WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiling buoy system

  1. Controllable Buoys and Networked Buoy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Faranak (Inventor); Davoudi, Farhooman (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Buoyant sensor networks are described, comprising floating buoys with sensors and energy harvesting capabilities. The buoys can control their buoyancy and motion, and can organize communication in a distributed fashion. Some buoys may have tethered underwater vehicles with a smart spooling system that allows the vehicles to dive deep underwater while remaining in communication and connection with the buoys.

  2. Mooring Line for an Oceanographic Buoy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A mooring line for an oceanographic buoy system includes four sections. The first section is a protected cable that is connectable to the buoy. The second section is...

  3. Buoy-Rope-Drum Wave Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A buoy-rope-drum wave power system is a new type of floating oscillating buoy wave power device, which absorbs energy from waves by buoy-rope-drum device. Based on the linear deep water wave theory and pure resistive load, with cylinder buoy as an example, the research sets up the theoretical model of direct-drive buoy-rope-drum wave power efficiency and analyzes the influence of the mass and load of the system on its generating efficiency. It points out the two main categories of the efficient buoy-rope-drum wave power system: light thin type and resonance type, and optimal designs of their major parameters are carried out on the basis of the above theoretical model of generating efficiency.

  4. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  5. Texas Automated Buoy System 1995-2005 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinasso, N. L.; Bender, L. C.; Walpert, J. N.; Lee, L. L.; Campbell, L.; Hetland, R. D.; Howard, M. K.; Martin, R. D.

    2005-05-01

    TABS was established in l995 to provide data to assess oil spill movement along Texas coast for the Texas General Land Office Oil Spill Prevention and Response Program. A system of nine automated buoys provide wind and current data in near real time. Two of these buoys are supported by the Flower Garden Banks Joint Industry Program. A TABS web site provides a public interface to view and download the data. A real time data analysis web page presents a wide variety of useful data products derived from the field measurements. Integration efforts now underway include transfer of buoy data to the National Data Buoy Center for quality control and incorporation into the Global Telecommunications Stream. The TGLO ocean circulation nowcast/forecast modeling system has been in continuous operation since 1998. Two models, POM and ROMS, are used to produce forecasts of near-surface wind driven currents up to 48 hours into the future. Both models are driven using wind fields obtained from the NAM (formerly Eta) forecast models operated by NOAA NCEP. Wind and current fields are displayed on websites in both static and animated forms and are updated four times per day. Under funding from the SURA/SCOOP program we are; 1) revamping the system to conform with the evolving Data Management and Communications (DMAC) framework adopted by the NSF Orion and OCEAN.US IOOS programs, 2) producing model-data comparisons, and 3) integrating the wind and current fields into the GNOME oil trajectory model used by NOAA/Hazmat. Academic research is planned to assimilate near real-time observations from TABS buoys and some 30-40 ADCP instruments scheduled to be mounted on offshore oil platforms in early 2005. Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) and its associated modeling efforts provide a reliable source of accurate, up-to-date information on currents along the Texas coast. As the nation embarks on the development of an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), TABS will be an active participant

  6. Hardware design of a submerged buoy system based on electromagnetic inductive coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Dalei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly introduces the hardware design of a new type of ocean buoy for multi-scale marine dynamic process. The buoy system can collect a number of real-time marine environment data and then transmit all the data back to the landing site through wireless module. The authors mainly designed the hardware circuit of the buoy system, including data collection system, data communication system, data storage system. Due to the buoy system will complete the marine observation work continuously for at least a month, so we add the low power consumption function which can realize the intermittent work for the data collection system. This paper also introduces the electromagnetic induction coupling technology of underwater sensors, the sea surface communication network technology, etc. The system can also extends to the ecological regional anomaly monitoring and the early warning of disaster weather.

  7. System Identification and Control of a Joint-Actuated Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    14 Figure 9: Green and Orange Colored Stripes of Craft Foam on the Buoy Payload ........... 15 Figure 10: Buoy Step...circuit board. The copper and blue paper were then heated in a press-n- peel press for just over one minute to allow the printer toner to bond with the...markers. Their matte finish kept variations due to brightness at a minimum, and the colors of orange and green were chosen because there were no

  8. Temperature and salinity profile data collected by drifting buoy and XBT in the Worldwide Oceans from 18 October 1999 to 28 February 2000 (NODC Accession 0000115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using moored buoy, profiling floats, and XBT casts in a world wide distribution from 18 October 1999 to 28 February 2000....

  9. Temperature profile and wind speed data collected from buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER for 1977-07-26 (NCEI Accession 7800034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and wind speed data were collected using buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 26 July 1977 to 26 July 1977. Data were...

  10. Temperature profile and current meter data collected using drifting buoy and profiling buoy casts from the Atlantic Ocean as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Mid-Ocean Dynamics Experiment (IDOE/MODE) project from 01 September 1972 to 01 April 1974 (NODC Accession 7400622)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile east-west current component, north-south current component, and other data were collected using drifting buoy and profiling float casts from the...

  11. An autonomous drifting buoy system for long term pCO2 observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Wakita, M.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have been carried out around the world to understand what happens to carbon dioxide (CO2) once it is emitted into the atmosphere, and how it relates to long-term climate change. However, the sea surface pCO2 observations on volunteer observation ships and research vessels concentrated in the North Atlantic and North Pacific. To assess the spatial and temporal variations of surface pCO2 in the global ocean, new automated pCO2 sensor which can be used in platform systems such as buoys or moorings is strongly desired. We have been developing the small drifting buoy system (diameter 250-340 mm, length 470 mm, weight 15 kg) for pCO2 measurement, with the support of the Japan EOS Promotion Program (JEPP), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The objective is to provide simplified, automated measurements of pCO2 over all the world's oceans, an essential factor in understanding how the ocean responds to climate change. The measurement principle for the pCO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry (e.g. Lefèvre et al., 1993; Degrandpre et al., 1995). The CO2 in the surrounding seawater equilibrates with the indicator solution across the gas permeable membranes. The equilibration process causes a change of pH in the indicator solution, which results in the change of optical absorbance. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. In our analytical system, we used an amorphous fluoropolymer tubing form of AF-2400 by DuPontTM for the gas permeable membrane due to its high gas permeability coefficients. The measurement system of the sensor consisted mainly of a LED light source, optical fibers, a CCD detector, and a downsized PC. The measured data were transmitted to the laboratory by satellite communication (Argos system). In the laboratory experiment, we obtained a high response time (less than 2 minutes) and a precision

  12. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  13. Oceanographic profile Temperature and Salinity measurements collected during the Arctic Buoy Program using drifting buoy in the Arctic from 1985-1994 (NODC Accession 0001497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between 1985 and 1994, the Polar Science Center at the University of Washington deployed 24 ARGOS data buoys in ice floes on the Arctic Ocean, from which six...

  14. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    Polar orbiting satellites equipped with random access data collection and position fixing systems have made long-term remote oceanographic/meteorological observations possible by means of instrumented drifting buoys fitted with ARGOS telementry...

  15. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, Thomas [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-03

    the evaluation of LIDAR-based wind measurement systems to validate the accuracy of remotely measured wind data in marine applications. Specifically, the test-bed will be utilized to systematically evaluate the capability of emerging scanning LIDAR and buoy mounted vertically profiling LIDAR by: (1) Evaluating a fixed scanning LIDAR against land-based 50 and 60 meter high meteorological masts fitted with research quality cup-vane and/or sonic anemometers; (2) Evaluating a buoy mounted vertically profiling LIDAR fixed on land and floating in a sheltered bay against a co-located 60 meter high meteorological mast fitted with a research quality cup-vane and/or sonic anemometers and the fixed scanning LIDAR; and (3) Offshore field evaluation of both LIDAR platforms through a comparison of the fixed scanning LIDAR data and data obtained by the buoy mounted LIDAR located 10 miles offshore. The proposed research will systematically validate Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) based wind measurement systems and assess the temporal and spatial variability of the offshore wind resource in the Mid-Atlantic east of New Jersey. The goal of the proposed project is to address the technical and commercial challenges of the offshore wind energy industry by validating and assessing cost-effective, over ocean wind resource characterization technologies. The objective is to systematically evaluate the capability of both scanning and vertically profiling LIDARs to accurately measure 3D wind fields through comparison with fixed met masts and intercomparison among LIDAR platforms. Once validated, data collected by both buoy mounted vertically profiling LIDARs and shore-based, pulsed horizontally scanning LIDARs can be used to accurately assess offshore wind resources and to quantify the spatial and temporal variability in the offshore wind fields. One of the fundamental research questions to be addressed in phase 1 is the assessment of various measurement and data processing schemes to

  16. Layout of buoys and seafloor transponders for next-generation measurement system for ocean floor crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, T.; Nagai, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method for monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean. We deployed benchmarks on the ocean floor and determine their positions through acoustic ranging from a vessel whose position is determined by kinematic GPS technique. Both sound speed structure and the benchmark (transponder) positions are determined simultaneously from the two-way travel time of ultrasonic signals. To monitor the crustal deformation at the focal area of anticipated plate boundary earthquakes, a lower margin of error is desirable. The most effective factor is a temporal-spatial variation of sound speed structure. In our measurement system, we can average temporal variations of sound speed structure, although they also include spatial variations. We are planning to install a moored buoy-based next generation measurement system using the tomographic technique as a method of distinguishing temporal and spatial variations of sound speed structure completely. We need to consider that the positions of the buoys are controlled by water current. We can control only the area of drifting by adjusting the length of the mooring cables and the buoyancy of the buoys. If we want to make the buoy stable around one point, we can make the cable short but we must make the buoyancy larger to avoid sinking by the current, which requires more cost. An appropriate designing of length of the cable and buoyancy is very important. We theoretically investigated the relationship between buoy-transponder geometry and the accuracy of transponder position. We assumed a system composed of three transponders installed at a depth of 1000 m and three buoys. The configurations of both buoy and transponder were equilateral triangles. The length of a side of them was 2000m.We assumed that the sound speed structure consisted of two layers. We defined 'initial sound speed structure (ISSS)' on which the value of sound speed in the first layer (0-100 m in depth) was 1523 m/s and it in the second layer

  17. National Data Buoy Center Buoy Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Buoy table consists of location information, ownership, and general geographic descriptions of buoys and weather stations. In addition to buoys operated by the...

  18. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  19. Physical profile and meteorological data from CTD casts during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON buoys in the equatorial Pacific from 02 March 2002 to 22 November 2002 (NODC Accession 0000945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data and meteorological data were collected from CTD casts in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during cruises to to service the TAO/TRITON buoy array....

  20. Current meter and temperature profile data from current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994 (NODC Accession 9700042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and temperature profile data were collected using current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994....

  1. Current meter and temperature profile data from current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 29 March 1991 to 24 December 1993 (NODC Accession 9900057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and temperature profile data were collected using current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 29 March 1991 to 24 December...

  2. Software and Support Development for an Environmental Data Buoy System for Predicting Surf-Zone Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-28

    34I.oaoY. .ic . of lb. "IN.o List Ciey. 01010. ocd ZIP Code Prep. -ae 1o. P~rolort. Tool, Ar.$. .d lot U.11 Mombers Kale, be.. lb .. be,iw code Ire.t lb...C-1-114-8o Offi,.c Ne.. and Address gt.lo lb, .1. tO tt, olf t no.1 -e 0.44,,..reoo tocldoth Oh otf.*0, of thecoleollbog 0 01cC1. yolo . t. I.loalrd...written, and tested with actual data for a microcomputer system, a similar version of which could be ultimately implemented in the buoy for complete

  3. Rancang Bangun Instrumen Sistem Buoy Menggunakan A-Wsn Protokol Zigbee Untuk Pengamatan Ekosistem Pesisir (Development of Buoy System Instrument using A-WSN ZigBee Protocol for Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acta Withamana

    2013-12-01

    resolution of sampling. Mooring buoy has been used as one of the options to carry out the task. However the big dimension in the existing buoy system is not suitable for coastal ecosystem monitoring. Rapid development in semiconductor technology has brought wireless sensor network (WSN. ZigBee communication protocol has the advantage of energy efficient and ease of implementation. This research was conducted to developing mooring buoy platform as well as analyzes the possibility of WSN to be implemented in coastal environment. The test on performance of developed mooring buoy was good and stable as the platform of instrument. The network performance of ZigBee radio gave 100% data transmitting and receiving success ratio in the static test. Using four Ni-MH batteries, the instrument can be operated for roughly 39 hours for coordinator and router, and 89 hours for end device. The sea field test shows that the worst is 84.94% success ratio on E1 and the greatest is 100% success ratio on R1 and E3. The received temperature data also accurate to describe the distribution of sea surface temperature at Panggang Island. Results of this study suggest that application of Buoy System instrument using  ZigBee-WSN protocol has the potential to be used in the observation activities of coastal ecosystems. Keywords: mooring buoy, instrument, WSN, ZigBee, coastal observation

  4. Response of Land-Sea Interface in Xiamen Bay to Extreme Weather Events Observed with the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a Multifunctional Sensors System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Pan, W.; Zhang, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate observations suggest that global climate change may result in an increase of extreme weather events (such as tropical cyclones, intense precipitation i.e. heavy rains) in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions. Subtropical coastal regions are often densely populated areas experiencing rapid development and widespread changes to the aquatic environment. The biogeochemical and ecological responses of coastal systems to extreme weather events are of increasing concern. Enhanced river nutrients input following rain storms has been linked to the ecological responses at land-sea interface. These land-sea interactions can be studied using multifunctional sensors systems. In our study, the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a monitoring system with multiple sensors, was deployed in Xiamen Bay for near real time measurements of different parameters. The Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array is a deep water net cage which functions in long-term synchronous observation of dynamic ecological characteristics with the support of an aerograph, water-watch, LOBO (Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory), ADCP, CTD chain system, YSI vertical profiler, flow cytometer, sea surface camera, and "communication box". The study showed that rain storms during multiple typhoons resulted in greater fluctuations of salinity, N concentration, and other water environmental conditions, which might have been connected with algal blooms (so-called red tide) in Xiamen Bay.

  5. A Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device and Numerical Study on Buoy Shape and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyin Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave and current energy can be harnessed in the East China Sea and South China Sea; however, both areas are subject to high frequencies of typhoon events. To improve the safety of the ocean energy conversion device, a Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device (FOECD with a single mooring system is proposed, which can be towed to avoid severe ocean conditions or for regular maintenance. In this paper, the structure of the FOECD is introduced, and it includes a catamaran platform, an oscillating buoy part, a current turbine blade, hydraulic energy storage and an electrical generation part. The numerical study models the large catamaran platform as a single, large buoy, while the four floating buoys were modeled simply as small buoys. Theoretical models on wave energy power capture and efficiency were established. To improve the suitability of the buoy for use in the FOECD and its power harvesting capability, a numerical simulation of the four buoy geometries was undertaken. The shape profiles examined in this paper are cylindrical, turbinate (V-shaped and U-shaped cone with cylinder, and combined cylinder-hemisphere buoys. Simulation results reveal that the suitability of a turbinate buoy is the best of the four types. Further simulation models were carried out by adjusting the tip radius of the turbinate buoy. Three performance criteria including suitability, power harvesting capability and energy capture efficiency were analyzed. It reveals that the turbinate buoy has almost the same power harvesting capabilities and energy capture efficiency, while its suitability is far better than that of a cylindrical buoy.

  6. Applications to marine disaster prevention spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent results of the research project funded by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 23226017) from FY 2011 to FY 2015 on an autonomous spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system and its applications to marine disaster prevention systems from a scientific point of view. This book spotlights research on marine disaster prevention systems related to incidents involving oil tankers and offshore platforms, approaching these problems from new scientific and technological perspectives. The most essential aspect of this book is the development of a deep-sea underwater robot for real-time monitoring of blowout behavior of oil and gas from the seabed and of a new type of autonomous surface vehicle for real-time tracking and monitoring of oil spill spread and drift on the sea surface using an oil sensor. The mission of these robots is to provide the simulation models for gas and oil blowouts or spilled oil drifting on the sea surface w...

  7. System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored buoy floating at the ocean surface and anchored to the seafloor precisely measures acceleration, pitch, roll, and Earth's magnetic flux field of the buoy...

  8. Wave Observations from Central California: SeaSonde Systems and In Situ Wave Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan M. Long

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave data from five 12-13 MHz SeaSondes radars along the central California coast were analyzed to evaluate the utility of operational wave parameters, including significant wave height, period, and direction. Data from four in situ wave buoys served to verify SeaSonde data and independently corroborate wave variability. Hourly averaged measurements spanned distance is 150 km alongshore × 45 km offshore. Individual SeaSondes showed statistically insignificant variation over 27 km in range. Wave height inter-comparisons between regional buoys exhibit strong correlations, approximately 0.93, and RMS differences less than 50 cm over the region. SeaSonde-derived wave data were compared to nearby buoys over timescales from 15 to 26 months, and revealed wave height correlations =0.85−0.91 and mean RMS difference of 53 cm. Results showed that height RMS differences are a percentage of significant wave height, rather than being constant independent of sea state. Period and directions compared favorably among radars, buoys, and the CDIP model. Results presented here suggest that SeaSondes are a reliable source of wave information. Supported by buoy data, they also reveal minimal spatial variation in significant wave height, period, and direction in coastal waters from ~45 km × ~150 km in this region of the central California coast. Small differences are explained by sheltering from coastal promontories, and cutoff boundaries in the case of the radars.

  9. Temperature profile and current meter data collected using moored buoy and profiling floats in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Mid-Ocean Dynamics Experiment (IDOE/MODE) project from 03 October 1972 to 13 July 1973 (NODC Accession 7500548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, pressure, east-west current component, north-south current component, fluorescence, and other data were collected using moored buoy and profiling floats...

  10. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Gricius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys, which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  11. SeaBuoySoft – an On-line Automated Windows based Ocean Wave height Data Acquisition and Analysis System for Coastal Field’s Data Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H.Tarudkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of various hydraulic parameters such as wave heights for the research and the practical purpose in the coastal fields is one of the critical and challenging but equally important criteria in the field of ocean engineering for the design and the development of hydraulic structures such as construction of sea walls, break waters, oil jetties, fisheries harbors, all other structures, and the ships maneuvering, embankments, berthing on jetties. This paper elucidates the development of “SeaBuoySoft online software system for coastal field‟s wave height data collection” for the coastal application work. The system could be installed along with the associated hardware such as a Digital Waverider Receiver unit and a Waverider Buoy at the shore. The ocean wave height data, transmitted by wave rider buoy installed in the shallow/offshore waters of sea is received by the digital waverider receiver unit and it is interfaced to the SeaBuoySoft software. The design and development of the software system has been worked out in-house at Central Water and Power Research Station, Pune, India. The software has been developed as a Windows based standalone version and is unique of its kind for the reception of real time ocean wave height data, it takes care of its local storage of wave height data for its further analysis work as and when required. The system acquires real time ocean wave height data round the clock requiring no operator intervention during data acquisition process on site.

  12. Moball-Buoy Network: A Near-Real-Time Ground-Truth Distributed Monitoring System to Map Ice, Weather, Chemical Species, and Radiations, in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, F.; Shahabi, C.; Burdick, J.; Rais-Zadeh, M.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The work had been funded by NASA HQ's office of Cryospheric Sciences Program. Recent observations of the Arctic have shown that sea ice has diminished drastically, consequently impacting the environment in the Arctic and beyond. Certain factors such as atmospheric anomalies, wind forces, temperature increase, and change in the distribution of cold and warm waters contribute to the sea ice reduction. However current measurement capabilities lack the accuracy, temporal sampling, and spatial coverage required to effectively quantify each contributing factor and to identify other missing factors. Addressing the need for new measurement capabilities for the new Arctic regime, we propose a game-changing in-situ Arctic-wide Distributed Mobile Monitoring system called Moball-buoy Network. Moball-buoy Network consists of a number of wind-propelled self-powered inflatable spheres referred to as Moball-buoys. The Moball-buoys are self-powered. They use their novel mechanical control and energy harvesting system to use the abundance of wind in the Arctic for their controlled mobility and energy harvesting. They are equipped with an array of low-power low-mass sensors and micro devices able to measure a wide range of environmental factors such as the ice conditions, chemical species wind vector patterns, cloud coverage, air temperature and pressure, electromagnetic fields, surface and subsurface water conditions, short- and long-wave radiations, bathymetry, and anthropogenic factors such as pollutions. The stop-and-go motion capability, using their novel mechanics, and the heads up cooperation control strategy at the core of the proposed distributed system enable the sensor network to be reconfigured dynamically according to the priority of the parameters to be monitored. The large number of Moball-buoys with their ground-based, sea-based, satellite and peer-to-peer communication capabilities would constitute a wireless mesh network that provides an interface for a global

  13. On the Optimization of Point Absorber Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A point absorbing wave energy converter (WEC is a complicated dynamical system. A semi-submerged buoy drives a power take-off device (PTO, which acts as a linear or non-linear damper of the WEC system. The buoy motion depends on the buoy geometry and dimensions, the mass of the moving parts of the system and on the damping force from the generator. The electromagnetic damping in the generator depends on both the generator specifications, the connected load and the buoy velocity. In this paper a velocity ratio has been used to study how the geometric parameters buoy draft and radius, assuming constant generator damping coefficient, affects the motion and the energy absorption of a WEC. It have been concluded that an optimal buoy geometry can be identified for a specific generator damping. The simulated WEC performance have been compared with experimental values from two WECs with similar generators but different buoys. Conclusions have been drawn about their behaviour.

  14. Buoy Technology Survey Recommendations for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Maritime Buoyage System MTS Marine Technology Society NAVFAC Naval Facilities Engineering Command NBS New Buoy Systems NKK Nippon Kogi Kogyo (Japan...8.7 LED LIGHTS RATIONALE The Japanese (Nippon Kogi Kogyo Co., Ltd.) are developing an LED (Light Emitting Diode) light for use on floating aids that...buoys. APPROACH Study the Paint Spraying and Radio Transmission Systems developed by Japan’s "Nippon Kogi Kogyo Co." and "Ryokuseisha Corp

  15. Temperature and pressure data collected using drifting buoy and profiling floats from the North Atlantic Ocean in part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 10 January 1975 to 31 May 1981 (NODC Accession 8700121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and pressure data were collected using drifting buoy and profiling floats from CHAIN, GILLISS, OCEANUS, and ENDEAVOR from the North Atlantic Ocean from...

  16. Temperature profile and pressure data collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean with support from the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 04 May to 18 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7601247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and pressure data were collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean from May 4, 1975 to December 18, 1975. Data were submitted by...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from time series and profile observations using CTD, Niskin bottle,and other instruments near CenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico from 2012-10-15 to 2014-04-22 (NCEI Accession 0131199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains time series profile (discrete bottle) data that were collected at the GenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi. The CenGOOS 3-m...

  18. Temperature profile data from moored buoy, profiling floats, TAO buoy, and XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 12 June 2000 to 29 December 2000 (NODC Accession 0000404)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from multiple ships from June 12, 2000 to December 29, 2000. Data were submitted by Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS)...

  19. Temperature profile data from moored buoy, profiling floats, TAO buoy, and XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 14 April 2000 to 20 February 2001 (NODC Accession 0000406)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from multiple ships from April 14, 2000 to February 20, 2001. Data were submitted by Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS)...

  20. Temperature profile and other data from moored buoy, profiling floats, TAO buoy, and XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 01 June 2000 to 29 November 2000 (NODC Accession 0000403)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected from multiple ships from June 1, 2000 to November 29, 2000. Data were submitted by Marine Environmental Data...

  1. Temperature profile data from moored buoy, profiling floats, TAO buoy, and XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 21 October 2000 to 31 January 2001 (NODC Accession 0000405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from multiple ships from October 21, 2000 to January 31, 2001. Data were submitted by Marine Environmental Data Service...

  2. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-09-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  3. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinpyo Hong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG, mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine’s motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT, the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  4. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  5. Sea-Change in Ocean Observations on Moored Buoys from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Elliott, J.; Pounder, D.; Kern, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presentation will provide the technical specifications, the systems engineering processes, and preliminary results from laboratory and field tests, as the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) undertakes a fundamental and broad transformation (sea-change) of its ocean observing systems on moored buoys. This transformation is necessary to gain efficiencies in maintaining operational ocean observation networks and to increase their reliability, which will reduce maintenance costs. The presentation will also compare and contrast existing and planned systems. The Self-Contained Ocean Observations Payload (SCOOP) takes advantage of the advances in communications and small, efficient, multi-purpose sensors to reduce the size and costs of systems and expand the suite of available real-time ocean observations. The communications will allow NDBC to increase the precision and decrease the latency of the observations. The hallmark of SCOOP is the modularity of the payloads that allow NDBC to host specialized systems, for the oceanographic research community, which may include observing ocean acidification and algal blooms, and tracking marine life, alongside its standard suite of meteorological, oceanographic, and wave systems. SCOOP will include cameras, primarily to document vandalism incidents, but they can also serve to corroborate many of the automatic observations. The two-year integration project - focused on recapitalization of NDBC's network of Hurricane Weather buoys - is aided by NDBC's 40 years of experience with marine observations and its continually improving approach to testing. Testimony to the rigor of NDBC's development and test procedures is that the World Meteorological Organization and the Intergovernmental Ocean Commission have designated NDBC as the first Regional Marine Instrumentation Center (RMIC). Integral to the fielding of these new systems is a Mission Control Center (MCC) performing the real-time, specialized monitoring and analyses and

  6. EML, VEGA, ODM, LTER, GLEON - considerations and technologies for building a buoy information system at an LTER site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, C.; Winslow, L.; Shin, P.; Hanson, P. C.; Barseghian, D.

    2010-12-01

    At the North Temperate Lakes Long Term Ecological Research (NTL LTER) site six buoys and one met station are maintained, each equipped with up to 20 sensors producing up to 45 separate data streams at a 1 or 10 minute frequency. Traditionally, this data volume has been managed in many matrix type tables, each described in the Ecological Metadata Language (EML) and accessed online by a query system based on the provided metadata. To develop a more flexible information system, several technologies are currently being experimented with. We will review, compare and evaluate these technologies and discuss constraints and advantages of network memberships and implementation of standards. A Data Turbine server is employed to stream data from data logger files into a database with the Real-time Data Viewer being used for monitoring sensor health. The Kepler work flow processor is being explored to introduce quality control routines into this data stream taking advantage of the Data Turbine actor. Kepler could replace traditional database triggers while adding visualization and advanced data access functionality for downstream modeling or other analytical applications. The data are currently streamed into the traditional matrix type tables and into an Observation Data Model (ODM) following the CUAHSI ODM 1.1 specifications. In parallel these sensor data are managed within the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) where the software package Ziggy streams the data into a database of the VEGA data model. Contributing data to a network implies compliance with established standards for data delivery and data documentation. ODM or VEGA type data models are not easily described in EML, the metadata exchange standard for LTER sites, but are providing many advantages from an archival standpoint. Both GLEON and CUAHSI have developed advanced data access capabilities based on their respective data models and data exchange standards while LTER is currently in a phase of

  7. Technology Refresh of NOAA’s Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) Buoy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    which utilizes an MSP430 microcontroller, controls the collecting of all analog data from sensors. In addition to collecting analog data the...Embedded Workbench and firmware developed for the MSP430 using ANSI C also compiled with IAR Systems Embedded Workbench. The GUI test and

  8. Response of surface buoy moorings in steady and wave flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    A numerical model has been developed to evaluate the dynamics of surface buoy mooring systems under wave and current loading. System tension response and variation of tension in the mooring line at various depths have been evaluated for deep water...

  9. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  10. NDBC Standard Meteorological Buoy Data, 1970-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) distributes meteorological data from moored buoys maintained by NDBC and others. Moored buoys are the weather sentinels of the...

  11. An overview of a moored ocean data buoy programme

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    This paper addresses the rationale. history, strategy and management techniques used in the developmcnt of NIO oceanographic data buoy programme. The system is used for short term as well as long term oceanographic observations. The technical...

  12. Buoy Dynamics in Subsurface Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Guillen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to find the tension acting on a line that anchors a buoy submerged just beneath the surface of the ocean. Since the problem statement only gives the geometric shapes and dimensions of the buoy, we must use calculus to find its volume and surface area through integration of the volumes and surfaces of revolution formed by the specific parts of the buoy along an axis. The volume and surface area determine the buoyancy force and force of gravity, the two forces acting on the buoy that affect the tension in the line. After calculating this data, we were able to conclude that the tension affecting the line would be approximately 78 kN if the buoy was made of 1% carbon steel with a thickness of 6.35 mm. This problem is useful in several engineering disciplines.

