results demonstrate that the PEDI-CAT is a valid outcome instrument for measuring functional abilities in children with CP, able to differentiate across fine and gross motor functional levels.

  17. Cognitive profiles and regional cerebral blood flow patterns in dementia of the Alzheimer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, G; Bruhn, P; Schmidt, E

    1994-01-01

    Individual cognitive profiles and correlations between cognitive functions and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were analyzed in 20 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). CBF was measured with high resolution single photon emission computed...

  18. Free choice profiling sensory analysis to discriminate coffees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Sorane Good Kitzberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensory attributes were evaluated from Arabica coffee genotypes growing in two places in Brazil, Mandaguari and Londrina. Post-harvest and roasted process was standardized. Free choice profiling sensory analysis was apply to investigate the influence of genetic variability and local cultivation (Londrina and Mandaguari, Brazil on the sensory characteristics of coffee genotypes. A sensory panel evaluated coffees from Mandaguari in two groups: one (Sarchimor derived, IPR100, IPR102, IPR105, IPR106 characterized by transparency, coffee colour, green aroma, taste (green, bitter, fermented, astringent and a watery texture, another group (Catuaí, Sarchimor derived, IPR101, IPR103 was characterized by coffee colour, brightness, aroma (coffee, acid, sweet, chocolate, acidity, bitterness, burnt aroma, sweetness and full-bodied. Coffees from Londrina presented brightness, coffee colour, sweet, green, burnt aroma, astringent, bitter, fermented, green taste; and watery texture (Catuaí, IPR97, IPR98, IPR100. Another group (Sarchimor derived, IPR101, IPR102, IPR103, IPR105, IPR106 were associated with turbidity, aroma (green, coffee, sweet, acidity, astringency, bitterness, sweetness and full-bodied. Catuaí, Iapar59, IPR99, IPR101, IPR103 and IPR108 exhibited positive attributes when grown in either locale. Edaphoclimatic conditions play a major role in the sensory profiles of coffee.

  19. [Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging between the cerebral cortex and speech discrimination in presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lu; Yu, Shuilian; Chen, Ruichun; Jing, Yan; Liang, Jianping

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between pure-tone average (PTA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) of the auditory pathway, cognitive cortex and auditory cortex in presbycusis. Twenty-five elderly subjects with presbycusis were participated in the study. PTA, speech discrimination abilities were evaluated in each subject. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was applied to access the FA of the IC, the superior frontal gyrus and the Heschl's gyrus. Compare the difference between two sides of the values of FA in the three areas. Bivariate correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of PTA and FA of the inferior colliculus (IC), the superior frontal gyrus and the Heschl's gyrus on speech discrimination abilities. There were no significant differences between the left and right side of the inferior colliculus (P > 0.05). Higher FA values were recorded at the left side of the Heschl's gyrus and the superior frontal gyrus (P < 0.05). Both PTA and the FA of the superior frontal gyrus have a negative association with speech discrimination abilities (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), while the FA of the Heschl's gyrus has a positive association with speech discrimination abilities (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the speech discrimination abilities of the elderly is not only related to the peripheral auditory function, but also to the central auditory and cognitive function.

  20. Does Somatosensory Discrimination Activate Different Brain Areas in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Compared to Typically Developing Children? An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Winckel, Ann; Verheyden, Geert; Wenderoth, Nici; Peeters, Ron; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Hecke, Wim; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat; Eyssen, Maria; Feys, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Aside from motor impairment, many children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) experience altered tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic awareness. Sensory deficits are addressed in rehabilitation programs, which include somatosensory discrimination exercises. In contrast to adult stroke patients, data on brain activation, occurring during…

  1. Discriminant Profile of Young Internet Dependents: The Role of Family Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Terres-Trindade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractInternational studies have shown effects of family relations on Internet addiction in young people. This research aimed to outline a discriminant profile of young people classified as dependent and not dependent on the Internet regarding to socio-biodemographic variables to parenting practices, parent-child conflict and interparental conflict. The sample consisted of 200 students (152 girls and 48 boys, between 15 and 24 years of age, 85.5% reside in Rio Grande do Sul and 14.5% in other Brazilian states. Participants responded individually to the protocol available online. The results showed that interparental conflict, parent-child conflict and the educational practice of supervision of paternal behavior discriminate dependents on Internet. The educational practice of maternal emotional support was the only discriminating variable for non-dependents. These national findings corroborate the international context studies and reinforce the importance of including the family in promotion and prevention of mental health of young people.

  2. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Gentillon, Cynthia A.

    2016-08-09

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  3. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Gentillon, Cynthia A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  4. Selected Gray Matter Volumes and Gender but Not Basal Ganglia nor Cerebellum Gyri Discriminate Left Versus Right Cerebral Hemispheres: Multivariate Analyses in human Brains at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Suarez-May, Marcela A; Favila, Rafael; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Rios, Camilo

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the lateralization of the human brain is evident through a multidisciplinary number of scientific studies. Understanding volumetric brain asymmetries allows the distinction between normal development stages and behavior, as well as brain diseases. We aimed to evaluate volumetric asymmetries in order to select the best gyri able to classify right- versus left cerebral hemispheres. A cross-sectional study performed in 47 right-handed young-adults healthy volunteers. SPM-based software performed brain segmentation, automatic labeling and volumetric analyses for 54 regions involving the cerebral lobes, basal ganglia and cerebellum from each cerebral hemisphere. Multivariate discriminant analysis (DA) allowed the assembling of a predictive model. DA revealed one discriminant function that significantly differentiated left vs. right cerebral hemispheres: Wilks' λ = 0.008, χ(2) (9) = 238.837, P brain gyri are able to accurately classify left vs. right cerebral hemispheres by using a multivariate approach; the selected regions correspond to key brain areas involved in attention, internal thought, vision and language; our findings favored the concept that lateralization has been evolutionary favored by mental processes increasing cognitive efficiency and brain capacity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Discrimination and Privacy in the Information Society Data Mining and Profiling in Large Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Calders, Toon; Schermer, Bart; Zarsky, Tal

    2013-01-01

    Vast amounts of data are nowadays collected, stored and processed, in an effort to assist in  making a variety of administrative and governmental decisions. These innovative steps considerably improve the speed, effectiveness and quality of decisions. Analyses are increasingly performed by data mining and profiling technologies that statistically and automatically determine patterns and trends. However, when such practices lead to unwanted or unjustified selections, they may result in unacceptable forms of  discrimination. Processing vast amounts of data may lead to situations in which data controllers know many of the characteristics, behaviors and whereabouts of people. In some cases, analysts might know more about individuals than these individuals know about themselves. Judging people by their digital identities sheds a different light on our views of privacy and data protection. This book discusses discrimination and privacy issues related to data mining and profiling practices. It provides technologic...

  6. Vitamin E profile as a reliable authenticity discrimination factor between chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, João C M; Alves, Rita C; Casal, Susana; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Pereira, José Alberto

    2009-06-24

    In this study, the profile of tocopherols and tocotrienols in chestnut ( Castanea sativa Mill.) kernel oil was evaluated. Four Portuguese chestnut varieties were selected: Aveleira, Boaventura, Judia, and Longal. The vitamin E determination had already been applied to similar matrices, but, to the authors' knowledge, it is the first time that chestnut kernel oil has been evaluated. The prevalent vitamer was gamma-tocopherol, often present in trace amounts in other natural products. Due to the high commercial value of chestnut, a statistical analysis of the obtained results was also conducted to define the tocopherol and tocotrienol profile as a reliable indicator of a specific chestnut variety. To achieve this objective, an analysis of variance was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the method as well as the uniformity of results for each variety. A discriminant analysis was also carried out revealing quite satisfactory results. Four varieties were clustered in four individual groups through the definition of two discriminant analysis dimensions.

  7. Gait Deviation Index, Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg; Pedersen, Niels Wisbech

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and Gait Profile Score (GPS) are the most used summary measures of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the reliability and agreement of these indices have not been investigated, limiting their clinimetric quality for research and clinical...... practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability and agreement of summary measures of gait (GDI; GPS; and the Gait Variable Score (GVS) derived from the GPS). The intra-rater reliability and agreement were investigated across two repeated sessions in 18 children aged 5...

  8. Profiles of acculturation among Hispanics in the United States: links with discrimination and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Clark, Trenette T; Vaughn, Michael G; Córdova, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that acculturation is a multifaceted construct with implications for substance use among Hispanics. However, few, if any, studies examining profiles of acculturation have been conducted using national samples. Moreover, no cluster-based studies have examined how acculturation relates to discrimination and substance use disorders among Hispanics in the United States. The present study, employing Wave 2 data on Hispanics (n = 6,359) from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions, aims to address these gaps. We use latent profile analysis to identify profiles of acculturation among Hispanics in the United States and, in turn, examine the relationships between membership in these profiles and experiences of discrimination and the prevalence of substance use disorders. A five-class solution was the optimal modeling of the data. Classes were identified as Class 1: Spanish-dominant/strongly separated (17 %), Class 2: Spanish-dominant/separated (18 %), Class 3: bilingual/bicultural (33 %), Class 4: English-dominant/bicultural (16 %), and Class 5: English-dominant/assimilated (16 %). Bilingual/bicultural Hispanics (Class 3) reported the highest prevalence of discrimination (31 %). Spanish-language dominant Hispanics (Classes 1 and 2) reported the lowest prevalence of substance use disorders. Significant differences in the prevalence of substance use disorders were observed between the bilingual/bicultural (Class 3) and English-dominant/assimilated classes (Class 5), but no differences were noted between the two English-dominant classes (Classes 4 and 5). Study findings indicate that acculturation is heterogeneous in its expression among Hispanics and suggest that Hispanics who maintain their Spanish-language capacity are at a substantially lower risk for a variety of substance use disorders.

  9. Amide proton transfer imaging to discriminate between low- and high-grade gliomas: added value to apparent diffusion coefficient and relative cerebral blood volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) from perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for discriminating between high- and low-grade gliomas. Forty-six consecutive adult patients with diffuse gliomas who underwent preoperative APT imaging, DTI and perfusion MRI were enrolled. APT signals were compared according to the World Health Organization grade. The diagnostic ability and added value of the APT signal to the ADC and rCBV for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and integrated discrimination improvement. The APT signal increased as the glioma grade increased. The discrimination abilities of the APT, ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different. Using both the APT signal and ADC significantly improved discrimination vs. the ADC alone (area under the ROC curve [AUC], 0.888 vs. 0.910; P = 0.007), whereas using both the APT signal and rCBV did not improve discrimination vs. the rCBV alone (AUC, 0.927 vs. 0.923; P = 0.222). APT imaging may be a useful imaging biomarker that adds value to the ADC for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  10. Organization of sensory discrimination and response selection in choice and nonchoice conditions: a study using cerebral evoked potentials in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, D S; Aminoff, M J; Shefrin, S L

    1990-10-01

    1. It has been suggested that the long-latency "event-related" cerebral evoked potentials (ERPs) reflect certain aspects of the neural processing underlying sensory discrimination in a two-choice reaction time task. The present paper examines the hypothesis that the coupling of these ERPs to sensory discrimination is variable and that the discrimination process is completed at different points during the course of cerebral processing, depending on the actual requirements of the task. 2. We recorded the cerebral evoked potentials and electromyogram (EMG) of the responding muscle in five different reaction time tasks, each requiring sensory discrimination and response selection of varying complexity. In the Choice condition two stimuli were presented, and two separate responses were required. In the two Go-No Go conditions two stimuli were presented, but a response was required to only one or the other of the stimuli. In the two Simple conditions only one stimulus was presented, and one response was required. 3. Under both Choice and Go-No Go conditions, the frequency histogram of the onset latency of the compound muscle action potential for the response to the frequent tone showed a bimodal distribution without overlap, suggesting that there were two distinct types of responder: fast and slow. The comparable histograms for the onset latency of the response to the rare tone also showed a bimodal distribution, but the mean onset latency was prolonged relative to the response to the frequent tone, and the mean separation was less so that the two distributions overlapped each other. 4. Despite the marked difference in response latencies between the fast and slow responders, there was no appreciable difference in cerebral evoked responses between the two groups. Moreover, in response to the frequent tone, all slow responders and, likewise, all fast responders had similar onset latencies of the averaged EMG activity regardless of condition. Nonetheless, fast or slow

  11. A novel low profile wireless flow sensor to monitor hemodynamic changes in cerebral aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfei; Jankowitz, Brian T.; Cho, Sung Kwon; Chun, Youngjae

    2015-03-01

    A proof of concept of low-profile flow sensor has been designed, fabricated, and subsequently tested to demonstrate its feasibility for monitoring hemodynamic changes in cerebral aneurysm. The prototype sensor contains three layers, i.e., a thin polyurethane layer was sandwiched between two sputter-deposited thin film nitinol layers (6μm thick). A novel superhydrophilic surface treatment was used to create hemocompatible surface of thin nitinol electrode layers. A finite element model was conducted using ANSYS Workbench 15.0 Static Structural to optimize the dimensions of flow sensor. A computational fluid dynamics calculations were performed using ANSYS Workbench Fluent to assess the flow velocity patterns within the aneurysm sac. We built a test platform with a z-axis translation stage and an S-beam load cell to compare the capacitance changes of the sensors with different parameters during deformation. Both LCR meter and oscilloscope were used to measure the capacitance and the resonant frequency shifts, respectively. The experimental compression tests demonstrated the linear relationship between the capacitance and applied compression force and decreasing the length, width and increasing the thickness improved the sensor sensitivity. The experimentally measured resonant frequency dropped from 12.7MHz to 12.48MHz, indicating a 0.22MHz shift with 200g ( 2N) compression force while the theoretical resonant frequency shifted 0.35MHz with 50g ( 0.5N). Our recent results demonstrated a feasibility of the low-profile flow sensor for monitoring haemodynamics in cerebral aneurysm region, as well as the efficacy of the use of the surface treated thin film nitinol for the low-profile sensor materials.

  12. Comprehensive gene expression profiling reveals synergistic functional networks in cerebral vessels after hypertension or hypercholesterolemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yi Ong

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic stenosis of cerebral arteries or intracranial large artery disease (ICLAD is a major cause of stroke especially in Asians, Hispanics and Africans, but relatively little is known about gene expression changes in vessels at risk. This study compares comprehensive gene expression profiles in the middle cerebral artery (MCA of New Zealand White rabbits exposed to two stroke risk factors i.e. hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia, by the 2-Kidney-1-Clip method, or dietary supplementation with cholesterol. Microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses of the MCA of the hypertensive rabbits showed up-regulated genes in networks containing the node molecules: UBC (ubiquitin, P38 MAPK, ERK, NFkB, SERPINB2, MMP1 and APP (amyloid precursor protein; and down-regulated genes related to MAPK, ERK 1/2, Akt, 26 s proteasome, histone H3 and UBC. The MCA of hypercholesterolemic rabbits showed differentially expressed genes that are surprisingly, linked to almost the same node molecules as the hypertensive rabbits, despite a relatively low percentage of 'common genes' (21 and 7% between the two conditions. Up-regulated common genes were related to: UBC, SERPINB2, TNF, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A and APP, and down-regulated genes, related to UBC. Increased HNF4A message and protein were verified in the aorta. Together, these findings reveal similar nodal molecules and gene pathways in cerebral vessels affected by hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, which could be a basis for synergistic action of risk factors in the pathogenesis of ICLAD.

  13. Do seasonal profiles of foliar pigments improve species discrimination of evergreen coastal tree species in KwaZulu- Natal, South Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available pigments, as well as improve species discrimination. This study investigated the potential of seasonal pigment profiles (for foliar carotenoid and total chlorophyll) in improving species discrimination for trees using leaf spectral data. Our aims were to (i...

  14. Discrimination Between Patients With Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Subjects Using Layer Analysis of Cerebral Blood Flow and Xenon Solubility Coefficient in Xenon-Enhanced Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Homaro; Kawashima, Ena; Tan, Xin; Sawa, Yutaka

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for discriminating between patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy subjects using layer analysis of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and xenon solubility coefficient (λ) in xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Xenon-enhanced CT was performed on 27 patients with AD (81.7 [3.3] years old) and 15 healthy volunteers (78.6 [4.0] years old) using a wide volume CT. For each subject, we created the first- (surface) to sixth-layer images of CBF and λ for the 6 viewing directions (layer thickness, 5 mm). For the discriminant views, receiver operating characteristic curves for the ratio of CBF to λ were created to identify patients with AD. For the third- and fourth-layer left lateral views, which were designated as the discriminant views, areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 96.8% and 97.4%, respectively. With the use of the discriminant views obtained by xenon-enhanced CT, we could effectively discriminate between patients with AD and healthy subjects using both CBF and λ.

  15. Amide proton transfer imaging to discriminate between low- and high-grade gliomas: added value to apparent diffusion coefficient and relative cerebral blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu; Kim, Se Hoon; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) from perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for discriminating between high- and low-grade gliomas. Forty-six consecutive adult patients with diffuse gliomas who underwent preoperative APT imaging, DTI and perfusion MRI were enrolled. APT signals were compared according to the World Health Organization grade. The diagnostic ability and added value of the APT signal to the ADC and rCBV for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and integrated discrimination improvement. The APT signal increased as the glioma grade increased. The discrimination abilities of the APT, ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different. Using both the APT signal and ADC significantly improved discrimination vs. the ADC alone (area under the ROC curve [AUC], 0.888 vs. 0.910; P = 0.007), whereas using both the APT signal and rCBV did not improve discrimination vs. the rCBV alone (AUC, 0.927 vs. 0.923; P = 0.222). APT imaging may be a useful imaging biomarker that adds value to the ADC for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas. • Higher APT values were correlated with higher glioma grades. • Adding the APT signal to the ADC improved glioma grading. • Adding the APT signal to rCBV did not improve glioma grading. • APT is a useful adjunct to the ADC for glioma grading.

  16. Discriminability of personality profiles in isolated and Co-morbid marijuana and nicotine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcherside, Ariel; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Baine, Jessica L; Filbey, Francesca M

    2016-04-30

    Specific personality traits have been linked with substance use disorders (SUDs), genetic mechanisms, and brain systems. Thus, determining the specificity of personality traits to types of SUD can advance the field towards defining SUD endophenotypes as well as understanding the brain systems involved for the development of novel treatments. Disentangling these factors is particularly important in highly co morbid SUDs, such as marijuana and nicotine use, so treatment can occur effectively for both. This study evaluated personality traits that distinguish isolated and co-morbid use of marijuana and nicotine. To that end, we collected the NEO Five Factor Inventory in participants who used marijuana-only (n=59), nicotine-only (n=27), both marijuana and nicotine (n=28), and in non-using controls (n=28). We used factor analyses to identify personality profiles, which are linear combinations of the five NEO Factors. We then conducted Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis to test accuracy of the personality factors in discriminating isolated and co-morbid marijuana and nicotine users from each other. ROC curve analysis distinguished the four groups based on their NEO personality patterns. Results showed that NEO Factor 2 (openness, extraversion, agreeableness) discriminated marijuana and marijuana+nicotine users from controls and nicotine-only users with high predictability. Additional ANOVA results showed that the openness dimension discriminated marijuana users from nicotine users. These findings suggest that personality dimensions distinguish marijuana users from nicotine users and should be considered in prevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism profiling discriminates chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiounn Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    immunohistochemical markers effectively discriminating the two pathologic entities. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, high-throughput SNP genotyping, and pathway analysis effectively distinguish chRCC from oncocytoma. We have generated a novel transcript predictor that is able to discriminate between the two entities accurately, and which has been validated both in an internal and an independent data-set, implying generalizability. A cytogenetic alteration, loss of chromosome 1p, common to renal oncocytoma and chRCC has been identified, providing the opportunities for identifying novel tumor suppressor genes and we have identified a series of immunohistochemical markers that are clinically useful in discriminating chRCC and oncocytoma.

  18. Genomic expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism profiling discriminates chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Min-Han; Wong, Chin Fong; Tan, Hwei Ling; Yang, Ximing J; Ditlev, Jonathon; Matsuda, Daisuke; Khoo, Sok Kean; Sugimura, Jun; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Furge, Kyle A; Kort, Eric; Giraud, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Vielh, Philippe; Amsellem-Ouazana, Delphine; Debré, Bernard; Flam, Thierry; Thiounn, Nicolas; Zerbib, Marc; Benoît, Gérard; Droupy, Stéphane; Molinié, Vincent; Vieillefond, Annick; Tan, Puay Hoon; Richard, Stéphane; Teh, Bin Tean

    2010-05-12

    Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) and renal oncocytoma are two distinct but closely related entities with strong morphologic and genetic similarities. While chRCC is a malignant tumor, oncocytoma is usually regarded as a benign entity. The overlapping characteristics are best explained by a common cellular origin, and the biologic differences between chRCC and oncocytoma are therefore of considerable interest in terms of carcinogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. Previous studies have been relatively limited in terms of examining the differences between oncocytoma and chromophobe RCC. Gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix HGU133Plus2 platform was applied on chRCC (n = 15) and oncocytoma specimens (n = 15). Supervised analysis was applied to identify a discriminatory gene signature, as well as differentially expressed genes. High throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed on independent samples (n = 14) using Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 100 K arrays to assess correlation between expression and gene copy number. Immunohistochemical validation was performed in an independent set of tumors. A novel 14 probe-set signature was developed to classify the tumors internally with 93% accuracy, and this was successfully validated on an external data-set with 94% accuracy. Pathway analysis highlighted clinically relevant dysregulated pathways of c-erbB2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in chRCC, but no significant differences in p-AKT or extracellular HER2 expression was identified on immunohistochemistry. Loss of chromosome 1p, reflected in both cytogenetic and expression analysis, is common to both entities, implying this may be an early event in histogenesis. Multiple regional areas of cytogenetic alterations and corresponding expression biases differentiating the two entities were identified. Parafibromin, aquaporin 6, and synaptogyrin 3 were novel immunohistochemical markers effectively discriminating

  19. Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in the Human Brain Stem, Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available The human brain is one of the most mysterious tissues in the body. Our knowledge of the human brain is limited due to the complexity of its structure and the microscopic nature of connections between brain regions and other tissues in the body. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of three brain regions-the brain stem, cerebellum and cerebral cortex-to identify genes that are differentially expressed among these different brain regions in humans and to obtain a list of robust, region-specific, differentially expressed genes by comparing the expression signatures from different individuals. Feature selection methods, specifically minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were employed to analyze the gene expression profiles. Sequential minimal optimization, a machine-learning algorithm, was employed to examine the utility of selected genes. We also performed a literature search, and we discuss the experimental evidence for the important physiological functions of several highly ranked genes, including NR2E1, DAO, and LRRC7, and we give our analyses on a gene (TFAP2B that have not been investigated or experimentally validated. As a whole, the results of our study will improve our ability to predict and understand genes related to brain regionalization and function.

  20. Discriminating patients with early-stage pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis using serum electrospray mass profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, James R.; Postier, Russell G.; Li, Min; Lerner, Megan R.; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Peyton, Marvin D.; Deb, Subrato J.; Baker, Candace M.; Williams, Travis L.; Hanas, Rushie Jane; Stowell, Donald E.; Lander, Theresa J.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Hanas, Jay S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests are needed to aid in the early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and monitoring pancreatitis development into malignancy especially in high risk patients. This study exhibits efforts and progress toward developing such blood tests, using electrospray-mass spectrometry (MS) serum profiling to distinguish patients with early-stage PDAC or pancreatitis from each other and from controls. Identification of significant serum mass peak differences between these individuals was performed using t tests and “leave one out” cross validation. Serum mass peak distributions of control individuals were distinguished from those of patients with chronic pancreatitis or early-stage PDAC with P values early-stage PDAC with a P value stages I, IIA and IIB were blindly validated from controls. Tandem MS/MS identified a cancer phenotype with elements of PDAC involved in early-stage PDAC/control discrimination. These studies indicate electrospray-MS mass profiling can detect serum changes in patients with pancreatitis or early-stage pancreatic cancer. Such technology has the potential to aid in early detection of pancreatic cancer, biomarker development, and in monitoring development of pancreatitis into PDAC. PMID:25637792

  1. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  2. Clinical Profile and Changes of Serum Lipid Levels in Epileptic Patients after Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ken; Sawada, Masahiro; Morioka, Harumi; Kyuzen, Maya; Ebina, Junya; Nagasawa, Junpei; Yanagihashi, Masaru; Miura, Ken; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Hirayama, Takehisa; Takazawa, Takanori; Kano, Osamu; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Iwasaki, Yasuo

    2017-03-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may increase development of dyslipidemia and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We examined the clinical profile and changes of serum lipid levels after AED monotherapy in patients with poststroke epilepsy (PSE) after cerebral infarction (CI). Medical records were reviewed in consecutive 2144 CI patients. Monotherapy of valproate, carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), zonisamide, levetiracetam, or lamotrigine was performed in PSE patients. Serum lipid levels were measured before and at 3 months after AED treatment. The prevalence of PSE was 7.0% in CI patients. The TOAST etiology disclosed large-artery atherosclerosis in 68 patients (45%), cardioembolism in 63 patients (42%), and undetermined cause in 19 patients (13%). CVD risk profile showed obesity of 18 patients (12%), current smoker of 30 patients (20%), hypertension of 75 patients (50%), diabetes mellitus of 32 patients (21%), dyslipidemia of 15 patients (10%), and atrial fibrillation of 63 patients (42%). CBZ or PHT administration increased serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels significantly compared to baseline and AED-untreated controls. Those levels were not increased significantly in other AED and control groups. Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not differ statistically in all groups. The prevalence of post-CI epilepsy was 7.0%. The pathogenesis contributed to atherothrombosis and cardioembolism. CBZ or PHT administration increased serum TC and LDL-C significantly. Thus, we should pay more attention to serum lipid levels in patients receiving cytochrome P450 (CYP)-induced AEDs, and might considerer switching to non-CYP-induced AEDs in patients with unfavorable serum lipid changes. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CSF biomarkers and neuropsychological profiles in patients with cerebral small-vessel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hermann

    Full Text Available Despite existing criteria, differential diagnosis of Vascular Dementia (VD and Alzheimer's disease (AD remains difficult. The aim of this study is to figure out cognitive and biomarker profiles that may help to distinguish between VD, AD and AD + Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD. We examined a cohort of patients with CSVD (n = 92. After stratification of cognitive impaired patients (n = 59 using the standard CSF beta-amyloid 42/40 ratio cut-off point of 0.975, we obtained two groups which differed with respect to several features: 32 patients with normal beta-amyloid 42/40 ratio (>0.975 showed markedly impaired blood-brain-barrier function as indicated by an elevated albumin ratio (median 8.35. They also differed in cognitive profiles when compared to 27 patients with AD typical beta-amyloid ratio and normal albumin ratio. We also enrolled an additional group of patients with AD (no significant CSVD on MRI, n = 27 which showed no impairment of the blood-brain-barrier. We showed a negative correlation between the albumin ratio and executive cognitive function (p = 0.016 and a negative correlation between memory function and typical AD markers like Tau (p = 0.004 and p181-Tau (p = 0.023 in our cohort. We suppose that the group of patients with normal beta-amyloid ratio represents VD while patients in the other groups represent AD+CSVD and pure AD. Our results support the idea that a dysfunction of the blood-brain-barrier might be contributing factor in the development of cognitive decline in CSVD as it seems to be of more importance than the severity of white matter lesions.

  4. Spatiotemporal profiles of dental pulp nociception in rat cerebral cortex: an optical imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Kato, Risako; Shirakawa, Tetsuo; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    Somatosensation is topographically organized in the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), which contributes to identify the region receiving sensory inputs. However, it is still unknown how somatosensory inputs from the oral region, especially nociceptive inputs from the teeth, are processed in the somatosensory cortex. We performed in vivo optical imaging and identified the precise cortical regions responding to electrical stimulation of the maxillary and mandibular dental pulp in rats. Electrical stimulation of the mandibular incisor pulp evoked neural excitation in two areas: the most rostroventral part of S1, and the ventral part of S2 caudal to the middle cerebral artery. Maxillary incisor pulp stimulation initially evoked responses only in the ventral part of S2, although later maximum responses were also observed in S1 similar to mandibular incisor stimulation responses. The maxillary and mandibular molar pulp-responding regions were located in the most ventral S2, a part of which was histologically classified as the insular oral region (IOR). In terms of the initial responses, maxillary incisor and molar stimulation induced excitation in the S2/IOR rostral to the mandibular dental pulp-responding region. Contrary to the spatially segregated initial responses, the maximum excitatory areas responding to both incisors and molars in the mandible and maxilla overlapped in S1 and the S2/IOR. Multielectrode extracellular recording supported the characteristic localization of S2/IOR neurons responding to mandibular and maxillary molar pulp stimulation. The discrete and overlapped spatial profiles of initial and maximum responses, respectively, may characterize nociceptive information processing of dental pain in the cortex. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. ClassyFlu: classification of influenza A viruses with Discriminatively trained profile-HMMs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Van der Auwera

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid characterization of influenza A virus (IAV hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sequences with respect to subtype and clade is at the basis of extended diagnostic services and implicit to molecular epidemiologic studies. ClassyFlu is a new tool and web service for the classification of IAV sequences of the HA and NA gene into subtypes and phylogenetic clades using discriminatively trained profile hidden Markov models (HMMs, one for each subtype or clade. ClassyFlu merely requires as input unaligned, full-length or partial HA or NA DNA sequences. It enables rapid and highly accurate assignment of HA sequences to subtypes H1-H17 but particularly focusses on the finer grained assignment of sequences of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 according to the cladistics proposed by the H5N1 Evolution Working Group. NA sequences are classified into subtypes N1-N10. ClassyFlu was compared to semiautomatic classification approaches using BLAST and phylogenetics and additionally for H5 sequences to the new "Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Clade Classification Tool" (IRD-CT proposed by the Influenza Research Database. Our results show that both web tools (ClassyFlu and IRD-CT, although based on different methods, are nearly equivalent in performance and both are more accurate and faster than semiautomatic classification. A retraining of ClassyFlu to altered cladistics as well as an extension of ClassyFlu to other IAV genome segments or fragments thereof is undemanding. This is exemplified by unambiguous assignment to a distinct cluster within subtype H7 of sequences of H7N9 viruses which emerged in China early in 2013 and caused more than 130 human infections. http://bioinf.uni-greifswald.de/ClassyFlu is a free web service. For local execution, the ClassyFlu source code in PERL is freely available.

  6. ClassyFlu: classification of influenza A viruses with Discriminatively trained profile-HMMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Bulla, Ingo; Ziller, Mario; Pohlmann, Anne; Harder, Timm; Stanke, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and rapid characterization of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sequences with respect to subtype and clade is at the basis of extended diagnostic services and implicit to molecular epidemiologic studies. ClassyFlu is a new tool and web service for the classification of IAV sequences of the HA and NA gene into subtypes and phylogenetic clades using discriminatively trained profile hidden Markov models (HMMs), one for each subtype or clade. ClassyFlu merely requires as input unaligned, full-length or partial HA or NA DNA sequences. It enables rapid and highly accurate assignment of HA sequences to subtypes H1-H17 but particularly focusses on the finer grained assignment of sequences of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 according to the cladistics proposed by the H5N1 Evolution Working Group. NA sequences are classified into subtypes N1-N10. ClassyFlu was compared to semiautomatic classification approaches using BLAST and phylogenetics and additionally for H5 sequences to the new "Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Clade Classification Tool" (IRD-CT) proposed by the Influenza Research Database. Our results show that both web tools (ClassyFlu and IRD-CT), although based on different methods, are nearly equivalent in performance and both are more accurate and faster than semiautomatic classification. A retraining of ClassyFlu to altered cladistics as well as an extension of ClassyFlu to other IAV genome segments or fragments thereof is undemanding. This is exemplified by unambiguous assignment to a distinct cluster within subtype H7 of sequences of H7N9 viruses which emerged in China early in 2013 and caused more than 130 human infections. http://bioinf.uni-greifswald.de/ClassyFlu is a free web service. For local execution, the ClassyFlu source code in PERL is freely available.

  7. Measuring physiological and pathological femoral anteversion using a biplanar low-dose X-ray system: validity, reliability, and discriminative ability in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thepaut, Matthias [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de chirurgie pediatrique, Brest (France); Brochard, Sylvain [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Leboucher, Julien [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Lempereur, Mathieu [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Stindel, Eric [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, La Cavale Blanche, Service d' Orthopedie-Traumatologie, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Tissot, Valentin [CHRU de Brest, Service de radiologie, Brest (France); Borotikar, Bhushan S. [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Institut Mines-Telecom, Telecom Bretagne, Brest (France)

    2016-02-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the concurrent validity and reliability of a low-dose biplanar X-ray system (Ld-BPR) for the measurement of femoral anteversion (FA) by comparing Ld-BPR-based three-dimensional measures with CT-scan-based measures and to assess the discriminative ability of this method in children with cerebral palsy. Fifty dry femora were scanned using both a CT scan and the Ld-BPR system. Ten femora were artificially modified to mimic a range of anteversion from -30 to +60 and scanned by both modalities. FA was quantified using the images from both modalities and statistically compared for concurrent validity. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of the Ld-BPR system was also determined. Further, Ld-BPR data from 16 hemiplegic and 22 diplegic children were analyzed for its discriminative ability. The concurrent validity between the Ld-BPR and CT-scan measures was excellent (R {sup 2} = 0.83-0.84) and no significant differences were found. The intra- and inter-trial reliability were excellent (ICCs = 0.98 and 0.97) with limits of agreement of (-2.28 ; +2.65 ) and (-2.76 ; +3.38 ) respectively. Further, no significant effects of angle or method were found in the sample of modified femora. Ld-BPR measures for FA were significantly different between healthy and impaired femora. The excellent concurrent validity with the CT scan modality, the excellent reliability, and the ability to discriminate pathological conditions evaluated by this study make this radiological method suitable for a validated use across hospitals and research institutes. (orig.)

  8. Profiles of African American College Students’ Alcohol Use and Sexual Behaviors: Associations With Stress, Racial Discrimination, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Isha W.; Cooper, Shauna M.; Ritchwood, Tiarney D.; Onyeuku, Chisom; Griffin, Charity Brown

    2017-01-01

    Though studies show that alcohol use and sexual activity increase during emerging adulthood, few studies examine within–ethnic group differences, particularly among African American college students. This investigation utilized a latent class analytic methodology to identify risk behavior profiles of alcohol use (frequency and amount of alcohol consumed), sexual activity (number of intimate partners), and co-occurring risk behaviors (drinking before sexual intercourse) among 228 African American college students. This investigation also examined whether identified risk behavior profiles were associated with stress (interpersonal, intraperso-nal, academic, and environmental), experiences of racial discrimination, and social support (from family, friends, and the college community). Results identified five distinct profiles within this sample: (a) High Sexual Risk—above-average sexual activity; (b) Abstainers—below-average alcohol use and sexual activity; (c) Low Risk—average alcohol use and sexual activity; (d) Alcohol Risk—above-average alcohol use and below-average sexual activity; and (e) Co-Occurring Risk—above-average alcohol use and sexual activity. Identified profiles differed across interpersonal and environmental stress, and self-reported frequency of experiences with racial discrimination. Implications for prevention programs and interventions aimed at reducing alcohol and sexual activity for African American college students are discussed. PMID:27215314

  9. Profiles of African American College Students' Alcohol Use and Sexual Behaviors: Associations With Stress, Racial Discrimination, and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Isha W; Cooper, Shauna M; Ritchwood, Tiarney D; Onyeuku, Chisom; Griffin, Charity Brown

    2017-01-01

    Though studies show that alcohol use and sexual activity increase during emerging adulthood, few studies examine within-ethnic group differences, particularly among African American college students. This investigation utilized a latent class analytic methodology to identify risk behavior profiles of alcohol use (frequency and amount of alcohol consumed), sexual activity (number of intimate partners), and co-occurring risk behaviors (drinking before sexual intercourse) among 228 African American college students. This investigation also examined whether identified risk behavior profiles were associated with stress (interpersonal, intrapersonal, academic, and environmental), experiences of racial discrimination, and social support (from family, friends, and the college community). Results identified five distinct profiles within this sample: (a) High Sexual Risk-above-average sexual activity; (b) Abstainers-below-average alcohol use and sexual activity; (c) Low Risk-average alcohol use and sexual activity; (d) Alcohol Risk-above-average alcohol use and below-average sexual activity; and (e) Co-Occurring Risk-above-average alcohol use and sexual activity. Identified profiles differed across interpersonal and environmental stress, and self-reported frequency of experiences with racial discrimination. Implications for prevention programs and interventions aimed at reducing alcohol and sexual activity for African American college students are discussed.

  10. Discrimination of Switchgrass Cultivars and Nitrogen Treatments Using Pigment Profiles and Hyperspectral Leaf Reflectance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Mosali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the use of hyperspectral narrowbands, hyperspectral narrowband indices and pigment measurements collected from switchgrass leaf as potential tools for discriminating among twelve switchgrass cultivars and five N treatments in one cultivar (Alamo. Hyperspectral reflectance, UV-B absorbing compounds, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids of the uppermost fully expanded leaves were determined at monthly intervals from May to September. Leaf hyperspectral data was collected using ASD FieldSpec FR spectroradiometer (350–2,500 nm. Discrimination of the cultivars and N treatments were determined based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA and linear discriminant analysis (DA. The stepwise discriminant analysis was used to determine the best indices that differentiate switchgrass cultivars and nitrogen treatments. Results of PCA showed 62% of the variability could be explained in PC1 dominated by middle infrared wavebands, over 20% in PC2 dominated by near infrared wavebands and just over 10% in PC3 dominated by green wavebands for separating both cultivars and N treatments. Discriminating among the cultivars resulted in an overall accuracy of 81% with the first five PCs in the month of September, but was less accurate (27% in classifying N treatments using the spectral data. Discrimination based on pigment data using the first two PCs resulted in an overall accuracy of less than 10% for separating switchgrass cultivars , but was more accurate (47% in grouping N treatments. The plant senescence ratio index (PSRI was found to be the best index for separating the cultivars late in the season, while the transform chlorophyll absorption ration index (TCARI was best for separating the N treatments. Leaf spectra data was found to be more useful than pigment data for the discrimination of switchgrass cultivars, particularly late in the growing season.

  11. Characterization of Fatty Acid Profile of Argan Oil and Other Edible Vegetable Oils by Gas Chromatography and Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Rueda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Virgin argan oil is an emergent oil that is being introduced into specialized international markets as a healthy and luxury food. In order to compare the fatty acid composition of argan oil with that of the eleven other vegetable edible oils, a combination of gas chromatography as analytical technique and multivariate discriminant analysis was applied. This analysis takes into account the conjoint effect of all the variables analyzed in the discrimination between oils and also shows the contribution of each variable to oils characterization. The model correctly classified 100% oil samples. According to the fatty acid composition, argan oil showed closest similarity firstly with sesame oil and secondly with high oleic sunflower oil. Olive oil was close to avocado oil and almond oil, followed by argan oil. Thus, similarities and differences between vegetable oils based on their fatty acid profile were established by the application of multivariate discriminant analysis. This method was proven to be a useful tool to study the relationships between oils according to the fat composition and to determine the importance of the fatty acid variables on the oils classification.

  12. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no models have been proposed that take into account non-sinusoidal stimuli for rotational motions. In this work, the influence of both the period length and the specific time course of an inertial stimulus is investigated. Thresholds for three acceleration profile shapes (triangular, sinusoidal, and trapezoidal) were measured for three period lengths (0.3, 1.4, and 6.7 s) in ten participants. A two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task was used where participants had to judge if a yaw rotation around an earth-vertical axis was leftward or rightward. The peak velocity of the stimulus was varied, and the threshold was defined as the stimulus yielding 75 % correct answers. In accordance with previous research, thresholds decreased with shortening period length (from ~2 deg/s for 6.7 s to ~0.8 deg/s for 0.3 s). The peak velocity was the determining factor for discrimination: Different profiles with the same period length have similar velocity thresholds. These measurements were used to fit a novel model based on a description of the firing rate of semi-circular canal neurons. In accordance with previous research, the estimates of the model parameters suggest that velocity storage does not influence perceptual thresholds.

  13. Comparison of bacterial DNA profiles of footwear insoles and soles of feet for the forensic discrimination of footwear owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Haruhisa

    2012-09-01

    It is crucial to identify the owner of unattended footwear left at a crime scene. However, retrieving enough DNA for DNA profiling from the owner's foot skin (plantar skin) cells from inside the footwear is often unsuccessful. This is sometimes because footwear that is used on a daily basis contains an abundance of bacteria that degrade DNA. Further, numerous other factors related to the inside of the shoe, such as high humidity and temperature, can encourage bacterial growth inside the footwear and enhance DNA degradation. This project sought to determine if bacteria from inside footwear could be used for footwear trace evidence. The plantar skins and insoles of shoes of volunteers were swabbed for bacteria, and their bacterial community profiles were compared using bacterial 16S rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Sufficient bacteria were recovered from both footwear insoles and the plantar skins of the volunteers. The profiling identified that each volunteer's plantar skins harbored unique bacterial communities, as did the individuals' footwear insoles. In most cases, a significant similarity in the bacterial community was identified for the matched foot/insole swabs from each volunteer, as compared with those profiles from different volunteers. These observations indicate the probability to discriminate the owner of footwear by comparing the microbial DNA fingerprint from inside footwear with that of the skin from the soles of the feet of the suspected owner. This novel strategy will offer auxiliary forensic footwear evidence for human DNA identification, although further investigations into this technique are required.

  14. Profiling the ionome of rice and its use in discriminating geographical origins at the regional scale, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Nunes, Luis; Wang, Yijie; Williams, Paul N; Zheng, Maozhong; Zhang, Qiufang; Zhu, Yongguan

    2013-01-01

    Element profile was investigated for their use to trace the geographical origin of rice (Oryza sativa L.) samples. The concentrations of 13 elements (calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), boron (B), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd)) were determined in the rice samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectrometry. Most of the essential elements for human health in rice were within normal ranges except for Mo and Se. Mo concentrations were twice as high as those in rice from Vietnam and Spain. Meanwhile, Se concentrations were three times lower in the whole province compared to the Chinese average level of 0.088 mg/kg. About 12% of the rice samples failed the Chinese national food safety standard of 0.2 mg/kg for Cd. Combined with the multi-elemental profile in rice, the principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA) and Fibonacci index analysis (FIA) were applied to discriminate geographical origins of the samples. Results indicated that the FIA method could achieve a more effective geographical origin classification compared with PCA and DFA, due to its efficiency in making the grouping even when the elemental variability was so high that PCA and DFA showed little discriminatory power. Furthermore, some elements were identified as the most powerful indicators of geographical origin: Ca, Ni, Fe and Cd. This suggests that the newly established methodology of FIA based on the ionome profile can be applied to determine the geographical origin of rice.

  15. Developmental Profiles and Temperament Patterns in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Relationships With Subtypes and Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ling Chen

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: The subtype and severity of sCP were associated with developmental profiles in children with sCP Temperament patterns were different between SD and SQ groups, but only weakly related to motor deficit. These data could allow clinicians to anticipate the developmental profiles and temperament patterns and plan appropriate therapeutic strategies for children with sCP.

