WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiling atmospheric cloud

  1. Measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a homemade stationary groundbased lidar system will be presented. In addition, information on basic characteristics and performance of the lidar system will be provided. Aerosol/Cloud lidar system in monostatic coaxial configuration uses the fundamental (1064 nm) and the second harmonic (532 nm) of a pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser to provide information on the relative concentration and spatial distribution of aerosol particles and cloud water droplets. Beam expander is used to reduce the laser beam divergence before to be transmitted into the atmosphere. In this study, high-resolution vertical profiles from the near ground up to 15 km altitude are obtained. A Newtonian telescope of diameter 400 mm with an adjustable field of view (FOV) is used to collect the elastic backscattered signal. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used for the 532 nm wavelength detection channel, while an avalanche photodiode (APD) is used for the 1064 nm wavelength detection channel. The optoelectronic detection channels use two similar very high frequency preamplification circuit. Data are acquired with a nominal spatial resolution of 7.5 m using a 12-bit 20 MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for each channel. Many functions, such as, range determination, background subtraction, digitization, and averaging are performed by the receiver subsystem. In addition, spatial resolution and linear dynamic range were optimized during signal processing.

  2. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    the SmartSonde repeatedly climbs and descends through cloud layers. ­ The re­designed SmartSonde proved to fly well with adequate thrust and aileron ...Alaska (as part of the MIZOPEX campaign) was inconclusive. One flight was carried out, where the plane ascended into the cloud base using an...autopilot that employs the same IR sensing system for bank angle flight control as proposed for cloud margin sensing. The plane underwent large bank

  3. Remote measurement of atmospheric temperature profiles in clouds with rotational Raman lidar; Fernmessung atmosphaerischer Temperaturprofile in Wolken mit Rotations-Raman-Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrendt, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    2000-07-01

    The development of a lidar receiver for remote measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles with the rotational Raman method is described. By a new receiver concept, this instrument allowed for the first time remote temperature measurements without any perturbation by the presence of clouds up to a backscatter ratio of 45. In addition, high efficiency of the spectral separation of atmospheric backscatter signals leads to improved measurement resolution: the minimum integration time needed for a statistical uncertainty < {+-}1 K at, e.g., 10 km height and 960 m height resolution is only 5 minutes. The measurement range extends to over 45 km altitude. Results of field campaigns obtained with the instrument are presented and discussed. In winter 1997/98, the instrument was transferred with the GKSS Raman lidar to Esrange (67.9 N, 21.1 E) in northern Sweden, where pioneering remote measurements of local temperatures in orographically induced polar stratospheric clouds could be carried out. (orig.)

  4. CLOUD an atmospheric research facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fastrup, B; Lillestøl, Egil; Bosteels, Michel; Gonidec, A; Kirkby, Jasper; Mele, S; Minginette, P; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Grundsøe, P; Marsh, N D; Polny, J; Svensmark, H; Viisanen, Y; Kurvinen, K L; Orava, Risto; Hameri, K; Kulmala, M; Laakso, I; O'Dowd, C D; Afrosimov, V; Basalaev, A; Panov, M; Laaksonen, B D; Joutsensaari, J; Ermakov, V; Makhmutov, V S; Maksumov, O; Pokrevsky, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Svirzhevsky, N S; Carslaw, K; Yin, Y; Trautmann, T; Arnold, F; Wohlfrom, K H; Hagen, D; Schmitt, J; Whitefield, P; Aplin, K L; Harrison, R G; Bingham, R; Close, Francis Edwin; Gibbins, C; Irving, A; Kellett, B; Lockwood, M; Mäkelä, J M; Petersen, D; Szymanski, W W; Wagner, P E; Vrtala, A; CERN. Geneva. SPS-PS Experiments Committee

    2001-01-01

    This report is the second of two addenda to the CLOUD proposal at CERN (physics/0104048), which aims to test experimentally the existence a link between cosmic rays and cloud formation, and to understand the microphysical mechanism. The document places CLOUD in the framework of a CERN facility for atmospheric research, and provides further details on the particle beam requirements.

  5. Cloud Computing with iPlant Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sheldon J; Skidmore, Edwin J; LaRose, Christopher J; Mercer, Andre W; Noutsos, Christos

    2013-10-15

    Cloud Computing refers to distributed computing platforms that use virtualization software to provide easy access to physical computing infrastructure and data storage, typically administered through a Web interface. Cloud-based computing provides access to powerful servers, with specific software and virtual hardware configurations, while eliminating the initial capital cost of expensive computers and reducing the ongoing operating costs of system administration, maintenance contracts, power consumption, and cooling. This eliminates a significant barrier to entry into bioinformatics and high-performance computing for many researchers. This is especially true of free or modestly priced cloud computing services. The iPlant Collaborative offers a free cloud computing service, Atmosphere, which allows users to easily create and use instances on virtual servers preconfigured for their analytical needs. Atmosphere is a self-service, on-demand platform for scientific computing. This unit demonstrates how to set up, access and use cloud computing in Atmosphere. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  7. Do Photochemical Hazes Cloud the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark; Zahnle, Kevin; Moses, Julianne; Morley, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The first young giant planet to be discovered by the Gemini Planet Imager was the ~ 2MJ planet 51 Eri b. This ~20 Myr old young Jupiter is the first directly imaged planet to show unmistakable methane in H band. To constrain the planet’s mass, atmospheric temperature, and composition, the GPI J and H band spectra as well as some limited photometric points were compared to the predictions of substellar atmosphere models. The best fitting models reported in the discovery paper (Macintosh et al. 2015) relied upon a combination of clear and cloudy atmospheric columns to reproduce the data. In the atmosphere of an object as cool as 700 K the global silicate and iron clouds would be expected to be found well below the photosphere, although strong vertical mixing in the low gravity atmosphere is a possibility. Instead, clouds of Na2S, as have been detected in brown dwarf atmospheres, are a likely source of particle opacity. As a third explanation we have explored whether atmospheric photochemistry, driven by the UV flux from the primary star, may yield hazes that also influence the observed spectrum of the planet. To explore this possibility we have modeled the atmospheric photochemistry of 51 Eri b using two state-of-the-art photochemical models, both capable of predicting yields of complex hydrocarbons under various atmospheric conditions. We also have explored whether photochemical products can alter the equilibrium temperature profile of the atmosphere. In our presentation we will summarize the modeling approach employed to characterize 51 Eri b, explaining constraints on the planet’s effective temperature, gravity, and atmospheric composition and also present results of our studies of atmospheric photochemistry. We will discuss whether photochemical hazes could indeed be responsible for the particulate opacity that apparently sculpts the spectrum of the planet.

  8. Exploring the Effects of Clouds on Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jenna; Line, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Secondary eclipse spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets allows us to probe the atmospheric properties on the daysides of tidally locked planets. Specifically, eclipse spectra combined with atmospheric retrieval models permit constraints on the molecular abundances and vertical thermal profiles of the planetary dayside. Eclipse spectra from HST WFC3 are typically interpreted assuming that all of the near infrared light is due solely to the thermal emission of the planet. However, recent evidence suggests that reflected stellar light from clouds on the planetary daysides might contaminate the near-IR spectrum. Here, we aim to explore how reflected light from clouds within in a simplified cloud framework will alter the shape of the near infrared spectra and how they will influence our determinations of dayside temperatures and abundances. Specifically, we will use atmospheric retrieval tools to determine the biases in abundances and temperature profiles if reflected light is not taken into account. We will explore the influence of reflected light on interpretation of WFC3 spectra of the well-observed exoplanets, HD209458b and WASP-43b. We will then investigate how reflected light in the near-IR will influence our interpretation of JWST spectra.

  9. A Condensation-coalescence Cloud Model for Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Formulation and Test Applications to Terrestrial and Jovian Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kazumasa; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    A number of transiting exoplanets have featureless transmission spectra that might suggest the presence of clouds at high altitudes. A realistic cloud model is necessary to understand the atmospheric conditions under which such high-altitude clouds can form. In this study, we present a new cloud model that takes into account the microphysics of both condensation and coalescence. Our model provides the vertical profiles of the size and density of cloud and rain particles in an updraft for a given set of physical parameters, including the updraft velocity and the number density of cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs). We test our model by comparing with observations of trade-wind cumuli on Earth and ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter. For trade-wind cumuli, the model including both condensation and coalescence gives predictions that are consistent with observations, while the model including only condensation overestimates the mass density of cloud droplets by up to an order of magnitude. For Jovian ammonia clouds, the condensation-coalescence model simultaneously reproduces the effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness, and cloud geometric thickness inferred from Voyager observations if the updraft velocity and CCN number density are taken to be consistent with the results of moist convection simulations and Galileo probe measurements, respectively. These results suggest that the coalescence of condensate particles is important not only in terrestrial water clouds but also in Jovian ice clouds. Our model will be useful to understand how the dynamics, compositions, and nucleation processes in exoplanetary atmospheres affect the vertical extent and optical thickness of exoplanetary clouds via cloud microphysics.

  10. Correlation between atmospheric electric fields and cloud cover using a field mill and cloud observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Kota; Suzuki, Yasuki; Ohya, Hiroyo; Takano, Toshiaki; Kawamura, Yohei; Nakata, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kozo

    2017-04-01

    It is known that lightning and precipitations of rain droplets generated from thunderclouds are a generator of global atmospheric electric circuit. In the fair weather, the atmospheric electric fields (AEF) are downward (positive), while they are upward (negative) during lightning and precipitations. However, the correlations between the AEF, and the cloud parameters such as cloud cover, weather phenomenon, have been not revealed quantitatively yet. In this study, we investigate the correlations between the AEF and the cloud parameters, weather phenomenon using a field mill, the 95 GHz-FALCON (FMCW Radar for Cloud Observations)-I and all-sky camera observations. In this study, we installed a Boltek field mill on the roof of our building in Chiba University, Japan, (Geographic coordinate: 35.63 degree N, 140.10 degree E, the sea level: 55 m) on the first June, 2016. The sampling time of the AEF is 0.5 s. On the other hand, the FALCON-I has observed the cloud parameters far from about 76 m of the field mill throughout 24 hours every day. The vertical cloud profiles and the Doppler velocity of cloud particles can be derived by the FALCON-I with high distance resolutions (48.8 m) (Takano et al., 2010). In addition, the images of the clouds and precipitations are recorded with 30-s sampling by an all-sky camera using a CCD camera on the same roof during 05:00-22:00 LT every day. The distance between the field mill and the all-sky camera is 3.75 m. During 08:30 UT - 10:30 UT, on 4 July, 2016, we found the variation of the AEF due to the approach of thundercloud. The variation consisted of two patterns. One was slow variation due to the movement of thunderclouds, and the other was rapid variation associated with lightning discharges. As for the movement of thunderclouds, the AEF increased when the anvil was located over the field mill, which was opposite direction of the previous studies. This change might be due to the positive charges in the upper anvil more than 14 km

  11. Ultrafine atmospheric aerosols, clouds and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jeffrey Robert

    Changes in atmospheric aerosol due to anthropogenic emissions are the most uncertain factors that have contributed to recent climate change. Much of this uncertainty is from the effect that particles have on cloud radiative properties, the aerosol indirect effect. Particles on which cloud droplets form are called cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Particles larger than about 80--100 nm dry diameter typically act as CCN in stratus clouds. In order to predict how cloud radiative properties have changed since pre-industrial times, the CCN concentrations in both present-day and pre-industrial times must be known. Much of the uncertainty in CCN predictions is from uncertainty in the sources of ultrafine particles (particles with diameter smaller than 100 nm) as well as the processes that grow these particles to CCN sizes. This thesis explores various aspects of the how uncertainties in ultrafine particles affect predictions of CCN. First, we explore the uncertainty in CCN due to uncertain sea-salt emissions and also the affect of recently quantified ultrafine sea-salt on CCN. In the Southern Ocean, uncertainty in sea-salt emissions contributed to uncertainties in CCN(0.2%) by a factor of 2. Ultrafine sea-salt aerosol increased CCN(0.2%) in remote marine regions by more than 20%. Next, we look at how primary carbonaceous particles affect CCN as well as how uncertainties in their chemical properties affect CCN. The addition of primary carbonaceous aerosol increased CCN(0.2%) concentrations by 65--90% in the globally averaged surface layer. A sensitivity study showed that approximately half of this increase occurs even if all carbonaceous aerosols are completely insoluble. To study the growth of ultrafine particles to CCN sizes, we develop the Probability of Ultrafine Growth (PUG) model. It was found in most cases that condensation is the dominant growth mechanism and coagulation with larger particles is the dominant sink mechanism for ultrafine particles. We found that the

  12. Atmospheric parameterization schemes for satellite cloud property retrieval during FIRE IFO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlow, James; Baum, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cloud retrieval algorithms generally require atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles to determine such cloud properties as pressure and height. For instance, the CO2 slicing technique called the ratio method requires the calculation of theoretical upwelling radiances both at the surface and a prescribed number (40) of atmospheric levels. This technique has been applied to data from, for example, the High Resolution Infrared Radiometer Sounder (HIRS/2, henceforth HIRS) flown aboard the NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites and the High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS). In this particular study, four NOAA-11 HIRS channels in the 15-micron region are used. The ratio method may be applied to various channel combinations to estimate cloud top heights using channels in the 15-mu m region. Presently, the multispectral, multiresolution (MSMR) scheme uses 4 HIRS channel combination estimates for mid- to high-level cloud pressure retrieval and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for low-level (is greater than 700 mb) cloud level retrieval. In order to determine theoretical upwelling radiances, atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles must be provided as well as profiles of other radiatively important gas absorber constituents such as CO2, O3, and CH4. The assumed temperature and humidity profiles have a large effect on transmittance and radiance profiles, which in turn are used with HIRS data to calculate cloud pressure, and thus cloud height and temperature. For large spatial scale satellite data analysis, atmospheric parameterization schemes for cloud retrieval algorithms are usually based on a gridded product such as that provided by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) or the National Meteorological Center (NMC). These global, gridded products prescribe temperature and humidity profiles for a limited number of pressure levels (up to 14) in a vertical atmospheric column. The FIRE IFO 2

  13. Akatsuki (space based cloud-tracking) and TNG/HARPS-N (ground based Doppler velocimetry) coordinated wind measurements of cloud top Venus' atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R.; Machado, P.; Peralta, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Widemann, T.; Harutyunyan, A.

    2017-09-01

    HARPS-N spectrograph was used for the first time to study the atmosphere's dynamics of a solar system body. We present zonal and meridional winds profiles of Venus' cloud top atmosphere, from coordinated observations using TNG/HARPS-N (Doppler velocimetry) and space-based Akatsuki (cloud tracking). The HARPS-N spectrograph provided unprecedented high quality spectra at Venus atmosphere, allowing us to retrieve wind velocities with an unmatched precision and spatial and temporal accuracy. The data will contribute to better constrain both zonal and meridional wind flow and detect and characterize mesoscale atmospheric waves on Venus' atmosphere.

  14. Fleets of enduring drones to probe atmospheric phenomena with clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Simon; Roberts, Greg; Benard, Emmanuel; Bronz, Murat; Burnet, Frédéric; Bouhoubeiny, Elkhedim; Condomines, Jean-Philippe; Doll, Carsten; Hattenberger, Gautier; Lamraoui, Fayçal; Renzaglia, Alessandro; Reymann, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A full spatio-temporal four-dimensional characterization of the microphysics and dynamics of cloud formation including the onset of precipitation has never been reached. Such a characterization would yield a better understanding of clouds, e.g. to assess the dominant mixing mechanism and the main source of cloudy updraft dilution. It is the sampling strategy that matters: fully characterizing the evolution over time of the various parameters (P, T, 3D wind, liquid water content, aerosols...) within a cloud volume requires dense spatial sampling for durations of the order of one hour. A fleet of autonomous lightweight UAVs that coordinate themselves in real-time as an intelligent network can fulfill this purpose. The SkyScanner project targets the development of a fleet of autonomous UAVs to adaptively sample cumuli, so as to provide relevant data to address long standing questions in atmospheric science. It mixes basic researches and experimental developments, and gathers scientists in UAV conception, in optimal flight control, in intelligent cooperative behaviors, and of course atmospheric scientists. Two directions of researches are explored: optimal UAV conception and control, and optimal control of a fleet of UAVs. The design of UAVs for atmospheric science involves the satisfaction of trade-offs between payload, endurance, ease of deployment... A rational conception scheme that integrates the constraints to optimize a series of criteria, in particular energy consumption, would yield the definition of efficient UAVs. This requires a fine modeling of each involved sub-system and phenomenon, from the motor/propeller efficiency to the aerodynamics at small scale, including the flight control algorithms. The definition of mission profiles is also essential, considering the aerodynamics of clouds, to allow energy harvesting schemes that exploit thermals or gusts. The conception also integrates specific sensors, in particular wind sensor, for which classic

  15. Atmospheric nucleation and growth in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Cloud Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Nucleation and growth of new particles in the atmosphere is thought to account for up to half of all cloud condensation nuclei. However the vapours and formation rates that underly this process are poorly understood, due both to the ultra low concentrations of participating vapours in the presence of high backgrounds and to the many sources of uncontrolled variability in the atmosphere. In consequence, laboratory measurements made under clean and precisely controlled conditions play an important role in identifying the vapours responsible and quantifying their associated nucleation and growth rates. The CLOUD experiment at CERN is studying the nucleation and growth of aerosol particles, and their interaction with clouds, in a 3 m stainless steel aerosol/cloud chamber. The experiment is optimised to study the influence of ions, for which the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) provides an adjustable source of 'cosmic rays'. Extraordinary care has been paid in the design and construction of CLOUD and its associated systems-gas, thermal, UV and electric field-to suppress contaminants at the technological limit. The unprecedented low contamination achieved in the CLOUD chamber has revealed that atmospheric nucleation and growth is sensitive to certain atmospheric vapours at mixing ratios of only a few parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv). Here we provide an overview of the design of CLOUD and its experimental programme over four years of operation at CERN.