  13. Wireless Sensor Networks Buoy For Coastal Waters Observation

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayat, Rizqi Rizaldi; Jaya, Indra; Hestirianoto, Totok

    2016-01-01

    The availability of data in real time and continuous is important to monitor in environmental change as early as possible. Wireless sensor networks (WSN) offer a new paradigm in the field of oceanography that can measure the parameters of complex marine environment using a moored buoy. This paper described design of a data transmission system with a moored buoy and tested the performance of WSN instrument based on ZigBee protocol radio module for monitoring coastal water environment in real t...

  14. A Danish Profiling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the statistical model used for profiling new unemployed workers in Denmark. When a worker – during his or her first six months in unemployment – enters the employment office for the first time, this model predicts whether or not he or she will be unemployed for more than six ...

  15. Physical profile data collected in the Equatorial Pacific during cruises to service the TAO array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys, from 2007-04-07 to the present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) Program, the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) was responsible for the at-sea collection, quality control and...

  16. A measurement system for vertical seawater profiles close to the air–sea interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Sims

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a near-surface ocean profiler, which has been designed to precisely measure vertical gradients in the top 10 m of the ocean. Variations in the depth of seawater collection are minimized when using the profiler compared to conventional CTD/rosette deployments. The profiler consists of a remotely operated winch mounted on a tethered yet free-floating buoy, which is used to raise and lower a small frame housing sensors and inlet tubing. Seawater at the inlet depth is pumped back to the ship for analysis. The profiler can be used to make continuous vertical profiles or to target a series of discrete depths. The profiler has been successfully deployed during wind speeds up to 10 m s−1 and significant wave heights up to 2 m. We demonstrate the potential of the profiler by presenting measured vertical profiles of the trace gases carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide. Trace gas measurements use an efficient microporous membrane equilibrator to minimize the system response time. The example profiles show vertical gradients in the upper 5 m for temperature, carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide of 0.15 °C, 4 µatm and 0.4 nM respectively.

  17. Long-Term Observations of Atmospheric CO2, O3 and BrO over the Transitioning Arctic Ocean Pack-ice: The O-Buoy Chemical Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, P.

    2016-02-01

    Autonomous, sea ice-tethered O-Buoys have been deployed (2009-2016) across the Arctic sea ice for long-term atmospheric measurements (http://www.o-buoy.org). O-Buoys (15) provide in-situ concentrations of three sentinel atmospheric chemicals, ozone, CO2 and BrO, as well as meteorological parameters and imagery, over the frozen ocean. O-Buoys were designed to transmit daily data over a period of 2 years while deployed in sea ice, as part of automated ice-drifting stations that include snow/ice measurement systems (e.g. Ice Mass Balance buoys) and oceanographic measurements (e.g. Ice Tethered Profilers). Seasonal changes in Arctic atmospheric chemistry are influenced by changes in the characteristics and presence of the sea ice vs. open water as well as air mass trajectories, especially during the winter-spring and summer-fall transitions when sea ice is melting and freezing, respectively. The O-Buoy Chemical Network provides the unique opportunity to observe these transition periods in real-time with high temporal resolution, and to compare them with those collected on land-based monitoring stations located. Due to the logistical challenges of measurements over the Arctic Ocean region, most long term, in-situ observations of atmospheric chemistry have been made at coastal or island sites around the periphery of the Arctic Ocean, leaving large spatial and temporal gaps that O-Buoys overcome. Advances in floatation, communications, power management, and sensor hardware have been made to overcome the challenges of diminished Arctic sea ice. O-Buoy data provide insights into enhanced seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in atmospheric composition, atmospheric boundary layer control on the amount of halogen activation, enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 signal over the more variable and porous pack ice, and to develop an integrated picture of the coupled ocean/ice/atmosphere system. As part of the Arctic Observing Network, we provide data to the community (www.aoncadis.org).

  18. Development of a GNSS Buoy for Monitoring Water Surface Elevations in Estuaries and Coastal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Pin Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS buoy that utilizes a Virtual Base Station (VBS combined with the Real-Time Kinematic (RTK positioning technology was developed to monitor water surface elevations in estuaries and coastal areas. The GNSS buoy includes a buoy hull, a RTK GNSS receiver, data-transmission devices, a data logger, and General Purpose Radio Service (GPRS modems for transmitting data to the desired land locations. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to test the capability of the buoy and verify the accuracy of the monitored water surface elevations. For the field tests, the GNSS buoy was deployed in the waters of Suao (northeastern part of Taiwan. Tide data obtained from the GNSS buoy were consistent with those obtained from the neighboring tide station. Significant wave heights, zero-crossing periods, and peak wave directions obtained from the GNSS buoy were generally consistent with those obtained from an accelerometer-tilt-compass (ATC sensor. The field tests demonstrate that the developed GNSS buoy can be used to obtain accurate real-time tide and wave data in estuaries and coastal areas.

  19. Development of a GNSS Buoy for Monitoring Water Surface Elevations in Estuaries and Coastal Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Pin; Huang, Ching-Jer; Chen, Sheng-Hsueh; Doong, Dong-Jiing; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2017-01-18

    In this work, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) buoy that utilizes a Virtual Base Station (VBS) combined with the Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning technology was developed to monitor water surface elevations in estuaries and coastal areas. The GNSS buoy includes a buoy hull, a RTK GNSS receiver, data-transmission devices, a data logger, and General Purpose Radio Service (GPRS) modems for transmitting data to the desired land locations. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to test the capability of the buoy and verify the accuracy of the monitored water surface elevations. For the field tests, the GNSS buoy was deployed in the waters of Suao (northeastern part of Taiwan). Tide data obtained from the GNSS buoy were consistent with those obtained from the neighboring tide station. Significant wave heights, zero-crossing periods, and peak wave directions obtained from the GNSS buoy were generally consistent with those obtained from an accelerometer-tilt-compass (ATC) sensor. The field tests demonstrate that the developed GNSS buoy can be used to obtain accurate real-time tide and wave data in estuaries and coastal areas.

  20. A Wave Power Device with Pendulum Based on Ocean Monitoring Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Guan, Wanchun; Wan, Xiaozheng; Li, Xuanqun; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Shixuan

    2018-01-01

    The ocean monitoring buoy usually exploits solar energy for power supply. In order to improve power supply capacity, this paper proposes a wave power device according to the structure and moving character of buoy. The wave power device composes of pendulum mechanism that converts wave energy into mechanical energy and energy storage mechanism where the mechanical energy is transferred quantitatively to generator. The hydrodynamic equation for the motion of buoy system with generator devise is established based on the potential flow theory, and then the characteristics of pendulum motion and energy conversion properties are analysed. The results of this research show that the proposed wave power devise is able to efficiently and periodically convert wave energy into power, and increasing the stiffness of energy storage spring is benefit for enhancing the power supply capacity of the buoy. This study provides a theory reference for the development of technology on wave power generator for ocean monitoring buoy.

  1. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy KN (WQB-KN): Kilo Nalu, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  2. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 03 (WQB-03): Kiholo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  3. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 04 (WQB-04): Hilo, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  4. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy AW (WQB-AW): Ala Wai, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  5. Temperature profile and other data collected using moored buoy in the Pacific Ocean (30-N to 30-S) as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 06 November 1977 to 24 March 1978 (NODC Accession 8200053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Air pressure, current, wind and temperature time series data were collected from moored buoys from TOGA Area in Pacific (30 N to 30 S). Buoy data from the equatorial...

  6. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis of Planar Buoy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rakeshbhai; Hanif, Muhammad Adnan; Oad, Rajev Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Different types of wave energy convertors are being studied using the heave motion of floating bodies to generate electricity. In this thesis, we investigate the interaction of floating buoys from hydrodynamic point of view. The dynamic heave response of buoy under two different load cases and represented by single degree of freedom model is studied. The fluid-structure interactions based on 2-dimensional linear potential flow theory were modeled and simulated using finite element method. The...

  7. Worldwide Buoy Technology Survey. Volume 1. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    WB Weiseler Bojen (Germany - Manufacturer) WGDB Wine Glass Discrepancy Buoy WHOI Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ZLBC Zeni Lite Buoy Co. (Japan...de Nantes - St, Nazaire, Port Autonome de Bordeaux , and Port Autonome de Marseille. Overseas locations also include Antigua and St. Frias in the...navigation. The navigation aids used along the Norwegian coast are tailored to the needs of the specific geographic and climatic conditions prevailing

  8. The O-Buoy Chemical Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, P. A.; Williams, C. R.; Rauschenberg, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Autonomous, sea ice-tethered buoys ("O-Buoys") are being deployed across the Arctic sea ice for long-term atmospheric measurements, with several O-Buoys having been deployed within the Hudson Bay, Beaufort Sea, and the North Pole. These buoys provide in-situ measurements of ozone, CO_{2} and BrO, as well as meteorological parameters, over the frozen ocean. O-Buoys were designed to transmit daily data over a period of 2 years while deployed in sea ice, as part of automated ice-drifting stations. Due to the logistical challenges of measurements over the Arctic Ocean region, most long term,in-situ observations of atmospheric chemistry have been made at coastal sites or islands near the coast, leaving large spatial and temporal gaps that O-Buoys can overcome. The significant uncertainty that remains in our understanding of the temporal and spatial variability in these parameters as well as the magnitude and/or frequency of long (CO_{2}) and short (ozone depletion) patterns can be overcome. Advances in floatation, communications, power management, and sensor hardware have been made to the original design to overcome the challenges of diminished Arctic sea ice which have resulted in our longest deployments into the summer so far.

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20070902.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040622-20040809.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72285, Lat: 15.23750 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030819-20050921.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030718.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20040208.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040622-20040808.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20071017.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060325-20080401.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040629-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020724-20020920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030806-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021024.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20010920-20020612.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020918-20030811.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020922-20030806.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030718-20030826.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040208-20060307.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030826-20040809.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030812-20040926.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34457, Lat: 28.41858 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20041005-20060917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20011026-20020917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030824-20040922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81593, Lat: 27.85397 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040927-20060912.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030824-20040421.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011022-20020325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030721-20030823.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63378, Lat: 25.44642 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060915-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20090515.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030305.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20080401.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020423-20020910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20021001-20030321.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051020-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051015.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63378, Lat: 25.44642 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060907-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030807-20040415.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81595, Lat: 27.85396 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20060915-20080828.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72285, Lat: 15.23750 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040622-20050227.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63378, Lat: 25.44642 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060915-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011017-20020120.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34457, Lat: 28.41858 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20041006-20060916.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72288, Lat: 15.23746 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050921-20060525.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011020-20011225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020424-20020802.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20100410.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060918-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021023.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050413-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. IABP Drifting Buoy Pressure, Temperature, Position, and Interpolated Ice Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) maintains a network of drifting buoys to provide meteorological and oceanographic data for real-time operational...

  11. Meteorological, oceanographic, and buoy data from JAMSTEC from five drifting buoys, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter) in the Arctic Ocean from 2000 to 2003 (NODC Accession 0002201)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1999, JAMSTEC and MetOcean Data System Ltd. developed a new drifting buoy, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter), to conduct long-term observations in the...

  12. Drifting and moored buoy data observed during 2015 and assembled by the Global Data Assembly Center for Drifting Buoy Data (formerly Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC)), Canada (NCEI Accession 0156004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data is available in real time to platform operators via telecommunications providers and distributed on the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World...

  13. Implementation of PLUTO Buoy for Monitoring Water Quality in Indonesia, Reflection and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, H.; Krismono, K.; Kusumaningrum, P. D.; Sianturi, D.; Firdaus, Y.; Taukhid, I.; Borneo, B. B.

    2016-02-01

    Research and development of PLUTO (Perairan Selalu Termonitor/Waters Always Monitored) buoy has reached its fourth year in 2015. Try out has been done in coastal waters, fishponds, fishing port ponds, and reservoirs. In the first year (2010) try out has been performed on coastal waters with off line measurement system. The buoy used temperature, salinity, DO and pH sensors. In the second year (2013) try out was carried out on fishponds and fishing port ponds using telemetry measurement system. In the third year (2014) try out was carried out on water reservoir with telemetry measurement system. In the fourth year (2015) android application is developed to monitor 4 water reservoirs and 1 lake. Beside that, observation point is added to 3 point depth for one buoy. Parameters used are temperature, DO, and turbidity. Three PLUTO buoys are placed in each reservoir, at inlet, outlet, and at center of fish cultivation. Through Ocean Science Meeting in New Orleans it is hoped that there will be input and suggestion from the experts for future development of the monitoring system for public inland waters (especially reservoir and lake) in Indonesia. Keywords: buoy PLUTO, salinity, temperature, Dissolved Oxygen (DO), pH, turbidity, telemetry

  14. 33 CFR 401.14 - Anchor marking buoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchor marking buoys. 401.14... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.14 Anchor marking buoys. A highly visible anchor marking buoy of a type approved by the Manager and the Corporation...

  15. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program's Visual Arctic Observing Buoys; The IceGoat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. E.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Rigor, I.; Valentic, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Naval Academy Oceanography Department currently has a curriculum based Polar Science Program (USNA PSP). Within the PSP there is an Arctic Buoy Program (ABP) student research component that will include the design, build, testing and deployment of Arctic Buoys. Establishing an active, field-research program in Polar Science will greatly enhance Midshipman education and research, as well as introduce future Naval Officers to the Arctic environment. The Oceanography Department has engaged the USNA Ocean Engineering, Systems Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, and Computer Science Departments and developed a USNA Visual Arctic Observing Buoy, IceGoat1, which was designed, built, and deployed by midshipmen. The experience gained through Polar field studies and data derived from these buoys will be used to enhance course materials and laboratories and will also be used directly in Midshipman independent research projects. The USNA PSP successfully deployed IceGoat1 during the BROMEX 2012 field campaign out of Barrow, AK in March 2012. This buoy reports near real-time observation of Air Temperature, Sea Temperature, Atmospheric Pressure, Position and Images from 2 mounted webcams. The importance of this unique type of buoy being inserted into the U.S. Interagency Arctic Buoy Program and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (USIABP/IABP) array is cross validating satellite observations of sea ice cover in the Arctic with the buoys webcams. We also propose to develop multiple sensor packages for the IceGoat to include a more robust weather suite, and a passive acoustic hydrophone. Remote cameras on buoys have provided crucial qualitative information that complements the quantitative measurements of geophysical parameters. For example, the mechanical anemometers on the IABP Polar Arctic Weather Station at the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) have at times reported zero winds speeds, and inspection of the images from the NPEO cameras have showed

  16. Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary intakes in children from rural Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape, South Africa. ... Hyperglycaemia and systemic inflammation was also prevalent, but no obesity was observed. Healthy lifestyles ...

  17. Pacific Ocean buoy temperature date - TAO/TRITON database & National Buoy Data Center database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pacific Ocean buoy temperature data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri,...

  18. PECULIARITIES OF CONSTRUCTION PROFILES OF SECURITY SYSTEMS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Lukinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Examines the specific issues of building functional and technological profiles of the security systems to ensure the safety of information systems in the paradigm of functional standardization; shows a view of the system of protection based on the model of OSE/RM; studied the composition and structure of the concept of "defense mechanism" for the purpose of profiling third instalment correction representation of the system of protection.

  19. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion. Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  20. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Lee, Jung-Lyul

    2012-12-01

    An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion.Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  1. Drifting buoy data collected by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) in oceans world-wide from 1984-05-01 to 1998-10-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains drifting buoy data collected from May 1984 through October 1998 from buoys deployed by the National Data Buoy Center, Stennis Space Center,...

  2. Analytical Study on an Oscillating Buoy Wave Energy Converter Integrated into a Fixed Box-Type Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanlie Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating buoy wave energy converter (WEC integrated to an existing box-type breakwater is introduced in this study. The buoy is installed on the existing breakwater and designed to be much smaller than the breakwater in scale, aiming to reduce the construction cost of the WEC. The oscillating buoy works as a heave-type WEC in front of the breakwater towards the incident waves. A power take-off (PTO system is installed on the topside of the breakwater to harvest the kinetic energy (in heave mode of the floating buoy. The hydrodynamic performance of this system is studied analytically based on linear potential-flow theory. Effects of the geometrical parameters on the reflection and transmission coefficients and the capture width ratio (CWR of the system are investigated. Results show that the maximum efficiency of the energy extraction can reach 80% or even higher. Compared with the isolated box-type breakwater, the reflection coefficient can be effectively decreased by using this oscillating buoy WEC, with unchanged transmission coefficient. Thus, the possibility of capturing the wave energy with the oscillating buoy WEC integrated into breakwaters is shown.

  3. An information systems auditor’s profile

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carroll, M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available finally presented a suggested IS auditor’s profile. Mariana Carroll, Alta van der Merwe, Sam Lubbe 2 Introduction The increasing dependence of organizations on computerized systems in recent years has led to concerns and challenges. Some... audit committee on the adequacy of the internal control framework operating within the organisation’s IT and telecommunications (IT&T) environment. With the increasing use of IS by most organisations and the problems encountered in the auditing...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected from profile, discrete sampling, and time series observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from R/V Gulf Challenger near a buoy off the coast of New Hampshire, U.S. in the Gulf of Maine from 2011-01-11 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0142327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected at the buoy off...

  5. Exergy Rate Profile of Multicomponent Distillation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Adewale Adesina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Exergy rate profiles, exergetic efficiency and irreversibility were used to examine the driving forces in multicomponent distillation system with the view to identifying feasible and efficient operating parameters. The mixture used comprised of 5% propane, 15% iso-butane, 25% nbutane, 20% iso-pentane and 35% n-pentane. Operating variables were feed temperature (-30 oC and -80 oC, pressure (800 kPa and 1200 kPa, and reflux-ratio (2 and 6. Stage-by-stage system exergy analysis was estimated. Column profiles of base case -30 oC, -80 oC, -30 oC-reflus ratio 6, -80 oC reflux ratio 6 and base case reflux ratio 6 did not crossed thus are thermodynamically feasible. Base case -30 oC-reflux ratio 2, -80 oC-reflux ratio 2, and base case-reflux ratio 2 were crossed and constricted and are infeasible. Base case results gave efficiency of 81.7% at depropanizer and 65.2% at debutanizer. Base cases sensitivity results with -30 oC, -80 oC and reflux ratio 6, efficiency range 57.40 – 70% and 65.20% - 54.90% for depropanizer and debutanizer respectively. Spitted cases gave 81.7% and 62.20% with more scatter profiles. Splitted feed base case -30 oC design gave the lowest overall system exergy loss rate of 1.12E+6 and efficiency of 95.70%. Design feasible parameters, system efficiency and irreversibility which form basis

  6. Aquarius: transitioning to an unmanned life support buoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S; Cooper, C

    1998-01-01

    The Aquarius underwater laboratory (or habitat) is the world's only operational saturation facility currently supporting scientific research and is operated by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. The underwater laboratory accommodates and supports six aquanauts (scientists and habitat technicians) at habitat depth for 10-30-day missions. In the past, life support systems were provided by a manned support barge or Mobile Support Base (MSB) moored directly above Aquarius. The MSB was manned 24 h a day during saturation missions, which required 12 support staff in three separate shifts. A new unmanned Life Support Buoy (LSB) replaces the MSB and provides life support systems and is the voice, video, and data communications bridge from the habitat to the shore base. The LSB transmits status of all life support systems to the habitat and the shore base, thus minimizing the need for support staff to be present overtop of Aquarius during missions.

  7. CytoBuoy: a step forward towards using flow cytometry in operational oceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B.J. Dubelaar

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available While the performance of biological sensors in real time monitoring networks is limited to bulk values like chlorophyll fluorescence, in practice the implementation of automated phytoplankton taxonomy remains a remote option. Aiming to reduce this gap we developed a flow cytometer called CytoBuoy for autonomous in situ operation, for instance in a moored buoy with wireless data transfer. Although not comparable to microscopy, flow cytometers detect and count particles allowing a limited level of particle characterization based on the light scatter and fluorescence properties of the individual particles. CytoBuoy analyses a large size range of particles, typical for marine coastal zones and fresh waters. The `field´ design implies a tradeoff between the accuracy and versatility of laboratory flow cytometers and the qualities needed for trouble free autonomous operation in situ. The optics and electronics however were designed for maximal reflection of the particle morphology in the measured signals. Whereas standard cytometers reduce these to single peak or area `listmode´ numbers, the signal courses are preserved fully by CytoBuoy and transferred to the computer as raw data, which allows more extended morphological analysis. Extended field tests will have to show how the system holds in various environments and weather conditions.

  8. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  9. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.248 Wildlife... tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b) Transmitters...

  10. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  11. Toxicological profile of therapeutic nanodelivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Helder A

    2012-10-01

    Several of the newly developed drug molecules show potent biological activity, but exhibit poor pharmacokinetic properties that may hinder their effective delivery to the intended site of action. In order to improve their pharmacological effect, these molecules can be associated with drug carriers in order to overcome these inherent difficulties. An ideal drug delivery agent requires therefore biocompatibility, improved solubility of a loaded drug or peptide, releasing of the payload at the absorption site and, at the same time, leaving undisturbed cell structure and function, and maintaining the physiological milieu. By taking advantage of the valuable properties of nanoscale delivery systems, such as increased surface area, improved solubility of hydrophobic drugs, possibility to encapsulate and protect drugs from degradation and reduced immunogenic potential and toxicological effect, new therapeutic options can be brought forth and improve the clinical arsenal for numerous diseases. The use of nanodelivery systems can even promote the re-investigation of pharmacokinetically less favourable, but biologically more active compounds. Although very promising, these systems may also encompass inherent toxicological issues, mainly due to their size and shape, physical interaction with cellular membranes and organelles, immunological reactions, long- or short-term tissue accumulation, and degradation products. Pharmaceutical nanodelivery systems, such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers and mesoporous silica and silicon based nanoparticles have shown great potential in preclinical applications and several of these nanosystems are even undergoing clinical trials. They have been found to combine drug delivery properties with an acceptable toxicological profile, which has made them prime candidates for several drug delivery approaches. This review aims to provide and correlate the toxicological studies with the drug delivery properties of the above mentioned

  12. 33 CFR 149.320 - What are the requirements for ring life buoys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... length. The light must be mounted on a bracket near the ring life buoy so that, when the ring life buoy is cast loose, the light will be pulled free of the bracket. (c) To each ring life buoy, there must... equipment. (b) Each ring life buoy must have a floating electric water light approved under approval series...

  13. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces the Wavestar wave energy converter and presents the implementation of model predictive controller that maximizes the power generation. The ocean wave power is extracted using a hydraulic electric generator which is connected to an oscillating buoy. The power generator...... is an additive device attached to the buoy which may include damping, stiffness or similar terms hence will affect the dynamic motion of the buoy. Therefore such a device can be seen as a closed-loop controller. The objective of the wave energy converter is to harvest as much energy from sea as possible...

  14. Improvement of the accuracy of continuous GPS/Acoustic measurement using a slackly moored buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imano, M.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Honsho, C.; Hino, R.

    2016-12-01

    For the real-time detection of seafloor crustal movement and tsunami associated with large earthquakes, it is necessary to monitor them continuously in their source regions. For this purpose, Tohoku University, JAMSTEC, and JAXA have co-developed a continuous GPS/Acoustic (GPS/A) measurement system using a moored buoy, and the third sea-trial is ongoing for a year in Kumano-nada, Nankai Trough. In this presentation, we report of the positioning accuracy of the continuous GPS/Acoustic measurement in the buoy system. We have adopted the array positioning technique developed by researchers at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography with some improvements. The advantage of this method is that errors in assumed sound velocity and array geometry (relative positions of individual seafloor transponders) little affect positioning results when measurements are conducted in the vicinity of the array center. However, the GPS/A measurement using a moored buoy is generally conducted under much worse condition than the conventional one using a research vessel. In our system, the mooring cable length was determined to be 1.5 times the water depth for safety reasons against strong current. Therefore, the buoy is drifting within a relatively wide area by the wind and the current, and measurements are randomly performed at various points within the area. These features can lead to significant systematic errors in the array positioning, because the effect of errors in pre-defined array geometry increases as the observation point goes farther from the array center. At the moments, the positioning accuracy of GPS/A measurement using a moored buoy is estimated as 0.6/0.7 m, for the EW/NS components, respectively, from the data obtained during the third sea-trial. It is considered that errors in the assumed array geometry result in considerable errors in the array positioning. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the array geometry more precisely in order to improve the accuracy of GPS

  15. Validation of FOAM near-surface ocean current forecasts using Lagrangian drifting buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, E. W.; Martin, M. J.; Hyder, P.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the quality of near-surface current forecasts from the FOAM ocean forecasting system is assessed using the trajectories of Lagrangian drifting buoys. A method is presented for deriving pseudo-Eulerian estimates of ocean currents from the positions of Surface Velocity Program drifters and the resulting data are compared to velocities observed by the global tropical moored buoy array. A quantitative analysis of the global FOAM velocities is performed for the period 2007 and 2008 using currents derived from over 3000 unique drifters (providing an average of 650 velocity observations per day). A potential bias is identified in the Southern Ocean which appears to be caused by wind-slip in the drifter dataset as a result of drogue loss. The drifter-derived currents are also used to show how the data assimilation scheme and a recent system upgrade impact upon the quality of FOAM current forecasts.

  16. Validation of FOAM near-surface ocean current forecasts using Lagrangian drifting buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. W. Blockley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the quality of near-surface current forecasts from the FOAM ocean forecasting system is assessed using the trajectories of Lagrangian drifting buoys. A method is presented for deriving pseudo-Eulerian estimates of ocean currents from the positions of Surface Velocity Program drifters and the resulting data are compared to velocities observed by the global tropical moored buoy array. A quantitative analysis of the global FOAM velocities is performed for the period 2007 and 2008 using currents derived from over 3000 unique drifters (providing an average of 650 velocity observations per day. A potential bias is identified in the Southern Ocean which appears to be caused by wind-slip in the drifter dataset as a result of drogue loss. The drifter-derived currents are also used to show how the data assimilation scheme and a recent system upgrade impact upon the quality of FOAM current forecasts.

  17. Directional waverider buoy in Indian waters - Experiences of NIO

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    Information on directional waves is extremely important in the design of harbour structures, such as breakwaters and jetties and to study the sediment transport pattern. Till recent days our country has been using waverider buoys which give all wave...

  18. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... are aids to navigation structures which are permanently fixed to the earth's surface. They range from... have a round shape. (2) Mariners attempting to pass a buoy close aboard risk collision with a yawing...

  19. Fatigue Life Prediction of the Keel Structure of a Tsunami Buoy Using Spectral Fatigue Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Yustiawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One  of  the  components  of  the  Indonesia  Tsunami  Early  Warning  System  (InaTEWS  is  a  surface  buoy.  The  surface buoy  is  exposed  to  dynamic  and  random  loadings  while  operating  at  sea,  particularly  due  to  waves.  Because  of  the cyclic  nature  of  the  wave  load,  this  may  result  in  a fatigue  damage  of  the  keel  structure,  which  connects  the  mooring line  with  the  buoy  hull.  The  operating  location  of  the buoy  is  off  the  Java  South  Coast  at  the  coordinate (10.3998  S, 108.3417  E. To  determine  the  stress  transfer  function, model  tests  were  performed,  measuring  the  buoy  motions  and the stress at the mooring line. A spectral fatigue analysis method is applied for the purpose of estimating the fatigue life of the keel structure. Utilizing the  model-test results, the S-N curve obtained in a previous study and the  wave data at the buoy location, it is found that the fatigue life of the keel structure is approximately 11 years.

  20. Methods and Tools for Profiling and Control of Distributed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukharev Roman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes and standardizes methods for profiling distributed systems that focus on simulation to conduct experiments and build a graph model of the system. The theory of queueing networks is used for simulation modeling of distributed systems, receiving and processing user requests. To automate the above method of profiling distributed systems the software application was developed with a modular structure and similar to a SCADA-system.