  16. Discriminating between silent cerebral infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity using combinations of three types of magnetic resonance images: a multicenter observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Hirai, Toshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Taoka, Toshiaki [Nara Prefectural Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kashihara (Japan); Higano, Shuichi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Sendai (Japan); Wakabayashi, Chieko [Suiseikai Kajikawa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsusue, Eiji [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Ida, Masahiro [Ebara Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    We attempted to determine the most appropriate combination of magnetic resonance (MR) images that can accurately detect and discriminate between asymptomatic infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH); these lesions have different clinical implications and are occasionally confused. We performed an observer performance analysis using cerebral MR images of 45 individuals with or without asymptomatic small white matter infarction and/or mild DWMH who participated in a physical checkup program at four institutions. Six observers interpreted whether infarction and/or DWMH existed in combinations of two or three image types of the T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. The observers' performance was evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The averaged area under the ROC curve (Az) for detecting a infarction was significantly larger in the combination of all the three image types (0.95) than that in any combinations of the two image types (T1WI and FLAIR images, 0.87; T2WI and FLAIR images, 0.85; T1WI and T2WI, 0.86). The Az for detecting DWMH was significantly smaller in the combination of T1WI and T2WI (0.79) than that in other image combinations (T1WI and FLAIR, 0.89; T2WI and FLAIR, 0.91; T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR, 0.90). The combination of T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR images is required to accurately detect both small white matter infarction and mild DWMH. (orig.)

  17. Subtypes of adolescents with substance use disorders and psychiatric comorbidity using cluster and discriminant analysis of MMPI-A profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallón-Neri, Ernesto; Díaz, Rosa; Forns, Maria; Goti, Javier; Canalda, Gloria; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to replicate and extend previous results on subtypes of adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD), according to their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for adolescents (MMPI-A) profiles. Sixty patients with SUD and psychiatric comorbidity (41.7% male, mean age = 15.9 years old) completed the MMPI-A, the Teen Addiction Severity Index (T-ASI), the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), and were interviewed in order to determine DSMIV diagnoses and level of substance use. Mean MMPI-A personality profile showed moderate peaks in Psychopathic Deviate, Depression and Hysteria scales. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four profiles (acting-out, 35% of the sample; disorganized-conflictive, 15%; normative-impulsive, 15%; and deceptive-concealed, 35%). External correlates were found between cluster 1, CBCL externalizing symptoms at a clinical level and conduct disorders, and between cluster 2 and mixed CBCL internalized/externalized symptoms at a clinical level. Discriminant analysis showed that Depression, Psychopathic Deviate and Psychasthenia MMPI-A scales correctly classified 90% of the patients into the clusters obtained.

  18. [Objective measures for setting the processors of cochlear implant systems : Use of discrimination functions and consideration of electrode profiles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, S; Herisanu, I; Praetorius, M

    2016-12-01

    When setting the electrical stimulation level of cochlear implants during individual adjustment of the speech processor, especially in children, objective measures such as intracochlearly measured electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAP) and intraoperative observation of electrically elicited stapedial reflexes (eSR) are indispensable. The benefit of these objective measures is based on the correlation between the derived response thresholds and psychometric data. The amplitude growth functions of eCAPs were measured intraoperatively for all electrodes in 30 ears of adult patients. The stimulus-dependent incidence of observable eSRs was recorded for all electrodes in 16 ears of adult patients. For evaluation of the data, new algorithms were applied which allowed the determination of thresholds without intervention of the investigator. Essential features were the conversion of observations into binary variables, and the consideration of logistic discrimination functions and their exceedance of a numeric threshold criterion. Regarding the eCAP data, closer and significant correlations are observed between objective thresholds and psychometric measures in comparison to conventional procedures. Profiles are more efficient than pooled data. Significant correlations are also observed for eSR thresholds, albeit to a lesser extent and without an evident difference between profiles and pooled data. Considering the by no means consistent international literature, the results illustrate the need for a consistent definition of response thresholds and the consideration of electrode profiles.

  19. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    beta1 (HLA-DQB1) was significantly reduced in RA patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusions: With the analytical procedure employed, we did not find any indication that RF-positive and RF-negative RA are two fundamentally different diseases. Most of the genes discriminative between RA patients......To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... patients, and seven healthy controls. Gene expression of about 10,000 genes were examined using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays. The analyses showed no significant differences in PBMC expression patterns from RF-positive and RF-negative patients. However, comparisons of gene expression patterns...

  20. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis - Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, L.F.; Rieneck, K.; Workman, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    beta1 (HLA-DQB1) was significantly reduced in RA patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusions: With the analytical procedure employed, we did not find any indication that RF-positive and RF-negative RA are two fundamentally different diseases. Most of the genes discriminative between RA patients......To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... patients, and seven healthy controls. Gene expression of about 10,000 genes were examined using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays. The analyses showed no significant differences in PBMC expression patterns from RF-positive and RF-negative patients. However, comparisons of gene expression patterns...

  1. Cytokine Profiles in Malawian Children Presenting with Uncomplicated Malaria, Severe Malarial Anemia, and Cerebral Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Wilson L; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Drayson, Mark T; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2017-04-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are involved in clearance of Plasmodium falciparum, and very high levels of these cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. In order to determine how cytokines vary with disease severity and syndrome, we enrolled Malawian children presenting with cerebral malaria (CM), severe malarial anemia (SMA), and uncomplicated malaria (UCM) and healthy controls. We analyzed serum cytokine concentrations in acute infection and in convalescence. With the exception of interleukin 5 (IL-5), cytokine concentrations were highest in acute CM, followed by SMA, and were only mildly elevated in UCM. Cytokine concentrations had fallen to control levels when remeasured at 1 month of convalescence in all three clinical malaria groups. Ratios of IL-10 to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and of IL-10 to IL-6 followed a similar pattern. Children presenting with acute CM had significantly higher concentrations of TNF-α (P Mandala et al.

  2. Discrimination among spawning concentrations of Lake Superior lake herring based on trace element profiles in sagittae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Charles R.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Shoesmith, John A.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the stock structure of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior, and recent increases in harvestable stock sizes has led to expanded exploitation in some areas. Research on marine teleosts has demonstrated that chemical differences in sagittal otoliths can be used for identification of fish stocks. We used plasma emission spectrophotometry to measure the concentrations of 10 trace elements in the sagittal otoliths from lake herring captured at eight spawning sites in Lake Superior and from Little Star Lake, an inland lake outside the Lake Superior basin. Discriminant function analysis indicated that elemental concentrations provided site-specific information but that considerable overlap existed among some locations, especially those in western Lake Superior. Correct classification rates varied from 12.0% to 86.1% and were generally higher for spawning locations from embayments in eastern Lake Superior and for the outgroup population from Little Star Lake. The results presented here demonstrate the potential usefulness of this technique for strictly freshwater species, especially those that live in highly oligotrophic waters such as Lake Superior.

  3. Construct validity of the Capacity Profile in preschool children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meester-Delver, Anke; Beelen, Anita; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Nollet, Frans; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2009-01-01

    The Capacity Profile (CAP) classifies additional care needs, subdivided into five domains of body functions (physical health, motor, sensory, mental, and voice/speech) of children with stable conditions. Construct validity of the CAP was established in 72 children (56 males, 16 females) with

  4. Construct validity of the Capacity Profile in preschool children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meester-Delver, Anke; Beelen, Anita; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Nollet, Frans; Gorter, Jan Willem

    The Capacity Profile (CAP) classifies additional care needs, subdivided into five domains of body functions (physical health, motor, sensory, mental, and voice/speech) of children with stable conditions. Construct validity of the CAP was established in 72 children (56 males, 16 females) with

  5. Clinical Spectrum, Comorbidities, and Risk Factor Profile of Cerebral Palsy Children: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Priyanka; Sitaraman, Sadasivan; Sachdeva, Pallavi

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in childhood. This study aimed to describe clinical spectrum, comorbidities, and risk factors associated with CP children. This hospital-based observational study was conducted in tertiary level hospital in Jaipur including 180 CP children aged 1-12 years, attending the Paediatric Neurology Outdoor and Child Development Centre. A detailed history of antenatal, natal, and postnatal events taken and thorough examination was performed to stratify children in proper topographical and physiological classification. Mothers of 47.7% CP children were primigravida and 17.7% mothers had anemia during pregnancy. Among natal factors, asphyxia contributed to maximum cases (52.2%). Seizure in postnatal life was the second most common risk factor for CP after asphyxia. Spastic CP (84.4%) was the most common physiological type, and quadriplegia (56.6%) was the most common topographical type observed in this study. Intellectual disability (47.7%) followed by epilepsy (41.6%) was the most common comorbidity. Even with the advancement of health-care system, asphyxia is the most common risk factor, and spastic quadriplegia is the most common type of CP. There is still a need of improving the health facilities to overcome this costly and common neuromotor disability. Widespread knowledge of common risk factors that can predispose to CP can prevent the CP development to some extent and knowledge of clinical spectrum, and comorbidities can improve their targeted treatment which can improve their growth and social participation.

  6. Evolution of cytokine profile during the treatment of cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Cristina da Silva; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia; Vidal, José Ernesto; Motoie, Gabriela; Costa-Silva, Thaís Alves da; Gava, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    This study was to follow IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 modulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV/cerebral toxoplasmosis patients (CT) during specific treatment. The results were compared with two other groups: HIV patients that had CT at least one year before (P/CT) and individuals with chronic toxoplasmosis (CHR). Blood samples (63) collected from three groups were analyzed. CT, 15 patients (3 blood samples collected one day before Toxoplasma gondii treatment; 7 and 15days during the treatment). P/CT, 5 patients (one blood sample collected at least, one year after the treatment). CHR, 13 individuals with chronic toxoplasmosis (one blood sample). Cytokine levels were assessed by ELISA after PBMC stimulation with T. gondii antigen. CT patients had low IFN-γ; discrete increase at 7th and 15th days; and the levels were recovered in cured patients (P/CT). CT patients had high TNF-α in the beginning of the treatment. TNF-α levels decrease during the treatment (7th and 15th) and in those patients who were treated (P/CT). IL-10 levels were almost similar in CT and P/CT groups but low when compared with CHR individuals. The evolution of the infection was correlated to restoration of IFN-γ response and a decrease of the inflammation. The evaluation of the immune response can provide valuable information and better monitoring of patients during specific treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The different morphologies of urachal adenocarcinoma do not discriminate genomically by micro-RNA expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Mei Lin Z; Kocherginsky, Masha; Tretiakova, Maria; Jimenez, Rafael E; Barkan, Güliz A; Mehta, Vikas; Sirintrapun, Sahussapont Joseph; Steinberg, Gary D; White, Kevin P; Stricker, Thomas; Paner, Gladell P

    2013-08-01

    Urachal adenocarcinoma has several morphologic presentations that include mucinous, enteric, signet ring cell, and not otherwise specified. Mixtures of these morphologies can occur, and percentage cut-offs are used for classification. The clinical significance of these morphologic types is currently unknown, and genetic analysis that could elucidate possible intertumoral differences has not been performed. In this study, we analyzed the micro-RNA expression profiles of 12 urachal adenocarcinomas classified using strict morphologic criteria (3 pure enteric, 3 pure mucinous, 2 signet ring cell [both 90% signet ring cell], 2 pure not otherwise specified, and 2 mixed cell types). Of 598 unique human micro-RNAs, 333 were expressed in more than 50% of the samples. Hierarchal clustering showed no distinct patterns in the genetic profiles of the morphologic types. However, there were individual micro-RNA differences when the different types were compared individually or grouped together, either by intracellular mucin production or by grouping enteric and signet ring cell together. In the later group, 13 messenger RNA species were differentially expressed (adjusted P value of ≤.05). However, these micro-RNA differences were small, suggesting more biologic similarity than differences among these entities. Thus, this study suggests that the different morphological subtypes may represent patterns of differentiation or a continuum of a single biological tumor type rather than several distinct types that arose from the urachal remnant epithelium. This finding, if further validated in larger studies, may have implications in future clinical therapeutic trials for urachal adenocarcinoma with regard to patient grouping and choice of therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. STR Profiling for Discrimination between Wild and Domestic Swine Specimens and between Main Breeds of Domestic Pigs Reared in Belarus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rębała

    Full Text Available A panel comprising 16 short tandem repeats (STRs and a gender-specific amelogenin marker was worked out and tested for robustness in discrimination between wild and domestic swine subspecies encountered in Europe, between regional populations of wild boars and between main breeds of domestic pigs reared in Belarus. The STR dataset comprised 310 wild boars, inhabiting all administrative regions of Belarus, and 313 domestic pigs, representing three local and three cosmopolitan lines. Additionally, a total of 835 wild boars were genotyped for the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R alleles specific for domestic pigs. Correctness of assignment of STR profiles to appropriate populations was measured by log-likelihood ratios (log-LRs. All samples were correctly identified as wild boars or domestic pigs with average log-LR of 42.4 (LR = 2.6×1018. On the other hand, as many as 50 out of 835 (6.0% genotyped wild boars from Belarus possessed MC1R alleles specific to domestic pigs, demonstrating supremacy of our STR profiling system over traditional differentiation between wild boars and domestic pigs, based on single binary markers. Mean log-LRs for allocation of wild boars to their regions of origin and of domestic pigs to appropriate breeds were 2.3 (LR = 9.7 and 13.4 (LR = 6.6×105, respectively. Our results demonstrate the developed STR profiling system to be a highly efficient tool for differentiation between wild and domestic swine subspecies and between diverse breeds of domestic pigs as well as for verification of genetic identity of porcine specimens for the purpose of forensic investigations of wildlife crimes, assurance of veterinary public health, parentage control in animal husbandry, food safety management and traceability of livestock products.

  9. STR Profiling for Discrimination between Wild and Domestic Swine Specimens and between Main Breeds of Domestic Pigs Reared in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rębała, Krzysztof; Rabtsava, Alina A.; Kotova, Svetlana A.; Kipen, Viachaslau N.; Zhurina, Natalja V.; Gandzha, Alla I.; Tsybovsky, Iosif S.

    2016-01-01

    A panel comprising 16 short tandem repeats (STRs) and a gender-specific amelogenin marker was worked out and tested for robustness in discrimination between wild and domestic swine subspecies encountered in Europe, between regional populations of wild boars and between main breeds of domestic pigs reared in Belarus. The STR dataset comprised 310 wild boars, inhabiting all administrative regions of Belarus, and 313 domestic pigs, representing three local and three cosmopolitan lines. Additionally, a total of 835 wild boars were genotyped for the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) alleles specific for domestic pigs. Correctness of assignment of STR profiles to appropriate populations was measured by log-likelihood ratios (log-LRs). All samples were correctly identified as wild boars or domestic pigs with average log-LR of 42.4 (LR = 2.6×1018). On the other hand, as many as 50 out of 835 (6.0%) genotyped wild boars from Belarus possessed MC1R alleles specific to domestic pigs, demonstrating supremacy of our STR profiling system over traditional differentiation between wild boars and domestic pigs, based on single binary markers. Mean log-LRs for allocation of wild boars to their regions of origin and of domestic pigs to appropriate breeds were 2.3 (LR = 9.7) and 13.4 (LR = 6.6×105), respectively. Our results demonstrate the developed STR profiling system to be a highly efficient tool for differentiation between wild and domestic swine subspecies and between diverse breeds of domestic pigs as well as for verification of genetic identity of porcine specimens for the purpose of forensic investigations of wildlife crimes, assurance of veterinary public health, parentage control in animal husbandry, food safety management and traceability of livestock products. PMID:27851802

  10. Unique intrahepatic transcriptomics profiles discriminate the clinical phases of a chronic HBV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hou

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B is a highly heterogeneous liver disease characterized by phases with fluctuations in viral replication and progressive liver damage in some, but not all infected individuals. Despite four decades of research, insight into host determinants underlying these distinct clinical phases-immunotolerant, immune active, inactive carrier, and HBeAg-negative hepatitis-remains elusive. We performed an in-depth transcriptome analysis of archived FFPE liver biopsies of each clinical phase to address host determinants associated with the natural history. Therefore, we determined, for the first time, intrahepatic global expression profiles of well-characterized chronic HBV patients at different clinical phases. Our data, obtained by microarray, demonstrate that B cells and NK/cytotoxic-related genes in the liver, including CD19, TNFRSF13C, GZMH, and KIR2DS3, were differentially expressed across the clinical HBV phases, which was confirmed by modular analysis and also Nanostring arrays in an independent cohort. Compared to the immunotolerant phase, 92 genes were differentially expressed in the liver during the immune active phase, 46 in the inactive carrier phase, and 71 in the HBeAg-negative phase. Furthermore, our study also revealed distinctive transcription of genes associated with cell cycle activity, NF-κB signaling, cytotoxic function and mitochondrial respiration between clinical phases. Our data define for the first time using microarray unique transcriptomes in the HBV-infected liver during consecutive clinical phases. We demonstrate that fluctuations of viral loads and liver damage coincide with fluctuations in the liver transcriptome and point to functional- immune and non-immune- components contributing to the clinical phenotype in patients.

  11. Integrated Analysis of Expression Profile Based on Differentially Expressed Genes in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiang Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common causes of death, only second to heart disease. Molecular investigations about stroke are in acute shortage nowadays. This study is intended to explore a gene expression profile after brain ischemia reperfusion. Meta-analysis, differential expression analysis, and integrated analysis were employed on an eight microarray series. We explored the functions and pathways of target genes in gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis and constructed a protein-protein interaction network. Meta-analysis identified 360 differentially expressed genes (DEGs for Mus musculus and 255 for Rattus norvegicus. Differential expression analysis identified 44 DEGs for Mus musculus and 21 for Rattus norvegicus. Timp1 and Lcn2 were overexpressed in both species. The cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were highly enriched for the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway. We have exhibited a global view of the potential molecular differences between middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO animal model and sham for Mus musculus or Rattus norvegicus, including the biological process and enriched pathways in DEGs. This research helps contribute to a clearer understanding of the inflammation process and accurate identification of ischemic infarction stages, which might be transformed into a therapeutic approach.

  12. Data Mining of Determinants of Intrauterine Growth Retardation Revisited Using Novel Algorithms Generating Semantic Maps and Prototypical Discriminating Variable Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscema, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo; Montanini, Luisa; Street, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Intra-uterine growth retardation is often of unknown origin, and is of great interest as a "Fetal Origin of Adult Disease" has been now well recognized. We built a benchmark based upon a previously analysed data set related to Intrauterine Growth Retardation with 46 subjects described by 14 variables, related with the insulin-like growth factor system and pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We used new algorithms for optimal information sorting based on the combination of two neural network algorithms: Auto-contractive Map and Activation and Competition System. Auto-Contractive Map spatializes the relationships among variables or records by constructing a suitable embedding space where 'closeness' among variables or records reflects accurately their associations. The Activation and Competition System algorithm instead works as a dynamic non linear associative memory on the weight matrices of other algorithms, and is able to produce a prototypical variable profile of a given target. Classical statistical analysis, proved to be unable to distinguish intrauterine growth retardation from appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) subjects due to the high non-linearity of underlying functions. Auto-contractive map succeeded in clustering and differentiating completely the conditions under study, while Activation and Competition System allowed to develop the profile of variables which discriminated the two conditions under study better than any other previous form of attempt. In particular, Activation and Competition System showed that ppropriateness for gestational age was explained by IGF-2 relative gene expression, and by IGFBP-2 and TNF-α placental contents. IUGR instead was explained by IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IL-6 gene expression in placenta. This further analysis provided further insight into the placental key-players of fetal growth within the insulin-like growth factor and cytokine systems. Our previous published

  13. Data Mining of Determinants of Intrauterine Growth Retardation Revisited Using Novel Algorithms Generating Semantic Maps and Prototypical Discriminating Variable Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Buscema

    Full Text Available Intra-uterine growth retardation is often of unknown origin, and is of great interest as a "Fetal Origin of Adult Disease" has been now well recognized. We built a benchmark based upon a previously analysed data set related to Intrauterine Growth Retardation with 46 subjects described by 14 variables, related with the insulin-like growth factor system and pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α.We used new algorithms for optimal information sorting based on the combination of two neural network algorithms: Auto-contractive Map and Activation and Competition System. Auto-Contractive Map spatializes the relationships among variables or records by constructing a suitable embedding space where 'closeness' among variables or records reflects accurately their associations. The Activation and Competition System algorithm instead works as a dynamic non linear associative memory on the weight matrices of other algorithms, and is able to produce a prototypical variable profile of a given target.Classical statistical analysis, proved to be unable to distinguish intrauterine growth retardation from appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA subjects due to the high non-linearity of underlying functions. Auto-contractive map succeeded in clustering and differentiating completely the conditions under study, while Activation and Competition System allowed to develop the profile of variables which discriminated the two conditions under study better than any other previous form of attempt. In particular, Activation and Competition System showed that ppropriateness for gestational age was explained by IGF-2 relative gene expression, and by IGFBP-2 and TNF-α placental contents. IUGR instead was explained by IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IL-6 gene expression in placenta.This further analysis provided further insight into the placental key-players of fetal growth within the insulin-like growth factor and cytokine systems. Our previous

  14. Profiles of bullying victimization, discrimination, social support, and school safety: Links with Latino/a youth acculturation, gender, depressive symptoms, and cigarette use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Unger, Jennifer B; Oshri, Assaf; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Latino/a youth are at risk for symptoms of depression and cigarette smoking but this risk varies by acculturation and gender. To understand why some youth are at greater risk than others, we identified profiles of diverse community experiences (perceived discrimination, bullying victimization, social support, perceived school safety) and examined associations between profiles of community experience and depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, acculturation, and gender. Data came from Project Red (Reteniendo y Entendiendo Diversidad para Salud), a school-based longitudinal study of acculturation among 1,919 Latino/a adolescents (52% female; 84% 14 years old; 87% U.S. born). Latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed 4 distinct profiles of community experience that varied by gender and acculturation. Boys were overrepresented in profile groups with high perceived discrimination, some bullying, and lack of positive experiences, while girls were overrepresented in groups with high bullying victimization in the absence and presence of other community experiences. Youth low on both U.S. and Latino/a cultural orientation described high perceived discrimination and lacked positive experiences, and were predominantly male. Profiles characterized by high perceived discrimination and /or high bullying victimization in the absence of positive experiences had higher levels of depressive symptoms and higher risk of smoking, relative to the other groups. Findings suggest that acculturation comes with diverse community experiences that vary by gender and relate to smoking and depression risk. Results from this research can inform the development of tailored intervention and prevention strategies to reduce depression and/or smoking for Latino/a youth. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Profiles of Bullying Victimization, Discrimination, Social Support, and School Safety: Links with Latino/a Youth Acculturation, Gender, Depressive Symptoms, and Cigarette Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Oshri, Assaf; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Latino/a youth are at risk for symptoms of depression and cigarette smoking but this risk varies by acculturation and gender. To understand why some youth are at greater risk than others, we identified profiles of diverse community experiences (perceived discrimination, bullying victimization, social support, perceived school safety) and examined associations between profiles of community experience and depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, acculturation, and gender. Data came from Project Red (Reteniendo y Entendiendo Diversidad para Salud), a school-based longitudinal study of acculturation among 1919 Latino/a adolescents (52% female; 84% 14 years old; 87% U.S. born). Latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed four distinct profiles of community experience which varied by gender and acculturation. Boys were overrepresented in profile groups with high perceived discrimination, some bullying, and lack of positive experiences, while girls were overrepresented in groups with high bullying victimization in the absence and presence of other community experiences. Youth low on both U.S. and Latino/a cultural orientation described high perceived discrimination and lacked positive experiences, and were predominantly male. Profiles characterized by high perceived discrimination and/or high bullying victimization in the absence of positive experiences had higher levels of depressive symptoms and higher risk of smoking, relative to the other groups. Findings suggest that acculturation comes with diverse community experiences that vary by gender and relate to smoking and depression risk. Results from this research can inform the development of tailored intervention and prevention strategies to reduce depression and/or smoking for Latino/a youth at risk for depression and/or smoking. PMID:26752445

  16. Stable Isotope Ratio and Elemental Profile Combined with Support Vector Machine for Provenance Discrimination of Oolong Tea (Wuyi-Rock Tea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yun-Xiao; Fu, Xian-Shu; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Zi-Hong; Cui, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Ya-Fen

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused on an effective method to discriminate the geographical origin of Wuyi-Rock tea by the stable isotope ratio (SIR) and metallic element profiling (MEP) combined with support vector machine (SVM) analysis. Wuyi-Rock tea (n = 99) collected from nine producing areas and non-Wuyi-Rock tea (n = 33) from eleven nonproducing areas were analysed for SIR and MEP by established methods. The SVM model based on coupled data produced the best prediction accuracy (0.9773). This prediction shows that instrumental methods combined with a classification model can provide an effective and stable tool for provenance discrimination. Moreover, every feature variable in stable isotope and metallic element data was ranked by its contribution to the model. The results show that δ(2)H, δ(18)O, Cs, Cu, Ca, and Rb contents are significant indications for provenance discrimination and not all of the metallic elements improve the prediction accuracy of the SVM model.

  17. In vivo metabolic flux profiling with stable isotopes discriminates sites and quantifies effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergano, Samantha Schrier; Rao, Meera; McCormack, Shana; Ostrovsky, Julian; Clarke, Colleen; Preston, Judith; Bennett, Michael J; Yudkoff, Marc; Xiao, Rui; Falk, Marni J

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease diagnosis is complicated both by an absence of biomarkers that sufficiently divulge all cases and limited capacity to quantify adverse effects across intermediary metabolism. We applied high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) studies of stable-isotope based precursor-product relationships in the nematode, C. elegans, to interrogate in vivo differences in metabolic flux among distinct genetic models of primary RC defects and closely related metabolic disorders. C. elegans strains studied harbor single nuclear gene defects in complex I, II, or III RC subunits (gas-1, mev-1, isp-1); enzymes involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis (clk-1), the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, idh-1), or pyruvate metabolism (pdha-1); and central nodes of the nutrient-sensing signaling network that involve insulin response (daf-2) or the sirtuin homologue (sir-2.1). Synchronous populations of 2000 early larval stage worms were fed standard Escherichia coli on nematode growth media plates containing 1,6-(13)C2-glucose throughout their developmental period, with samples extracted on the first day of adult life in 4% perchloric acid with an internal standard. Quantitation of whole animal free amino acid concentrations and isotopic incorporation into amino and organic acids throughout development was performed in all strains by HPLC and isotope ratio MS, respectively. GC/MS analysis was also performed to quantify absolute isotopic incorporation in all molecular species of key TCA cycle intermediates in gas-1 and N2 adult worms. Genetic mutations within different metabolic pathways displayed distinct metabolic profiles. RC complex I (gas-1) and III (isp-1) subunit mutants, together with the coenzyme Q biosynthetic mutant (clk-1), shared a similar amino acid profile of elevated alanine and decreased glutamate. The metabolic signature of the complex II mutant (mev-1) was distinct from that of the other RC mutants but

  18. Data Mining of Determinants of Intrauterine Growth Retardation Revisited Using Novel Algorithms Generating Semantic Maps and Prototypical Discriminating Variable Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscema, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo; Montanini, Luisa; Street, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-uterine growth retardation is often of unknown origin, and is of great interest as a “Fetal Origin of Adult Disease” has been now well recognized. We built a benchmark based upon a previously analysed data set related to Intrauterine Growth Retardation with 46 subjects described by 14 variables, related with the insulin-like growth factor system and pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin -6 and tumor necrosis factor -α. Design and Methods We used new algorithms for optimal information sorting based on the combination of two neural network algorithms: Auto-contractive Map and Activation and Competition System. Auto-Contractive Map spatializes the relationships among variables or records by constructing a suitable embedding space where ‘closeness’ among variables or records reflects accurately their associations. The Activation and Competition System algorithm instead works as a dynamic non linear associative memory on the weight matrices of other algorithms, and is able to produce a prototypical variable profile of a given target. Results Classical statistical analysis, proved to be unable to distinguish intrauterine growth retardation from appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) subjects due to the high non-linearity of underlying functions. Auto-contractive map succeeded in clustering and differentiating completely the conditions under study, while Activation and Competition System allowed to develop the profile of variables which discriminated the two conditions under study better than any other previous form of attempt. In particular, Activation and Competition System showed that ppropriateness for gestational age was explained by IGF-2 relative gene expression, and by IGFBP-2 and TNF-α placental contents. IUGR instead was explained by IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IL-6 gene expression in placenta. Conclusion This further analysis provided further insight into the placental key-players of fetal growth within the insulin-like growth

  19. Discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended-sand in rivers using side-looking acoustic profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Williams, Cory A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques rely on measurements of ancillary properties that correlate with suspended-sediment concentration and particle size and thus require the collection of traditional samples for calibration. Through in situ deployments, these methods can provide the high temporal resolution that cannot be achieved through traditional sampling. Here we focus on the evaluation of acoustic profiling techniques (e.g. acoustic-Doppler sideways-looking profilers, or ADPs). One major advantage of acoustic profiling is the ability to concurrently measure water velocity (using Doppler-shift methods) and suspended-sediment concentration such that suspended-sediment flux can be directly computed using data from a single instrument. Acoustic-Doppler profilers have become popular for measuring water velocity and discharge in rivers, through both moving-boat operations and from fixed deployments such as bank-mounted sideways-looking instruments (Hirsch and Costa, 2004, Muste et al., 2007). The method presented herein is most suited to sideways-looking applications as a complement to the "index velocity" technique, whereby an index velocity from a sideways-looking instrument is related to the cross-section average velocity (determined from moving-boat discharge measurements) as a means for developing a continuous water-discharge record (Ruhl and Simpson, 2005). Topping et al. (2007) presented a method for discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended sand, using single frequency ADPs. This method takes advantage of the relations among acoustic backscatter, sediment-induced acoustic attenuation, suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), and particle size distribution (PSD). Backscatter is the amount of sound scattered back and received at the transducer while sediment-induced attenuation is the amount of sound scattered in other directions and absorbed by the sediment particles. Both of these parameters can be measured with an ADP, and their different dependencies on SSC and PSD allow for the

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals an impaired brain metabolic profile in mice resistant to cerebral malaria infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Kober, Frank; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Dalmasso, Christiane; Coltel, Nicolas; Liprandi, Agnès; Gulian, Jean-Marc; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J; Viola, Angèle

    2007-05-11

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with an annual death toll exceeding one million. Severe malaria is a complex multisystem disorder, including one or more of the following complications: cerebral malaria, anemia, acidosis, jaundice, respiratory distress, renal insufficiency, coagulation anomalies, and hyperparasitemia. Using a combined in vivo/in vitro metabolic-based approach, we investigated the putative pathogenic effects of Plasmodium berghei ANKA on brain, in a mouse strain developing malaria but resistant to cerebral malaria. The purpose was to determine whether the infection could cause a brain dysfunction distinct from the classic cerebral syndrome. Mice resistant to cerebral malaria were infected with P. berghei ANKA and explored during both the symptomless and the severe stage of the disease by using in vivo brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. The infected mice did not present the lesional and metabolic hallmarks of cerebral malaria. However, brain dysfunction caused by anemia, parasite burden, and hepatic damage was evidenced. We report an increase in cerebral blood flow, a process allowing temporary maintenance of oxygen supply to brain despite anemia. Besides, we document metabolic anomalies affecting choline-derived compounds, myo-inositol, glutamine, glycine, and alanine. The choline decrease appears related to parasite proliferation. Glutamine, myo-inositol, glycine, and alanine variations together indicate a hepatic encephalopathy, a finding in agreement with the liver damage detected in mice, which is also a feature of the human disease. These results reveal the vulnerability of brain to malaria infection at the severe stage of the disease even in the absence of cerebral malaria.

  1. Physical profiling and IR spectroscopy: simple and effective methods to discriminate between genuine and counterfeit samples of Viagra® and Cialis®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, Deborah; Vandemoortele, Suzanne; Bothy, Jean-Luc; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia; Apers, Sandra; Deconinck, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Counterfeit medicines are a global threat to public health. High amounts enter the European market, enforcing the need for simple techniques to help customs detect these pharmaceuticals. This study focused on physical profiling and IR spectroscopy to obtain a prime discrimination between genuine and illegal Viagra® and Cialis® medicines. Five post-tableting characteristics were explored: colour, mass, long length, short length, and thickness. Hypothesis testing showed that most illegal samples (between 60 and 100%) significantly differ from the genuine medicines, in particular for mass and long length. Classification and Regression Trees (CART) analysis resulted in a good discrimination between genuine and illegal medicines (98.93% correct classification rate for Viagra®, 99.42% for Cialis®). Moreover, CART confirmed the observation that mass and long length are the key physical characteristics which determine the observed discrimination. IR analysis was performed on tablets without blister and on tablets in intact blister. These data were analyzed using Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) and Partial Least Squares - Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Supervised techniques needed to be applied since Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was not able to generate the desired discrimination. Our study shows that a perfect discrimination between genuine and illegal medicines can be made by both SIMCA and PLS-DA without removing the tablets from the blister. This approach has the advantage of keeping the blister intact. Our study demonstrates that these user friendly techniques are reliable methods to aid customs to obtain a prime distinction between genuine and illegal samples on the spot. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Developmental histories of perceived racial discrimination and diurnal cortisol profiles in adulthood: A 20-year prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Emma K.; Heissel, Jennifer A.; Zeiders, Katharine H.; Richeson, Jennifer A.; Ross, Emily C.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Levy, Dorainne J.; Kemeny, Margaret; Brodish, Amanda B.; Malanchuk, Oksana; Peck, Stephen C.; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2015-01-01

    Perceived racial discrimination (PRD) has been associated with altered diurnal cortisol rhythms in past cross-sectional research. We investigate whether developmental histories of PRD, assessed prospectively, are associated with adult diurnal cortisol profiles. One-hundred and twelve (N = 50 Black, N = 62 White) adults from the Maryland Adolescent Development in Context Study provided saliva samples in adulthood (at approximately age 32 years) at waking, 30 min after waking, and at bedtime for 7 days. Diurnal cortisol measures were calculated, including waking cortisol levels, diurnal cortisol slopes, the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and average daily cortisol (AUC). These cortisol outcomes were predicted from measures of PRD obtained over a 20-year period beginning when individuals were in 7th grade (approximately age 12). Greater average PRD measured across the 20-year period predicted flatter adult diurnal cortisol slopes for both Black and White adults, and a lower CAR. Greater average PRD also predicted lower waking cortisol for Black, but not White adults. PRD experiences in adolescence accounted for many of these effects. When adolescent and young adult PRD are entered together predicting cortisol outcomes, PRD experiences in adolescence (but not young adulthood) significantly predicted flatter diurnal cortisol slopes for both Black and White adults. Adolescent, but not young adult PRD, also significantly predicted lower waking and lower average cortisol for Black adults. Young adult PRD was, however, a stronger predictor of the CAR, predicting a marginally lower CAR for Whites, and a significantly larger CAR for Blacks. Effects were robust to controlling for covariates including health behaviors, depression, income and parent education levels. PRD experiences interacted with parent education and income to predict aspects of the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Although these results suggest PRD influences on cortisol for both Blacks and Whites, the key

  3. CT and MR perfusion can discriminate severe cerebral hypoperfusion from perfusion absence: evaluation of different commercial software packages by using digital phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwano, Ikuko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Christensen, Soren [University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Neurology and Radiology, Victoria (Australia); Oestergaard, Leif [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, DK, Aarhus C (Denmark); Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) are expected to be usable for ancillary tests of brain death by detection of complete absence of cerebral perfusion; however, the detection limit of hypoperfusion has not been determined. Hence, we examined whether commercial software can visualize very low cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) by creating and using digital phantoms. Digital phantoms simulating 0-4% of normal CBF (60 mL/100 g/min) and CBV (4 mL/100 g/min) were analyzed by ten software packages of CT and MRI manufacturers. Region-of-interest measurements were performed to determine whether there was a significant difference between areas of 0% and areas of 1-4% of normal flow. The CTP software detected hypoperfusion down to 2-3% in CBF and 2% in CBV, while the MRP software detected that of 1-3% in CBF and 1-4% in CBV, although the lower limits varied among software packages. CTP and MRP can detect the difference between profound hypoperfusion of <5% from that of 0% in digital phantoms, suggesting their potential efficacy for assessing brain death. (orig.)

  4. Classification of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) from 1H NMR lipid profiling combined with principal component and linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzi, Serge; Giani, Ivan; Héberger, Károly; Axelson, David E; Moretti, Vittorio M; Reniero, Fabiano; Guillou, Claude

    2007-11-28

    The combination of (1)H NMR fingerprinting of lipids from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) with nonsupervised and supervised multivariate analysis was applied to differentiate wild and farmed fish and to classify farmed specimen according to their areas of production belonging to the Mediterranean basin. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied on processed (1)H NMR profiles made a clear distinction between wild and farmed samples. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) allowed classification of samples according to the geographic origin, as well as for the wild and farmed status using both PCA scores and NMR data as variables. Variable selection for LDA was achieved with forward selection (stepwise) with a predefined 5% error level. The methods allowed the classification of 100% of the samples according to their wild and farmed status and 85-97% to geographic origin. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) analyses provided complementary means for the successful discrimination among classes investigated.

  5. Needs, problems and rehabilitation goals of young children with cerebral palsy as formulated in the rehabilitation activities profile for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Bianca J. G.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; de Blecourt, Alida C. E.; Ties, Jans G.; Boonstra, Anne M.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Nakken, Han; Postema, Klaas

    Objective: To describe the content of needs, problems and goals of 41 Dutch children with cerebral palsy using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) as a classification system. To evaluate the adherence of formulations of needs,

  6. Gradient adjustment method for better discriminating correlating and non-correlating regions of physiological signals: application to the partitioning of impaired and intact zones of cerebral autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S; Antunes, André; Montgomery, Dean; Borg, Ulf R

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated over a range of systemic blood pressures by the cerebral autoregulation (CA) control mechanism. This range lies within the lower and upper limits of autoregulation (LLA, ULA), beyond which blood pressure drives CBF, and CA function is considered impaired. A standard method to determine autoregulation limits noninvasively using NIRS technology is via the COx measure: a moving correlation index between mean arterial pressure and regional oxygen saturation. In the intact region, there should be no correlation between these variables whereas in the impaired region, the correlation index should approximate unity. In practice, however, the data may be noisy and/or the intact region may often exhibit a slightly positive relationship. This positive relationship may render traditional autoregulation limit calculations difficult to perform, resulting in the need for manual interpretation of the data using arbitrary thresholds. Further, the underlying mathematics of the technique are asymmetric in terms of the results produced for impaired and intact regions and are, in fact, not computable for the ideal case within the intact region. In this work, we propose a novel gradient adjustment method (GACOx) to enhance the differences in COx values observed in the intact and impaired regions. Results from a porcine model (N = 8) are used to demonstrate that GACOx is successful in determining LLA values where traditional methods fail. It is shown that the derived GACOx indices exhibit a mean difference between the intact/impaired regions of 1.54 ± 0.26 (mean ± SD), compared to 0.14 ± 0.10 for the traditional COx method. The GACOx effectively polarizes the COx data in order to better differentiate the intact and impaired zones and, in doing so, makes the determination of the LLA and ULA points a simpler and more consistent task. The method lends itself to the automation of the robust determination of autoregulation zone limits.

  7. Development of a 3D Tissue Culture-Based High-Content Screening Platform That Uses Phenotypic Profiling to Discriminate Selective Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booij, Tijmen H; Klop, Maarten J D; Yan, Kuan; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Szokol, Balint; Orfi, Laszlo; van de Water, Bob; Keri, Gyorgy; Price, Leo S

    2016-10-01

    3D tissue cultures provide a more physiologically relevant context for the screening of compounds, compared with 2D cell cultures. Cells cultured in 3D hydrogels also show complex phenotypes, increasing the scope for phenotypic profiling. Here we describe a high-content screening platform that uses invasive human prostate cancer cells cultured in 3D in standard 384-well assay plates to study the activity of potential therapeutic small molecules and antibody biologics. Image analysis tools were developed to process 3D image data to measure over 800 phenotypic parameters. Multiparametric analysis was used to evaluate the effect of compounds on tissue morphology. We applied this screening platform to measure the activity and selectivity of inhibitors of the c-Met and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases in 3D cultured prostate carcinoma cells. c-Met and EGFR activity was quantified based on the phenotypic profiles induced by their respective ligands, hepatocyte growth factor and EGF. The screening method was applied to a novel collection of 80 putative inhibitors of c-Met and EGFR. Compounds were identified that induced phenotypic profiles indicative of selective inhibition of c-Met, EGFR, or bispecific inhibition of both targets. In conclusion, we describe a fully scalable high-content screening platform that uses phenotypic profiling to discriminate selective and nonselective (off-target) inhibitors in a physiologically relevant 3D cell culture setting. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. DNA barcoding and LC-MS metabolite profiling of the lichen-forming genus Melanelia: Specimen identification and discrimination focusing on Icelandic taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maonian; Heidmarsson, Starri; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Eiriksson, Finnur F; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Olafsdottir, Elin S

    2017-01-01

    Taxa in the genus Melanelia (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) belong to a group of saxicolous lichens with brown to black foliose thalli, which have recently undergone extensive changes in circumscription. Taxa belonging to Parmeliaceae are prolific producers of bioactive compounds, which have also been traditionally used for chemotaxonomic purposes. However, the chemical diversity of the genus Melanelia and the use of chemical data for species discrimination in this genus are largely unexplored. In addition, identification based on morphological characters is challenging due to few taxonomically informative characters. Molecular identification methods, such as DNA barcoding, have rarely been applied to this genus. This study aimed to identify the Melanelia species from Iceland using DNA barcoding approach, and to explore their chemical diversity using chemical profiling. Chemometric tools were used to see if lichen metabolite profiles determined by LC-MS could be used for the identification of Icelandic Melanelia species. Barcoding using the fungal nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS) successfully identified three Melalenlia species occurring in Iceland, together with Montanelia disjuncta (Basionym: Melanelia disjuncta). All species formed monophyletic clades in the neighbor-joining nrITS gene tree. However, high intraspecific genetic distance of M. stygia suggests the potential of unrecognized species lineages. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metabolite data gave a holistic overview showing that M. hepatizon and M. disjuncta were distinct from the rest, without the power to separate M. agnata and M. stygia due to their chemical similarity. Orthogonal partial least-squares to latent structures-discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA), however, successfully distinguished M. agnata and M. stygia by identifying statistically significant metabolites, which lead to class differentiation. This work has demonstrated the potential of DNA barcoding, chemical

  9. 1H-NMR-based metabolomics study of cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jee Youn; Lee, Ho-Sub; Kang, Dae-Gill; Kim, No Soo; Cha, Min Ho; Bang, Ok-Sun; Ryu, Do Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2011-05-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of adult disability and death in developing countries. However, early diagnosis is difficult and no reliable biomarker is currently available. Thus, we applied a 1H-NMR metabolomics approach to investigate the altered metabolic pattern in plasma and urine from patients with cerebral infarctions and sought to identify metabolic biomarkers associated with stroke. Metabolic profiles of plasma and urine from patients with cerebral infarctions, especially small vessel occlusion, were investigated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis, such as principal components analysis and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. Multivariate statistical analysis showed a significant separation between patients and healthy individuals. The plasma of stroke patients was characterized by the increased excretion of lactate, pyruvate, glycolate, and formate, and by the decreased excretion of glutamine and methanol; the urine of stroke patients was characterized by decreased levels of citrate, hippurate, and glycine. These metabolites detected from plasma and urine of patients with cerebral infarctions were associated with anaerobic glycolysis, folic acid deficiency, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Furthermore, the presence of cerebral infarction in the external validation model was predicted with high accuracy. These data demonstrate that a metabolomics approach may be useful for the effective diagnosis of cerebral infarction and for the further understanding of stroke pathogenesis.