  16. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  17. Clouds and the atmospheric circulation response to warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, Paulo; Hartmann, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    We study the effect of clouds on the atmospheric circulation response to CO2 quadrupling in an aquaplanet model with a slab-ocean lower boundary. The cloud effect is isolated by locking the clouds to either the control or 4xCO2 state in the shortwave (SW) or longwave (LW) radiation schemes. In our model, cloud-radiative changes explain more than half of the total poleward expansion of the Hadley cells, midlatitude jets, and storm tracks under CO2 quadrupling, even though they cause only one-fourth of the total global-mean surface warming. The effect of clouds on circulation results mainly from the SW cloud-radiative changes, which strongly enhance the Equator-to-pole temperature gradient at all levels in the troposphere, favoring stronger and poleward-shifted midlatitude eddies. By contrast, quadrupling CO2 while holding the clouds fixed causes strong polar amplification and weakened midlatitude baroclinicity at lower levels, yielding only a small poleward expansion of the circulation. Our results show that (a) the atmospheric circulation responds sensitively to cloud-driven changes in meridional and vertical temperature distribution, and (b) the spatial structure of cloud feedbacks likely plays a dominant role in the circulation response to greenhouse gas forcing. While the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud feedback are expected to be highly model-dependent, an analysis of 4xCO2 simulations of CMIP5 models shows that the SW cloud feedback likely forces a poleward expansion of the tropospheric circulation in most climate models.

  18. The Impact of Clouds and Hazes in Substellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of clouds significantly alters the spectra of cool substellar atmospheres from terrestrial planets to brown dwarfs. In cool planets like Earth and Jupiter, volatile species like water and ammonia condense to form ice clouds. In hot planets and brown dwarfs, iron and silicates instead condense, forming dusty clouds. Irradiated methane-rich planets may have substantial hydrocarbon hazes. During my thesis, I have studied the impact of clouds and hazes in a variety of substellar objects. First, I present results for cool brown dwarfs including clouds previously neglected in model atmospheres. Model spectra that include sulfide and salt clouds can match the spectra of T dwarf atmospheres; water ice clouds will alter the spectra of the newest and coldest brown dwarfs, the Y dwarfs. These sulfide/salt and ice clouds potentially drive spectroscopic variability in these cool objects, and this variability should be distinguishable from variability caused by hot spots.Next, I present results for small, cool exoplanets between the size of Earth and Neptune, so-called super Earths. They likely have sulfide and salt clouds and also have photochemical hazes caused by stellar irradiation. Vast resources have been dedicated to characterizing the handful of super Earths accessible to current telescopes, yet of the planets smaller than Neptune studied to date, all have radii in the near-infrared consistent with being constant in wavelength, likely showing that these small planets are consistently enshrouded in thick hazes and clouds. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. I show that despite these challenges, there are promising avenues for understanding this class of small planets: by observing the thermal emission and reflectivity of

  19. Sound, infrasound, and sonic boom absorption by atmospheric clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michaël; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2011-09-01

    This study quantifies the influence of atmospheric clouds on propagation of sound and infrasound, based on an existing model [Gubaidulin and Nigmatulin, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 26, 207-228 (2000)]. Clouds are considered as a dilute and polydisperse suspension of liquid water droplets within a mixture of dry air and water vapor, both considered as perfect gases. The model is limited to low and medium altitude clouds, with a small ice content. Four physical mechanisms are taken into account: viscoinertial effects, heat transfer, water phase changes (evaporation and condensation), and vapor diffusion. Physical properties of atmospheric clouds (altitude, thickness, water content and droplet size distribution) are collected, along with values of the thermodynamical coefficients. Different types of clouds have been selected. Quantitative evaluation shows that, for low audible and infrasound frequencies, absorption within clouds is several orders of magnitude larger than classical absorption. The importance of phase changes and vapor diffusion is outlined. Finally, numerical simulations for nonlinear propagation of sonic booms indicate that, for thick clouds, attenuation can lead to a very large decay of the boom at the ground level. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  20. Using a Venus Atmosphere Model to Investigate Variations in Cloud-level Winds and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Helen; Mitchell, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a new Venus Middle atmosphere Model (VMM), which simulates the atmosphere from just below the cloud deck to around 100 km altitude, with the aim of focusing on the dynamics at cloud levels and above. We take this approach as the circulation and dynamics between the ground and cloud altitudes are not well known. Wind velocities below ~40 km altitude cannot be observed remotely and there are only a few in-situ wind profiles from entry probes on the Venera and Pioneer Venus missions, which are limited in spatial and temporal coverage. However, in the atmosphere at cloud altitudes significant information can be obtained on the circulation and dynamics of Venus' atmosphere and many more observations are available, including measurements from Venus Express and Akatsuki. Preliminary results from the VMM with a simplified radiation scheme have been validated by comparison with Pioneer Venus and Venus Express measurements and show reasonable agreement with the observations. Values of parameters near the lower boundary which are not well measured can be inferred by comparison with values at higher altitudes. We use sensitivity experiments to determine the most important processes involved in shaping the wind and temperature structure at cloud altitudes. We compare the results of simulations with measurements from Pioneer Venus and Venera probes and from the Venus Express and Akatsuki missions

  1. Statistics of vertical backscatter profiles of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distribution of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relationship between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve located near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effects on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  2. Radiation profiles measured through clouds using a return glider radiosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Kivi, Rigel

    2016-04-01

    With new and improved radiation sensors in a small glider aircraft vertical flights through clouds have been conducted. This new Return Glider Radiosonde (RG-R) is lifted up with double balloon technique to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible during ascent. The RG-R is equipped with a routine radiosonde to transmit the data to a ground station and an autopilot to fly the glider radiosonde back to the launch site, where it lands autonomous with a parachute. The RG-R was successfully tested and deployed for tropospheric and stratospheric radiation measurements up to 30 hPa (24 km altitude) at the GRUAN sites Payerne (Switzerland) and Sodankylä (Finland). Radiation profiles and the radiation budget through the atmosphere during different daytimes and under cloud-free and cloudy situations will be shown in relation to temperature and humidity at the surface and in the atmosphere. The RG-R flight characteristics and new measurement possibilities will also be discussed.

  3. Pollen as atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Allison L.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Deng, Chunhua; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Pendleton, Michael W.; Bryant, Vaughn

    2015-05-01

    Anemophilous (wind-dispersed) pollen grains are emitted in large quantities by vegetation in the midlatitudes for reproduction. Pollen grains are coarse particles (5-150 µm) that can rupture when wet to form submicron subpollen particles (SPP) that may have a climatic role. Laboratory CCN experiments of six fresh pollen samples show that SPP activate as CCN at a range of sizes, requiring supersaturations from 0.81 (± 0.07)% for 50 nm particles, 0.26 (± 0.03)% for 100 nm particles, and 0.12 (± 0.00)% for 200 nm particles. Compositional analyses indicate that SPP contain carbohydrates and proteins. The SPP contribution to global CCN is uncertain but could be important depending on pollen concentrations outside the surface layer and the number of SPP generated from a single pollen grain. The production of hygroscopic SPP from pollen represents a novel, biologically driven cloud formation pathway that may influence cloud optical properties and lifetimes, thereby influencing climate.

  4. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    overfly the Canadian Coast Guard Ice Breaker Louis S. St-Laurent . The ship was equipped with a laser ceilometer and radiosonde launch facility. We...dropsonde. Note that a ceilometer often cannot see beyond the lowest cloud layer when that layer is thick or dense, since too much laser energy is...enable lateral variations to be observed. The glider sonde caries the same differential IR flux sensor as the dropsondes. Data is telemetered at 10Hz

  5. Cosmic ray decreases affect atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Bondo, Torsten; Svensmark, J.

    2009-01-01

    Close passages of coronal mass ejections from the sun are signaled at the Earth's surface by Forbush decreases in cosmic ray counts. We find that low clouds contain less liquid water following Forbush decreases, and for the most influential events the liquid water in the oceanic atmosphere can...... diminish by as much as 7%. Cloud water content as gauged by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) reaches a minimum ≈7 days after the Forbush minimum in cosmic rays, and so does the fraction of low clouds seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in the International......, and liquid-water clouds appears to exist on a global scale....

  6. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius in shallow convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional satellite retrievals can only provide information on cloud-top droplet effective radius (re. Given the fact that cloud ensembles in a satellite snapshot have different cloud-top heights, Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 used the cloud-top height and the corresponding cloud-top re from the cloud ensembles in the snapshot to construct a profile of re representative of that in the individual clouds. This study investigates the robustness of this approach in shallow convective clouds based on results from large-eddy simulations (LES for clean (aerosol mixing ratio Na = 25 mg−1, intermediate (Na = 100 mg−1, and polluted (Na = 2000 mg−1 conditions. The cloud-top height and the cloud-top re from the modeled cloud ensembles are used to form a constructed re profile, which is then compared to the in-cloud re profiles. For the polluted and intermediate cases where precipitation is negligible, the constructed re profiles represent the in-cloud re profiles fairly well with a low bias (about 10 %. The method used in Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 is therefore validated for nonprecipitating shallow cumulus clouds. For the clean, drizzling case, the in-cloud re can be very large and highly variable, and quantitative profiling based on cloud-top re is less useful. The differences in re profiles between clean and polluted conditions derived in this manner are however, distinct. This study also investigates the subadiabatic characteristics of the simulated cumulus clouds to reveal the effect of mixing on re and its evolution. Results indicate that as polluted and moderately polluted clouds develop into their decaying stage, the subadiabatic fraction

  7. Profiling energy consumption of VMs for green cloud computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qingwen, C.; Grosso, P.; van der Veldt, K.; de Laat, C.; Hofman, R.; Bal, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    The GreenClouds project in the Netherlands in- vestigates a system-level approach towards greening High- Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures and clouds. In this paper we present our initial results in profiling virtual machines with respect to three power metrics, i.e. power, power

  8. Venus atmosphere profile from a maximum entropy principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Epele

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The variational method with constraints recently developed by Verkley and Gerkema to describe maximum-entropy atmospheric profiles is generalized to ideal gases but with temperature-dependent specific heats. In so doing, an extended and non standard potential temperature is introduced that is well suited for tackling the problem under consideration. This new formalism is successfully applied to the atmosphere of Venus. Three well defined regions emerge in this atmosphere up to a height of 100 km from the surface: the lowest one up to about 35 km is adiabatic, a transition layer located at the height of the cloud deck and finally a third region which is practically isothermal.

  9. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-04

    launched sensor package in Colorado and have conducted several field deployments with overflights of ice -breaker based and land -based ceilometers. Initial...Evolution of Sea Ice Sb. GRANT NUMBER N000 1 4-1 2- 1-0232 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Axel Schweiger Se. TASK NUMBER...ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to examine the role of sea- ice and atmospheric interactions in the retreat of the SIZ . As sea ice retreats

  10. Atmospheric Water-Cycle Regimes and Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S.; Fetzer, E. J.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between the atmospheric water vapor budget and cloud properties is investigated by collocated reanalysis fields from Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument. Intensities of surface water exchange (precipitation minus evaporation) are analyzed in the space of 'dynamical regimes', which are defined by combination of large-scale water vapor advection and convergence calculated from the MERRA. The atmospheric water vapor sinks associated with mid-latitude storm systems and precipitation in the west coast of United States are mainly driven by the large-scale dynamical advection, while those associated with tropical deep convection and summertime monsoons are mainly driven by water vapor convergence. Subtropical subsidence area over the eastern ocean basins is dominated by strong water vapor divergence. These dynamical regimes are then connected to the collocated MODIS cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. Probability density distributions of these MODIS cloud properties associated with each dynamical regime will be presented.

  11. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J.; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L. S.; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N.; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  12. Observing relationships between lightning and cloud profiles by means of a satellite-borne cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiat, Martina; Porcù, Federico; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Cloud electrification and related lightning activity in thunderstorms have their origin in the charge separation and resulting distribution of charged iced particles within the cloud. So far, the ice distribution within convective clouds has been investigated mainly by means of ground-based meteorological radars. In this paper we show how the products from Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat, a polar satellite of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP), can be used to obtain information from space on the vertical distribution of ice particles and ice content and relate them to the lightning activity. The analysis has been carried out, focusing on 12 convective events over Italy that crossed CloudSat overpasses during significant lightning activity. The CPR products considered here are the vertical profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC) and the effective radius (ER) of ice particles, which are compared with the number of strokes as measured by a ground lightning network (LINET). Results show a strong correlation between the number of strokes and the vertical distribution of ice particles as depicted by the 94 GHz CPR products: in particular, cloud upper and middle levels, high IWC content and relatively high ER seem to be favourable contributory causes for CG (cloud to ground) stroke occurrence.

  13. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    New particle formation (or nucleation) is acknowledged as a significant source of climate-relevant aerosol throughout the atmosphere. However, performing atmospherically relevant nucleation experiments in a laboratory setting is extremely challenging. As a result, until now, the parameterisations used to represent new particle formation in global aerosol models were largely based on in-situ observations or theoretical nucleation models, and usually only represented the binary H2SO4-H2O system. Several different chemicals can affect particle formation rates, even at extremely low trace concentrations, which are technically challenging to measure directly. Nucleation rates also respond to environmental changes in e.g. temperature in a highly non-linear fashion. The CERN CLOUD experiment was designed to provide the most controlled and accurate nucleation rate measurements to date, over the full range of free tropospheric temperatures and down to sulphuric acid concentrations of the order of 105 cm-3. We will present a parameterisation of inorganic nucleation rates for use in global models, based on these measurements, which includes four separate nucleation pathways: binary neutral, binary ion-induced, ternary neutral, and ternary ion-induced. Both inorganic and organic nucleation parameterisations derived from CLOUD measurements have been implemented in the GLOMAP global aerosol model. The parameterisations depend on temperature and on concentrations of sulphuric acid, ammonia, organic vapours, and ions. One of CLOUD's main original goals was to determine the sensitivity of atmospheric aerosol to changes in the nucleation rate over a solar cycle. We will show that, in a present-day atmosphere, the changes in climate-relevant aerosol (in the form of cloud-level cloud condensation nuclei) over a solar cycle are on average about 0.1%, with local changes of less than 1%. In contrast, anthropogenic changes in ammonia since pre-industrial times were estimated to have a

  14. Effects of cloud superparameterization at the land-atmosphere interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. S.; Sun, J.; Kooperman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Problems exist in simulating land-atmosphere coupling in modern GCMs. The effect of including explicit boundary layer dynamics via cloud superparameterization (SP) on land-atmosphere coupling is analyzed in several versions of the SP Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM). Super-parameterization impacts both the net radiative input to the land-surface and the partitioning of sensible and latent heating with a distinct signature. We separate the effects of atmospheric processes, especially cloud radiative properties, from land-surface processes, especially soil-moisture dynamics, using a series of free-running and hindcast simulations. Effects of SP include reducing the coupling strength in the Central Great Plain in American, and reverses the terrestrial segment coupling sign (from negative to positive) over India. Analysis of the triggering feedback strength (TFS) and amount feedback strength (AFS) shows SP can capture the patterns of these indices over North America, with probability of afternoon precipitation enhanced by high evaporative fraction along the eastern United States and Mexico, while conventional versions of CAM struggle to capture this signal.

  15. Modeling study of cloud droplet nucleation and in-cloud sulfate production during the Sanitation of the Atmosphere (SANA) 2 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Seidl, Winfried

    1998-01-01

    Based upon the measurements of vertical profiles of gaseous SO2, H2O2, O3, and meteorological parameters from aircraft and of the aerosol chemical composition and gaseous NH3, HNO3, and SO2 at the surface in southeastern Germany (Melpitz) during the Sanitation of the Atmosphere (SANA) 2 campaign, realistic modeling of cloud droplet nucleation and in-cloud sulfate production was performed with an explicit microphysical cloud model with size-resolved chemistry and cloud top entrainment. For the fair weather cumulus observed during the measurements, the calculated cloud droplet number concentrations could be as high as 2000 cm-3 (and precloud aerosol sulfate up to 9.1 μg m-3), indicating strong sulfur pollution at Melpitz during the campaign. The in-cloud sulfate production is within 1.5-5.0 μg m-3, depending on the initial gaseous NH3 concentration in the parcel. This result shows the necessity of gaseous NH3 vertical profile measurements. Entrainment can reduce the cloud droplet number concentration and cause the distribution of in-cloud produced sulfate to shift toward larger particle sizes. Under the cases we studied, we do not find a significant effect of cloud top gaseous H2O2 entrainment on the in-cloud sulfate production. For the adiabatic cases the departure of bulk water H2O2 from the Henry's law equilibrium is very small. When entrainment included, however, bulk water H2O2 concentrations could be clearly less than the equilibrium values, and the deficiencies are higher (>20%) for droplets larger than 10 μm radius. Our results suggest that entrainment could be one of the important factors to account for the measured H2O2 deficiency in cloud water.