  1. OPTIMAL LOCATION OF TSUNAMI WARNING BUOYS AND SEA LEVEL MONITORING STATIONS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study determines the optimal location of detection components of a tsunami warning system in the Mediterranean region given the existing and planned infrastructure. Specifically, we examine the locations of existing tsunameters DART buoys and coastal sea-level monitoring stations to see if additional buoys and stations will improve the proportion of the coastal population that may receive a warning ensuring a timely response. A spreadsheet model is used to examine this issue. Based on the historical record of tsunamis and assuming international cooperation in tsunami detection, it is demonstrated that the existing network of sea level stations and tsunameters enable around ninety percent of the coastal population of the Mediterranean Sea to receive a 15 minute warning. Improvement in this result can be achieved through investment in additional real-time, coastal, sea level monitoring stations. This work was undertaken as a final year undergraduate research project.

  2. Fatigue Life Prediction of the Keel Structure of a Tsunami Buoy Using Spectral Fatigue Analysis Method

    OpenAIRE

    Angga Yustiawan; Ketut Suastika; Wibowo Nugroho

    2013-01-01

    One  of  the  components  of  the  Indonesia  Tsunami  Early  Warning  System  (InaTEWS)  is  a  surface  buoy.  The  surface buoy  is  exposed  to  dynamic  and  random  loadings  while  operating  at  sea,  particularly  due  to  waves.  Because  of  the cyclic  nature  of  the  wave  load...

  3. Faculty Profile Systems: New Services and Roles for Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Marlee; Macklin, Lisa A.; Mangiafico, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Many universities have implemented faculty profile systems that capture faculty and researchers' scholarly outputs and activities. These systems usually include public profiles and tools to help find collaborators or experts. They may be used to create reports for faculty annual reviews or for promotion and tenure, or to assist faculty with…

  4. Adaptive Sensing Based on Profiles for Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a profile-based sensing framework for adaptive sensor systems based on models that relate possibly heterogeneous sensor data and profiles generated by the models to detect events. With these concepts, three phases for building the sensor systems are extracted from two examples: a combustion control sensor system for an automobile engine, and a sensor system for home security. The three phases are: modeling, profiling, and managing trade-offs. Designing and building a sensor system involves mapping the signals to a model to achieve a given mission.

  5. CAMEX-3 AIRBORNE VERTICAL ATMOSPHERE PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 DC-8 Airborne Vertical Atmosphere Profiling System (AVAPS) uses dropwindsonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to measure the atmospheric...

  6. CAMEX-3 AIRBORNE VERTICAL ATMOSPHERE PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 DC-8 Airborne Vertical Atmosphere Profiling System (AVAPS) uses dropwinsonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to measure the atmospheric...

  7. Drifting buoy data from buoy casts in a world wide distribution as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) from 1989-07-01 to 1989-07-31 (NODC Accession 8900227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data were collected using buoy casts in a world wide distribution from July 1, 1989, to July 31, 1989. Data were submitted by National Data Buoy Center...

  8. Oceanographic Multisensor Buoy Based on Low Cost Sensors for Posidonia Meadows Monitoring in Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some underwater areas with high ecological interest that should be monitored. Posidonia and seagrasses exert considerable work in protecting the coastline from erosion. In these areas, many animals and organisms live and find the grassland food and the protection against predators. It is considered a bioindicator of the quality of coastal marine waters. It is important to monitor them and maintain these ecological communities as clean as possible. In this paper, we present an oceanographic buoy for Posidonia meadows monitoring. It is based on a set of low cost sensors which are able to collect data from water such as salinity, temperature, and turbidity and from the weather as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall, among others. The system is mounted in a buoy which keeps it isolated to possible oxidation problems. Data gathered are processed using a microcontroller. Finally the buoy is connected with a base station placed on the mainland through a wireless connection using a FlyPort module. The network performance is checked in order to ensure that no delays will be generated on the data transmission. This proposal could be used to monitor other areas with special ecological interest and for monitoring and supervising aquaculture activities.

  9. Using Buoy and Radar Data to Study Sudden Wind Gusts Over Coastal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Georgios; Chronis, Themis; Lang, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Significant sudden wind gusts can pose a threat to aviation near the coastline, as well as small (sailing) boats and commercial ships approaching the ports. Such cases can result in wind speed changes of more than an order of magnitude within 5 minutes, which can then last up to 20 minutes or more. Although the constellation of scatterometers is a good means of studying maritime convection, those sudden gusts are not easily captured because of the low time resolution. The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) provides continuous measurements of wind speed and direction along the US coastal regions every 6 minutes. Buoys are platforms placed at specific places on the seas, especially along coastlines, providing data for atmospheric and oceanic studies. Next Generation Radars (NEXRADs), after the recent upgrade of the network to dual-pol systems, offer enhanced capabilities to study atmospheric phenomena. NEXRADs provide continuous full-volume scans approximately every 5 minutes and therefore are close to the time resolution of the buoy measurements. Use of single- Doppler retrievals might also provide a means of further validation.

  10. Development of an Autonomous Aerosol Sampler for Ocean Buoys and Land Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scholkovitz, Edward

    1998-01-01

    ... (aerosol embedded filters) from moored ocean buoys and remote areas on land. Research on aerosols, in particular, and atmospheric chemistry, in general, has not been previously attempted from buoys...

  11. A comprehensive comparison of SST of satellite, ship, buoy and model data in the sea around Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, M.; Cho, Y.; Kwak, H.; Seo, G.

    2012-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) affects atmospheric temperature through air-sea interaction proces. Therefore a sufficient number of SST data with high accuracy is essential for improving weather forecasting precisely. A comparison of SST data provided by several oceanic and atmospheric organization is necessary because methods in observation and calculation have different properties and processes respectively. In situ data observed routinely by National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Korea is compared with the satellite observed SSTs (AVHRR+AMSR, OSTIA). Buoy data operated by Korea Meteorological Administration is compared with the satellite observed SSTs and model SST calculated by ocean circulation model (Regional Ocean Modeling system). with harmonic analysis. These comparative studies clearly reveal that satellite observed SST is about 2°C higher than that of in situ SST in coastal area. The difference of SST between in situ SST and satellite SST in summer is higher than that in winter. The correlation coefficient of in situ data with the AVHRR+AMSR SST (r2=0.65) is lower than that with OSTIA SST (r2=0.80). Annual amplitude of SST observed by buoy, satellite and calculated by model in coastal area is commonly larger than that of SST of those in open ocean. Phase difference of SST between satellite and buoy data is about 10° at 365-day cycle. Phase difference of SST between model and buoy data is about 20° at 365-day cycle.

  12. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen N.; Sichani, Mahdi T.; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces the Wavestar wave energy converter and presents the implementation of model predictive controller that maximizes the power generation. The ocean wave power is extracted using a hydraulic electric generator which is connected to an oscillating buoy. The power generator...... is an additive device attached to the buoy which may include damping, stiffness or similar terms hence will affect the dynamic motion of the buoy. Therefore such a device can be seen as a closed-loop controller. The objective of the wave energy converter is to harvest as much energy from sea as possible....... This approach is then taken into account and an MPC controller is designed for a model wave energy converter and implemented on a numerical example. Further, the power outtake of this controller is compared to the optimal controller as an indicator of the performance of the designed controller....

  13. Soil Temperature and Moisture Profile (STAMP) System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The soil temperature and moisture profile system (STAMP) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil water content (soil-type specific and loam type), plant water availability, soil conductivity, and real dielectric permittivity as a function of depth below the ground surface at half-hourly intervals, and precipitation at one-minute intervals. The profiles are measured directly by in situ probes at all extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The profiles are derived from measurements of soil energy conductivity. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil. The STAMP system replaced the SWATS system in early 2016.

  14. Meteorological buoy measurements in the Iceland Sea, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún

    2017-10-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) conducted meteorological buoy measurements in the central Iceland Sea in the time period 2007-2009, specifically in the northern Dreki area on the southern segment of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Due to difficulties in deployment and operations, in situ measurements in this region are sparse. Here the buoy, deployment and measurements are described with the aim of giving a future user of the data set information that is as comprehensive as possible. The data set has been quality-checked, suspect data removed and the data set made publicly available from PANGAEA Data Publisher (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.876206).

  15. UpTempO Buoys for Understanding and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    program was initiated by Professor Peter Niiler at Scripps (UCSD) to drop 200 m long thermistor string buoys ahead of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico...via Air Force C130 planes, the so- called “ hurricane hunters.” In recent years, a surplus of buoys developed which coincided with a lack of... displacement over the retreat seasons of 2007-2013 in the Laptev Sea. The ice edge advances southward only when the wind is strong and the open water to

  16. Novel two-stage piezoelectric-based ocean wave energy harvesters for moored or unmoored buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R.; Rastegar, J.

    2009-03-01

    Harvesting mechanical energy from ocean wave oscillations for conversion to electrical energy has long been pursued as an alternative or self-contained power source. The attraction to harvesting energy from ocean waves stems from the sheer power of the wave motion, which can easily exceed 50 kW per meter of wave front. The principal barrier to harvesting this power is the very low and varying frequency of ocean waves, which generally vary from 0.1Hz to 0.5Hz. In this paper the application of a novel class of two-stage electrical energy generators to buoyant structures is presented. The generators use the buoy's interaction with the ocean waves as a low-speed input to a primary system, which, in turn, successively excites an array of vibratory elements (secondary system) into resonance - like a musician strumming a guitar. The key advantage of the present system is that by having two decoupled systems, the low frequency and highly varying buoy motion is converted into constant and much higher frequency mechanical vibrations. Electrical energy may then be harvested from the vibrating elements of the secondary system with high efficiency using piezoelectric elements. The operating principles of the novel two-stage technique are presented, including analytical formulations describing the transfer of energy between the two systems. Also, prototypical design examples are offered, as well as an in-depth computer simulation of a prototypical heaving-based wave energy harvester which generates electrical energy from the up-and-down motion of a buoy riding on the ocean's surface.

  17. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume VI. International agreement profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on world energy. The international agreement profiles in WENDS are all energy-related and are organized by energy technology. These are: coal; conservation; fusion; geothermal; nuclear fission; oil, gas, and shale; solar, wind, and ocean thermal; and other (cooperation in electrical power equipment acquisition, energy, energy research, etc.). The agreement profiles are accessible by energy technology and alphabetically by country.

  18. lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to estimate the mean prevalence of dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as CVD risk factors as well as dietary intakes and to investigate associations between these CVD risk factors and dietary intakes among apparently healthy school-aged.

  19. The November 2011 irruption of buoy barnacles Dosima fascicularis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were accompanied by large numbers of bluebottles Physalia physalis and other neustonic organisms. Of 100 buoy barnacle colonies examined, only three were attached to obvious floating items (two Janthina shells and one piece of plastic). Dissection failed to reveal foreign attachment sites in 40 floats, but digesting ...

  20. Oceansat-2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Goswami and Rajagopal. (2003) showed the impact of scatterometer data assimilation in numerical models to improve the weather forecast over India. Satheesan et al. (2007) evaluated the performance of QuikSCAT wind vec- tors against in-situ buoy observations over the. Indian Ocean and reported the mean difference.

  1. Determination of wave direction using an orbital following buoy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Almeida, A.M.; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Vethamony, P.

    as computed simulated data. This is a preliminary report on program development. In the case of observed data, wave directions obtained with BUOY-D-P agreed within within plus or minus 5 degrees with the single available visual estimate of swell direction...

  2. Small Flux Buoy for Characterizing Marine Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    34 7. VectorNav VN-100 Rugged Accelerometer :......................... 34 C. MASFLUX FIELD DEPLOYMENT AND DATA QUALITY...oceanographic and GPS sensor specifications. ........ 31 Table 3. Accelerometer and compass specifications. ....................................... 32...superior over other flux sampling buoys in its wave measurements. Owing to its unique configurations of capacitance wires, it can sample much smaller

  3. Precise-Orientation-Beamforming Scheme for Wireless Communications between Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing wireless sensor network (WSN to monitor the marine environment is one of the major techniques in oceanographic monitoring, and how to increase the limited communication distance between the buoys in WSN has become a hot research issue. In this paper, a new technique called precise-orientation-beamforming (POB which uses the beamforming algorithm to increase the communication distance between buoys is presented. As was widely applied in the radar and sonar, the beamforming method was not used to extend the communication distance between buoys so far. The POB method overcomes the unstable position of buoys caused by waves by implementing the orientation filter. The whole process includes two steps: First, the real-time attitude of the antenna array is calculated by the orientation filter. With the known relative direction of the destination node to the antenna array, the second step is to control phased array antenna beamforming parameters, directing the beam at the destination node. The POB scheme has been simulated under the condition of regular waves. The results reveal that POB provides significant power gains and improves the distance between two communicating nodes effectively.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF BUOY-MOUNTED OCEANOGRAPHIC SENSORS (BMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    transducers. (c) analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of digital versus frequency transmission modes for sensor-to-buoy data link; (d) development ... of and potential use of an inductively coupled clamp-on sensor technique; (e) techniques for abatement of biological growth (fouling) on sensitive

  5. Optimization of wave energy capture of wave-powered navigational lighting buoys of seadromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Guangda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper proposes an optimized design for wave-power navigational lighting buoys of seadromes.[Methods] Based on the theory of three-dimensional potential flow, the buoyant motion response of a buoy is calculated. A type of array of wave-power navigational lighting buoys located in an offshore seadrome is proposed,and a procedure for the design optimization of its component buoys is presented. Matching the best Power Take-Off(PTO damping, the diameter to draft ratio and array distance with the best energy capture width ratio are acquired, and the energy capture for the short-term forecast of the buoy array is accomplished. On this basis, combined with the actual sea conditions, energy capture for the long-term forecast of an individual buoy is accomplished. The influence of the buoy diameter, buoy draft and array distance on the energy capture width ratio is discussed.[Results] The results show that the energy capture width ratio is at its greatest when the diameter to draft ratio is between 2.4-2.6; the smaller the distance between array buoys, the greater the energy capture width of each buoy.[Conclusions] The results can provide a reference and suggestions for the optimization of the design of wave energy generation for arrays buoy.

  6. A year-long journey across the Arctic Ocean: the story of the chemical composition of the air as recorded by O-Buoy # 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcheva, S.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Carlsen, M. S.; Chavez, F.; Matrai, P. A.; Perovich, D. K.; Shepson, P.; Simpson, W. R.; Valentic, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    A number of autonomous, ice-tethered buoys have been deployed in different parts of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Ocean as part of the USA-Canada collaborative project O-Buoy since 2009. The main feature of these buoys is their capability to simultaneously measure the concentrations of atmospheric constituents important for climate change and air quality, such as ozone, carbon dioxide, bromine monoxide, and meteorological parameters directly over the sea ice. O-Buoy # 4 was deployed from the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent icebreaker along a survey trip undertaken by the Canadian Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Program at latitude 88.15°N and longitude 157.49°W on September 5, 2011. O-Buoy # 4 provided input into various fields of the Arctic contemporary measurement and observation technology that include equipment design, instrumentation control, power management and analytical instrumentation performance through approximately a year long journey, guided by the Arctic transpolar drift system and moving close to the North Pole. The relevant meteorological observations have been integrated into the marine weather observation network of WMO and the wind speed and direction data records were utilized for weather forecast model validation purposes. Indisputably, the highest achievement of O-buoy #4 is the continuous data set presenting the seasonal levels and the variations of the chemical composition of the atmosphere in the High Arctic. The comparison of the ozone concentrations record with the only existing year-long, ice-based record of ozone data collected by the French schooner TARA and other coastal observatories such as Alert (82.45°N, 62.508°W) supports the hypothesis made by Hopper et all. back in 1994 that the air over the Arctic Ocean surface contains ozone at very low concentrations through the spring season. Unfortunately, no other long term observations over the ice exists to compare O-buoy recorded data with to advance our understanding of the path, the

  7. Ohio Agricultural Business and Production Systems. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Kershaw, Isaac; Mokma, Arnie

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in agricultural business and production systems. Following an introduction, the Ohio College Tech Prep standards and program, and relevant definitions are described. Next are the technical competency profiles for these…

  8. Mississippi Quality Step System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS)Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Mississippi's Quality Step System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Application…

  9. New Hampshire Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of New Hampshire's Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  10. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  11. Missouri Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Missouri's Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  12. GPM Ground Validation Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) OLYMPEX dataset contains dropsonde vertical profiles of atmospheric pressure, air...

  13. Fermilab booster ion profile monitor system using LABVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagel, J.R.; Chen, D.; Crisp, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    1995-05-05

    The new Booster Ion Profile Monitor has been implemented to simultaneously capture both horizontal and vertical profiles at a once-per-turn sample rate, throughout a Booster cycle. The system uses LabVIEW software running on a MacIntosh Quadra 650 talking to both VME and CAMAC hardware. Microchannel plate voltage is turned on just prior to making a measurement and automatically turned off when the measurement is complete. This action allows using a high gain while preserving microchannel plate lifetime. The data captured may be archived for later analysis. Current analysis available include position, emittance/sigma, 2D color intensity plot of raw data, and single turn profiles for any turn during the cycle. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Fermilab booster ion profile monitor system using LABVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagel, J. R.; Chen, D.; Crisp, J.

    1995-05-01

    The new Booster Ion Profile Monitor has been implemented to simultaneously capture both horizontal and vertical profiles at a once-per-turn sample rate, throughout a Booster cycle. The system uses LabVIEW software running on a MacIntosh Quadra 650 talking to both VME and CAMAC hardware. Microchannel plate voltage is turned on just prior to making a measurement and automatically turned off when the measurement is complete. This action allows using a high gain while preserving microchannel plate lifetime. The data captured may be archived for later analysis. Current analysis available include position, emittance/sigma, 2D color intensity plot of raw data, and single turn profiles for any turn during the cycle.

  15. The wave buoy analogy - estimating high-frequency wave excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the wave buoy analogy where a ship is considered as a wave buoy, so that measured ship responses are used as a basis to estimate wave spectra and associated sea state parameters. The study presented follows up on a previous paper, Nielsen [Nielsen UD. Response-based estimation...... of sea state parameters — influence of filtering. Ocean Engineering 2007;34:1797–810.], where time series of ship responses were generated from a known wave spectrum for the purpose of the inverse process — the estimation of the underlying wave excitations. Similar response generations and vice versa...... be estimated reasonably well, even considering high-frequency wave components of a wind sea wave spectrum....

  16. Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy: Stage 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi

    2017-01-01

    . The model is further able to give an estimate of the power production of the device in a given wave climate as well as other statistical estimates of the device motions and loads. The performance of different device shapes and dimensions has been evaluated, where displacement limits appropriate for each......This report presents the results of the first stage of the project "Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy". The objectives of this stage are to develop a numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy, a self-reacting wave energy device consisting of two heaving bodies, and to investigate a number...... of variations of the device geometry in order to arrive at a design optimized for the target deployment site. The findings will be used as a basis to inform planned small-scale wave tank tests. A review of literature on self-reacting wave energy devices consisting of two heaving bodies has been conducted...

  17. Random-Profiles-Based 3D Face Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joongrock Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a noble nonintrusive three-dimensional (3D face modeling system for random-profile-based 3D face recognition is presented. Although recent two-dimensional (2D face recognition systems can achieve a reliable recognition rate under certain conditions, their performance is limited by internal and external changes, such as illumination and pose variation. To address these issues, 3D face recognition, which uses 3D face data, has recently received much attention. However, the performance of 3D face recognition highly depends on the precision of acquired 3D face data, while also requiring more computational power and storage capacity than 2D face recognition systems. In this paper, we present a developed nonintrusive 3D face modeling system composed of a stereo vision system and an invisible near-infrared line laser, which can be directly applied to profile-based 3D face recognition. We further propose a novel random-profile-based 3D face recognition method that is memory-efficient and pose-invariant. The experimental results demonstrate that the reconstructed 3D face data consists of more than 50 k 3D point clouds and a reliable recognition rate against pose variation.

  18. ASSIMILATION OF REAL-TIME DEEP SEA BUOY DATA FOR TSUNAMI FORECASTING ALONG THAILAND’S ANDAMAN COASTLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seree Supharatid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami enhanced the necessity for a tsunami early warning system for countries bordering the Indian Ocean, including Thailand. This paper describes the assimilation of real-time deep sea buoy data for tsunami forecasting along Thailand’s Andaman coastline. Firstly, the numerical simulation (by the linear and non-linear shallow water equations was carried out for hypothetical cases of tsunamigenic earthquakes with epicenters located in the Andaman micro plate. Outputs of the numerical model are tsunami arrival times and the maximum wave height that can be expected at 58 selected communities along Thailand Andaman coastline and two locations of DART buoys in the Indian Ocean. Secondly, a “neural” network model (GRNN was developed to access the data from the numerical computations for subsequent construction of a tsunami database that can be displayed on a web-based system. This database can be updated with the integration from two DART buoys and from several GRNN models.

  19. Snow depth evolution on sea ice from Snow Buoy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, M.; Arndt, S.; Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Katlein, C.; König-Langlo, G.; Nicolaus, A.; Rossmann, H. L.; Schiller, M.; Schwegmann, S.; Langevin, D.

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover is an Essential Climate Variable. On sea ice, snow dominates the energy and momentum exchanges across the atmosphere-ice-ocean interfaces, and actively contributes to sea ice mass balance. Yet, snow depth on sea ice is one of the least known and most difficult to observe parameters of the Arctic and Antarctic; mainly due to its exceptionally high spatial and temporal variability. In this study; we present a unique time series dataset of snow depth and air temperature evolution on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice recorded by autonomous instruments. Snow Buoys record snow depth with four independent ultrasonic sensors, increasing the reliability of the measurements and allowing for additional analyses. Auxiliary measurements include surface and air temperature, barometric pressure and GPS position. 39 deployments of such Snow Buoys were achieved over the last three years either on drifting pack ice, on landfast sea ice or on an ice shelf. Here we highlight results from two pairs of Snow Buoys installed on drifting pack ice in the Weddell Sea. The data reveals large regional differences in the annual cycle of snow depth. Almost no reduction in snow depth (snow melt) was observed in the inner and southern part of the Weddell Sea, allowing a net snow accumulation of 0.2 to 0.9 m per year. In contrast, summer snow melt close to the ice edge resulted in a decrease of about 0.5 m during the summer 2015/16. Another array of eight Snow Buoys was installed on central Arctic sea ice in September 2015. Their air temperature record revealed exceptionally high air temperatures in the subsequent winter, even exceeding the melting point but with almost no impact on snow depth at that time. Future applications of Snow Buoys on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice will allow additional inter-annual studies of snow depth and snow processes, e.g. to support the development of snow depth data products from airborne and satellite data or though assimilation in numerical models.

  20. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  1. The M3A multi-sensor buoy network of the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zanon

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A network of three multi-sensor timeseries stations able to deliver real time physical and biochemical observations of the upper thermocline has been developed for the needs of the Mediterranean Forecasting System during the MFSTEP project. They follow the experience of the prototype M3A system that was developed during the MFSPP project and has been tested during a pilot pre-operational period of 22 months (2000–2001. The systems integrate sensors for physical (temperature, salinity, turbidity, current speed and direction as well as optical and chemical observations (dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, PAR, nitrate. The south Aegean system (E1-M3A follows a modular design using independent mooring lines and collects biochemical data in the upper 100 m and physical data in the upper 500 m of the water column. The south Adriatic buoy system (E2-M3A uses similar instrumentation but on a single mooring line and also tests a new method of pumping water samples from relatively deep layers, performing analysis in the protected "dry" environment of the buoy interior. The Ligurian Sea system (W1-M3A is an ideal platform for air-sea interaction processes since it hosts a large number of meteorological sensors while its ocean instrumentation, with real time transmission capabilities, is confined in the upper 50 m layer. Despite their different architecture, the three systems have common sampling strategy, quality control and data management procedures. The network operates in the Mediterranean Sea since autumn 2004 collecting timeseries data for calibration and validation of the forecasting system as well for process studies of regional dynamics.

  2. Theory and application of calibration techniques for an NDBC directional wave measurements buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, K. E.; Lau, J. C.-K.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) deployed a 10-m-diameter discus-type hull in the Pacific Ocean some 185 km southwest of Los Angeles, CA, in April 1984. Aboard this hull was an electronic system capable of acquiring, processing, and transmitting to shore directional wave measurements. For this system to produce accurate data, a number of factors had to be taken into account. These factors included noise, amplitude and phase alterations due to mechanical and electrical components, and magnetic fields arising from the hull. Comprehensive calibration and verification techniques were developed and applied to ensure data quality. The system configuration is described with emphasis on the methods used in the data processing to correct for the various factors. Examples of the resulting corrected data are given.

  3. Exact boundary controllability of nodal profile for quasilinear hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tatsien; Gu, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the exact boundary controllability of nodal profile, a new kind of exact boundary controllability stimulated by some practical applications. This kind of controllability is useful in practice as it does not require any precisely given final state to be attained at a suitable time t=T by means of boundary controls, instead it requires the state to exactly fit any given demand (profile) on one or more nodes after a suitable time t=T by means of boundary controls. In this book we present a general discussion of this kind of controllability for general 1-D first order quasilinear hyperbolic systems and for general 1-D quasilinear wave equations on an interval as well as on a tree-like network using a modular-structure construtive method, suggested in LI Tatsien's monograph "Controllability and Observability for Quasilinear Hyperbolic Systems"(2010), and we establish a complete theory on the local exact boundary controllability of nodal profile for 1-D quasilinear hyp...

  4. 21 CFR 866.6040 - Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gene expression profiling test system for breast... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6040 Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis. (a) Identification. A gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis...

  5. Global Near Real-Time Temperature and Salinity Profile Data from the GTSPP project from 9/1/1999 - 11/30/1999 (NODC Accession 0000059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using moored buoy, profiling floats, and XBT casts in a world wide distribution from 01 September 1999 to 30 November 1999....

  6. UpTempO Buoys for Understanding and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    GPS, alkaline batteries for 1.5 years of operation, Iridium antenna , sea level pressure sensor, and sea surface temperature sensor at 0.12 m depth... NOAA product, (ii) the high resolution MUR product available from JPL’s PODAAC = Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center, and (iii...observations and the widely used NOAA OIv2 (a.k.a. “Reynolds”) SST field. A major goal of the overall UpTempO buoy program is to improve these fields by

  7. Power Production Analysis of the OE Buoy WEC for the CORES Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    , however, suffers from the occurrence of sudden stops (2). Another type of self-rectifying turbine, an impulse turbine, was used in place of a Wells turbine to, in refit of the OE Buoy, in order to compare the two types.OE Buoy was deployed in Galway Bay, Ireland during March, April and May of 2011, during...

  8. Initial Construction and Deployments of the Long-Term Ambient-Noise Buoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    acoustic ambient noise in the deep ocean. With a nucleus of surplus equipment from two buoy projects of the 1960’s plus additional equipment designed...and built at NRL, seven Ambient Noise Buoys were fabricated. One was designed for investigation in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz with four

  9. Drifting buoy data observed during 1985 through 1989 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9100057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 2 January 1985 to 31 December 1989. Data were processed by...

  10. Drifting buoy data observed during 1992 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 01 January 1992 to 31 December 1992. Data were processed by...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N110W from 2006-11-22 to 2016-10-07 (NCEI Accession 0130052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  17. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  18. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  20. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S180W from 2006-11-16 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  1. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N125W from 2006-08-26 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  2. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-06-05 (NCEI Accession 0131447)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  4. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131445)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  5. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  6. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0131173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  7. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  8. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  9. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T9N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N110W from 2006-11-20 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  17. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  18. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  20. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  1. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  2. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  4. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  5. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S110W from 2006-11-22 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  6. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  7. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  8. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  9. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-05 (NCEI Accession 0130063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N125W from 2006-08-27 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131195)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S95W from 2006-11-08 to 2016-07-07 (NCEI Accession 0131186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S95W from 2006-11-09 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  17. Seabed resident event driven profiling system (SREP). Concept, design and tests

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Maurya, P.K.; Fernandes, L.; Madhan, R.; Desa, E.S.; Dabolkar, N.A.; Navelkar, G.S.; Naik, L.; Shetye, V.G.; Shetty, N.B.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Nagvekar, S.; Vimalakumari, D.

    The seabed resident event driven profiling system (SREP) described here offers a novel, optimized approach to profiling in coastal waters from seabed to sea surface during the rough seas encountered in the southwest monsoon season (June...