  10. Ataque cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi Tan, Yuri; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1998-01-01

    ¿Qué es un ataque cerebral?/¿Qué tipos de ataque cerebral existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de un ataque cerebral?/Factores de riesgo para un ataque cerebral/Tratamiento médico del ataque cerebral/¿por qué es importante acudir temprano cuando se presentan las señales de alarma?/ Manejo preventivo del ataque cerebral isquémico/Tratamiento quirúrgico del ataque cerebral/Enfermedad vascular cerebral hemorrágica/¿Cómo está constituido el grupo de ataque cerebral de la fundación Clínica Valle d...

  11. Multigene analysis unveils distinctive expression profiles of helper T-cell-related genes in the intestinal mucosa that discriminate between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iboshi, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Akiho, Hirotada; Harada, Naohiko; Nakamuta, Makoto; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-06-01

    Although the involvement of helper T (Th) and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune molecules in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is widely accepted, no discriminatory mucosal expression profiles of these molecules between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) have been clarified. Mucosal expression of 17 cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg were measured by quantitative PCR in endoscopic biopsies from inflamed (40 from UC [UCI] and 20 from CD [CDI]) and noninflamed (47, 22, and 25 from UC, CD, and controls, respectively) colon or ileum. The discriminatory power of these markers to differentiate between the 2 diseases was evaluated by linear discriminant analysis and, unsupervised, principal component analysis. By univariate analysis, many targets were markedly increased in inflamed versus noninflamed areas. However, marker expression was almost comparable between UCI and CDI, with the largest difference in UCI-predominant interleukin (IL) 21 and IL-13 with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.704 and 0.664, respectively. In contrast, combinations of 2 to 7 markers improved UCI versus CDI discrimination with AUC = 0.875 to 0.975. Among these, a 5-maker set (interferon-γ, IL-12 p35, T-bet, GATA3, and IL-21) demonstrated an AUC of 0.949 and a misclassification rate of 8.3%. Principal component analysis also markedly separated UCI and CDI. Inflamed mucosae from UC and CD could be discriminated with high accuracy using combinations of Th cell-related markers. Multigene analysis, possibly reflecting the underlying pathogenesis, is expected to be useful for diagnosis, monitoring and further defining distinctive characteristics in inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. High-throughput metabolic profiling of diverse green Coffea arabica beans identified tryptophan as a universal discrimination factor for immature beans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Setoyama

    Full Text Available The maturity of green coffee beans is the most influential determinant of the quality and flavor of the resultant coffee beverage. However, the chemical compounds that can be used to discriminate the maturity of the beans remain uncharacterized. We herein analyzed four distinct stages of maturity (immature, semi-mature, mature and overripe of nine different varieties of green Coffea arabica beans hand-harvested from a single experimental field in Hawaii. After developing a high-throughput experimental system for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS measurement, we applied metabolic profiling, integrated with chemometric techniques, to explore the relationship between the metabolome and maturity of the sample in a non-biased way. For the multivariate statistical analyses, a partial least square (PLS regression model was successfully created, which allowed us to accurately predict the maturity of the beans based on the metabolomic information. As a result, tryptophan was identified to be the best contributor to the regression model; the relative MS intensity of tryptophan was higher in immature beans than in those after the semi-mature stages in all arabica varieties investigated, demonstrating a universal discrimination factor for diverse arabica beans. Therefore, typtophan, either alone or together with other metabolites, may be utilized for traders as an assessment standard when purchasing qualified trading green arabica bean products. Furthermore, our results suggest that the tryptophan metabolism may be tightly linked to the development of coffee cherries and/or beans.

  13. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  14. Subtypes of adolescents with substance use disorders and psychiatric comorbidity using cluster and discriminant analysis of MMPI-A profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Magallón Neri, Ernesto Mijail; Díaz, R.; Forns, Maria, 1946-; Goti, J.; Canalda Sahli, Gloria; Castro Fornieles, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to replicate and extend previous results on subtypes of adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD), according to their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for adolescents (MMPI-A) profiles. Sixty patients with SUD and psychiatric comorbidity (41.7% male, mean age = 15.9 years old) completed the MMPI-A, the Teen Addiction Severity Index (T-ASI), the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), and were interviewed in order to determine DSMIV diagnoses and level ...

  15. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  17. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  18. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  19. Quantitative NMR Metabolite Profiling of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Discriminates between Biofilm and Planktonic Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Wound bioburden in the form of colonizing biofilms is a major contributor to nonhealing wounds. Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe commonly found in chronic wounds; however, much remains unknown about the basic physiology of this opportunistic pathogen, especially with regard to the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of S. aureus biofilms have suggested that S. aureus biofilms exhibit an altered metabolic state relative to the planktonic phenotype. Herein, comparisons of extracellular and intracellular metabolite profiles detected by 1H NMR were conducted for methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) S. aureus strains grown as biofilm and planktonic cultures. Principal component analysis distinguished the biofilm phenotype from the planktonic phenotype, and factor loadings analysis identified metabolites that contributed to the statistical separation of the biofilm from the planktonic phenotype, suggesting that key features distinguishing biofilm from planktonic growth include selective amino acid uptake, lipid catabolism, butanediol fermentation, and a shift in metabolism from energy production to assembly of cell-wall components and matrix deposition. These metabolite profiles provide a basis for the development of metabolite biomarkers that distinguish between biofilm and planktonic phenotypes in S. aureus and have the potential for improved diagnostic and therapeutic use in chronic wounds. PMID:24809402

  20. Characterization and evaluation of phenolic profiles and color as potential discriminating features among Spanish extra virgin olive oils with protected designation of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Herrera, Mercedes; Vélez-Martín, Alberto; Ramos-Merchante, Adrián; Richter, Pablo; Beltrán, Rafael; Sayago, Ana

    2018-02-15

    Changes in phenolic profiles and color parameters can help to differentiate between extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs) with protected designation of origin (PDO). Phenolic profile characterization and CIELAB parameters determination of 9 PDO EVOOs from Spain were developed. Both properties of EVOOs are very relevant to their commercialization and increase the product value. The Serrana de Espadán olive cultivar was characterized for the first time and showed the highest pinoresinol concentrations and clarities in these olive oils, which are important values for the product image. To detect fraudulent instrumental work and implement quality control, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were performed. EVOO geographical origin and cultivar distributions were achieved with cumulative variances of 93.4% and 92.4%, respectively. A categorization of PDO EVOOs was proposed using the following 7 phenolic compounds: phenolic alcohols (tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol), 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, 3,4-DHPEA-EA, p-HPEA-EDA, pinoresinol and total phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Canonical discrimination of the effect of a new broiler production facility on soil chemical profiles as related to current management practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L Sheffield

    Full Text Available The effect dirt-floored broiler houses have on the underlying native soil, and the potential for contamination of the ground water by leaching under the foundation, is an understudied area. This study examines alterations in fifteen quantitative soil parameters (Ca, Cu, electrical conductivity, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, NO3, organic matter, P, pH, S, soil moisture and Zn in the underlayment of a newly constructed dirt-floored broiler house over the first two years of production (Native through Flock 11. The experiment was conducted near NW Robertson County, Texas, where the native soil is a fine, smectitic thermic Udertic Paleustalfs and the slopes range from zero to three percent. Multiple samples were collected from under each of three water and three feed lines the length of the house, in a longitudinal study during February 2008 through August 2010. To better define the relationship between the soil parameters and sampling times, a canonical discriminant analysis approach was used. The soil profiles assembled into five distinctive clusters corresponding to time and management practices. Results of this work revealed that the majority of parameters increased over time. The management practices of partial and total house clean-outs markedly altered soil profiles the house underlayment, thus reducing the risk of infiltration into the ground water near the farm. This is important as most broiler farms consist of several houses within a small area, so the cumulative ecological impact could be substantial if not properly managed.

  2. Chemical Profiling of the Essential Oils of Syzygium aqueum, Syzygium samarangense and Eugenia uniflora and Their Discrimination Using Chemometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeh, Mansour; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Krstin, Sonja; Youssef, Fadia S; Ashour, Mohamed L; Wink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The essential oil compositions of the leaves of three related Myrtaceae species, namely Syzygium aqueum, Syzygium samarangense and Eugenia uniflora, were investigated using GLC/MS and GLC/FID. Altogether, 125 compounds were identified: α-Selinene (13.85%), β-caryophyllene (12.72%) and β-selinene constitute the most abundant constituents in S. aqueum. Germacrene D (21.62%) represents the major compound in S. samarangense whereas in E. uniflora, spathulenol (15.80%) represents the predominant component. Multivariate chemometric analyses were used to discriminate the essential oils using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on the chromatographic results. The antimicrobial activity of the popularly used E. uniflora essential oil was assessed using broth microdilution method against six Gram-positive, three Gram-negative bacteria and two fungi. The oil showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Bacillus licheniformis exhibiting MIC and MMC of 0.63 mg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of E. uniflora essential oil was investigated against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (T. b. brucei) and MCF-7 cancer cell line using MTT assay. It showed moderate activity against MCF-7 cells with an IC50 value of 76.40 μg/ml. On the other hand, T. brucei was highly susceptible to E. uniflora essential oil with IC50 of 11.20 μg/ml, and a selectivity index of 6.82. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. Casein Hydrolysates by Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis Proteases: Peptide Profile Discriminates Strain-Dependent Enzyme Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounouala, Fatima Zohra; Roudj, Salima; Karam, Nour-Eddine; Recio, Isidra; Miralles, Beatriz

    2017-10-25

    Casein from ovine and bovine milk were hydrolyzed with two extracellular protease preparations from Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis. The hydrolysates were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS for peptide identification. A strain-dependent peptide profile could be observed, regardless of the casein origin, and the specificity of these two proteases could be computationally ascribed. The cleavage pattern yielding phenylalanine, leucine, or tyrosine at C-terminal appeared both at L. lactis and Lb. brevis hydrolysates. However, the cleavage C-terminal to lysine was favored with Lb. brevis protease. The hydrolysates showed ACE-inhibitory activity with IC50 in the 16-70 μg/mL range. Ovine casein hydrolysates yielded greater ACE-inhibitory activity. Previously described antihypertensive and opioid peptides were found in these ovine and bovine casein hydrolysates and prediction of the antihypertensive activity of the sequences based on quantitative structure and activity relationship (QSAR) was performed. This approach might represent a useful classification tool regarding health-related properties prior to further purification.

  4. Detection of metabolites discriminating subtypes of thyroid cancer: Molecular profiling of FFPE samples using the GC/MS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojakowska, Anna; Chekan, Mykola; Marczak, Łukasz; Polanski, Krzysztof; Lange, Dariusz; Pietrowska, Monika; Widlak, Piotr

    2015-12-05

    One of the critical issues in thyroid cancer diagnostic is differentiation between follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma and the follicular variant of papillary carcinoma, which in some cases is not possible based on histopathological features only. In this paper we performed molecular profiling of thyroid tissue aiming to identify metabolites characteristic for different types of thyroid cancer. FFPE tissue specimens were analysed from 5 different types of thyroid malignancies (follicular, papillary/classical variant, papillary/follicular variant, medullary and anaplastic cancers), benign follicular adenoma and normal thyroid. Extracted metabolites were identified and semi-quantified using the GC/MS approach. There were 28 metabolites identified, whose abundances were significantly different among different types of thyroid tumours, including lipids, carboxylic acids, and saccharides. We concluded, that multi-component metabolome signature could be used for classification of different subtypes of follicular thyroid lesions. Moreover, potential applicability of the GC/MS-based analysis of FFPE tissue samples in diagnostics of thyroid cancer has been proved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Mira Skadegård

    discrimination as two ways of articulating particular, opaque forms of racial discrimination that occur in everyday Danish (and other) contexts, and have therefore become normalized. I present and discuss discrimination as it surfaces in data from my empirical studies of discrimination in Danish contexts......In this article, I discuss structural discrimination, an underrepresented area of study in Danish discrimination and intercultural research. It is defined here as discursive and constitutive, and presented as a central element of my analytical approach. This notion is employed in the with which...... to understand and identify aspects of power and asymmetry in communication and interactions. With this as a defining term, I address how exclusion and discrimination exist, while also being indiscernible, within widely accepted societal norms. I introduce the concepts of microdiscrimination and benevolent...

  6. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before, during, or soon after birth such as cerebral palsy Stroke Very low blood pressure Brain cells are very sensitive to a lack of ... of the eye to light Exams and Tests Cerebral hypoxia can usually be diagnosed based on the person's medical history and a physical exam. Tests are done to ...

  7. Temporal profile of the effects of intracisternal injection of magnesium sulfate solution on vasodilation of spastic cerebral arteries in the canine SAH model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Hara, Yasukazu; Aiko, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    the temporal profiles of the effects of intracisternal injection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO(4)) on vasodilation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) concentration were investigated in the canine subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. cerebral vasospasm was induced using the two-hemorrhage model in seven female beagles. On day 7, 0.5 ml/kg of 15 mmol/l MgSO(4) in Ringer solution was injected into the cerebellomedullary cistern. Angiography was performed on day 1 (before SAH), and before and 1, 3, and 6 h after the intracisternal injection on day 7. CSF Mg(2+) was measured at the same time. the diameters of the basilar artery (BA), vertebral artery (VA), and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) before the intracisternal injection on day 7 were 0.59 ± 0.15, 0.41 ± 0.17, and 0.35 ± 0.17 mm, respectively, and were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) compared with the baseline diameters on day 1. The BA diameters at 1 h (0.74 ± 0.16 mm) and 3 h (0.73 ± 0.13 mm), the VA diameter at 1 h (0.64 ± 0.14 mm), and the SCA diameter at 3 h (0.54 ± 0.08 mm) after the injection were significantly increased (p < 0.05). The CSF Mg(2+) concentration was significantly increased (p < 0.01) at 1 h (3.59 ± 0.76 mEq/l) and 3 h (2.00 ± 0.31 mEq/l) after the injection compared with the baseline value (1.35 ± 0.23 mEq/l). the reversible effect of intracisternal MgSO(4) solution injection on the spastic artery depends on maintenance of the optimal CSF Mg(2+) concentration.

  8. Detecting Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Heckman, James J.

    1998-01-01

    The evidence on discrimination produced from the audit method is examined. Audits survey the average firm and not the marginal firm which determines the level of market discrimination. Taken on its own terms, there is little evidence of labor market discrimination from audit methods. The validity of audit methods is critically dependent on unverified assumptions about equality across race/gender groups of the distributions of unobserved (by audit designers) productivity components acted on by...

  9. Considerations When Using Discriminant Function Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles To Identify Sources of Fecal Contamination of Surface Water in Michigan▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneene, John B.; Miller, RoseAnn; Sayah, Raida; Johnson, Yvette J.; Gilliland, Dennis; Gardiner, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (i) identify issues that affect the ability of discriminant function analysis (DA) of antimicrobial resistance profiles to differentiate sources of fecal contamination, (ii) test the accuracy of DA from a known-source library of fecal Escherichia coli isolates with isolates from environmental samples, and (iii) apply this DA to classify E. coli from surface water. A repeated cross-sectional study was used to collect fecal and environmental samples from Michigan livestock, wild geese, and surface water for bacterial isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disk diffusion for 12 agents chosen for their importance in treating E. coli infections or for their use as animal feed additives. Nonparametric DA was used to classify E. coli by source species individually and by groups according to antimicrobial exposure. A modified backwards model-building approach was applied to create the best decision rules for isolate differentiation with the smallest number of antimicrobial agents. Decision rules were generated from fecal isolates and applied to environmental isolates to determine the effectiveness of DA for identifying sources of contamination. Principal component analysis was applied to describe differences in resistance patterns between species groups. The average rate of correct classification by DA was improved by reducing the numbers of species classifications and antimicrobial agents. DA was able to correctly classify environmental isolates when fewer than four classifications were used. Water sample isolates were classified by livestock type. An evaluation of the performance of DA must take into consideration relative contributions of random chance and the true discriminatory power of the decision rules. PMID:17337537

  10. Considerations when using discriminant function analysis of antimicrobial resistance profiles to identify sources of fecal contamination of surface water in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneene, John B; Miller, RoseAnn; Sayah, Raida; Johnson, Yvette J; Gilliland, Dennis; Gardiner, Joseph C

    2007-05-01

    The goals of this study were to (i) identify issues that affect the ability of discriminant function analysis (DA) of antimicrobial resistance profiles to differentiate sources of fecal contamination, (ii) test the accuracy of DA from a known-source library of fecal Escherichia coli isolates with isolates from environmental samples, and (iii) apply this DA to classify E. coli from surface water. A repeated cross-sectional study was used to collect fecal and environmental samples from Michigan livestock, wild geese, and surface water for bacterial isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disk diffusion for 12 agents chosen for their importance in treating E. coli infections or for their use as animal feed additives. Nonparametric DA was used to classify E. coli by source species individually and by groups according to antimicrobial exposure. A modified backwards model-building approach was applied to create the best decision rules for isolate differentiation with the smallest number of antimicrobial agents. Decision rules were generated from fecal isolates and applied to environmental isolates to determine the effectiveness of DA for identifying sources of contamination. Principal component analysis was applied to describe differences in resistance patterns between species groups. The average rate of correct classification by DA was improved by reducing the numbers of species classifications and antimicrobial agents. DA was able to correctly classify environmental isolates when fewer than four classifications were used. Water sample isolates were classified by livestock type. An evaluation of the performance of DA must take into consideration relative contributions of random chance and the true discriminatory power of the decision rules.

  11. Spatial discrimination and visual discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Annika M. J.; Grand, Nanna; Klastrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    in a visual discrimination test. The juvenile minipigs were able to learn the spatial hole-board discrimination test and showed improved working and reference memory during the learning phase. Performance in the memory phases was affected by the retention intervals, but the minipigs were able to remember...... the concept of the test in both memory phases. Working memory and reference memory were significantly improved in the last trials of the memory phases. In the visual discrimination test, the minipigs learned to discriminate between the three figures presented to them within 9-14 sessions. For the memory test......, all minipigs performed 9/12 correct choices or better. Juvenile Gottingen minipigs are able to learn to perform in a spatial hole-board discrimination test as well as in a visual discrimination test, showing an increase in performance over time. Both tests have considerable scope to assess learning...

  12. Cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... chap 598. Nass R, Sidhu R, Ross G. Autism and other developmental disabilities. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  13. Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Cephalic Disorders Information Page NINDS Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Information Page NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page ... Information Page Adrenoleukodystrophy Information Page Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Information Page Agnosia Information Page Aicardi-Goutieres ...

  14. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  15. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Genetic Discrimination Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features ...

  16. Extrastriate cortical areas activated during visual discrimination in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, PE

    1981-01-01

    The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 254 different regions of the human extrastriate cerebral cortex during rest and during visual shape discrimination. Visual shape discrimination increased the rCBF markedly in the frontal eye fields, the upper part of the prefrontal cortex......, the lateral occipital cortex and the superior parietal cortex. Moderate increases of rCBF appeared in the inferotemporal cortex, the parietotemporo-occipital region and scattered in the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex....

  17. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  18. Accuracy of the Siriraj Stroke Score in Differentiating Cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Scoring systems based on discriminant analysis technique and multivariate logistic regression have been developed to distinguish cerebral haemorrhage (CH) from cerebral infarction (CI). This distinction is necessary in the acute management of stroke patients. Objectif The Siriraj stroke score (SSS) was ...

  19. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  20. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  1. The Monte Carlo validation framework for the discriminant partial least squares model extended with variable selection methods applied to authenticity studies of Viagra® based on chromatographic impurity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowska, B; Custers, D; Deconinck, E; Daszykowski, M

    2016-02-07

    The aim of this work was to develop a general framework for the validation of discriminant models based on the Monte Carlo approach that is used in the context of authenticity studies based on chromatographic impurity profiles. The performance of the validation approach was applied to evaluate the usefulness of the diagnostic logic rule obtained from the partial least squares discriminant model (PLS-DA) that was built to discriminate authentic Viagra® samples from counterfeits (a two-class problem). The major advantage of the proposed validation framework stems from the possibility of obtaining distributions for different figures of merit that describe the PLS-DA model such as, e.g., sensitivity, specificity, correct classification rate and area under the curve in a function of model complexity. Therefore, one can quickly evaluate their uncertainty estimates. Moreover, the Monte Carlo model validation allows balanced sets of training samples to be designed, which is required at the stage of the construction of PLS-DA and is recommended in order to obtain fair estimates that are based on an independent set of samples. In this study, as an illustrative example, 46 authentic Viagra® samples and 97 counterfeit samples were analyzed and described by their impurity profiles that were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and further discriminated using the PLS-DA approach. In addition, we demonstrated how to extend the Monte Carlo validation framework with four different variable selection schemes: the elimination of uninformative variables, the importance of a variable in projections, selectivity ratio and significance multivariate correlation. The best PLS-DA model was based on a subset of variables that were selected using the variable importance in the projection approach. For an independent test set, average estimates with the corresponding standard deviation (based on 1000 Monte Carlo runs) of the correct

  2. Gene expression analysis reveals early changes in several molecular pathways in cerebral malaria-susceptible mice versus cerebral malaria-resistant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grau Georges E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analyses allow the identification and assessment of molecular signatures in whole tissues undergoing pathological processes. To better understand cerebral malaria pathogenesis, we investigated intra-cerebral gene-expression profiles in well-defined genetically cerebral malaria-resistant (CM-R and CM-susceptible (CM-S mice, upon infection by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. We investigated mouse transcriptional responses at early and late stages of infection by use of cDNA microarrays. Results Through a rigorous statistical approach with multiple testing corrections, we showed that PbA significantly altered brain gene expression in CM-R (BALB/c, and in CM-S (CBA/J and C57BL/6 mice, and that 327 genes discriminated between early and late infection stages, between mouse strains, and between CM-R and CM-S mice. We further identified 104, 56, 84 genes with significant differential expression between CM-R and CM-S mice on days 2, 5, and 7 respectively. The analysis of their functional annotation indicates that genes involved in metabolic energy pathways, the inflammatory response, and the neuroprotection/neurotoxicity balance play a major role in cerebral malaria pathogenesis. In addition, our data suggest that cerebral malaria and Alzheimer's disease may share some common mechanisms of pathogenesis, as illustrated by the accumulation of β-amyloid proteins in brains of CM-S mice, but not of CM-R mice. Conclusion Our microarray analysis highlighted marked changes in several molecular pathways in CM-S compared to CM-R mice, particularly at early stages of infection. This study revealed some promising areas for exploration that may both provide new insight into the knowledge of CM pathogenesis and the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Development of a 3D Tissue Culture-Based High-Content Screening Platform That Uses Phenotypic Profiling to Discriminate Selective Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, T.H.; Klop, M.J.; Yan, K.; Szántai-Kis, C.; Szokol, B.; Orfi, L .; Water, van de B.; Keri, G.; Price, L.S.

    2016-01-01

    3D tissue cultures provide a more physiologically relevant context for the screening of compounds, compared with 2D cell cultures. Cells cultured in 3D hydrogels also show complex phenotypes, increasing the scope for phenotypic profiling. Here we describe a high-content screening platform that uses

  4. The application of fuzzy statistics and linear discriminant analysis as criteria for optimizing the preparation of plasma for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry peptide profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Joanna; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Dereziński, Paweł; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-08-25

    An alternative bioinformatics approach based on fuzzy theory statistics and linear discriminant analysis is proposed for the interpretation of MALDI MS spectra in peptide profiling. When applied, the methodology enables the establishment of a reproducible plasma preparation protocol appropriate for the evaluation of small data sets. The samples were collected from pregnant women affected by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), n=18 and control group, n=13. The following pre-treatment sets were tested: pipette tips with C18 stationary phase (ZipTip, Millipore and Omix, Agilent) and magnetic bead-based weak cation exchange chromatography kit (MB WCX, Bruker Daltonics). The spectra were recorded using a MALDI TOF mass spectrometer (UltrafleXtreme, Bruker Daltonics) for a mass range of m/z from 1000 to 10,000. The significant features were selected using the wrapper selection method, and two classification systems were tested: discriminant analysis (DA) and fuzzy inference system (FIS). ClinProTools software was employed to compare the usefulness of the proposed methodology. The study showed that the optimum results for MS spectra were obtained after the use of the ZipTip as pre-treatment method in plasma preparation. Chemometric analysis allowed the differentiation of the GDM group from the control with a high degree of accuracy: 0.7333 (DA) and 0.8065 (FIS). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Transcriptional profiles discriminate patients with pulmonary tuberculosis from non-tuberculous individuals depending on the presence of non-insulin diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carmen J; Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Macías-Segura, Noé; González-Curiel, Rosa Angélica; Martínez-Balderas, Víctor Yordani; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Small, Peter; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify transcriptional biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that discriminate individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from those with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in individuals without NIDDM. Using gene expression microarrays we identified differentially expressed genes from lungs of mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or a mutant (ΔsigH) representing a non-inflammatory model. Genes expressed in blood, with inflammatory related functions were evaluated in humans by RT-qPCR. NCF1 and ORM transcripts have the better discriminatory capacity to identify PTB subjects from LTBI and non-infected controls (NICs) independently of the presence of NIDDM. The sequential evaluation of the mRNA levels of NCF1 and ORM as multiple diagnostic tests showed 95% Sensitivity (Se) and 80% Specificity (Sp). In addition, FPR2 promises to be a good biomarker for the PTB detection in subjects with NIDDM (Se=100%; Sp=90%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cholinesterase inhibition improves blood flow in the ischemic cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scremin, O U; Li, M G; Scremin, A M; Jenden, D J

    1997-01-01

    The ability of central cholinesterase inhibition to improve cerebral blood flow in the ischemic brain was tested in Sprague-Dawley rats with tandem occlusion of left middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow was measured with lodo- 14C-antipyrine autoradiography in 170 regions of cerebral cortex. The regional distribution of blood flow was characterized in normal animals by cerebral blood flow maxima in the temporal regions. After 2 h ischemia, minimum cerebral blood flow values were found in the lateral frontal and parietal areas on the left hemisphere, and a new maximum was found in the right hemisphere in an area approximately symmetrical to the ischemic focus. Heptyl-physostigmine (eptastigmine), a carbamate cholinesterase inhibitor with prolonged time of action improved cerebral blood flow in most regions, with the exception of the ischemic core. The drug also enhanced the ischemia-induced rostral shift of cerebral blood flow maxima in the right hemisphere. The effects of eptastigmine were more marked 24 h after ischemia. Discriminant analysis showed that data from only 22 regions was sufficient to achieve 100% accuracy in classifying all cases into the various experimental conditions. The redistribution of cerebral blood flow to the sensorimotor area of the right hemisphere of animals with cerebral ischemia, a phenomenon possibly related to recovery of function, was also enhanced by eptastigmine.

  7. Cerebral edema in drug addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daruši Dragana J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The effect of drugs leaves permanent consequences on the brain, organic in type, followed by numerous manifestations, and it significantly affects the development of mental dysfunctions. The clinicians are often given a task to estimate a patient’s personality during treatment or during experts estimate of a drug addict. The aim of this research was to determine the differences, if any, in characteristics of addicts experience and personality traits in drug addicts with or without cerebral edema. Methods. The research was conducted on a sample of 252 male drug addicts, the average age of 23.3 (SD = 4.3 years. Cerebral edema was confirmed on magnetic resonance (MR images of the brain performed during the treatment of the addicts. The participants were tested by the psychologists using Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 test, and the data were processed using canonical discriminate analysis within the SPSS program. The dependent variable in the study was cerebral edema. A block of independent variables, designed for the requirements of this study, consisted of two subgroups. The first one consisted of 12 variables describing the relevant characteristics of drug abuse. The second subgroup consisted of 8 psychopathological tendencies in the personality defined by the mentioned test. Results. Cerebral edema was confirmed in 52 (20.63% of the drug addicts. The differences between the groups of drug addicts with and without cerebral edema were determined in the following: the time span of taking drugs (0.301, use of alcohol parallel with drugs (0.466, and treatment for addiction (0.603. In the drug addicts with a cerebral edema, MMPI-201 confirmed the increase in the scales for hypochondria, psychopathic deviations and psychastenia, and the decrease in the scales for schizophrenia and depression. Conclusion. Our study confirmed a possible connection between cerebral edema and personality traits in a number of the

  8. Penalized linear discriminant analysis and Discrete AdaBoost to distinguish human hair metal profiles: The case of adolescents residing near Mt. Etna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzo, A; Tamburo, E; Varrica, D; Dongarrà, G; Mineo, A

    2016-06-01

    The research focus of the present paper was twofold. First, we tried to document that human intake of trace elements is influenced by geological factors of the place of residence. Second, we showed that the elemental composition of human hair is a useful screening tool for assessing people's exposure to potentially toxic substances. For this purpose, we used samples of human hair from adolescents and applied two robust statistical approaches. Samples from two distinct geological and environmental sites were collected: the first one was characterized by the presence of the active volcano Mt. Etna (ETNA group) and the second one lithologically made up of sedimentary rocks (SIC group). Chemical data were statistically processed by Penalized Linear Discriminant Analysis (pLDA) and Discrete AdaBoost (DAB). The separation between the two groups turned out well, with few overlaps accounting for less than 5%. The chemical variables that better distinguished ETNA group from SIC group were As, Cd, Co, Li, Mo, Rb, Sr, U and V. Both pLDA and DAB allowed us to characterize the elements most closely related to the volcanic contribution (As, U and V) and those (Cd, Co, Li, Mo, Rb and Sr) prevalently influenced by the geology of the area where SIC samples were collected. We conclude that the geological characteristics of the area of residence constitute a key factor in influencing the potential exposure to trace elements. Hair analysis coupled with robust statistical methods can be effectively used as a screening procedure to identify areas at great environmental risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Concentration profiling of minerals in iliac crest bone tissue of opium addicted humans using inductively coupled plasma and discriminant analysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Jamshidi, Mahbobeh; Yeganeh, Ali; Mahmoudi, Mani

    2016-02-20

    Opium addiction is one of the main health problems in developing countries and induces serious defects on the human body. In this work, the concentrations of 32 minerals including alkaline, heavy and toxic metals have been determined in the iliac crest bone tissue of 22 opium addicted individuals using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The bone tissues of 30 humans with no physiological and metabolomic diseases were used as the control group. For subsequent analyses, the linear and quadratic discriminant analysis techniques have been used for classification of the data into "addicted" and "non-addicted" groups. Moreover, the counter-propagation artificial neural network (CPANN) has been used for clustering of the data. The results revealed that the CPANN is a robust model and thoroughly classifies the data. The area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic curve for this model was more than 0.91. Investigation of the results revealed that the opium consumption causes a deficiency in the level of Calcium, Phosphate, Potassium and Sodium in iliac crest bone tissue. Moreover, this type of addiction induces an increment in the level of toxic and heavy metals such as Co, Cr, Mo and Ni in iliac crest tissue. The correlation analysis revealed that there were no significant dependencies between the age of the samples and the mineral content of their iliac crest, in this study. The results of this work suggest that the opium addicted individuals need thorough and restricted dietary and medical care programs after recovery phases, in order to have healthy bones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Discrimination and Anti-discrimination in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    The purpose of this report is to describe and analyse Danish anti-discrimination legislation and the debate about discrimination in Denmark in order to identify present and future legal challenges. The main focus is the implementation of the EU anti-discrimination directives in Danish law...

  11. Quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging. A statistical analysis of the normal range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, K.; Basugi, N.; Fukushima, T.; Tango, T.; Suzuki, I.; Kaminuma, T.; Kurashina, S.

    1987-07-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable.

  12. Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (<2.5 mm) Cerebral Vessels Using The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C-C; Li, W; Feng, Z-Z; Hong, B; Xu, Y; Liu, J-M; Huang, Q-H

    2017-06-01

    The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support (LVIS) stent is a new device recently introduced for the treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. This single-center study presents the authors' preliminary experience using the LVIS stent to treat saccular aneurysms with parent arteries smaller than 2.5 mm. Aneurysms with a LVIS stent used in a small parent vessel (LVIS stents in small vessels is feasible, safe, and effective in the midterm. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to validate our promising results. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard,; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation (SO2) in young adults...

  14. The gene expression profiles of induced pluripotent stem cells from individuals with childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy are consistent with proposed mechanisms of pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex disorder with variable expressivity that affects the nervous, adrenocortical and male reproductive systems. Although ABCD1 mutations are known to provide the genetic basis for X-ALD, its pathogenesis is not fully elucidated. While elevated very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels in blood and reduced VLCFA catabolic activity in cultured fibroblasts are biomarkers used to identify ABCD1 mutation carriers, the roles peroxisomal lipid metabolism play in disease etiology are unknown. Methods Primary skin fibroblasts from two male patients with the childhood cerebral form of the disease (CCALD) caused by ABCD1 frameshift or missense mutations and three healthy donors were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing the OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC factors. Candidate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were subject to global gene expression, DNA methylation, DNA copy number variation, and genotyping analysis and tested for pluripotency through in vitro differentiation and teratoma formation. Saturated VLCFA (sVLCFA) and plasmalogen levels in primary fibroblasts and iPSCs from healthy donors as well as CCALD patients were determined through mass spectroscopy. Results Skin fibroblasts from CCALD patients and healthy donors were reprogrammed into validated iPSCs. Unlike fibroblasts, CCALD patient iPSCs show differentially expressed genes (DEGs) relevant to both peroxisome abundance and neuroinflammation. Also, in contrast to fibroblasts, iPSCs from patients showed no significant difference in sVLCFA levels relative to those from controls. In all cell types, the plasmalogen levels tested did not correlate with ABCD1 mutation status. Conclusion Normal ABCD1 gene function is not required for reprogramming skin fibroblasts into iPSCs or maintaining pluripotency. Relative to DEGs found in fibroblasts, DEGs uncovered in comparisons of CCALD patient and control iPSCs are more consistent with major hypotheses

  15. Metabonomic profiling of serum and urine by (1H NMR-based spectroscopy discriminates patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Wang

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has seriously impacted the health of individuals and populations. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H NMR-based metabonomics combined with multivariate pattern recognition analysis was applied to investigate the metabolic signatures of patients with COPD. Serum and urine samples were collected from COPD patients (n = 32 and healthy controls (n = 21, respectively. Samples were analyzed by high resolution (1H NMR (600 MHz, and the obtained spectral profiles were then subjected to multivariate data analysis. Consistent metabolic differences have been found in serum as well as in urine samples from COPD patients and healthy controls. Compared to healthy controls, COPD patients displayed decreased lipoprotein and amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, and increased glycerolphosphocholine in serum. Moreover, metabolic differences in urine were more significant than in serum. Decreased urinary 1-methylnicotinamide, creatinine and lactate have been discovered in COPD patients in comparison with healthy controls. Conversely, acetate, ketone bodies, carnosine, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetyglycine, pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate exhibited enhanced expression levels in COPD patients relative to healthy subjects. Our results illustrate the potential application of NMR-based metabonomics in early diagnosis and understanding the mechanisms of COPD.

  16. Interesterified fat or palm oil as substitutes for partially hydrogenated fat during the perinatal period produces changes in the brain fatty acids profile and increases leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the cerebral microcirculation from the male offspring in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misan, Vanessa; Estato, Vanessa; de Velasco, Patricia Coelho; Spreafico, Flavia Brasil; Magri, Tatiana; Dos Santos, Raísa Magno de Araújo Ramos; Fragoso, Thaiza; Souza, Amanda S; Boldarine, Valter Tadeu; Bonomo, Isabela T; Sardinha, Fátima L C; Oyama, Lila M; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2015-08-07

    We investigated whether maternal intake of normolipidic diets with distinct fatty acid (FA) compositions alters the lipidic profile and influences the inflammatory status of the adult offsprings׳ brains. C57BL/6 female mice during pregnancy and lactation received diets containing either soybean oil (CG), partially hydrogenated vegetable fat rich in trans-fatty acids (TG), palm oil (PG), or interesterified fat (IG). After weaning, male offspring from all groups received control diet. The FA profile was measured in the offspring׳s brains at post-natal days 21 and 90. Brain functional capillary density as well as leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the cerebral post-capillary venules was assessed by intravital fluorescence microscopy at post-natal day 90. Inflammation signaling was evaluated through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) content in brain of the adult offspring. In the 21-day old offspring, the brains of the TG showed higher levels of trans FA and reduced levels of linoleic acid (LA) and total n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). At post-natal day 90, TG and IG groups showed reduced levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and total n-3 PUFA tended to be lower compared to CG. The offspring׳s brains exhibited an altered microcirculation with increased leukocyte rolling in groups TG, PG and IG and in TG group increased leukocyte adhesion. The TLR4 content of TG, IG and PG groups only tended to increase (23%; 20% and 35%, respectively). Maternal consumption of trans FA, palm oil or interesterified fat during pregnancy and lactation can trigger the initial steps of inflammatory pathways in the brain of offspring in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Badness of Discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2006-01-01

    The most blatant forms of discrimination are morally outrageous and very obviously so; but the nature and boundaries of discrimination are more controversial, and it is not clear whether all forms of discrimination are morally bad; nor is it clear why objectionable cases of discrimination are bad...

  18. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dieting OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  19. Cerebral microangiopathies; Zerebrale Mikroangiopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-03-15

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  20. Discriminant Multitaper Component Analysis of EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Sajda, Paul

    This work extends Bilinear Discriminant Component Analysis to the case of oscillatory activity with allowed phase-variability across trials. The proposed method learns a spatial profile together with a multitaper basis which can integrate oscillatory power in a band-limited fashion. We demonstrate......-rhythm, whose power is known to modulate as a function of which hand a subject plans to move, and thus is expected to be discriminative (predictive) of the subject’s response....

  1. Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

  2. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation (SO2) in young adults at rest and during incremental intensity exercise. In extra-cerebral tissue, an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and a decrease in SO2 were observed while only cerebral HbR increased at high intensity exercise. Results in extra-cerebral tissue are consistent with thermoregulatory mechanisms to dissipate excess heat through skin blood flow, while cerebral changes are in agreement with cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution mechanisms to meet oxygen demand in activated regions during exercise. No significant difference was observed in oxy- (HbO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT). In addition HbO2, HbR and HbT increased with subject's peak power output (equivalent to the maximum oxygen volume consumption; VO2 peak) supporting previous observations of increased total mass of red blood cells in trained individuals. Our results also revealed known gender differences with higher hemoglobin in men. Our approach in quantifying both extra-cerebral and cerebral absolute hemoglobin during exercise may help to better interpret past and future continuous-wave NIRS studies that are prone to extra-cerebral contamination and allow a better understanding of acute cerebral changes due to physical exercise.

  3. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation (SO2) in young adults at rest and during incremental intensity exercise. In extra-cerebral tissue, an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and a decrease in SO2 were observed while only cerebral HbR increased at high intensity exercise. Results in extra-cerebral tissue are consistent with thermoregulatory mechanisms to dissipate excess heat through skin blood flow, while cerebral changes are in agreement with cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution mechanisms to meet oxygen demand in activated regions during exercise. No significant difference was observed in oxy- (HbO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT). In addition HbO2, HbR and HbT increased with subject’s peak power output (equivalent to the maximum oxygen volume consumption; VO2 peak) supporting previous observations of increased total mass of red blood cells in trained individuals. Our results also revealed known gender differences with higher hemoglobin in men. Our approach in quantifying both extra-cerebral and cerebral absolute hemoglobin during exercise may help to better interpret past and future continuous-wave NIRS studies that are prone to extra-cerebral contamination and allow a better understanding of acute cerebral changes due to physical exercise. PMID:27867696

  4. Cerebral infarction and ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuiab, A

    1989-07-01

    With the availability of contrast echocardiography, patent foramen ovale is frequently detected in patients with stroke, especially in those with no clear etiology and/or the young patient with stroke. Before this report, an association of stroke with ventricular septal defect had not been reported. In this communication, we describe a 38-year-old patient who developed an occipital lobe infarction and who, on investigation, was found to have a ventricular septal defect. Other investigations, which included four-vessel cerebral angiography, collagen disease workup, and coagulation profile, were all normal. We believe this case further extends the spectrum of cerebral ischemic events that may occur with intracardiac shunts.

  5. LABOR DISCRIMINATION IN BULGARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyara Slavyanska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Labor discrimination is a phenomenon with very serious social and economic consequences, which has increased actuality and importance in Bulgaria nowadays. Because of the high price of discrimination, building effective anti-discrimination legislation occupies a special place in the policy of the European Union. Despite the European directives, the presence of anti-discrimination legislation and the broadly declared anti-discrimination inclinations in our country, these are absolutely not enough for providing environment of equality, with a climate of respect and tolerance to the differences. It turns out that certain groups are definitely victims of labor discrimination. In this connection the present article consecutively identifies these groups, as well as the reasons for their discrimination, underlining the necessity and benefits of the integration of the different.

  6. Clinical discriminators between acute brain hemorrhage and infarction: a practical score for early patient identification Características clínicas diferenciais entre hemorragia e infarto cerebral: uma escala prática para identificação precoce do paciente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton R. Massaro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available New treatments for acute stroke require a rapid triage system, which minimizes treatment delays and maximizes selection of eligible patients. Our aim was to create a score for assessing the probability of brain hemorrhage among patients with acute stroke based upon clinical information. Of 1805 patients in the Stroke Data Bank, 1273 had infarction (INF and 237 had parenchymatous hemorrhage (HEM verified by CT. INF and HEM discriminators were determined by logistic regression and used to create a score. ROC curve was used to choose the cut-point for predicting HEM (score Novas perspectivas no tratamento do acidente vascular cerebral (AVC requerem um método de triagem rápido para seleção dos pacientes. Nosso objetivo foi criar uma escala com informações clínicas simples para diferenciar hematoma intra-parenquimatoso (HEM entre os pacientes com AVC. Estudamos 1.273 pacientes com AVC isquêmico (INF e 237 com HEM do Stroke Data Bank. Variáveis independentes para o diagnóstico de INF e HEM foram determinadas pela análise de regressão logística e utilizadas para criar uma escala. Através da curva ROC foi escolhido o nível de corte para discriminar HEM (<= 2 , com sensibilidade de 76%, especificidade de 83%. Foi realizada validação externa utilizando os pacientes do estudo NOMASS. Embora o uso de uma escala de fácil aplicação pelas equipes de emergência não possa substituir os métodos de imagem na diferenciação entre INF e HEM para a indicação de trombolítico, a escala proposta pode ser útil para selecionar pacientes para estudos clínicos e tratamento pré-hospitalar, alertar técnicos de tomografia e as equipes médicas sobre a chegada de pacientes, contribuindo para reduzir atrasos cruciais no tratamento.