  16. Validation of MODIS cloud mask and multilayer flag using CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud profiles and a cross-reference of their cloud classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Fetzer, Eric J.; Wong, Sun; Kahn, Brian H.; Yue, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 cloud observations (MYD06) at 1 km are collocated with daytime CloudSat-Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) (C-C) cloud vertical structures (2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR). For 2007-2010, over 267 million C-C cloud profiles are used to (1) validate MODIS cloud mask and cloud multilayer flag and (2) cross-reference between C-C cloud types and MODIS cloud regimes defined by joint histograms of cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical depth (τ). Globally, of total observations, C-C reports 27.1% clear and 72.9% cloudy, whereas MODIS reports 30.0% confidently clear and 58.7% confidently cloudy, with the rest 7.1% as probably clear and 4.2% as probably cloudy. Agreement between MODIS and C-C is 77.8%, with 20.9% showing both clear and 56.9% showing both cloudy. The 9.1% of observations are clear in MODIS but cloudy in C-C, indicating clouds missed by MODIS; 1.8% of observations are cloudy in MODIS but clear in C-C, likely due to aerosol/dust or surface snow layers misidentified by MODIS. C-C reports 47.4/25.5% single-layer/multilayer clouds, while MODIS reports 26.7/14.0%. For C-C single-layer clouds, 90% of tropical MODIS high (CTP 23) clouds are recognized as deep convective in C-C. Approximately 70% of MODIS low-level (CTP > 680 hPa) clouds are classified as stratocumulus in C-C regardless of region and optical thickness. No systematic relationship exists between MODIS middle-level (680 < CTP < 440 hPa) clouds and C-C cloud types, largely due to different definitions adopted.

  17. Biological aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their impact on clouds (BIOCLOUDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Pierre; Attard, Eleonore; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Flossmann, Andrea; Good, Nicholas; Joly, Muriel; Koop, Thomas; Möhler, Ottmar; Monier, Marie; Morris, Cindy; Oehm, Caroline; Pöschl, Ulrich; Sancelme, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The project BIOCLOUDS aimed at investigating and quantifying the role of bioaerosols in tropospheric clouds. We focused on the studies on microorganisms, mainly bacteria. To reach our objective we (1) isolated and identified INA bacterial strains in cloud waters, (2) studied in more details IN properties of bacteria isolated from cloud waters in laboratories and cloud chamber, (3) used new data as input to cloud models. 1. Isolation and Identification of INA bacterial strains in cloud waters Cloud water samples were collected at the puy de Dôme station under sterile conditions, microorganisms were cultured on agar plates and further identified by DNA sequencing coding for16SrRNA. 257 bacterial strains isolated from 25 cloud events were screened and 44 isolates were selected as they belonged to Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and Erwinia genera which are potential INA candidates. Using the classical "Droplet Freezing method" as ice nucleation test, 7 strains were shown INA+. Their cumulative IN frequency profiles were established and showed that some of them are very efficient, for example the strain Pseudomonas syringae 13b74 started to nucleate a t-3°C and 4% of the cells were active at- 5°C. 2. Further laboratory investigations of IN properties of cloud bacterial strains All the experiments presented in this section were carried out with 3 Pseudomonas syringae strains. We tested the influence of O3, NO, UV and pH, which are atmospheric markers of anthropogenic activity, on the IN activity of the Pseudomonas strains. It was clearly shown that pH had a main influence, acidic pHs decreased the IN activity of the strains. This suggests a negative impact of human emissions on the natural capacity of bacteria to precipitate with rain. The 3 Pseudomas strains were sprayed in the AIDA cloud chamber. The survival of these strains with time before cloud formation was measured and will be used in the future to parameterize models for bacterial transport. After cloud formation

  18. Shallow marine cloud topped boundary layer in atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-04-01

    A common problem in many atmospheric models is excessive expansion over cold water of shallow marine planetary boundary layer (PBL) topped by a thin cloud layer. This phenomenon is often accompanied by spurious light precipitation. The "Cloud Top Entrainment Instability" (CTEI) was proposed as an explanation of the mechanism controlling this process in reality thereby preventing spurious enlargement of the cloudy area and widely spread light precipitation observed in the models. A key element of this hypothesis is evaporative cooling at the PBL top. However, the CTEI hypothesis remains controversial. For example, a recent direct simulation experiment indicated that the evaporative cooling couldn't explain the break-up of the cloudiness as hypothesized by the CTEI. Here, it is shown that the cloud break-up can be achieved in numerical models by a further modification of the nonsingular implementation of the Mellor-Yamada Level 2.5 turbulence closure model (MYJ) developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Washington. Namely, the impact of moist convective instability is included into the turbulent energy production/dissipation equation if (a) the stratification is stable, (b) the lifting condensation level (LCL) for a particle starting at a model level is below the next upper model level, and (c) there is enough turbulent kinetic energy so that, due to random vertical turbulent motions, a particle starting from a model level can reach its LCL. The criterion (c) should be sufficiently restrictive because otherwise the cloud cover can be completely removed. A real data example will be shown demonstrating the ability of the method to break the spurious cloud cover during the day, but also to allow its recovery over night.

  19. Effect of cloud cover and atmospheric circulation patterns on the observed surface solar radiation in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiacchio, Marc; Vitolo, Renato

    2012-01-01

    ...) in Europe including cloud cover and atmospheric circulation patterns. The role of observed cloud cover on DSW was analyzed through generalized linear models using DSW measurements obtained from the Global Energy Balance Archive during 1971–1996...

  20. Development of an atmospheric infrared radiation model with high clouds for target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisario, Christophe; Malherbe, Claire; Schweitzer, Caroline; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    In the field of target detection, the simulation of the camera FOV (field of view) background is a significant issue. The presence of heterogeneous clouds might have a strong impact on a target detection algorithm. In order to address this issue, we present here the construction of the CERAMIC package (Cloudy Environment for RAdiance and MIcrophysics Computation) that combines cloud microphysical computation and 3D radiance computation to produce a 3D atmospheric infrared radiance in attendance of clouds. The input of CERAMIC starts with an observer with a spatial position and a defined FOV (by the mean of a zenithal angle and an azimuthal angle). We introduce a 3D cloud generator provided by the French LaMP for statistical and simplified physics. The cloud generator is implemented with atmospheric profiles including heterogeneity factor for 3D fluctuations. CERAMIC also includes a cloud database from the French CNRM for a physical approach. We present here some statistics developed about the spatial and time evolution of the clouds. Molecular optical properties are provided by the model MATISSE (Modélisation Avancée de la Terre pour l'Imagerie et la Simulation des Scènes et de leur Environnement). The 3D radiance is computed with the model LUCI (for LUminance de CIrrus). It takes into account 3D microphysics with a resolution of 5 cm-1 over a SWIR bandwidth. In order to have a fast computation time, most of the radiance contributors are calculated with analytical expressions. The multiple scattering phenomena are more difficult to model. Here a discrete ordinate method with correlated-K precision to compute the average radiance is used. We add a 3D fluctuations model (based on a behavioral model) taking into account microphysics variations. In fine, the following parameters are calculated: transmission, thermal radiance, single scattering radiance, radiance observed through the cloud and multiple scattering radiance. Spatial images are produced, with a

  1. Atmospheric brown clouds: regional assessment report with focus on Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, V.; M. Agrawal; H. Akimoto (and others)

    2008-07-01

    UNEP commissioned an assessment of the impacts of atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) on regional radiative forcing, climate, agriculture, water and health. Part 1 of this report describes the impacts on radiative forcing and climate. The impacts of ABCs on agriculture and human health are described I Parts II and III, respectively. The study identified 13 cities as ABC hotspots, including Bangkok, Beijing, Mumbai, New Delhi, Seoul, Shanghai and Shenzhen. The effect of brown clouds is to make these cities darker or dimmer because particles such as sulfates from burning coal and other fossil fuels reflect and scatter rays back to space and other particles such as black carbon absorb sunlight before it reaches the ground. Brown clouds contain a variety of toxic aerosols, carcinogens and particles including particulate matter (PM) of less than 2.5 microns in width. These have been linked with a variety of health effects from respiratory disease and cardio-vascular problems. Increase in concentrations of PM 2.5 of 20 microgrammes per cubic metre could lead to about 340,000 excess deaths per year in China and India.

  2. Atmospheric Aerosols: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Activity of Selected Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenorn, T.; Henning, S.; Hartz, K. H.; Kiss, G.; Pandis, S.; Bilde, M.

    2005-12-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of vapors in the atmosphere plays a major role in both climate through micro meteorology and in the physical and chemical processes of a single particle. This work has focused on the cloud droplet activation of a number of pure and mixed compounds. The means used to investigate these processes have been the University of Copenhagen cloud condensation nucleus counter setup and the Carnegie Mellon University CCNC setup. The importance of correct water activity modeling has been addressed and it has been pointed out that the molecular mass is an important parameter to consider when choosing model compounds for cloud activation models. It was shown that both traditional Kohler theory and Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility reproduce measurements of soluble compounds well. For less soluble compounds it is necessary to use Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility. It was also shown that this works for mixtures of compounds containing both inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids. It has also been shown that particle phase and humidity history is important for activation behavior of particles consisting of two slightly soluble organic substances (succinic and adipic acid) and a soluble salt (NaCl). Model parameters for terpene oxidation product cloud activation have been derived. These are based on two sets of average parameters covering monoterpene oxidation products and sesquiterpene oxidation products. All parameters except the solubility were estimated and an effective solubility was calculated as the fitting parameter. The average solubility of the model compound found for mono terpene oxidation products is similar to those of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate; however the higher molecular weight leads to a slightly higher activation diameter at fixed supersaturation. On a molar basis the monoterpene oxidation products show a 1.5 times higher effective solubility than the sesquiterpene oxidation products.

  3. A 15 year legacy of cloud and atmosphere observations in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupe, M.

    2012-12-01

    properties, and impacts on surface radiation; the indirect effect of aerosols on the surface longwave radiative effects of Arctic clouds; improved measurements of low amounts of atmospheric water vapor and their impacts on atmospheric radiation; dynamical and microphysical processes that are responsible for long-lived Arctic stratiform clouds; evaluation of satellite observations in extreme and observationally-difficult regimes; and assessment of model performance for models ranging from very high resolution to climate model simulations in the Arctic. The observational legacy at Barrow continues as ARM works to expand and enhance its impact. Plans are underway to install observational capabilities at a sister location in Oliktok Point to the east of Barrow, including enhanced capabilities of tethered balloon profiling and flying unmanned aerial vehicles over the adjacent Arctic Ocean. A new set of scanning cloud and precipitation radars have recently come online at Barrow that will allow for new insights on the spatial context of measurements at Barrow, including important information on the variability of atmospheric processes associated with the coastline. And lastly, there are many opportunities for the intensive observations at Barrow to inform important regional research on permafrost and sea-ice loss, while also serving as an unmatched, long-term record for evaluating atmospheric processes in regional and global climate models.

  4. Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alex; Arutyunyan, Vardan; Larin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    A new mathematical model of the global transport of gaseous species and aerosols in the atmosphere and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres was constructed. PSCs play a significant role in ozone chemistry since heterogeneous reactions proceed on their particle surfaces and in the bulk, affecting the gas composition of the atmosphere, specifically, the content of chlorine and nitrogen compounds, which are actively involved in the destruction of ozone. Stratospheric clouds are generated by co-condensation of water vapor and nitric acid on sulfate particles and in some cases during the freezing of supercooled water as well as when nitric acid vapors are dissolved in sulfate aerosol particles [1]. These clouds differ in their chemical composition and microphysics [2]. In this study, we propose new kinetic equations describing the variability of species in the gas and condensed phases to simulate the formation of PSCs. Most models for the formation of PSCs use constant background values of sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere. This approach is too simplistic since sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere are characterized by considerably nonuniform spatial and temporal variations. Two PSC types are considered: Type 1 refers to the formation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type 2 refers to the formation of particles composed of different proportions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O. Their formation is coupled with the spatial problem of sulfate aerosol generation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere incorporating the chemical and kinetic transformation processes (photochemistry, nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation) and using a non-equilibrium particle-size distribution [3]. In this formulation, the system of equations is closed and allows an adequate description of the PSC dynamics in the stratosphere. Using the model developed, numerical experiments were performed to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of

  5. Retrieving cloud, dust and ozone abundances in the Martian atmosphere using SPICAM/UV nadir spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willame, Y.; Vandaele, A. C.; Depiesse, C.; Lefèvre, F.; Letocart, V.; Gillotay, D.; Montmessin, F.

    2017-08-01

    We present the retrieval algorithm developed to analyse nadir spectra from SPICAM/UV aboard Mars-Express. The purpose is to retrieve simultaneously several parameters of the Martian atmosphere and surface: the dust optical depth, the ozone total column, the cloud opacity and the surface albedo. The retrieval code couples the use of an existing complete radiative transfer code, an inversion method and a cloud detection algorithm. We describe the working principle of our algorithm and the parametrisation used to model the required absorption, scattering and reflection processes of the solar UV radiation that occur in the Martian atmosphere and at its surface. The retrieval method has been applied on 4 Martian years of SPICAM/UV data to obtain climatologies of the different quantities under investigation. An overview of the climatology is given for each species showing their seasonal and spatial distributions. The results show a good qualitative agreement with previous observations. Quantitative comparisons of the retrieved dust optical depths indicate generally larger values than previous studies. Possible shortcomings in the dust modelling (altitude profile) have been identified and may be part of the reason for this difference. The ozone results are found to be influenced by the presence of clouds. Preliminary quantitative comparisons show that our retrieved ozone columns are consistent with other results when no ice clouds are present, and are larger for the cases with clouds at high latitude. Sensitivity tests have also been performed showing that the use of other a priori assumptions such as the altitude distribution or some scattering properties can have an important impact on the retrieval.

  6. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  7. NUCAPS: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System Cloud-Cleared Radiances (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Cloud-Cleared Radiances (CCRs) from the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS). NUCAPS was developed by the NOAA/NESDIS...

  8. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Bistatic imaging lidar measurements of aerosols, fogs, and clouds in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinming; Mishima, Hidetsugu; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Saito, Yasunori; Nomura, Akio; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Morikawa, Kimio

    1998-08-01

    We have been developing a bistatic imaging lidar using a high sensitive CCD camera with an image intensifier as a high speed shutter for measuring spatial distributions of aerosols, fogs and clouds in the lower atmosphere at daytime as well as at nighttime. The bistatic imaging lidar was applied to two field observation campaigns. One was made cooperatively with a wind profiler and a radiosonde at Moriya (36 km north of Tokyo) for five days from May 26 to 30, 1997 and another cooperatively with a monostatic lidar at Hakuba alpine ski area of Nagano for 10 days from February 7 to 16, 1998 during the period of the 18th Winter Olympic Games in Japan. We report the results obtained at both campaigns and discuss the ability of this system in measuring the meteorological features of the local lower atmosphere under different conditions.

  10. Cloud Condensation Nuclei properties of model and atmospheric HULIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dinar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic like substances (HULIS have been identified as a major fraction of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols. These large multifunctional compounds of both primary and secondary sources are surface active and water soluble. Hence, it is expected that they could affect activation of organic aerosols into cloud droplets. We have compared the activation of aerosols containing atmospheric HULIS extracted from fresh, aged and pollution particles to activation of size fractionated fulvic acid from an aquatic source (Suwannee River Fulvic Acid, and correlated it to the estimated molecular weight and measured surface tension. A correlation was found between CCN-activation diameter of SRFA fractions and number average molecular weight of the fraction. The lower molecular weight fractions activated at lower critical diameters, which is explained by the greater number of solute species in the droplet with decreasing molecular weight. The three aerosol-extracted HULIS samples activated at lower diameters than any of the size-fractionated or bulk SRFA. The Köhler model was found to account for activation diameters, provided that accurate physico-chemical parameters are known.

  11. Implementation of aerosol-cloud interactions in the regional atmosphere-aerosol model COSMO-MUSCAT(5.0) and evaluation using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipu, Sudhakar; Quaas, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Stoll, Jens; Mühlbauer, Andreas; Sourdeval, Odran; Salzmann, Marc; Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina

    2017-06-01

    The regional atmospheric model Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) coupled to the Multi-Scale Chemistry Aerosol Transport model (MUSCAT) is extended in this work to represent aerosol-cloud interactions. Previously, only one-way interactions (scavenging of aerosol and in-cloud chemistry) and aerosol-radiation interactions were included in this model. The new version allows for a microphysical aerosol effect on clouds. For this, we use the optional two-moment cloud microphysical scheme in COSMO and the online-computed aerosol information for cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (Cccn), replacing the constant Cccn profile. In the radiation scheme, we have implemented a droplet-size-dependent cloud optical depth, allowing now for aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. To evaluate the models with satellite data, the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project Observation Simulator Package (COSP) has been implemented. A case study has been carried out to understand the effects of the modifications, where the modified modeling system is applied over the European domain with a horizontal resolution of 0.25° × 0.25°. To reduce the complexity in aerosol-cloud interactions, only warm-phase clouds are considered. We found that the online-coupled aerosol introduces significant changes for some cloud microphysical properties. The cloud effective radius shows an increase of 9.5 %, and the cloud droplet number concentration is reduced by 21.5 %.