  18. Accurate Linking of Lake Erie Water Level with Shoreline Datum Using GPS Buoy and Satellite Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chien Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to accurately link the water level to the shoreline vertical datum for various applications including coastal management, lake/river/estuary/wetland hydrological or storm surge modeling/forecasting. Coastal topography is historically surveyed and referenced to the predetermined vertical datum in terms of orthometric heights, or the heights above the geoid, which is poorly known in terms of accuracy and lack of adequate spatial resolution for coastal applications such as estuary or storm surge modeling. We demonstrate an accurate linking of the lake surface to a shoreline datum using satellite techniques, including GPS buoy and satellite altimetry, water level gauges, and local geoid and lake circulation models. The possible error sources are analyzed and an error budget is reported in this study. An innovated method to estimate geoid height near the water level gauge using a GPS buoy is proposed. It is found that at a 95% confidence interval, the method is consistent with the National Geodetic Survey GEOID03 geoid model. The lake surface represented using a lake circulation model provided by the Great Lakes Forecasting Systems is also verified with kriging based on the data (1999 - 2001 from the water level gauge, and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter. Mean discrepancies of 2.7 and 7.2 cm are found with the data from the gauges around Lake Erie, and from the combination of the gauges and the altimeter, respectively. It reveals that the current dominant limitation of more accurate linking of water surface to shoreline is the insufficient knowledge of geoid in the current models. Further improvement is feasible through more accurate and higher resolution modeling of the lake geoid.

  19. Evidence that grey seals (Halichoerus grypus use above-water vision to locate baited buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Fjälling

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing gear in the Baltic is often raided by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus. The seals remove the fish and damage the nets, or entangle themselves and drown. In order to develop ways of mitigating the seals-fisheries conflict, it is important to know exactly how the seals locate the fishing gear. A field experiment was conducted in order to clarify whether seals use their vision above water to do this. Bait (herring; Clupea harengus was attached to the anchor lines of buoys of the type that is commonly used to mark the position of fishing gear. In all, 643 buoys were set. Some of the buoys (210 were also fitted with camera traps. Weather data were collected from official weather stations nearby. Bait loss (mean 18% was significantly correlated with buoy size (P = 0.002 and wind speed (P = 0.04. There was a significant association between bait loss and seal observations near the buoys (P = 0.05. Five photos of grey seals were obtained from the camera traps. No fish-eating birds, such as cormorants or mergansers, were ever observed near the buoys or caught on camera. It was concluded that a main cause of missing bait was scavenging by grey seals, and that they did use above-water vision to locate the buoys. It was also concluded that wind strength (i.e. wave action contributed tothe bait loss. The camera trap buoys had a somewhat lower bait loss than the other buoys (P = 0.054, which was attributed to a scaring effect. Neither the number of seal observations nor the bait loss differed significantly between the 2 study areas in the experiment (P = 0.43 and P = 0.83, respectively. Bait loss was not affected by the buoy colour (red, white, or grey; P = 0.87. We suggest that the findings of this experiment could be put into practice in a seal-disturbed area by deploying a number of decoy buoys, or by hiding live buoys below the surface of the water. This would increase the cost of foraging for the seals, and hence discourage them from exploiting

  20. User profile modeling for building recommendation systems: a theoretical study and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARTH, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this tutorial is to describe and synthesize the concepts and techniques used in the design of recommendation systems that can deal with user profiles. The development of such recommendation systems requires solutions of two sub problems: (i the creation and maintenance of user profile, and; (ii the appropriate use of user profiles. This work is a theoretical tutorial on this subject. This is a useful text for people who are interested in the theoretical foundations of modeling user profile and recommendation systems. This text presents illustrative diagrams that summarize the main components used in the modeling of user profiles

  1. Profiling Total Viable Bacteria in a Hemodialysis Water Treatment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Zhu, Xuan; Zhang, Menglu; Wang, Yuxin; Lv, Tianyu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2017-05-28

    Culture-dependent methods, such as heterotrophic plate counting (HPC), are usually applied to evaluate the bacteriological quality of hemodialysis water. However, these methods cannot detect the uncultured or viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria, both of which may be quantitatively predominant throughout the hemodialysis water treatment system. Therefore, propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR associated with HPC was used together to profile the distribution of the total viable bacteria in such a system. Moreover, high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was utilized to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. The HPC results indicated that the total bacterial counts conformed to the standards, yet the bacteria amounts were abruptly enhanced after carbon filter treatment. Nevertheless, the bacterial counts detected by PMA-qPCR, with the highest levels of 2.14 × 10 7 copies/100 ml in softener water, were much higher than the corresponding HPC results, which demonstrated the occurrence of numerous uncultured or VBNC bacteria among the entire system before reverse osmosis (RO). In addition, the microbial community structure was very different and the diversity was enhanced after the carbon filter. Although the diversity was minimized after RO treatment, pathogens such as Escherichia could still be detected in the RO effluent. In general, both the amounts of bacteria and the complexity of microbial community in the hemodialysis water treatment system revealed by molecular approaches were much higher than by traditional method. These results suggested the higher health risk potential for hemodialysis patients from the up-to-standard water. The treatment process could also be optimized, based on the results of this study.

  2. Stationary Tether Device for Buoy Apparatus and System for Using

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A rigid, neutrally buoyant hydrodynamicaly-faired tether and associated fastening hardware that loosely holds a bathymetric float at a predetermined distance from a...

  3. Profile of gastrointestinal involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, T; Saar, P; Jin, D; Noethe, M; Müller, A; Soydan, N; Hardt, P D; Jaeger, C; Distler, O; Roeb, E; Bretzel, R G; Müller-Ladner, U

    2012-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of the numerous organ manifestations, involvement of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) appears to be the most frequent with regard to the clinical symptoms. However, as the frequency and clinical relevance of GI involvement in patients with SSc are not known in detail, the German network of the systemic sclerosis (DNSS) has developed a detailed questionnaire to evaluate the extent and profile of gastrointestinal involvement in SSc patients. The multi-symptom questionnaire was used at baseline and after 1 year in registered patients of the DNSS. In addition, the results were compared with gastrointestinal disorders in patients with SSc and other rheumatic diseases, as well as with the medical history of the patients. In total, 90 patients were included in the study. The results of the study show that in reality, a much higher (nearly all) percentage of (98,9%) patients than expected suffer from GI-symptoms, regardless of the stage of their disease. Of these, meteorism (87,8%) was the most common followed by coughing/sore voice (77,8%), heartburn (daytime 68,9%, nighttime 53,3%), diarrhea (67,8%), stomach ache (68,9%) and nausea (61,1%). Although SSc patients were treated according to the respective recommendations, only limited improvements with regard to GI-symptoms could be achieved after 1 year of follow-up. In addition, the study revealed that the multi-symptom questionnaire is a useful tool to contribute to identify the gastrointestinal sequelae in systemic sclerosis.

  4. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  5. NODC Standard Format Drifting Buoy (F156) Data (1975-1994) (NODC Accession 0014200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains time series ocean circulation data determined by tracking the movement of drifting buoys, drogues or other instrumented devices. Movement is...

  6. Physical and optical data collected from drifting buoys between May 1993 - December 1996 (NODC Accession 0000586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling and downwelling irradiances were collected from surface optical drifter buoys off the California coast (NE Pacific limit-180) from 05 May 1993 to 06...

  7. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database Webdisc (7 disc set) (NODC Accession 0090141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This CD-ROM set contains the historic archive of meteorological and oceanographic data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN stations operated by the NOAA National...

  8. Analysis of Floating Buoy of a Wave Power Generating Jack-Up Platform Haiyuan 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Date Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the performance of floating buoys of a wave power generating jack-up platform called Haiyuan 1, in order to work out the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The performance of the buoy, especially its delivered power, is an important issue in designing oscillating buoy wave energy converter. In this case, major factors affect the performance including incident wave, designed draft, and hydraulic pressure on the buoy. To find out the relationship among design draft, hydraulic pressure, and delivered power, the key point is to precisely estimate wave induced motion of the buoy. Three-dimensional theory and time domain method based on potential theory were adopted in the paper. Unlike ship and other floating structures, motion of wave energy converter (WEC buoy in wave will be weakened because of energy take-off, which will cause significant draft changing with time. Thus, draft changing should be taken into consideration as well. In addition, green water problem occurs more frequently than that in ship and other floating structures and also might the reduce delivered power. Therefore, green water problem will also be taken into account when choosing the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The calculation indicates that the optimum designed draft is 0.935 m, while the optimum designed hydraulic pressure is 30 kN.

  9. Surface wind-drifted currents observed by drifting buoys in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K.

    Surface and upper layer currents were observed by drifting GPS buoys in the East China Sea from February to March in 2001 and 2003. Both observations showed that two buoys deployed at the same position 120 nautical miles northwestward from the Kuroshio made different trajectories each other. The buoy drogued at 15m depth drifted northward, indicating the Kuroshio Branch Current extending to the Japan Sea, whose trajectory was properly reproduced by a high resolution 3-D model assimilated to satellite sea level. On the other hand, the buoy without drogue was drawn in eastward to the Kuroshio and its trajectory was not reproduced by the numerical model. In the region where currents were comparatively weak, the no-drogue buoy drifted to the direction which gave good agreement in synoptic time scale with the surface current direction inferred from the Ekman drift using wind data based on QuikSCAT. However the drifting speed of the buoy was over twice faster than 3.5% of the wind speed, indicating the contamination of drifting effects due to wind waves. These results suggested that a small difference of the vertical position of organic/inorganic matters in the surface layer let their future routes change drastically under the multiple drifting effects.

  10. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  11. The Effects of Buoy Density and Buoy Flashing Pattern on Steering Through a Channel Bend,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Given our ecological of a seemingly difficult to maneuver vessel such as a VLCC nitche , which we occupy, our visual systems have evolved with an enormous...However, when the avoided. hua stransplanted from his nitche to either air or sea mnofthe stimulus arrays which we normally deal with In conclusion, the

  12. Adaptive Super-Twisting Observer for Estimation of Random Road Excitation Profile in Automotive Suspension Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  13. Effect of High-Frequency Sea Waves on Wave Period Retrieval from Radar Altimeter and Buoy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wave periods estimated from satellite altimetry data behave differently from those calculated from buoy data, especially in low-wind conditions. In this paper, the geometric mean wave period T a is calculated from buoy data, rather than the commonly used zero-crossing wave period T z . The geometric mean wave period uses the fourth moment of the wave frequency spectrum and is related to the mean-square slope of the sea surface measured using altimeters. The values of T a obtained from buoys and altimeters agree well (root mean square difference: 0.2 s only when the contribution of high-frequency sea waves is estimated by a wavenumber spectral model to complement the buoy data, because a buoy cannot obtain data from waves having wavelengths that are shorter than the characteristic dimension of the buoy.

  14. Towards Malaysian LADM Country Profile for 2D and 3D Cadastral Registration System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulkifli, N.A.; Abdul Rahman, A.; Jamil, H.; Teng, C.H.; Tan, L.C.; Looi, K.S.; Chan, K.L.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive Land Administration Domain Model (LADM, ISO 2012) country profile for 2D and 3D cadastral registration system for Malaysia. The proposed Malaysian country profile is partly based on the existing spatial (including survey) and administrative registration systems,

  15. Strategies of detecting Profile-injection attacks in E-Commerce Recommender System: A survey Partha

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarathi Chakraborty; Dr. Sunil Karforma

    2015-01-01

    E-commerce recommender systems are vulnerable to different types of shilling attack where the attacker influences the recommendation procedure in favor of him by inserting fake user-profiles into the system...

  16. Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activation and Metabolic Profile in Young Children : The ABCD Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; van den Born, Bert-Jan H; Hoekstra, Christine M C A; Gademan, Maaike G J; van Eijsden, Manon; de Rooij, Susanne R; Twickler, Marcel T B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In adults, increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic nervous system activity are associated with a less favorable metabolic profile. Whether this is already determined at early age is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the association between autonomic nervous system

  17. Evaluation of Laser Profile and Deflection Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    LRSERS F, BC TEST 5 20.0 LASER9S fiBC TEST -A-5 PROFILES VITH NO CORRECTIONS ST. LARWENCE ROArO WES LASERS ABCO TEST 6 * 2Q. 4-50.@ DITAC - ET 1 A...LASERS ABCO TEST 3 * .0 1-4~ Lui z 󈧎. 160.0 019𔄁 8 . 0 . DIT*C FEE X L PROFILES HIGH PRSS FILTERED RUNWRY. TY’NDRLL FIR FORCE BASE "LASERS ABCD TEST 3... ABCO TEST 2 40. . V.@.. Cn1RR EFT ED FPRONFLE EPIM ’D-2 PROFILE MEASUFRED ,I-TH RnO AND LEVELRUNWAY AT TYNDALL IR FORCE BAHE LASERS ABCD TEST 3 Il S

  18. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK ADVANCED VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) DROPSONDE SYSTEM V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) Dropsonde System dataset was collected by the...

  19. Development of Laser, Detector, and Receiver Systems for an Atmospheric CO2 Lidar Profiling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Singh, Upendra

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is being developed with the capability to measure range-resolved and column amounts of atmospheric CO2. This system is also capable of providing high-resolution aerosol profiles and cloud distributions. It is being developed as part of the NASA Earth Science Technology Office s Instrument Incubator Program. This three year program involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. At the end of a three-year development this instrument is expected to be capable of making measurements in the lower troposphere and boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located. It will be a valuable tool in the validation of NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) measurements of column CO2 and suitable for deployment in the North American Carbon Program (NACP) regional intensive field campaigns. The system can also be used as a test-bed for the evaluation of lidar technologies for space-application. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements.

  20. CEFLE and Direkt Profil: a new computer learner corpus in French L2 and a system for grammatical profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Granfeldt, Jonas; Nugues, Pierre; Persson, Emil; Thulin, Jonas; Ågren, Malin; Schlyter, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract in Undetermined The importance of computer learner corpora for research in both second language acquisition and foreign language teaching is rapidly increasing. Computer learner corpora can provide us with data to describe the learner's interlanguage system at different points of its development and they can be used to create pedagogical tools. In this paper, we first present a new computer learner corpora in French. We then describe an analyzer called Direkt Profil, that we have dev...

  1. Development of the Sensor for Environmental Assessment (SEA Buoy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    current profiler. The phased array current profiler was an Edo Corporation development program intended to provide an ocean current profiler with a...of designs, the final implementation incorporates a Navmar designed variable gain amplifier for hydrophone outputs to the signal conditioning and

  2. Heaving displacement amplification characteristics of a power buoy in shoaling water with insufficient draft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The resonance power buoy is a convincing tool that can increase the extraction efficiency of wave energy. The buoy needs a corresponding draft, to move in resonance with waves within the peak frequency band where wave energy is concentrated. However, it must still be clarified if the buoy acts as an effective displacement amplifier, when there is insufficient water depth. In this study, the vertical displacement of a circular cylinder-type buoy was calculated, with the spectrum data observed in a real shallow sea as the external wave force, and with the corresponding draft, according to the mode frequency of normal waves. Such numerical investigation result, without considering Power Take-Off (PTO damping, confirmed that the area of the heave responses spectrum can be amplified by up to about tenfold, compared with the wave energy spectrum, if the draft corresponds to the peak frequency, even with insufficient water depth. Moreover, the amplification factor of the buoy varied, according to the seasonal changes in the wave spectra.

  3. MODELLING AND VIBRATION ANALYSIS OF A ROAD PROFILE MEASURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Patel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During a vehicle development program, load data representing severe customer usage is required. The dilemma faced by a design engineer during the design process is that during the initial stage, only predicted loads estimated from historical targets are available, whereas the actual loads are available only at the fag end of the process. At the same time, changes required, if any, are easier and inexpensive during the initial stages of the design process whereas they are extremely costly in the latter stages of the process. The use of road profiles and vehicle models to predict the load acting on the whole vehicle is currently being researched. This work hinges on the ability to accurately measure road profiles. The objective of the work is to develop an algorithm, using MATLAB Simulink software, to convert the input signals into measured road profile. The algorithm is checked by the MATLAB Simulink 4 degrees of freedom half car model. To make the whole Simulink model more realistic, accelerometer and laser sensor properties are introduced. The present work contains the simulation of the mentioned algorithm with a half car model and studies the results in distance, time, and the frequency domain.

  4. Assessing the construct validity of five nutrient profiling systems using diet modeling with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerfeuille, E; Vieux, F; Lluch, A; Darmon, N; Rolf-Pedersen, N

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient profiling classifies individual food products according to their nutrient content. According to the WHO (World Health Organization), validation is a key step in the development of a nutrient profiling system. The aim was to assess the construct validity of five European nutrient profiling systems (Choices, Keyhole, (AFSSA), European Commission (EC) system and FoodProfiler). Construct validity was assessed for each of the five-selected nutrient profiling systems by testing whether healthy foods (that is, identified as eligible by the system) make healthy diets, and unhealthy foods (that is, non-eligible) make unhealthy diets, using diet modeling. The AFSSA, EC and FoodProfiler systems were identified as valid, but differences in their levels of permissiveness suggested some misclassified food products. The two other systems failed the construct validity assessment. Among these three systems, the EC system is the less demanding in terms of nutritional information, it would, therefore, be the easiest to implement for regulating nutrition and health claims in Europe.

  5. Illinois Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Illinois' Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  6. A paper recommender system based on user's profile in big data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These systems present a personalized proposal to users who seek to find a special kind of relevant data or their priorities through the big number of data. Recommendersystem based on personalization uses the user profile and in view of the fact that the user profile encompass information pertaining to the user priorities; ...

  7. Experimental Studies of New Joint System for Thin-Walled Steel Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian Roşca; I. P. Ciongradi; M. Budescu

    2006-01-01

    The results and conclusions regarding the experimental test of the joint assembly of thin walled steel profile with and without strengthening elements (stiffeners) are presented. The entire test series have been performed using the 5 mm thick KB600 thin-walled profiles and 3.5 mm thick KB450. In the paper will be presented the analysis of the joints connecting the KB600-5.5 steel profiles. The KONTIBEAM system is primarily made of two galvanized sheet profiles so denominated as KB, which are ...

  8. Wave observations from an array of directional buoys over the southern Brazilian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Henrique Patricio Prado; Violante-Carvalho, Nelson; Nogueira, Izabel Christina Martins; Babanin, Alexander; Liu, Qingxiang; de Pinho, Uggo Ferreira; Nascimento, Fabio; Parente, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that the majority of buoy measurements are located around the US coast and along some Europeans countries. The lack of long-term and densely spaced in situ measurements in the Southern Hemisphere in general, and the South Atlantic in particular, hinders several investigations due to the lack of detailed metocean information. Here, we present an effort to overcome this limitation, with a dense network of buoys along the Brazilian coast, equipped with several meteorological and oceanographic sensors. Out of ten currently operational buoys, three are employed to present the main characteristics of waves in the Southern part of the network. For the first time, sensor characteristics and settings are described, as well as the methods applied to the raw wave data. Statistics and distributions of wave parameters, swell propagating events, comparison with a numerical model and altimeters and a discussion about the occurrence of freak waves are presented.

  9. Storm wave buoy equipped with micromechanical inertial unit: Results of development and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryazin, D. G.; Staroselcev, L. P.; Belova, O. O.; Gleb, K. A.

    2017-07-01

    The article describes the results of developing a wave buoy to measure the statistical characteristics of waves and the characteristics of directional spectra of three-dimensional waves. The device is designed for long-term measurements lasting up to a season, which can help solve problems in forecasting waves and preventing emergencies from wave impact on offshore platforms, hydraulic structures, and other marine facilities. The measuring unit involves triads of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and a three-component magnetometer. A description of the device, results of laboratory research of its characteristics, and bench and full-scale tests are offered. It is noted that to assess the performance characteristics, comparative tests of the Storm wave buoy were conducted with a standard string wave probe installed on an offshore platform. It is shown that the characteristics and capabilities of the wave buoy make it possible to oust foreign devices from the domestic market.

  10. Wave observations from an array of directional buoys over the southern Brazilian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Henrique Patricio Prado; Violante-Carvalho, Nelson; Nogueira, Izabel Christina Martins; Babanin, Alexander; Liu, Qingxiang; de Pinho, Uggo Ferreira; Nascimento, Fabio; Parente, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that the majority of buoy measurements are located around the US coast and along some Europeans countries. The lack of long-term and densely spaced in situ measurements in the Southern Hemisphere in general, and the South Atlantic in particular, hinders several investigations due to the lack of detailed metocean information. Here, we present an effort to overcome this limitation, with a dense network of buoys along the Brazilian coast, equipped with several meteorological and oceanographic sensors. Out of ten currently operational buoys, three are employed to present the main characteristics of waves in the Southern part of the network. For the first time, sensor characteristics and settings are described, as well as the methods applied to the raw wave data. Statistics and distributions of wave parameters, swell propagating events, comparison with a numerical model and altimeters and a discussion about the occurrence of freak waves are presented.

  11. 77 FR 29254 - Safety Zones, Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... transit the Lower Mississippi River between mile marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA and the Southwest Pass Sea...; Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

  12. Application of Buoy Observations in Determining Characteristics of Several Typhoons Passing the East China Sea in August 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningli Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The buoy observation network in the East China Sea is used to assist the determination of the characteristics of tropical cyclone structure in August 2012. When super typhoon “Haikui” made landfall in northern Zhejiang province, it passed over three buoys, the East China Sea Buoy, the Sea Reef Buoy, and the Channel Buoy, which were located within the radii of the 13.9 m/s winds, 24.5 m/s winds, and 24.5 m/s winds, respectively. These buoy observations verified the accuracy of typhoon intensity determined by China Meteorological Administration (CMA. The East China Sea Buoy had closely observed typhoons “Bolaven” and “Tembin,” which provided real-time guidance for forecasters to better understand the typhoon structure and were also used to quantify the air-sea interface heat exchange during the passage of the storm. The buoy-measured wind and pressure time series were also used to correct the intensity of “Damrey” initially determined by CMA.

  13. Molecular profiles to biology and pathways: a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laere, Steven; Dirix, Luc; Vermeulen, Peter

    2016-06-16

    Interpreting molecular profiles in a biological context requires specialized analysis strategies. Initially, lists of relevant genes were screened to identify enriched concepts associated with pathways or specific molecular processes. However, the shortcoming of interpreting gene lists by using predefined sets of genes has resulted in the development of novel methods that heavily rely on network-based concepts. These algorithms have the advantage that they allow a more holistic view of the signaling properties of the condition under study as well as that they are suitable for integrating different data types like gene expression, gene mutation, and even histological parameters.

  14. Provider Profiling: A Population Health Improvement Tool for the Southeast Military Health System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pemberton, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    ...). Profiling with Provider Perspectives, a Primary Care Management Tool, provides the SEMHS with a standardized performance measurement system that offers feedback in a user friendly and non-threatening format...

  15. Profiles of Automotive Suppliers Industries--Engineered Mechanical Components and Systems : Volume II, Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    The profile describes and analyzes that segment of the automotive supplier industry which provides engineered mechanical components/assemblies/systems to the prime auto manufacturers. It presents an overview of the role and structure of this industry...

  16. Profiles of Automotive Suppliers Industries--Engineered Mechanical Components and Systems : Volume I, Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    This profile describes and analyzes that segment of the automotive supplier industry which provides engineered mechanical components/assemblies/systems to the prime auto manufacturers. It presents an overview of the role and structure of this industr...

  17. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Quality Management System Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile describes quality management system tools that were customized for residential construction by BSC, IBACOS, and PHI, for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework.

  18. Complement profile and activation mechanisms by different LDL apheresis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Enebakk, Terje; Christiansen, Dorte; Ludviksen, Judith Krey; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-07-01

    Extracorporeal removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by means of selective LDL apheresis is indicated in otherwise uncontrolled familial hypercholesterolemia. During blood-biomaterial interaction other constituents than the LDL particles are affected, including the complement system. We set up an ex vivo model in which human whole blood was passed through an LDL apheresis system with one of three different apheresis columns: whole blood adsorption, plasma adsorption and plasma filtration. The concentrations of complement activation products revealed distinctly different patterns of activation and adsorption by the different systems. Evaluated as the final common terminal complement complex (TCC) the whole blood system was inert, in contrast to the plasma systems, which generated substantial and equal amounts of TCC. Initial classical pathway activation was revealed equally for both plasma systems as increases in the C1rs-C1inh complex and C4d. Alternative pathway activation (Bb) was most pronounced for the plasma adsorption system. Although the anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) were equally generated by the two plasma separation systems, they were efficiently adsorbed to the plasma adsorption column before the "outlet", whereas they were left free in the plasma in the filtration system. Consequently, during blood-biomaterial interaction in LDL apheresis the complement system is modulated in different manners depending on the device composition. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A New Profile Learning Model for Recommendation System based on Machine Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen H. Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems (RSs have been used to successfully address the information overload problem by providing personalized and targeted recommendations to the end users. RSs are software tools and techniques providing suggestions for items to be of use to a user, hence, they typically apply techniques and methodologies from Data Mining. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a new user profile learning model to promote the recommendation accuracy of vertical recommendation systems. The proposed profile learning model employs the vertical classifier that has been used in multi classification module of the Intelligent Adaptive Vertical Recommendation (IAVR system to discover the user’s area of interest, and then build the user’s profile accordingly. Experimental results have proven the effectiveness of the proposed profile learning model, which accordingly will promote the recommendation accuracy.

  20. [MMPI-2 profiles in groups of systemic autoimmune disease - rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus - patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csókási, Krisztina; Hargitai, Rita; Járai, Róbert; Nagy, László; Czirják, László; Kiss, Enikö Csilla

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are characterized by the alteration of immunological response, which can damage many organs and systems and result in a wide variety of clinical presentations. In addition to physical symptoms, psychiatric disorders are also common to many autoimmune diseases. Anxiety, depression, psychosis and cognitive deficits have the highest prevalence. The aim of this study was to display the degree of psychopathological symptoms in patients with RA and SLE. Female inpatients with RA (N=68) and SLE (N=78) were recruited from the Rheumatology and Immunology Clinic of the University of Pecs and were asked to complete the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and a short demografical form. The clinical personality profiles of the patient groups were explored and compared with each other. High scores (above 64T) were detected on the Hypochondriasis (Hs), Depression (D) and Hysteria (Hy) scales in both groups. Besides, the participants performed elevated scores on the Masculinity-Feminity (Mf), Psychasthenia (Pt) and Social Introversion (Si) clinical scales. They scored in the elevated range on the Physical Malfunctioning, Subjective Depression, Lassitude-Malaise and Somatic Complaints subscales of the neurotic triad. No significant difference was found on the ten clinical scales between the SLE and RA patients. Characteristics of MMPI-2 profiles in SLE and RA patients seem to be the consequence of the disease and a common feature of chronic conditions. High scores on the neurotic triad scales may reflect the comorbid psychiatric disorders and the somatic symptoms alike, so further investigations with the revised Hungarian MMPI-2 are needed.

  1. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    Three satellite-tracked drifting buoys released in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean followed the path of the current moving westward approximately zonally in the vicinity of 10 degrees S latitude. On nearing the east coast of Africa...

  2. HAB Buoy: a new instrument for in situ monitoring and early warning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new microplankton imaging and analysis instrument, HAB Buoy, is described. It integrates a high-speed camera for in-flow image acquisition with automatic specimen labelling software, known as DiCANN (Dinoflagellate Categorisation by Artificial Neural Network). Some preliminary results are presented together with a ...

  3. 33 CFR 149.321 - How many ring life buoys must be on each deepwater port?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on each deepwater port? 149.321 Section 149.321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Manned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149.321 How many ring life buoys must be...

  4. Where is the science? What will it take to show that nutrient profiling systems work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Marilyn S

    2010-04-01

    Nutrient profiling is defined as the science of ranking or categorizing foods on the basis of their nutritional composition. Validity is a general term meaning accuracy. Nutrient profiling systems in the United States have not undergone any systematic validation effort to assess their accuracy against a comparison measure or group of measures. Different types of validation studies should be conducted: content, face, convergent, criterion, and predictive. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing the validity of nutrient profiling systems with the desired objective of assisting US consumers with food selection to improve diet quality. For a profiling system to work successfully in the American marketplace, it must function well with consumers from most or all cultural groups, from all racial groups, and with low-literate as well as highly literate people. Emphasis should be placed on conducting different types of validation studies and multiple studies with different subpopulation groups. The use of consistent standards to assess the accuracy and usefulness of multiple profiling systems is imperative to successfully identify a nutrient profiling intervention that will have the potential to lead to improved diet quality and eventually to an improved health status in US consumers.