  7. Bacteraemia in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enwere, G.; van Hensbroek, M. B.; Adegbola, R.; Palmer, A.; Onyiora, E.; Weber, M.; Greenwood, B.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a treatment trial of cerebral malaria, blood cultures were done in 276 Gambian children, aged between 1 and 9 years, with cerebral malaria. Fourteen (5%) of these were positive. The organisms isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (6), coliforms (4), Pseudomonas spp. (2), Salmonella spp. (1)

  8. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  9. Evaluation of cerebral dyschromatopsia using color afterimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi; Kezuka, Machiko; Hibino, Haruo; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2006-02-06

    Cerebral dyschromatopsia is traditionally evaluated by color discrimination tests such as the Farnsworth-Maunsell 100 Hue Test. These tests are also used to evaluate color-perception deficits caused by eye disease, and they do not tell us whether color perception is impaired in the eye or in the brain. Here, we used color afterimage to isolate color-perception deficits in the brain from those in the eyes, in a patient with cerebral dyschromatopsia. The results showed that the patient perceived color afterimage of yellow and blue with abnormal duration and chromaticity. On the other hand, the patient performed normally on the Farnsworth-Maunsell 100 Hue Test. We conclude that the color afterimage test would be useful to evaluate color perception in the brain.

  10. Discrimination and numerical analysis of human pathogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discrimination and numerical analysis of human pathogenic Candida albicans strains based on SDSPAGE protein profiles. ... obtaining a correct identification, both the commercial yeast kit system and the numerical analysis of whole-cell protein patterns can be useful for the more reliable identification of C. albicans strains.

  11. Measuring Discriminations : an Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    DUGUET Emmanuel; Yannick L'Horty; Meurs, Dominique; Pascale PETIT

    2010-01-01

    The articles published here were all presented at the international conference on the measurement of discriminations held at the University of Evry Val d'Essonne on 13 and 14 December 2007, under the auspices of the TEPP research federation (FR n° 3126 of the CNRS). Over these two days, about sixty participants discussed the problems of defining and measuring discrimination, including work on economics, sociology and law; on discriminations in hiring, training, unemployment, promotion, career...

  12. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  13. Trends in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, E

    2001-05-01

    The terms trend and cerebral palsy are defined emphazing the non-diagnostic nature of the cerebral palsy label. Criteria necessary for valid estimation of trends include constant methods of estimating population based numerators and denominators over a number of years, which render them hard to obtain, particularly in developing countries. Trends in cerebral palsy are an important source of aetiological hypotheses for congenital cerebral palsy, provide corroborative evidence for existing hypotheses and may direct strategies to prevent post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy. In developed countries the overall frequency of congenital cerebral palsy has changed little during the last decades. However this masks a dramatic increase in the frequency in the infants born most preterm, a decline in those born moderately preterm and little change in those born at term, but the severity of impairments of those born very preterm is decreasing while for those born at term severity in increasing. These changes may be the result of the increasing ability of perinatal care to rescue very vulnerable infants. There is less agreement in trends of post neonatally acquired cerebral palsy which are more sensitive to social well being.

  14. Acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G J; Lessell, S

    1977-01-01

    Color blindness developed in five patients apparently because of lesions in the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. Three of them also had symptoms of prosopagnosia. The lesions were neoplastic in two and vascular in three of the patients. It would appear that bilateral, inferior, occipital lobe lesions may be responsible both for acquired cerebral dyschromatopsia and prosopagnosia. Evidence from experimental investigations in primates suggests that the areas of the cerebral hemispheres analogous to those involved in these patients, may be specialized for the processing of colored stimuli.

  15. Discrimination against Black Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloud, Ashwaq; Alsulayyim, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is a structured way of abusing people based on racial differences, hence barring them from accessing wealth, political participation and engagement in many spheres of human life. Racism and discrimination are inherently rooted in institutions in the society, the problem has spread across many social segments of the society including…

  16. INTERSECTIONAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CHILDREN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbøl, Camilla Ida

    This paper adds a perspective to existing research on child protection by engaging in a debate on intersectional discrimination and its relationship to child protection. The paper has a twofold objective, (1) to further establish intersectionality as a concept to address discrimination against...... children, and (2) to illustrate the importance of addressing intersectionality within rights-based programmes of child protection....

  17. Flash-Type Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  18. Sparse discriminant analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Hastie, Trevor; Witten, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    commonplace in biological and medical applications. In this setting, a traditional approach involves performing feature selection before classification. We propose sparse discriminant analysis, a method for performing linear discriminant analysis with a sparseness criterion imposed such that classification......We consider the problem of performing interpretable classification in the high-dimensional setting, in which the number of features is very large and the number of observations is limited. This setting has been studied extensively in the chemometrics literature, and more recently has become...... and feature selection are performed simultaneously. Sparse discriminant analysis is based on the optimal scoring interpretation of linear discriminant analysis, and can be extended to perform sparse discrimination via mixtures of Gaussians if boundaries between classes are nonlinear or if subgroups...

  19. Discrimination in Modern Society

    OpenAIRE

    Schekach, E. V.; Щекач, Е. В.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of discrimination in modern society are examined in the article. Types of discrimination, ways of demonstration, methods of combating discrimination and inequality are described. Particular attention is paid to the legal basis and the real life stories, which serve as a material base for judgments how to prevent discrimination. Possible ways are suggested to eliminate such a negative phenomenon of society like discrimination. Статья посвящена вопросам дискриминации в современном общ...

  20. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  1. Cerebral Manifestations of Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Brussé (Ingrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis intends to describe and explain the course of clinical neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameters in patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. We aimed to improve knowledge on cerebral pathophysiological mechanisms of preeclampsia related to signs and

  2. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Cerebral Cavernous Malformation ...

  3. Dysphagia in cerebral palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annamaria Salghetti; Andrea Martinuzzi

    2012-01-01

      Feeding problems are often present in children with neuromotor impairment: dysphagia is usually seen in the most severe form of cerebral palsy and it's defined as the difficulty with any of the four phases of swallowing...

  4. Cerebral Palsy in Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lucila Merino Marcos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty-five years, a number of important films have been made in which the protagonist or supporting actor has had, or simulated having, cerebral palsy.  On occasion, these characters have been played by people with disabilities.  In the course of this field’s history, films have portrayed many diverse aspects of cerebral palsy such as healthcare and social and familial obligations.

  5. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author).

  6. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  7. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  8. Sparse tensor discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jian; Tang, Jinhui; Zhang, David

    2013-10-01

    The classical linear discriminant analysis has undergone great development and has recently been extended to different cases. In this paper, a novel discriminant subspace learning method called sparse tensor discriminant analysis (STDA) is proposed, which further extends the recently presented multilinear discriminant analysis to a sparse case. Through introducing the L1 and L2 norms into the objective function of STDA, we can obtain multiple interrelated sparse discriminant subspaces for feature extraction. As there are no closed-form solutions, k-mode optimization technique and the L1 norm sparse regression are combined to iteratively learn the optimal sparse discriminant subspace along different modes of the tensors. Moreover, each non-zero element in each subspace is selected from the most important variables/factors, and thus STDA has the potential to perform better than other discriminant subspace methods. Extensive experiments on face databases (Yale, FERET, and CMU PIE face databases) and the Weizmann action database show that the proposed STDA algorithm demonstrates the most competitive performance against the compared tensor-based methods, particularly in small sample sizes.

  9. Optimal discrimination index and discrimination efficiency for essay questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing-shing

    2014-01-01

    Recommended guidelines for discrimination index of multiple choice questions are often indiscriminately applied to essay type questions also. Optimal discrimination index under normality condition for essay question is independently derived. Satisfactory region for discrimination index of essay questions with passing mark at 50% of the total is between 0.12 and 0.31 instead of 0.40 or more in the case for multiple-choice questions. Optimal discrimination index for essay question is shown to increase proportional to the range of scores. Discrimination efficiency as the ratio of the observed discrimination index over the optimal discrimination index is defined. Recommended guidelines for discrimination index of essay questions are provided.

  10. Associations of racial discrimination and parental discrimination coping messages with African American adolescent racial identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Bridget L; Macon, Tamarie A; Mustafaa, Faheemah N; Bogan, Erin D; Cole-Lewis, Yasmin; Chavous, Tabbye M

    2015-06-01

    Research links racial identity to important developmental outcomes among African American adolescents, but less is known about the contextual experiences that shape youths' racial identity. In a sample of 491 African American adolescents (48% female), associations of youth-reported experiences of racial discrimination and parental messages about preparation for racial bias with adolescents' later racial identity were examined. Cluster analysis resulted in four profiles of adolescents varying in reported frequency of racial discrimination from teachers and peers at school and frequency of parental racial discrimination coping messages during adolescents' 8th grade year. Boys were disproportionately over-represented in the cluster of youth experiencing more frequent discrimination but receiving fewer parental discrimination coping messages, relative to the overall sample. Also examined were clusters of adolescents' 11th grade racial identity attitudes about the importance of race (centrality), personal group affect (private regard), and perceptions of societal beliefs about African Americans (public regard). Girls and boys did not differ in their representation in racial identity clusters, but 8th grade discrimination/parent messages clusters were associated with 11th grade racial identity cluster membership, and these associations varied across gender groups. Boys experiencing more frequent discrimination but fewer parental coping messages were over-represented in the racial identity cluster characterized by low centrality, low private regard, and average public regard. The findings suggest that adolescents who experience racial discrimination but receive fewer parental supports for negotiating and coping with discrimination may be at heightened risk for internalizing stigmatizing experiences. Also, the findings suggest the need to consider the context of gender in adolescents' racial discrimination and parental racial socialization.

  11. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral...

  12. On Teaching about Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a classroom assignment which is designed to motivate students' critical thinking skills concerning sex discrimination. Includes data sets for student analysis, instructions for student writing assignments, answers to student work, and suggestions for enhancing critical thinking skills. (GEA)

  13. Discrimination in lexical decision.

    OpenAIRE

    Milin, P.; Feldman, L.B.; Ramscar, M.; Hendrix, P.; Baayen, R.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a novel set of discrimination-based indicators of language processing derived from Naive Discriminative Learning (ndl) theory. We compare the effectiveness of these new measures with classical lexical-distributional measures?in particular, frequency counts and form similarity measures?to predict lexical decision latencies when a complete morphological segmentation of masked primes is or is not possible. Data derive from a re-analysis of a large subset of decision late...

  14. Multiview Uncorrelated Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiliang; Xie, Xijiong; Yang, Mo

    2016-12-01

    Multiview learning is more robust than single-view learning in many real applications. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a popular technique to utilize information stemming from multiple feature sets. However, it does not exploit label information effectively. Later multiview linear discriminant analysis (MLDA) was proposed through combining CCA and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Due to the successful application of uncorrelated LDA (ULDA), which seeks optimal discriminant features with minimum redundancy, we propose a new supervised learning method called multiview ULDA (MULDA) in this paper. This method combines the theory of ULDA with CCA. Then we adapt discriminant CCA (DCCA) instead of the CCA in MLDA and MULDA, and discuss about the effect of this modification. Furthermore, we generalize these methods to the nonlinear case by kernel-based learning techniques. The new method is called kernel multiview uncorrelated discriminant analysis (KMUDA). Then we modify kernel multiview discriminant analysis and KMUDA by replacing Kernel CCA with Kernel DCCA. Our methods are tested on different real datasets and compared with other state-of-the-art methods. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of our methods.

  15. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  16. Clinical Spectrum of Cerebral Palsy and Associated Disability in South Egypt: A Local Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Abas

    2017-02-01

    CONCLUSION: Cerebral palsy in developing countries has a higher prevalence and different clinical profile regarding severity and associated disability. The perinatal and high-quality neonatal care together with physical therapy and rehabilitation programs is still lacking in developing countries.

  17. Cerebral palsy-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha D

    2004-07-01

    Cerebral Palsy encompasses a heterogeneous group of non-progressive motor disorders caused by injury to the developing brain. Management is best done in a multidisciplinary set up under one roof. Comprehensive assessment of the child to evaluate functional ability and associated problems is followed by an individualized plan of management with long term goals and short term objectives. Participation of the family is pivotal to ensure proper habilitation of the child. A home-based management plan is advocated. Considerable experience, sensitivity and understanding are needed both for breaking the news and counselling the parents of a child with cerebral palsy.

  18. Is cerebral hemorrhage approaching?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yoneyama, Takumi; Hamasuna, Ryouichi; Fujime, Kenichi; Goya, Tomokazu [Junwakai Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In Junwakai Memorial Hospital, from May, 2000 to April, 2001, 1042 patients underwent MRI examination to detect intracerebral microbleed (MB). This series included 481 hypertensive cases and 109 intra-cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage patients. MB was identified by MRI GRASS image that detects hemosiderin with high sensitivity. The occurrence of MB is high in men and increased with the age. The hypertensive patients showed increased frequency of MB in proportion to the duration of hypertension. Almost all of the symptomatic cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage cases showed multiple MBs except for massive hemorrhagic lesions. Therefore, MB can be an antecedant feature of the inpending symptomatic intracerebral and cerebellar hemorrhages. (author)

  19. Sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Bruno Leonardo Scofano; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro; Maia Filho, Heber de Souza

    To review the literature on sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy. Non-systematic review using the keywords "sialorrhea" and "child" carried out in the PubMed ® , LILACS ® , and SciELO ® databases during July 2015. A total of 458 articles were obtained, of which 158 were analyzed as they were associated with sialorrhea in children; 70 had content related to sialorrhea in cerebral palsy or the assessment and treatment of sialorrhea in other neurological disorders, which were also assessed. The prevalence of sialorrhea is between 10% and 58% in cerebral palsy and has clinical and social consequences. It is caused by oral motor dysfunction, dysphagia, and intraoral sensitivity disorder. The severity and impact of sialorrhea are assessed through objective or subjective methods. Several types of therapeutic management are described: training of sensory awareness and oral motor skills, drug therapy, botulinum toxin injection, and surgical treatment. The most effective treatment that addresses the cause of sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy is training of sensory awareness and oral motor skills, performed by a speech therapist. Botulinum toxin injection and the use of anticholinergics have a transient effect and are adjuvant to speech therapy; they should be considered in cases of moderate to severe sialorrhea or respiratory complications. Atropine sulfate is inexpensive and appears to have good clinical response combined with good safety profile. The use of trihexyphenidyl for the treatment of sialorrhea can be considered in dyskinetic forms of cerebral palsy or in selected cases. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological and molecular comparison of K(ATP) channels in rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Edvinsson, Lars; Olesen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels play an important role in the regulation of cerebral vascular tone. In vitro studies using synthetic K(ATP) channel openers suggest that the pharmacological profiles differ between rat basilar arteries and rat middle cerebral arteries. To address this issue......, we studied the possible involvement of endothelial K(ATP) channels by pressurized arteriography after luminal administration of synthetic K(ATP) channel openers to rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries. Furthermore, we examined the mRNA and protein expression profile of K(ATP) channels to rat...... basilar and middle cerebral arteries using quantitative real-time PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Western blotting, respectively. In the perfusion system, we found no significant responses after luminal application of three K(ATP) channel openers to rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries...

  1. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions.

  2. [Multiple cerebral tuberculomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, L; Villarreal, F

    The tuberculosis is a disease that continues being important cause of morbidity and mortality at worldwide level. Its presentation as tuberculomas cerebral manifold at level of the central nervous system is little frequent in immunocompetent patients and can be confused with other etiology. An indigenous young man, immunocompetent consulted for history of headache, nausea, vomits, convulsions, double vision and hemiparesia left side, which in the cerebral tomography of revenue was showing injuries compatible with cerebral abscesses; for which he received treatment with antibiotics without improvement for what there takes biopsy of the injuries that reported tuberculomas, specific treatment being initiated later and the primary area being investigated without the same one be detecting. After the first procedural step with evident clinical and radiographic improvement. The tuberculosis in anyone of their forms of presentation must be included within the diagnosis differential of the patients in our endemic countries for this disease. The clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral injuries is difficult and single usually it obtains to the diagnosis during a pathology study that shows tuberculomas with caseosa necrosis, epiteliodes cell and the acid alcohol bacilli resistant.

  3. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  4. CASE REPORT Cerebral schistosomiasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0b013e3182704d1e]. 5. Sanelli PC, Lev MH, Gonzalez RG, Schaefer PW. Unique linear and nodular MR enhancement pattern in schistosomiasis of the central nervous system: Report of three patients. AJR 2001;177(6):1471-1474. Cerebral schistosomiasis.

  5. Disturbed functional brain interactions underlying deficient tactile object discrimination in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weder, B; Azari, NP; Knorr, U; Seitz, RJ; Keel, A; Nienhusmeier, M; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Ludin, HP

    2000-01-01

    Somatosensory discrimination of cuboid objects was studied in a group of healthy volunteers and patients with Parkinson's disease using regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements obtained with positron emission tomography (PET) and O-15 labeled water [(H2O)-O-15]. A 6-[F-18]-fluoro-L-dopa

  6. Early prediction of cerebral malaria by (1)H NMR based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumita; Sengupta, Arjun; Sharma, Shobhona; Sonawat, Haripalsingh M

    2016-04-12

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening disease, caused mainly by Plasmodium falciparum in humans. In adults only 1-2% of P. falciparum-infected hosts transit to the cerebral form of the disease while most exhibit non-cerebral malaria (NCM). The perturbed metabolic pathways of CM and NCM have been reported. Early marker(s) of CM is(are) not known and by the time a patient exhibits the pathological symptoms of CM, the disease has progressed. Murine CM, like the human disease, is difficult to assign to specific animals at early stage and hence the challenge to treat CM at pre-clinical stage of the disease. This is the first report of prediction of CM in mice using a novel strategy based on (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. Mice were infected with malarial parasites, and serum was collected from all the animals (CM/NCM) before CM symptoms were apparent. The assignment of mice as NCM/CM at an early time point is based on their symptoms at days 8-9 post-infection (pi). The serum samples were subjected to (1)H NMR-based metabolomics. (1)H NMR spectra of the serum samples, collected at various time points (pi) in multiple sets of experiments, were subjected to multivariate analyses. The results from orthogonal partial least square discriminant analyses (OPLS-DA) suggest that the animals with CM start to diverge out in metabolic profile and were distinct on day 4 pi, although by physical observation they were indistinguishable from the NCM. The metabolites that appeared to contribute to this distinction were serum lipids and lipoproteins, and 14-19% enhancement was observed in mice afflicted with CM. A cut-off of 14% change of total lipoproteins in serum predicts 54-71% CM in different experiments at day 4 pi. This study clearly demonstrates the possibility of differentiating and identifying animals with CM at an early, pre-clinical stage. The strategy, based on metabolite profile of serum, tested with different batches of animals in both the

  7. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    El término parálisis cerebral (PC) engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia me...

  8. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  9. Education and Gender Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the status of women education in present education system and some measures to overcome the lags existing. Discrimination against girls and women in the developing world is a devastating reality. It results in millions of individual tragedies, which add up to lost potential for entire countries. Gender bias in education is an…

  10. Housing discrimination 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, D

    2000-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that phone-based discrimination exists, an undergraduate course was conducted at the University of Pennsylvania. It was noted that racial housing audits were designed in such a way that teams of White and Black auditors were assigned similar identities and characteristics. To this effect, systematic differences in treatment were taken to reflect racial discrimination. The course, ¿Research Design: Measurement of Discrimination,¿ was carried out as a response to the pressure to involve undergraduates in research. A racially diverse group of students registered, among them speakers of Black English Vernacular, Black Accented English, and White Middle Class English. A total of 79 rental units advertised in newspapers and rental guides were audited by the class. Overall, results of the study suggest that telephone audits constitute a potentially cheap, easy, and efficient way of measuring and studying processes of racial discrimination in urban housing markets. Compared with Whites, African Americans were less likely to be told of a unit's availability, more likely to speak to a rental agent, to pay an application fee, and to have credit mentioned as an issue. In addition, these racial effects interacted with and were exacerbated by gender class.

  11. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  12. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D{sub 2}, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. Our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  13. Discrimination Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochocki, Thomas E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Examined the learning performance of 192 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children on either a two or four choice simultaneous color discrimination task. Compared the use of verbal reinforcement and/or punishment, under conditions of either complete or incomplete instructions. (Author/SDH)

  14. Size is the Most Important Predictor of Aneurysm Rupture Among Multiple Cerebral Aneurysms: Post Hoc Subgroup Analysis of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Study Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojima, Masaaki; Morita, Akio; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Tominari, Shinjiro

    2017-06-20

    Multiple cerebral aneurysms are encountered in approximately 15% to 35% of patients harboring unruptured cerebral aneurysms. It would be of clinical value to determine which of them is most likely to rupture. To characterize features of the ruptured aneurysm relative to other concomitant fellow aneurysms in patients with multiple cerebral aneurysms. From a total of 5720 patients who were prospectively registered in the Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Study in Japan, a subgroup of patients with multiple cerebral aneurysms who developed subarachnoid hemorrhage was extracted for this post hoc analysis. Intrapatient comparisons of each aneurysm were carried out using aneurysm-specific factors such as size, location, and shape to identify predictors of rupture among the fellow aneurysms in a patient with multiple cerebral aneurysms. Twenty-five patients with 62 aneurysms were identified from the total cohort of 5720 patients. With the distinctiveness in size, which means the aneurysm was the single largest among the multiple aneurysms, the ruptured aneurysm in each case was discriminated from the other coexisting aneurysms with a sensitivity of 0.76 and specificity of 0.86. Our results suggest that the largest aneurysm is likely to rupture among coexisting aneurysms in a patient with multiple cerebral aneurysms.

  15. Epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, S; Ahuja, B; Taluja, V; Bhatia, V K

    2001-02-01

    This article deals with the clinical profile of children with cerebral palsy and epilepsy, and to study the clinical predictors of response to anti-epileptic drugs. It is a prospective hospital based follow-up study. All the children who presented with cerebral palsy and history of seizure (other than neonatal seizures) over a period of one year were included. Seizures were classified according to ILAE classification. An EEG was obtained in all cases. Neuroimaging was done in all patients. Eighty-five patients were studied and followed for minimum of 12 months. Perinatal factors accounted for 62 (72.3%) cases. The motor deficits seen were quadriparesis (n = 64), hemiplegia (n = 12) and diplegia (n = 9). Associated mental retardation was seen in 80.9% patients with quadriparesis. A predominance of generalised epilepsy was seen with generalised tonic clonic seizures (32.9%) followed by mycolonic seizures (30.6%) and localisation related epilepsy (24.7%). The patients with quadriparesis were more likely to have generalised epilepsy and 52.4% of them required two or more anti-epileptic drugs for control of seizures. Patients with hemiplegia had localisation related epilepsy in 83.3% of cases. On multivariate analysis presence of quadriparesis, microcephaly, mental retardation and myoclonic epilepsy were found to predict the poor response to AED. Epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy is of severe nature and difficult to control. Presence of quadriparesis, mental retardation and myoclonic seizures was predictive of poor response to anti- epileptic drugs.

  16. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  17. Plasticidad cerebral y lenguaje

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Torres Sánchez, Ignacio; Berthier Torres, Marcelo Luís

    2012-01-01

    Hace pocos años se daba por sentado que la recuperación del lenguaje tras una lesión cerebral era imposible, al igual que adquirir la lengua materna más allá de los tres primeros años de vida. Sin embargo, las últimas indagaciones muestran que nuestra capacidad de aprender es mucho mayor.

  18. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  19. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    reflected a cerebral form of high altitude illness. In 1964, Fitch described a similar form of mountain sickness with neurolkgical manifestations in the...71% in thaL of Hackett et al; this sex distribution undoubtedly reflects the larger numbers of males presently involved in trekking and 44...HACE with loss of consciousness, absence of pupillary reactions, flaccidity of all extremities and the presence of bilateral Babinski responses. The

  20. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Richard Bain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g. posture and degree of hyperthermia. The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g. hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges, an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e. 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided.

  1. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used in treatment of paediatric diseases, but evidence of associated adverse cerebral effects is accumulating. The various pharmacokinetic profiles of the exogenous glucocorticoids and the changes in pharmacodynamics during childhood, result in different exposure...... of nervous tissue to exogenous glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids activate two types of intracellular receptors, the mineralocorticoid receptor and the glucocorticoid receptor. The two receptors differ in cerebral distribution, affinity and effects. Exogenous glucocorticoids favor activation...... of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...

  2. Term neonatal encephalopathy antecedent cerebral palsy: a retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulos, Paulina; Oskoui, Maryam; Dagenais, Lynn; Shevell, Michael I

    2013-05-01

    To compare the clinical profile of term-born cerebral palsy children with or without antecedent moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy. We hypothesized that antecedent neonatal encephalopathy is associated with a spastic quadriparesis cerebral palsy clinical profile, a higher severity of functional motor impairment, and a greater number of associated comorbidities. Using the Quebec Cerebral Palsy Registry, neurologic subtype, Gross Motor Function Classification System stratification, and comorbidities were compared in children with cerebral palsy with and without antecedent neonatal encephalopathy. Differences between groups were evaluated using chi square analysis for categorical variables and student t test for continuous variables. We identified 132 children with cerebral palsy born full term over a 4 year-interval (1999-2002 inclusive) within the Quebec Cerebral Palsy Registry, of which 44 (33%) had an antecedent neonatal encephalopathy. Spastic quadriplegia subtype of cerebral palsy and Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III-V (non-independent ambulation) were significantly associated with antecedent neonatal encephalopathy. The mean number of comorbidities experienced was not different in the two groups. Of five documented comorbidities, only severe communication difficulties were found to be associated (p cerebral palsy born at term and with a history of neonatal encephalopathy. Copyright © 2012 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Discriminative validity of the Danish version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Michelle; Gard, Gunvor; Aadahl, Mette

    2011-01-01

    . The PEDI was administered as a questionnaire completed by the parents. Results from receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed that in the case of discrimination between children with CP and nondisabled children, the sensitivity and specificity were 77.3 and 97.8%, respectively......The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) assesses functional status in children with disabilities aged 0.5-7.5 years. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Danish version of the PEDI was able to discriminate between nondisabled children and children with cerebral palsy (CP....... In the discrimination between children with JIA and nondisabled children, the sensitivity and specificity were 99.8 and 81.7%, respectively. Study results indicate that the Danish version of the PEDI shows good discriminative validity. Further studies of the discriminative validity are recommended....

  4. Perceived discrimination in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Iris Andriessen; Henk Fernee; Karin Wittebrood

    2014-01-01

    Only available in electronic version There is no systematic structure in the Netherlands for mapping out the discrimination experiences of different groups in different areas of society. As in many other countries, discrimination studies in the Netherlands mostly focus on the experiences of specific groups, on specific domains or on specific types of discrimination. This study aims to chart the extent to which residents of the Netherlands perceive that they are subject to discrimination, from...

  5. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  6. Severity of the aggression/anxiety-depression/attention child behavior checklist profile discriminates between different levels of deficits in emotional regulation in youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter R; Day, Helen; Goldin, Rachel L; Spencer, Thomas; Faraone, Stephen V; Surman, Craig B H; Wozniak, Janet

    2012-04-01

    We examined whether severity scores (1 SD vs 2 SDs) of a unique profile of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) consisting of the Anxiety/Depression, Aggression, and Attention (AAA) scales would help differentiate levels of deficits in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Subjects were 197 children with ADHD and 224 without ADHD. We defined deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) as an aggregate cutoff score of >180 but siblings. In contrast, the CBCL-DESR was associated with higher rates of comorbid disruptive behavior, anxiety disorders, and impaired interpersonal functioning compared with other ADHD children. Severity scores of the AAA CBCL profiles can help distinguish 2 groups of emotional regulation problems in children with ADHD.

  7. Discrimination in lexical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milin, Petar; Feldman, Laurie Beth; Ramscar, Michael; Hendrix, Peter; Baayen, R Harald

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a novel set of discrimination-based indicators of language processing derived from Naive Discriminative Learning (ndl) theory. We compare the effectiveness of these new measures with classical lexical-distributional measures-in particular, frequency counts and form similarity measures-to predict lexical decision latencies when a complete morphological segmentation of masked primes is or is not possible. Data derive from a re-analysis of a large subset of decision latencies from the English Lexicon Project, as well as from the results of two new masked priming studies. Results demonstrate the superiority of discrimination-based predictors over lexical-distributional predictors alone, across both the simple and primed lexical decision tasks. Comparable priming after masked corner and cornea type primes, across two experiments, fails to support early obligatory segmentation into morphemes as predicted by the morpho-orthographic account of reading. Results fit well with ndl theory, which, in conformity with Word and Paradigm theory, rejects the morpheme as a relevant unit of analysis. Furthermore, results indicate that readers with greater spelling proficiency and larger vocabularies make better use of orthographic priors and handle lexical competition more efficiently.

  8. The relative merits of discriminating and non-discriminating dosemeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshal, T. O.; Christensen, Palle; Julius, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    The need for discriminating and non-discriminating personal dosemeters in the field of radiological protection is examined. The ability of various types of dosemeter to meet these needs is also discussed. It is concluded that there is a need for discriminating dosemeters but in the majority...... of cases a simple two element non-discriminating dosemeter will suffice. In cases where the use of discriminating dosemeters is justified, thermoluminescence dosemeters can be designed to provided information on radiation type and energy, but if further information is required the photographic film...

  9. Transgender Discrimination and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An emerging area of law is developing regarding sex/gender identity discrimination, also referred to as transgender discrimination, as distinguished from discrimination based on sexual orientation. A transgendered individual is defined as "a person who has a gender-identity disorder which is a persistent discomfort about one?s assigned sex or…

  10. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H; van Lieshout, J J

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2 the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established.

  11. Cerebral Autoregulation in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Griffioen, Annemiek C.; Zeeman, Gerda; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preeclampsia is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. METHODS: In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (determined by transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (determined by noninvasive

  12. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Cerebral cavernous malformation Cerebral cavernous malformation Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cerebral cavernous malformations are collections of small blood vessels ( capillaries ) ...

  13. [Discrimination of HIV infected persons in medical settings in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianasolo, R L; Rakotoarivelo, R A; Randriarimanana, D; Angijiro, P G; Randria, M J D

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the discrimination profile of healthcare personnel towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in medical settings in Madagascar. A prospective, multicentric, descriptive, and analytic study was made with a questionnaire filled in anonymously, between February and August 2009, in 17 Madagascar hospitals (public and private). Thirty-six percent of PLWHA reported that they had been confronted with discrimination in the medical field. The age (30-40 years) and the level of education had an impact on discrimination in our study (pdiscrimination (n=8/13) (61.5 %). Discrimination in the medical field was listed as: refusal of the patient to be managed in the hospital (n=5/27) (18.5 %) because of the fear of discrimination (n=4/5) (80 %) and sharing serological status with healthcare providers. Discrimination by the medical staff was listed as the unjustified use of some tools (stethoscope, tensiometer, thermometer) and by the refusal to manage PLWHA (p>0.05). Fifty-three percent of healthcare providers answered the question on HIV transmission mode correctly. Fifteen percent replied that HIV was transmitted by saliva, and 20 % by physical contact. As elsewhere, discrimination of PLWHA in the medical field is present in Madagascar. Fighting discrimination should be included in the strategy against propagation of HIV infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Post-Neonatal Cerebral Palsy Cases: A European Registry-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, Laurence; Ehlinger, Virginie; Klapouszczak, Dana; Delobel, Malika; Hollody, Katalin; Sellier, Elodie; De La Cruz, Javier; Alberge, Corine; Genolini, Christophe; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyze trends over time in prevalence of cerebral palsy of post-neonatal origin, to investigate whether changes are similar according to severity and to describe the disability profile by etiology. Post-neonatal cases, birth years 1976 to 1998, were identified from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe…

  15. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Tramadol in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Angela N.; Bigelow, George E.; Lanier, Ryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Tramadol is an unscheduled atypical analgesic that acts as an agonist at μ-opioid receptors and inhibits monoamine reuptake. Tramadol can suppress opioid withdrawal, and chronic administration can produce opioid physical dependence; however, diversion and abuse of tramadol is low. The present study further characterized tramadol in a three-choice discrimination procedure. Nondependent volunteers with active stimulant and opioid use (n = 8) participated in this residential laboratory study. Subjects were trained to discriminate between placebo, hydromorphone (8 mg), and methylphenidate (60 mg), and tests of acquisition confirmed that all volunteers could discriminate between the training drugs. The following drug conditions were then tested during discrimination test sessions: placebo, hydromorphone (4 and 8 mg), methylphenidate (30 and 60 mg), and tramadol (50, 100, 200, and 400 mg). In addition to discrimination measures, which included discrete choice, point distribution, and operant responding, subjective and physiological effects were measured for each test condition. Both doses of hydromorphone and methylphenidate were identified as hydromorphone- and methylphenidate-like, respectively. Lower doses of tramadol were generally identified as placebo, with higher doses (200 and 400 mg) identified as hydromorphone, or opioid-like. The highest dose of tramadol increased ratings on the stimulant scale, but was not significantly identified as methylphenidate-like. Tramadol did not significantly increase subjective ratings associated with reinforcement. Taken together, these results extend previous work with tramadol as a potential medication for the treatment of opioid dependence and withdrawal, showing acute doses of tramadol exhibit a profile of effects similar to opioid agonists and may have abuse liability in certain populations. PMID:21467190

  16. Cerebral oxygenation after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Trine W; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare absolute values of regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (cStO2 ) during haemodynamic transition after birth and repeatability during steady state for two commercial near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices. METHODS: In a prospective observational study, the INVOS 5100C and FORE......: The INVOS and FORE-SIGHT cStO2 estimates showed oxygenation-level-dependent difference during birth transition. The better repeatability of FORE-SIGHT could be due to the lower response to change in saturation....

  17. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilan eZhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNeural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain.

  18. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns.

  19. Discriminative Shape Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, M.; de Bruijne, M.

    2009-01-01

    The alignment of shape data to a common mean before its subsequent processing is an ubiquitous step within the area shape analysis. Current approaches to shape analysis or, as more specifically considered in this work, shape classification perform the alignment in a fully unsupervised way......, not taking into account that eventually the shapes are to be assigned to two or more different classes. This work introduces a discriminative variation to well-known Procrustes alignment and demonstrates its benefit over this classical method in shape classification tasks. The focus is on two...

  20. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon...

  1. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Discriminative Relational Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Zhu, Jun; Xia, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Relational topic models (RTMs) provide a probabilistic generative process to describe both the link structure and document contents for document networks, and they have shown promise on predicting network structures and discovering latent topic representations. However, existing RTMs have limitations in both the restricted model expressiveness and incapability of dealing with imbalanced network data. To expand the scope and improve the inference accuracy of RTMs, this paper presents three extensions: 1) unlike the common link likelihood with a diagonal weight matrix that allows the-same-topic interactions only, we generalize it to use a full weight matrix that captures all pairwise topic interactions and is applicable to asymmetric networks; 2) instead of doing standard Bayesian inference, we perform regularized Bayesian inference (RegBayes) with a regularization parameter to deal with the imbalanced link structure issue in real networks and improve the discriminative ability of learned latent representations; and 3) instead of doing variational approximation with strict mean-field assumptions, we present collapsed Gibbs sampling algorithms for the generalized relational topic models by exploring data augmentation without making restricting assumptions. Under the generic RegBayes framework, we carefully investigate two popular discriminative loss functions, namely, the logistic log-loss and the max-margin hinge loss. Experimental results on several real network datasets demonstrate the significance of these extensions on improving prediction performance.

  3. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  4. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. New cerebral protection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Werner, Christian

    2005-10-01

    This article presents an overview of the most recent and important strategies to reduce secondary brain damage. There is currently no magic bullet available to protect the brain after neuronal injury. This is related to the complex pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, which makes it unlikely that a single pharmacological intervention results in sustained neuroprotection. Analyses of clinical studies reveal that acute physiologic derangements (e.g. fever, hypertension and hypotension, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, hyperglycemia) are the most important predictors of unfavorable outcome after brain injury and have to be treated. The effectiveness of anesthetic agents to extend the ischemic tolerance of neurons has been demonstrated in experimental settings, but such benefits have not been demonstrated in humans. The effectiveness of osmodiuretics to decrease elevated intracranial pressure, a factor with relevance to outcome, has been demonstrated. Infusion of magnesium in patients with subarachnoidal hemorrhage can reduce the occurrence of delayed ischemia caused by cerebrovascular spasm. The prophylactic administration of glucocorticoids should be avoided. While the positive effects of chronic administration of statins to reduce the incidence of stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical studies, the protective effect of acute administration of statins after a cerebral insult has do be defined. Control of physiological variables, avoidance of hyperthermia, intensive control of plasma glucose concentrations, use of anesthetic agents and osmodiuretics to control intracranial hypertension and the possible prophylactic administration of magnesium in patients at risk of vasospasm and of statins in patients with cerebrovascular risk factors are currently the most important strategies to reduce neuronal injury.

  6. Application of the antibiotic disk diffusion method to multivariate profiling of soil bacterial community: comparing the power to discriminate different soils and dimension of the discrimination with that of the Biolog method Aplicação do método de difusão de disco de antibiótico para traçar o perfil da comunidade bacteriana no solo: comparação de seu poder discriminatório e dimensão da discriminação em relação ao método Biolog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Doi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic disk diffution (ADD method was compared with the Biolog method in terms of power to discriminate soils and dimension of the discrimination. Soils from a forest and a citrus field in Thailand were profiled with these methods. These methods differentiated the soils in the principal component score plots. Then, Wilk's lambda statistic was determined to estimate power of these methods to discriminate the soils. The ADD method scored Wilk's lambda of 0.003 (p = 0.144 and 0.000 (p=0.020, for direct and ratio-transformed calculation, respectively. The Biolog method recorded Wilk's lambda of 0.001 (p=0.067, 0.003 (p=0.144 and 0.035 (p=0.440, at 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 average well color developments (AWCDs, respectively. The ADD method showed high discrimination power, or at least comparable to that of the Biolog method. Redundancy analysis (RDA resulted in ordination diagrams, which revealed a difference in dimension of the soil discrimination among the methods and the AWCDs. The soil environmental factors significantly related to the bacterial profiles at p=0.05 were: available phosphorus (ADD method and Biolog 0.25 AWCD, and pH (Biolog 0.50 and 0.75 AWCD. These results indicated that the profiling methods and the AWCDs revealed the multidimensionality of the discrimination. The possibility of the application of the ADD method to extraction of such pieces of information for effective land management was suggested.O método de Difusão de Disco de Antibiótico (ADD foi comparado ao método Biolog quanto ao seu poder de discriminar solos e quanto à dimensão da discriminação, analisando-se os solos de uma floresta e de um campo de cítricos na Tailândia. A diferenciação dos solos por esses métodos foi feita de acordo com o score plot do componente principal.Em seguida, determinou-se o valor de lambda de Wilk para estimar o poder discriminatório desses métodos. O método ADD resultou em lambda de Wilk de 0,003 (p=0,144 e 0,035 (p=0

  7. Endophilia or Exophobia: Beyond Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Feld, J.F.; Salamanca Acosta, N.; Hamermesh, D.

    2013-01-01

    The immense literature on discrimination treats outcomes as relative: One group suffers compared to another. But does a difference arise because agents discriminate against others – are exophobic – or because they favor their own kind – are endophilic? This difference matters, as the relative importance of the types of discrimination and their inter-relation affect market outcomes. Using a field experiment in which graders at one university were randomly assigned students' exams that did or d...

  8. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function-the Obstacles and Curb tests-relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test-retest reliability. At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (pspina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81-0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73-0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test-retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test-retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy.

  9. Weight discrimination and bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Rebecca M; King, Kelly M

    2013-04-01

    Despite significant attention to the medical impacts of obesity, often ignored are the negative outcomes that obese children and adults experience as a result of stigma, bias, and discrimination. Obese individuals are frequently stigmatized because of their weight in many domains of daily life. Research spanning several decades has documented consistent weight bias and stigmatization in employment, health care, schools, the media, and interpersonal relationships. For overweight and obese youth, weight stigmatization translates into pervasive victimization, teasing, and bullying. Multiple adverse outcomes are associated with exposure to weight stigmatization, including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, suicidal ideation, poor academic performance, lower physical activity, maladaptive eating behaviors, and avoidance of health care. This review summarizes the nature and extent of weight stigmatization against overweight and obese individuals, as well as the resulting consequences that these experiences create for social, psychological, and physical health for children and adults who are targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Multitask clustering tries to improve the clustering performance of multiple tasks simultaneously by taking their relationship into account. Most existing multitask clustering algorithms fall into the type of generative clustering, and none are formulated as convex optimization problems. In this paper, we propose two convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering (DMTC) objectives to address the problems. The first one aims to learn a shared feature representation, which can be seen as a technical combination of the convex multitask feature learning and the convex Multiclass Maximum Margin Clustering (M3C). The second one aims to learn the task relationship, which can be seen as a combination of the convex multitask relationship learning and M3C. The objectives of the two algorithms are solved in a uniform procedure by the efficient cutting-plane algorithm and further unified in the Bayesian framework. Experimental results on a toy problem and two benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  11. Introduction to multivariate discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kégl Balázs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate discrimination or classification is one of the best-studied problem in machine learning, with a plethora of well-tested and well-performing algorithms. There are also several good general textbooks [1–9] on the subject written to an average engineering, computer science, or statistics graduate student; most of them are also accessible for an average physics student with some background on computer science and statistics. Hence, instead of writing a generic introduction, we concentrate here on relating the subject to a practitioner experimental physicist. After a short introduction on the basic setup (Section 1 we delve into the practical issues of complexity regularization, model selection, and hyperparameter optimization (Section 2, since it is this step that makes high-complexity non-parametric fitting so different from low-dimensional parametric fitting. To emphasize that this issue is not restricted to classification, we illustrate the concept on a low-dimensional but non-parametric regression example (Section 2.1. Section 3 describes the common algorithmic-statistical formal framework that unifies the main families of multivariate classification algorithms. We explain here the large-margin principle that partly explains why these algorithms work. Section 4 is devoted to the description of the three main (families of classification algorithms, neural networks, the support vector machine, and AdaBoost. We do not go into the algorithmic details; the goal is to give an overview on the form of the functions these methods learn and on the objective functions they optimize. Besides their technical description, we also make an attempt to put these algorithm into a socio-historical context. We then briefly describe some rather heterogeneous applications to illustrate the pattern recognition pipeline and to show how widespread the use of these methods is (Section 5. We conclude the chapter with three essentially open research problems

  12. Introduction to multivariate discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kégl, Balázs

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate discrimination or classification is one of the best-studied problem in machine learning, with a plethora of well-tested and well-performing algorithms. There are also several good general textbooks [1-9] on the subject written to an average engineering, computer science, or statistics graduate student; most of them are also accessible for an average physics student with some background on computer science and statistics. Hence, instead of writing a generic introduction, we concentrate here on relating the subject to a practitioner experimental physicist. After a short introduction on the basic setup (Section 1) we delve into the practical issues of complexity regularization, model selection, and hyperparameter optimization (Section 2), since it is this step that makes high-complexity non-parametric fitting so different from low-dimensional parametric fitting. To emphasize that this issue is not restricted to classification, we illustrate the concept on a low-dimensional but non-parametric regression example (Section 2.1). Section 3 describes the common algorithmic-statistical formal framework that unifies the main families of multivariate classification algorithms. We explain here the large-margin principle that partly explains why these algorithms work. Section 4 is devoted to the description of the three main (families of) classification algorithms, neural networks, the support vector machine, and AdaBoost. We do not go into the algorithmic details; the goal is to give an overview on the form of the functions these methods learn and on the objective functions they optimize. Besides their technical description, we also make an attempt to put these algorithm into a socio-historical context. We then briefly describe some rather heterogeneous applications to illustrate the pattern recognition pipeline and to show how widespread the use of these methods is (Section 5). We conclude the chapter with three essentially open research problems that are either

  13. Perceived discrimination: why applicants and employees expect and perceive discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu Ghazaleh, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we have investigated perceptions of discrimination. We have shown discrimination exists in the eyes of applicants and employees and especially when from an ethnic minority group. There are psychological variables that influence these perceptions differently for minority and

  14. Cerebral Palsy: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sheffali; Sondhi, Vishal

    2017-11-20

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormalities of muscle tone, movement and motor skills, and is attributed to injury to the developing brain. The clinical features of this entity evolve over time and the specific CP syndrome may be recognizable only after 3-5 y of age; although suggestive signs and symptoms may be present at an earlier age. The management involves neurological rehabilitation (addressing muscle tonal abnormalities, and devising physical and occupational therapies) and diagnosis and management of co-morbidities (including epilepsy, impairment of cognition, vision, hearing, and disturbances of growth and gastrointestinal function). The management, therefore, is multidisciplinary involving the treating physician working with a team of rehabilitation-, orthopedic-, psychologic-, and social care- providers.