  12. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  13. Statistical comparison of properties of simulated and observed cumulus clouds in the vicinity of Houston during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongli; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Lu, Miao-Ling; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-07-01

    We present statistical comparisons of properties of clouds generated by Large Eddy Simulations (LES) with aircraft observations of nonprecipitating, warm cumulus clouds made in the vicinity of Houston, TX during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), carried out in the summer of 2006. Aircraft data were sampled with the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter airplane. Five flights (days) that are most suitable for studying aerosol-cloud interactions are selected from the 22 flights. The model simulations are initiated with observed environmental profiles. The simulations are used to generate an ensemble of thousands of cumulus clouds for statistically meaningful evaluations. Statistical comparisons focus on the properties of a set of dynamical and thermodynamical variables, sampled either in the cloud or the cloud updraft core. The set of variables includes cloud liquid water content (LWC), number mixing ratio of cloud droplets (Nd), cloud effective radius (re), updraft velocity (w), and the distribution of cloud sizes. In general, good agreement between the simulated and observed clouds is achieved in the normalized frequency distribution functions, the profiles averaged over the cloudy regions, the cross-cloud averages, and the cloud size distributions, despite big differences in sample size between the model output and the aircraft data. Some unresolved differences in frequency distributions of w and possible differences in cloud fraction are noted. These comparisons suggest that the LES is able to successfully generate the cumulus cloud populations that were present during GoMACCS. The extent to which this is true will depend on the specific application.

  14. CAMEX-3 AIRBORNE VERTICAL ATMOSPHERE PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 DC-8 Airborne Vertical Atmosphere Profiling System (AVAPS) uses dropwindsonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to measure the atmospheric...

  15. CAMEX-3 AIRBORNE VERTICAL ATMOSPHERE PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 DC-8 Airborne Vertical Atmosphere Profiling System (AVAPS) uses dropwinsonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to measure the atmospheric...

  16. Characterization of cirrus clouds and atmospheric state using a new hyper-spectral optimal estimation retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veglio, P.; Holz, R.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of cirrus clouds as regulators of Earth's climate and radiation budget has been widely demonstrated, but still their characterization remains challenging. In order to derive cirrus properties, many retrieval techniques rely on prior assumptions on the atmospheric state or on the ice microphysics, either because the computational cost is too high or because the measurements do not have enough information, as in the case of broadband sensors. In this work we present a novel infrared hyper-spectral optimal estimation retrieval capable of simultaneously deriving cirrus cloud parameters (optical depth, effective radius, cloud top height) and atmospheric state (temperature and water vapor profiles) with their associated uncertainties by using a fast forward radiative transfer code. The use of hyperspectral data help overcoming the problem of the information content while the computational cost can be addressed by using a fast radiative transfer model. The tradeoff of this choice is an increasing in the complexity of the problem. Also, it is important to consider that by using a fast, approximate radiative transfer model, the uncertainties must be carefully evaluated in order to prevent or minimize any biases that could negatively affect the results. For this application data from the HS3 field campaign are used, which provide high quality hyper-spectral measurements from Scanning HIS along with CPL and possibly also dropsonde data and GDAS reanalysis to help validate the results. The future of this work will be to move from aircraft to satellite observations, and the natural choice is AIRS and CALIOP that offer a similar setup to what is currently used for this study.

  17. Remote sensing of cloud sides of deep convection: towards a three-dimensional retrieval of cloud particle size profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zinner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cloud scanner sensor is a central part of a recently proposed satellite remote sensing concept – the three-dimensional (3-D cloud and aerosol interaction mission (CLAIM-3D combining measurements of aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of clouds and profiles of cloud microphysical characteristics. Such a set of collocated measurements will allow new insights in the complex field of cloud-aerosol interactions affecting directly the development of clouds and precipitation, especially in convection. The cloud scanner measures radiance reflected or emitted by cloud sides at several wavelengths to derive a profile of cloud particle size and thermodynamic phase. For the retrieval of effective size a Bayesian approach was adopted and introduced in a preceding paper.

    In this paper the potential of the approach, which has to account for the complex three-dimensional nature of cloud geometry and radiative transfer, is tested in realistic cloud observing situations. In a fully simulated environment realistic cloud resolving modelling provides complex 3-D structures of ice, water, and mixed phase clouds, from the early stage of convective development to mature deep convection. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer is used to realistically simulate the aspired observations.

    A large number of cloud data sets and related simulated observations provide the database for an experimental Bayesian retrieval. An independent simulation of an additional cloud field serves as a synthetic test bed for the demonstration of the capabilities of the developed retrieval techniques. For this test case only a minimal overall bias in the order of 1% as well as pixel-based uncertainties in the order of 1 μm for droplets and 8 μm for ice particles were found for measurements at a high spatial resolution of 250 m.

  18. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  19. Radiative Impacts of Cloud Heterogeneity and Overlap in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.; Sud, Y. C.; Suarez, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The radiative impacts of introducing horizontal heterogeneity of layer cloud condensate, and vertical overlap of condensate and cloud fraction are examined with the aid of a new radiation package operating in the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model. The impacts are examined in terms of diagnostic top-of-the-atmosphere shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect (CRE) calculations for a range of assumptions and parameter specifications about the overlap. The investigation is conducted for two distinct cloud schemes, the one that comes with the standard GEOS-5 distribution, and another which has been recently used experimentally for its enhanced GEOS-5 distribution, and another which has been recently used experimentally for its enhanced cloud microphysical capabilities; both are coupled to a cloud generator allowing arbitrary cloud overlap specification. We find that cloud overlap radiative impacts are significantly stronger for the operational cloud scheme for which a change of cloud fraction overlap from maximum-random to generalized results to global changes of SW and LW CRE of approximately 4 Watts per square meter, and zonal changes of up to approximately 10 Watts per square meter. This is because of fewer occurrences compared to the other scheme of large layer cloud fractions and of multi-layer situations with large numbers of atmospheric being simultaneously cloudy, conditions that make overlap details more important. The impact on CRE of the details of condensate distribution overlap is much weaker. Once generalized overlap is adopted, both cloud schemes are only modestly sensitive to the exact values of the overlap parameters. We also find that if one of the CRE components is overestimated and the other underestimated, both cannot be driven towards observed values by adjustments to cloud condensate heterogeneity and overlap alone.

  20. MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product (TERRA Browse Product)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is browse product: "MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product" Data set information: http://modis-atmos.gsfc.nasa.gov/ [placeholder metadata

  1. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  2. Atmospheric System Research Marine Low Clouds Workshop Report, January 27-29,2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wood, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Marine low clouds are a major determinant of the Earth?s albedo and are a major source of uncertainty in how the climate responds to changing greenhouse gas levels and anthropogenic aerosol. Marine low clouds are particularly difficult to simulate accurately in climate models, and their remote locations present a significant observational challenge. A complex set of interacting controlling processes determine the coverage, condensate loading, and microphysical and radiative properties of marine low clouds. Marine low clouds are sensitive to atmospheric aerosol in several ways. Interactions at microphysical scales involve changes in the concentration of cloud droplets and precipitation, which induce cloud dynamical impacts including changes in entrainment and mesoscale organization. Marine low clouds are also impacted by atmospheric heating changes due to absorbing aerosols. The response of marine low clouds to aerosol perturbations depends strongly upon the unperturbed aerosol-cloud state, which necessitates greater understanding of processes controlling the budget of aerosol in the marine boundary layer. Entrainment and precipitation mediate the response of low clouds to aerosols but these processes also play leading roles in controlling the aerosol budget. The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program are making major recent investments in observational data sets from fixed and mobile sites dominated by marine low clouds. This report provides specific action items for how these measurements can be used together with process modeling to make progress on understanding and quantifying the key cloud and aerosol controlling processes in the next 5-10 years. Measurements of aerosol composition and its variation with particle size are needed to advance a quantitative, process-level understanding of marine boundary-layer aerosol budget. Quantitative precipitation estimates

  3. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  4. Gravity Wave-induced High-altitude CO2 Ice Clouds in Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.; Hartogh, P.

    2015-12-01

    First general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of cold air required for CO2 condensation and ice cloud formation in Mars' atmosphere are presented. Results suggest that these ice clouds are generated by lower atmospheric small-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral GW parameterization of Yiğit et al. (2008). Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good qualitative agreement with observations of high-altitude CO2 ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of subgrid-scale GWs in facilitating high-altitude CO2 cloud formation and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  5. The Role of CO2 Clouds on the Stability of the Early Mars Atmosphere Against Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, Jim; Kling, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    The early Mars atmosphere was likely significantly more massive than it is today, given the growing body of evidence that liquid water flowed on the surface early in the planet’s history. Although the CO2 inventory was likely larger in the past, there is much we still do not understand about the state of that CO2. As surface pressure increases, the temperature at which CO2 condenses also increases, making it more likely that CO2 ice would form and persist on the surface when the atmospheric mass increases. An atmosphere that is stable against collapse must contain enough energy, distributed globally, to prohibit the formation of permanents CO2 ice reservoirs that lead to collapse. The presence of the “faint young sun” compounds this issue. Previous global climate model (GCM) investigations show that atmospheres within specific ranges of obliquities and atmospheric masses are stable against collapse. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to expand on these works by focusing specifically on the role of CO2 clouds in atmospheric stability. Two end member simulations are executed, one that includes CO2 cloud formation and one that does not. The simulation that explicitly includes CO2 clouds is stable, while the simulation without CO2 clouds collapses into permanent surface CO2 reservoirs. In both cases, significant atmospheric condensation is occurring in the atmosphere throughout the year. In the case without CO2 clouds, all atmospheric condensation (even if it occurs at altitude) leads directly to the accumulation of surface ice, whereas in the case with CO2 clouds, there is a finite settling timescale for the cloud particles. Depending on this timescale and the local conditions, the cloud particles could stay aloft or sublimate as they fall toward the surface. Thus, the striking difference between these two cases illustrates the important role of CO2 clouds. We plan to conduct and present further simulations to better understand how atmospheric stability depends on

  6. Annual Cycle of GW-induced CO2 Cloud Formation in Mars' Middle Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiğit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) of lower atmospheric origin influence the dynamical and thermal structure of the Martian middle and upper atmosphere. Recently, using the Max Planck Institute Martian General Circulation Model (MPI-MGCM), incorporating the Yigit et al 2008 whole atmosphere nonlinear GW parameterization, Yigit et al 2015 have demonstrated that GWs facilitate high-altitude CO2 ice cloud formation. In this study, using the same modeling framework, we analyze the annual cycle of cloud formation along with the associated variations of GW activity. CO2 ice cloud variations in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere (MLT) during one Martian year appreciably coincide with GW effects, suggesting that GW processes significantly affect CO2 ice cloud formation in the Martian MLT

  7. How does the latitudinal dependency of the cloud structure change Venus' atmosphere's general circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; Lebonnois, S.

    2017-09-01

    Differently to the previous simulation of the LMD/IPSL Venus GCM, we now take into account the latitudinal variation of the clouds' structure and we analyze its impacts on the general circulation of Venus atmosphere. Both solar heating rates and the infrared net-exchange rate matrix used in the radiative transfer code have been modified in that sense. Additional tuning below the clouds has also been performed. The current results show a better agreement with observations in both mean zonal wind and average temperature fields. Moreover, taking into account the latitudinal variation of the clouds has brought along with it the formation of a well defined cold collar poleward of 60º at cloud level. Besides, we have reanalyzed the wave activity present in Venus atmosphere and found new baroclinic mid-latitude waves. However, we do not obtain the gravity waves present in the deep atmosphere in the previous model.

  8. Effect of atmospheric gases, surface albedo and cloud overlap on the absorbed solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Sinha

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided new evidence that models may systematically underestimate cloud solar absorption compared to observations. This study extends previous work on this "absorption anomaly'' by using observational data together with solar radiative transfer parameterisations to calculate fs (the ratio of surface and top of the atmosphere net cloud forcings and its latitudinal variation for a range of cloud types. Principally, it is found that (a the zonal mean behaviour of fs varies substantially with cloud type, with the highest values obtained for low clouds; (b gaseous absorption and scattering can radically alter the pattern of the variation of fs with latitude, but gaseous effects cannot in general raise fs to the level of around 1.5 as recently determined; (c the importance of the gaseous contribution to the atmospheric ASR is such that whilst fs rises with surface albedo, the net cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR falls; (d the assumed form of the degree of cloud overlap in the model can substantially affect the cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR whilst leaving the parameter fs largely unaffected; (e even large uncertainties in the observed optical depths alone cannot account for discrepancies apparent between modelled and newly observed cloud solar absorption. It is concluded that the main source of the anomaly may derive from the considerable uncertainties regarding impure droplet microphysics rather than, or together with, uncertainties in macroscopic quantities. Further, variable surface albedos and gaseous effects may limit the use of contemporaneous satellite and ground-based measurements to infer the cloud solar absorption from the parameter fs.

  9. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  10. The origin of rotation profiles in star-forming clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Tomida, Kengo; Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    The angular momentum distribution and its redistribution are of crucial importance in the formation and evolution of circumstellar discs. Many molecular line observations towards young stellar objects indicate that the radial distributions of the specific angular momentum j have a characteristic profile. In the inner region, typically R ≲ 100 au, the specific angular momenta distribute as j ∝ r1/2, indicating the existence of a rotationally supported disc. In the outer regions, R ≳ 5000 au, j increases as the radius increases, and the slope is steeper than unity. This behaviour is assumed to reflect the original angular momentum distributions in the maternal molecular clouds. In the intermediate region, 100 au ≲ R ≲ 5000 au, the j-distribution appears to be almost flat. While this is often interpreted to be a consequence of the conservation of the specific angular momentum, the interpretation actually is insufficient and requires a stronger condition that the initial distribution of j must be spatially uniform. However, this requirement seems to be unrealistic and inconsistent with observations. In this work, we propose a simple alternative explanation: the apparently flat j profile is produced by strong elongation owing to the large velocity gradient in the accreting flow, no matter what the initial j-distribution is. In order to show this, we provide a simple analytic model for the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds. We also propose a method to estimate the ages of protostars using only the observed rotation profile. We demonstrate the validity of this method in comparison with hydrodynamic simulations, and apply the model to the young stellar objects L1527 IRS, TMC-1A and B335.

  11. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  12. Covariance Between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds Within Atmospheric State Regimes at the Satellite Footprint Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  13. Direct measurements of the effect of biomass burning over the Amazon on the atmospheric temperature profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Remer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols suspended in the atmosphere interact with solar radiation and clouds, thus change the radiation energy fluxes in the atmospheric column. In this paper we measure changes in the atmospheric temperature profile as a function of the smoke loading and the cloudiness, over the Amazon basin, during the dry seasons (August and September of 2005–2008. We show that as the aerosol optical depth (AOD increases from 0.02 to a value of ~0.6, there is a decrease of ~4°C at 1000 hPa, and an increase of ~1.5°C at 850 hPa. The warming of the aerosol layer at 850 hPa is likely due to aerosol absorption when the particles are exposed to direct illumination by the sun. The large values of cooling in the lower layers could be explained by a combination of aerosol extinction of the solar flux in the layers aloft together with an aerosol-induced increase of cloud cover which shade the lower atmosphere. We estimate that the increase in cloud fraction due to aerosol contributes about half of the observed cooling in the lower layers.

  14. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  15. Exploring noctilucent cloud variability using the nudged and extended version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuilman, Maartje; Karlsson, Bodil; Benze, Susanne; Megner, Linda

    2017-11-01

    Ice particles in the summer mesosphere - such as those connected to noctilucent clouds and polar mesospheric summer echoes - have since their discovery contributed to the uncovering of atmospheric processes on various scales ranging from interactions on molecular levels to global scale circulation patterns. While there are numerous model studies on mesospheric ice microphysics and how the clouds relate to the background atmosphere, there are at this point few studies using comprehensive global climate models to investigate observed variability and climatology of noctilucent clouds. In this study it is explored to what extent the large-scale inter-annual characteristics of noctilucent clouds are captured in a 30-year run - extending from 1979 to 2009 - of the nudged and extended version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM30). To construct and investigate zonal mean inter-seasonal variability in noctilucent cloud occurrence frequency and ice mass density in both hemispheres, a simple cloud model is applied in which it is assumed that the ice content is solely controlled by the local temperature and water vapor volume mixing ratio. The model results are compared to satellite observations, each having an instrument-specific sensitivity when it comes to detecting noctilucent clouds. It is found that the model is able to capture the onset dates of the NLC seasons in both hemispheres as well as the hemispheric differences in NLCs, such as weaker NLCs in the SH than in the NH and differences in cloud height. We conclude that the observed cloud climatology and zonal mean variability are well captured by the model.