  5. Family Shopping Recommendation System Using User Profile and Behavior Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jiacheng, Xu

    2017-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, recommendation system has been a hot technology for enterprises to streamline their sales. Recommendation algorithms for individual users have been extensively studied over the past decade. Most existing recommendation systems also focus on individual user recommendations, however in many daily activities, items are recommended to the groups not one person. As an effective means to solve the problem of group recommendation problem,we extend the single use...

  6. A 3D Laser Profiling System for Rail Surface Defect Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhimin; Li, Qingquan; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin

    2017-08-04

    Rail surface defects such as the abrasion, scratch and peeling often cause damages to the train wheels and rail bearings. An efficient and accurate detection of rail defects is of vital importance for the safety of railway transportation. In the past few decades, automatic rail defect detection has been studied; however, most developed methods use optic-imaging techniques to collect the rail surface data and are still suffering from a high false recognition rate. In this paper, a novel 3D laser profiling system (3D-LPS) is proposed, which integrates a laser scanner, odometer, inertial measurement unit (IMU) and global position system (GPS) to capture the rail surface profile data. For automatic defect detection, first, the deviation between the measured profile and a standard rail model profile is computed for each laser-imaging profile, and the points with large deviations are marked as candidate defect points. Specifically, an adaptive iterative closest point (AICP) algorithm is proposed to register the point sets of the measured profile with the standard rail model profile, and the registration precision is improved to the sub-millimeter level. Second, all of the measured profiles are combined together to form the rail surface through a high-precision positioning process with the IMU, odometer and GPS data. Third, the candidate defect points are merged into candidate defect regions using the K-means clustering. At last, the candidate defect regions are classified by a decision tree classifier. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed laser-profiling system in rail surface defect detection and classification.

  7. Involvement of Ghrelin-Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor System in Pathoclinical Profiles of Digestive System Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang WANG; Weigang WANG; Wencai QIU; Youben FAN; Jun ZHAO; Yu WANG; Qi ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    Ghrelin receptor has been shown to be expressed along the human gastrointestinal tract.Recent studies showed that ghrelin and a synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist improved weight gain and lean body mass retention in a rat model of cancer cachexia by acting on ghrelin receptor, that is, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). This study aims to explore the expression and the distribution of ghrelin receptor in human gastrointestinal tract cancers and to investigate the possible involvement of the ghrelin-GHS-R system in human digestive cancers. Surgical human digestive cancer specimens were obtained from various portions of the gastrointestinal tract from different patients. The expression of ghrelin receptor in these tissues was detected by tissue microarray technique. Our results showed that ghrelin receptor was expressed in cancers throughout the gastrointestinal tract, mainly in the cytoplasm of mucosal layer cells.Its expression level possibly correlated with organ type, histological grade, tumor-nodes-metastases stage,and nutrition status (weight loss) of the patients. For the first time, we identified the distribution of ghrelin receptor in digestive system cancers. Our results implied that the ghrelin-GHS-R system might be involved in the pathoclinical profiles of digestive cancers.

  8. Dynamic analysis of propulsion mechanism directly driven by wave energy for marine mobile buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenjiang; Zheng, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Chang, Zongyu

    2016-07-01

    Marine mobile buoy(MMB) have many potential applications in the maritime industry and ocean science. Great progress has been made, however the technology in this area is far from maturity in theory and faced with many difficulties in application. A dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism is very necessary for optimizing the parameters of the MMB, especially with consideration of hydrodynamic force. The principle of wave-driven propulsion mechanism is briefly introduced. To set a theory foundation for study on the MMB, a dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism of the MMB is obtained. The responses of the motion of the platform and the hydrofoil are obtained by using a numerical integration method to solve the ordinary differential equations. A simplified form of the motion equations is reached by omitting terms with high order small values. The relationship among the heave motion of the buoy, stiffness of the elastic components, and the forward speed can be obtained by using these simplified equations. The dynamic analysis show the following: The angle of displacement of foil is fairly small with the biggest value around 0.3 rad; The speed of mobile buoy and the angle of hydrofoil increased gradually with the increase of heave motion of buoy; The relationship among heaven motion, stiffness and attack angle is that heave motion leads to the angle change of foil whereas the item of speed or push function is determined by vertical velocity and angle, therefore, the heave motion and stiffness can affect the motion of buoy significantly if the size of hydrofoil is kept constant. The proposed model is provided to optimize the parameters of the MMB and a foundation is laid for improving the performance of the MMB.

  9. Advantages and Pitfalls of Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolome Profiling in Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Aretz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based metabolome profiling became the method of choice in systems biology approaches and aims to enhance biological understanding of complex biological systems. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics are well established technologies and are commonly used by many scientists. In comparison, metabolomics is an emerging field and has not reached such high-throughput, routine and coverage than other omics technologies. Nevertheless, substantial improvements were achieved during the last years. Integrated data derived from multi-omics approaches will provide a deeper understanding of entire biological systems. Metabolome profiling is mainly hampered by its diversity, variation of metabolite concentration by several orders of magnitude and biological data interpretation. Thus, multiple approaches are required to cover most of the metabolites. No software tool is capable of comprehensively translating all the data into a biologically meaningful context yet. In this review, we discuss the advantages of metabolome profiling and main obstacles limiting progress in systems biology.

  10. OR State Profile. Oregon: Oregon State Assessment System (OSAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Oregon State Assessment System. Its purpose is to assess proficiency in the Essential Skills for the purpose of earning a regular or modified high school diploma. Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills is also used for federal accountability purposes under No Child Left Behind. [For the main report,…

  11. Indian Systems Of Medicine: A Brief Profile | Ravishankar | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal plants based traditional systems of medicines are playing important role in providing health care to large section of population, especially in developing countries. Interest in them and utilization of herbal products produced based on them is increasing in developed countries also. To obtain optimum benefit and to ...

  12. Profile of the first generation of marketing expert systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe emergence of expert systems in marketing can be seen as the next step in the development of the use of computers in marketing management, where starting out with an almost exclusively mathematical model building/optimization approach, gradually more judgmental elements from

  13. Meta-Model and UML Profile for Requirements Management of Software and Embedded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpinen Tero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Software and embedded system companies today encounter problems related to requirements management tool integration, incorrect tool usage, and lack of traceability. This is due to utilized tools with no clear meta-model and semantics to communicate requirements between different stakeholders. This paper presents a comprehensive meta-model for requirements management. The focus is on software and embedded system domains. The goal is to define generic requirements management domain concepts and abstract interfaces between requirements management and system development. This leads to a portable requirements management meta-model which can be adapted with various system modeling languages. The created meta-model is prototyped by translating it into a UML profile. The profile is imported into a UML tool which is used for rapid evaluation of meta-model concepts in practice. The developed profile is associated with a proof of concept report generator tool that automatically produces up-to-date documentation from the models in form of web pages. The profile is adopted to create an example model of embedded system requirement specification which is built with the profile.

  14. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Job Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Job Profiles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  15. Profiling the overdamped dynamics of a nonadiabatic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Prasun [Department of Chemistry, Bose Institute, 93/1 A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Shit, Anindita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sudip, E-mail: sudip_chattopadhyay@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Banik, Suman K., E-mail: skbanik@jcbose.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Bose Institute, 93/1 A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2015-09-08

    Graphical abstract: The theoretical analysis that is addressed here can be used to illustrate both a qualitative and a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of a particle in the presence of an external probe. - Highlights: • Interaction of systems with strong fields results in many interesting observations. • The relevant systems are characterized by an extremely high degree of control. • The theory that is addressed here is useful to investigate the transport process. • Effective to understand the trapping mechanism in a rapidly oscillating potential. • Useful to study the dynamics of particles in the presence of an external probe. - Abstract: Rapidly oscillating time-periodic potentials with a vanishing time average have been exploited to investigate the dynamics of an overdamped particle. Using the multiple scale perturbation theory, it has been shown that the dynamics can be adequately characterized by an explicitly time-independent effective potential. The resulting “effective equation of motion” can offer various avenues to handle the dynamics of the system driven by a high-frequency field. We study the effects of the field parameters on the mobility of the overdamped particle moving in the effective potential. The variation of the mobility with the field parameters is associated with the interplay of spatially periodic gradients, time periodic modulation and thermal noise in the overdamped region. Good agreement between the simulations and theoretical estimates validates our methodology that captures the constitutional features ruling the dynamics in the overdamped limit. The results observed here can also be extended to the quantum system.

  16. Ophthalmic profile and systemic features of pediatric facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Murthy, Sowmya; Swaminathan, Meenakshi

    2015-12-01

    Facial nerve palsy (FNP) occurs less frequently in children as compared to adults but most cases are secondary to an identifiable cause. These children may have a variety of ocular and systemic features associated with the palsy and need detailed ophthalmic and systemic evaluation. This was a retrospective chart review of all the cases of FNP below the age of 16 years, presenting to a tertiary ophthalmic hospital over the period of 9 years, from January 2000 to December 2008. A total of 22 patients were included in the study. The average age at presentation was 6.08 years (range, 4 months to 16 years). Only one patient (4.54%) had bilateral FNP and 21 cases (95.45%) had unilateral FNP. Seventeen patients (77.27%) had congenital palsy and of these, five patients had a syndromic association, three had birth trauma and nine patients had idiopathic palsy. Five patients (22.72%) had an acquired palsy, of these, two had a traumatic cause and one patient each had neoplastic origin of the palsy, iatrogenic palsy after surgery for hemangioma and idiopathic palsy. Three patients had ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy, two children were diagnosed to have Moebius syndrome, one child had an ipsilateral Duane's syndrome with ipsilateral hearing loss. Corneal involvement was seen in eight patients (36.36%). Amblyopia was seen in ten patients (45.45%). Neuroimaging studies showed evidence of trauma, posterior fossa cysts, pontine gliosis and neoplasms such as a chloroma. Systemic associations included hemifacial macrosomia, oculovertebral malformations, Dandy Walker syndrome, Moebius syndrome and cerebral palsy FNP in children can have a number of underlying causes, some of which may be life threatening. It can also result in serious ocular complications including corneal perforation and severe amblyopia. These children require a multifaceted approach to their care.

  17. Investigation of an Advanced Cellulose Profile Used for the Manufacture of Gating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawieja Z.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The herein paper contains the results of investigations on a new type of cellulose blend used for the manufacture of profiles applied in the process of making gating systems in the foundry industry. A standard cellulose profile was subjected to an experiment. During the experiment the profile was filled with a liquid cast iron and at the same time the temperatures of the liquid metal crystallizing inside the profile were measured as well as the temperature of the outer layer of the profile was controlled. Further, the microstructure of the cast iron, which crystallized out inside the cellulose profile, was analysed and the cellulose, thermally degraded after the experiment, was verified with the use of the chemical analysis method. Moreover, a quality analysis of the original as well as the degraded cellulose profile was run with the use of the FTIR infrared spectroscopy. The presented results revealed that the cellulose blend is aluminium silicate enriched and contains organic binder additives. The cast iron, which crystallized out, tended to have an equilibrium pearlitic structure with the release of graphite and carbides. The generation of disequilibrium ausferrite phases was also observed in the structure.

  18. Improving electronic customers' profile in recommender systems using data mining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Julashokri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems are tools for realization one to one marketing. Recommender systems are systems, which attract, retain, and develop customers. Recommender systems use several ways to make recommendations. Two ways are using more than the others: collaborative filtering and content-based filtering. In this study, a recommender system model based on collaborative filtering has proposed. Proposed model was endeavored to improve the customer profile in collaborative systems to enhance the recommender system efficiency. This improvement was done using time context and group preferences. Experimental results show that the proposed model has a better recommendation performance than existing models.

  19. Profile: Agincourt Health and Socio-demographic Surveillance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kathleen; Collinson, Mark A; Gómez-Olivé, F Xavier; Mokoena, Obed; Twine, Rhian; Mee, Paul; Afolabi, Sulaimon A; Clark, Benjamin D; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W; Khosa, Audrey; Khoza, Simon; Shabangu, Mildred G; Silaule, Bernard; Tibane, Jeffrey B; Wagner, Ryan G; Garenne, Michel L; Clark, Samuel J; Tollman, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system (HDSS), located in rural northeast South Africa close to the Mozambique border, was established in 1992 to support district health systems development led by the post-apartheid ministry of health. The HDSS (90 000 people), based on an annual update of resident status and vital events, now supports multiple investigations into the causes and consequences of complex health, population and social transitions. Observational work includes cohorts focusing on different stages along the life course, evaluation of national policy at population, household and individual levels and examination of household responses to shocks and stresses and the resulting pathways influencing health and well-being. Trials target children and adolescents, including promoting psycho-social well-being, preventing HIV transmission and reducing metabolic disease risk. Efforts to enhance the research platform include using automated measurement techniques to estimate cause of death by verbal autopsy, full ‘reconciliation’ of in- and out-migrations, follow-up of migrants departing the study area, recording of extra-household social connections and linkage of individual HDSS records with those from sub-district clinics. Fostering effective collaborations (including INDEPTH multi-centre work in adult health and ageing and migration and urbanization), ensuring cross-site compatibility of common variables and optimizing public access to HDSS data are priorities. PMID:22933647

  20. [Peculiarities of cardiovascular system pathology depending on psychological profile in patients of senior age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorenko, I O

    2013-01-01

    Interrelations between peculiarities of psychological profile of patients of senior age groups (according to Cattel), level of stress hormones in blood and background pathology of cardiovascular system were studied. Levels of catecholamine and corticosteroids in dynamics, rate of magnesium in erythrocytes and calcium in plaques of coronary arteries as well as fats, Holter ECG, daily profiles of blood pressure, vasomotor function of endothelium and microcirculation were analysed. It is established that stress hormones indirectly determine original form of stress reaction depending on patients' psychological profile. This contributes to the development of one or another form of cardiovascular system pathology. Excessive alcohol intake also promotes progression of cardiovascular system pathology. Depression, being a reflection of disbalance of stress hormones levels, can be used as a marker of unfavourable course of cardiovascular pathology.

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-01 (NCEI Accession 0070959)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-12 (NODC Accession 0101426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-07 (NODC Accession 0095565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-08 (NODC Accession 0122005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-08 (NODC Accession 0112958)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during December 2014 (NODC Accession 0125264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-04 (NODC Accession 0106521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0128073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-01 (NODC Accession 0085139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-05 (NODC Accession 0108385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-10 (NODC Accession 0114407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-10 (NODC Accession 0002436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-06 (NODC Accession 0002309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-06 (NCEI Accession 0074384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 June 1976 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy and other data was collected by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-04 (NODC Accession 0002176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-02 (NODC Accession 0104259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-09 (NODC Accession 0002415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-02 (NODC Accession 0086627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2014 (NCEI Accession 0122592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-01 (NODC Accession 0116427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-06 (NODC Accession 0092557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during November 2014 (NODC Accession 0122594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-11 (NODC Accession 0099948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-09 (NODC Accession 0098547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-01 (NODC Accession 0103632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-05 (NCEI Accession 0073426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0136935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-10 (NODC Accession 0099428)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0130916)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-09 (NODC Accession 0113792)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-06 (NODC Accession 0120329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-03 (NODC Accession 0088199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during January 2015 (NODC Accession 0125752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131704)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-04 (NODC Accession 0090312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-05 (NODC Accession 0119474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-05 (NODC Accession 0002226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-11 (NODC Accession 0002469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-08 (NCEI Accession 0077456)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-12 (NODC Accession 0115760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-02 (NODC Accession 0117491)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during March 2015 (NODC Accession 0127371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-12 (NODC Accession 0083918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-04 (NODC Accession 0118539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0150816)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-08 (NODC Accession 0095593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-07 (NODC Accession 0121505)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0142963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-11 (NODC Accession 0082371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-03 (NCEI Accession 0072077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-10 (NODC Accession 0079513)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-05 (NODC Accession 0090313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137949)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-11 (NODC Accession 0115123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-07 (NODC Accession 0111971)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0140790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-04 (NCEI Accession 0072886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-09 (NODC Accession 0078579)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-07 (NCEI Accession 0074922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-03 (NODC Accession 0104424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2014 (NODC Accession 0122593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-06 (NODC Accession 0110477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during February 2015 (NODC Accession 0126669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0146738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0153542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-03 (NODC Accession 0117682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during October 2014 (NODC Accession 0122591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-02 (NCEI Accession 0071368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Validation of the NASA GEWEX-SRB Radiation Data over the Tropical Oceans: Comparisons with PIRATA, RAMA, TAO and WHOI Buoy Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Gupta, S. K.; Cox, S. J.; Mikovitz, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX SRB (Global Energy and Water Exchanges, Surface Radiation Budget) project produces and archives shortwave and longwave radiation budget flux estimates at the top of the atmosphere and at the Earth's surface. The latest version in the archive, Release 3.0, is available as 3-hourly, 3-hourly-monthly, daily and monthly means continuously over the period from July 1983 to December 2007 on a quasi-equal-area grid system of 44016 grid boxes. SRB Release 4 with further improvements in data quality and higher spatial resolution is being developed. The SRB shortwave/longwave fluxes at the Earth's surface from the algorithm GSW(V3.0)/GLW(V3.1) have been extensively validated against high-quality ground-based observations, in particular observed data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Comparisons with nearly 6000 site-months of both shortwave and longwave data from 52 BSRN sites show generally good agreement. In addition, the GEWEX SRB data have also been found to compare favorably with the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) data and the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) data. In spite of the fact that the BSRN sites are scattered on all seven continents, the validation of the SRB data over the vast oceans had not been done until recently. In this paper, we present comparisons of the GEWEX-SRB data shortwave/longwave data with observations made on arrays moored in tropical oceans. Specifically, we have data from 21 buoys, or moorings, from Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Atlantic (PIRATA), 14 buoys from the Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA) in the Indian Ocean, 20 buoys from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array in the Pacific, and 3 buoys from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) (2 in the Pacific and 1 in the Atlantic). The data from these buoys span 12 years from 2000 to 2011, though not necessarily continuously. It is found that except for occasional

  18. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19910101 to 19910331 (NODC Accession 9100101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Gerald P Lesblam, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format...

  19. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database 1993 with Updates (19 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0095199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs holds marine meteorological, oceanographic, and wave spectra data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN (Coastal-Marine Automated Network) stations...

  20. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Kailua Bay, Windward Oahu, Hawaii during August 2000 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Mark 2 Directional Waverider Buoy roughly...

  1. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19781122 to 19810113 (NODC Accession 8600071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 359 Drifting Surface Buoys were deployed in the Southern Hemisphere oceans from November 22, 1978 to January 13, 1981 as part of the First Global Atmospheric...

  2. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Waimea Bay, North Shore, Oahu during December 2001 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Directional Waverider Buoy roughly 5 km...

  3. CYTOKINE PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eduardovna Tsanyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the levels of cytokines in patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE and to determine their correlation with SLE activity and organ damage, as well as their changes during rituximab (RTM therapy.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 26 patients (5 men and 21 women with a median (Me age of 27 [range 23-40] years and a SLE duration of 9 to 300 months (Me 72 [range 36-108] months and 30 healthy donors marched withthe examinees for gender and age. Disease activity was assessed using the SLEDAI-2K index. The serum levels of 27 cytokines were measured utilizing X-MAP technologies on a BioPlex 200 device (Bio-Rad, USA. The patients were divided into 2 groups of 13 persons in each: lupus nephritis (LN and no renal injury. All the patients included in the trial received RTM therapy.Results. A statistically significant elevation in the concentrations of interleukin 13 (IL-13 and G-CSF was found in the patients with SLE versus the healthy control group (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively. The LN group displayed a statistically significant increase in the concentrations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-13, and G-CSF as compared with the non-LN group (р = 0.039, р = 0.03, р = 0.037, р = 0.03, and р = 0.028, respectively. ROC analysis established the sensitivity and specificity of all indices in the LN group. The area under the ROC curve was equal for all indicators. The highest specificity of IL-13 (85% was observed in the LN group. These cytokines other than that of IL13 (62% showed the same sensitivity (70%.Conclusion. The patients with LN had statistically significantly elevated concentrations of IL4, IL6, IL7, IL13, and G-CSF. The findings suggest that these cytokines are associated with VN.

  4. Research and application of online measurement system of tire tread profile in automobile tire production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengyao; Chen, Xiangguang; Yang, Kai; Liu, Xuejiao

    2017-01-01

    To improve the measuring efficiency of width and thickness of tire tread in the process of automobile tire production, the actual condition for the tire production process is analyzed, and a fast online measurement system based on moving tire tread of tire specifications is established in this paper. The coordinate data of tire tread profile is acquired by 3D laser sensor, and we use C# language for programming which is an object-oriented programming language to complete the development of client program. The system with laser sensor can provide real-time display of tire tread profile and the data to require in the process of tire production. Experimental results demonstrate that the measuring precision of the system is <= 1mm, it can meet the measurement requirements of the production process, and the system has the characteristics of convenient installation and testing, system stable operation.

  5. Shortcut design of ice bank systems based on load profile characteristics.; Eine kennzahlgestuetzte Auslegungsmethodik fuer Eisspeicheranlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchner, S.; Hilligweg, A. [Georg-Simon-Ohm-Fachhochschule Nuernberg (Germany). Fachbereich Maschinenbau und Versorgungstechnik

    2006-07-01

    A shortcut design of ice bank systems based on load profile characteristics is presented. Load characteristics are derived from the energy balance of the charge/discharge cycle. Further, a test method for the discharge capacity can be derived form heat transfer equations. The design method and test methods are explained using the example of two different load curves. (orig.)

  6. EDNA-An expert software system for comparison and evaluation of DNA profiles in forensic casework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldemann, B.; Dornseifer, S.; Heylen, T.

    2015-01-01

    eDNA is an expert software system for DNA profile comparison, match interpretation and automated report generation in forensic DNA casework. Process automation and intelligent graphical representation maximise reliability of DNA evidence, while facilitating and accelerating the work of DNA experts....

  7. Control of Sewer systems and Wastewater treatment plants using pollutant concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Henrik; Nielsen, Marinus K.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    On-line measurements of pollutants in the wastewater combined with grey-box modelling are used to estimate the amount of deposits in the sewer system. The pollutant mass flow at the wastewater treatment plant is found to consist of a diurnal profile minus the deposited amount of pollutants...

  8. Monitoring High-Frequency Ocean Signals Using Low-Cost Gnss/imu Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lun; Kuo, Chung-Yen; Shih, Chiao-Hui; Lin, Li-Ching; Chiang, Kai-wei; Cheng, Kai-Chien

    2016-06-01

    In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS) or Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  9. A climatology of air-sea interactions at the Mediterranean LION and AZUR buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniaux, Guy; Prieur, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Giordani, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The LION and AZUR buoys (respectively at 42.1°N 4.7°E and 43.4°N 7.8°E) provide an extended data set since respectively 1999 and 2001 to present for studying air-sea interactions in the northwestern Mediterranean basin. The two buoys are located where high wind events occur (resp. north western and north easterly gale winds), that force and condition deep oceanic winter convection in that region. A short-term climatology (resp. 13 and 11 years) of air-sea interactions has been developed, which includes classical meteo-oceanic parameters, but also waves period and significant wave heights and radiative fluxes. Moreover turbulent surface fluxes have been estimated from various bulk parameterizations, in order to estimate uncertainties on fluxes. An important dispersion of turbulent fluxes is found at high wind speeds according to the parameterization used, larger than taking into account the second order effects of cool skin, warm layer and waves. An important annual cycle affects air temperatures (ATs), SSTs and turbulent fluxes at the two buoys. The annual cycle of ATs and SSTs can be well reconstructed from the first two annual harmonics, while for the turbulent heat fluxes the erratic occurrence of high and low flux events, well correlated with high/dry and low windy periods, strongly affect their annual and interannual cycles. The frequency of high surface heat fluxes and high wind stress is found highest during the autumn and winter months, despite the fact that north-westerly gale winds occur all year long at LION buoy. During calm weather period, ATs and SSTs experience an important diurnal cycle (on average 1 and 0.5°C respectively), that affect latent and sensible heat fluxes. Finally, an estimate of the interannual variability of the turbulent fluxes in Autumn and Winter is discussed, in order to characterize their potential role on deep ocean convection.

  10. Wave and Current Observations in a Tidal Inlet Using GPS Drifter Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    sensitive, and reliable. MEMS accelerometers use capacitance measurements between two surfaces to determine the acceleration of an object. A movable...was refined by adding an accelerometer and utilizing horizontal Doppler velocity measurements to better resolve the wave surface motions. The WRD...particularly in the wind-wave band. Vertical measurements were significantly improved through the addition of the accelerometer . A large array of WRD buoys

  11. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  12. Review of 5kW wave energy LOPF buoy design study and test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    stage, in line with the TRL and four phases development (proof of concept, design and feasibility study, field trials and half or full‐scale trials) promoted by AAU and supported by the marine renewable energy sector. To complement this, the IEC 114 standards define 3 stages of testing (1=small scale......The purpose of this project was to document the mechanical power production against a target power curve of a 5kW grid connected wave energy buoy in Nissum Bredning at Helligsø. This test site is typically used for open sea testing of scale 1:10 devices in irregular waves. In order to better adapt...... to the moderate wave height, the buoy was down sized by a factor of 3 and a new lower target power curve for the buoy was agreed to. Downsizing the project also had the advantage that it is more cost effective and fast to experiment with small wave energy devices than with big devices, at an early development...

  13. The Beam Profile Monitoring System for the CERN IRRAD Proton Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Glaser, M; Matli, E; Pezzullo, G; Gan, K K; Kagan, H; Smith, S; Warner, J D

    2016-01-01

    To perform proton irradiation experiments, CERN built during LS1 a new irradiation facility in the East Area at the Proton Synchrotron accelerator. At this facility, named IR-RAD, a high-intensity 24 GeV/c proton beam is used. During beam steering and irradiation, the intensity and the transverse profile of the proton beam are monitored online with custom-made Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) devices. In this work, we present the design and the architecture of the IRRAD BPM system, some results on its performance with the proton beam, as well as its planned grades.

  14. Energy demand and thermal comfort of HVAC systems with thermally activated building systems as a function of user profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pałaszyńska Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS are a way to use building structure as a thermal energy storage. As a result, renewable energy sources may be used more efficiently. The paper presents numerical analysis of a HVAC system with TABS energy demand and indoor thermal comfort of a representative room in a non-residential building (governmental, commercial, educational. The purpose of analysis is to investigate the influence of a user profile on system performance. The time span of the analysis is one year – a typical meteorological year. The model was prepared using a generally accepted simulation tool – TRNSYS 17. The results help to better understand the interaction of a user profile with TABS. Therefore they are important for the development of optimal control algorithms for energy efficient buildings equipped with such systems.

  15. Energy demand and thermal comfort of HVAC systems with thermally activated building systems as a function of user profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałaszyńska, Katarzyna; Bandurski, Karol; Porowski, Mieczysław

    2017-11-01

    Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) are a way to use building structure as a thermal energy storage. As a result, renewable energy sources may be used more efficiently. The paper presents numerical analysis of a HVAC system with TABS energy demand and indoor thermal comfort of a representative room in a non-residential building (governmental, commercial, educational). The purpose of analysis is to investigate the influence of a user profile on system performance. The time span of the analysis is one year - a typical meteorological year. The model was prepared using a generally accepted simulation tool - TRNSYS 17. The results help to better understand the interaction of a user profile with TABS. Therefore they are important for the development of optimal control algorithms for energy efficient buildings equipped with such systems.

  16. Design of Launch Abort System Thrust Profile and Concept of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, Daniel; O'Keefe, Stephen A.; Winski, Richard G.; Davidson, John B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how the Abort Motor thrust profile has been tailored and how optimizing the Concept of Operations on the Launch Abort System (LAS) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) aides in getting the crew safely away from a failed Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Unlike the passive nature of the Apollo system, the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle will be actively controlled, giving the program a more robust abort system with a higher probability of crew survival for an abort at all points throughout the CLV trajectory. By optimizing the concept of operations and thrust profile the Orion program will be able to take full advantage of the active Orion LAS. Discussion will involve an overview of the development of the abort motor thrust profile and the current abort concept of operations as well as their effects on the performance of LAS aborts. Pad Abort (for performance) and Maximum Drag (for separation from the Launch Vehicle) are the two points that dictate the required thrust and shape of the thrust profile. The results in this paper show that 95% success of all performance requirements is not currently met for Pad Abort. Future improvements to the current parachute sequence and other potential changes will mitigate the current problems, and meet abort performance requirements.