  15. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur.

  16. Neurocognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria in adults: a pilot study in Benguela Central Hospital, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Bruno; Kalei, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    To characterize the neurocognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria (CM) in an adult sample of the city of Benguela, Angola. A neuropsychological assessment was carried out in 22 subjects with prior history of CM ranging from 6 to 12 months after the infection. The obtained results were compared to a control group with no previous history of cerebral malaria. The study was conducted in Benguela Central Hospital, Angola in 2011. CM group obtained lower results on the two last trials of a verbal learning task and on an abstract reasoning test. CM is associated to a slower verbal learning rate and to difficulties in the ability to discriminate and perceive relations between new elements.

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José Manuel; Canhão, Patrícia; Aguiar de Sousa, Diana

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has an incidence of 1.32/100,000/years in high-income countries, and higher in middle- and low-income countries. CVT is more frequent in infants and children young adults and females, especially during pregnancy/puerperium. CVT are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency because of the increased awareness and higher use of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for investigating patients with acute and subacute headaches and new onset seizures. CVT rarely present as a stroke syndrome. Their most frequent presentations are isolated headache, intracranial hypertension syndrome, seizures, a lobar syndrome and encephalopathy. The confirmation of the diagnosis of CVT relies on the demonstration of thrombi in the cerebral veins and/or sinuses by MR/MR venography or veno CT. The more frequent risk factors/associated conditions for CVT are genetic prothrombotic conditions, antiphospholipid syndrome and other acquired prothrombotic diseases, including cancer, oral contraceptives, puerperium and pregnancy, infections and trauma. The prognosis of CVT is in general favorable, as acute death rate is below 5% and only 15% of the patients remain dependent or die. Treatment in the acute phase includes management of the associated condition, anticoagulation with either low molecular weight or unfractionated heparin, treatment of intracranial hypertension, prevention of recurrent seizures and headache relief. In patients in severe condition on admission or who deteriorate despite anticoagulation, local thrombolysis or thrombectomy is an option. Decompressive surgery is lifesaving in patients with large venous infarcts or hemorrhage with impending herniation. After the acute phase, patients should anticoagulated for a variable period of time, depending on their inherent thrombotic risk. CVT patients may experience recurrent seizures. Prophylaxis with anti-epileptic drugs is recommended after the first seizure, in those with hemispheric lesions. There

  18. Discrimination of Swiss cheese from 5 different factories by high impact volatile organic compound profiles determined by odor activity value using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry and odor threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kaitlyn; Wick, Cheryl; Castada, Hardy; Kent, Kyle; Harper, W James

    2013-10-01

    Swiss cheese contains more than 200 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been utilized for the analysis of volatile compounds in food products; however, it is not sensitive enough to measure VOCs directly in the headspace of a food at low concentrations. Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) provides a basis for determining the concentrations of VOCs in the head space of the sample in real time at low concentration levels of parts per billion/trillion by volume. Of the Swiss cheese VOCs, relatively few have a major impact on flavor quality. VOCs with odor activity values (OAVs) (concentration/odor threshold) greater than one are considered high-impact flavor compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize SIFT-MS concentrations in conjunction with odor threshold values to determine OAVs thereby identifying high-impact VOCs to use for differentiating Swiss cheese from five factories and identify the factory variability. Seventeen high-impact VOCs were identified for Swiss cheese based on an OAV greater than one in at least 1 of the 5 Swiss cheese factories. Of these, 2,3-butanedione was the only compound with significantly different OAVs in all factories; however, cheese from any pair of factories had multiple statistically different compounds based on OAV. Principal component analysis using soft independent modeling of class analogy statistical differentiation plots, with all of the OAVs, showed differentiation between the 5 factories. Overall, Swiss cheese from different factories was determined to have different OAV profiles utilizing SIFT-MS to determine OAVs of high impact compounds. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Racial/Ethnic Workplace Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Laura J.; Ornelas, India J.; Lyles, Courtney R.; Williams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Experiences of discrimination are associated with tobacco and alcohol use, and work is a common setting where individuals experience racial/ethnic discrimination. Few studies have evaluated the association between workplace discrimination and these behaviors, and none have described associations across race/ethnicity. Purpose To examine the association between workplace discrimination and tobacco and alcohol use in a large, multistate sample of U.S. adult respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey Reactions to Race Module (2004–2010). Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated cross-sectional associations between self-reported workplace discrimination and tobacco (current and daily smoking) and alcohol use (any and heavy use, and binge drinking) among all participants and stratified by race/ethnicity, adjusting for relevant covariates. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Among respondents, 70,080 completed the workplace discrimination measure. Discrimination was more common among black non-Hispanic (21%), Hispanic (12%), and other race respondents (11%) than white non-Hispanics (4%) (p<0.001). In the total sample, discrimination was associated with current smoking (risk ratio [RR]=1.32, 95% CI=1.19, 1.47), daily smoking (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.24, 1.61), and heavy drinking (RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01, 1.22), but not binge or any drinking. Among Hispanics, workplace discrimination was associated with increased heavy and binge drinking, but not any alcohol use or smoking. Workplace discrimination among black non-Hispanics and white Non-Hispanics was associated with increased current and daily smoking, but not alcohol outcomes. Conclusions Workplace discrimination is common, associated with smoking and alcohol use, and merits further policy attention given the impact of these behaviors on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25441232

  20. Perceived weight discrimination and obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina R Sutin

    Full Text Available Weight discrimination is prevalent in American society. Although associated consistently with psychological and economic outcomes, less is known about whether weight discrimination is associated with longitudinal changes in obesity. The objectives of this research are (1 to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of becoming obese (Body Mass Index≥30; BMI by follow-up among those not obese at baseline, and (2 to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of remaining obese at follow-up among those already obese at baseline. Participants were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community-dwelling US residents. A total of 6,157 participants (58.6% female completed the discrimination measure and had weight and height available from the 2006 and 2010 assessments. Participants who experienced weight discrimination were approximately 2.5 times more likely to become obese by follow-up (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.58-4.08 and participants who were obese at baseline were three times more likely to remain obese at follow up (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 2.06-4.97 than those who had not experienced such discrimination. These effects held when controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, education and when baseline BMI was included as a covariate. These effects were also specific to weight discrimination; other forms of discrimination (e.g., sex, race were unrelated to risk of obesity at follow-up. The present research demonstrates that, in addition to poorer mental health outcomes, weight discrimination has implications for obesity. Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity.

  1. Perceived Discrimination in LGBTIQ Discourse: A Typology of Verbal Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol Rojas Lizana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New within the field of Discourse Analysis, Perceived Discrimination (PD is the study of discourse that focuses on the perspective of the victims of discrimination. This article explores the experiences of verbal discrimination as reported by eighteen LGBTIQ participants during semi-structured, co-constructed interviews. Data were classified in order to develop a taxonomy of discrimination based on Mellor’s (2003, 2004. This taxonomy foregrounds two types of discrimination: verbal and behavioural. In this paper, I exemplify the forms of verbal discrimination encountered and offer an analysis of the discourse used in the construction of the experiences and of the effects reported. The results show that verbal discrimination is an overt phenomenon and that participants are stressed by the ever present possibility of facing it. Verbal discrimination is mainly triggered by a perceived transgression to the normalised standards of people’s behaviour, movements and look in a heterosexist society. It presents three subtypes: name calling, abuse and remarks. These subtypes are described through the analysis of keywords, effects and expressions (such as faggot, gay, dyke, queer, the pronoun ‘it’, religious comments and other remarks. The type of discrimination used was associated with the level of acquaintance perpetrators have with the experiencers; that is, name calling was used by people unknown to the victims while abuse and remarks by acquaintances and family members. Participants resorted to several discursive strategies to convey their intentions. They used mitigation strategies when wanting to minimize the experience, hedging and repetition were used for emphasis, and to convey urgency and pervasiveness. Metaphorical expressions related to internal or external injuries were also used to express the powerful effect of verbal discrimination on people.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A Zalenskaya

    Full Text Available Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy.To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7 treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC and non-inflammatory (NIC compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA.Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes.In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial screening of candidates prior

  3. Children's Perceptions of Gender Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christia Spears; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2004-01-01

    Children (N = 76; ages 5-10 years) participated in a study designed to examine perceptions of gender discrimination. Children were read scenarios in which a teacher determined outcomes for 2 students (1 boy and 1 girl). Contextual information (i.e., teacher's past behavior), the gender of the target of discrimination (i.e., student), and the…

  4. Housing Discrimination toward Blind Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom E. C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The study involving 68 persons who had advertised apartments for rent was designed to determine if housing discrimination exists toward blind persons. Results indicated that housing discrimination toward blind persons does exist, as nearly 40 percent of the Ss refused to rent the apartment to the blind second caller. (Author/SBH)

  5. Price Discrimination in Academic Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Patrick; Merz, Thomas E.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of price discrimination (charging different prices to different customers for same product) for 89 academic journals in 6 disciplines reveals: incidence of price discrimination rose between 1974 and 1984, increase in mean institutional (library) subscription price exceeded increase in mean individual subscription price. Journal list…

  6. Vibrotactile Discrimination of Musical Timbre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Frank A.; Ammirante, Paolo; Fels, Deborah I.

    2012-01-01

    Five experiments investigated the ability to discriminate between musical timbres based on vibrotactile stimulation alone. Participants made same/different judgments on pairs of complex waveforms presented sequentially to the back through voice coils embedded in a conforming chair. Discrimination between cello, piano, and trombone tones matched…

  7. Perceptions of Discrimination during Downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkey, Linda Kathryn

    1993-01-01

    Demonstrates that perceptions of ethnic discrimination during layoffs are moderately correlated with perceptions of selection fairness and information access during the layoff process. Shows that, in the company studied, both minority and majority ethnic group members felt equally discriminated against. (SR)

  8. Endophilia or exophobia: beyond discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feld, J.F.; Salamanca Acosta, N.; Hamermesh, D.

    2013-01-01

    The immense literature on discrimination treats outcomes as relative: One group suffers compared to another. But does a difference arise because agents discriminate against others—are exophobic—or because they favor their own kind—are endophilic? This difference matters, as the relative importance

  9. Perceived discrimination in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iris Andriessen; Henk Fernee; Karin Wittebrood

    2014-01-01

    Only available in electronic version There is no systematic structure in the Netherlands for mapping out the discrimination experiences of different groups in different areas of society. As in many other countries, discrimination studies in the Netherlands mostly focus on the experiences

  10. Discrimination against Muslim American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Karen J.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is ample evidence of discrimination toward Muslim Americans in general, there is limited information specific to Muslim American adolescents. The few existing studies specific to this age group suggest that Muslim American adolescents encounter much discrimination from teachers, school administrators, and classmates. This…

  11. Tacrolimus prevents murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are immunosuppressants frequently used in human organ transplantation. Tacrolimus is also reported to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. Here, we report that tacrolimus prevented the death from cerebral malaria of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57BL/6J mice, but not their death from malaria due to the high parasitaemia and severe anaemia. The mycophenolate mofetil-treated mice showed higher mortality from cerebral malaria and succumbed to malaria earlier than tacrolimus-treated littermates. Tacrolimus attenuated the infiltration of mononuclear cells including pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain. It appears to prevent murine cerebral malaria through the inhibition of cerebral infiltration of CD8+ T cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Scoliosis in Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1998-01-01

    The natural history and risk factors for progressive severe scoliosis were evaluated in 37 institutionalized spastic cerebral palsy patients followed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, and at Centers in Nagano, Japan.

  13. [Senile macula and cerebral functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offret, G; Dhermy, P

    1984-01-01

    Because of similarities in the physiology and histology of the intraocular and the cerebral circulations, a study of cerebral disorders in patients with senile macular choroidal degeneration (S.M.C.D.) was undertaken. Of 26 cases of S.M.C.D. with sufficient follow-up, 7 showed signs of cerebral disfunction. Types of problems most often found were inordinate disturbances of short-term memory, judgement, and social behavior. It appears that S.M.C.D. tends more to be associated with mental involution than with sensory-motor deficits. Various methods of investigating the cerebro-vascular circulation can be helpful in discussing causes of mental involution, including doppler ultrasound, echotomography Xemon 133 inhalation, positron emission tomography, C.T. scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance scanning. The physiopathology may involve relative cerebral ischemia, modification of neurotransmitters, and free radical formation, as well as immunologic factors. Specific treatment may one day become reality.

  14. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  15. Cerebral and Sinus Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The typical target INR is 2.0 to 3.0. One of the newer oral blood thinners (rivaroxaban [ ... the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention . Diagnosis and management of cerebral venous thrombosis: a statement for healthcare ...

  16. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa Rao; Vidyullatha; Subbalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cere...

  17. Parálisis cerebral :

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado Navarro, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    Se aborda el tema de la parálisis cerebral definiendo qué es, clasificando los tipos de parálisis dependiendo de la afectación y las características principales. Se explican algunos de sus tratamientos, se dan sistemas alternativos y/o aumentativos de comunicación para un alumno con PC (parálisis cerebral).

  18. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  19. Characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atmakuri RM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries where Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic, viral encephalitis and cerebral malaria are found in the same population, and parasitemia with Plasmodium falciparum is common in asymptomatic children. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to those with presumed viral encephalitis. Methods We studied the following CSF parameters: cell count, glucose, protein, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and adenosine deaminase (ADA levels, in children with cerebral malaria, with presumed viral encephalitis, and in control subjects who had a lumbar puncture after a febrile convulsion with postictal coma. Results We recruited 12 children with cerebral malaria, 14 children with presumed viral encephalitis and 20 controls prospectively, over 2 years in the Government General Hospital in Kakinada, India. Patients with cerebral malaria had significantly lower CSF glucose, and higher protein, LDH, CSF/blood LDH ratio and CSF ADA levels but a lower CSF/serum ADA ratio compared to controls (p Conclusion CSF/serum ADA ratio and CSF glucose levels were the best discriminators of cerebral malaria from presumed viral encephalitis in our study. Further studies are needed to explore their usefulness in epidemiological studies.

  20. Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT generates lots of high-dimensional sensor intelligent data. The processing of high-dimensional data (e.g., data visualization and data classification is very difficult, so it requires excellent subspace learning algorithms to learn a latent subspace to preserve the intrinsic structure of the high-dimensional data, and abandon the least useful information in the subsequent processing. In this context, many subspace learning algorithms have been presented. However, in the process of transforming the high-dimensional data into the low-dimensional space, the huge difference between the sum of inter-class distance and the sum of intra-class distance for distinct data may cause a bias problem. That means that the impact of intra-class distance is overwhelmed. To address this problem, we propose a novel algorithm called Hierarchical Discriminant Analysis (HDA. It minimizes the sum of intra-class distance first, and then maximizes the sum of inter-class distance. This proposed method balances the bias from the inter-class and that from the intra-class to achieve better performance. Extensive experiments are conducted on several benchmark face datasets. The results reveal that HDA obtains better performance than other dimensionality reduction algorithms.

  1. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  2. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  3. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  4. Risk factors for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvanand, S; Kapoor, S K; Reddaiah, V P; Singh, U; Sundaram, K R

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major cause of crippling in children, but it's etiology is poorly understood. This case control study was done to assess some of the identified risk factors for cerebral palsy, 125 cerebral palsy cases selected from hospital clinic and 125 age and sex matched neighbourhood controls, all aged less than 5 years and residing in Delhi (India) were studied. Information regarding antenatal, natal and postnatal period was collected by mother's interview, and wherever available, from hospital records with the study subjects. Most common type of cerebral palsy was spastic (88%). Quadriplegia was the commonest topographical subtype (86.4%). Birth asphyxia was found to be present in only 25.6% of cases. The commonest risk factor amongst cases was low birth weight (28.8%). The multivariate odds ratios (confidence limits) for the risk factors found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy were 36.1 (7.76-160) for birth asphyxia, 13.8 (4.95-38.3) for low birth weight, 37.4 (4.47-313) for neonatal convulsion, 23 (4.7-112) for neonatal jaundice, 14.4 (3.69-56.4) for neonatal infection, 24.9 (2.78-223) for instrument assisted delivery and 15.4 (1.57-152) for antepartum hemorrhage. Precipitate labour, caesarean section, twins, toxemia, breech delivery and head injury were not found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy. Thus birth asphyxia, low birth weight, neonatal convulsions, neonatal jaundice, neonatal infection, instrument assisted delivery and antepartum hemorrhage are significant risk factors for cerebral palsy.

  5. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  6. Epidemiologic associations with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael E; MacLennan, Alastair H; Gibson, Catherine S; McMichael, Gai L; Haan, Eric A; Broadbent, Jessica L; Goldwater, Paul N; Dekker, Gustaaf A

    2011-09-01

    To estimate epidemiologic risk factors for cerebral palsy. Data were collected by linkage to state-based perinatal repositories and cerebral palsy registers and using a maternal questionnaire. The cohort included 587 individuals with cerebral palsy and 1,154 non-cerebral palsy controls. The following factors were associated with cerebral palsy: recorded maternal infection during pregnancy (41.4% patients compared with 31.3% controls; odds ratio [OR] 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.26-1.91), small for gestational age ([birth weight less than third customized centile] 43.9% patients compared with 6.3% controls; OR 11.75, 6.25-22.08), gestational age less than 32 weeks (29.3% patients compared with 0.7% controls; OR 59.20, 28.87-121.38), multiple birth (OR 6.62, 4.00-10.95), a relative with cerebral palsy (OR 1.61, 1.12-2.32), breech position (13.7% patients compared with 6.0% controls; OR 2.48, 1.76-3.49), bleeding at any time in pregnancy (29.3% patients compared with 16.9% controls; OR 2.04, 1.61-2.58), male sex (58.8% patients compared with 45.8% controls; OR 1.68, 1.38-2.06), multiple miscarriage (7.7% patients compared with 3.5% controls; OR 2.30, 1.38-3.82), smoking (14.0% patients compared with 10.6% controls; OR 1.37, 1.02-1.85), and illicit drug use (3.3% patients compared with 1.5% controls; OR 2.22, 1.14-4.30). Factors not associated with cerebral palsy were "disappearing twin," diabetes, maternal body mass index, hypertension, alcohol consumption, anemia, maternal hypothyroidism, forceps or vacuum delivery, and maternal age. Preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, perinatal infection, and multiple birth present the largest risks for a cerebral palsy outcome. Reassuringly, upper respiratory tract and gastrointestinal infections during pregnancy were not associated with cerebral palsy. II.

  7. Covariance-enhanced discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peirong; Zhu, J I; Zhu, Lixing; Li, Y I

    Linear discriminant analysis has been widely used to characterize or separate multiple classes via linear combinations of features. However, the high dimensionality of features from modern biological experiments defies traditional discriminant analysis techniques. Possible interfeature correlations present additional challenges and are often underused in modelling. In this paper, by incorporating possible interfeature correlations, we propose a covariance-enhanced discriminant analysis method that simultaneously and consistently selects informative features and identifies the corresponding discriminable classes. Under mild regularity conditions, we show that the method can achieve consistent parameter estimation and model selection, and can attain an asymptotically optimal misclassification rate. Extensive simulations have verified the utility of the method, which we apply to a renal transplantation trial.

  8. Getting the Facts on Housing Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sara L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a guide for conducting investigations of housing discrimination complaints. Outlines interview questions, documentation procedures, procedures for establishing proof of discrimination, and evaluation techniques. (MK)

  9. CEREBRAL PALSY—Diagnosis in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Margaret Holden

    1961-01-01

    Definite diagnosis of cerebral palsy is usually possible during the first six months of life in the hemiplegic child, but in the paraplegic or quadriplegic it may not be clear until the second half of the first year or later. Diagnosis should include not only type, degree and extent of motor handicap, but also intelligence, personality factors, sensory deficits, seizures and other physical problems. Diagnosis depends on detecting deviations from normal growth and development, of being aware of a multitude of progressive and other lesions which may simulate, at least early, the “static” group of conditions characterized by motor deficit due to central nervous system disease. Management involves early positioning, use of special equipment (mainly improvised), sensory stimulation and experience, as well as motor training, evaluation of intelligence and special learning situations to assist in discrimination learning and lengthening of attention span. Nursery schools for mentally capable children from 18 months to 3 years of age assist in developing independence, maturity and growth of personality. Except for patients with very severe mental or physical involvement, competitive employment in adult life is not related so much to the physical handicap as to personality characteristics, traits which are formed in early years. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:13790560

  10. EU Law and Multiple Discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    In EU law, nationality and gender were the only equality issues on the legal agenda from the outset in 1958 and for about 40 years. Multiple discrimination was not addressed until the 1990's. The intersectionality approach which has been widely discussed outside Europe has mainly been used...... with a view to gendermainstreaming the fight against other kinds of discrimination (on grounds of ethnic origin, age, etc)....

  11. Handheld Sensor for UXO Discrimination:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Goods Properties Inc. (formerly Remington Arms Co.) is conducting an investigation for UXO on the 422-acre Lake Success Business Park property in... UXO Discrimination June 2006 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is...number. 1. REPORT DATE 01 JUN 2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Handheld Sensor for UXO Discrimination: Cost

  12. A laser pumped quantum discriminator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkin, L.A.; Fateev, G.P.; Pikhtelev, A.I.; Puzanov, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of laser pumping in a quantum discriminator employing alkaline metal vapors is investigated. A good qualitative correlation between computed and experimental relations of the quality parameter on the intensity of laser light is noted. It is demonstrated that the value of the quality parameter of the quantum discriminator with laser pumping may be increased by a factor of at least two compared to a traditional scheme.

  13. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ichord

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at 0.6/100,000/year, with 30–50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns. In childhood CSVT, acute infections of the head and neck such as mastoiditis are most common, followed by chronic underlying diseases such as nephrotic syndrome, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Signs and symptoms are also age related. Seizures and altered mental status are the commonest manifestations in newborns. Headache, vomiting, and lethargy, sometimes with 6th nerve palsy, are the most common symptoms in children and adolescents. Recent multicenter cohort studies from North America and Europe have provided updated information on risk factors, clinical presentations, treatment practices, and outcomes. While systemic anticoagulation is the most common specific treatment used, there are wide variations and many uncertainties even among experts concerning best practice. The treatment dilemma is especially pronounced for neonatal CSVT. This is due in part to the higher prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage among newborns on the one hand, and the clear evidence that newborns suffer greater long-term neurologic morbidity on the other hand. With the advent of widespread availability and acceptance of acute endovascular therapy for arterial ischemic stroke, there is renewed interest in this therapy for children with CSVT. Limited published evidence exists regarding the benefits and risks of these invasive therapies. Therefore, the authors of current guidelines advise reserving this therapy for children with progressive and severe disease who have failed optimal medical management. As research focused on childhood cerebrovascular disease continues to grow rapidly, the future prospects

  14. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  15. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  17. Effects of Hyperglycemia and Effects of Ketosis on Cerebral Perfusion, Cerebral Water Distribution, and Cerebral Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O’Donnell, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury. PMID:22498698

  18. Oral Microbial Profile Discriminates Breastfed from Formula-Fed Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif; Vestman, Nelly Romani; Claesson, Rolf; Öhman, Carina; Domellöf, Magnus; Tanner, Anne CR; Hernell, Olle; Johansson, Ingegerd

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the impact of diet on the oral microbiota of infants although diet is known to affect the gut microbiota. The aims of the present study were to compare the oral microbiota in breastfed and formula-fed infants, and investigate growth inhibition of streptococci by infant-isolated lactobacilli. Subjects and Methods 207 mothers consented to participation of their three-month old infants. 146 (70.5%) infants were exclusively and 38 (18.4%) partially breastfed, and 23 (11.1%) were exclusively formula-fed. Saliva from all infants was cultured for Lactobacillus species, with isolate identifications from 21 infants. Lactobacillus isolates were tested for their ability to supress Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis. Oral swabs from 73 infants were analysed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) and by q-PCR for Lactobacilius gasseri. Results Lactobacilli were cultured from 27.8% of exclusively and partially breastfed infants, but not from formula-fed infants. The prevalence of 14 HOMIM detected taxa, and total salivary lactobacilli counts differed by feeding method. Multivariate modelling of HOMIM detected bacteria and possible confounders clustered samples from breastfed infants separately from formula-fed infants. The microbiota of breastfed infants differed based on vaginal or C-section delivery. Isolates of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. gasseri and Lactobacillus vaginalis inhibited growth of the cariogenic S. mutans and the commensal S. sanguinis: L. plantarum > L. gasseri > L. vaginalis. Conclusion The microbiota of the mouth differs between breastfed and formula-fed three-month-old infants. Possible mechanisms for microbial differences observed include species suppression by lactobacilli indigenous to breast milk. PMID:22955450

  19. Keratinocyte gene expression profiles discriminate sensitizing and irritating compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel, R.J. van de; Pennings, J.L.A.; Baken, K.A.; Pronk, T.E.; Boorsma, A.; Gottschalk, R.; Loveren, H. van

    2010-01-01

    Many chemicals can induce allergic contact dermatitis. Because evaluation of skin sensitizing potential by animal testing is prohibited for cosmetics, and screening of many chemicals is required within Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals, urgent need exists for

  20. Cerebral Syphilitic Gumma in Immunocompetent Man, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Sato, Hidenori; Osa, Morichika; Fujikura, Yuji; Kawana, Akihiko

    2018-02-01

    Although cerebral syphilitic gummas are generally considered to be rare manifestations of tertiary syphilis, many reports exist of early cerebral syphilitic gumma. Our finding of cerebral syphilitic gumma in an HIV-negative man within 5 months after syphilis infection suggests that this condition should be considered in syphilis patients who have neurologic symptoms.

  1. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  2. Cerebral toksoplasmose primaert diagnosticeret som tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M E; Skøt, J; Skriver, E B

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis as the presenting manifestation of AIDS are reported. The initial diagnoses were brain tumors because of the cerebral mass lesions which resembled glioblastoma. In the light of the increasing occurrence of AIDS, attention is drawn to cerebral toxoplasmosis...

  3. History and definition of delayed cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R Loch

    2013-01-01

    A list of the vasospasm meetings is provided. The early descriptions of angiographic vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia are presented. Selected advances in knowledge in the field and some controversies are described. A proposal for definitions of neurological deterioration due to delayed cerebral ischemia, of cerebral infarction, and of vasospasm is reviewed.

  4. Features to validate cerebral toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina da Cunha Correia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurotoxoplasmosis (NT sometimes manifests unusual characteristics. Methods We analyzed 85 patients with NT and AIDS according to clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, cranial magnetic resonance, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR characteristics. Results In 8.5%, focal neurological deficits were absent and 16.4% had single cerebral lesions. Increased sensitivity of PCR for Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the central nervous system was associated with pleocytosis and presence of >4 encephalic lesions. Conclusions Patients with NT may present without focal neurological deficit and NT may occur with presence of a single cerebral lesion. Greater numbers of lesions and greater cellularity in cerebrospinal fluid improve the sensitivity of PCR to T gondii.

  5. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... The population analyzed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analyzed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive...

  6. Detection and quantification of microRNA in cerebral microdialysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary brain injury accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality in patients with spontaneous aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but the pathogenesis and pathophysiology remain controversial. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important posttranscriptional regulators...... of complementary mRNA targets and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of other types of acute brain injury. Cerebral microdialysis is a promising tool to investigate these mechanisms. We hypothesized that miRNAs would be present in human cerebral microdialysate. METHODS: RNA was extracted and miRNA...... profiles were established using high throughput real-time quantification PCR on the following material: 1) Microdialysate sampled in vitro from A) a solution of total RNA extracted from human brain, B) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a neurologically healthy patient, and C) a patient with SAH; and 2...

  7. Detection of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by time-difference magnetic inductive phase shift spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencai Pan

    Full Text Available Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. A B-F distribution profile was designed according to the MIPSS under FB that can provide instantaneous diagnostic information about the cerebral hemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage.

  8. Risk factors for cerebral edema in diabetic ketoacidosis in a developing country: role of fluid refractory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Lokesh Kumar; Jayashree, Muralindharan; Muralindharan, Jayashree; Singhi, Sunit

    2012-03-01

    To study the clinical profile and risk factors of cerebral edema in children with diabetic ketoacidosis with specific reference to fluid refractory shock. Retrospective review of medical records. Twelve-bed pediatric intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Seventy-seven patients admitted to pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis over 5 yrs. Medical records were reviewed, and data with respect to patients' age, clinical features, biochemical profile (blood glucose, osmolality, electrolytes, urea, creatinine, arterial pH, PaCO(2), and HCO(3) at admission, 6-12 hrs, 24 hrs, and beyond 24 hrs), cerebral edema, presence of sepsis and shock, treatment details, and primary outcome in terms of survival or death were retrieved. Patients with and without cerebral edema were compared. Variables that were significant on univariate analysis were entered in a multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the predictors for cerebral edema. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated using SPSS version 15. Mean age of the patients was 5.6 (standard deviation, 3.8) years. Fifty-five (71.4%) patients had new-onset diabetes mellitus. Cerebral edema was seen in 20 patients (26%). Blood glucose, serum osmolality, and CO(2) values at admission and rate of decline in glucose and osmolality during the first 12 hrs were similar in the cerebral edema and noncerebral edema groups. On multiple logistic regression analysis, fluid refractory shock (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-41; p = .025) and presence of azotemia (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-16; p = .034) at admission were predictors for development of cerebral edema. Mortality in cerebral edema group was 25% as compared to 3% in the noncerebral edema group. Patients with fluid refractory shock and azotemia at admission had higher odds for development of cerebral edema. Initial blood glucose, effective osmolality, or decline in glucose and osmolality had

  9. Bounding solutions for cerebral aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhal, Julia Olegivna; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are weak spots in the vessel structure of the brain, which present a serious problem to the patient. Julia Mikhal and Bernard Geurts present the application of an Immersed Boundary (IB) method to the simulation of blood flow through such aneurysms. The goal is to understand the

  10. [Intraoperative diagnosis of cerebral gliomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N

    1980-01-01

    At the Burdenko Institute for Neurosurgery in Moscow, the following methods are used for the demarkation of cerebral gliomas: Beta-radiometry, rheometry = measurement of th electrical resistance of the cerebral tissue, staining of the tumour prior to the surgical intervention by means of a Serbinenko catheter, puncture biopsy as well as thermometry. The most frequently used techniques are beta-radiometry and rheometry. The methods are simple in application and the results are reliable. The accuracy of the localisation of a cerebral glioma by means of beta-radiometry is 98 per cent. For the impedance measurement a frequency of 1000 Hz is used. Liquids show the lowest and fibrous meningiomas the highest electrical resistance values. On an average the resistance of cerebral tumours is half as high as that of the average normal brain tissue. In almost all operations one tries to obtain an information about the extent and position of the glioma by means of brain puncture. A special needle probe has been designed to obtain tissue pieces for histological examinations. Experience has also been gained with ultrasonic probing and with temperature measurements of tumour and brain tissue. the interior of the tumours shows a 0.5 to 3 degrees C higher temperature.

  11. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  12. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Katoch Sabita; Devi Anjana; Kulkarni Prajakta

    2007-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP) patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  13. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  14. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Sabita; Devi, Anjana; Kulkarni, Prajakta

    2007-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP) patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  15. CT of cerebral hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.

    1988-12-01

    Six cases of cerebral hydatid disease (CHD) were seen in Kuwait over a period of 8 years. The typical CT appearance of a large well-defined spherical nonenhanced unilocular cyst was seen in four cases. Two unusual but characteristic types of calcification were seen, one in each of the remaining two cases.

  16. Intelligibility of 4-Year-Old Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Schueler, Brynn; Schultz, Laurel; DuHadway, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined speech intelligibility in typically developing (TD) children and 3 groups of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were classified into speech/language profile groups following Hustad, Gorton, and Lee (2010). Questions addressed differences in transcription intelligibility scores among groups, the effects of utterance…

  17. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório neste tipo de paciente. CONTEÚDO: O artigo aborda aspectos da paralisia cerebral como etiologia, classificação, fatores de risco, fisiopatologia, quadro clínico, diagnóstico, terapêuticas utilizadas bem como avaliação pré-operatória, medicação pré-anestésica, manuseio intra e pós-operatório, analgesia pós-operatória e dor crônica. CONCLUSÕES: O anestesiologista desempenha um papel importante na diminuição da morbidade e mortalidade anestésico-cirúrgica em pacientes portadores de paralisia cerebral. O conhecimento da fisiopatologia dos diferentes tipos de paralisia cerebral bem como das doenças associadas e suas terapêuticas é imprescindível, pois permite ao anestesiologista antecipar e prevenir complicações intra e pós-operatórias neste tipo de paciente.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La parálisis cerebral (PC es una enfermedad no progresiva consecuente de una lesión en el sistema nervioso central, llevando a un comprometimiento motor del paciente. El portador de PC, frecuentemente es sometido a procedimientos quirúrgicos debido a enfermedades usuales y situaciones particulares consecuentes de la parálisis cerebral. El objetivo de este artículo, fue revisar aspectos de la parálisis cerebral de interés para el anestesista, permitiendo un adecuado manoseo pre, intra y posoperatorio en este tipo de paciente. CONTENIDO: El artículo aborda aspectos de la parálisis cerebral como etiología, clasificación, factores de

  18. Intracranial Hypertension and Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Children With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Thresholds and Burden in Accidental and Abusive Insults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Ferguson, Nikki; Shein, Steven L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Luther, Jim; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Clark, Robert S B; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Adelson, P David; Bell, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The evidence to guide therapy in pediatric traumatic brain injury is lacking, including insight into the intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure thresholds in abusive head trauma. We examined intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure thresholds and indices of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure burden in relationship with outcome in severe traumatic brain injury and in accidental and abusive head trauma cohorts. A prospective observational study. PICU in a tertiary children's hospital. Children less than18 years old admitted to a PICU with severe traumatic brain injury and who had intracranial pressure monitoring. None. A pediatric traumatic brain injury database was interrogated with 85 patients (18 abusive head trauma) enrolled. Hourly intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure (in mm Hg) were collated and compared with various thresholds. C-statistics for intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure data in the entire population were determined. Intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion indices were formulated based on the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg and cerebral perfusion pressure less than 50 mm Hg, respectively. A secondary analysis was performed on accidental and abusive head trauma cohorts. All of these were compared with dichotomized 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. The models with the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg (C = 0.641; 95% CI, 0.523-0.762) and cerebral perfusion pressure less than 45 mm Hg (C = 0.702; 95% CI, 0.586-0.805) had the best fits to discriminate outcome. Two factors were independently associated with a poor outcome, the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg and abusive head trauma (odds ratio = 5.101; 95% CI, 1.571-16.563). As the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg increases by 1, the odds of a poor outcome increased by 4.6% (odds ratio = 1

  19. Employment Discrimination against LGBT Utahns

    OpenAIRE

    Rosky, Clifford; Mallory, Christy; Smith, Jenni; Badgett, M. V. Lee

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes data from a 2010 survey on the employment experiences of 939 LGBT people living in Utah.  The study found that 44% of LGB people and 66% of transgender people in Utah have experienced employment discrimination.  The data showed that employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity currently occurs in Utah, with close to 30% of LGB respondents and 45% of transgender respondents reporting that they experienced some form of workplace harassment on a w...

  20. Labor Market Discrimination: Vietnamese Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Yamane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnamese and East European immigrants face similar obstacles in the U.S. labor market. This provides for an interesting test of racial discrimination in the labor market. Does it make any difference if an immigrant is Asian or White? When Vietnamese immigrants are compared to East European immigrants, Vietnamese men earn 7-9% less than comparable East European men, with more discrimination among the less educated, and in the larger Vietnamese population centers like California. Vietnamese women earn as much as comparable East European women. Vietnamese immigrants, male and female, are much less likely to hold managerial and supervisory positions than comparable East European immigrants.

  1. Discriminative learning for speech recognition

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiadong

    2008-01-01

    In this book, we introduce the background and mainstream methods of probabilistic modeling and discriminative parameter optimization for speech recognition. The specific models treated in depth include the widely used exponential-family distributions and the hidden Markov model. A detailed study is presented on unifying the common objective functions for discriminative learning in speech recognition, namely maximum mutual information (MMI), minimum classification error, and minimum phone/word error. The unification is presented, with rigorous mathematical analysis, in a common rational-functio

  2. Profile of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy at Universitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Topographically, there are six types1: hemiplegia (one arm and leg on the same side of the body are affected), monoplegia (one limb is affected), diplegia (both legs more affected than arms), quadriplegia (all limbs, body and face symmetrically affected), triplegia (three limbs are affected, usually both legs and one arm), and ...

  3. Profile of children with cerebral palsy attending outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    morbidities were mental retardation (31%) and speech impairment (26.3%). About 50% of the children severely affected by CP fell within Levels 4 and 5 of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) of CP severity. It was concluded that ...

  4. Digital subtraction angiography in cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sin Young; Kim, Ji Hun; Suh, Hong Kil; Kim, Hyo Heon; Kwack, Eun Young; Lee, Il Seong [College of Medicine Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    The usefulness and radiographic findings of the angiography in cerebral infarction are well known. We attempted to evaluate the angiographic causes, findings, and the usefulness of DSA in cerebral infarction. The authors reviewed retrospectively DSA images of 51 patients who were diagnosed as having cerebral infarction by brain CT and/or MRI and clinical settings. DSA was performed in all 51 patients, and in 3 patients, conventional angiogram was also done. Both carotid DSA images were obtained in AP, lateral, oblique projections, and one or both vertebral DSA images in AP and lateral. The authors reviewed the patient's charts for symptoms, operative findings and final diagnosis, and analysed DSA findings of cerebral atherosclerosis with focus on 6 major cerebral arteries. Among the 51 patients of cerebral infarction 43 patients (84.3%) had cerebral atherosclerosis, 1 dissecting aneurysm, 1 moyamoya disease and 6 negative in angiogram. DSA findings of cerebral atherosclerosis were multiple narrowing in 42 patients (97.7%), tortuosity in 22 (51.2%), dilatation in 14, occlusion in 12, avascular region in 8, collaterals in 7, ulcer in 6, and delayed washout of contrast media in 3. In cerebral atherosclerosis, internal carotid artery was involved in 37 patients (86.0%), middle cerebral artery in 29 (67.4%) posterior cerebral artery in 28, anterior cerebral artery in 26, vertebral artery in 22, and basilar artery in 15. Intracranial involvement of cerebral atherosclerosis (64.9%) was more common than extracranial involvement (16.2%). In cerebral infarction MRA may be the screening test, but for more precise evaluation of vascular abnormality and its extent, DSA should be considered.

  5. Lipid profile in cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togha, Mansoureh; Gheini, Mohamad Reza; Ahmadi, Babak; Khashaiar, Patricia; Razeghi, Soodeh

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the lipid profile have been suggested as a risk factor for developing ischemic stroke. Their role in intra-cerebral hemorrhage, however, is not clear. The present study was designed to evaluate the lipid profile levels of patients who had experienced an acute stroke during the first 24-hour and to compare these levels in different patients suffering from the stroke, either hemorrhagic or ischemic, and healthy individuals. In this cross-sectional study, 258 consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to the neurology department of our center during September 2006 and September 2007 were studied. As for the control group, 187 apparently healthy subjects living in the same community and matched for age and sex were selected. Lipid profile was measured and compared between the three groups. In the patients' group, 65 suffered from hemorrhagic stroke (group 1) and the other 193 had ischemic stroke (group 2). Except for TG values, there was no significant difference among the ischemic and hemorrhagic lipid profile. Age, cholesterol, and LDL influenced the risk of developing an ischemic stroke; TG was not reported as a risk factor or a protective one. While the comparison of data retrieved from patients suffering from hemorrhagic strokes with the controls, revealed LDL as the risk factor contributing to the development of ICH whereas TG was reported as a protective factor. It could be concluded that LDL level can be considered as a risk factor for both ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral events.

  6. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes and primary angiitis of the central nervous system: clinical, imaging, and angiographic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Aneesh B; Topcuoglu, Mehmet A; Fok, Joshua W; Kursun, Oguzhan; Nogueira, Raul G; Frosch, Matthew P; Caviness, Verne S

    2016-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) are invariably considered in the differential diagnosis of new cerebral arteriopathies. However, prompt and accurate diagnosis remains challenging. Here we compared the features of 159 RCVS to 47 PACNS patients and developed criteria for prompt bedside diagnosis. Recurrent thunderclap headache (TCH), and single TCH combined with either normal neuroimaging, border zone infarcts, or vasogenic edema, have 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing RCVS or RCVS-spectrum disorders. In patients without TCH and positive angiography, neuroimaging can discriminate RCVS (no lesion) from PACNS (deep/brainstem infarcts). Ann Neurol 2016;79:882-894. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  7. Imaging experimental cerebral malaria in vivo: significant role of ischemic brain edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Viola, Angèle; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Duhamel, Guillaume; Kober, Frank; Ibarrola, Danielle; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Coltel, Nicolas; Gharib, Bouchra; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2005-08-10

    The first in vivo magnetic resonance study of experimental cerebral malaria is presented. Cerebral involvement is a lethal complication of malaria. To explore the brain of susceptible mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, multimodal magnetic resonance techniques were applied (imaging, diffusion, perfusion, angiography, spectroscopy). They reveal vascular damage including blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhages attributable to inflammatory processes. We provide the first in vivo demonstration for blood-brain barrier breakdown in cerebral malaria. Major edema formation as well as reduced brain perfusion was detected and is accompanied by an ischemic metabolic profile with reduction of high-energy phosphates and elevated brain lactate. In addition, angiography supplies compelling evidence for major hemodynamics dysfunction. Actually, edema further worsens ischemia by compressing cerebral arteries, which subsequently leads to a collapse of the blood flow that ultimately represents the cause of death. These findings demonstrate the coexistence of inflammatory and ischemic lesions and prove the preponderant role of edema in the fatal outcome of experimental cerebral malaria. They improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria and may provide the necessary noninvasive surrogate markers for quantitative monitoring of treatment.