  16. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  17. STEREO RECONSTRUCTION OF ATMOSPHERIC CLOUD SURFACES FROM FISH-EYE CAMERA IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Katai-Urban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article a method for reconstructing atmospheric cloud surfaces using a stereo camera system is presented. The proposed camera system utilizes fish-eye lenses in a flexible wide baseline camera setup. The entire workflow from the camera calibration to the creation of the 3D point set is discussed, but the focus is mainly on cloud segmentation and on the image processing steps of stereo reconstruction. Speed requirements, geometric limitations, and possible extensions of the presented method are also covered. After evaluating the proposed method on artificial cloud images, this paper concludes with results and discussion of possible applications for such systems.

  18. Atmosphere Clouds Model Algorithm for Solving Optimal Reactive Power Dispatch Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Kanagasabai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method, called Atmosphere Clouds Model (ACM algorithm, used for solving optimal reactive power dispatch problem. ACM stochastic optimization algorithm stimulated from the behavior of cloud in the natural earth. ACM replicate the generation behavior, shift behavior and extend behavior of cloud. The projected (ACM algorithm has been tested on standard IEEE 30 bus test system and simulation results shows clearly about the superior performance of the proposed algorithm in plummeting the real power loss. Normal 0 false false false EN-IN X-NONE X-NONE

  19. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  20. GPM Ground Validation Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) OLYMPEX dataset contains dropsonde vertical profiles of atmospheric pressure, air...

  1. Simulating atmospheric transport of the 2011 Grímsvötn ash cloud using a data insertion update scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, K. L.; Western, L. M.; Watson, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    Effective modelling of atmospheric volcanic ash dispersion is important to ensure aircraft safety, and has been the subject of much study since the Eyjafjallajökull ash crisis in Europe in 2010. In this paper, a novel modelling method is presented, where the atmospheric transport of the 2011 Grímsvötn ash cloud is simulated using a data insertion update scheme. Output from the volcanic ash transport and dispersion model, NAME, is updated using satellite retrievals and the results of a probabilistic ash, cloud and clear sky classification algorithm. A range of configurations of the scheme are compared with each other, in addition to a simple data insertion method presented in a previous study. Results show that simulations in which ash layer heights and depths are updated using the model output generally perform worse in relation to satellite derived ash coverage and ash column loading than simulations that use satellite-retrieved heights and an assumed layer depth of 1.0 km. Simulated ash column loading and concentration tends to be under-predicted using this update scheme, but the timing of the arrival of the ash cloud at Stockholm is well captured, as shown by comparison with lidar-derived mass concentration profiles. Most of the updated simulations in this comparison make small gains in skill on the simple data insertion scheme.

  2. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dunne, E M; Kurten, A; Almeida, J; Duplissy, J; Williamson, C; Ortega, I K; Pringle, K J; Adamov, A; Baltensperger, U; Barmet, P; Benduhn, F; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Clarke, A; Curtius, J; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Ehrhart, S; Flagan, R C; Franchin, A; Guida, R; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Heinritzi, M; Jokinen, T; Kangasluoma, J; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Kupc, A; Lawler, M J; Lehtipalo, K; Makhmutov, V; Mann, G; Mathot, S; Merikanto, J; Miettinen, P; Nenes, A; Onnela, A; Rap, A; Reddington, C L S; Riccobono, F; Richards, N A D; Rissanen, M P; Rondo, L; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Sengupta, K; Simon, M; Sipila, M; Smith, J N; Stozkhov, Y; Tome, A; Trostl, J; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Winkler, P M; Worsnop, D R; Carslaw, K S

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. Here we build a global model of aerosol formation using extensive laboratory-measured nucleation rates involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions and organic compounds. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds in addition to sulfuric acid. A significant fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied variations in cosmic ray intensity do not significantly affect climate via nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  3. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Cloud Properties from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of cloud products was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-X)...

  4. Self-consistent atmosphere modeling with cloud formation for low-mass stars and exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncher, Diana; Jørgensen, Uffe G.; Helling, Christiane

    2017-12-01

    Context. Low-mass stars and extrasolar planets have ultra-cool atmospheres where a rich chemistry occurs and clouds form. The increasing amount of spectroscopic observations for extrasolar planets requires self-consistent model atmosphere simulations to consistently include the formation processes that determine cloud formation and their feedback onto the atmosphere. Aims: Our aim is to complement the MARCS model atmosphere suit with simulations applicable to low-mass stars and exoplanets in preparation of E-ELT, JWST, PLATO and other upcoming facilities. Methods: The MARCS code calculates stellar atmosphere models, providing self-consistent solutions of the radiative transfer and the atmospheric structure and chemistry. We combine MARCS with a kinetic model that describes cloud formation in ultra-cool atmospheres (seed formation, growth/evaporation, gravitational settling, convective mixing, element depletion). Results: We present a small grid of self-consistently calculated atmosphere models for Teff = 2000-3000 K with solar initial abundances and log (g) = 4.5. Cloud formation in stellar and sub-stellar atmospheres appears for Teff < 2700 K and has a significant effect on the structure and the spectrum of the atmosphere for Teff < 2400 K. We have compared the synthetic spectra of our models with observed spectra and found that they fit the spectra of mid- to late-type M-dwarfs and early-type L-dwarfs well. The geometrical extension of the atmospheres (at τ = 1) changes with wavelength resulting in a flux variation of 10%. This translates into a change in geometrical extension of the atmosphere of about 50 km, which is the quantitative basis for exoplanetary transit spectroscopy. We also test DRIFT-MARCS for an example exoplanet and demonstrate that our simulations reproduce the Spitzer observations for WASP-19b rather well for Teff = 2600 K, log (g) = 3.2 and solar abundances. Our model points at an exoplanet with a deep cloud-free atmosphere with a substantial

  5. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  6. The dynamic surface tension of atmospheric aerosol surfactants reveals new aspects of cloud activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The activation of aerosol particles into cloud droplets in the Earth’s atmosphere is both a key process for the climate budget and a main source of uncertainty. Its investigation is facing major experimental challenges, as no technique can measure the main driving parameters, the Raoult’s term and surface tension, σ, for sub-micron atmospheric particles. In addition, the surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols could not be isolated until recently. Here we present the first dynamic investigation of the total surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols, evidencing adsorption barriers that limit their gradient (partitioning) in particles and should enhance their cloud-forming efficiency compared with current models. The results also show that the equilibration time of surfactants in sub-micron atmospheric particles should be beyond the detection of most on-line instruments. Such instrumental and theoretical shortcomings would be consistent with atmospheric and laboratory observations and could have limited the understanding of cloud activation until now. PMID:24566451

  7. Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. I. Climatic effects of multi-layered clouds for Earth-like planets and implications for habitable zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, D.; Patzer, A. B. C.; von Paris, P.; Godolt, M.; Stracke, B.; Gebauer, S.; Grenfell, J. L.; Rauer, H.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: The effects of multi-layered clouds in the atmospheres of Earth-like planets orbiting different types of stars are studied. The radiative effects of cloud particles are directly correlated with their wavelength-dependent optical properties. Therefore the incident stellar spectra may play an important role for the climatic effect of clouds. We discuss the influence of clouds with mean properties measured in the Earth's atmosphere on the surface temperatures and Bond albedos of Earth-like planets orbiting different types of main sequence dwarf stars. The influence of clouds on the position of the habitable zone around these central star types is discussed. Methods: A parametric cloud model has been developed based on observations in the Earth's atmosphere. The corresponding optical properties of the cloud particles are calculated with the Mie theory accounting for shape effects of ice particles by the equivalent sphere method. The parametric cloud model is linked with a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model to study the effect of clouds on the surface temperature and the Bond albedo of Earth-like planets in dependence of the type of central star. Results: The albedo effect of the low-level clouds depends only weakly on the incident stellar spectra because the optical properties remain almost constant in the wavelength range of the maximum of the incident stellar radiation. The greenhouse effect of the high-level clouds on the other hand depends on the temperature of the lower atmosphere, which is itself an indirect consequence of the different types of central stars. In general the planetary Bond albedo increases with the cloud cover of either cloud type. An anomaly was found for the K and M-type stars however, resulting in a decreasing Bond albedo with increasing cloud cover for certain atmospheric conditions. Depending on the cloud properties, the position of the habitable zone can be located either farther from or closer to the central star. As

  8. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  9. The July 2016 Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) campaign at Thule, Greenland: surface radiation budget and role of clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Daniela; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Pace, Giandomenico; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-04-01

    The Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project, funded by the Italian Programme for Antarctic Research, is aimed at investigating the surface radiation budget (SRB), the variability of atmospheric water vapour, and the long-term variations in stratospheric composition and structure at Thule, Greenland, in the framework of the international Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO, 76.5° N, 68.8° W) is devoted to study climate change and has been operational since 1990, with the contribution of different international institutions: DMI, NCAR, ENEA, INGV, Universities of Roma and Firenze (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). As part of SVAAP an intensive field campaign was held at Thule from 5 to 28 July 2016. The campaign was also aimed at supporting the installation of VESPA-22, a new microwave radiometer for water vapour profiling in the upper atmosphere and integrated water vapour (IWV), and offered the possibility to study the cloud physical and optical properties and their impact on the SRB. Measurements of downward shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) irradiance were already available since 2009. Additional observations were added to obtain the SRB and to characterize the atmospheric state: upward SW and LW irradiance, upwelling and downwelling photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), downward irradiance in the 8-14 µm infrared window, temperature and relative humidity tropospheric profiles, IWV, liquid water path (LWP), lidar tropospheric backscattering profiles, sky brightness temperature (BT) in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, visible and infrared sky images, surface meteorological parameters. Moreover, 23 radiosonde were launched during the campaign. Data from the period 14-28 July are presented in this study. The first part of the campaign was characterized by stable cloud-free conditions, while alternation of cloudy and cloud-free sky occurred after 18 July. The

  10. Design evaluations for a flight cloud physics holocamera. [holographic/photographic camera for low-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.; Kurtz, R. L.; Lemons, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a holographic/photographic camera to be used with the zero-g or low-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The flight prototype holocamera is intended to record particles from 0.01 to 5 microns for an optimum two-dimensional plane only in the microscopic photography mode, particles on a volume basis in the in-line holography mode from 5 microns up, and all particle sizes possible on a volume basis in the acute sideband holography mode.

  11. Remote sensing the vertical profile of cloud droplet effective radius, thermodynamic phase, and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Martins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei.

    Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

    The CLAIM-3D (3-Dimensional Cloud Aerosol Interaction Mission satellite concept proposed here combines several techniques to simultaneously measure the vertical profile of cloud

  12. Impacts of the cloud structure's latitudinal variation on the general circulation of the Venus atmosphere as modeled by the LMD-GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Lebonnois, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    A new simulation of Venus atmospheric circulation obtained with the LMD Venus GCM is described and the impact of cloud's latitudinal structure on the general circulation is analyzed. The model used here is based on that presented in Lebonnois et al. (2016). However, in the present simulation we consider the latitudinal variation of the cloud structure (Haus et al., 2014) both for the solar heating and to compute the infrared net-exchange rate matrix used in the radiative transfer module. The new cloud treatment affects mainly the balance in the angular momentum and the zonal wind distribution. Consequently, the agreement between the vertical profile of the modeled mean zonal wind and the profiles measured by different probes, is clearly improved from previous simulations in which zonal winds below the clouds were weak (roughly half the observed values). Moreover, the equatorial jet obtained at the base of the cloud deck is now more consistent with the observations. In Lebonnois et al. (2016) it was too strong compared to mid-latitudes, but in the present simulation the equatorial jet is less intense than the mid-latitude jets, in concordance with cloud-tracking measurements (Hueso et al., 2015). Since the atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the angular momentum budget of the Venus's atmospheric circulation, we analyze the wave activity by means of the Fast Fourier Transform technique studying the frequency spectrum of temperature, zonal and meridional wind fields. Modifications in the activity of the different types of waves present in the Venusian atmosphere compared to Lebonnois et al. (2016) are discussed, in terms of horizontal and vertical transport of the angular momentum by diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, barotropic and baroclinic waves, and Rossby and Kelvin type waves. Haus R., Kappel D. and Arnold G., 2014. Atmospheric thermal structure and cloud features in the southern hemisphere of Venus as retrieved from VIRTIS/VEX radiation measurements. Icarus

  13. Seasonal variation in diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Ørby, Pia Viuf; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profile within the Danish city of Aarhus was shown to change in a systematic manner as the pollen season progressed. Although diurnal grass pollen profiles can differ greatly from day-to-day, it is common practice to establish...... the time of day when peak concentrations are most likely to occur using seasonally averaged diurnal profiles. Atmospheric pollen loads are highly dependent upon emissions, and different species of grass are known to flower and emit pollen at different times of the day and during different periods...... of the pollen season. Pollen concentrations are also influenced by meteorological factors - directly through those parameters that govern pollen dispersion and transport, and indirectly through the weather-driven flowering process. We found that three different profiles dominated the grass pollen season...

  14. 3D Object Segmentation of Point Clouds using Profiling Techniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the automatic processing of point clouds, higher level information in the form of point segments is required for classification and object detection purposes. Segmentation allows for the definition of these segments. Because of the increasing size of point clouds faster and more reliable segmentation methods are being ...

  15. Simultaneous and synergistic profiling of cloud and drizzle properties using ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Rusli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of radar reflectivity (Z measurements in the retrieval of liquid water cloud properties, it remains nontrivial to interpret Z due to the possible presence of drizzle droplets within the clouds. So far, there has been no published work that utilizes Z to identify the presence of drizzle above the cloud base in an optimized and a physically consistent manner. In this work, we develop a retrieval technique that exploits the synergy of different remote sensing systems to carry out this task and to subsequently profile the microphysical properties of the cloud and drizzle in a unified framework. This is accomplished by using ground-based measurements of Z, lidar attenuated backscatter below as well as above the cloud base, and microwave brightness temperatures. Fast physical forward models coupled to cloud and drizzle structure parameterization are used in an optimal-estimation-type framework in order to retrieve the best estimate for the cloud and drizzle property profiles. The cloud retrieval is first evaluated using synthetic signals generated from large-eddy simulation (LES output to verify the forward models used in the retrieval procedure and the vertical parameterization of the liquid water content (LWC. From this exercise it is found that, on average, the cloud properties can be retrieved within 5 % of the mean truth. The full cloud–drizzle retrieval method is then applied to a selected ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques campaign dataset collected in Cabauw, the Netherlands. An assessment of the retrieval products is performed using three independent methods from the literature; each was specifically developed to retrieve only the cloud properties, the drizzle properties below the cloud base, or the drizzle fraction within the cloud. One-to-one comparisons, taking into account the uncertainties or limitations of each retrieval, show that our results are consistent

  16. Modulation of the Atmospheric-ocean Oscillations on Seasonal Cloud Fraction in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the studies of China's monsoon region are generally based on the relationship between the precipitation and circulation indexes. However, the skewness of precipitation's time series is obvious and of non-normal distribution, and the precipitation is inhomogeneous regionally and seasonally, it makes the analysis inaccurate. To avoid these limitations, our research uses the cloud fraction data from MODIS and EECRA (Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports Archive) which is relatively stable. This research analyzes the mechanism of how the different atmospheric-ocean oscillations including ENSO, AMO, PDO, NAO and AO influence the monsoon region in China. We use EOF analysis to decompose the cloud fraction and get several significant modes which can contribute more than 50% of the whole ones, then calculate the correlations of the cloud fraction with the five circulation indexes in different regions of China seasonally. The analysis reveals that AMO, NAO and AO have high correlation with the cloud fraction in the whole year especially in the spring, the correlation coefficient may reach 0.8 in mode 3 of EOF analysis. Besides, ENSO and PDO are both highly correlated with the cloud fraction except in winter. To illustrate regionally, Northern China, Northeast China and Southwest China are influenced by NAO mostly, Northwest China is affected by AMO, and Eastern China is highly correlated with PDO and ENSO. It brings some new understandings of the monsoon region.

  17. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Ensembles to Cloud Microphysics in Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, Minghua; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Month-long large-scale forcing data from two field campaigns are used to drive a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and produce ensemble simulations of clouds and precipitation. Observational data are then used to evaluate the model results. To improve the model results, a new parameterization of the Bergeron process is proposed that incorporates the number concentration of ice nuclei (IN). Numerical simulations reveal that atmospheric ensembles are sensitive to IN concentration and ice crystal multiplication. Two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations are carried out to address the sensitivity of atmospheric ensembles to model dimensionality. It is found that the ensembles with high IN concentration are more sensitive to dimensionality than those with low IN concentration. Both the analytic solutions of linear dry models and the CRM output show that there are more convective cores with stronger updrafts in 3D simulations than in 2D, which explains the differing sensitivity of the ensembles to dimensionality at different IN concentrations.

  18. Atmospheric Collapse on Early Mars: The Role of CO2 Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Steakley, K. E.; Murphy, J. R.; Kling, A.