  17. HRR Profiling on Integrated Radar-Communication Systems Using OFDM-PCSF Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanxuan Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve both the transmission data rate and the range resolution simultaneously in integrated radar-communication (RadCom systems, orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing with phase-coded and stepped-frequency (OFDM-PCSF waveform is proposed. A corresponding high resolution range (HRR profile generation method is also presented. We first perform OFDM-PCSF waveform design by combining the intrapulse phase coding with the interpulse stepped-frequency modulation. We then give the ambiguity function (AF based on the presented waveforms. Then, the synthetic range profile (SRP processing to achieve HRR performance is analyzed. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed methods can achieve HRR profiles of the targets and high data rate transmissions, while a relative low computational complexity can be achieved.

  18. Feature profile evolution in plasma processing using on-wafer monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This book provides for the first time a good understanding of the etching profile technologies that do not disturb the plasma. Three types of sensors are introduced: on-wafer UV sensors, on-wafer charge-up sensors and on-wafer sheath-shape sensors in the plasma processing and prediction system of real etching profiles based on monitoring data. Readers are made familiar with these sensors, which can measure real plasma process surface conditions such as defect generations due to UV-irradiation, ion flight direction due to charge-up voltage in high-aspect ratio structures and ion sheath conditions at the plasma/surface interface. The plasma etching profile realistically predicted by a computer simulation based on output data from these sensors is described.

  19. Instrumented Full Scale Tests of a Drifting Buoy and Drogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    of very high accuracy (better than 200 feet) owing to the phase-tracking system employed. Both an automatic Epsco and a Simrad/Internav Loran C system...from.the output of a Simrad/Internav LORAN C navi- gator. A similar Epsco system was also employed while coupled to a separate antenna. The Epsco unit gave

  20. Development of a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) for continuous temperature profiling upto lower stratospheric altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2012-07-01

    The Gadanki (13.46°N, 79.17°E) MST radar is a high power VHF pulsed coherent Doppler radar established for remote probing of atmospheric phenomena in the Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere regions. Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) was developed using this radar to obtain height profiles of atmospheric temperature up to lower stratospheric altitudes. RASS uses the effect of temperature on the speed of sound in air as a means to sense the atmospheric temperature. It is the combination of a Doppler radar and acoustic exciters. The radar was augmented with acoustic exciters that were designed and constructed for this purpose. The Doppler radar profiles the speed of refractive index perturbations induced by the acoustic source. RASS has been demonstrated to be a reliable ground-based remote profiling technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature, Tv over the past two decades. This work describes the design of the system and its application to the observation of height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature up to and beyond tropical tropopause altitudes. Observations were made during 2007, 2008 and 2009 over periods extending up to 72 hours. These observations demonstrate temperature profiling capability up to about 18 km in altitude, though on an occasion height coverage upto 22.8km was obtained briefly; lowest height covered is from about 1.5km onwards. During the period of the RASS observations simultaneous data from radiosonde was used to validate the temperature measurements. Simultaneous satellite-based measurement of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) and precipitation from ground-based instruments was used to study the atmospheric phenomena of gravity waves and atmospheric stability during a convection event.

  1. Demonstrating the Alaska Ocean Observing System in Prince William Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, G. Carl; McCammon, Molly

    2013-07-01

    The Alaska Ocean Observing System and the Oil Spill Recovery Institute developed a demonstration project over a 5 year period in Prince William Sound. The primary goal was to develop a quasi-operational system that delivers weather and ocean information in near real time to diverse user communities. This observing system now consists of atmospheric and oceanic sensors, and a new generation of computer models to numerically simulate and forecast weather, waves, and ocean circulation. A state of the art data management system provides access to these products from one internet portal at http://www.aoos.org. The project culminated in a 2009 field experiment that evaluated the observing system and performance of the model forecasts. Observations from terrestrial weather stations and weather buoys validated atmospheric circulation forecasts. Observations from wave gages on weather buoys validated forecasts of significant wave heights and periods. There was an emphasis on validation of surface currents forecasted by the ocean circulation model for oil spill response and search and rescue applications. During the 18 day field experiment a radar array mapped surface currents and drifting buoys were deployed. Hydrographic profiles at fixed stations, and by autonomous vehicles along transects, were made to acquire measurements through the water column. Terrestrial weather stations were the most reliable and least costly to operate, and in situ ocean sensors were more costly and considerably less reliable. The radar surface current mappers were the least reliable and most costly but provided the assimilation and validation data that most improved ocean circulation forecasts. We describe the setting of Prince William Sound and the various observational platforms and forecast models of the observing system, and discuss recommendations for future development.

  2. Power profiling of Cholesky and QR factorizations on distributed memory systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bosilca, George

    2012-08-30

    This paper presents the power profile of two high performance dense linear algebra libraries on distributed memory systems, ScaLAPACK and DPLASMA. From the algorithmic perspective, their methodologies are opposite. The former is based on block algorithms and relies on multithreaded BLAS and a two-dimensional block cyclic data distribution to achieve high parallel performance. The latter is based on tile algorithms running on top of a tile data layout and uses fine-grained task parallelism combined with a dynamic distributed scheduler (DAGuE) to leverage distributed memory systems. We present performance results (Gflop/s) as well as the power profile (Watts) of two common dense factorizations needed to solve linear systems of equations, namely Cholesky and QR. The reported numbers show that DPLASMA surpasses ScaLAPACK not only in terms of performance (up to 2X speedup) but also in terms of energy efficiency (up to 62 %). © 2012 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  3. In vitro steroid profiling system for the evaluation of endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yosuke; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine disruptors (ED) are chemicals that affect various aspects of the endocrine system, often leading to the inhibition of steroidogenesis. Current chemical safety policies that restrict human exposure to such chemicals describe often time-consuming and costly methods for the evaluation of ED effects. We aimed to develop an effective tool for accurate phenotypic chemical toxicology studies. We developed an in vitro ED evaluation system using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods for metabolomic analysis of multi-marker profiles. Accounting for sample preparation and GC/MS/MS conditions, we established a screening method that allowed the simultaneous analysis of 17 steroids with good reproducibility and a linear calibration curve. Moreover, we applied the developed system to H295R human adrenocortical cells exposed to forskolin and prochloraz in accordance with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines and observed dose-dependent variations in steroid profiles. While the OECD guidelines include only testosterone and 17β-estradiol, our system enabled a comprehensive and highly sensitive analysis of steroid profile alteration due to ED exposure. The application of our ED evaluation screen could be economical and provide novel insights into the hazards of ED exposure to the endocrine system. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services Systems: Interim Report. Unemployment Insurance Occasional Paper 96-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Evelyn K.; And Others

    The Evaluation of Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services (WPRS) systems was designed to provide the U.S. Department of Labor information on how states are designing, implementing, and operating their worker profiling and reemployment services systems for dislocated workers and to compare the effectiveness of different state approaches to…

  5. A robust fibre laser system for electro-optic electron bunch profile measurements at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissmann, Laurens-Georg

    2012-08-15

    For the electro-optic measurement of electron bunch profiles at FLASH a robust ytterbium doped fibre laser (YDFL) system has been developed consisting of a laser oscillator and a two-staged amplifier. The oscillator is designed to meet the specifications of high reliability and low noise operation. The amplifier makes use of tailored nonlinearity to enhance the spectral bandwidth of the output laser pulses. Active repetition rate control enables sub-picosecond synchronisation of the laser to the accelerator reference RF. Using a two-stage gating scheme the output pulse train repetition rate is adopted to the accelerator repetition rate. An experimental site used for electro-optic electron bunch diagnostics has been redesigned to support single-shot bunch profile measurements based on spectral decoding. An existing bunch profile monitor with a similar laser system was upgraded and electro-optic bunch profile measurements were conducted, allowing for a comparison with measurements done with other longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics and with former measurements.

  6. Numerical calibration of laser line scanning system with multiple sensors for inspecting cross-section profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Li, Yuehua; Huang, Fengshan; Liu, Lijian

    2016-11-01

    Line structured light sensors (LSLSs) have gained more and more applications in industry. An interested profile can be easily obtained through the analysis of laser-object intersection stripe. But one sensor is inadequate to get a closed crosssection profile due to the obstacle of the laser light. Thus, multiple LSLSs were integrated as a whole for profile inspection and a numerical calibration method was also proposed. Firstly, the laser planes from all laser projectors were adjusted to coincide with the target plane by adjusting the fixtures of the laser projector. For each sensor, origin of the world coordinate system (WCS) was fixed at the center of a corner calibration dot with its X and Y axis coincide with the row and column direction of target dots. Each sensor camera captured one image of the same target. The relationship between the pixel coordinate system (PCS) and the WCS was established using an interpolation method via the world coordinates of target dot centers and their corresponding pixel coordinates. Then the measurement points from all the sensors were transformed into the global WCS, and a closed cross-section profile can be achieved. This proposed method neither need to establish the intrinsic, the extrinsic and the distortion models of the camera, nor need to solve the complex optimization equations to determine the model coefficients. Finally, a workpeice with stairs and a rectangular block were inspected. The comparison with the measuring results from the coordinate measuring machine further validates the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  7. The potential of high-frequency profiling to assess vertical and seasonal patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in lakes: An extension of the Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentrup, Jennifer A.; Williamson, Craig E.; Colom-Montero, William; Eckert, Werner; de Eyto, Elvira; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Huot, Yannick; Isles, Peter D. F.; Knoll, Lesley B.; Leach, Taylor H.; McBride, Christopher G.; Pierson, Don; Pomati, Francesco; Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Samal, Nihar R.; Staehr, Peter A.; Winslow, Luke A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of high-frequency sensors on profiling buoys to investigate physical, chemical, and biological processes in lakes is increasing rapidly. Profiling buoys with automated winches and sensors that collect high-frequency chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) profiles in 11 lakes in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) allowed the study of the vertical and temporal distribution of ChlF, including the formation of subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SSCM). The effectiveness of 3 methods for sampling phytoplankton distributions in lakes, including (1) manual profiles, (2) single-depth buoys, and (3) profiling buoys were assessed. High-frequency ChlF surface data and profiles were compared to predictions from the Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) model. The depth-integrated ChlF dynamics measured by the profiling buoy data revealed a greater complexity that neither conventional sampling nor the generalized PEG model captured. Conventional sampling techniques would have missed SSCM in 7 of 11 study lakes. Although surface-only ChlF data underestimated average water column ChlF, at times by nearly 2-fold in 4 of the lakes, overall there was a remarkable similarity between surface and mean water column data. Contrary to the PEG model’s proposed negligible role for physical control of phytoplankton during the growing season, thermal structure and light availability were closely associated with ChlF seasonal depth distribution. Thus, an extension of the PEG model is proposed, with a new conceptual framework that explicitly includes physical metrics to better predict SSCM formation in lakes and highlight when profiling buoys are especially informative.

  8. Differences in sheep and goats milk fatty acid profile between conventional and organic farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiplakou, Eleni; Kotrotsios, Vaios; Hadjigeorgiou, Ioannis; Zervas, George

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in chemical composition and particularly in fatty acid (FA) profile, with emphasis on cis-9, trans-11 CLA, of milk obtained from conventional and organic dairy sheep and goats farms under the farming conditions practiced in Greece. Four dairy sheep and four dairy goat farms, representing common conventional production systems and another four dairy sheep and four dairy goat farms, organically certified, representing organic production and feeding systems were selected from all over Greece. One hundred and sixty two individual milk samples were collected from those farms in January-February 2009, about three months after parturition. The milk samples were analyzed for their main chemical constituents and their FA profile. The results showed that the production system affected milk chemical composition: in particular fat content was lower in the organic sheep and goats milk compared with the corresponding conventional. Milk from organic sheep had higher content in MUFA, PUFA, alpha-LNA, cis-9, trans-11 CLA, and omega-3 FA, whereas in milk from organic goats alpha-LNA and omega-3 FA content was higher than that in conventional one. These differences are, mainly, attributed to different feeding practices used by the two production systems. The results of this study show that the organic milk produced under the farming conditions practiced in Greece has higher nutritional value, due to its FA profile, compared with the respective conventional milk.

  9. Design and verification of the miniature optical system for small object surface profile fast scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Sheng; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Jen, Jen-Yu; Lai, Ti-Yu; Jan, Chia-Ming; Hu, Po-Chi

    2016-04-01

    As the progress of optical technologies, different commercial 3D surface contour scanners are on the market nowadays. Most of them are used for reconstructing the surface profile of mold or mechanical objects which are larger than 50 mm×50 mm× 50 mm, and the scanning system size is about 300 mm×300 mm×100 mm. There are seldom optical systems commercialized for surface profile fast scanning for small object size less than 10 mm×10 mm×10 mm. Therefore, a miniature optical system has been designed and developed in this research work for this purpose. Since the most used scanning method of such system is line scan technology, we have developed pseudo-phase shifting digital projection technology by adopting projecting fringes and phase reconstruction method. A projector was used to project a digital fringe patterns on the object, and the fringes intensity images of the reference plane and of the sample object were recorded by a CMOS camera. The phase difference between the plane and object can be calculated from the fringes images, and the surface profile of the object was reconstructed by using the phase differences. The traditional phase shifting method was accomplished by using PZT actuator or precisely controlled motor to adjust the light source or grating and this is one of the limitations for high speed scanning. Compared with the traditional optical setup, we utilized a micro projector to project the digital fringe patterns on the sample. This diminished the phase shifting processing time and the controlled phase differences between the shifted phases become more precise. Besides, the optical path design based on a portable device scanning system was used to minimize the size and reduce the number of the system components. A screwdriver section about 7mm×5mm×5mm has been scanned and its surface profile was successfully restored. The experimental results showed that the measurement area of our system can be smaller than 10mm×10mm, the precision reached to

  10. Microbial and chemical profile of a ponds system for the treatment of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Heloísa; Viancelli, Aline; Martins, Claudia L; Antonio, Regina V; Costa, Rejane H R

    2013-10-01

    The present study describes the behavior of spatio-temporal variation of parameters and microbial profile of a pilot stabilization ponds system, consisted of three serial ponds, for the treatment of landfill leachate. Bacterial diversity was determined through molecular techniques (FISH, PCR and phylogenic analysis), while the phytoplankton community was evaluated through optical microscopy and quantified by the Sedgewick-Rafter chamber. Physicochemical parameters were also evaluated. The ponds system presented the following removal efficiency: 56% for TCOD; 83% for SBOD5 and 82% for N-NH4(+). Moreover, the analysis of chlorophyll a and DO showed stratification in the mass of water by the vertical profile. The analysis of the phytoplankton community showed a low number of species, with a predominance of Chlamydomonas sp. and presence of Cryptomonas sp. in lower density. The bacterial diversity analysis showed the presence of Planctomycetales, Verrucomicrobiales, some Desulfovibionaceae sulfate-reducing bacteria and Pseudomonas sp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  12. Heterogeneity of Systemic Oxidative Stress Profiles in COPD: A Potential Role of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Maury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS plays a key role in the muscle impairment and exercise capacity of COPD patients. However, the literature reveals that systemic OS markers show great heterogeneity, which may hinder the prescription of effective antioxidant supplementation. This study therefore aimed to identify OS markers imbalance of COPD patients, relative to validated normal reference values, and to investigate the possibility of systemic OS profiles. We measured systemic enzymatic/nonenzymatic antioxidant and lipid peroxidation (LP levels in 54 stable COPD patients referred for a rehabilitation program. The main systemic antioxidant deficits in these patients concerned vitamins and trace elements. Fully 89% of the COPD patients showed a systemic antioxidant imbalance which may have caused the elevated systemic LP levels in 69% of them. Interestingly, two patient profiles (clusters 3 and 4 had a more elevated increase in LP combined with increased copper and/or decreased vitamin C, GSH, and GPx. Further analysis revealed that the systemic LP level was higher in COPD women and associated with exercise capacity. Our present data therefore support future supplementations with antioxidant vitamins and trace elements to improve exercise capacity, but COPD patients will probably show different positive responses.

  13. Development of a Rapid Beam Emittance Measurement System using a Real-Time Beam Profile Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Keita; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Takane; Morinobu, Shunpei; Nagayama, Keiichi; Tamura, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Yuusuke

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a rapid beam emittance measurement system for the injection beam of the K140 azimuthally varying field (AVF) cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP). So far, a conventional emittance monitor has been used in a section of a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) system to evaluate the quality of the injected beam to the K400 ring cyclotron. Two kinds of emittance monitors were supplemented in the low energy beam line for evaluation of ion beams from ion sources. One of them is a conventional type consisting of two sets of position-variable slits and a three-wire profile monitor (TPM), similar to the one installed in the MEBT system of the AVF cyclotron. It takes about 30 min to get emittances in both the horizontal and vertical planes. For quick emittance measurements, we have developed a new system equipped with a set of fast moving slits with a fixed gap and a real-time beam profile monitor (BPM83) with a rotating helical wire. With this system the measurement time was considerably reduced to 70 s for both the horizontal and vertical emittances. Moreover the data analysis and graphical processing were completely automated. The overall measurement and analysis time was successfully minimized within 75 s. This rapid emittance measurement system has contributed to improve the beam quality by optimizing parameters of ion sources and the beam transport system.

  14. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  15. MAMPOSSt: Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems - I. Gaussian 3D velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, Gary A.; Biviano, Andrea; Boué, Gwenaël

    2013-03-01

    Mass modelling of spherical systems through internal kinematics is hampered by the mass-velocity anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the Jeans equation, as well as the lack of techniques that are both fast and adaptable to realistic systems. A new fast method, called Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems (MAMPOSSt), is developed and thoroughly tested. MAMPOSSt performs a maximum-likelihood fit of the distribution of observed tracers in projected phase space (projected radius and line-of-sight velocity). As in other methods, MAMPOSSt assumes a shape for the gravitational potential (or equivalently the total mass profile). However, instead of postulating a shape for the distribution function in terms of energy and angular momentum, or supposing Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distributions, MAMPOSSt assumes a velocity anisotropy profile and a shape for the 3D velocity distribution. The formalism is presented for the case of a Gaussian 3D velocity distribution. In contrast to most methods based on moments, MAMPOSSt requires no binning, differentiation, nor extrapolation of the observables. Tests on cluster-mass haloes from ΛCDM dissipationless cosmological simulations indicate that, with 500 tracers, MAMPOSSt is able to jointly recover the virial radius, tracer scale radius, dark matter scale radius and outer or constant velocity anisotropy with small bias (elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  16. Development and evaluation of a high sensitivity dial system for profiling atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 ( laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  17. O-buoy measurements over the Arctic sea ice: Temporal and spatial extents of ozone depletion events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfacre, J. W.; Shepson, P. B.; Simpson, W. R.; Knepp, T. N.; Pratt, K. A.; Matrai, P. A.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Perovich, D. K.; Baldwin, M. E.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    During springtime in the Arctic, interactions between sea ice and the atmosphere lead to unique halogen chemistry, resulting in significant losses of tropospheric ozone and mercury. However, significant uncertainty remains in our understanding of the temporal and spatial extents of Arctic ozone depletion events. Due to the logistical challenges of measurements over the Arctic Ocean region, most in-situ observations of ozone depletion events have been made at coastal sites or islands near the coast, leaving a large spatial gap. In addition, many supporting measurements are made in campaign-mode, with no long term observations. Therefore, autonomous sea ice tethered buoys ("O-buoys") are being deployed across the Arctic sea ice for long-term atmospheric measurements. These buoys provide in-situ measurements of ozone, CO2 and BrO, as well as meteorological parameters, over the frozen ocean, where most ozone depletion events are thought to occur. To date, several O-buoys have been deployed within the Hudson Bay and Beaufort Sea. From data from the first set of O-buoy deployments, we will discuss the observed temporal and spatial extents of ozone depletion events, as well as the calculated halogen atom concentrations and measured BrO concentrations associated with these events.

  18. A Profiling System for the Assessment of Individual Needs for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. Dreschler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the development of a profiling system to specify the needs of hearing-aid candidates. As a basis for the profile of compensation needs, we used a slightly modified version of the Amsterdam Inventory of Disability and Handicap, combined with the well-known Client-Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI. The first questionnaire results in scores for six audiological dimensions: detection, speech in quiet, speech in noise, localization, focus or discrimination, and noise tolerance. The goal of this study was to determine whether the six dimensions derived from the disability questionnaire are appropriate to also categorize individual COSI targets. The results show a good agreement between eight audiologists in the categorization of COSI goals along the six dimensions. The results per dimension show that the dimension focus or discrimination can be regarded as superfluous. Possible additional dimensions were tinnitus and listening effort. The results indicate that it is possible to translate individual user needs (administered using COSI into more general dimensions derived from a disability questionnaire. This allows to summarize the compensation needs for individual patients in a profile of general dimensions, based on the degree of disability and the individual user needs. This profile can be used as a starting point in hearing aid selection. This approach also offers a well-structured method for the evaluation of the postfitting results.

  19. Device- and service profiles for integrated or systems based on open standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildner Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrated OR systems nowadays are closed and proprietary, so that the interconnection of components from third-party vendors is only possible with high time and cost effort. An integrated operating theatre with open interfaces, giving clinical operators the opportunity to choose individual medical devices from different manufacturers, is currently being developed in the framework of the BMBF (Federal Ministry of Education and Research funded project OR.NET [1]. Actual standards and concepts regarding technical feasibility and accreditation process do not cope with the requirements for modular integration based on an open standard. Therefore, strategies as well as service and device profiles to enable a procedure for risk management and certifiability are in the focus of the project work. Amongst others, a concept for User Interface Profiles (UI-Profiles has been conceived in order to describe medical device functions and the entire user interface regarding Human-Machine-Interaction (HMI characteristics with the aim to identify human-induced risks of central user interfaces. The use of standardized device and service profiles shall allow the manufacturers to integrate their medical devices in the OR.NET network, without disclosing the medical devices’ risk analysis and related confidential knowledge or proprietary information.

  20. Slogger: A Profiling and Analysis System Based on Semantic Web Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Baker

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, distributed systems are being used to host all manner of applications. While these platforms provide a relatively cheap and effective means of executing applications, so far there has been little work in developing tools and utilities that can help application developers understand problems with the supporting software, or the executing applications. To fully understand why an application executing on a distributed system is not behaving as would be expected it is important that not only the application, but also the underlying middleware, and the operating system are analysed too, otherwise issues could be missed and certainly overall performance profiling and fault diagnoses would be harder to understand. We believe that one approach to profiling and the analysis of distributed systems and the associated applications is via the plethora of log files generated at runtime. In this paper we report on a system (Slogger, that utilises various emerging Semantic Web technologies to gather the heterogeneous log files generated by the various layers in a distributed system and unify them in common data store. Once unified, the log data can be queried and visualised in order to highlight potential problems or issues that may be occurring in the supporting software or the application itself.

  1. A highly sensitive and specific system for large-scale gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid progress in the field of gene expression-based molecular network integration has generated strong demand on enhancing the sensitivity and data accuracy of experimental systems. To meet the need, a high-throughput gene profiling system of high specificity and sensitivity has been developed. Results By using specially designed primers, the new system amplifies sequences in neighboring exons separated by big introns so that mRNA sequences may be effectively discriminated from other highly related sequences including their genes, unprocessed transcripts, pseudogenes and pseudogene transcripts. Probes used for microarray detection consist of sequences in the two neighboring exons amplified by the primers. In conjunction with a newly developed high-throughput multiplex amplification system and highly simplified experimental procedures, the system can be used to analyze >1,000 mRNA species in a single assay. It may also be used for gene expression profiling of very few (n = 100 or single cells. Highly reproducible results were obtained from duplicate samples with the same number of cells, and from those with a small number (100 and a large number (10,000 of cells. The specificity of the system was demonstrated by comparing results from a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, and an ovarian cancer cell line, NCI/ADR-RES, and by using genomic DNA as starting material. Conclusion Our approach may greatly facilitate the analysis of combinatorial expression of known genes in many important applications, especially when the amount of RNA is limited.

  2. Statistical analyses to support forensic interpretation for a new ten-locus STR profiling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, L A; Evett, I W

    2001-01-01

    A new ten-locus STR (short tandem repeat) profiling system was recently introduced into casework by the Forensic Science Service (FSS) and statistical analyses are described here based on data collected using this new system for the three major racial groups of the UK: Caucasian. Afro-Caribbean and Asian (of Indo-Pakistani descent). Allele distributions are compared and the FSS position with regard to routine significance testing of DNA frequency databases is discussed. An investigation of match probability calculations is carried out and the consequent analyses are shown to provide support for proposed changes in how the FSS reports DNA results when very small match probabilities are involved.

  3. Characterization of sea-ice kinematic in the Arctic outflow region using buoy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruibo Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from four ice-tethered buoys deployed in 2010 were used to investigate sea-ice motion and deformation from the Central Arctic to Fram Strait. Seasonal and long-term changes in ice kinematics of the Arctic outflow region were further quantified using 42 ice-tethered buoys deployed between 1979 and 2011. Our results confirmed that the dynamic setting of the transpolar drift stream (TDS and Fram Strait shaped the motion of the sea ice. Ice drift was closely aligned with surface winds, except during quiescent conditions, or during short-term reversal of the wind direction opposing the TDS. Meridional ice velocity south of 85°N showed a distinct seasonal cycle, peaking between late autumn and early spring in agreement with the seasonality of surface winds. Inertia-induced ice motion was strengthened as ice concentration decreased in summer. As ice drifted southward into the Fram Strait, the meridional ice speed increased dramatically, while associated zonal ice convergence dominated the ice-field deformation. The Arctic atmospheric Dipole Anomaly (DA influenced ice drift by accelerating the meridional ice velocity. Ice trajectories exhibited less meandering during the positive phase of DA and vice versa. From 2005 onwards, the buoy data exhibit high Arctic sea-ice outflow rates, closely related to persistent positive DA anomaly. However, the long-term data from 1979 to 2011 do not show any statistically significant trend for sea-ice outflow, but exhibit high year-to-year variability, associated with the change in the polarity of DA.

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alters the systemic metabolomic profile in healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Melve, Guro Kristin; Bruserud, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) from healthy donors are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The effect of G-CSF administration on global serum metabolite profiles has not been investigated before. This study aims to examine the systemic metabolomic profiles prior to and following administration of G-CSF in healthy adults. Blood samples were collected from 15 healthy stem cell donors prior to and after administration of G-CSF 10 µg/kg/day for 4 days. Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, metabolite levels in serum were determined using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparison of the metabolite profiles of donors before and after G-CSF treatment revealed 239 metabolites that were significantly altered. The major changes of the metabolite profiles following G-CSF administration included alteration of several fatty acids, including increased levels of several medium and long-chain fatty acids, as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids; while there were lower levels of other lipid metabolites such as phospholipids, lysolipids, sphingolipids. Furthermore, there were significantly lower levels of several amino acids and/or their metabolites, including several amino acids with known immunoregulatory functions (methionine, tryptophan, valine). Lastly, the levels of several nucleotides and nucleotide metabolites (guanosine, adenosine, inosine) were also decreased after G-CSF administration, while methylated products were increased. Some of these altered products/metabolites may potentially have angioregulatory effects whereas others may suggest altered intracellular epigenetic regulation. Our results show that G-CSF treatment alters biochemical serum profiles, in particular amino acid, lipid and nucleotide metabolism. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the relevance of these changes in healthy donors.

  5. Perceived parental security profiles in African American adolescents involved in the juvenile justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andretta, James R; Ramirez, Aaron M; Barnes, Michael E; Odom, Terri; Roberson-Adams, Shelia; Woodland, Malcolm H

    2015-12-01

    Many researchers have shown the importance of parent attachment in childhood and adolescence. The present study extends the attachment literature to African Americans involved in the juvenile justice system (N = 213), and provides an initial inquiry using person-oriented methods. The average age was 16.17 years (SD = 1.44), and the sample was predominantly male (71%). Results of a confirmatory factor analysis of Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment-Short Form (IPPA-S) scores supported a 3-factor model: (a) Communication, (b) Trust, and (c) Alienation. Model-based clustering was applied to IPPA-S scores, and results pointed to 4 perceived parental security profiles: high security, moderately high security, moderately low security, and low security. In keeping with our hypotheses, IPPA-S profiles were associated with prosocial behaviors, depression, anxiety, and oppositional defiance. Contrary to hypotheses, IPPA-S profiles were not associated with perspective taking, emotional concern, or behaviors characteristic of a conduct disorder. Results also showed that gender, age, family member with whom the participant resides, charge severity, and offense history did not have an effect on IPPA-S clustering. Implications for therapeutic jurisprudence in African Americans involved with the juvenile justice system are provided. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Shortcut design of ice bank systems based on load profile characteristics; Kennzahlgestuetzte Dimensionierung von Eisspeicheranlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilligweg, A. [Georg-Simon-Ohm-Fachhochschule, Nuernberg (Germany). Fachbereich Maschinenbau und Versorgungstechnik; Hofmann, P.