  8. Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Halvor; Romi, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction. Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain), neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution) as dependent variables. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI) was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019). Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis. PMID:21915166

  9. MicroRNAs: a novel promising therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-li Min

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the molecular mechanism of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, we examined the microRNA (miRNA expression profile in rat cortex after focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using miRNA microarrays and bioinformatic tools to systematically analyze Gene Ontology (GO function classifications, as well as the signaling pathways of genes targeted by these differentially expressed miRNAs. Our results show significantly changed miRNA expression profiles in the reperfusion period after focal cerebral ischemia, with a total of 15 miRNAs up-regulated and 44 miRNAs down-regulated. Target genes of these differentially expressed miRNAs were mainly involved in metabolic and cellular processes, which were identified as hub nodes of a miRNA-GO-network. The most correlated pathways included D-glutamine and D-glutamate metabolism, the renin-angiotensin system, peroxisomes, the PPAR signaling pathway, SNARE interactions in vesicular transport, and the calcium signaling pathway. Our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in the pathological process of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding miRNA expression and function may shed light on the molecular mechanism of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  10. Discriminant Analysis on a Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alan H.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a method for discriminant analysis which uses the multiple regression facilities offered by many microcomputer statistical packages. This method is illustrated with an ecological example using the MICROTAB statistical package on a BBC microcomputer. Compares these results with an analysis of the same data using SPSS X. (Author/CW)

  11. Contextual Advantage for State Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schmid

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Finding quantitative aspects of quantum phenomena which cannot be explained by any classical model has foundational importance for understanding the boundary between classical and quantum theory. It also has practical significance for identifying information processing tasks for which those phenomena provide a quantum advantage. Using the framework of generalized noncontextuality as our notion of classicality, we find one such nonclassical feature within the phenomenology of quantum minimum-error state discrimination. Namely, we identify quantitative limits on the success probability for minimum-error state discrimination in any experiment described by a noncontextual ontological model. These constraints constitute noncontextuality inequalities that are violated by quantum theory, and this violation implies a quantum advantage for state discrimination relative to noncontextual models. Furthermore, our noncontextuality inequalities are robust to noise and are operationally formulated, so that any experimental violation of the inequalities is a witness of contextuality, independently of the validity of quantum theory. Along the way, we introduce new methods for analyzing noncontextuality scenarios and demonstrate a tight connection between our minimum-error state discrimination scenario and a Bell scenario.

  12. Spatial layout affects speed discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1997-01-01

    We address a surprising result in a previous study of speed discrimination with multiple moving gratings: discrimination thresholds decreased when the number of stimuli was increased, but remained unchanged when the area of a single stimulus was increased [Verghese & Stone (1995). Vision Research, 35, 2811-2823]. In this study, we manipulated the spatial- and phase relationship between multiple grating patches to determine their effect on speed discrimination thresholds. In a fusion experiment, we merged multiple stimulus patches, in stages, into a single patch. Thresholds increased as the patches were brought closer and their phase relationship was adjusted to be consistent with a single patch. Thresholds increased further still as these patches were fused into a single patch. In a fission experiment, we divided a single large patch into multiple patches by superimposing a cross with luminance equal to that of the background. Thresholds decreased as the large patch was divided into quadrants and decreased further as the quadrants were maximally separated. However, when the cross luminance was darker than the background, it was perceived as an occluder and thresholds, on average, were unchanged from that for the single large patch. A control experiment shows that the observed trend in discrimination thresholds is not due to the differences in perceived speed of the stimuli. These results suggest that the parsing of the visual image into entities affects the combination of speed information across space, and that each discrete entity effectively provides a single independent estimate of speed.

  13. Preschool Children's Discrimination of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ellen; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Children's abilities to judge "who is older" without using size as a cue were studied. Five-year-olds were better able to discriminate age than four-year-olds but were not equal to adults. No significant sex differences were found. (Author/RD)

  14. Structural Discrimination and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    discrimination looms with the possibility of crash optimisation impulses in which a protective shield is cast over those individuals in which society may have a vested interest in prioritising or safeguarding. A stark dystopian scenario is introduced to sketch the contours whereby personal beacons signal...

  15. Epigenetics and cerebral organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Sheena Louise; Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Maria Michel, Tanja

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 in 68 children in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is characterized by impairments in social interactions and communication, restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors, and interests. Owing to disease compl...... of the art concerning knowledge on epigenetic changes in autism and how new, cutting edge expertise based on three-dimensional (3D) stem cell technology models (brain organoids) can contribute in elucidating the multiple aspects of disease mechanisms....... also play a role. Some studies indicate a set of candidate genes with different DNA methylation profiles in ASD compared to healthy individuals. Thus epigenetic alterations could help bridging the gene-environment gap in deciphering the underlying neurobiology of autism. However, epigenome......-wide association studies (EWAS) have mainly included a very limited number of postmortem brain samples. Hence, cellular models mimicking brain development in vitro will be of great importance to study the critical epigenetic alterations and when they might happen. This review will give an overview of the state...

  16. Maternal alcohol exposure during mid-pregnancy dilates fetal cerebral arteries via endocannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleverstov, Olga; Tobiasz, Ana; Jackson, J Scott; Sullivan, Ryan; Ma, Dejian; Sullivan, J Pierce; Davison, Steven; Akkhawattanangkul, Yada; Tate, Danielle L; Costello, Terry; Barnett, Stacey; Li, Wei; Mari, Giancarlo; Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N

    2017-06-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure often results in fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Mechanisms of fetal brain damage by alcohol remain unclear. We used baboons (Papio spp.) to study alcohol-driven changes in the fetal cerebral artery endocannabinoid system. Pregnant baboons were subjected to binge alcohol exposure via gastric infusion three times during a period equivalent to the second trimester of human pregnancy. A control group was infused with orange-flavored drink that was isocaloric to the alcohol-containing solution. Cesarean sections were performed at a time equivalent to the end of the second trimester of human pregnancy. Fetal cerebral arteries were harvested and subjected to in vitro pressurization followed by pharmacological profiling. During each alcohol-infusion episode, maternal blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) reached 80 mg/dL, that is, equivalent to the BAC considered legal intoxication in humans. Circulating anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) remained unchanged. Ultrasound studies on pregnant mothers revealed that fetal alcohol exposure decreased peak systolic blood velocity in middle cerebral arteries when compared to pre-alcohol levels. Moreover, ethanol-induced dilation was observed in fetal cerebral arteries pressurized in vitro. This dilation was abolished by the mixture of AM251 and AM630, which block cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, respectively. In the presence of AM251, the cannabinoid receptor agonist AEA evoked a higher, concentration-dependent dilation of cerebral arteries from alcohol-exposed fetuses. The difference in AEA-induced cerebral artery dilation vanished in the presence of AM630. CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNA and protein levels were similar in cerebral arteries from alcohol-exposed and control-exposed fetuses. In summary, alcohol exposure dilates fetal cerebral arteries via endocannabinoid receptors and results in an increased function of CB2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral bioimpedance for detection of cerebral edema in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwood, Barbara E; Dunster, Kimble R; Colditz, Paul B; Ward, Leigh C

    2002-07-26

    The association of sustained cerebral edema with poor neurological outcome following hypoxia-ischaemia in the neonate suggests that measurement of cerebral edema may allow early prediction of outcome in these infants. Direct measurements of cerebral impedance have been widely used in animal studies to monitor cerebral edema, but such invasive measurements are not possible in the human neonate. This study investigated the ability of noninvasive cerebral impedance measurements to detect cerebral edema following hypoxia-ischaemia. One-day-old piglets were anaesthetized, intubated and ventilated. Hypoxia was induced by reducing the inspired oxygen concentration to 4-6% O(2). Noninvasive cerebral bioimpedance was measured using gel electrodes attached to the scalp. Cerebral bioimpedance was also measured directly by insertion of two silver-silver chloride electrodes subdurally. Noninvasive and invasive measurements were made before, during and after hypoxia. Whole body impedance was measured to assess overall fluid movements. Intracranial pressure was measured continuously via a catheter inserted subdurally, as an index of cerebral edema. There was good agreement between noninvasive and invasive measurements of cerebral impedance although externally obtained responses were attenuated. Noninvasive measurements were also well correlated with intracranial pressure. Whole body impedance changes did not account for increases in noninvasively measured cerebral impedance. Results suggest that noninvasive cerebral impedance measurements do reflect intracranial events, and are able to detect cerebral edema following hypoxia-ischaemia in the neonate. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Rehabilitation of spasticity and related problems in childhood cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, P J

    2003-01-01

    Spasticity is one part of the upper motor neuron syndrome, but it is a widespread problem in cerebral palsy; it is debilitating, affects function and can lead to musculoskeletal complications. Significant advances have occurred in antispasticity management (and related musculoskeletal problems) in children with cerebral palsy during the past 5-10 years. Botulinum toxin A has been the most outstanding treatment advance; it is relatively long-lasting, easy to administer, reversible, has a favourable side-effect profile and is highly useful for focal spasticity. There is an emerging role for intrathecal baclofen in Australia. Despite being available and practised in North America for years, selective dorsal rhizotomy has not been popular in Australia. The use of orthopaedic surgery has significantly altered in recent years. There is still a place for oral drug treatment, including some newer agents and the potential for combination treatment with other modalities. The role of physical therapy in defining disability, assessing function, undertaking biomechanical assessment and providing mobility aids/casting/orthoses and motor training/stretching exercises is critical for the success of medical and surgical interventions. From an Australian perspective, the purpose of the present review is to provide a critical review of therapies available for spasticity associated with childhood cerebral palsy.

  19. Lipid Metabolism, Abdominal Adiposity, and Cerebral Health in the Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Meghann; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Fieremans, Els; Veraart, Jelle; Novikov, Dmitry S; Du, Xiaoming; Adhikari, Bhim; Fisseha, Feven; Bruce, Heather; Chiappelli, Joshua; Sampath, Hemalatha; Ament, Seth; O'Connell, Jeffrey; Shuldiner, Alan R; Hong, L Elliot

    2017-11-01

    To assess the association between peripheral lipid/fat profiles and cerebral gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in healthy Old Order Amish (OOA). Blood lipids, abdominal adiposity, liver lipid contents, and cerebral microstructure were assessed in OOA (N = 64, 31 males/33 females, ages 18-77). Orthogonal factors were extracted from lipid and imaging adiposity measures. GM assessment used the Human Connectome Project protocol to measure whole-brain average cortical thickness. Diffusion-weighted imaging was used to derive WM fractional anisotropy and kurtosis anisotropy measurements. Lipid/fat measures were captured by three orthogonal factors explaining 80% of the variance. Factor one loaded on cholesterol and/or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measurements; factor two loaded on triglyceride/liver measurements; and factor three loaded on abdominal fat measurements. A two-stage regression including age/sex (first stage) and the three factors (second stage) examined the peripheral lipid/fat effects. Factors two and three significantly contributed to WM measures after Bonferroni corrections (P < 0.007). No factor significantly contributed to GM. Blood pressure (BP) inclusion did not meaningfully alter the lipid/fat-WM relationship. Peripheral lipid/fat indicators were significantly and negatively associated with cerebral WM rather than with GM, independent of age and BP level. Dissecting the fat/lipid components contributing to different brain imaging parameters may open a new understanding of the body-brain connection through lipid metabolism. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  20. Endarterectomia e atrofia cortical cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Eduardo Belini Soares

    2016-01-01

    Resumo: O acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico (AVCi) é uma das principais causas de morte no Brasil e no mundo. Dentre as principais causas destaca-se a doença aterosclerótica, em especial, a formada do bulbo carotídeo. A mesma pode ser considerada sintomática quando é causadora de AVCi ou ataque isquêmico transitório. Todavia, sabe-se que as estenoses ditas assintomáticas, também levam a diminuição de fluxo sanguíneo cerebral. Idosos acima de 80 anos prevalência das estenoses assintomáticas...

  1. Random Whole Metagenomic Sequencing for Forensic Discrimination of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Smith, Renee J.; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations. PMID:25111003

  2. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia S Khodakova

    Full Text Available Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER; similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF; non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS; and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  3. Orthostatic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Syndrome (OCHOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eNovak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Orthostatic dizziness without orthostatic hypotension is common but underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study describes orthostatic cerebral hypoperfusion syndrome (OCHOS. OCHOS is defined by: 1 Abnormal orthostatic drop of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv during the tilt test; and 2 Absence of orthostatic hypotension, arrhythmia, vascular abnormalities, or other causes of abnormal orthostatic CBFv.Methods: This retrospective study included patients referred for evaluation of unexplained orthostatic dizziness. Patients underwent standardized autonomic testing including 10 minutes of tilt test. The following signals were monitored: heart rate, end tidal CO2, blood pressure and CBFv from the middle cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler. Patients were screened for OCHOS. Patients which fulfilled the OCHOS criteria were compared to age and gender matched controls.Results: From 1279 screened patients, 102 patients (60/42 women/men, age 51.1±14.9, range 19-84 years fulfilled criteria of OCHOS. There was no difference in baseline supine hemodynamic variables between OCHOS and the control group. During the tilt, mean CBFv decreased 24.1±8.2% in OCHOS versus 4.2±5.6% in controls (p<0.0001 without orthostatic hypotension in both groups. Supine mean blood pressure (OCHOS/controls, 90.5±10.6/91.1±9.4 mmHg, p=0.62 remained unchanged during the tilt (90.4±9.7/92.1±9.6 mmHg, p=0.2. End tidal CO2 and heart rate responses to the tilt were normal and equal in both groups.Conclusion: OCHOS is a novel syndrome of low orthostatic CBFv. Two main pathophysiological mechanisms are proposed including active cerebral vasoconstriction and passive increase of peripheral venous compliance. OCHOS may be a common cause of orthostatic dizziness.

  4. Copeptin Levels in Cerebral Infarction, Intracranial Hemorrhage and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Feyza; Gurger, Mehtap; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Atescelik, Metin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Ilhan, Nevin; Ilhan, Selcuk; Goktekin, Mehmet C

    2016-12-01

    To determine copeptin levels in patients with suspected intracranial events and to determine whether copeptin levels could be used in the discrimination of cerebral infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the emergency room. Blood samples were obtained from the patients prior to imaging to determine the levels of copeptin. Patients were divided into diagnostic groups after the imaging. One hundred and seventy-six participants, who were enrolled in the study, were as follows: 50 cerebral infarction (CI) patients (M/F: 24/26), 47 intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) patients (M/F: 27/20), 29 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients (M/F: 17/12) and 50 healthy controls. Differences and correlations between groups were analyzed. Plasma levels of copeptin in patients with CI, ICH, and SAH were 5.49 ng/dL (IQR 4.73 to 6.96), 4.50 ng/dL (IQR 3.04 to 9.77), and 5.90 ng/dL (IQR 3.11 to 13.26), respectively. It was found to be 2.0 ng/dL (IQR 1.57 to 2.5) in healthy volunteers. There was no significant correlation between copeptin levels and Intracerebral Hemorrhage Score (ICHS) (r = 0.231, p = 0.118). However, significant positive correlation was found between copeptin levels with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (r = 0.365, p = 0.009) and the BotterelHunt and Hess Scale (BHHS) (r = 0.590, p = 0.001). The copeptin levels of 41 (32.5%) patients who died were found to be significantly higher than those 85 (67.5%) patients who were discharged (p Copeptin levels in patients with CI, ICH, and SAH are significantly higher than healthy volunteers, but the plasma level of copeptin is not decisive in the discrimination of CI, ICH, and SAH.

  5. Discrimination and health in an English study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaher, M; Paul, Sheila; Lambert, Helen; Ahmad, Waqar; Paradies, Yin; Davey Smith, George

    2008-04-01

    In this study we examine the relationship between education, racial discrimination and health among white (n=227), African Caribbean (n=213) and Indian and Pakistani (n=233) adults aged between 18 and 59 years living in Leeds, England, as measured in a stratified population survey. Measures of discrimination included any physical attack, verbal abuse and a combined variable, any discrimination due to race, colour, ethnicity or sex. Analyses were conducted examining the relationship between education and discrimination, discrimination and health, and discrimination and health controlling for education. People educated above secondary level were more likely than people educated to secondary level or below to report being physically attacked, verbally abused and exposed to discrimination. People from minority ethnic groups (African Caribbean and Indian Pakistani) were more likely to be verbally abused and exposed to discrimination than the white group. Ethnicity and education interacted for African Caribbeans, such that respondents with post-school qualifications were more likely to report verbal abuse or any discrimination. There was no association between having been exposed to any kind of discrimination and having fair or poor health. Physical attack and any discrimination were associated with anxiety, worry and depression. The results remained unchanged when ethnicity and education were included in the models. Education and ethnicity were associated with differences in exposure to discrimination. In turn, exposure to discrimination was associated with higher levels of anxiety, worry or depression although there was no association between discrimination and health. The results support the contention that racial discrimination may play an important role in modifying the relationship between ethnicity, socioeconomic position and health. The counter-intuitive relationship between education and levels of reported discrimination in non-minority ethnic groups highlights

  6. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage.

  7. Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Nazli; Mayer, Stephan A

    2003-04-01

    To summarize new pathophysiologic insights and recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Important, newly recognized mediators of cerebral arterial spasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage include superoxide free radicals, ferrous hemoglobin (which acts as a nitric oxide scavenger), endothelins, protein kinase C, and rho kinase. Microvascular dysfunction and autoregulatory failure also has been an area of increasing research focus in recent years. New diagnostic modalities include measures of cerebral blood flow such as single-photon emission computed tomography and perfusion computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial brain oxygen tension probes, and jugular venous oxygen saturation monitors. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and microdialysis can detect tissue biochemical abnormalities, but these techniques have not found their way into routine clinical practice as of yet. In addition to nimodipine and hypertensive hypervolemic therapy, promising new treatments for vasospasm or its ischemic complications include magnesium sulfate, fasudil hydrochloride, tirilazad mesylate, erythropoietin, and induced hypothermia. Balloon angioplasty has emerged as the primary weapon for treating medically refractory ischemia from vasospasm and in many centers is being used as a first-line treatment or even prophylactically. The neurointensive care management of vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage has evolved significantly over the past 10 years, with many new diagnostic modalities and promising treatments now available. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of these new techniques and to further define the optimal management of this often devastating complication. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  8. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance...... imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N......-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0...

  9. Cerebral Edema and Cerebral Hemorrhages in Interleukin-10-Deficient Mice Infected with Plasmodium chabaudi

    OpenAIRE

    Sanni, Latifu A.; Jarra, William; Li, Ching; Langhorne, Jean

    2004-01-01

    During a Plasmodium chabaudi infection in interleukin-10 (IL-10) knockout mice, there is greater parasite sequestration, more severe cerebral edema, and a high frequency of cerebral hemorrhage compared with infection of C57BL/6 mice. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment ameliorated both cerebral edema and hemorrhages, suggesting that proinflammatory responses contributed to cerebral complications in infected IL-10−/− mice.

  10. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Neha Bansal MD; Anju Aggarwal MD, FIAP, MNAMS; M. M. A. Faridi MD, FIAP, MNAMS; Tusha Sharma PhD; B. D. Baneerjee PhD

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead leve...

  11. Assessment of the hand in cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Bhardwaj; S Raja Sabapathy

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the musculoskeletal manifestation of a nonprogressive central nervous system lesion that usually occurs due to a perinatal insult to the brain. Though the cerebral insult is static the musculoskeletal pathology is progressive. Some patients with cerebral palsy whose hands are affected can be made better by surgery. The surgical procedures as such are not very technically demanding but the assessment, decision-making, and selecting the procedures for the given patient make th...

  12. Within centre evaluation of hypercalcaemia discriminant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Friis; Conradsen, Knut

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic hypercalcaemia discriminant functions, discriminating between clinically significant and non-significant hypercalcaemia, were tested 5 years after their development in order to evaluate the impact of time on their diagnostic capacity. Two populations, consisting of 257 and 129 patients...

  13. Discriminating Yogurt Microstructure Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Møller, Flemming; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann

    2015-01-01

    The protein microstructure of many dairy products is of great importance for the consumers’ experience when eating the product. However, studies concerning discrimination between protein microstructures are limited. This paper presents preliminary results for discriminating different yogurt...

  14. Use of discriminant analysis to identify propensity for purchasing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Floriani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Properties usually represent a milestone for people and families due to the high added-value when compared with family income. The objective of this study is the proposition of a discrimination model, by a discriminant analysis of people with characteristics (according to independent variables classified as potential buyers of properties, as well as to identify the interest in the use of such property, if it will be assigned to housing or leisure activities such as a cottage or beach house, and/or for investment. Thus, the following research question is proposed: What are the characteristics that better describe the profile of people which intend to acquire properties? The study justifies itself by its economic relevance in the real estate industry, as well as to the players of the real estate Market that may develop products based on the profile of potential customers. As a statistical technique, discriminant analysis was applied to the data gathered by questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. Three hundred and thirty four responses were gathered. Based on this study, it was observed that it is possible to identify the intention for acquired properties, as well the purpose for acquiring it, for housing or investments.

  15. Coronary risk correlates with cerebral amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bruce R; Marchant, Natalie L; Jagust, William J; DeCarli, Charles C; Mack, Wendy; Chui, Helena C

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that vascular risk factors are amyloidogenic. Participants were 43 persons, most with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment. Vascular risk was quantified using the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile (FCRP) score. Cerebral amyloid was measured by [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET) and quantified with a Global PIB index, which is the average of distribution volume ratios in selected cortical regions of interest. In a bivariate model FCRP accounted for 16% of the variance in PIB index (p effect of FCRP was independent of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, which was also associated as expected with PIB. Carotid intima-media thickness was not associated with PIB index. Effects of individual FCRP component risk factors, cholesterol, and glycemic status on PIB index were all nonsignificant, suggesting an aggregate effect of risk factors. Although this is a correlational observation it may represent a causal relationship as there are multiple, plausible, amyloidogenic mechanisms of vascular risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Effect of labetalol on cerebral blood flow and middle cerebral arterial flow velocity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Schierbeck, Jens; Howardy, P

    1991-01-01

    The effect of labetalol, a combined alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, on the cerebral circulation was investigated in 7 normotensive subjects. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with the intravenous 133Xe method and mean flow velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery was determined...

  17. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  18. Cerebral hemodynamics in aging : the interplay between blood pressure, cerebral perfusion, and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in measurement techniques have made it possible to study dynamic changes in brain blood flow. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measures changes in cerebral blood flow-velocity in the larger cerebral arteries (e.g. the middle cerebral artery). Near infrared spectroscopy records changes

  19. Lipopolysaccharide infusion enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation without affecting cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Plovsing, Ronni R; Evans, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation in a h...... in a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during the early stages of sepsis....

  20. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  1. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    . They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  2. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-03-31

    High-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717 ± 123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21%; distal MCA, 6%; anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4%; ophthalmic artery, 2%; posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8%; and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with 'fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (Psystem.

  3. Late cerebral ischaemia after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Povlsen, G K

    2011-01-01

    Late cerebral ischaemia after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) carries high morbidity and mortality because of reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and subsequent cerebral ischaemia. This is associated with upregulation of contractile receptors in cerebral artery smooth muscles via the activation...... their sensitivity to endogenous agonists such as ET-1 and 5-HT by increasing their smooth muscle expression of receptors for these after SAH. This is associated with reduced CBF and neurological deficits. A number of signal transduction components mediating this receptor upregulation have been identified, including...

  4. Labor Mobility and Racial Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Deschamps; José de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of labor mobility on racial discrimination. We present an equilibrium search model that reveals an inverted U-shaped relationship between labor mobility and race-based wage differentials. We explore this relationship empirically with an exogenous mobility shock on the European soccer labor market. The Bosman ruling by the European Court of Justice in 1995 lifted restrictions on soccer player mobility. Using a panel of all clubs in the English first division from...

  5. Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jun; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and general framework called {\\it Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks} (MaxEnDNet), which integrates the max-margin structured learning and Bayesian-style estimation and combines and extends their merits. Major innovations of this model include: 1) It generalizes the extant Markov network prediction rule based on a point estimator of weights to a Bayesian-style estimator that integrates over a learned distribution of the weights. 2) It extends the ...

  6. DISCRIMINATION AGAINST MIGRANT WORKERS IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Badarulzaman, Muhammad Hafiz; Ayub, Zainal A; Yusoff, Zuryati M; Wahab, Harlida A

    2017-01-01

    AbstractMigrant workers are often discriminated against in almost every aspect of life. Discrimination against them is due to irrational dislike of them and also negative perception towards them. It is alleged that migrant workers contribute to the crimes hike in Malaysia. Using doctrinal research methodology, this article discusses direct and perceptive discrimination against them. This article concludes that physical discriminations are mostly happened because ineffective enforcement of the...

  7. Testing for Statistical Discrimination based on Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Lesner, Rune Vammen

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a model which incorporates the two most commonly cited strands of the literature on statistical discrimination, namely screening discrimination and stereotyping. The model is used to provide empirical evidence of statistical discrimination based on gender in the labour market. It is shown that the implications of both screening discrimination and stereotyping are consistent with observable wage dynamics. In addition, it is found that the gender wage gap decreases in tenure...

  8. Fairness Testing: Testing Software for Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Galhotra, Sainyam; Brun, Yuriy; Meliou, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This paper defines software fairness and discrimination and develops a testing-based method for measuring if and how much software discriminates, focusing on causality in discriminatory behavior. Evidence of software discrimination has been found in modern software systems that recommend criminal sentences, grant access to financial products, and determine who is allowed to participate in promotions. Our approach, Themis, generates efficient test suites to measure discrimination. Given a sche...

  9. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care Decisions Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young ... plan healthy meals. continue Step 3: Explore Young-Adult Education Young adults with cerebral palsy are entitled ...

  10. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  11. Gender discrimination in exam grading?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    2018-01-01

    Girls, on average, obtain higher test scores in school than boys, and recent research suggests that part of this difference may be due to discrimination against boys in grading. This bias is consequential if admission to subsequent education programs is based on exam scores. This study assesses t...... tendencies are in accordance with statistical discrimination as a mechanism for grading bias in essay writing and with gender-stereotyped beliefs of math being a male domain.......Girls, on average, obtain higher test scores in school than boys, and recent research suggests that part of this difference may be due to discrimination against boys in grading. This bias is consequential if admission to subsequent education programs is based on exam scores. This study assesses...... are scored twice (blind and non-blind). Both strategies use difference-in-differences methods. Although imprecisely estimated, the point estimates indicate a blind grading advantage for boys in essay writing of approximately 5-8% SD, corresponding to 9-15% of the gender gap in essay exam grades. The effect...

  12. Discriminating between explosions and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake, explosion, and a nuclear test data are compared with forward modeling and band-pass filtered surface wave amplitude data for exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination. The proposed discrimination method is based on the solutions of a double integral transformation in the wavenumber and frequency domains. Recorded explosion data on June 26, 2001 (39.212°N, 125.383°E) and October 30, 2001 (38.748°N, 125.267°E), a nuclear test on October 9, 2006 (41.275°N, 129.095°E), and two earthquakes on April 14, 2002 (39.207°N, 125.686°E) and June 7, 2002 (38.703°N, 125.638°E), all in North Korea, are used to discriminate between explosions and earthquakes by seismic wave analysis and numerical modeling. The explosion signal is characterized by first P waves with higher energy than that of S waves. Rg waves are clearly dominant at 0.05-0.5 Hz in the explosion data but not in the earthquake data. This feature is attributed to the dominant P waves in the explosion and their coupling with the SH components.

  13. Simultaneous Visual Discrimination in Asian Elephants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissani, Moti; Hoefler-Nissani, Donna; Lay, U. Tin; Htun, U. Wan

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments explored the behavior of 20 Asian elephants ("Elephas aximus") in simultaneous visual discrimination tasks. In Experiment 1, 7 Burmese logging elephants acquired a white+/black- discrimination, reaching criterion in a mean of 2.6 sessions and 117 discrete trials, whereas 4 elephants acquired a black+/white- discrimination in 5.3…

  14. Non-discrimination and equality of women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostland, Rolanda Carina

    2006-01-01

    Non-discrimination is considered to be a cornerstone of the human rights framework of the United Nations. Already in the UN Charter of 1945 it is stated that human rights should be promoted without discrimination as to, amongst other things, sex. This principle of non-discrimination on the ground of

  15. Experienced discrimination amongst European old citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; van Santvoort, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the experienced age discrimination of old European citizens and the factors related to this discrimination. Differences in experienced discrimination between old citizens of different European countries are explored. Data from the 2008 ESS survey are used. Old age is defined as

  16. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  17. Supervised non-negative tensor factorization for automatic hyperspectral feature extraction and target discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dylan; Bapst, Aleksander; Coon, Joshua; Pung, Aaron; Kudenov, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides a highly discriminative and powerful signature for target detection and discrimination. Recent literature has shown that considering additional target characteristics, such as spatial or temporal profiles, simultaneously with spectral content can greatly increase classifier performance. Considering these additional characteristics in a traditional discriminative algorithm requires a feature extraction step be performed first. An example of such a pipeline is computing a filter bank response to extract spatial features followed by a support vector machine (SVM) to discriminate between targets. This decoupling between feature extraction and target discrimination yields features that are suboptimal for discrimination, reducing performance. This performance reduction is especially pronounced when the number of features or available data is limited. In this paper, we propose the use of Supervised Nonnegative Tensor Factorization (SNTF) to jointly perform feature extraction and target discrimination over hyperspectral data products. SNTF learns a tensor factorization and a classification boundary from labeled training data simultaneously. This ensures that the features learned via tensor factorization are optimal for both summarizing the input data and separating the targets of interest. Practical considerations for applying SNTF to hyperspectral data are presented, and results from this framework are compared to decoupled feature extraction/target discrimination pipelines.

  18. Models of Cerebral-Body Perfusion and Cerebral Chemical Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Compartmental modelling, perfusion flux and pressure, interaction between cerebral, respiratory and heart syz 19. TRACT (Continue on reverse if niecesmay and...ZFB and -CB (0 < (18) Zp 3l where a (- 10000) Indicates the ratio of the vein-venous sinous to the cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier, and 03( = 1...mean venous sinous efflux. Is given by Q, = Q; a Q" = 750m.mlin. Because Q, Q; and Q; are a-priori known, and the mean head values h cC . hlp, h;,A

  19. Parenchymal microvascular systems and cerebral atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesztelyi, G; Finnegan, W; DeMaro, J A; Wang, J Y; Chen, J L; Fenstermacher, J

    1993-05-21

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are hypertensive, hyperactive, and hydrocephalic; furthermore SHR have smaller brain volume and weight than age-matched, normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). At 6-7 months of age, local cerebral glucose is sizably lower in SHR than WKY. The hypothesis that these several abnormalities of SHR lead to variations in cerebral microvascular bed morphology was tested in 6-7-month-old SHR and WKY by quantitating various parameters of small, intermediate, and large parenchymal microvessels (grouped by luminal diameter) in 21 brain areas. Within each rat strain, the microvascular bed properties such as vessel profile frequency (density) varied considerably among the 21 brain areas. In opposition to the hypothesis, mean luminal diameter as well as profile frequency, surface area, and luminal volume of the microvascular beds per unit tissue mass were virtually identical in each brain area of SHR and WKY for the three groups of microvessels. These findings coupled with the reports of less tissue per structure but similar density of neurons throughout the brain of SHR and WKY indicate that there are fewer neurons and less vascular tissue per brain structure in 6-7-month-old SHR than WKY; in addition, they suggest a linkage between the size of parenchymal microvascular beds and the surrounding nervous tissue.

  20. Tumor classification based on orthogonal linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiya; Zhang, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression profiles have great potential for accurate tumor diagnosis. It is expected to enable us to diagnose tumors precisely and systematically, and also bring the researchers of machine learning two challenges, the curse of dimensionality and the small sample size problems. We propose a manifold learning based dimensional reduction algorithm named orthogonal local discriminant embedding (O-LDE) and apply it to tumor classification. Comparing with the classical local discriminant embedding (LDE), O-LDE aims to obtain an orthogonal linear projection matrix by solving an optimization problem. After being projected into a low-dimensional subspace by O-LDE, the data points of the same class maintain their intrinsic neighbor relations, whereas the neighboring points of the different classes are far from each other. Experimental results on a public tumor dataset validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Association and discrimination of diesel fuels using chemometric procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Lucas J. [Michigan State University, Forensic Science Program, School of Criminal Justice, East Lansing, MI (United States); McIlroy, John W.; Waddell Smith, Ruth [Michigan State University, Forensic Science Program, School of Criminal Justice, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing, MI (United States); McGuffin, Victoria L. [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Five neat diesel samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and total ion chromatograms as well as extracted ion profiles of the alkane and aromatic compound classes were generated. A retention time alignment algorithm was employed to align chromatograms prior to peak area normalization. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients and principal components analysis were then employed to investigate association and discrimination among the diesel samples. The same procedures were also used to investigate the association of a diesel residue to its neat counterpart. Current limitations in the retention time alignment algorithm and the subsequent effect on the association and discrimination of the diesel samples are discussed. An understanding of these issues is crucial to ensure the accuracy of data interpretation based on such chemometric procedures. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  3. Doppler sonography to monitor flow in different cerebral arteries in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Roncari, S; Micieli, G; Bosone, D; Passatore, M

    2000-07-01

    Most of the transcranial Doppler (TCD) experimental studies on cerebral haemodynamics have been performed in the rabbit because of the similarity between its Willis circle and that of the human, but these studies have mainly been limited to the basilar artery. The present study was aimed at extending the use of TCD sonography to all other large cerebral arteries. In anaesthetised rabbits, these arteries were insonated from three different recording sites, i.e. top-cranial, suboccipital and orbital, using a two-channel pulsed Doppler device equipped with 4 and 8 MHz probes. First, discrimination between intra- and extracranial arteries was achieved through a standard 'rebreathing' test (hypercapnic-hypoxic stimulation). The distinctive blood velocity response patterns, reflecting the different extents of metabolic reactivity in intra- and extracranial territories, are described and discussed. Intracranial arteries were then identified on the basis of their response to ipsi- and contralateral common carotid artery occlusion. This procedure allowed recording from the following arteries: anterior common trunk, anterior cerebral, internal carotid, middle cerebral and basilar; the latter could be simultaneously monitored with any of the others. This study provides an experimental model allowing investigation of regional differences in the haemodynamic response to neurogenic and pharmacological stimuli.

  4. Testing for Statistical Discrimination based on Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesner, Rune Vammen

    This paper develops a model which incorporates the two most commonly cited strands of the literature on statistical discrimination, namely screening discrimination and stereotyping. The model is used to provide empirical evidence of statistical discrimination based on gender in the labour market....... It is shown that the implications of both screening discrimination and stereotyping are consistent with observable wage dynamics. In addition, it is found that the gender wage gap decreases in tenure but increases in job transitions and that the fraction of women in high-ranking positions within a firm does...... not affect the level of statistical discrimination by gender....

  5. Validity of gait parameters for hip flexor contracture in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang Hyeong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoas contracture is known to cause abnormal hip motion in patients with cerebral palsy. The authors investigated the clinical relevance of hip kinematic and kinetic parameters, and 3D modeled psoas length in terms of discriminant validty, convergent validity, and responsiveness. Methods Twenty-four patients with cerebral palsy (mean age 6.9 years and 28 normal children (mean age 7.6 years were included. Kinematic and kinetic data were obtained by three dimensional gait analysis, and psoas lengths were determined using a musculoskeletal modeling technique. Validity of the hip parameters were evaluated. Results In discriminant validity, maximum psoas length (effect size r = 0.740, maximum pelvic tilt (0.710, maximum hip flexion in late swing (0.728, maximum hip extension in stance (0.743, and hip flexor index (0.792 showed favorable discriminant ability between the normal controls and the patients. In convergent validity, maximum psoas length was not significantly correlated with maximum hip extension in stance in control group whereas it was correlated with maximum hip extension in stance (r = -0.933, p Conclusions Maximum pelvic tilt, maximum psoas length, hip flexor index, and maximum hip extension in stance were found to be clinically relevant parameters in evaluating hip flexor contracture.

  6. Localization and patterns of Cerebral dyschromatopsia: A study of subjects with prospagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Daniel; Corrow, Sherryse L; Corrow, Jeffrey C; Barton, Alistair R S; Duchaine, Brad; Barton, Jason J S

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral dyschromatopsia is sometimes associated with acquired prosopagnosia. Given the variability in structural lesions that cause acquired prosopagnosia, this study aimed to investigate the structural correlates of prosopagnosia-associated dyschromatopsia, and to determine if such colour processing deficits could also accompany developmental prosopagnosia. In addition, we studied whether cerebral dyschromatopsia is typified by a consistent pattern of hue impairments. We investigated hue discrimination in a cohort of 12 subjects with acquired prosopagnosia and 9 with developmental prosopagnosia, along with 42 matched controls, using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test. We found impaired hue discrimination in six subjects with acquired prosopagnosia, five with bilateral and one with a unilateral occipitotemporal lesion. Structural MRI analysis showed maximum overlap of lesions in the right and left lingual and fusiform gyri. Fourier analysis of their error scores showed tritanopic-like deficits and blue-green impairments, similar to tendencies displayed by the healthy controls. Three subjects also showed a novel fourth Fourier component, indicating additional peak deficits in purple and green-yellow regions. No subject with developmental prosopagnosia had impaired hue discrimination. In our subjects with prosopagnosia, dyschromatopsia occurred in those with acquired lesions of the fusiform gyri, usually bilateral but sometimes unilateral. The dyschromatopsic deficit shows mainly an accentuation of normal tritatanopic-like tendencies. These are sometimes accompanied by additional deficits, although these could represent artifacts of the testing procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple cerebral aneurysms of middle cerebral artery. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Nica1, Tatiana Rosca1, A. Dinca2, M. Stroi3, Mirela Renta4, A.V. Ciurea5

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cerebral aneurysms present awide variation in incidence with averages of13% at angiographic studies and 22.7% atautopsy.High blood pressue, cigarette smoking,stress and possible also age and female sexseem to be risk factors for multipleintracranial aneurysms (MIAn in patientsof working age who have suffered asubarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.Aneurysms were situated on the same sidein one-third of the patients with twoaneurysms and the most common site wasthe middle cerebral artery (MCA. Tomanage these challenging lesionsneurosurgeons must use all availableinnovations and advances, includingdiagnostic, technical and perioperativeadjuncts. The author presents a case ofmiddle age female, with two saccularaneurysms situated on the same side (rightMCA, who was operated in our clinic, 20days after first SAH episode, I grade onHunt/Hess scale. The angio MRI wasperformed before, and control DSangiography after operation. After pterionalapproach, the author used themagnification, microsurgical technics,temporal clip, and two permanent Yasargilcurved clips. A postoperative good recoveryenable the patient go to work and drive onemonth later.

  8. Cerebral oximetry in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Andresen, Bjørn; Plomgaard, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a major cause of death before 5 years of age and it is a major cause of neurodevelopmental impairment across the world. Preterm infants are most unstable during the transition between fetal and newborn life during the first days of life and most brain damage occurs...... in this period. The brain of the preterm infant is accessible for tissue oximetry by near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral oximetry has the potential to improve the long-term outcome by helping to tailor the support of respiration and circulation to the individual infant's needs, but the evidence is still lacking...

  9. Flow structures in cerebral aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Gambaruto, Alberto M; João, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of blood flow are commonly correlated to a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. In this work means to describe and characterise the flow field in the free-slip and no-slip domains are discussed in the context of cerebral aneurysms, reconstructed from in-vivo medical imaging. The approaches rely on a Taylor series expansion of the velocity field to first order terms that leads to a system of ODEs, the solution to which locally describes the motion of the flow. On perfor...

  10. Visual disorders in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Amita

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy children with cere-bral palsy were examined for aetiological factors responsible, type of disorder and ocular abnormalities. The overall inci-dence of ocular abnormalities was 68.69%, the highest frequency being of squint (35.7%. Other anomalies detected inclu-ded refractive errors (28.5%, optic atrophy (10% and coloboma (2.9%. Most children were spastic quadriplegics with asphyxia as the major aetiological factor. The study created an awareness amongst parents of these children. The visual status of those affected could be improved for imparting education and training in a better way.

  11. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in cerebral neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Harkany, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a widely expressed neuropeptide system originally discovered in the gut. Both cerebral and peripheral neurons as well as endocrine I-cells in the small intestine process proCCK to tyrosyl-O-sulfated and α-carboxyamidated peptides. Recently, we reported that gut endocrine I...... for nonsulfated CCK-8 with an antibody recognizing both sulfated and nonsulfated CCK. However, nonsulfated CCK immunoreactivity was stronger than that of sulfated CCK in cell bodies and weaker in nerve terminals. We conclude that only a small fraction of neuronal CCK is nonsulfated. The intracellular distribution...... of nonsulfated CCK in neurons suggests that they contribute only modestly to the CCK transmitter activity....

  12. Validating the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) questionnaire for use in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-Y; Cheng, C-C; Hung, J-W; Ju, Y-H; Lin, J-H; Lo, S-K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) questionnaire. We performed forward (into Chinese) and backward translation of the CP QOL-Child for: (1) the primary caregiver form (for parents of children with CP aged 4-12 years); and (2) the child self-report form (for children with cerebral palsy aged 9-12 years). Psychometric properties assessed included test-retest reliability, internal consistency, item discrimination, construct validity, and concordance between the forms of questionnaire. The Chinese CP QOL-Child was completed by 145 caregivers and 44 children. Excellent test-retest reliability and internal consistency were obtained. Item discrimination analysis revealed a majority of the items have moderate to good discriminating power. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated distinguishable domain structure as on the original English version. Significant associations were found between lower QOL and more severe motor disability. Consistent with the English version, the highest correlation between the primary caregiver and child forms on QOL was in the domain of functioning. Results of this study indicate that the Chinese CP QOL-Child appears to be valid for use in Mandarin-Chinese speaking children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Animal models of cerebral arterial gas embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a dreaded complication of diving and invasive medical procedures. Many different animal models have been used in research on cerebral arterial gas embolism. This review provides an overview of the most important characteristics of these animal models. The properties

  14. Ataxic cerebral palsy and genetic predisposition.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, G.

    1988-01-01

    It was calculated that in the 962 family members of 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy there were 75 (8%) with a history of neurodevelopmental disorder and 31 (3%) with a major congenital malformation. This was not significantly greater than expected, and does not support the hypothesis of a genetic non-Mendelian role in the aetiology of ataxic cerebral palsy.