    2017-01-01

    The abundance of evidence that liquid water flowed on the surface early in Mars' history strongly implies that the early Martian atmosphere was significantly more massive than it is today. While it seems clear that the total CO2 inventory was likely substantially larger in the past, the fundamental question about the physical state of that CO2 is not completely understood. Because the temperature at which CO2 condenses increases with surface pressure, surface CO2 ice is more likely to form and persist as the atmospheric mass increases. For the atmosphere to remain stable against collapse, there must be enough energy, distributed planet wide, to stave off the formation of permanent CO2 caps that leads to atmospheric collapse. The presence of a "faint young sun" that was likely about 25 percent less luminous 3.8 billion years ago than the sun today makes this even more difficult. Several physical processes play a role in the ultimate stability of a CO2 atmosphere. The system is regulated by the energy balance between solar insolation, the radiative effects of the atmosphere and its constituents, atmospheric heat transport, heat exchange between the surface and the atmosphere, and latent heating/cooling. Specific considerations in this balance for a given orbital obliquity/eccentricity and atmospheric mass are the albedo of the caps, the dust content of the atmosphere, and the presence of water and/or CO2 clouds. Forget et al. show that, for Mars' current obliquity (in a circular orbit), CO2 atmospheres ranging in surface pressure from 500 hectopascals to 3000 hectopascals would have been stable against collapsing into permanent surface ice reservoirs. Soto et al. examined a similar range in initial surface pressure to investigate atmospheric collapse and to compute collapse rates. CO2 clouds and their radiative effects were included in Forget et al. but they were not included in Soto et al. Here we focus on how CO2 clouds affect the stability of the atmosphere

  19. Are noctilucent clouds harbingers of global change in the middle atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gary E.

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC) and their space counterpart, Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) are water-ice clouds that form in the cold high-latitude mesopause region during summertime. These clouds have been suggested to be sensitive markers of long-term mesospheric change. It was previously reported that NLC numbers over northwestern Europe increased in the late 20 th century. However, when the observations are sorted properly by location, the time series of NLC observations no longer shows an upward trend. A 40-year data set from Moscow also shows no significant long-term trend in NLC numbers, but an increase in their average brightness. There is also new satellite evidence that PMCs have brightened over the past 23 years. Recent mesospheric cloud occurrences have been reported at unusually-low latitudes (40°-50°N). Together with the satellite evidence, these developments have promoted speculation that permanent atmospheric changes near the high-latitude mesopause region have occurred. Before such conclusions can be drawn, natural variations in NLC activity need to be understood. The solar cycle appears to be the dominant natural influence. The published data (both from the ground and space-based) are consistent in showing a pronounced 10-11 year period oscillation in cloud occurrence, which is approximately anti-correlated with the solar cycle. The brighter the clouds, the more their numbers change over the solar cycle. The cyclic change is likely due to small changes in mesospheric temperature and water vapor, induced by the solar cycle variation of UV irradiance. There is an unexplained several-year time lag between solar cycle minimum and the peak of cloud activity. Longer time series and more comprehensive models are needed before the link with global change can be established.

  20. Evolution of an impact-generated dust cloud and its effects on the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.; Mckay, C. P.; Liu, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    A simulation is carried out of the evolution of an optically thick dust cloud in the earth's atmosphere, and calculations are made of the effects that such a dust cloud would have on the amount of visible light reaching the surface and the temperature at the earth's surface. It is found that large quantities of dust remain in the atmosphere for periods of only three to six months. This duration is fixed by the physical processes of coagulation; these cause the rapid formation of micron-sized particles and sedimentation that quickly removes the particles from the atmosphere. The duration of the event is found to be nearly independent of the initial altitude, initial particle size, initial mass, atmospheric vertical diffusive mixing rate, and rainout rate. It depends to a slight extent on the particle density and the probability that colliding particles stick together to form a larger particle. In addition, the duration is limited by the rate at which the debris spreads from the initial impact site. A doubling code is used to calculate the visible radiative transfer in the dust clouds. It is found that light levels are too low for vision for one to six months and too low for photosynthesis for two months to one year.

  1. Profiling of poorly stratified smoky atmospheres with scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir Kovalev; Cyle Wold; Alexander Petkov; Wei Min Hao

    2012-01-01

    The multiangle data processing technique is considered based on using the signal measured in zenith (or close to zenith) as a core source for extracting the information about the vertical atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used as the auxiliary data to extract the vertical transmittance profile from the zenith signal. Simulated and experimental...

  2. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  3. An Investigation of Atmospheric Temperature, Humidity and Cloud Detection Techniques Over the Arctic Marine Cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candlish, Lauren M.

    The veracity of a Radiometric Microwave Profiling Radiometer (MWRP) while mounted onboard a ship in the Arctic marine environment was assessed. The MWRP was validated against radiosonde data by calculating the RMS and bias for simultaneous measurements taken for temperature and absolute humidity profiles. The vertical resolution of the MWRP was calculated using the inter-level covariance method. Based on the comparisons, the MWRP provided reliable measurements of both temperature and absolute humidity while mounted on the CCGS Amundsen. Satellites CloudSat and Calipso were assessed over the Arctic marine cryosphere. Temperature and absolute humidity from the ECMWF-aux data product was compared with profiles from the ship based MWRP. The cloud base heights measured by the ceilometer and MWRP were compared to CloudSat and Calipso's GeoProf-lidar. Due to a large number of possible false detections, the constraints used by the GeoProf-lidar data product for cloud detection may need to be further refined.

  4. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  5. New Stereo Vision Digital Camera System for Simultaneous Measurement of Cloud Base Height and Atmospheric Visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeiro, F. M.; Carretas, F.; Palma, N.; Ramos, P. M.; Wagner, F.

    2013-12-01

    Clouds play an important role in many aspects of everyday life. They affect both the local weather as well as the global climate and are an important parameter on climate change studies. Cloud parameters are also important for weather prediction models which make use of actual measurements. It is thus important to have low-cost instrumentation that can be deployed in the field to measure those parameters. This kind of instruments should also be automated and robust since they may be deployed in remote places and be subject to adverse weather conditions. Although clouds are very important in environmental systems, they are also an essential component of airplane safety when visual flight rules (VFR) are enforced, such as in most small aerodromes where it is not economically viable to install instruments for assisted flying. Under VFR there are strict limits on the height of the cloud base, cloud cover and atmospheric visibility that ensure the safety of the pilots and planes. Although there are instruments, available in the market, to measure those parameters, their relatively high cost makes them unavailable in many local aerodromes. In this work we present a new prototype which has been recently developed and deployed in a local aerodrome as proof of concept. It is composed by two digital cameras that capture photographs of the sky and allow the measurement of the cloud height from the parallax effect. The new developments consist on having a new geometry which allows the simultaneous measurement of cloud base height, wind speed at cloud base height and atmospheric visibility, which was not previously possible with only two cameras. The new orientation of the cameras comes at the cost of a more complex geometry to measure the cloud base height. The atmospheric visibility is calculated from the Lambert-Beer law after the measurement of the contrast between a set of dark objects and the background sky. The prototype includes the latest hardware developments that

  6. Understanding the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b: Do Photochemical Hazes Cloud the Planets Spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Zahnle, Kevin; Moses, J.; Morley, C.

    2015-01-01

    The first young giant planet to be discovered by the Gemini Planet Imager was the (is) approximately 2MJ planet 51 Eri b. This approximately 20 Myr old young Jupiter is the first directly imaged planet to show unmistakable methane in H band. To constrain the planet's mass, atmospheric temperature, and composition, the GPI J and H band spectra as well as some limited photometric points were compared to the predictions of substellar atmosphere models. The best fitting models reported in the discovery paper (Macintosh et al. 2015) relied upon a combination of clear and cloudy atmospheric columns to reproduce the data. However for an object as cool as 700 K, the origin of the cloud coverage is somewhat puzzling, as the global silicate and iron clouds would be expected to have sunk well below the photosphere by this effective temperature. While strong vertical mixing in these low gravity atmospheres remains a plausible explanation, we have explored whether atmospheric photochemistry, driven by the UV flux from the primary star, may yield hazes that also influence the observed spectrum of the planet. To explore this possibility we have modeled the atmospheric photochemistry of 51 Eri b using two state-of-the-art photochemical models, both capable of predicting yields of complex hydrocarbons under various atmospheric conditions. In our presentation we will summarize the modeling approach employed to characterize 51 Eri b, explaining constraints on the planet's effective temperature, gravity, and atmospheric composition and also present results of our studies of atmospheric photochemistry. We will discuss whether photochemical hazes could indeed be responsible for the particulate opacity that apparently sculpts the spectrum of the planet.

  7. Improvements in Near-Terminator and Nocturnal Cloud Masks using Satellite Imager Data over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trepte, Q.Z.; Minnis, P.; Heck, P.W.; Palikonda, R.

    2005-03-18

    Cloud detection using satellite measurements presents a big challenge near the terminator where the visible (VIS; 0.65 {micro}m) channel becomes less reliable and the reflected solar component of the solar infrared 3.9-{micro}m channel reaches very low signal-to-noise ratio levels. As a result, clouds are underestimated near the terminator and at night over land and ocean in previous Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program cloud retrievals using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager data. Cloud detection near the terminator has always been a challenge. For example, comparisons between the CLAVR-x (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR]) cloud coverage and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) measurements north of 60{sup o}N indicate significant amounts of missing clouds from AVHRR because this part of the world was near the day/night terminator viewed by AVHRR. Comparisons between MODIS cloud products and GLAS at the same regions also shows the same difficulty in the MODIS cloud retrieval (Pavolonis and Heidinger 2005). Consistent detection of clouds at all times of day is needed to provide reliable cloud and radiation products for ARM and other research efforts involving the modeling of clouds and their interaction with the radiation budget. To minimize inconsistencies between daytime and nighttime retrievals, this paper develops an improved twilight and nighttime cloud mask using GOES-9, 10, and 12 imager data over the ARM sites and the continental United States (CONUS).

  8. Modeling the evolution of the aerosol cloud of toxicants in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarchuk Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the methods of mathematical modeling, the formation and evolution of aerosol clouds of toxicants in the atmosphere from the chemical industry enterprises, thermal power engineering and rocket carriers of space vehicles is analyzed. The processes of dynamic interaction of drops between themselves and a two-phase flow, processes of agglomeration, crushing and evaporation of aerosol particles are taken into account. The results of numerical calculations are presented.

  9. Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-01

    We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

  10. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A View from MGS TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Qu, Zheng; Pearl, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the method of Tamppari et al. to map water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. This technique was originally developed to analyze the broadband Viking IRTM channels and we have now applied it to the TES data. To do this, the TES spectra are convolved to the IRTM bandshapes and spatial resolutions, enabling use of the same processing techniques as were used in Tamppari et al.. This retrieval technique relies on using the temperature difference recorded in the 20 micron and 11 micron IRTM bands (or IRTM convolved TES bands) to map cold water ice clouds above the warmer Martian surface. Careful removal of surface contributions to the observed radiance is therefore necessary, and we have used both older Viking-derived basemaps of the surface emissivity and albedo, and new MGS derived basemaps in order the explore any possible differences on cloud retrieval due to differences in surface contribution removal. These results will be presented in our poster. Our previous work has concentrated primarily on comparing MGS TES to Viking data; that work saw that large-scale cloud features, such as the aphelion cloud belt, are quite repeatable from year to year, though small scale behavior shows some variation. Comparison of Viking and MGS era cloud maps will be presented in our poster. In the current stage of our study, we have concentrated our efforts on close analysis of water ice cloud behavior in the northern summer of the three MGS mapping years on relatively small spatial scales, and present our results below. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Abundance Profiles for C3 Hydrocarbons in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard; Jolly, Antoine; Sung, Keeyoon; Irwin, Patrick; Flasar, F. Michael

    2017-10-01

    The atmosphere of Titan is of astrobiological importance. Its highly reducing composition and prebiotic chemistry make it analogous to that of the early Earth. Since the Voyager era, several complex hydrocarbons and nitriles have been detected, in some cases making Titan the only known planetary body where these gasses occur naturally. In this work, we report abundance profiles of four major C3 gasses expected to occur in Titan’s atmosphere, derived from Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) data.Using the NEMESIS iterative radiative transfer module, we retrieved vertical abundance profiles for propane (C3H8) and propyne (CHCCH3), both initially detected by the Voyager IRIS instrument. Using newly available line data, we were also able to determine the first vertical abundance profiles for propene (C3H6), initially detected in 2013. We present profiles for several latitudes and times and compare to photochemical model predictions and previous observations. We also discuss our efforts to further the search for allene (CH2CCH2), an isomer of propyne. The abundances we retrieved will help to further our understanding of the chemical pathways that occur in Titan's atmosphere.

  12. flexCloud: Deployment of the FLEXPART Atmospheric Transport Model as a Cloud SaaS Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Don; Arnold, Dèlia

    2014-05-01

    FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) is a Lagrangian transport and dispersion model used by a growing international community. We have used it to simulate and forecast the atmospheric transport of wildfire smoke, volcanic ash and radionuclides. Additionally, FLEXPART may be run in backwards mode to provide information for the determination of emission sources such as nuclear emissions and greenhouse gases. This open source software is distributed in source code form, and has several compiler and library dependencies that users need to address. Although well-documented, getting it compiled, set up, running, and post-processed is often tedious, making it difficult for the inexperienced user. Our interest is in moving scientific modeling and simulation activities from site-specific clusters and supercomputers to a cloud model as a service paradigm. Choosing FLEXPART for our prototyping, our vision is to construct customised IaaS images containing fully-compiled and configured FLEXPART codes, including pre-processing, execution and postprocessing components. In addition, with the inclusion of a small web server in the image, we introduce a web-accessible graphical user interface that drives the system. A further initiative being pursued is the deployment of multiple, simultaneous FLEXPART ensembles in the cloud. A single front-end web interface is used to define the ensemble members, and separate cloud instances are launched, on-demand, to run the individual models and to conglomerate the outputs into a unified display. The outcome of this work is a Software as a Service (Saas) deployment whereby the details of the underlying modeling systems are hidden, allowing modelers to perform their science activities without the burden of considering implementation details.

  13. MERRA IAU 2d atmospheric single-level diagnostics subsetted along CloudSat track V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the MERRA IAU 2d atmospheric single-level diagnostics subset, collocated with the CloudSat track. The subset is processed at the Modeling and Assimilation...

  14. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  15. 3d object segmentation of point clouds using profiling techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Wang, J. & Shan, J., 2009. Segmentation of lidar point clouds for building extraction. In Proceedings. American Society of Photogramm Remote Sensing Annual Conference. p. 9–13. Yang, M., Lee, E., 1999. Segmentation of measured point data using a parametric quadric surface approximation, Computer-Aided Design 31, ...

  16. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  17. Radiation Budget Profiles measured through the Atmosphere with a Return Glider Radiosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipona, R.; Kraeuchi, A.; Kivi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Very promising radiation budget profile measurements through the atmosphere were made in 2011 with a balloon borne short- and longwave net radiometer. New and improved radiation sensors from Kipp&Zonen are now used in a glider aircraft together with a standard Swiss radiosonde from Meteolabor AG. This new return glider radiosonde (RG-R), is lifted up with double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion and to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible during the ascent measuring phase. The RG-R is equipped with a release mechanism and an autopilot that flies the glider radiosonde back to the launch site, or to a predefined open space, where it releases a parachute for landing once it is 100 meter above ground. The RG-R was successfully tested and deployed for tropospheric and stratospheric radiation measurements up to 30 hPa (24 km altitude) at the GRUAN sites Payerne (Switzerland) and Sodankylä (Finland). Radiation profiles and the radiation budget through the atmosphere during different daytimes and under cloud-free and cloudy situations will be shown in relation to temperature and humidity at the surface and in the atmosphere. The RG-R flight characteristics and new measurement possibilities will also be discussed.

  18. Derivation of cloud-free-region atmospheric motion vectors from FY-2E thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhui; Sui, Xinxiu; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hang; Tang, Min; Zhan, Yizhe; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2017-02-01

    The operational cloud-motion tracking technique fails to retrieve atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) in areas lacking cloud; and while water vapor shown in water vapor imagery can be used, the heights assigned to the retrieved AMVs are mostly in the upper troposphere. As the noise-equivalent temperature difference (NEdT) performance of FY-2E split window (10.3-11.5 μm, 11.6-12.8 μm) channels has been improved, the weak signals representing the spatial texture of water vapor and aerosols in cloud-free areas can be strengthened with algorithms based on the difference principle, and applied in calculating AMVs in the lower troposphere. This paper is a preliminary summary for this purpose, in which the principles and algorithm schemes for the temporal difference, split window difference and second-order difference (SD) methods are introduced. Results from simulation and cases experiments are reported in order to verify and evaluate the methods, based on comparison among retrievals and the "truth". The results show that all three algorithms, though not perfect in some cases, generally work well. Moreover, the SD method appears to be the best in suppressing the surface temperature influence and clarifying the spatial texture of water vapor and aerosols. The accuracy with respect to NCEP 800 hPa reanalysis data was found to be acceptable, as compared with the accuracy of the cloud motion vectors.

  19. PHOENIX MARS MET LIDAR ATMOSPHERIC PROFILES EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PHX Atmospheric Lidar Profiles product contains unprocessed laser scattering atmospheric profiles for photon counting data at 532nm, and analog data at both 532...

  20. PHOENIX MARS MET LIDAR ATMOSPHERIC PROFILES RDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PHX Atmospheric Lidar Profiles product contains raw (volts and counts) laser scattering atmospheric profiles for photon counting data at 532nm, and analog data...