    1999-09-01

    For the exact design of a cooling supply system with ice bank the knowledge of the cooling load profile is a necessity. In many cases the cooling load profile must be estimated quite roughly during early design stages. In this article it is shown that even on the basis of this rough estimation statements about the dimension of an ice storage system can be made. For this purpose dimensionless characteristic numbers are defined, which are independent of the type of storage equipment or type of the chiller. They are only based on the cooling load profile. Especially for HVAC applications a shortcut method is proposed that can be used in early design stages. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur exakten Auslegung von Kaelteversorgungssystemen mit Eisspeichern ist die Kenntnis des Kuehllastprofils notwendig. Im folgenden Beitrag wird gezeigt, dass sich schon auf der Basis dieser Annahmen Aussagen ueber die Groesse von Eisspeicheranlagen treffen lassen. Dazu werden dimensionslose Kennzahlen eingefuehrt, die unabhaenig von der Art des Speichersystems und der Art der Kaelteanlage nur ueber das Kuehllastprofil definiert sind. Im speziellen wird fuer Auslegungen in der Technischen Gebaeudeausruestung ein verkuerztes Abschaetzungsverfahren dargestellt, das in einem fruehen Planungsstand verwendet werden kann. (orig.)

  7. Applicability analysis of hexahedral hollow profiles as component elements of supporting systems for gondola cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fomin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is presentation of features and results of the conducted works on determination of introduction expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as the component elements of the modern supporting systems of railway freight gondola cars. Methodology. During the research an introduction methodology of different types of profiles as alternative to the existent supporting elements of the body module for freight car was used. This methodology had been developed by the author before. It is oriented to the reduction in material consumption and providing of strength requirements and operating reliability of the car design under study. The developed methodology includes the procedures of admissible values calculation of the resistance moments of the section of the hexahedral hollow profile, which is being introduced. It also includes the determination of optimum (i.e. characterized by the minimum material consumption when meeting the durability requirements values of height and minimum thickness of profile in the conditions of construction limitations. At the same time the admissible resistance moments are calculated as such, which are equal to the value of existent implementation of supporting element or as such that are determined taking into account the surplus design reserve. The first direction is applied in this work. Findings. As a result of the conducted research the introduction expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as vertical rods of the lateral and latitude belts of the walls of the butt-end freight gondola cars is grounded and the optimum parameters of such replacements are determined. Originality. The problem of the use expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as the supporting elements of the freight gondola cars bodies was first considered in the article. To solve this problem the mathematical models describing the dependence of basic strength and mass indexes of the proper profiles on varying the geometrical

  8. Comparison of ECMWF surface meteorology and buoy observations in the Ligurian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bozzano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Since numerical weather prediction (NWP models are usually used to force ocean circulation models, it is important to investigate their skill in reproducing surface meteorological parameters in open sea conditions. Near-surface meteorological data (air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction have been acquired from several sensors deployed on an offshore large spar buoy in the Ligurian Sea (Northern Mediterranean Sea from February to December 2000. The buoy collected 7857 valid records out of 8040 during 335 days at sea.

    These observations have been compared with data from NWP models and specifically, the outputs of the ECMWF analysis in the two grid points closest to the buoy position. Hourly data acquired by the buoy have been undersampled to fit the data set of the model composed by values computed at the four synoptic hours. For each mentioned meteorological parameter an analysis has been performed by evaluating instantaneous synoptic differences, distributions, daily and annual variations and related statistics. The comparison shows that the model reproduces correctly the baric field while significant differences result for the other variables, which are more affected by local conditions. This suggests that the observed discrepancies may be due to the poor resolution of the model that probably is not sufficient to appropriately discriminate between land and ocean surfaces in a small basin such as the Ligurian Sea and to take into account local peculiarities.

    The use of time- and space-averaged model data reduces the differences with respect to the in situ observations, thus making the model data usable for analysis with minor requirements about time and space resolution.

    Although this comparison is strongly limited and we cannot exclude measurement errors, its results suggest a great caution in the

  9. Comparison of ECMWF surface meteorology and buoy observations in the Ligurian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bozzano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Since numerical weather prediction (NWP models are usually used to force ocean circulation models, it is important to investigate their skill in reproducing surface meteorological parameters in open sea conditions. Near-surface meteorological data (air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction have been acquired from several sensors deployed on an offshore large spar buoy in the Ligurian Sea (Northern Mediterranean Sea from February to December 2000. The buoy collected 7857 valid records out of 8040 during 335 days at sea. These observations have been compared with data from NWP models and specifically, the outputs of the ECMWF analysis in the two grid points closest to the buoy position. Hourly data acquired by the buoy have been undersampled to fit the data set of the model composed by values computed at the four synoptic hours. For each mentioned meteorological parameter an analysis has been performed by evaluating instantaneous synoptic differences, distributions, daily and annual variations and related statistics. The comparison shows that the model reproduces correctly the baric field while significant differences result for the other variables, which are more affected by local conditions. This suggests that the observed discrepancies may be due to the poor resolution of the model that probably is not sufficient to appropriately discriminate between land and ocean surfaces in a small basin such as the Ligurian Sea and to take into account local peculiarities. The use of time- and space-averaged model data reduces the differences with respect to the in situ observations, thus making the model data usable for analysis with minor requirements about time and space resolution. Although this comparison is strongly limited and we cannot exclude measurement errors, its results suggest a great caution in the use of the model data, especially at high frequency resolution. They may lead to incorrect estimates of

  10. High Resolution Hydraulic Profiling and Groundwater Sampling using FLUTe™ System in a Fractured Limestone Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janniche, Gry Sander; Christensen, Anders G.; Grosen, Bernt

    innovative investi-gation methods for characterization of the source zone hydrogeology and contamination, including FLUTe system hydraulic profiling and Water-FLUTe multilevel groundwater sampling, in fractured bryo-zoan limestone bedrock. High resolution hydraulic profiling was conducted in three cored......Characterization of the contaminant source zone architecture and the hydraulics is essential to develop accurate site specific conceptual models, delineate and quantify contaminant mass, perform risk as-sessment, and select and design remediation alternatives. This characterization is particularly...... challeng-ing in deposit types as fractured limestone. The activities of a bulk distribution facility for perchloroe-thene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) at the Naverland site near Copenhagen, Denmark, has resulted in PCE and TCE DNAPL impacts to a fractured clay till and an underlying fractured limestone...

  11. Comparative Systems Biology Reveals Allelic Variation Modulating Tocochromanol Profiles in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rebekah E.; Islamovic, Emir; Obert, Donald E.; Wise, Mitchell L.; Herrin, Lauri L.; Hang, An; Harrison, Stephen A.; Ibrahim, Amir; Marshall, Juliet M.; Miclaus, Kelci J.; Lazo, Gerard R.; Hu, Gongshe; Jackson, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Tocochromanols are recognized for nutritional content, plant stress response, and seed longevity. Here we present a systems biological approach to characterize and develop predictive assays for genes affecting tocochromanol variation in barley. Major QTL, detected in three regions of a SNP linkage map, affected multiple tocochromanol forms. Candidate genes were identified through barley/rice orthology and sequenced in genotypes with disparate tocochromanol profiles. Gene-specific markers, designed based on observed polymorphism, mapped to the originating QTL, increasing R2 values at the respective loci. Polymorphism within promoter regions corresponded to motifs known to influence gene expression. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a trend of increased expression in tissues grown at cold temperatures. These results demonstrate utility of a novel method for rapid gene identification and characterization, and provide a resource for efficient development of barley lines with improved tocochromanol profiles. PMID:24820172

  12. Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind recorders from AIRCRAFT and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic Experiment/Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial (SEQUAL/FOCAL) project from 1980-01-25 to 1985-12-18 (NODC Accession 8700111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data were collected from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind...

  13. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. 165.812 Section 165.812 Navigation..., Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Within the Lower Mississippi... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters...

  14. Tsunami Detection Systems for International Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Results are presented regarding the first commercially available, fully operational, tsunami detection system to have passed stringent U.S. government testing requirements and to have successfully demonstrated its ability to detect an actual tsunami at sea. Spurred by the devastation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people, the private sector actively supported the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's (IOC"s) efforts to develop a tsunami warning system and mitigation plan for the Indian Ocean region. As each country in the region developed its requirements, SAIC recognized that many of these underdeveloped countries would need significant technical assistance to fully execute their plans. With the original focus on data fusion, consequence assessment tools, and warning center architecture, it was quickly realized that the cornerstone of any tsunami warning system would be reliable tsunami detection buoys that could meet very stringent operational standards. Our goal was to leverage extensive experience in underwater surveillance and oceanographic sensing to produce an enhanced and reliable deep water sensor that could meet emerging international requirements. Like the NOAA Deep-ocean Assessment and Recording of Tsunamis (DART TM ) buoy, the SAIC Tsunami Buoy (STB) system consists of three subsystems: a surfaccommunications buoy subsystem, a bottom pressure recorder subsystem, and a buoy mooring subsystem. With the operational success that DART has demonstrated, SAIC decided to build and test to the same high standards. The tsunami detection buoy system measures small changes in the depth of the deep ocean caused by tsunami waves as they propagate past the sensor. This is accomplished by using an extremely sensitive bottom pressure sensor/recorder to measure very small changes in pressure as the waves move past the buoy system. The bottom pressure recorder component includes a processor with algorithms that

  15. Concentrating optical system optimization for 3- and 4-junction solar cells: impact of illumination profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Wilkins, Matthew M.; Schriemer, Henry P.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Optical component designs for concentrating photovoltaic systems with three different multijunction solar cells (MJSCs) are optimized to yield maximum system efficiencies under standard test conditions, specifically uniform illumination. Optimization uses an integrated optoelectrical approach with ray tracing of the optical train to generate an irradiance profile for input to the cell's distributed circuit model. These cells, a three-junction lattice-matched (3JLM) solar cell, a three-junction lattice-mismatched inverted metamorphic (3JIMM) solar cell, and a four-junction lattice-matched (4JLM) solar cell, were individually designed for maximum efficiency at 1000×. The optical train introduces losses, modifies the spectrum, and produces a spatially nonuniform profile across the cell. We decouple spectral modification from spatial nonuniformity to separately determine their individual impacts on system efficiencies, finding the optimal set of optical design parameters for each case. Spectral modification yields modest loss penalties (from 1.0% to 1.6%, relative to the MJSC), but the impact of nonuniformity is more significant and cell dependent, with relative loss penalties of 1.1%, 3.8%, and 2.3%, for 3JLM, 3JIMM, and 4JLM, respectively. While spectral modification does not significantly impact design parameters, spatial nonuniformity does, with absolute losses of 1% and 3.4% if 3JIMM and 4JLM cells are used in a 3JLM optimized system, respectively.

  16. Profiling microbial communities in manganese remediation systems treating coal mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Dominique L; Hansel, Colleen M; Burgos, William D; Santelli, Cara M

    2015-03-01

    Water discharging from abandoned coal mines can contain extremely high manganese levels. Removing this metal is an ongoing challenge. Passive Mn(II) removal beds (MRBs) contain microorganisms that oxidize soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(III/IV) minerals, but system performance is unpredictable. Using amplicon pyrosequencing, we profiled the bacterial, fungal, algal, and archaeal communities in four MRBs, performing at different levels, in Pennsylvania to determine whether they differed among MRBs and from surrounding soil and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. Archaea were not detected; PCRs with archaeal primers returned only nontarget bacterial sequences. Fungal taxonomic profiles differed starkly between sites that remove the majority of influent Mn and those that do not, with the former being dominated by Ascomycota (mostly Dothideomycetes) and the latter by Basidiomycota (almost entirely Agaricomycetes). Taxonomic profiles for the other groups did not differ significantly between MRBs, but operational taxonomic unit-based analyses showed significant clustering by MRB with all three groups (P < 0.05). Soil samples clustered separately from MRBs in all groups except fungi, whose soil samples clustered loosely with their respective MRB. Known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for a minor proportion of bacterial sequences (up to 0.20%) but a greater proportion of fungal sequences (up to 14.78%). MRB communities are more diverse than previously thought, and more organisms may be capable of Mn(II) oxidation than are currently known. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Bayesian inference of earthquake parameters from buoy data using a polynomial chaos-based surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Giraldi, Loic

    2017-04-07

    This work addresses the estimation of the parameters of an earthquake model by the consequent tsunami, with an application to the Chile 2010 event. We are particularly interested in the Bayesian inference of the location, the orientation, and the slip of an Okada-based model of the earthquake ocean floor displacement. The tsunami numerical model is based on the GeoClaw software while the observational data is provided by a single DARTⓇ buoy. We propose in this paper a methodology based on polynomial chaos expansion to construct a surrogate model of the wave height at the buoy location. A correlated noise model is first proposed in order to represent the discrepancy between the computational model and the data. This step is necessary, as a classical independent Gaussian noise is shown to be unsuitable for modeling the error, and to prevent convergence of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler. Second, the polynomial chaos model is subsequently improved to handle the variability of the arrival time of the wave, using a preconditioned non-intrusive spectral method. Finally, the construction of a reduced model dedicated to Bayesian inference is proposed. Numerical results are presented and discussed.

  18. Thin ice and storms: Sea ice deformation from buoy arrays deployed during N-ICE2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkin, Polona; Spreen, Gunnar; Cheng, Bin; Doble, Martin; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Haapala, Jari; Hughes, Nick; Kaleschke, Lars; Nicolaus, Marcel; Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    Arctic sea ice has displayed significant thinning as well as an increase in drift speed in recent years. Taken together this suggests an associated rise in sea ice deformation rate. A winter and spring expedition to the sea ice covered region north of Svalbard-the Norwegian young sea ICE2015 expedition (N-ICE2015)—gave an opportunity to deploy extensive buoy arrays and to monitor the deformation of the first-year and second-year ice now common in the majority of the Arctic Basin. During the 5 month long expedition, the ice cover underwent several strong deformation events, including a powerful storm in early February that damaged the ice cover irreversibly. The values of total deformation measured during N-ICE2015 exceed previously measured values in the Arctic Basin at similar scales: At 100 km scale, N-ICE2015 values averaged above 0.1 d-1, compared to rates of 0.08 d-1 or less for previous buoy arrays. The exponent of the power law between the deformation length scale and total deformation developed over the season from 0.37 to 0.54 with an abrupt increase immediately after the early February storm, indicating a weakened ice cover with more free drift of the sea ice floes. Our results point to a general increase in deformation associated with the younger and thinner Arctic sea ice and to a potentially destructive role of winter storms.

  19. Policy outcomes of applying different nutrient profiling systems in recreational sports settings: the case for national harmonization in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Poirier, Kelly; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Shearer, Cindy; Kirk, Sara F L

    2015-08-01

    To assess agreement among three nutrient profiling systems used to evaluate the healthfulness of vending machine products in recreation and sport settings in three Canadian provinces. We also assessed whether the nutritional profile of vending machine items in recreation and sport facilities that were adhering to nutrition guidelines (implementers) was superior to that of facilities that were not (non-implementers). Trained research assistants audited the contents of vending machines. Three provincial nutrient profiling systems were used to classify items into each province's most, moderately and least healthy categories. Agreement among systems was assessed using weighted κ statistics. ANOVA assessed whether the average nutritional profile of vending machine items differed according to province and guideline implementation status. Eighteen recreation and sport facilities in three Canadian provinces. One-half of facilities were implementing nutrition guidelines. Snacks (n 531) and beverages (n 618) within thirty-six vending machines were audited. Overall, the systems agreed that the majority of items belonged within their respective least healthy categories (66-69 %) and that few belonged within their most healthy categories (14-22 %). Agreement among profiling systems was moderate to good, with κ w values ranging from 0·49 to 0·69. Implementers offered fewer of the least healthy items (Ppolicy outcomes of the three systems are likely to be similar, suggesting there may be scope to harmonize nutrient profiling systems at a national level to avoid unnecessary duplication and support food reformulation by industry.

  20. The Effect of Electric Load Profiles on the Performance of Off-Grid Residential Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephen Treado

    2015-01-01

      This paper investigates the energy performance of off-grid residential hybrid renewable electric power systems, particularly the effect of electric load profiles on the ability to harvest available...

  1. Assessing the performance of the Cretan Sea ecosystem model with the use of high frequency M3A buoy data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Triantafyllou

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Mediterranean Forecasting System Pilot Project a buoy was deployed in the Cretan Sea and for the first time high-frequency physical and biogeochemical data were collected over an extended period, providing a unique opportunity for the evaluation of an ecosystem model. The model both tuned and validated in the Cretan Sea in the past, is explored and quantified. In addition, the optimal parameter set is determined while the effects of high-frequency forcing are explored. The model results are satisfactory, especially at the upper part of the water column, while the inability of 1-D modelling in fully exploring the hydrodynamics of the particular area is depicted and further developments are suggested. Key words. Oceanography; general (numerical modeling – Oceanography; biological and chemical (ecosystems and ecology

  2. Pulmonary cachexia, systemic inflammatory profile, and the interleukin 1beta -511 single nucleotide polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, Roelinka; Grimble, Robert F; Howell, W Martin; Shale, Dennis J; Creutzberg, Eva C; Wouters, Emiel F; Schols, Annemie M

    2005-11-01

    Cachexia is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is thought to be linked to an enhanced systemic inflammatory response. We investigated differences in the systemic inflammatory profile and polymorphisms in related inflammatory genes in COPD patients. A cross-sectional study was performed in 99 patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages II-IV), who were stratified by cachexia based on fat-free mass index (FFMI; in kg/m2: leptin, and urinary pseudouridine (as a marker of cellular protein breakdown) were measured. Fat mass, leptin, and pseudouridine were significantly different (P COPD patients, who are characterized by an elevated systemic inflammatory response, cachexia is not discriminatory for the extent of increase in inflammatory status. This study, however, indicates a potential influence of genetic predisposition on the cachexia process.

  3. Quality evaluation of stereo 3DTV systems with open profiling of quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepplinger, Sara; Hottong, Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Current work describes two evaluations in two different locations investigating possible differences in the experience of quality of stereo 3DTV systems. Herein, the work presents the usage of the Open Profiling of Quality method. This method allows going beyond up to now considered distinctive features (e.g., glasses wear comfort, brightness…). During the first evaluation standardized display-settings were used for each tested system. In the second study all systems were tested with their provided factory settings. Other factors like test stimuli, play out technology, laboratory settings, and viewing position were strictly standardized. Additionally, influencing factors like spectacle frames and display design have been minimized by using same eyeglass frames (but different technology) and hiding the display chassis. The results of both evaluations show distinct influences of display technology on quality perception. This is affirmed by the quality describing attributes deriving from the open profiling of quality method beyond the quantitative quality rating. This influence has to be considered within subjective evaluation of quality in order to support test-retest reliability and user centered approaches on quality evaluation of stereo 3D visualization. Different quality perception of different display technologies was confirmed even under different TV settings.

  4. Measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a homemade stationary groundbased lidar system will be presented. In addition, information on basic characteristics and performance of the lidar system will be provided. Aerosol/Cloud lidar system in monostatic coaxial configuration uses the fundamental (1064 nm) and the second harmonic (532 nm) of a pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser to provide information on the relative concentration and spatial distribution of aerosol particles and cloud water droplets. Beam expander is used to reduce the laser beam divergence before to be transmitted into the atmosphere. In this study, high-resolution vertical profiles from the near ground up to 15 km altitude are obtained. A Newtonian telescope of diameter 400 mm with an adjustable field of view (FOV) is used to collect the elastic backscattered signal. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used for the 532 nm wavelength detection channel, while an avalanche photodiode (APD) is used for the 1064 nm wavelength detection channel. The optoelectronic detection channels use two similar very high frequency preamplification circuit. Data are acquired with a nominal spatial resolution of 7.5 m using a 12-bit 20 MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for each channel. Many functions, such as, range determination, background subtraction, digitization, and averaging are performed by the receiver subsystem. In addition, spatial resolution and linear dynamic range were optimized during signal processing.

  5. A Module for Assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation System for Unique Forecasting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounder radiance data are assimilated into operational modeling systems however the process is computationally expensive and only approximately 1% of available data are assimilated due to data thinning as well as the fact that radiances are restricted to cloud-free fields of view. In contrast, the number of hyperspectral infrared profiles assimilated is much higher since the retrieved profiles can be assimilated in some partly cloudy scenes due to profile coupling other data, such as microwave or neural networks, as first guesses to the retrieval process. As the operational data assimilation community attempts to assimilate cloud-affected radiances, it is possible that the use of retrieved profiles might offer an alternative methodology that is less complex and more computationally efficient to solve this problem. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has assimilated hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System. Early research at SPoRT demonstrated improved initial conditions when assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) thermodynamic profiles into WRF (using WRF-Var and assigning more appropriate error weighting to the profiles) to improve regional analysis and heavy precipitation forecasts. Successful early work has led to more recent research utilizing WRF and GSI for applications including the assimilation of AIRS profiles to improve WRF forecasts of atmospheric rivers and assimilation of AIRS, Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) profiles to improve model representation of tropopause folds and associated non-convective wind events. Although more hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles can be assimilated into model forecasts, one disadvantage is the retrieved profiles have traditionally been assigned the

  6. Effect of Different Management System on Haemato-biochemical profile in Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A very little information is available in literature on management of Japanese quail (Couturnix Couturnix Japonica in different housing system (cage system and deep litter system of management. The average weekly body weight gain was significantly higher in deep litter system (34±0.43gm than cage (12.71±0.41gm system at the 3rd week of age. The average daily feed consumption by individual quails was higher in cage (12.71±2.10 than deep litter system (11.84±1.47 during 0-6 weeks of age. The haematobiochemical profile viz Hb (gm%,TEC (106/µl ,PCV(%,TLC(103/ µlalong with biochemical studies as blood sugar (mg/dl, total serum protein (gm/dl,serum calcium (mg/100ml and serum phosphorus (mg/dl were well within the normal health of quail under both cage and deep litter system of management. [Vet. World 2010; 3(6.000: 291-292

  7. Microbial Community Profiles in Wastewaters from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Jałowiecki

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the potential of community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs methodology as an assay for characterization of the metabolic diversity of wastewater samples and to link the metabolic diversity patterns to efficiency of select onsite biological wastewater facilities. Metabolic fingerprints obtained from the selected samples were used to understand functional diversity implied by the carbon substrate shifts. Three different biological facilities of onsite wastewater treatment were evaluated: fixed bed reactor (technology A, trickling filter/biofilter system (technology B, and aerated filter system (the fluidized bed reactor, technology C. High similarities of the microbial community functional structures were found among the samples from the three onsite wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, as shown by the diversity indices. Principal components analysis (PCA showed that the diversity and CLPPs of microbial communities depended on the working efficiency of the wastewater treatment technologies. This study provided an overall picture of microbial community functional structures of investigated samples in WWTPs and discerned the linkages between microbial communities and technologies of onsite WWTPs used. The results obtained confirmed that metabolic profiles could be used to monitor treatment processes as valuable biological indicators of onsite wastewater treatment technologies efficiency. This is the first step toward understanding relations of technology types with microbial community patterns in raw and treated wastewaters.

  8. Systemic Cytokine Profiles in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection and Alterations following Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukti; Jagannathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth organism that infects ∼50 to 100 million people worldwide. Despite its widespread prevalence, very little is known about the immune response that characterizes human S. stercoralis infection. To study the systemic cytokine profile characteristic of Strongyloides infection, we measured the circulating levels of a large panel of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in asymptomatic, infected individuals (n = 32) and compared them to those in uninfected, controls (n = 24). Infected individuals exhibited significantly lower circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-1β [IL-1β]) and significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and transforming growth factor β [TGF-β]). Moreover, treatment of Strongyloides infection resulted in a significant reversal of the cytokine profile, with increased levels of proinflammatory (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-23, and IL-1β) and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and TGF-β) cytokines following treatment. Thus, S. stercoralis infection is characterized by alterations in the levels of systemic cytokines, reflecting major alterations in the underlying immune response to this chronic helminth infection. PMID:26597982

  9. Temperature Profile in Fuel and Tie-Tubes for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishal Patel

    2015-02-01

    A finite element method to calculate temperature profiles in heterogeneous geometries of tie-tube moderated LEU nuclear thermal propulsion systems and HEU designs with tie-tubes is developed and implemented in MATLAB. This new method is compared to previous methods to demonstrate shortcomings in those methods. Typical methods to analyze peak fuel centerline temperature in hexagonal geometries rely on spatial homogenization to derive an analytical expression. These methods are not applicable to cores with tie-tube elements because conduction to tie-tubes cannot be accurately modeled with the homogenized models. The fuel centerline temperature directly impacts safety and performance so it must be predicted carefully. The temperature profile in tie-tubes is also important when high temperatures are expected in the fuel because conduction to the tie-tubes may cause melting in tie-tubes, which may set maximum allowable performance. Estimations of maximum tie-tube temperature can be found from equivalent tube methods, however this method tends to be approximate and overly conservative. A finite element model of heat conduction on a unit cell can model spatial dependence and non-linear conductivity for fuel and tie-tube systems allowing for higher design fidelity of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  10. The Beam Profile Monitoring System for the IRRAD Proton Facility at the CERN PS East Area

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Matli, Emanuele; Ravotti, Federico; Gan, Kock Kiam; Kagan, Harris; Smith, Shane; Warner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, devices are frequently required to withstand a certain radiation level. As a result, detectors and electronics must be irradiated to determine their level of radiation tolerance. To perform these irradiations, CERN built a new irradiation facility in the East Area at the Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerator. At this facility, named IRRAD, a high-intensity 24 GeV/c proton beam is used. During irradiation, it is necessary to monitor the intensity and the transverse profile of the proton beam. The Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) for IRRAD uses 39-channel pixel detectors to monitor the beam position. These pixel detectors are constructed using thin foil copper pads positioned on a flex circuit. When protons pass through the copper pads, they induce a measurable current. To measure this current and determine the total flux of protons passing through the thin foil copper detectors, a new data acquisition system was designed as well as a new database and on-line display system. In...

  11. Microbial Community Profiles in Wastewaters from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna Małgorzata; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the potential of community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) methodology as an assay for characterization of the metabolic diversity of wastewater samples and to link the metabolic diversity patterns to efficiency of select onsite biological wastewater facilities. Metabolic fingerprints obtained from the selected samples were used to understand functional diversity implied by the carbon substrate shifts. Three different biological facilities of onsite wastewater treatment were evaluated: fixed bed reactor (technology A), trickling filter/biofilter system (technology B), and aerated filter system (the fluidized bed reactor, technology C). High similarities of the microbial community functional structures were found among the samples from the three onsite wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), as shown by the diversity indices. Principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the diversity and CLPPs of microbial communities depended on the working efficiency of the wastewater treatment technologies. This study provided an overall picture of microbial community functional structures of investigated samples in WWTPs and discerned the linkages between microbial communities and technologies of onsite WWTPs used. The results obtained confirmed that metabolic profiles could be used to monitor treatment processes as valuable biological indicators of onsite wastewater treatment technologies efficiency. This is the first step toward understanding relations of technology types with microbial community patterns in raw and treated wastewaters. PMID:26807728

  12. A nutrient profiling system for the (re)formulation of a global food and beverage portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Masset, Gabriel; Charles, Veronique Rheiner; Hoover, Cassandra; Chesneau-Guillemont, Caroline; Leroy, Fabienne; Lehmann, Undine; Spieldenner, Jörg; Tee, E-Siong; Gibney, Mike; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-04-01

    To describe the Nestlé Nutritional Profiling System (NNPS) developed to guide the reformulation of Nestlé products, and the results of its application in the USA and France. The NNPS is a category-specific system that calculates nutrient targets per serving as consumed, based on age-adjusted dietary guidelines. Products are aggregated into 32 food categories. The NNPS ensures that excessive amounts of nutrients to limit cannot be compensated for by adding nutrients to encourage. A study was conducted to measure changes in nutrient profiles of the most widely purchased Nestlé products from eight food categories (n = 99) in the USA and France. A comparison was made between the 2009-2010 and 2014-2015 products. The application of the NNPS between 2009-2010 and 2014-2015 was associated with an overall downwards trend for all nutrients to limit. Sodium and total sugars contents were reduced by up to 22 and 31 %, respectively. Saturated Fatty Acids and total fat reductions were less homogeneous across categories, with children products having larger reductions. Energy per serving was reduced by food categories in the USA and France. Confirmatory analyses are needed in other countries and food categories; the impact of such a large-scale reformulation on dietary intake and health remains to be investigated.