  15. Cerebral emboli and depressive symptoms in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hardicre, J.; Byrne, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vascular depression hypothesis and our recent findings of increased frequency of spontaneous cerebral emboli in dementia suggest that such emboli may be involved in the causation of depressive symptoms in dementia. AIMS: To evaluate the association between spontaneous cerebral emboli

  16. Spontaneous peripheral gangrene following severe cerebral malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... phalanges of the right index and middle fingers and the distal phalanges of the great, second and middle toes of the right foot following cerebral malaria. Until now, there has been only five such cases of peripheral gangrene associated with 'cerebral' malaria reported in literature and all these were all from Southeast Asia.

  17. Fatal cerebral oedema in adult diabetic ketoacidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringhuizen, A.; Tjan, D.H.; Grool, A.; Vugt, R. van; Zante, A.R. van

    2010-01-01

    In this report, a case of adult onset fatal cerebral oedema as a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is described and confirmed at post-mortem pathological examination. The pathogenesis of cerebral oedema due to DKA is still unknown. Potential mechanisms include the administration of

  18. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this system...

  19. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only...

  20. OCULAR FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy is commonly associated with ocular abnormalities which often impact on their development and education. There is paucity of studies on this in Nigeria. We decided to study/ determine the prevalence of ocular abnormalities among children with cerebral palsy that attended the neurology clinic of University of ...

  1. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  2. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyngeraa, T. S.; Pedersen, L. M.; Mantoni, T.; Belhage, B.; Rasmussen, L. S.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Pott, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA)

  3. Precision of coherence analysis to detect cerebral autoregulation by near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, GH; Christensen, KB; Leung, TS

    2010-01-01

    Coherence between spontaneous fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and the cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy signal can detect cerebral autoregulation. Because reliable measurement depends on signals with high signal-to-noise ratio, we hypothesized that coherence is more precisely...... determined when fluctuations in ABP are large rather than small. Therefore, we investigated whether adjusting for variability in ABP (variabilityABP) improves precision. We examined the impact of variabilityABP within the power spectrum in each measurement and between repeated measurements in preterm infants....... We also examined total monitoring time required to discriminate among infants with a simulation study. We studied 22 preterm infants (GAABP within the power spectrum did not improve the precision. However, adjusting...

  4. Self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and bronchodilator response in African American youth with asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Sonia; Borrell, Luisa N.; Eng, Celeste; Nguyen, Myngoc; Thyne, Shannon; LeNoir, Michael A.; Burke-Harris, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Importance Asthma is a multifactorial disease composed of endotypes with varying risk profiles and outcomes. African Americans experience a high burden of asthma and of psychosocial stress, including racial discrimination. It is unknown which endotypes of asthma are vulnerable to racial/ethnic discrimination. Objective We examined the association between self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and bronchodilator response (BDR) among African American youth with asthma ages 8 to 21 years (n = 576) and whether this association varies with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level. Materials and methods Self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination was assessed by a modified Experiences of Discrimination questionnaire as none or any. Using spirometry, BDR was specified as the mean percentage change in forced expiratory volume in one second before and after albuterol administration. TNF-α was specified as high/low levels based on our study population mean. Linear regression was used to examine the association between self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and BDR adjusted for selected characteristics. An interaction term between TNF-α levels and self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination was tested in the final model. Results Almost half of participants (48.8%) reported racial/ethnic discrimination. The mean percent BDR was higher among participants reporting racial/ethnic discrimination than among those who did not (10.8 versus 8.9, p = 0.006). After adjustment, participants reporting racial/ethnic discrimination had a 1.7 (95% CI: 0.36–3.03) higher BDR mean than those not reporting racial/ethnic discrimination. However, we found heterogeneity of this association according to TNF-α levels (p-interaction = 0.040): Among individuals with TNF-α high level only, we observed a 2.78 higher BDR mean among those reporting racial/ethnic discrimination compared with those not reporting racial/ethnic discrimination (95%CI: 0.79–4.77). Conclusions We found BDR to be

  5. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, K. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases.

  6. Effect of policosanol on cerebral ischemia in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Policosanol is a mixture of higher aliphatic primary alcohols isolated from sugar cane wax, whose main component is octacosanol. An inhibitory effect of policosanol on platelet aggregation and cerebral ischemia in animal models has been reported. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of policosanol on cerebral ischemia induced by unilateral carotid ligation and bilateral clamping and recirculation in Mongolian gerbils. Policosanol (200 mg/kg administered immediately after unilateral carotid ligation and at 12- or 24-h intervals for 48 h significantly inhibited mortality and clinical symptoms when compared with controls, whereas lower doses (100 mg/kg were not effective. Control animals showed swelling (tissue vacuolization and necrosis of neurons in all areas of the brain studied (frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory tubercle, showing a similar injury profile. In the group treated with 200 mg/kg policosanol swelling and necrosis were significantly reduced when compared with the control group. In another experimental model, comparison between groups showed that the brain water content of control gerbils (N = 15 was significantly higher after 15 min of clamping and 4 h of recirculation than in sham-operated animals (N = 13, whereas policosanol (200 mg/kg (N = 19 significantly reduced the edema compared with the control group, with a cerebral water content identical to that of the sham-operated animals. cAMP levels in the brain of control-ligated Mongolian gerbils (N = 8 were significantly lower than those of sham-operated animals (N = 10. The policosanol-treated group (N = 10 showed significantly higher cAMP levels (2.68 pmol/g of tissue than the positive control (1.91 pmol/g of tissue and similar to those of non-ligated gerbils (2.97 pmol/g of tissue. In conclusion, our results show an anti-ischemic effect of policosanol administered after induction of cerebral ischemia, in two different experimental

  7. Cerebral astrocytoma in a sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjanikish, Ghasem; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Dezfoulian, Omid

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytoma as one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors is rarely reported in veterinary literature. A 7-year-old Persian Lori-Bakhtiari ewe was presented to the clinic with a two months history of progressive blindness, nystagmus to the right, bilaterally decreased pupillary reflexes, head pressing and paddling. At necropsy, a whitish well-circumscribed mass with dimensions of 3.50×2.50×1.50 cm was observed in the dorsal parietal lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere. Microscopically, the mass was well-circumscribed and highly cellular, consisted of round to elongated cells with scant and vacuolated cytoplasm with few, flaccid processes. The nuclei were round to oval with densely stippled chromatin and indistinct nucleoli. Immunohistochemical analyses showed positive staining for vimentin, S100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Definitive diagnosis of cerebral protoplasmic astrocytoma was made on the basis of the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. This type of neoplasm should be included in the differential diagnosis of CNS lesions in the sheep. PMID:29085617

  8. Neuroimaging patterns of cerebral hyperperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S.; Portnov, Yu; Semenov, A.; Korotkevich, A.; Kokov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after revascularization is a rare phenomenon associated with post-ischemic (reactive) hyperemia and acute pathological hyperperfusion. First described on perfusion CT as a very often moderate CBF increase, MTT/TTP decrease within 30% like a temporary effect, according to a short-time deterioration of neurological symptoms (vestibular ataxia - 58%, vegetative dysfunction - 100%, asthenic syndrome - 100%) in early postoperative period in patients with cardiac ischemia who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. The acute pathological hyperperfusion carotid revascularization is a casuistic phenomenon with two- or three-fold CBV and MTT/TTP increase and high hemorrhage risk. Besides, we detected similar exchanges via perfusion CT called benign hyperemia, which marks extension of MTT/TTP and an increase of CBV from 27% to 48% (average 30%), but with normal CBF-parameters, indicating that venous stasis in acute venous ischemic stroke due cerebral venous sinus-trombosis (68%), only 6% in cardioembolic stroke and appears never in arterial stroke. Territorial coincidence registered for perifocal of necrosis zones of benign hyperemia and vasogenic edema accompanied on MRI (DWI, ADC). Secondary hemorrhagic transformation registered for primary non-hemorrhagic venous stroke in 27%, only in 9% for arterial stroke and in 60% for cardioembolic stroke. Probably, congestion is an increasingly predisposing factor secondary hemorrhaging than necrosis.

  9. Cortical area in the rat that mediates visual pattern discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wörtwein, Gitta; Mogensen, Jesper; Williams, Gregg

    1994-01-01

    Neurobiologi, visuel discrimination, delayed alternation, rotte, inferotemporal cortex, artssammenligning......Neurobiologi, visuel discrimination, delayed alternation, rotte, inferotemporal cortex, artssammenligning...

  10. Effect of short-term maternal fasting in the third trimester on uterine, umbilical, and fetal middle cerebral artery Doppler indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aal, Diaa-Eldeen M; Shahin, Ahmed Y; Hamed, Hossam O

    2009-10-01

    To assess the effect of short-term maternal fasting on uterine, umbilical, and middle cerebral artery Doppler indices, and on maternal serum glucose levels and fetal behavior. Maternal serum glucose levels, fetal biophysical profiles, and uterine, umbilical, and middle cerebral artery Doppler indices were assessed in 110 healthy women in the third trimester of pregnancy after fasting for 10-12 hours and 2 hours after a balanced meal. Maternal serum glucose levels, nonstress test results, fetal breathing movements, and biophysical profile improved after a meal compared with after fasting for 10-12 hours. Uterine, umbilical, and middle cerebral artery Doppler indices were not significantly different after fasting and after a meal. Short-term maternal fasting during the third trimester of pregnancy has no effect on uterine, umbilical, or fetal cerebral artery Doppler indices, and has a transient but significant effect on maternal serum glucose levels and fetal behavior.

  11. Hand-held UXO Discriminator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperikova, E.; Smith, J.T.; Kappler, K.N.; Ratti, A.; Morrison, H.F.; Becker, A.

    2010-04-01

    With prior funding (UX-1225, MM-0437, and MM-0838), we have successfully designed and built a cart-mounted Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) and demonstrated its performance at various test sites (e.g., Gasperikova et al., 2007, 2009). It is a multi-transmitter multi-receiver active electromagnetic system that is able to discriminate UXO from scrap at a single measurement position, hence eliminates equirement of a very accurate sensor location. The cart-mounted system comprises of three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers (Smith et al., 2007). Receiver coils are located on ymmetry lines through the center of the system and see identical fields during the on-time of the pulse in all of the transmitter coils. They can then be wired in opposition to produce zero output during the n-ime of the pulses in three orthogonal transmitters. Moreover, this configuration dramatically reduces noise in the measurements by canceling the background electromagnetic fields (these fields are uniform ver the scale of the receiver array and are consequently nulled by the differencing operation), and by canceling the noise contributed by the tilt of the receivers in the Earth's magnetic field, and therefore reatly enhances receivers sensitivity to the gradients of the target.

  12. Children's discrimination of vowel sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Jeffry A.; Kluender, Keith R.; Evans, Julia

    2003-10-01

    Children's ability to discriminate sequences of steady-state vowels was investigated. Vowels (as in ``beet,'' ``bat,'' ``bought,'' and ``boot'') were synthesized at durations of 40, 80, 160, 320, 640, and 1280 ms. Four different vowel sequences were created by concatenating different orders of vowels for each duration, separated by 10-ms intervening silence. Thus, sequences differed in vowel order and duration (rate). Sequences were 12 s in duration, with amplitude ramped linearly over the first and last 2 s. Sequence pairs included both same (identical sequences) and different trials (sequences with vowels in different orders). Sequences with vowel of equal duration were presented on individual trials. Children aged 7;0 to 10;6 listened to pairs of sequences (with 100 ms between sequences) and responded whether sequences sounded the same or different. Results indicate that children are best able to discriminate sequences of intermediate-duration vowels, typical of conversational speaking rate. Children were less accurate with both shorter and longer vowels. Results are discussed in terms of auditory processing (shortest vowels) and memory (longest vowels). [Research supported by NIDCD DC-05263, DC-04072, and DC-005650.

  13. Anticipated discrimination among people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçok, A; Brohan, E; Rose, D; Sartorius, N; Leese, M; Yoon, C K; Plooy, A; Ertekin, B A; Milev, R; Thornicroft, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of anticipated discrimination in people with schizophrenia (n = 732) from 27 countries in the International Study of Discrimination and Stigma Outcomes (INDIGO). Anticipated discrimination was assessed through four questions of Discrimination and Stigma Scale. Twenty-five individuals were identified at each site who were reasonably representative of all such treated cases within the local area. Sixty-four per cent of the participants reported that they had stopped themselves from applying for work, training or education because of anticipated discrimination. Seventy-two per cent of them reported that they felt the need to conceal their diagnosis. Expecting to be avoided by others who know about their diagnosis was highly associated with decisions to conceal their diagnosis. Those who concealed their diagnosis were younger and more educated. The participants who perceived discrimination by others were more likely to stop themselves from looking for a close relationship. Anticipated discrimination in finding and keeping work was more common in the absence than in the presence of experienced discrimination, and the similar findings applied to intimate relationships. This study shows that anticipated discrimination among people with schizophrenia is common, but is not necessarily associated with experienced discrimination. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Social identity change in response to discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzo, Cristina; de la Sablonnière, Roxane; Auger, Emilie; Caron-Diotte, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the conditions under which discrimination can lead to social identity changes among members of a minority group. Both positive and negative relations between perceptions of discrimination and social identity have previously been reported. To explain the conflicting results and understand the complex reality of members of stigmatized groups, we argue that group-based emotions (e.g., group-based dissatisfaction) and ambiguity of discrimination cues (i.e., overt vs. ambiguous) need to be considered. We hypothesized that perceptions of discrimination would play a moderating role between group-based dissatisfaction and social identity change in a context of ambiguous, but not of overt, discrimination. The sample was comprised of 151 Arab Muslims living in the province of Quebec. Participants read fictitious newspaper articles portraying either overt (n = 76) or ambiguous (n = 75) discrimination towards in-group members. Results revealed that for participants in the overt discrimination condition, only group-based dissatisfaction was positively associated with social identity change. In contrast, for the participants in the ambiguous discrimination condition, those who perceived little discrimination and felt low group-based dissatisfaction reported a decrease in social identity. However, those who perceived low group discrimination and felt high group-based dissatisfaction reported a positive social identity change. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Perceived age discrimination in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, Isla; Kneale, Dylan; de Oliveira, Cesar; Demakakos, Panayotes; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: to examine perceived age discrimination in a large representative sample of older adults in England. Methods: this cross-sectional study of over 7,500 individuals used data from the fifth wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a longitudinal cohort study of men and women aged 52 years and older in England. Wave 5 asked respondents about the frequency of five everyday discriminatory situations. Participants who attributed any experiences of discrimination to their age were treated as cases of perceived age discrimination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of experiencing perceived age discrimination in relation to selected sociodemographic factors. Results: approximately a third (33.3%) of all respondents experienced age discrimination, rising to 36.8% in those aged 65 and over. Perceived age discrimination was associated with older age, higher education, lower levels of household wealth and being retired or not in employment. The correlates of age discrimination across the five discriminatory situations were similar. Conclusion: understanding age discrimination is vital if we are to develop appropriate policies and to target future interventions effectively. These findings highlight the scale of the challenge of age discrimination for older adults in England and illustrate that those groups are particularly vulnerable to this form of discrimination. PMID:24077751

  16. Patients’ perceptions of discrimination during hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Patricia; Kolly, Véronique; Perneger, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To identify sources of perceived discrimination during hospitalization and examine the relationship of perceived discrimination to patient and hospital stay characteristics, and to patient ratings of care. Background  Patient experiences of discrimination within the health‐care system are associated with delays in care seeking, non‐adherence to medical advice and poorer health status. Most research to date has focused on race and ethnicity‐based discrimination, and few studies have included hospitalized patients. Methods  Questions about patients’ experiences of discrimination were added to a regular patient opinion survey conducted at the Geneva University Hospitals. Participants were 1537 adult residents of Switzerland discharged from the hospital between 15 February and 15 March 2007. Results  A total of 171 (11.1%) respondents reported at least one source of discrimination. Most (93, 54.4%) reported a single cause of discrimination. The most frequent causes of discrimination were language, age, nationality and having a disease that is viewed negatively by others. Fifteen percentage of non‐European respondents reported at least one of the following types of discrimination: language, nationality, religion and skin colour. Reporting discrimination from any cause was associated with higher Picker Patient Experience problem scores, and patients who reported discrimination were less likely to describe their care as very good or excellent and less likely to recommend the hospital to others. Conclusions  Patient experiences of discrimination during hospitalization are relatively frequent and are associated with lower patient ratings of care. Collection of data on patient experiences of discrimination may contribute to the development of interventions aimed at ensuring respectful, quality care for all patients. PMID:19788555

  17. Patients' perceptions of discrimination during hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Patricia; Kolly, Véronique; Perneger, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    To identify sources of perceived discrimination during hospitalization and examine the relationship of perceived discrimination to patient and hospital stay characteristics, and to patient ratings of care. Patient experiences of discrimination within the health-care system are associated with delays in care seeking, non-adherence to medical advice and poorer health status. Most research to date has focused on race and ethnicity-based discrimination, and few studies have included hospitalized patients. Questions about patients' experiences of discrimination were added to a regular patient opinion survey conducted at the Geneva University Hospitals. Participants were 1537 adult residents of Switzerland discharged from the hospital between 15 February and 15 March 2007. A total of 171 (11.1%) respondents reported at least one source of discrimination. Most (93, 54.4%) reported a single cause of discrimination. The most frequent causes of discrimination were language, age, nationality and having a disease that is viewed negatively by others. Fifteen percentage of non-European respondents reported at least one of the following types of discrimination: language, nationality, religion and skin colour. Reporting discrimination from any cause was associated with higher Picker Patient Experience problem scores, and patients who reported discrimination were less likely to describe their care as very good or excellent and less likely to recommend the hospital to others. Patient experiences of discrimination during hospitalization are relatively frequent and are associated with lower patient ratings of care. Collection of data on patient experiences of discrimination may contribute to the development of interventions aimed at ensuring respectful, quality care for all patients.

  18. The Sociology of Discrimination: Racial Discrimination in Employment, Housing, Credit, and Consumer Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pager, Devah; Shepherd, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Persistent racial inequality in employment, housing, and a wide range of other social domains has renewed interest in the possible role of discrimination. And yet, unlike in the pre-civil rights era, when racial prejudice and discrimination were overt and widespread, today discrimination is less readily identifiable, posing problems for social scientific conceptualization and measurement. This article reviews the relevant literature on discrimination, with an emphasis on racial discrimination in employment, housing, credit markets, and consumer interactions. We begin by defining discrimination and discussing relevant methods of measurement. We then provide an overview of major findings from studies of discrimination in each of the four domains; and, finally, we turn to a discussion of the individual, organizational, and structural mechanisms that may underlie contemporary forms of discrimination. This discussion seeks to orient readers to some of the key debates in the study of discrimination and to provide a roadmap for those interested in building upon this long and important line of research.

  19. Discrimination and subjective well-being: protective influences of membership in a discriminated category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilica, Karel

    2011-03-01

    Research reveals that discrimination has harmful effects on health and quality of life. Among the most frequent types of discrimination pertains gender and age discrimination. Research results show that discriminatory behaviours based on gender afflict predominantly women; age discrimination afflicts mainly older adults. At the same time, it has been found that members of these traditionally discriminated categories often use strategies that mitigate the effects of discrimination. Discrimination will have detrimental effects on subjective well-being. But its effects will be most harmful for persons who are not members of the traditionally discriminated categories. These hypotheses were tested on data from three waves of the European Social Survey that the Czech Republic also participated in. Data were analyzed in a series of multilevel random coefficients regression analyses with respondents nested within states and states nested within years of study. Both perceived gender discrimination and perceived age discrimination have negative effects on subjective well-being. However, gender discrimination had more harmful effects on the subjective well-being of men than women and age discrimination had the most harmful effects on the subjective well-being of people in their middle ages, not the elderly ones. Discrimination does not need to have most harmful effects on the quality of life of members of the categories that are discriminated against most often.

  20. A lumped parameter model of cerebral blood flow control combining cerebral autoregulation and neurovascular coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Martens, Esther G H J; Gommer, Erik D; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow regulation is based on a variety of different mechanisms, of which the relative regulatory role remains largely unknown. The cerebral regulatory system expresses two regulatory properties: cerebral autoregulation and neurovascular coupling. Since partly the same mechanisms play a role in cerebral autoregulation and neurovascular coupling, this study aimed to develop a physiologically based mathematical model of cerebral blood flow regulation combining these properties. A lumped parameter model of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery and its distal vessels was constructed. Blood flow regulation is exerted at the arteriolar level by vascular smooth muscle and implements myogenic, shear stress based, neurogenic, and metabolic mechanisms. In eight healthy subjects, cerebral autoregulation and neurovascular coupling were challenged by squat-stand maneuvers and visual stimulation using a checkerboard pattern, respectively. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured using transcranial Doppler, whereas blood pressure was measured by finger volume clamping. In seven subjects, the model proposed fits autoregulation and neurovascular coupling measurement data well. Myogenic regulation is found to dominate the autoregulatory response. Neurogenic regulation, although only implemented as a first-order mechanism, describes neurovascular coupling responses to a great extent. It is concluded that our single, integrated model of cerebral blood flow control may be used to identify the main mechanisms affecting cerebral blood flow regulation in individual subjects.

  1. A Descriptive Study on the Neonatal Morbidity Profile of Autism Spectrum Disorders, Including a Comparison with Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atladóttir, H. Ó.; Schendel, D. E.; Parner, E. T.; Henriksen, T. B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the profile of specific neonatal morbidities in children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and to compare this profile with the profile of children with hyperkinetic disorder, cerebral palsy, epilepsy or intellectual disability. This is a Danish population based cohort study, including all…

  2. ocular findings in children with cerebral palsy attending a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diplegia and spastic tetraplegia types. Beckung,. Hagberg and Uldall (2008: e187-92) classified them as Spastic unilateral cerebral palsy, Spastic bilateral cerebral palsy and dyskinetic cerebral palsy and ataxic cerebral palsy. In the spastic type there is stiffness and movement difficulties, in ataxic form there is a disturbance ...

  3. Optical characterization of two-layered turbid media for non-invasive, absolute oximetry in cerebral and extracerebral tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertan Hallacoglu

    Full Text Available We introduce a multi-distance, frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS method to measure the optical coefficients of two-layered media and the thickness of the top layer from diffuse reflectance measurements. This method features a direct solution based on diffusion theory and an inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We have validated our method through Monte Carlo simulations, experiments on tissue-like phantoms, and measurements on the forehead of three human subjects. The Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements have shown that, in ideal two-layered samples, our method accurately recovers the top layer thickness (L, the absorption coefficient (µ a and the reduced scattering coefficient (µ' s of both layers with deviations that are typically less than 10% for all parameters. Our method is aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral and extracerebral tissue of adult human subjects, where the top layer (layer 1 represents extracerebral tissue (scalp, skull, dura mater, subarachnoid space, etc. and the bottom layer (layer 2 represents cerebral tissue. Human subject measurements have shown a significantly greater total hemoglobin concentration in cerebral tissue (82±14 µM with respect to extracerebral tissue (30±7 µM. By contrast, there was no significant difference between the hemoglobin saturation measured in cerebral tissue (56%±10% and extracerebral tissue (62%±6%. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an inversion procedure in the frequency domain with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge is used for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  4. Block-diagonal discriminant analysis and its bias-corrected rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Herbert; Tong, Tiejun; Ng, Michael

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput expression profiling allows simultaneous measure of tens of thousands of genes at once. These data have motivated the development of reliable biomarkers for disease subtypes identification and diagnosis. Many methods have been developed in the literature for analyzing these data, such as diagonal discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and k-nearest neighbor methods. The diagonal discriminant methods have been shown to perform well for high-dimensional data with small sample sizes. Despite its popularity, the independence assumption is unlikely to be true in practice. Recently, a gene module based linear discriminant analysis strategy has been proposed by utilizing the correlation among genes in discriminant analysis. However, the approach can be underpowered when the samples of the two classes are unbalanced. In this paper, we propose to correct the biases in the discriminant scores of block-diagonal discriminant analysis. In simulation studies, our proposed method outperforms other approaches in various settings. We also illustrate our proposed discriminant analysis method for analyzing microarray data studies.

  5. Prosody discrimination by songbirds (Padda oryzivora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Nozomi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Maekawa, Kikuo; Hibiya, Junko

    2012-01-01

    In human verbal communication, not only lexical information, but also paralinguistic information plays an important role in transmitting the speakers' mental state. Paralinguistic information is conveyed mainly through acoustic features like pitch, rhythm, tempo and so on. These acoustic features are generally known as prosody. It is known that some species of birds can discriminate certain aspects of human speech. However, there have not been any studies on the discrimination of prosody in human language which convey different paralinguistic meanings by birds. In the present study, we have shown that the Java sparrow (Padda oryzivora) can discriminate different prosodic patterns of Japanese sentences. These birds could generalize prosodic discrimination to novel sentences, but could not generalize sentence discrimination to those with novel prosody. Moreover, unlike Japanese speakers, Java sparrows used the first part of the utterance as the discrimination cue.

  6. Prosody discrimination by songbirds (Padda oryzivora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Naoi

    Full Text Available In human verbal communication, not only lexical information, but also paralinguistic information plays an important role in transmitting the speakers' mental state. Paralinguistic information is conveyed mainly through acoustic features like pitch, rhythm, tempo and so on. These acoustic features are generally known as prosody. It is known that some species of birds can discriminate certain aspects of human speech. However, there have not been any studies on the discrimination of prosody in human language which convey different paralinguistic meanings by birds. In the present study, we have shown that the Java sparrow (Padda oryzivora can discriminate different prosodic patterns of Japanese sentences. These birds could generalize prosodic discrimination to novel sentences, but could not generalize sentence discrimination to those with novel prosody. Moreover, unlike Japanese speakers, Java sparrows used the first part of the utterance as the discrimination cue.

  7. Discriminative clustering via extreme learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gao; Liu, Tianchi; Yang, Yan; Lin, Zhiping; Song, Shiji; Wu, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Discriminative clustering is an unsupervised learning framework which introduces the discriminative learning rule of supervised classification into clustering. The underlying assumption is that a good partition (clustering) of the data should yield high discrimination, namely, the partitioned data can be easily classified by some classification algorithms. In this paper, we propose three discriminative clustering approaches based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). The first algorithm iteratively trains weighted ELM (W-ELM) classifier to gradually maximize the data discrimination. The second and third methods are both built on Fisher's Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA); but one approach adopts alternative optimization, while the other leverages kernel k-means. We show that the proposed algorithms can be easily implemented, and yield competitive clustering accuracy on real world data sets compared to state-of-the-art clustering methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning to Discriminate Face Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although visual feature leaning has been well studied, we still know little about the mechanisms of perceptual learning of complex object. Here, human perceptual learning in discrimination of in-depth orientation of face view was studied using psychophysics, EEG and fMRI. We trained subjects to discriminate face orientations around a face view (i.e. 30° over eight daily sessions, which resulted in a significant improvement in sensitivity to the face view orientation. This improved sensitivity was highly specific to the trained orientation and persisted up to six months. Different from perceptual learning of simple visual features, this orientation-specific learning effect could completely transfer across changes in face size, visual field and face identity. A complete transfer also occurred between two partial face images that were mutually exclusive but constituted a complete face. However, the transfer of the learning effect between upright and inverted faces and between a face and a paperclip object was very weak. Before and after training, we measured EEG and fMRI BOLD signals responding to both the trained and the untrained face views. Analyses of ERPs and induced gamma activity showed that face view discrimination training led to a larger reduction of N170 latency at the left occipital-temporal area and a concurrent larger decrease of induced gamma activity at the left frontal area with the trained face view, compared with the untrained ones. BOLD signal amplitude and MVPA analyses showed that, in face-selective cortical areas, training did not lead to a significant amplitude change, but induced a more reliable spatial pattern of neural activity in the left FFA. These results suggest that the visual system had learned how to compute face orientation from face configural information more accurately and that a large amount of plastic changes took place at a level of higher visual processing where size-, location-, and identity

  9. Increased cerebral water content in hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours, and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuropsychological testing revealed mainly attentional and executive cognitive dysfunction in HD. Voxel-based-morphometry showed only marginal alterations in the right inferior medial temporal lobe white matter in HD compared to controls. Marked increases in global brain water content were found in the white matter, specifically in parietal areas, in HD patients compared to controls. Although the global water content in the gray matter did not differ between the two groups, regional increases of brain water content in particular in parieto-temporal gray matter areas were observed in HD patients. No relevant brain hydration changes were revealed before and after hemodialysis. Whereas longer duration of dialysis vintage was associated with increased water content in parieto-temporal-occipital regions, lower intradialytic weight changes were negatively correlated with brain water content in these areas in HD patients. Worse cognitive performance on an attention task correlated with increased hydration in frontal white matter. In conclusion, long-term HD is associated with altered brain tissue water homeostasis mainly in parietal white matter regions, whereas the attentional domain in the cognitive dysfunction profile in HD could be linked to increased frontal white matter water content.

  10. School readiness of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, Frances E; Coleman, Andrea; Weir, Kelly A; Ware, Robert S; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-08-01

    To examine school readiness in preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP) on three of five domains compared with reported norms of children with typical development (CTD). A representative population of 151 preschool-age children with CP (87 males, 64 females; 131 [87%] with spasticity, 17 [11%] dyskinesia, 3 [4%] hypotonia) were assessed at 48 or 60 months corrected age. Children were functioning in the following Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels: I, 74 (49%); II, 17 (11%); III, 14 (9%); IV, 26 (17%); V, 20 (13%). Children's motor performance, self-care, and social function were assessed using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) and communication using the Communication and Symbolic Behaviour Scales Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP). Results were compared with a reference sample of CTD (PEDI CTD n=412; CSBS-DP CTD n=790). Linear regression was used to compare these data by functional severity. Children with CP had significantly lower PEDI scores in all domains than CTD. Self-care scores ranged from 0.5 to more than 4SD below CTD, motor performance was 2 to >4SD below CTD, and social function between 0.5 and >4SD below CTD. Fifty-five per cent of children demonstrated significantly delayed communication skills. Non-ambulant children displayed significantly lower scores than ambulant children. Preschool-age children with CP perform significantly below their peers in three of five key readiness-to-learn skill areas including mobility, self-care, social function, and communication abilities. Broader emphasis needs to be placed on multimodal screening and intervention to prepare children with CP for school entry. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  11. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome.

  12. Multimodal Discrimination of Alzheimer's Disease Based on Regional Cortical Atrophy and Hypometabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyuk Jin; Kwak, Kichang; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Structural MR image (MRI) and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) have been widely employed in diagnosis of both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) pathology, which has led to the development of methods to distinguish AD and MCI from normal controls (NC). Synaptic dysfunction leads to a reduction in the rate of metabolism of glucose in the brain and is thought to represent AD progression. FDG-PET has the unique ability to estimate glucose metabolism, providing information on the distribution of hypometabolism. In addition, patients with AD exhibit significant neuronal loss in cerebral regions, and previous AD research has shown that structural MRI can be used to sensitively measure cortical atrophy. In this paper, we introduced a new method to discriminate AD from NC based on complementary information obtained by FDG and MRI. For accurate classification, surface-based features were employed and 12 predefined regions were selected from previous studies based on both MRI and FDG-PET. Partial least square linear discriminant analysis was employed for making diagnoses. We obtained 93.6% classification accuracy, 90.1% sensitivity, and 96.5% specificity in discriminating AD from NC. The classification scheme had an accuracy of 76.5% and sensitivity and specificity of 46.5% and 89.6%, respectively, for discriminating MCI from AD. Our method exhibited a superior classification performance compared with single modal approaches and yielded parallel accuracy to previous multimodal classification studies using MRI and FDG-PET.

  13. Discrimination, race relations and the second generation

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Mary C.; Kasinitz, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In an increasingly diverse America, the experience of race and racial discrimination is too often described as if it is the same for all racial and ethnic groups. Utilizing the perspective on ethnic and racial groups developed by Zolberg that stresses their contingent and dynamic nature, we explore ethnic and racial discrimination in depth. Drawing on data from the New York Second Generation Study we describe the experience of prejudice and discrimination among eight groups of young adults-na...

  14. Discrimination problems of retirement age employees

    OpenAIRE

    Krinitsyna, Zoya Vasilievna; Mikhailova, T. R.; German, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that there is an increasing number of people of retirement age; however, they face great obstacles in the labor market. Different types of age discrimination are named: open and indirect discrimination. The analysis of internal and external factors of integration of retirement age people into the labor market is given. The main causes of discrimination of people of retirement age are shown. The basic problems in the labor market of elderly workers and possible ways of their soluti...

  15. The use of turning tasks in clinical gait analysis for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Philippe C; Stebbins, Julie; Theologis, Tim; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-02-01

    Turning while walking is a crucial component of locomotion that is performed using an outside (step) or inside (spin) limb strategy. The aims of this paper were to determine how children with cerebral palsy perform turning maneuvers and if specific kinematic and kinetic adaptations occur compared to their typically developing peers. Motion capture data from twenty-two children with cerebral palsy and fifty-four typically developing children were collected during straight and 90° turning gait trials. Experimental data were used to compute spatio-temporal parameters, margin of stability, ground reaction force impulse, as well as joint kinematics and kinetics. Both child groups preferred turning using the spin strategy. The group of children with cerebral palsy exhibited the following adaptations during turning gait compared to the typically developing group: stride length was decreased across all phases of the turn with largest effect size for the depart phase (2.02), stride width was reduced during the turn phase, but with a smaller effect size (0.71), and the average margin of stability during the approach phase of turning was reduced (effect size of 0.98). Few overall group differences were found for joint kinematic and kinetic measures; however, in many cases, the intra-subject differences between straight walking and turning gait were larger for the majority of children with cerebral palsy than for the typically developing children. In children with cerebral palsy, turning gait may be a better discriminant of pathology than straight walking and could be used to improve the management of gait abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral hypoxic ischemia at different cerebral oxygen saturations in piglets: amplitude-integrated EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Ding, Haiyan; Hou, Xinlin; Liu, Yunfeng; Ye, Datian

    2008-01-01

    the objective of present paper was to study the amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) in hypoxic ischemic (HI) animal models and to test the reliability of aEEG method when used to monitor cerebral injuries. HI animal models were constructed and classified into mild, moderate and severe cerebral oxygen saturation groups according to regional oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) in brains. Then aEEG waveforms were obtained from raw EEG data using digital signal processing. aEEG reflected cerebral functions consistently and accurately at different cerebral rSO(2) levels. aEEG waveforms rarely changed in the group of mild HI; they dropped but recovered in moderate HI group; and aEEG maintained very low after HI in the cases when severe HI happened. aEEG method could monitor cerebral functions directly, accurately and consistently. It is a reliable tool to continuously evaluate cerebral injuries.

  17. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  18. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  19. Discrimination of Arabic contrasts by American learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Al Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on second language perception of non-native contrasts. The study specifically tests the perceptual assimilation model (PAM by examining American learners’ ability to discriminate Arabic contrasts. Twenty two native American speakers enrolled in a university level Arabic language program took part in a forced choice AXB discrimination task. Results of the study provide partial evidence for PAM. Only two-category contrasts followed straightforwardly from PAM; discrimination results of category-goodness difference and both uncategorizable contrasts yielded partial support, while results of uncategorized versus categorized contrast discrimination provided counter-evidence to PAM.

  20. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value workplace discrimination, p value Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  1. Atypical radiological findings in cerebral hydatid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzagmout, Mohammed; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohammed E

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral hydatid disease is very rare, representing only 2% of all cerebral space occupying lesions. The diagnosis is usually based on a pathognomonic CT pattern. Exceptionally, the image is atypical raising suspicion of many differential diagnoses such as intracerebral infectious, vascular lesions, or tumors. We report 2 atypical cases of cerebral hydatid cysts diagnosed in a 21, and a 24-year-old woman. The CT scan results suggest oligodendroglioma in the first case and brain abscess in the second. An MRI was helpful in the diagnosis of the 2 cases. Both patients underwent successful surgery with a good outcome. The hydatid nature of the cyst was confirmed by histology in both cases.

  2. The serpentine mitral valve and cerebral embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker James

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Valvular strands, well-delineated filiform masses, attached to cardiac valve edges are associated with cerebral embolism and stroke. Strokes, caused by emboli from valvular strands, tend to occur among younger persons. In this case report a valvular strand, giving a peculiar serpentine appearance to the mitral valve is described. This mitral valvular strand was the only explanation for an episode of cerebral embolism, presenting with a transient right sided hemiparesis. It is proposed that a randomized study involving combined treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is warranted in young patients with valvular strands, presenting with a first episode of cerebral embolism.

  3. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O

    1987-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 56 patients before and one to four times after uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy. The findings were related to the ratio between internal carotid artery (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) mean pressures. Within the 1st...... postoperative day CBF increased by a median of 37% in the ipsilateral and 33% in the contralateral hemisphere. Later recordings showed a gradual return of CBF toward the preoperative level. Sixteen patients with an ICA/CCA pressure ratio below 0.7 showed a significantly more pronounced and longer-lasting flow......, occurred in the low pressure ratio group, while the hemispheric asymmetry on average was unchanged in the high pressure ratio group. This relative hyperemia was most pronounced 2 to 4 days following reconstruction. The marked hyperemia, absolute as well as relative, in patients with a low ICA/CCA pressure...

  5. Discrimination of Earthquake and Blast Seismicity in Western Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, N.; Law, A.; Yenier, E.; Reynen, A.; Baturan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recorded seismicity in western Alberta is caused by natural and induced earthquakes or blast events from mining and quarry operations. Accurate discrimination of earthquakes from blast events is crucial for evaluating recent seismicity with respect to the historical catalog and for assessing seismic hazards associated with naturally occurring or induced seismicity. In general, blast events are discriminated from earthquakes based on their proximity to active mines and quarries in addition to day-of-week and time-of-day timing patterns. In some parts of western Alberta, however, seismicity originates in regions with active mines, historical earthquake seismicity, and hydraulic fracturing operations. Based on timing patterns or event locations alone, natural or induced seismicity may be misidentified as mining activity. Several studies report that relative differences in Fourier or response spectra can be used to discriminate blast and earthquake events. Other studies report that the relative timing and amplitude of seismic phases may provide useful metrics for classifying blast events. Here we propose an alternative method that accounts for both differences in phase spectra and phase timing and amplitude. In particular, we evaluate the normalized time integral for characteristic functions of particle motion from confirmed blast and earthquake events recorded by regional Alberta seismic networks. We then use these time-integral profiles to re-classify events that are initially categorized as suspected blasts based on timing pattern and event location indicators.

  6. Infant discrimination of humanoid robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh eMatsuda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, extremely humanlike robots called androids have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm—a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android—two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants’ looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

  7. Infant discrimination of humanoid robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Goh; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extremely humanlike robots called "androids" have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants) were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm-a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android-two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants' looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body) was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

  8. Visual behaviours of neurologically impaired children with cerebral visual impairment: an ethological study

    OpenAIRE

    Porro, G.L.; Dekker, E.M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, O; Schilder, M.B.H.; Wittebol - Post, D.; Schenk-Rootlieb, A.J.F; Treffers, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Visual functions of neurologically impaired children with permanent cerebral visual impairment (CVI) can be difficult to determine. This study investigated the behavioural profile of CVI children by means of ethological observations in order to gain a better understanding of their visual functions.
METHODS—Video registrations of nine subjects who were unable to undergo more orthodox methods of visual function testing were observed and analysed by an ethologist.
RESULTS—A serie...

  9. Gender discrimination for women with diabetes mellitus in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Meskine, Djamila; El Gradechi, Aldjia

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the greatest global challenges. Its expansion varies from an area to another according to genetic, traditions, socio-economic conditions, and stress. In Algeria, as in other emerging countries undergoing an epidemiological transition, noncommunicable diseases are sharply increasing. After high blood pressure, DM is now the second metabolic disease. But are women more concerned by DM since obesity frequency is higher in females? Can we assert that there is a sort of sex discrimination for DM complications? To answer these questions we took into account published documents carried in Algerian population. But, as those were very scarce, we also considered newspapers articles, some documents published by health minister department, posters and oral communications of the Algerian Society of Endocrinology and Diabetology, and our clinical experience. We also have done a small survey to get our patients' opinions. At the first sight, it seems gender discrimination between men and women cannot exist since most epidemiological studies showed that both sexes are broadly and equally affected by DM, except for old aged females who are the most affected. When we reconsidered the problem, and when we compared past results to those obtained after the terrorism period, many studies showed a sort of gender difference. Apart from gestational DM, which is increasing sharply, some complications and death related to DM are prevailing in women. Coronary diseases and cerebral vascular accidents are more frequent in women too, especially the young ones and those suffering from DM. These complications are probably due to the recent and rapid modification in women's lifestyle with a strong reduction in physical activity, eating disorders, hormonal contraception, and high sensitivity to perceived stress secondary to the near past stressing life and/or to numerous responsibilities taken by women in the modern society.