  1. Lidar and Ceilometer Observations and Comparisons of Atmospheric Cloud Structure at Nagqu of Tibetan Plateau in 2014 Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoquan Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the project of the Third Tibetan Plateau Experiment of Atmospheric Science (TIPEX III, the intensive observation of cloud and precipitation in Nagqu was conducted from 1 July to 31 August 2014. The CL31 ceilometer and a WAter vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL were deployed and focused on studying the cloud macroscopic characteristics and vertical distribution. The statistical result of CL31 ceilometer in continuous operation mode shows that the cloud occurrence is about 81% with a majority of simple one-layer cloud. The cloud base and top height are retrieved by improved differential zero-crossing method using lidar data. The results of cloud base height (CBH are compared with CL31 ceilometer, showing a good consistency with each other, however, in some cases, the CL31 ceilometer overestimates the CBH and is also validated by synchronous radiosonde data. The time snippet comparisons of cloud property between CL31 ceilometer and lidar imply that the cloud properties have obvious diurnal variations with “U” shape distribution. The cloud development including the time-spatial distribution features also has distinct diurnal variations based on the lidar measurement. The detection range of lidar goes beyond the maximum height of CL31 ceilometer, offering substantial observations to the analysis of cirrus cloud radiation characteristics and formation mechanism.

  2. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Precipitation Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles in clear and cloudy regions with accuracy which approaches that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model using WRF-Var. Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in clear and partly cloudy regions, and uncontaminated portions of retrievals above clouds in overcast regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts resulting from improved thermodynamic fields. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  3. Interaction between the low altitude atmosphere and clouds by high-precision polarization lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Lidar is a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor the weather changes and the environmental issues. This technique should not been restricted in those fields. In this study, the authors aim to be apply it to the prediction of weather disaster. The heavy rain and the lightning strike are our targets. The inline typed MPL (micro pulse lidar) has been accomplished to grasp the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere and to predict the heavy rain, while it was hard to catch the sign of lightning strike. The authors introduced a new algorism to catch the direct sign of the lightning strike. Faraday effect is caused by lightning discharge in the ionized atmosphere. This effect interacts with the polarization of the propagating beam, that is, the polarization plane is rotated by the effect. In this study, high precision polarization lidar was developed to grasp the small rotation angle of the polarization of the propagating beam. In this report, the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere was monitored by the high precision polarization lidar. And the observation result of the lightning discharge were analyzed.

  4. Studying Close Approaches for a Cloud of Particles Considering Atmospheric Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Martins Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper has the goal of studying close approaches between a planet and a group of particles. The mathematical model includes the presence of the atmosphere of the planet. This cloud is assumed to be created by the passage of the spacecraft in the atmosphere of the planet, which can cause the explosion of the spacecraft. The system is assumed to be formed by the Sun, the planet, and the spacecraft that explodes and becomes a cloud of particles. The Sun and the planet are assumed to be in circular orbits and the motion is planar. The equations of motion are the ones given by the circular planar restricted three-body problem combined with the forces given by the atmospheric drag. In the numerical simulations, the planet Jupiter is the celestial body used for the close approaches. The initial positions and velocities of the spacecraft and the particles are specified at the periapsis, because it is assumed that this is the point where the explosion occurs.

  5. Microbial production of ice crystals in clouds as a novel atmospheric biosignature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santl-Temkiv, T.; Sahyoun, M.; Kjeldsen, H.; Ling, M.; Boesen, T.; Karlson, U. G.; Finster, K.

    2014-03-01

    A diverse assembly of exoplanets has been discovered during recent decades (Howard 2013), their atmospheres providing some of the most accessible evidence for the presence of biological activity on these planets. Metabolic gases have been commonly proposed as atmospheric biosignatures (Seager et al 2012). However, airborne microbes are also involved in cloud- and precipitation formation on Earth. Thus, meteorological phenomena may serve as alternative atmospheric biosignatures, for which appropriate observational techniques have yet to be developed. The atmospheric part of the Earth's water cycle heavily relies on the presence of nucleating particles, which promote the condensation and freezing of atmospheric water, both potentially leading to precipitation. While cloud condensation nuclei are diverse and relatively common, ice nuclei are poorly understood and comparably rare airborne particles. According to current knowledge, most ice nucleation below ñ15∞C is driven by the presence of inorganic dust particles, which are considered inactive at higher temperatures. Biogenic IN are the only reported particles that promote ice formation above ñ10∞C. Some bacteria, e.g. Pseudomonas syringae, produce Ice Nucleation Active (INA) proteins that are most efficient ice nuclei currently known. These INA bacteria are common in the atmosphere, and may thus be involved in precipitation processes of mixed phase clouds (Möhler et al 2007). We investigate the relevance of bacterial INA proteins for atmospheric processes using three approaches: (i) study of the presence of INA bacteria and their INA proteins in the atmosphere, (ii) a detailed molecular and physical study of isolated INA proteins, and finally (iii) a modeling study of the importance of INA proteins for ice-path in clouds as well as their importance for precipitation. During 14 precipitation events, we observed that 12% of isolated bacteria carried INA genes. INA bacteria had likely been emitted to the

  6. Influence of the land-atmosphere coupling on cloud development and precipitation over Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro Rodrigues, Daniela; Chou, Sin Chan

    2017-04-01

    The processes of interaction between the land surface and the atmosphere may play an important role in mesoscale convection and precipitation. Numerical weather and climate prediction models still do not correctly represent surface-to-atmosphere changes. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the land surface-to-atmosphere coupling on cloud development and convective precipitation over the Southeast region of Brazil. The effects of the land-atmosphere coupling are analyzed through simulations with the Eta regional model in very high spatial resolution (1 km), using the NOAH surface scheme. Different values were tested for the Zilitinkevich coefficient (Czil) which partitions the heat/moisture and momentum roughness lengths and indirectly determine the coupling force between the land surface and the atmosphere. The results showed that improvements in the precipitation simulation can be obtained by changing the value of the surface-to-atmosphere exchange coefficient. Changes in parameter values impact partitioning of surface flows resulting in changes in atmospheric fields near the surface. We have found that in general the increase in Czil leads to a decrease in latent and sensitive heat fluxes and, consequently, causes an increase in surface temperature. A decrease in surface temperature was observed in tropical forest areas when the value of the Czil coefficient was dynamically varied as a function of the height of the vegetation. The substitution of the default value (0.2) for the value of 0.8 and values that vary dynamically due to the roughness of the vegetation cover showed the best results in the simulation of the precipitation event. These values decreased precipitation overestimates and increased their amount in regions where it was underestimated. Improvements in the simulation of surface fluxes and in the atmospheric field were obtained by adopting the dynamic coupling coefficient. The tests need to be analyzed for other regions

  7. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  8. Vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity that matches Schumann resonance observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaenko, Alexander P; Galuk, Yuri P; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity in the range from 2 to 98 km. The propagation constant of extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves was computed for this profile by using the full wave solution. A high correspondence is demonstrated of the data thus obtained to the conventional standard heuristic model of ELF propagation constant derived from the Schumann resonance records performed all over the world. We also suggest the conductivity profiles for the ambient day and ambient night conditions. The full wave solution technique was applied for obtaining the corresponding frequency dependence of propagation constant relevant to these profiles. By using these propagation constants, we computed the power spectra of Schumann resonance in the vertical electric field component for the uniform global distribution of thunderstorms and demonstrate their close similarity in all the models. We also demonstrate a strong correspondence between the wave attenuation rate obtained for these conductivity profiles and the measured ones by using the ELF radio transmissions.

  9. Properties of dust and clouds in the Mars atmosphere: Analysis of Viking IRTM emission phase function sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of emission-phase-function (EPF) observations from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) yields a wide variety of results regarding dust and cloud scattering in the Mars atmosphere and atmospheric-corrected albedos for the surface of Mars. A multiple scattering radiative transfer model incorporating a bidirectional phase function for the surface and atmospheric scattering by dust and clouds is used to derive surface albedos and dust and ice optical properties and optical depths for these various conditions on Mars.

  10. Lidar observations of the polar atmosphere. Clouds and waves - phenomena and mechanisms; Lidarbeobachtungen der polaren Atmosphaere. Wolken und Wellen - Phaenomene und Mechanismen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, U.

    2003-11-01

    Since 1997 the Bonn University Institute of Physics operates a Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar on the Esrange near the Swedish city of Kiruna north of the Arctic circle. During seven winter and six summer campaigns a large amount of cloud and temperature observations were obtained in the polar middle atmosphere. The temperature observations of the U. Bonn lidar regularly show waves superposed on the temperature profiles. An analysis of these atmospheric gravity waves reveals strong wave activity during winter and little wave activity during summer. This seasonal variability can be understood in terms of the dominant wind regimes in the troposphere and stratosphere. A continuous decrease in the potential energy density of the gravity waves is observable since 1997. During winter polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) are frequently observed. PSCs play a key role in the polar stratospheric chemistry which leads to the formation of the ozone hole. The existence of these clouds depends crucially on atmospheric temperatures, which determine the PSC types formed. An analysis of the occurrence of PSCs regarding the types and synoptical temperatures disclose that most of the observed PSCs need additional cooling to below synoptic scale temperatures for formation. Dynamically induced cooling is provided by the large gravity wave activity observed in the winter temperature data. (orig.)

  11. Cloud ice caused by atmospheric mineral dust - Part 1: Parameterization of ice nuclei concentration in the NMME-DREAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Madonna, Fabio; Rosoldi, Marco; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Nikolic, Jugoslav

    2016-09-01

    Dust aerosols are very efficient ice nuclei, important for heterogeneous cloud glaciation even in regions distant from desert sources. A new generation of ice nucleation parameterizations, including dust as an ice nucleation agent, opens the way towards a more accurate treatment of cold cloud formation in atmospheric models. Using such parameterizations, we have developed a regional dust-atmospheric modelling system capable of predicting, in real time, dust-induced ice nucleation. We executed the model with the added ice nucleation component over the Mediterranean region, exposed to moderate Saharan dust transport, over two periods lasting 15 and 9 days, respectively. The model results were compared against satellite and ground-based cloud-ice-related measurements, provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) and the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (CIAO) in Potenza, southern Italy. The predicted ice nuclei concentration showed a reasonable level of agreement when compared against the observed spatial and temporal patterns of cloud ice water. The developed methodology permits the use of ice nuclei as input into the cloud microphysics schemes of atmospheric models, assuming that this approach could improve the predictions of cloud formation and associated precipitation.

  12. Large-Scale, Parallel, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    present the architecture of SciReduce, describe the achieved 'clock time' speedups in fusing datasets on our own compute nodes and in the public Cloud, and discuss the Cloud cost tradeoffs for storage, compute, and data transfer. We will also present a concept/prototype for staging NASA's A-Train Atmospheric datasets (Levels 2 & 3) in the Amazon Cloud so that any number of compute jobs can be executed 'near' the multi-sensor data. Given such a system, multi-sensor climate studies over 10-20 years of data could be performed in an efficient way, with the researcher paying only his own Cloud compute bill. SciReduce Architecture

  13. Cloud base vertical velocity statistics: a comparison between an atmospheric mesoscale model and remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The statistics of cloud base vertical velocity simulated by the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model AROME are compared with Cloudnet remote sensing observations at two locations: the ARM SGP site in central Oklahoma, and the DWD observatory at Lindenberg, Germany. The results show that AROME significantly underestimates the variability of vertical velocity at cloud base compared to observations at their nominal resolution; the standard deviation of vertical velocity in the model is typically 4–8 times smaller than observed, and even more during the winter at Lindenberg. Averaging the observations to the horizontal scale corresponding to the physical grid spacing of AROME (2.5 km explains 70–80 % of the underestimation by the model. Further averaging of the observations in the horizontal is required to match the model values for the standard deviation in vertical velocity. This indicates an effective horizontal resolution for the AROME model of at least 10 km in the presented case. Adding a TKE-term on the resolved grid-point vertical velocity can compensate for the underestimation, but only for altitudes below approximately the boundary layer top height. The results illustrate the need for a careful consideration of the scales the model is able to accurately resolve, as well as for a special treatment of sub-grid scale variability of vertical velocities in kilometer-scale atmospheric models, if processes such as aerosol-cloud interactions are to be included in the future.

  14. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Limb V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  15. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  16. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  17. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Limb V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  18. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Limb V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  20. An Analysis of Cloud Computing with Amazon Web Services for the Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. L.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA science and engineering efforts rely heavily on compute and data handling systems. The nature of NASA science data is such that it is not restricted to NASA users, instead it is widely shared across a globally distributed user community including scientists, educators, policy decision makers, and the public. Therefore NASA science computing is a candidate use case for cloud computing where compute resources are outsourced to an external vendor. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a commercial cloud computing service developed to use excess computing capacity at Amazon, and potentially provides an alternative to costly and potentially underutilized dedicated acquisitions whenever NASA scientists or engineers require additional data processing. AWS desires to provide a simplified avenue for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. AWS has been extensively used by JPL for a wide range of computing needs and was previously tested on a NASA Agency basis during the Nebula testing program. Its ability to support the Langley Science Directorate needs to be evaluated by integrating it with real world operational needs across NASA and the associated maturity that would come with that. The strengths and weaknesses of this architecture and its ability to support general science and engineering applications has been demonstrated during the previous testing. The Langley Office of the Chief Information Officer in partnership with the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has established a pilot business interface to utilize AWS cloud computing resources on a organization and project level pay per use model. This poster discusses an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the pilot business interface from a project level perspective by specifically using a processing scenario involving the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project.

  1. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  2. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  3. Clouds and Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Extrasolar Planet HR8799b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barman, T S; Macintosh, B A; Konopacky, Q M; Marois, C

    2011-03-21

    Using the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS, on the Keck II telescope, broad near-infrared H and K-band spectra of the young exoplanet HR8799b have been obtained. In addition, six new narrow-band photometric measurements have been taken across the H and K bands. These data are combined with previously published photometry for an analysis of the planet's atmospheric properties. Thick photospheric dust cloud opacity is invoked to explain the planet's red near-IR colors and relatively smooth near-IR spectrum. Strong water absorption is detected, indicating a Hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Only weak CH{sub 4} absorption is detected at K band, indicating efficient vertical mixing and a disequilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} ratio at photospheric depths. The H-band spectrum has a distinct triangular shape consistent with low surface gravity. New giant planet atmosphere models are compared to these data with best fitting bulk parameters, T{sub eff} = 1100K {+-} 100 and log(g) = 3.5 {+-} 0.5 (for solar composition). Given the observed luminosity (log L{sub obs}/L{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} -5.1), these values correspond to a radius of 0.75 R{sub Jup{sub 0.12}{sup +0.17}} and mass {approx} 0.72 M{sub Jup{sub -0.6}{sup +2.6}} - strikingly inconsistent with interior/evolution models. Enhanced metallicity (up to {approx} 10 x that of the Sun) along with thick clouds and non-equilibrium chemistry are likely required to reproduce the complete ensemble of spectroscopic and photometric data and the low effective temperatures (< 1000K) required by the evolution models.

  4. An Observational Diagnostic for Distinguishing between Clouds and Haze in Hot Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, 1116 8th Avenue, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Bean, Jacob L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Parmentier, Vivien, E-mail: kemptone@grinnell.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    The nature of aerosols in hot exoplanet atmospheres is one of the primary vexing questions facing the exoplanet field. The complex chemistry, multiple formation pathways, and lack of easily identifiable spectral features associated with aerosols make it especially challenging to constrain their key properties. We propose a transmission spectroscopy technique to identify the primary aerosol formation mechanism for the most highly irradiated hot Jupiters (HIHJs). The technique is based on the expectation that the two key types of aerosols—photochemically generated hazes and equilibrium condensate clouds—are expected to form and persist in different regions of a highly irradiated planet’s atmosphere. Haze can only be produced on the permanent daysides of tidally locked hot Jupiters, and will be carried downwind by atmospheric dynamics to the evening terminator (seen as the trailing limb during transit). Clouds can only form in cooler regions on the nightside and morning terminator of HIHJs (seen as the leading limb during transit). Because opposite limbs are expected to be impacted by different types of aerosols, ingress and egress spectra, which primarily probe opposing sides of the planet, will reveal the dominant aerosol formation mechanism. We show that the benchmark HIHJ, WASP-121b, has a transmission spectrum consistent with partial aerosol coverage and that ingress–egress spectroscopy would constrain the location and formation mechanism of those aerosols. In general, using this diagnostic we find that observations with the James Webb Space Telescope and potentially with the Hubble Space Telescope should be able to distinguish between clouds and haze for currently known HIHJs.

  5. Cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres of hot super-Earths like 55 Cnc e and CoRoT7b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, G.; Helling, Ch.; Miguel, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Clouds form in the atmospheres of planets where they can determine the observable spectra, the albedo and phase curves. Cloud properties are determined by the local thermodynamical and chemical conditions of an atmospheric gas. A retrieval of gas abundances requires a comprehension of the cloud formation mechanisms under varying chemical conditions. With the aim of studying cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres, we explore the possibility of clouds in evaporating exoplanets like CoRoT-7b and 55 Cancri e (55 Cnc e) in comparison to a generic set of solar abundances and the metal-rich gas giant HD 149026b. We assess the impact of metal-rich, non-solar element abundances on the gas-phase chemistry, and apply our kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation model to study cloud structures and their details. We provide an overview of global cloud properties in terms of material compositions, maximum particle formation rates and average cloud particle sizes for various sets of rocky element abundances. Our results suggest that the conditions on 55 Cnc e and HD 149026b should allow the formation of mineral clouds in their atmosphere. The high temperatures on some hot rocky super-Earths (e.g. the day side of CoRoT-7b) result in an ionized atmospheric gas, and they prevent gas condensation, making cloud formation unlikely on its day side.