  13. 77 FR 65816 - Safety Zone; Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ..., Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... the Lower Mississippi River between the Port of New Orleans Cruise Ship Terminal, mile marker 96.0... intending to transit the Lower Mississippi River between mile marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA and the Southwest...

  14. Comparison of ERA-Interim waves with buoy data in the eastern Arabian Sea during high waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.

    at two locations in eastern Arabian Sea One location is a deep water location and another one is a shallow water location The comparison of significant wave height (SWH) between ERA dataset and buoy data at both the locations shows good correlation...

  15. Verification of model wave heights with long-term moored buoy data: Application to wave field over the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Polnikov, V.G.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.

    research work through Women Scientist Scheme (WOS-A). We are grateful to ECMWF for providing the required ERA wind data and INCOIS, Hyderabad for providing the buoy data for model validation. We are also thankful to CERSAT, IFREMER, France for providing...

  16. Instabilities in passive and active optical systems with a Gaussian transverse intensity profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugiato, L. A.; Strini, G.; Horowicz, R. J.; Narducci, L. M.

    1984-09-01

    The steady-state and stability properties of bistable optical systems, lasers with an injected signal, and ordinary free-running lasers are analyzed. The study is based on a unifield model of a ring cavity containing a finite-size cylindrical sample of homogeneously broadened two-level atoms which is capable of supporting a single field mode with a Gaussian transverse profile. The equations of motion in the steady state are solved, a linear stability analysis of the stationary solutions is performed, the domains of unstable operation of each of the three systems are identified, and the results are compared in detail with those of earlier planewave uniform field calculations. Significant enhancement of the instability domain relative to the plane-wave limit is found in the case of the injected-signal laser. A less pronounced enhancement is found for mixed absorptive and dispersive optical bistability.

  17. Mission profile emulator for the power electronics systems of motor drive applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Due to the adverse temperature swings which normally occur in the power semiconductor devices during the start-up and deceleration periods of the motor drive system, the thermal design and control, as well as the reliability analysis of the power devices becomes crucial. In order to facilitate...... testing and access the loading and lifetime performances, a novel stress emulator for power semiconductor devices based on the mission profile of a motor drive system is proposed and designed. The control algorithm for the stress emulator setup is introduced, and the issues concerning the Orthogonal...... Signal Generator (OSG) are addressed by means of adaptive Notch filter implementation. Finally, experimental results are provided in order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed emulation technique....

  18. [System analysis of metabolic profile of blood in patients with thermal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'eva, A G; Martucevich, A K; Peretiagin, S P; Didenko, N V

    2014-01-01

    To make multiparametric analysis of blood metabolic profile in early period of burn disease. We tested blood samples of 15 healthy adults (control group) and 60 patients with thermal trauma (main group--II-4IIIA, B degree of burn, more then 15 bsp). Parameters of lipid metabolism, level of glucose, lactate, malonic dialdehyde and some enzymes in blood plasma and erythrocytes were estimated. In early period of burn disease we fixed the clear metabolic disorders, including tissues hypoxia, activation of plasma transaminases and oxidoreductases, inhibition of detoxication system, induction of oxidative stress. Connection of metabolic changes, associated with burn disease, was registered. It supported by numerous correlations between studied parameters, formed from first day after trauma. Our data expand the knowledge about mating metabolic changes of catalytic activity of blood enzymes, forming in early period of burn disease (system metabolic disadaptation), and diagnostic value of some blood biochemical parameters in estimation of burned patient metabolism.

  19. The design and analysis of channel transmission communication system of XCTD profiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Jin, Xiang-Yu; Song, Guo-Min; Shang, Ying-Sheng; Li, Hong-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a channel transmission communication system of expendable conductivity-temperature-depth is established in accordance to the operation characteristics of the transmission line to more accurately assess the characteristics of deep-sea abandoned profiler channel. The wrapping inductance is eliminated to maximum extent through the wrapping pattern of the underwater spool and the overwater spool and the calculation of the wrapping diameter. The feasibility of the proposed channel transmission communication system is verified through theoretical analysis and practical measurement of the transmission signal error rate in the amplitude shift keying (ASK) modulation. The proposed design provides a new research method for the channel assessment of complex abandoned measuring instrument and an important experiment evidence for the rapid development of the deep-sea abandoned measuring instrument.

  20. Biovolume-size spectra of epipelagic zooplankton using a multi-frequency acoustic profiling system (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, J. M.; Ortner, P. B.; Pieper, R. E.; Holliday, D. V.

    1993-03-01

    Zooplankton biovolume data from a Multi-frequency Acoustic Profiling System were used to construct biovolume-size spectra for the Gulf Stream and the Southern California Bight. These spectra were linear through most, but not all, of the size range sampled (0.025-4.00 mm, ESR). Analysis of covariance was sometimes a useful tool to distinguish among spectra taken at different times and places. Difference spectra offered an alternative method of visualizing disparities between spectra. We compared our acoustically-derived spectra from the Gulf Stream with those obtained from other oceans with different samplers and those obtained in the same waters with a different sampler. The results indicate that differences attributable to sampler bias within the same system presently make it difficult, if not impossible, to interpret comparisons from different samplers in different ecosystems.

  1. Assessment of an expert system for the automated validation of electrophoretic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorizzi, Romolo M; Zanardi, Valerio; Agnoletti, Riziero; Alberelli, Anna; Babini, Alessandra; De Vita, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The Core-lab of the Greater Romagna Area Hub Laboratory carries out about 250,000 capillary electrophoresis assays/year. The huge workload demands the assessing of an Experimental Expert System (EES) capable to sort out the negative samples. Capillarys 2 analyzer has been employed coupled with an EES (based on five simple rules) integrated with the electrophoretic test management software PhoresisCore for assessing the entire workload of a week (5,683 samples). The classification was compared with that of two expert laboratorians. The expert system automatically classified 2974 profiles as negative and no positive samples were erroneously classified as negative (negative predictive value: 100%). The EES sensitivity was 100% and the FTE required for the validation was reduced from 1.26 to 0.63. The EES could be easily implemented in routine activity embedded in a middleware or directly running in the analyzer improving the workflow.

  2. Promoting climate, ocean and data literacy by hosting a CO2 buoy from NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab at the Exploratorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabine, C. L.; Miller, M. K.; Maenner, S.; Sutton, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Exploratorium's new museum site on the San Francisco waterfront is a unique location for place-based learning about climate impacts on the ocean. With access to the Bay and surrounding environment, and strong partnerships with a national network of NOAA scientists and local researchers, the museum can serve as an educational node for a variety of atmosphere and ocean observing networks. The most visible and iconic instrument at the museum's Pier 15 location is a CO2 buoy from NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle. Part of an international network of real-time ocean acidification sensors, the NOAA buoy streams temperature, salinity, atmospheric and surface water CO2 data from the Exploratorium location to NOAA. Near real-time and archived ocean and atmosphere carbon data are then shared with and displayed in the museum's Bay Observatory along with other water quality, weather, and air quality conditions. Displaying both the instruments and the data they provide gives the public a better understanding of where climate data comes from, how scientists make meaning from time series data, and the value of long-term observation in understanding climate change and the ways that humans impact the environment. However, creating interactive exhibits from environmental data presents many challenges, including interpreting complex earth systems and biological and human interactions. What is the impact of the adjacent urban center and the estuary on the Bay's carbon content? How do we tease out long-term trends from the local variability? How do we connect the place-based learning to global processes and impacts? We'll address some of these challenges in the presentation and include the importance of collaborative partnerships between informal education institutions and researchers in place-based education about climate and environmental change.

  3. Place-based Learning Collaboration: Promoting climate, ocean and data literacy by hosting a CO2 buoy from NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab at the Exploratorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Sabine, C. L.; Maenner, S.; Sutton, A.; Raleigh, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Exploratorium's new museum site on the San Francisco waterfront is a unique location for place-based learning about climate impacts on the ocean. With access to the Bay and surrounding environment, and strong partnerships with a national network of NOAA scientists and local researchers, the museum can serve as an educational node for a variety of atmosphere and ocean observing networks. The most visible and iconic instrument at the museum's Pier 15 location is a CO2 buoy from NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle. Part of an international network of real-time ocean acidification sensors, the NOAA buoy streams temperature, salinity, atmospheric and surface water CO2 data from the Exploratorium location to NOAA. Near real-time and archived ocean and atmosphere carbon data is displayed in the museum's Bay Observatory along with other water quality, weather, and air quality conditions. Displaying both the instruments and the data they provide gives the public a better understanding of where climate data comes from, how scientists make meaning from time series data, and the value of long-term observation in understanding climate change and the ways that humans impact the environment. However, creating interactive exhibits from environmental data presents many challenges, including interpreting complex earth systems and biological and human interactions. What is the impact of the adjacent urban center and the estuary on the Bay's carbon content? How do we tease out long-term trends from the local variability? How do we connect the place-based learning to global processes and impacts? We'll address some of these challenges in the presentation and include the importance of collaborative partnerships between informal education institutions and researchers in place-based education about climate and environmental change.

  4. Genomic fingerprints, ARDRA profiles and quinone systems for classification of Pasteurella sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, A; Lubitz, W; Busse, H J

    2000-12-01

    In order to investigate the relationships between species of the genus Pasteurella sensu stricto such as Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella canis, Pasteurella stomatis, Pasteurella dagmatis, Pasteurella avium, Pasteurella volantium, Pasteurella gallinarum, Pasteurella species A, Pasteurella species B and "Pasteurella leonis" MCCM 00659 their genomic fingerprints and ARDRA profiles were compared and their quinone systems were analysed. Visual comparison of band patterns from rep-PCR (ERIC-, REP- and BOX-PCR) and the analyses of the combined band patterns by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with averages) dendrogram derived from the combined fingerprint profiles demonstrated that each strain displays a distinct genomic fingerprint. In members of the same species several similarities in the band patterns were observed. Combined ARDRA profiles, obtained after digestion of amplified 23S rRNA coding genes with the enzymes DdeI, MseI and RsaI, revealed a dissection of the members of the genus Pasteurella sensu stricto into two groups which was in agreement with the two groups obtained from our analyses of the quinone systems. These two groups corresponded with the two phylogenetically determined subclusters 3A and 3B described previously. The species of subcluster 3A displayed a quinone system with ubiquinone Q-7 (32-56%) and ubiquinone Q-8 (44-63%) as major compounds. Members of subcluster 3B had a quinone system with ubiquinone Q-8 (86-97%) as the major compound. Based on these results it can be suggested that the genus Pasteurella sensu stricto should be restricted to the species of subcluster 3B including the species Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella canis, Pasteurella stomatis, Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella species B. In addition, evidence was found which would indicate that: 1) Pasteurella canis MCCM 00927 is misnamed and should be reclassified with Pasteurella multocida; 2) Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica may be classified as a separate species; and

  5. [Measurements of CO2 Concentration Profile in Troposphere Based on Balloon-Borne TDLAS System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Kan, Rui-feng; Xu, Zhen-yu; Ruan, Jun; Yuan, Song

    2015-10-01

    The main source and sink of CO2 in the atmosphere are concentrated in the troposphere. It is of great significance to the study of CO2 flux and global climate change to obtain the accurate tropospheric CO2 concentration profile. For the characteristics of high resolution, high sensitivity and fast response of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), a compact balloon-borne system based on direct absorption was developed to detect the CO2 concentration profiles by use of the 2 004. 02 nm, R(16), v1+v3 line without the interfere of H2O absorption and the CO2 density of the number of molecules below 10 km in the troposphere was obtained. Due to the balloon-borne environment, a compact design of one single board integrated with laser driver, signal conditioning, spectra acquiring and concentration retrieving was developed. Limited by the working capability and hardware resources of embedded micro-processor, the spectra processing algorithm was optimized to reduce the time-cost. Compared with the traditional TDLAS sensors with WMS technique, this system was designed based on the direct absorption technique by means of an open-path Herriott cell with 20 m optical-path, which avoided the process of standardization and enhanced the environmental adaptation. The universal design of hardware and software platform achieved diverse gas measuring by changing the laser and adjusting some key parameters in algorithm. The concept of compact design helped to reduce the system's power and volume and balanced the response speed and measure precision. The power consumes below 1.5 W in room temperature and the volume of the single board is 120 mm x 100 mm x 25 mm, and the measurement accuracy is ± 0.6 x 10(-6) at 1.5 s response time. It has been proved that the system can realize high precision detection of CO2 profile at 15 m vertical resolution in troposphere and TDLAS is an available method for balloon-borne detection.

  6. Migrating the facility profile information management system into the world wide web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kero, R.E.; Swietlik, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy - Office of Special Projects and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), along with the Department of Energy - office of Scientific and Technical Information have previously designed and implemented the Environment, Safety and Health Facility Profile Information Management System (FPIMS) to facilitate greater efficiency in searching, analyzing and disseminating information found within environment, safety and health oversight documents. This information retrieval based system serves as a central repository for full-text electronic oversight documents, as well as a management planning and decision making tool that can assist in trend and root cause analyses. Continuous improvement of environment, safety and health programs are currently aided through this personal computer-based system by providing a means for the open communication of lessons learned across the department. Overall benefits have included reductions in costs and improvements in past information management capabilities. Access to the FPIMS has been possible historically through a headquarters-based local area network equipped with modems. Continued demand for greater accessibility of the system by remote DOE field offices and sites, in conjunction with the Secretary of Energy` s call for greater public accessibility to Department of Energy (DOE) information resources, has been the impetus to expand access through the use of Internet technologies. Therefore, the following paper will discuss reasons for migrating the FPIMS system into the World Wide Web (Web), various lessons learned from the FPIMS migration effort, as well as future plans for enhancing the Web-based FPIMS.

  7. Distinct Neurochemical Profiles of Spinocerebellar Ataxias 1, 2, 6, and Cerebellar Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; Iltis, Isabelle; Hutter, Diane; Thomas, William; Bushara, Khalaf O.; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic neurodegenerative ataxias are movement disorders that affect the cerebellum. Robust and objective biomarkers are critical for treatment trials of ataxias. In addition, such biomarkers may help discriminate between ataxia subtypes because these diseases display substantial overlap in clinical presentation and conventional MRI. Profiles of 10–13 neurochemical concentrations obtained in vivo by high field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can potentially provide ataxia-type specific biomarkers. We compared cerebellar and brainstem neurochemical profiles measured at 4 T from 26 patients with spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1, N=9; SCA2, N=7; SCA6, N=5) or cerebellar multiple system atrophy (MSA-C, N=5) and 15 age-matched healthy controls. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was used to assess disease severity. The patterns of neurochemical alterations relative to controls differed between ataxia types. Myo-inositol levels in the vermis, myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, total creatine, glutamate, glutamine in the cerebellar hemispheres and myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, glutamate in the pons were significantly different between patient groups (Bonferroni corrected pataxia types. Studies with higher numbers of patients and other ataxias are warranted to further investigate the clinical utility of neurochemical levels as measured by high-field MRS as ataxia biomarkers. PMID:20838948

  8. Thermal profiles of electrocauteries, the Nd:YAG laser, and the electromagnetic-field focusing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, W S; Hudkins, B; Dempewolf, S; Patil, A A; Clingan, F A; McGee, J M

    1992-01-01

    Electromagnetic-field focusing (EFF) is a method of converging induced eddy current onto a pointed tip of a tuned length return circuit in the near field of a resonator, which results in the production of high temperature. Previously reported applications of this method include various devices for local hyperthermia and a precision surgical device. The latter is currently being used in human clinical trials under two investigational device exemptions from the Food and Drug Administration. In the present work, the thermal profile produced in a uniform, tissue-simulating phantom by the hand-held probe of the surgical EFF system is compared with those produced by mono- and bipolar electrocauteries and by a contact Nd:YAG laser. At the equivalent power setting and 2-cm insertion depth, the EFF probe was shown to have a tighter thermal profile than the monopolar electrocautery or the contact Nd:YAG laser. This finding is consistent with earlier histologic evidence that brain cortical tissue cut by the surgical EFF probe had minimal thermal damage in the tissue surrounding the incision.

  9. Perancangan Sistem Prediktor Daya Pada Panel Photovoltaic di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Prisilia Susanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Buoy weather station merupakan stasiun informasi cuaca yang banyak dijumpai di pelabuhan, khususnya di Surabaya. Untuk mengoperasikannya diperlukan sumber daya listrik berupa panel photovoltaic. Efek fotolistrik pada PV mampu merubah energi cahaya menjadi energi listrik. Besarnya daya yang dihasilkan tergantung dari intensitas matahari, temperatur permukaan, dan keadaan geografis setempat. Untuk memprediksi daya keluaran per setengah jam yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV maka digunakan metode jaringan syaraf tiruan dengan algoritma backpropagation pada software Matlab. Variabel yang digunakan berupa data daya yang diperoleh dari tegangan dan arus yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV di daerah Surabaya. Data daya selama 3 hari per setengah jam tersebut dijadikan data input dan target pada Matlab. Hasil terbaik perancangan sistem prediksi daya keluaran panel PV menggunakan JST pada Matlab yaitu Mean Square Error (MSE sebesar 0,0113 dan akurasi ketepatan prediksi sebesar 99,81%.

  10. Presentation of the optical sensor OPTISENS designed for Eulerian measurements of phytoplankton on a moored buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volent, Zsolt; Johnsen, Geir

    1993-12-01

    Since 1988 a newly designed transmissometer (OPTISENS) has been used along the southern Norwegian coast to monitor phytoplankton blooms. The instrument has been suspended on a buoy equipped with an ARGOS PTT for satellite transmission of data. The OPTISENS is a light beam transmissometer with 3 different colors of the light, i.e. red, green and blue with peak wavelengths at 650 nm, 555 nm and 470 nm, respectively. Long-term measurements in the sea and laboratory experiments of in vivo absorption- and fluorescence excitation spectra, have demonstrated that it not only can distinguish between different particles but also identify of different groups of bloom-forming phytoplankton, some of which are toxic. The attenuation coefficient ratios between the colors blue, green, yellow and red will be discussed for different phytoplankton groups.

  11. Health & Demographic Surveillance System Profile: The Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance System (Rufiji HDSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrema, Sigilbert; Kante, Almamy M; Levira, Francis; Mono, Amaniel; Irema, Kahema; de Savigny, Don; Masanja, Honorati

    2015-04-01

    The Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) was established in October 1998 to evaluate the impact on burden of disease of health system reforms based on locally generated data, prioritization, resource allocation and planning for essential health interventions. The Rufiji HDSS collects detailed information on health and survival and provides a framework for population-based health research of relevance to local and national health priorities.In December 2012 the population under surveillance was about 105,503 people, residing in 19,315 households. Monitoring of households and members within households is undertaken in regular 6-month cycles known as 'rounds'. Self reported information is collected on demographic, household, socioeconomic and geographical characteristics. Verbal autopsy is conducted using standardized questionnaires, to determine probable causes of death. In conjunction with core HDSS activities, the ongoing studies in Rufiji HDSS focus on maternal and new-born health, evaluation of safety of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) exposure in early pregnancy and the clinical safety of a fixed dose of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQP) in the community. Findings of studies conducted in Rufiji HDSS can be accessed at www.ihi.or.tz/IHI-Digital-Library. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  12. Plasma lipids profile and erythrocytes system in patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.

    2006-08-01

    Erythrocytes system study can provide a framework for detailed exploration of blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions, one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. Our objective was to explore erythrocytes system in patients with stable angina pectoris II f.c. (Canadian classification). The participants (N = 56, age 40 - 55 years) without obesity, glucose tolerance violations, lipid lowering drugs treating, heart failure of II and more functional classes (NYHA), coronary episode at least 6 months before study were involved in the study. Blood samples were incubated with glucose solutions of increasing concentrations (from 2.5% to 20% with 2.5% step) during 60 mm (36° C). In prepared blood smears erythrocyte's sizes were studied. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels were also measured. Received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree, with after going first and second derivations. Erythrocytes system "behavior" was studied by means of phase pattern constructing. By lipids levels all the patient were divided into five groups: 1) patients with normal lipids levels, 2) patients with borderline total cholesterol level, 3) patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia, 4) patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia and 5) patients with combined hyperlipidemia. Erythrocytes size lowering process was of set of "stages", which characteristics differ significantly (p > 0.05) in all five groups. Their rate and acceleration characteristics allow us to detect type of lipid profile in patients. Erythrocyte system disturbing by glucose concentration increase show to be most resistant in group of patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia.

  13. A new beam profile monitor and time of flight system for CologneAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascovici, G. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S., E-mail: heinze@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Fink, L.; Mueller-Gatermann, C.; Schiffer, M.; Feuerstein, C. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Pfeiffer, M.; Jolie, J.; Thiel, S.; Zell, K.O.; Arnopolina, O. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A complex beam detector consisting of a high-resolution beam profile monitor (BPM) and a time of flight (TOF) spectrometer with tracking capabilities was designed especially for the special needs of the Cologne center for accelerator mass spectrometry (CologneAMS). The beam detector assembly is designed to match the beam specifications of the 6 MV Tandetron AMS setup and its data acquisition system. It will have a reconfigurable structure, either as a fast TOF subsystem with a ca. 10 cm{sup 2} equivalent active area, or as a more complex BPM-TOF detector with beam tracking capabilities and a larger active area (16 cm{sup 2}). The purpose of this detector is to suppress background during spectrometry of heavy ions (U, Cm, Pu, Am etc.) and to suppress isobaric interferences such as {sup 36}S in {sup 36}Cl spectra.

  14. Proteomic profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies nutrient-starvation-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Agner, Jeppe; Piersma, Sander R

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully enter the latent stage, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to conditions such as nutrient limitation and hypoxia. In vitro models that mimic latent infection are valuable tools for describing the changes in metabolism that occur when the bacterium exists in a non......-growing form. We used two complementary proteomic approaches, label-free LC-MS/MS analysis and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, to determine the proteome profile of extracellular proteins from M. tuberculosis cultured under nutrient starvation. Through the label-free LC-MS/MS analysis......, significant differences in the overall metabolism during nutrient starvation were detected. Notably, members of the toxin-antitoxin systems were present in larger quantities in nutrient-starved cultures, supporting a role for these global modules as M. tuberculosis switches its metabolism into dormancy...

  15. Observing System Simulation Experiments for an array of autonomous biogeochemical profiling floats in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenkovich, Igor; Haza, Angelique; Gray, Alison R.; Dufour, Carolina O.; Garraffo, Zulema

    2017-09-01

    This study uses Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to examine the reconstruction of biogeochemical variables in the Southern Ocean from an array of autonomous profiling floats. In these OSSEs, designed to be relevant to the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observation and Modeling (SOCCOM) project, the simulated floats move with oceanic currents and sample dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon. The annual mean and seasonal cycle of these fields are then reconstructed and compared to the original model fields. The reconstruction skill is quantified with the reconstruction error (RErr), defined as the difference between the reconstructed and actual model fields, weighted by a local measure of the spatiotemporal variability. The square of the RErr is small (exception of the seasonal cycle in parts of the Indo-Atlantic, and that doubling this number to 300 results in a very modest increase in the reconstruction skill for dissolved oxygen.

  16. Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activation and Metabolic Profile in Young Children: The ABCD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; van den Born, Bert-Jan H; Hoekstra, Christine M C A; Gademan, Maaike G J; van Eijsden, Manon; de Rooij, Susanne R; Twickler, Marcel T B

    2015-01-01

    In adults, increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic nervous system activity are associated with a less favorable metabolic profile. Whether this is already determined at early age is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the association between autonomic nervous system activation and metabolic profile and its components in children at age of 5-6 years. Cross-sectional data from an apparently healthy population (within the ABCD study) were collected at age 5-6 years in 1540 children. Heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA; parasympathetic activity) and pre-ejection period (PEP; sympathetic activity) were assessed during rest. Metabolic components were waist-height ratio (WHtR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), fasting triglycerides, glucose and HDL-cholesterol. Individual components, as well as a cumulative metabolic score, were analyzed. In analysis adjusted for child's physical activity, sleep, anxiety score and other potential confounders, increased HR and decreased RSA were associated with higher WHtR (P< 0.01), higher SBP (p<0.001) and a higher cumulative metabolic score (HR: p < 0.001; RSA: p < 0.01). Lower PEP was only associated with higher SBP (p <0.05). Of all children, 5.6% had 3 or more (out of 5) adverse metabolic components; only higher HR was associated with this risk (per 10 bpm increase: OR = 1.56; p < 0.001). This study shows that decreased parasympathetic activity is associated with central adiposity and higher SBP, indicative of increased metabolic risk, already at age 5-6 years.

  17. Towards evaluating the intensity of convective systems by using GPS radio occultation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Deep convective systems, also more casually often just called storms, are destructive weather phenomena causing every year many deaths, injuries and damages and accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe, including Europe. Damages are mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain and these parameters are strongly connected to the structure of the storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes which are still mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in-situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or not reliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage. With this study we propose a new method for detecting the convection intensity in terms of rain rate and surface wind speed by using meteorological surface measurements in combination with atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation observations, which are available in essentially all weather conditions and with global coverage. The analysis of models indicated a relationship between the cloud top altitude and the intensity of a storm. We thus use GPS radio occultation bending angle profiles for detecting the storm's cloud top altitude and we correlate this value to the rain rate and wind speed measured by meteorological station networks in two different regions, the WegenerNet climate station network (South-Eastern Styria, Austria) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site (ARM, Southern Great Plains, USA), respectively. The results show a good correlation between the cloud top altitude and the maximum rain rate in the monitored areas, while this is not found for maximum wind speed. We conclude from this

  18. Health & demographic surveillance system profile: the Nahuche Health and Demographic Surveillance System, Northern Nigeria (Nahuche HDSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Olatunji; Doctor, Henry V; Jumare, Abdulazeez; Sahabi, Nasiru; Abdulwahab, Ahmad; Findley, Sally E; Abubakar, Sani D

    2014-12-01

    The Nahuche Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) study site, established in 2009 with 137 823 individuals is located in Zamfara State, north western Nigeria. North-West Nigeria is a region with one of the worst maternal and child health indicators in Nigeria. For example, the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey estimated an under-five mortality rate of 185 deaths per 1000 live births for the north-west geo-political zone compared with a national average of 128 deaths per 1000 live births. The site comprises over 100 villages under the leadership of six district heads. Virtually all the residents of the catchment population are Hausa by ethnicity. After a baseline census in 2010, regular update rounds of data collection are conducted every 6 months. Data collection on births, deaths, migration events, pregnancies, marriages and marriage termination events are routinely conducted. Verbal autopsy (VA) data are collected on all deaths reported during routine data collection. Annual update data on antenatal care and household characteristics are also collected. Opportunities for collaborations are available at Nahuche HDSS. The Director of Nahuche HDSS, M.O. Oche at [ochedr@hotmail.com] is the contact person for all forms of collaboration. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series and surface observations using Moored Autonomous Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (MADIC) System, Sunburst SAMI2 pH sensor, and other instruments from Kewalo Buoy near the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii from 2013-10-31 to 2014-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0132048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To expand the number of tools available for autonomous carbonate system observations, we have developed a robust surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)...

  20. Ontology-Based User Profiling for Personalized Acces to Information within Collaborative Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amine Alimam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern educational technology methods has become an important area of research in order to support learning as well as collaboration. This is especially evident with the rise of internet and web 2.0 platforms that have transformed users’ role from mere content consumers to fully content consumers-producers. Furthermore, people engaged in collaborative learning capitalize on one another’s resources and skills, unlike individual learning. This paper proceeds with a categorization of the main tools and functions that characterize the personalization learning aspect, in order to discuss their trade-offs with collaborative learning systems. It proposes a framework of a personalized information research (IR within a collaborative learning system, incorporating the characterization of the research type carried by the query, as well as modeling and constructing semantic users’ profiles. We use the context of the user query into a prediction mechanism of the search type, based on a previous identification of users’ levels and interests. The paper is concluded by presenting experiment results, revealing that the use of the subject ontology extension approach satisfyingly contributes to improvement in the accuracy of system recommendations.