  10. Gender discrimination for women with diabetes mellitus in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Chentli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the greatest global challenges. Its expansion varies from an area to another according to genetic, traditions, socio-economic conditions, and stress. In Algeria, as in other emerging countries undergoing an epidemiological transition, noncommunicable diseases are sharply increasing. After high blood pressure, DM is now the second metabolic disease. But are women more concerned by DM since obesity frequency is higher in females? Can we assert that there is a sort of sex discrimination for DM complications? Materials and Methods: To answer these questions we took into account published documents carried in Algerian population. But, as those were very scarce, we also considered newspapers articles, some documents published by health minister department, posters and oral communications of the Algerian Society of Endocrinology and Diabetology, and our clinical experience. We also have done a small survey to get our patients′ opinions. Results and Conclusion : At the first sight, it seems gender discrimination between men and women cannot exist since most epidemiological studies showed that both sexes are broadly and equally affected by DM, except for old aged females who are the most affected. When we reconsidered the problem, and when we compared past results to those obtained after the terrorism period, many studies showed a sort of gender difference. Apart from gestational DM, which is increasing sharply, some complications and death related to DM are prevailing in women. Coronary diseases and cerebral vascular accidents are more frequent in women too, especially the young ones and those suffering from DM. These complications are probably due to the recent and rapid modification in women′s lifestyle with a strong reduction in physical activity, eating disorders, hormonal contraception, and high sensitivity to perceived stress secondary to the near past stressing life and/or to numerous

  11. Gender discrimination for women with diabetes mellitus in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Meskine, Djamila; El Gradechi, Aldjia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the greatest global challenges. Its expansion varies from an area to another according to genetic, traditions, socio-economic conditions, and stress. In Algeria, as in other emerging countries undergoing an epidemiological transition, noncommunicable diseases are sharply increasing. After high blood pressure, DM is now the second metabolic disease. But are women more concerned by DM since obesity frequency is higher in females? Can we assert that there is a sort of sex discrimination for DM complications? Materials and Methods: To answer these questions we took into account published documents carried in Algerian population. But, as those were very scarce, we also considered newspapers articles, some documents published by health minister department, posters and oral communications of the Algerian Society of Endocrinology and Diabetology, and our clinical experience. We also have done a small survey to get our patients’ opinions. Results and Conclusion: At the first sight, it seems gender discrimination between men and women cannot exist since most epidemiological studies showed that both sexes are broadly and equally affected by DM, except for old aged females who are the most affected. When we reconsidered the problem, and when we compared past results to those obtained after the terrorism period, many studies showed a sort of gender difference. Apart from gestational DM, which is increasing sharply, some complications and death related to DM are prevailing in women. Coronary diseases and cerebral vascular accidents are more frequent in women too, especially the young ones and those suffering from DM. These complications are probably due to the recent and rapid modification in women's lifestyle with a strong reduction in physical activity, eating disorders, hormonal contraception, and high sensitivity to perceived stress secondary to the near past stressing life and/or to numerous responsibilities taken by

  12. Slow pupillary light responses in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and neurological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Elisa G; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Dijkstra, Linze J; Hielkema, Tjitske; Kos, Claire; Bos, Arend F; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-12-01

    Having observed slow pupillary light responses (PLRs) in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy, we retrospectively evaluated whether these were associated with specific brain lesions or unfavourable outcomes. We carried out neurological examinations on 30 infants at very high risk of cerebral palsy five times until the corrected age of 21 months, classifying each PLR assessment as normal or slow. The predominant reaction during development was determined for each infant. Neonatal brain scans were classified based on the type of brain lesion. Developmental outcome was evaluated at 21 months of corrected age with a neurological examination, the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Second Edition and the Infant Motor Profile. Of the 30 infants, 16 developed cerebral palsy. Predominantly slow PLRs were observed in eight infants and were associated with periventricular leukomalacia (p = 0.007), cerebral palsy (p = 0.039), bilateral cerebral palsy (p = 0.001), poorer quality of motor behaviour (p slow PLR in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and poorer developmental outcome. Slow PLR might be an expression of white matter damage, resulting in dysfunction of the complex cortico-subcortical circuitries. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Imaging mass spectrometry detection of gangliosides species in the mouse brain following transient focal cerebral ischemia and long-term recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn N Whitehead

    Full Text Available Gangliosides, a member of the glycosphingolipid family, are heterogeneously expressed in biological membranes and are particularly enriched within the central nervous system. Gangliosides consist of mono- or poly-sialylated oligosaccharide chains of variable lengths attached to a ceramide unit and are found to be intimately involved in brain disease development. The purpose of this study is to examine the spatial profile of ganglioside species using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI imaging (IMS following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO reperfusion injury in the mouse. IMS is a powerful method to not only discriminate gangliosides by their oligosaccharide components, but also by their carbon length within their sphingosine base. Mice were subjected to a 30 min unilateral MCAO followed by long-term survival (up to 28 days of reperfusion. Brain sections were sprayed with the matrix 5-Chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole, scanned and analyzed for a series of ganglioside molecules using an Applied Biosystems 4800 MALDI TOF/TOF. Traditional histological and immunofluorescence techniques were performed to assess brain tissue damage and verification of the expression of gangliosides of interest. Results revealed a unique anatomical profile of GM1, GD1 and GT1b (d18:1, d20:1 as well as other members of the glycosphingolipid family. There was marked variability in the ratio of expression between ipsilateral and contralateral cortices for the various detected ganglioside species following MCAO-reperfusion injury. Most interestingly, MCAO resulted in the transient induction of both GM2 and GM3 signals within the ipsilateral hemisphere; at the border of the infarcted tissue. Taken together, the data suggest that brain region specific expression of gangliosides, particularly with respect to hydrocarbon length, may play a role in neuronal responses to injury.

  14. Burnout Syndrome Profiles among Teachers (Perfiles del Síndrome de Burnout entre Profesores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Gonçalves Câmara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnout Syndrome (BS is a psychological reaction related to chronic occupational stress, both interpersonal and emotional. This study assessed three discriminant profiles of BS in teachers according to psychosocial factors. Profile 1 represents teachers with or without BS; Profile 2 represents teachers with BS or without BS in reference to the dimension guilt; and Profile 3 represents Profile 1 and Profile 2. The sample comprised 679 Brazilian primary school teachers. The instruments used were: sociodemographic data questionnaire; Spanish Burnout Inventory; and Battery of Psychosocial Risk Assessment to assess role ambiguity, social support, self-efficacy, autonomy, role conflict, and overload and intention to leave the profession. Differences between the groups were assessed using discriminant analysis. Results show that the variables that compose the discriminant profiles (Profile 1 and Profile 2 were intention to leave the profession, overload, role conflict, and role ambiguity, with self-efficacy discriminating teachers without BS in Profile 1. Profiles 1 and 2 were discriminated by two determinant factors: role conflict, and intention to leave the profession. The results suggest a need for interventions on psychosocial stressors to prevent burnout.

  15. Forensic discrimination of copper wire using trace element concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettman, Joshua R; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Saunders, Christopher P; Snyder, Deanna L; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2014-08-19

    Copper may be recovered as evidence in high-profile cases such as thefts and improvised explosive device incidents; comparison of copper samples from the crime scene and those associated with the subject of an investigation can provide probative associative evidence and investigative support. A solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for measuring trace element concentrations in high-purity copper was developed using standard reference materials. The method was evaluated for its ability to use trace element profiles to statistically discriminate between copper samples considering the precision of the measurement and manufacturing processes. The discriminating power was estimated by comparing samples chosen on the basis of the copper refining and production process to represent the within-source (samples expected to be similar) and between-source (samples expected to be different) variability using multivariate parametric- and empirical-based data simulation models with bootstrap resampling. If the false exclusion rate is set to 5%, >90% of the copper samples can be correctly determined to originate from different sources using a parametric-based model and >87% with an empirical-based approach. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the developed method for the comparison of copper samples encountered as forensic evidence.

  16. Enhanced contractility of intraparenchymal arterioles after global cerebral ischemia in rat - new insights into the development of delayed cerebral hypoperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Radziwon-Balicka, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    in the large arteries on the brain surface (pial arteries) after global cerebral ischemia. However, smaller arterioles inside the brain (parenchymal arterioles) are equally important in the regulation of cerebral blood flow and yet their pathophysiology after global cerebral ischemia is largely unknown...... of delayed cerebral hypoperfusion after global cerebral ischemia in combination with vascular changes of the pial vasculature. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  17. Cerebral schistosomiasis | Ravi | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although schistosomiasis (bilharzia) is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans, schistosomal infection of the nervous system is rare. This report is of an unusual case of primary cerebral schistosomiasis and describes its magnetic resonance imaging appearance.

  18. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  19. INTEGRATED REHABILITATION APPROACH IN CEREBRAL PALSY PATIENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bellomo, R.G; Barassi, G; Verì, N; Giannuzzo, G; Di Felice, P; Pecoraro, I; D’Ettole, S; Saggini, R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition determined by a damage occurred in the developing brain of children during the first year of life, resulting in cognitive alterations and motor disorders like spasticity...

  20. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  1. Resonancia magnetica cerebral: secuencias basicas e interpretacion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caballero, Ligia; Puentes, Sofia; Rivera, Diego Miguel

    2011-01-01

    La resonancia magnetica cerebral se ha establecido como una herramienta muy valiosa para el diagnostico de enfermedades neurologicas, debido a su capacidad de proveer excelente detalle y caracterizacion de los tejidos...

  2. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-01-01

    ...) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures...

  3. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biffi, Alessandro; Greenberg, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arteries, arterioles, and less often capillaries and veins of the central nervous system...

  4. Postishemic Cerebral Function and Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Aleksandrin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of massive blood loss on cerebral blood flow-function relationships was studied in rats in the postis-chemic period. Anxiety was examined in the raised cross-shaped labyrinth. Cerebral blood flow was registered by a laser Doppler flowmeter. One-hour massive blood flow substantially increased the level of anxiety in 75% of the rats following 7 and 20 days. There were no significant behavior changes in 25% of the animals. Experimental animals with preserved behavioral parameters showed cerebral blood flow resistance to ischemia and reperfusion while rats with increased anxiety were found to have delayed postischemic hypoperfusion. Thus, a relationship was found between the behavior of the rats and the resistance of cerebral blood flow to ischemia and reperfusion.

  5. Transcranial cerebral oximetry in random normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Mukesh; Stark, Jennifer; Dujovny, Manuel; Alp, M. Serdar; Widman, Ronald; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Near infrared optical spectroscopy is becoming a useful method for monitoring regional cerebral oxygenation status. The method is simple, reliable and noninvasive and the information which it provides is clinically significant in managing a growing number of neurological ailments. Use of this technique has been described previously by numerous authors. In the present study, regional cerebral oxygen saturation was measured at rest in 94 subjects randomly elected from a diverse population of individuals. This sample consisted of 38 males and 65 females, with the age ranging from 18 - 70. There were 68 light-skinned individuals and 35 with darker skin comprising various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was recorded as 67.14 plus or minus 8.84%. The association of the mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation in various group of individuals in relationship of their age, race, sex and skin color is examined.

  6. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, much genomic data and a novel body of knowledge, including the identification of microRNAs, are being increasingly accumulated for the development of laboratory testing cassettes for cerebral malaria prevention. Therefore, understanding of the underlying complex molecular basis of cerebral malaria is important for the design of strategy for cerebral malaria treatment and control.

  7. Gluconeogenesis and fasting in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thien, H.; Ackermans, M. T.; Weverling, G. J.; Dang Vinh, T.; Endert, E.; Kager, P. A.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In healthy subjects after an overnight fast, glucose production is for approximately 50% derived from glycogenolysis. If the fast is prolonged, glucose production decreases due to a decline in glycogenolysis, while gluconeogenesis remains stable. In cerebral malaria, glucose production

  8. The cerebral microvasculature in schizophrenia: a laser capture microdissection study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies of brain and peripheral tissues in schizophrenia patients have indicated impaired energy supply to the brain. A number of studies have also demonstrated dysfunction of the microvasculature in schizophrenia patients. Together these findings are consistent with a hypothesis of blood-brain barrier dysfunction in schizophrenia. In this study, we have investigated the cerebral vascular endothelium of schizophrenia patients at the level of transcriptomics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used laser capture microdissection to isolate both microvascular endothelial cells and neurons from post mortem brain tissue from schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. RNA was isolated from these cell populations, amplified, and analysed using two independent microarray platforms, Affymetrix HG133plus2.0 GeneChips and CodeLink Whole Human Genome arrays. In the first instance, we used the dataset to compare the neuronal and endothelial data, in order to demonstrate that the predicted differences between cell types could be detected using this methodology. We then compared neuronal and endothelial data separately between schizophrenic subjects and controls. Analysis of the endothelial samples showed differences in gene expression between schizophrenics and controls which were reproducible in a second microarray platform. Functional profiling revealed that these changes were primarily found in genes relating to inflammatory processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides preliminary evidence of molecular alterations of the cerebral microvasculature in schizophrenia patients, suggestive of a hypo-inflammatory state in this tissue type. Further investigation of the blood-brain barrier in schizophrenia is warranted.

  9. An Empirical Approach to Salary Discrimination: With Case Study of Sex Discrimination in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Julie A.; Murphy, Norman C.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical method to determine sex discrimination in salaries considered known differential variables which can legitimately be used to determine salary level apart from discrimination based on improper criteria, such as race, sex, religion, etc. This case study of a group of educators exemplifies salary discrimination based on sex. (Author/MV)

  10. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Soumita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM, respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP. An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced

  11. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  12. Chronic cerebral ischemia, neuroplasticity, possibilities of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Chukanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents current views on the pathogenetic mechanisms of cerebral ischemia. It discusses the role of neurotrophins in the processes of neuroplasticity. Experimental and clinical studies of the neuropeptide drug Cerebrolysin are reviewed. The authors describe in detail the results of the clinical trial and a health economic analysis of the effects of Cerebrolysin on the time course of clinical changes, progression, and risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia. 

  13. Cystatin C modulates cerebral beta-amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Stephan A; Herzig, Martin C; Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Kilger, Ellen; Selenica, Maj-Linda; Winkler, David T; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Levy, Efrat; Grubb, Anders; Jucker, Mathias

    2007-12-01

    The CST3 Thr25 allele of CST3, which encodes cystatin C, leads to reduced cystatin C secretion and conveys susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that overexpression of human cystatin C in brains of APP-transgenic mice reduces cerebral amyloid-beta deposition and that cystatin C binds amyloid-beta and inhibits its fibril formation. Our results suggest that cystatin C concentrations modulate cerebral amyloidosis risk and provide an opportunity for genetic risk assessment and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Treatment of cerebral aspergillosis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, J M; Fábrega, E; Casafont, F; Fariñas, M C; Salesa, R; Vázquez, A; Berciano, J

    1992-09-01

    We report the treatment of cerebral aspergillosis with amphotericin B, flucytosine, surgery, and liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) after a liver transplant. The patient died 2 months after cessation of antifungal therapy, as a consequence of multiple-system organ failure. The only relevant postmortem finding in the brain was a small, encapsulated abscess containing hyphae. This case indicates that L-AmB is an effective alternative drug for cerebral aspergillosis.

  15. Cerebral biomarkers in women with preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia and eclampsia are among the most common causes of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are no reliable means to predict eclampsia or cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia and knowledge of the brain involvement in preeclampsia is still limited. S100B and neuron specific enolase (NSE) are two cerebral biomarkers of glial- and neuronal origin respectively. They are used as predictors for neurological outcome after traumatic brain injuries and cardiac arres...

  16. Wearable wireless cerebral oximeter (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral oximeters measure continuous cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology noninvasively. It has been involved into operating room setting to monitor oxygenation within patient's brain when surgeons are concerned that a patient's levels might drop. Recently, cerebral oxygen saturation has also been related with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency (CCVI). Patients with CCVI would be benefited if there would be a wearable system to measure their cerebral oxygen saturation in need. However, there has yet to be a wearable wireless cerebral oximeter to measure the saturation in 24 hours. So we proposed to develop the wearable wireless cerebral oximeter. The mechanism of the system follows the NIRS technology. Emitted light at wavelengths of 740nm and 860nm are sent from the light source penetrating the skull and cerebrum, and the light detector(s) receives the light not absorbed during the light pathway through the skull and cerebrum. The amount of oxygen absorbed within the brain is the difference between the amount of light sent out and received by the probe, which can be used to calculate the percentage of oxygen saturation. In the system, it has one source and four detectors. The source, located in the middle of forehead, can emit two near infrared light, 740nm and 860nm. Two detectors are arranged in one side in 2 centimeters and 3 centimeters from the source. Their measurements are used to calculate the saturation in the cerebral cortex. The system has included the rechargeable lithium battery and Bluetooth smart wireless micro-computer unit.

  17. Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Mete Civelek; Ayçe Atalay

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral palsy diagnosis is a clinical one and it includes motor development delay, abnormal muscle tone and hyperreflexia. Muscle weakness, spasticity, loss of coordination, the continuation of the primitive reflexes and non-developed normal motor control are often seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is the velocity dependent increase in the resistance against passive muscle stretching. Spasticity treatment program should be established after detailed evaluation of degree an...

  18. Gender Discrimination and Women's Development in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    Gender is a common term where as gender discrimination is meant only for women, because females are the only victims of gender discrimination. Females are nearly 50 percent of the total population but their representation in public life is very low. Recognizing women's right and believing their ability are essential for women's empowerment and…

  19. Pattern recognition in bees : orientation discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Srinivasan, M.V.; Wait, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera, worker) were trained to discriminate between two random gratings oriented perpendicularly to each other. This task was quickly learned with vertical, horizontal, and oblique gratings. After being trained on perpendicularly-oriented random gratings, bees could discriminate

  20. Price Discrimination and Resale: A Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuchoudhary, Atin; Metcalf, Christopher; Pommerenke, Kai; Reiley, David; Rojas, Christian; Rostek, Marzena; Stodder, James

    2008-01-01

    The authors present a classroom experiment designed to illustrate key concepts of third-degree price discrimination. By participating as buyers and sellers, students actively learn (1) how group pricing differs from uniform pricing, (2) how resale between buyers limits a seller's ability to price discriminate, and (3) how preventing price…

  1. Discrimination against Women: Prevalence, Consequences, Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrine, Hope; Klonoff, Elizabeth A.

    This book reports two scientific studies of the frequency of discrimination against women and the physical and mental health impacts of discrimination. The preface and introduction contain an overview of the studies, which examined a sample of women selected to represent educational, racial, economic, and age diversity, and a summary of existing…

  2. Wage Discrimination against Handicapped Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William G.; Lambrinos, James

    1985-01-01

    The extent of discrimination against handicapped men and women is estimated in this article. Observed wage differentials are corrected for selectivity bias. Results indicate that almost one-third of the wage differential for men and close to one-half for women can be attributed to discrimination. Handicapped women are also subjected to sex…

  3. 7 CFR 15.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Extension Service participates. (2) Rural Electrification and Rural Telephone Programs. (i) Refusal or...; (ii) Refusal or failure by a borrower to extend, or discrimination by a borrower in the extension of... selection of schools and child-care institutions to participate in the Program. (ii) Discrimination by a...

  4. Updating the OMERACT Filter: Discrimination and Feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, George; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Tugwell, Peter; Boers, Maarten; Kirwan, John R.; Bingham, Clifton O.; Boonen, Annelies; Brooks, Peter; Conaghan, Philip G.; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Dougados, Maxime; Furst, Daniel E.; Gossec, Laure; Guillemin, Francis; Helliwell, Philip; Hewlett, Sarah; Kvien, Tore K.; Landewé, Robert B.; March, Lyn; Mease, Philip J.; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Simon, Lee; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M.

    2014-01-01

    The "Discrimination" part of the OMERACT Filter asks whether a measure discriminates between situations that are of interest. "Feasibility" in the OMERACT Filter encompasses the practical considerations of using an instrument, including its ease of use, time to complete, monetary costs, and

  5. Statistical Theories of Discrimination in Labor Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Dennis J.; Cain, Glen G.

    1977-01-01

    Economic discrimination in labor markets, different pay for workers of the same ability, is analyzed in several statistical models using data for black/white and male/female earnings. The conclusion is that statistical theories are unlikely to explain labor market discrimination. (MF)

  6. Discrimination among adults with craniofacial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to establish the level of perceived discrimination experienced by adults with congenital craniofacial conditions in Australia and to examine predictors of discrimination. Specifically, this study tested whether social support mediates the relationship between discrimination and health. Adults (n = 93) who had been treated at the Australian Craniofacial Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide for congenital craniofacial conditions (not including cleft lip and/or palate) completed questionnaires examining satisfaction with life, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, satisfaction with social support, and satisfaction with appearance. A substantial minority of adults with congenital craniofacial conditions reported that they experience discrimination almost every day in a range of areas. Higher reports of discrimination were related to older age, being male, and less education. Other factors related to higher discrimination included lower levels of satisfaction with life, self-esteem, satisfaction with appearance and mental quality of life, as well as higher levels of anxiety and depression. Social support partially mediated the relationship between discrimination and mental health outcomes. The current study shows that discrimination experiences continue into adulthood confirming the importance of ensuring patients are well supported both by psychosocial services as well as within their own social support networks.

  7. Infants' discrimination of happy and sad music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Ross; Gentile, Douglas A; Pick, Anne D

    2008-12-01

    Infants can detect information specifying affect in infant- and adult-directed speech, familiar and unfamiliar facial expressions, and in point-light displays of facial expressions. We examined 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-month-olds' discrimination of musical excerpts judged by adults and preschoolers as happy and sad. In Experiment 1, using an infant-controlled habituation procedure, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-month-olds heard three musical excerpts that were rated as either happy or sad. Following habituation, infants were presented with two new musical excerpts from the other affect group. Nine-month-olds discriminated the musical excerpts rated as affectively different. Five- and seven-month-olds discriminated the happy and sad excerpts when they were habituated to sad excerpts but not when they were habituated to happy excerpts. Three-month-olds showed no evidence of discriminating the sad and happy excerpts. In Experiment 2, 5-, 7-, and 9-month-olds were presented with two new musical excerpts from the same affective group as the habituation excerpts. At no age did infants discriminate these novel, yet affectively similar, musical excerpts. In Experiment 3, we examined 5-, 7-, and 9-month-olds' discrimination of individual excerpts rated as affectively similar. Only the 9-month-olds discriminated the affectively similar individual excerpts. Results are discussed in terms of infants' ability to discriminate affect across a variety of events and its relevance for later social-communicative development.

  8. Discrimination in Autism within Different Sensory Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Michelle; Passetti, Filippo

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that unusual visual processing in autism might stem from enhanced visual discrimination. Although there are also many anecdotal reports of auditory and tactile processing disturbances in autism these have received comparatively little attention. It is possible that the enhanced discrimination ability in vision in…

  9. 7 CFR 15d.2 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., religion, sex, age, national origin, marital status, familial status, sexual orientation, or disability, or... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 15d.2 Section 15d.2... THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15d.2 Discrimination prohibited. (a) No agency, officer...

  10. Sex Discrimination in a Paramedical Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zincone, Louis H., Jr.; Close, Frank A.

    1978-01-01

    Survey data from a national sample of physical therapists were used to investigate male-female income differences in the field. Results indicated salary differentials to be due both to discrimination and differences in productivity. Types of discrimination and how they affect employment productivity measures are examined. (MF)

  11. Mental illness - stigma and discrimination in Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their illness on the one side, and widespread stigma and discrimination on the other. Evidence from North America and paralleling findings from research in Western Europe suggest that stigma and discrimination are major problems in the community, with negative attitudes and behaviour towards people with mental illness ...

  12. Tunnel Diode Discriminator with Fixed Dead Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A solid state discriminator for the range 0.4 to 10 V is described. Tunnel diodes are used for the discriminator element and in a special fixed dead time circuit. An analysis of temperature stability is presented. The regulated power supplies are described, including a special negative resistance...

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Perceived discrimination and mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived discrimination and mental health disorders: The. South African Stress and Health study. Hashim Moomal, Pamela B Jackson, Dan J Stein, Allen Herman, Landon Myer, Soraya Seedat, Edith Madela-Mntla,. D R Williams. Discrimination includes actions (subtle or overt, direct or indirect) that limit the social, political ...

  14. Discrimination Report ESTCP Project #MM-0437

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperikova, Erika

    2008-10-01

    The FY06 Defense Appropriation contains funding for the 'Development of Advanced, Sophisticated, and Discrimination Technologies for UXO Cleanup' in the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The...problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed. The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs'. Significant progress has been made in discrimination technology. To date, testing of these approaches has been primarily limited to test sites with only limited application at live sites. Acceptance of discrimination technologies requires demonstration of system capabilities at UXO sites under real world conditions. FE Warren Air Force Base (AFB) in Cheyenne, WY is one such site. The demonstration objective was to determine the discrimination capabilities, cost and reliability of the Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) in discrimination of UXO from scrap metal in real life conditions. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performed a detection and discrimination survey of the Priority 1 area ({approx}5 acres) of the FE Warren AFB. The data included a system characterization with the emplaced calibration items and targets in the Geophysical Prove Out (GPO) area.

  15. Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Washington, DC.

    This brochure presents regulatory guidelines on sex discrimination with sections devoted to: general principles; sex as a bona fide occupational qualification; separate lines of progression and seniority systems; discrimination against married women; advertising job opportunities; employment agencies; pre-employment inquiries as to sex; the…

  16. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  17. Hydroacoustic Blockage Calibration for Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harben, P E; Matzel, E; Upton, Z; Pulli, J J

    2003-07-11

    The core focus of this hydroacoustic research is to develop a better understanding of hydroacoustic blockage to better predict those stations that can be used in discrimination analysis for any particular event. The research involves two approaches: (1) model-based assessment of blockage and (2) ground-truth data-based assessment of blockage. The goal is to reliably determine all hydroacoustic stations that can be brought to bear on a discrimination analysis from any event location in the world s oceans. An important aspect of this capability is to include reflected T-phases where they reliably occur since reflected T-phases can allow station utilization when the direct path is otherwise completely blocked. We have conceptually designed an approach to automate assessment procedures that will allow both model-based and data-based methodologies to be utilized and in the future, integrated. We have modified the HydroCAM model-based network assessment code to include variable density bathymetry grids. This will improve the reliability of model-based blockage assessment as dense bathymetry grids are added to the bathymetry database where available and needed. We are also running the HydroCAM code to produce blockage grids in the Indian Ocean for many different blockage criteria. We have been building the database necessary to begin the data driven assessment of blockage. At present, the database is accumulating earthquake events within the Indian Ocean basin as recorded at Diego Garcia and Cape Leeuwin. Over 130 events from 2001 and 2002 have been loaded. Now earthquake event data is automatically loaded into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory database at 1-hour record lengths to accommodate future reflection phase analysis. Future work will focus on the utilization of reflected T-phases, the automated use of model-based blockage grids, and the enhancement and use of the data-based method for blockage assessment in the Indian Ocean. The analysis methodology will

  18. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  20. Association of cerebral palsy with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, A; Agarwal, R P; Sadhna

    1997-10-01

    Fifty patients of various types of cerebral palsy were studied to find out an association between cerebral palsy, EEG abnormalities and development quotient. Seventy-six per cent patients had spastic cerebral palsy. Hypotonic cerebral palsy was the next common type (14%). Athetosis and ataxic forms were found to be rare (2% each). Epilepsy was associated with 56% patients. Clinical types of seizures observed were: Generalised tonic-clonic (43%), myoclonic (17.9%), generalised tonic (10.7%), partial simple (10.7%) and partial complex (17.9%). The incidence of seizures was highest in hypotonic type in which 85.7% had epilepsy. Mean developmental quotient of cerebral palsy patients was 34.9% with maximum retardation in hypotonic cerebral palsy (25.14%). Sixty per cent of patients had abnormal EEG, out of these hypotonic patients had maximum (70%) chances of EEG abnormality followed by spastic patients (55%). Developmental retardation was more severe statistically in the patients with abnormal EEG than normal EEG.

  1. Is fasting necessary for elective cerebral angiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O-K; Oh, C W; Park, H; Bang, J S; Bae, H-J; Han, M K; Park, S-H; Han, M H; Kang, H-S; Park, S-K; Whang, G; Kim, B-C; Jin, S-C

    2011-05-01

    In order to prevent unexpected events such as aspiration pneumonia, cerebral angiography has been performed under fasting in most cases. We investigated prospectively the necessity of fasting before elective cerebral angiography. The study is an open-labeled clinical trial without random allocation. In total, 2554 patients who underwent elective cerebral angiography were evaluated on development of nausea, vomiting, and pulmonary aspiration during and after angiography. Potential risks and benefits associated with fasting were provided in written documents and through personal counseling to patients before the procedure. The patients chose their fasting or nonfasting option. No restriction in diet was given after angiography. The patients were observed for 24 hours. Nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was considered as a positive event associated with cerebral angiography. The overall incidence of nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was 1.05% (27/2554 patients). There was no patient with pulmonary aspiration. No statistical difference in nausea and vomiting development between the fasting and the diet groups was found. The incidence of nausea and vomiting associated with cerebral angiography is low and not affected by diet or fasting. Pulmonary aspiration had no difference between the diet and the fasting group. Our study suggests that fasting may not be necessary for patients who undergo elective cerebral angiography.

  2. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction.

  3. Cerebral Radionecrosis in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Che Hsu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This study involved seven patients with cerebral radionecrosis following radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Their charts were reviewed and the relationship of extracranial malignancies to cerebral radionecrosis was investigated. The radiation dose ranged from 70 to 135 Gy, and the latency was from 6 to 39 months. Two of seven patients died of NPC-related complications during follow-up. The crude incidence of cerebral radionecrosis in patients with NPC was 0.93% in our series. Improvement of symptoms could be achieved by corticosteroid therapy, with or without surgery. In a review of the literature, there were 306 cases of cerebral radionecrosis in extracranial malignancies. The nasopharynx is the most common primary site in cerebral radionecrosis of extracranial malignancies, followed by the scalp and sinonasal tract. The 3-year overall survival rate in our series was 68.57%, as provided by the Kaplan-Meier product limited method. Cerebral radionecrosis in NPC patients should be differentiated from tumor recurrence, in order to apply the appropriate treatment.

  4. Ocular problems in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ayhan Tuzcu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate eye problemsin children with cerebral palsy in our region.Materials and Methods: 90 patients which was diagnosedas cerebral palsy, treated and followed up in PediatricNeurology Department of Mustafa Kemal University,were included to this study. The history was taken, anda physical examination was performed to determine theetiology of the disease and type of SP. All of the patientswere underwent a detailed ophthalmological examinationincluding visual acuity, refractive error, amblyopia, strabismus,nystagmus and fundus examination.Results: Totally 90 patients, 51 male and 39 female,were included to the study. When the etiologic factorswere evaluated, the asphyxia was seen in 33.3% of thepatients. The most common type of cerebral palsy wasspastic quadriplegia at the rate of 43.3%. Eye problemswere detected in 60% of our cases. Of this, 54.4% wererefractive errors, 35.6% were strabismus, and 22.2%were optic nerve pathologies. Amblyopia was found in11.1% of cases. Although strabismus is more common inspastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy, there was no statisticallysignificant differenceConclusions: In conclusion, eye problems are commonin children with cerebral palsy. Therefore, we recommendroutine eye examination in these patients due to be beneficialin reducing the detection and communication difficulties.Key words: Cerebral palsy, refractive error, strabismus,optic atrophy

  5. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Forthun, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts......-the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort. MOBAND-CP includes maternal interview/questionnaire data collected during pregnancy and follow-up, plus linked information from national health registries. FINDINGS TO DATE: Initial harmonisation of data from the 2 cohorts...... has created 140 variables for children and their mothers. In the MOBAND-CP cohort, 438 children with CP have been identified through record linkage with validated national registries, providing by far the largest such sample with prospectively collected detailed pregnancy data. Several studies...

  6. Cerebral hemodynamics at altitude: effects of hyperventilation and acclimatization on cerebral blood flow and oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Matthew R; Edsell, Mark E; Kim, Meeri N; Mesquita, Rickson; Putt, Mary E; Imray, Chris; Yow, Heng; Wilson, Mark H; Yodh, Arjun G; Grocott, Mike; Martin, Daniel S

    2015-06-01

    Alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygenation are implicated in altitude-associated diseases. We assessed the dynamic changes in CBF and peripheral and cerebral oxygenation engendered by ascent to altitude with partial acclimatization and hyperventilation using a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy, transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Peripheral (Spo2) and cerebral (Scto2) oxygenation, end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), and cerebral hemodynamics were studied in 12 subjects using transcranial Doppler and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) at 75 m and then 2 days and 7 days after ascending to 4559 m above sea level. After obtaining baseline measurements, subjects hyperventilated to reduce baseline ETCO2 by 50%, and a further set of measurements were obtained. Cerebral oxygenation and peripheral oxygenation showed a divergent response, with cerebral oxygenation decreasing at day 2 and decreasing further at day 7 at altitude, whereas peripheral oxygenation decreased on day 2 before partially rebounding on day 7. Cerebral oxygenation decreased after hyperventilation at sea level (Scto2 from 68.8% to 63.5%; Phyperventilation after 2 days at altitude (Scto2 from 65.6% to 69.9%; P=.001), and did not change after hyperventilation after 7 days at altitude (Scto2 from 62.2% to 63.3%; P=.35). An intensification of the normal cerebral hypocapnic vasoconstrictive response occurred after partial acclimatization in the setting of divergent peripheral and cerebral oxygenation. This may help explain why hyperventilation fails to improve cerebral oxygenation after partial acclimatization as it does after initial ascent. The use of DCS is feasible at altitude and provides a direct measure of CBF indices with high temporal resolution. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  8. Analyzing Students’ Discrimination in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analisa Listanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The negative stigma which causes discrimination appears because of someone’s point of view towards the diversity of race, religion, social, or culture. This diversity can also be found in primary school. Some student are not able yet to appreciate and respect the diversity. This research used a qualitative approach with study case method of giving the knowledge about discrimination in primary school. This research aimed to find out the cause, effect, and effort in minimizing discrimination at school. Based on the data obatained, the causing factors of the discrimination are social background, physical disability, and strong and weak groups at school. Forming the attitude to appreciate and respect diversity on students can be achieved through daily leraning activity at school which can be created through multicultural education approach in order to minimize discrimination in primary school.

  9. Study of signal discrimination for timing measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Krepelkova, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The timing detectors of the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) are currently read out using discrete components, separated into three boards; the first board hosts the sensors and the amplifiers, the second one hosts the discriminators and the third is dedicated to the Time to Digital Converter (TDC) and to the interface with the data acquisition system (DAQ). This work proposes a new front-end electronics for the timing detector, with sensors, amplifiers and discriminators integrated on the same board. We simulated an updated version of the amplifier together with a discriminator designed using commercial components. We decided to use an LVDS buffer as a discriminator, because of its cost, availability, speed and lo w power consumption. As a proof of concept, we used the LVDS input of an FPGA to discriminate signals produced by a detector prototype, using a radioactive source.

  10. Transferability between Hospitals of Hypercalcaemia Discriminant Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; McNair, Peter; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    1996-01-01

    , estimated from routine laboratory analysis, age and sex in two consecutively recorded populations with hypercalcemia including 162 and 257 patients with hypercalcemia. Discriminant functions were developed for each sex to distinguish between hypercalcemia associated with malignancy and hypercalcemia......Transferability of discriminant functions is potentially useful both from an economical point of view and because, in general, medical knowledge, in this case discriminant functions, should be transferable. In the present study we have evaluated the transferability of discriminant functions......, and increased to 83 and 89% at posterior probability levels higher than 60%. Transfer of the discrimination functions between the hospitals was followed by a decrease in diagnostic accuracy of 6-16%. At a posterior probability of 60% the diagnostic accuracies were 79% or more in the receiving hospital, in both...

  11. Testing hydrometeor particle type discrimination derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Maki; Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Hagihara, Yuichiro

    2017-02-01

    We developed a test version of algorithm that discriminate cloud/precipitation phase and ice cloud particle shape (hereafter, hydrometeor particle type) from the synergy use of the cloud profiling radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat satellite and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. We used the CALIOP classification algorithm that was developed by Yoshida et al. (2010) and modified by Hirakata et al. (2014). The CPR algorithm mainly consisted of the following steps: (1) initial discrimination by the look-up-table derived from the match-up statistical analysis of the CPR radar reflectivity, CALIOP cloud particle type and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation, and (2) precipitation correction of initial discrimination by unattenuated surface radar reflectivity. Lastly, the CPR and CALIOP synergy particle type was discriminated, simply by selecting the hydrometeor type that was most reasonable. In this study, we showed two case studies of the CPR, the CALIOP and the synergy discrimination results. By taking the advantage of CPR's capability to penetrate into thick cloud and observe light precipitation, and CALIOP's sensitivity to detect thin ice clouds, the synergy algorithm gave seamless vertical profile from thin cloud to precipitation.

  12. Characteristics of non-cerebral coenurosis in tropical goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulopoulos, G; Kassab, A; Theodoropoulos, G

    2015-07-30

    The epidemiological, clinical, and biochemical profile of non-cerebral coenurosis in goats and the morphological characteristics of the responsible metacestodes (cysts) were examined in a cross-sectional survey of slaughtered goats in abattoirs of the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.) originating from Abu Dhabi and various tropical countries. The age, country of origin, and location of each cyst in the body of goats were recorded. Blood samples collected from infected and matching healthy goats were subjected to biochemical analysis. Data on the morphological characteristics of the cysts as well as the clusters, scoleces, and rostellar hooks in one cyst from each affected carcass were collected. The data collected were subjected to statistical analysis. A total of 2,284 slaughtered goats were examined and 40 goats were diagnosed as infected with non-cerebral coenurus cysts. The prevalence of non-cerebral coenurosis was 1.75% and the degree of parasite aggregation (k) was 0.003, which is indicative of overdispersion (kvalue. A total of 76 non-cerebral coenurus cysts from 14 different body locations were collected. No cysts were found in the brain or spinal cord. Cysts located in psoas muscles had on average significantly bigger volumes and higher numbers of scoleces and clusters compared to cysts located in other body parts (P-value=0.000). Significant differences in the morphometric measurements of the rostellar hooks were observed between cysts found in goats from different countries of origin (P-value5; R-Sq=89.4%; P-value=0.000) and between number of clusters and number of scoleces (b=25.13>1; R-Sq=79.8%; P-value=0.000) indicative of following a positive allometric growth as well as between number of clusters and volume of cysts (b=0.25value=0.000) indicative of following a negative allometric growth. The biological significance of the observed allometries is not known, but perhaps for evolutionary reasons the parasite is investing its resources more on the growth

  13. Hue discrimination in Iberoamerican Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Jazmín; Medina, Juana

    2008-04-01

    In this work we analyze the Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue Test results, this test offers a simple method for testing color discrimination and was applied to a sample of 129 observers, with natural daylight in the same conditions (the observers were men and women), all of these were participants in colorimetric training courses, and aged 20 to 76, with two to twenty five years experience in the color control manufacturer laboratories (of plastics, rugs, dyes, textiles, and paints). Their job titles included mixers, inspectors, shaders, matchers, passers, and dyers. The test was applied twice and the results here presented are the comparison between both tests, taking into account errors by mistakes incidence in each hue position, as well as the redeeming of each participant in both test. The comparison shows us that most of the mistakes are in the green hue in both tests, but in the second test, approximately 20 percent of the observers reduced those. Also we can to separate persons with normal color vision of those which have zones of color confusion. In this work it is show some ones results of the comparison between men and women.

  14. From discrimination to internalized mental illness stigma: The mediating roles of anticipated discrimination and anticipated stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Diane M; Williams, Michelle K; Weisz, Bradley M

    2015-06-01

    Internalizing mental illness stigma is related to poorer well-being, but less is known about the factors that predict levels of internalized stigma. This study explored how experiences of discrimination relate to greater anticipation of discrimination and devaluation in the future and how anticipation of stigma in turn predicts greater stigma internalization. Participants were 105 adults with mental illness who self-reported their experiences of discrimination based on their mental illness, their anticipation of discrimination and social devaluation from others in the future, and their level of internalized stigma. Participants were approached in several locations and completed surveys on laptop computers. Correlational analyses indicated that more experiences of discrimination due to one's mental illness were related to increased anticipated discrimination in the future, increased anticipated social stigma from others, and greater internalized stigma. Multiple serial mediator analyses showed that the effect of experiences of discrimination on internalized stigma was fully mediated by increased anticipated discrimination and anticipated stigma. Experiences of discrimination over one's lifetime may influence not only how much future discrimination people with mental illness are concerned with but also how much they internalize negative feelings about the self. Mental health professionals may need to address concerns with future discrimination and devaluation in order to decrease internalized stigma. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. From Discrimination to Internalized Mental Illness Stigma: The Mediating Roles of Anticipated Discrimination and Anticipated Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Diane M.; Williams, Michelle K.; Weisz, Bradley M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Internalizing mental illness stigma is related to poorer well-being, but less is known about the factors that predict levels of internalized stigma. This study explored how experiences of discrimination relate to greater anticipation of discrimination and devaluation in the future, and how anticipation of stigma, in turn predicts greater stigma internalization. Method Participants were 105 adults with mental illness who self-reported their experiences of discrimination based on their mental illness, their anticipation of discrimination and social devaluation from others in the future, and their level of internalized stigma. Participants were approached in several locations and completed surveys on laptop computers. Results Correlational analyses indicated that more experiences of discrimination due to one’s mental illness were related to increased anticipated discrimination in the future, increased anticipated social stigma from others, and greater internalized stigma. Multiple serial mediator analyses showed that the effect of experiences of discrimination on internalized stigma was fully mediated by increased anticipated discrimination and anticipated stigma. Conclusion and Implications for Practice Experiences of discrimination over the lifetime may influence not only how much future discrimination people with mental illness are concerned with but also how much they internalize negative feelings about the self. Mental health professionals may need to address concerns with future discrimination and devaluation in order to decrease internalized stigma. PMID:25844910

  16. Cerebral oxygen extraction, oxygen consumption, and regional cerebral blood flow during the aura phase of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, Jes; Lassen, N A

    1994-01-01

    The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism.......The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism....

  17. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed

  18. The specter of discrimination: Fear of interpersonal racial discrimination among adolescents in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This analysis examines fear of interpersonal racial discrimination among Black, Hispanic, and White adolescents. The extent and correlates of these concerns are examined using survey data from the Project for Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Borrowing from the fear-of-crime literature, the contact hypothesis, and group threat theory, several hypotheses are developed linking discrimination fear to direct personal experience with discrimination, indirect or vicarious experience, and environmental signals of discrimination. Results show that about half of Blacks and Hispanics have feared discrimination in the past year. Multivariate results indicate that fear is most likely if one has experienced victimization first-hand and when one's parent is affected by discrimination. Further, a larger presence neighborhood outgroups produces greater fear. Overall, discrimination fear constitutes an additional obstacle for minority adolescents as they transition to adulthood. The phenomenon warrants increased scholarly attention and represents a fruitful avenue for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices reflected by event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Gu, Feng; Zhang, Xiliang; Yang, Lizhuang; Chen, Lijun; Wei, Zhengde; Zha, Rujing; Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2014-01-01

    Human voice is a gender discriminating cue and is important to mate selection. This study employed electrophysiological recordings to examine whether there is specific cerebral activity when presented with opposite-sex voices as compared to same-sex voices. Male voices and female voices were pseudo-randomly presented to male and female participants. In Experiment 1, participants were instructed to determine the gender of each voice. A late positivity (LP) response around 750 ms after voice onset was elicited by opposite-sex voices, as reflected by a positive deflection of the ERP to opposite-sex voices than that to same-sex voices. This LP response was prominent around parieto-occipital recording sites, and it suggests an opposite-sex specific process, which may reflect emotion- and/or reward-related cerebral activity. In Experiment 2, participants were instructed to press a key when hearing a non-voice pure tone and not give any response when they heard voice stimuli. In this task, no difference were found between the ERP to same-sex voices and that to opposite-sex voices, suggesting that the cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices may disappear without gender-related attention. These results provide significant implications on cognitive mechanisms with regard to opposite-sex specific voice processing.

  20. Cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices reflected by event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Li

    Full Text Available Human voice is a gender discriminating cue and is important to mate selection. This study employed electrophysiological recordings to examine whether there is specific cerebral activity when presented with opposite-sex voices as compared to same-sex voices. Male voices and female voices were pseudo-randomly presented to male and female participants. In Experiment 1, participants were instructed to determine the gender of each voice. A late positivity (LP response around 750 ms after voice onset was elicited by opposite-sex voices, as reflected by a positive deflection of the ERP to opposite-sex voices than that to same-sex voices. This LP response was prominent around parieto-occipital recording sites, and it suggests an opposite-sex specific process, which may reflect emotion- and/or reward-related cerebral activity. In Experiment 2, participants were instructed to press a key when hearing a non-voice pure tone and not give any response when they heard voice stimuli. In this task, no difference were found between the ERP to same-sex voices and that to opposite-sex voices, suggesting that the cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices may disappear without gender-related attention. These results provide significant implications on cognitive mechanisms with regard to opposite-sex specific voice processing.