  6. Recent studies of the optical properties of dust and cloud particles in the Mars atmosphere and the interannual frequency of global dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Muhleman, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The results of research with two distinctly separate sets of observations yield new information on the optical properties of particulate scatterers in the Mars atmosphere, and on the interannual variability of the abundance of such scatterers in the Mars atmosphere. The first set of observations were taken by the IRTM (Infrared Thermal Mapper) instrument onboard the Viking Orbiters, during the period 1976 to 1980. Several hundred emission phase function (EPF) sequences were obtained over the Viking mission, in which the IRTM visual brightness channel observed the same area of surface/atmosphere as the spacecraft passed overhead. The 1 to 2 percent accuracy of calibration and the phase-angle coverage that characterizes these data make them ideally suited to determining both the optical depths and optical properties of dust and cloud scatterers in the Mars atmosphere versus latitude, longitude, seasons (L sub s), and surface elevation over the extended period of Viking observations. The EPF data were analyzed with a multiple scattering radiative transfer code to determine dust single scattering albedos which are distinctly higher than indicated by the Viking Lander observations. The second set of observations regard ground-based observations of the 1.3 to 2.6 mm rotational transitions of CO in the Martian atmosphere. The low-to-mid latitude average of the atmospheric temperature profile (0 to 70 km altitude) were derived from a number of such observations over the 1980 to 1990 period.

  7. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  8. Atmospheric Correction Performance of Hyperspectral Airborne Imagery over a Small Eutrophic Lake under Changing Cloud Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Markelin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery of inland water bodies is essential to interpret water-leaving radiance signals and for the accurate retrieval of water quality variables. Atmospheric correction is particularly challenging over inhomogeneous water bodies surrounded by comparatively bright land surface. We present results of AisaFENIX airborne hyperspectral imagery collected over a small inland water body under changing cloud cover, presenting challenging but common conditions for atmospheric correction. This is the first evaluation of the performance of the FENIX sensor over water bodies. ATCOR4, which is not specifically designed for atmospheric correction over water and does not make any assumptions on water type, was used to obtain atmospherically corrected reflectance values, which were compared to in situ water-leaving reflectance collected at six stations. Three different atmospheric correction strategies in ATCOR4 was tested. The strategy using fully image-derived and spatially varying atmospheric parameters produced a reflectance accuracy of ±0.002, i.e., a difference of less than 15% compared to the in situ reference reflectance. Amplitude and shape of the remotely sensed reflectance spectra were in general accordance with the in situ data. The spectral angle was better than 4.1° for the best cases, in the spectral range of 450–750 nm. The retrieval of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a concentration using a popular semi-analytical band ratio algorithm for turbid inland waters gave an accuracy of ~16% or 4.4 mg/m3 compared to retrieval of Chl-a from reflectance measured in situ. Using fixed ATCOR4 processing parameters for whole images improved Chl-a retrieval results from ~6 mg/m3 difference to reference to approximately 2 mg/m3. We conclude that the AisaFENIX sensor, in combination with ATCOR4 in image-driven parametrization, can be successfully used for inland water quality observations. This implies that the need for in situ

  9. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flynn, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign, was based out of Ellington Field in Houston, Texas, during August and September 2013. The study focused on pollution emissions and the evolution of gases and aerosols in deep convective outflow, and the influences and feedbacks of aerosol particles from anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning on meteorology, clouds, and climate. The project required three aircraft to accomplish these goals. The NASA DC-8 provided observations from near the surface to 12 km, while the NASA ER-2 provided high-altitude observations reaching into the lower stratosphere as well as important remote-sensing observations connecting satellites with observations from lower-flying aircraft and surface sites. The SPEC, Inc. Learjet obtained aerosol and cloud microphysical measurement in convective clouds and convective outflow.

  10. Study of cloud enhanced surface UV radiation at the atmospheric observatory of Southern Patagonia, Río Gallegos, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Elian A.; Salvador, Jacobo; Orte, Facundo; Bulnes, Daniela; D'Elia, Raul; Antón, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation are two important issues in the study of Earth's atmosphere. The anthropogenic perturbation of the ozone layer has induced change in the amount of UV radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, mainly through the Antarctic ozone hole. Also clouds have been identified as the main modulator of UV amount over short time scales. While clouds can decrease direct radiation, they can produce an increase in the diffuse component, and as a consequence the surface UV radiation may be higher than during an equivalent clear sky scenario. In particular this situation can be important when a low ozone column and partially cloud coverered skies occur simultaneously. These situations happen frequently in southern Patagonia, where the CEILAP Lidar Division has established the Atmospheric Observatory of Southern Patagonia, an atmospheric remote sensing site near the city of Río Gallegos (51°55'S, 69°14'W). In this paper, the impact of clouds on UV radiation is investigated by the use of ground based measurements from the passive remote sensing instruments operating at this site, mainly broad and moderate narrow band filter radiometers. Cloud modification factors (CMF, ratio between the measured UV radiation in a cloudy sky and the simulated radiation under cloud-free conditions) are evaluated for the study site. CMFs higher than 1 are found during spring and summer time, when lower total ozone columns, higher solar elevations and high cloud cover occur simultaneously, producing extreme erythemal irradiance at the ground surface. Enhancements as high as 25% were registered. The maximum duration of the enhancement was around 30 minutes. This produces dangerous sunbathing conditions for the Río Gallegos citizen.

  11. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to consistently include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis – merely based on solute solubilities – to explicitly account for the water mass consumed by hydration. As a result, in chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH suffices to determine the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients, since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and directly links the aerosol hygroscopic growth to fog, haze and cloud formation.

    We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3 for use in regional and global chemistry-transport and climate models. Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stoichiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by

  12. ALTIUS, a future small mission for O3 and other atmospheric trace species concentration profiles retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Pieroux, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Errera, Quentin; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Neefs, Eddy; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    The ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) mission aims at the retrieval of atmospheric trace species concentration profiles with a good vertical resolution and a global coverage. It will be flown on a PROBA-type platform on a Sun-synchronous orbit with a 10:00 AM typical local time. The instrument exploits the concept of hyperspectral imaging of different light sources: limb-scattered radiance, Sun, Moon, stars, planets. These sources are observed sequentially, depending on their availability and good positioning. This multi-mode observation capability enables measurements in both bright and dark side of the orbit, extending the coverage to virtually all latitudes and different illumination conditions (including polar night). The instrument concept relies on three independent spectral channels: UV, VIS and NIR. The imaging technique alleviates the need for scanning systems as the field of view will capture the atmosphere from cloud top to the lower thermosphere at once. It also makes the pointing calibration more easy and robust, an important feature knowing that tangent altitude misregistration is one of the major sources of bias in the retrieved products. In each channel, the wavelength selection for each image will be performed by a tunable filter: an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) for the VIS and NIR, and a FPI (Fabry-Perot Interferometer) in the UV. ALTIUS has recently completed a phase B1 under ESA supervision. The next milestone will be the preliminary design review (PDR) that will take place within a few months from now. Launch is expected for 2020 with a 3-5 years design lifetime. We will present the scientific objectives of the mission, and the current status of the payload and platform concepts. An overview of the main in-flight calibration strategies will be given, and the expected performance of the O3 level-2 product for the different modes of observation will be shown.

  13. Impact of AIRS Thermodynamic Profiles on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Blakenship, Clay B.; Wick, Gary A.; Neiman, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    This project is a collaborative activity between the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center and the NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) to evaluate a SPoRT Advanced Infrared Sounding Radiometer (AIRS: Aumann et al. 2003) enhanced moisture analysis product. We test the impact of assimilating AIRS temperature and humidity profiles above clouds and in partly cloudy regions, using the three-dimensional variational Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation (DA) system (Developmental Testbed Center 2012) to produce a new analysis. Forecasts of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model initialized from the new analysis are compared to control forecasts without the additional AIRS data. We focus on some cases where atmospheric rivers caused heavy precipitation on the US West Coast. We verify the forecasts by comparison with dropsondes and the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Blended Total Precipitable Water product.

  14. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  15. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  16. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  17. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  18. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  19. Daytime Cirrus Cloud Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Forcing Properties at a Midlatitude Site and their Global Consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Lolli, Simone; Lewis, Jasper R.; Gu, Yu; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2016-01-01

    One year of continuous ground-based lidar observations (2012) is analyzed for single-layer cirrus clouds at the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network site at the Goddard Space Flight Center to investigate top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) annual net daytime radiative forcing properties. A slight positive net daytime forcing is estimated (i.e., warming): 0.070.67 W m(exp -2) in sample-relative terms, which reduces to 0.030.27 W m(exp -2) in absolute terms after normalizing to unity based on a 40% midlatitude occurrence frequency rate estimated from satellite data. Results are based on bookend solutions for lidar extinction-to-backscatter (20 and 30 sr) and corresponding retrievals of the 532-nm cloud extinction coefficient. Uncertainties due to cloud under sampling, attenuation effects, sample selection, and lidar multiple scattering are described. A net daytime cooling effect is found from the very thinnest clouds (cloud optical depth of less than or equal to 0.01), which is attributed to relatively high solar zenith angles. A relationship involving positive negative daytime cloud forcing is demonstrated as a function of solar zenith angle and cloud-top temperature. These properties, combined with the influence of varying surface albedos, are used to conceptualize how daytime cloud forcing likely varies with latitude and season, with cirrus clouds exerting less positive forcing and potentially net TOA cooling approaching the summer poles (not ice and snow covered) versus greater warming at the equator. The existence of such a gradient would lead cirrus to induce varying daytime TOA forcing annually and seasonally, making it a far greater challenge than presently believed to constrain the daytime and diurnal cirrus contributions to global radiation budgets.

  20. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    Within the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (Wielicki et al. 1996), the Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group is tasked with calculating vertical profiles of heating rates, globally, and continuously, beneath CERES footprint observations of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This is accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details on the code and its inputs can be found in Kato et al. (2005) and Rose and Charlock (2002). Among the many required inputs is characterization of the vertical column profile of aerosols beneath each footprint. To do this SARB combines aerosol optical depth information from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with aerosol constituents specified by the Model for Atmosphere and Chemical Transport (MATCH) of Collins et al. (2001), and aerosol properties (e.g. single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter) from Tegen and Lacis (1996) and OPAC (Hess et al. 1998). The publicly available files that include these flux profiles, called the Clouds and Radiative Swath (CRS) data product, available from the Langley Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). As various versions of the code are completed, publishable results are named ''Editions.'' After CRS Edition 2A was finalized it was found that dust aerosols were too absorptive. Dust aerosols have subsequently been modified using a new set of properties developed by Andy Lacis and results have been released in CRS Edition 2B. This paper discusses the effects of changing desert dust aerosol properties, which can be significant for the radiation budget in mid ocean, a few thousand kilometers from the source regions. Resulting changes are validated via comparison of surface observed fluxes from the Saudi Solar Village surface site (Myers et al

  1. Development of Laser, Detector, and Receiver Systems for an Atmospheric CO2 Lidar Profiling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Singh, Upendra

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is being developed with the capability to measure range-resolved and column amounts of atmospheric CO2. This system is also capable of providing high-resolution aerosol profiles and cloud distributions. It is being developed as part of the NASA Earth Science Technology Office s Instrument Incubator Program. This three year program involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. At the end of a three-year development this instrument is expected to be capable of making measurements in the lower troposphere and boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located. It will be a valuable tool in the validation of NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) measurements of column CO2 and suitable for deployment in the North American Carbon Program (NACP) regional intensive field campaigns. The system can also be used as a test-bed for the evaluation of lidar technologies for space-application. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements.

  2. CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES OF MONITORING OF THE QUALITY OF TRAINING OF WORKERS OF RAILWAY PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana Bondarenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of creating the system of monitoring of the quality of professional training of future workers of railway profile, the author puts forward a technology of using cloud services of the search system of Google. The article proves that the system provides a complex support of monitoring, from creating appropriate forms and storing of the results in cloud storage to the\\processing of results of the monitoring and management of the system of testing on the basis of using the service of Google-Calendar. In the article there has been considered the usage of the concept of BYOD for testing of students’ achievement. The article demonstrates the advantages of  the proposed approach to monitoring the quality of training of future workers of railway profile highlighting  the usage of the cloud services of the search system of Google as a means of  expanding the boundaries of research in space and time and making the procedure more flexible and systematic.

  3. Cloud tracking of the Venus atmosphere with Akatsuki: High-quality wind snapshots, jets, and instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, T.; Murakami, S.; Satoh, T.; Watanabe, S.; Kouyama, T.; Ogohara, K.; Imamura, T.; Takagi, M.; Kashimura, H.; Peralta, J.; Limaye, S. S.; Sato, T. M.; Nakamura, M.; Yamada, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Young, E. F.

    2017-09-01

    We have conducted cloud tracking using image data from Akatsuki, a Venus orbiting satellite, at multiple wavelengths. Our method provides cloud-motion vectors with unprecedented high quality. Obtained cloud top winds exhibit rich spatial and temporal variability. In the lower cloud layer, it is observed that a jet stream was formed in the equatorial region in 2016, which persisted at least over a few months. Occasionally, batropically unstable vortices are found to develop to erode the shear associated with the jet.

  4. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Limb Special Observation V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir Special Observation V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Limb Special Observation V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  7. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir Special Observation V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  8. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir Special Observation V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates and associated errors (diagonals and covariance matrices), along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical...

  9. The SARTre model for radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres and its application to the derivation of cirrus cloud properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendrock, J.

    2006-07-01

    Modeling of radiative transfer (RT) is one of the essentials of atmospheric remote sensing. It has been common to use separate models for the simulation of shortwave radiation dominated by scattering of sunlight and longwave radiation characterized by emission from trace gases. These days also shortwave instruments are operated in limb mode, which demand models taking the sphericity of the Earth and atmosphere into account. On the other hand, infrared and microwave sounders are increasingly being used for the observation of ice clouds, that necessitate the modeling of scattering by cloud particles. Both trends require RT models, that are capable of taking into account scattering as well as the sphericity of the atmosphere. This suggests a unified handling of short- and longwave radiation, which furthermore allows for a consistent evaluation of multispectral data. Focusing on these aspects, the RT-model SARTre ([Approximate] Spherical Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model) has been developed. To our knowledge, SARTre is the first model, that is capable of limb modeling in the ultraviolet, visible, near to far infrared, and microwave spectral region. Here, algorithm baseline, implementation, verification and validation of SARTre are presented. SARTre has been used to study effects of cirrus clouds on infrared limb emission spectra. An exemplary retrieval of cirrus parameters from MIPAS measurements is demonstrated, and the plausibility of the results is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Continuous standalone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry highly charged cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm) with minimum losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was > 94% during these five months.

  11. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges). One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K) and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  12. Role of Low Clouds in Summertime Atmosphere-Ocean Interactions over the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Joel R.; Zhang, Yuan; Wallace, John M.

    1998-10-01

    The summer-to-summer variability of the areal extent of marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC; stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) over the North Pacific is examined for the period of record 1952-92 using a dataset based on surface observations. Variability is largest in two regions: the central and western Pacific along 35°N coincident with a strong meridional gradient in climatological MSC amount, and the eastern Pacific near 15°N downstream of the persistent stratocumulus deck off Baja California. The MSC amount in both regions tends to be negatively correlated with local sea surface temperature (SST), suggestive of a positive cloud feedback on SST. The MSC amounts in the two regions also tend to be negatively correlated by virtue of their relationship to the basin-wide sea level pressure (SLP) field: a strengthening of the seasonal mean subtropical anticyclone is accompanied by increased cloudiness in the trade wind regime and decreased cloudiness in the southerly flow farther toward the west. These relationships are reflected in the leading modes derived from empirical orthogonal function analysis and singular value decomposition analysis of the MSC, SST, and SLP fields.From the 1950s to the 1980s, summertime MSC amounts increased in the central and western Pacific and decreased in the trade wind region, while SST exhibited the opposite tendencies. Although these trends contributed to the relationships described above, similar patterns are obtained when the analysis is performed on 1-yr difference fields (e.g., 1953 minus 1952, 1954 minus 1953, etc.). Hence, it appears that MSC plays an important role in atmosphere-ocean coupling over the North Pacific during the summer season when latent and sensible heat fluxes are not as dominant and the coupling between atmospheric circulation and SST is not as strong as in winter.

  13. Cloud and radiative heating profiles associated with the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwon; Waliser, Duane E.; Cesana, Gregory V.; Jiang, Xianan; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Neena, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    The cloud water content (CW) and radiative heating rate (QR) structures related to northward propagating boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations (BSISOs) are analyzed using data from A-train satellites in conjunction with the ERA-Interim reanalysis. It is found that the northward movement of CW- and QR anomalies are closely synchronized with the northward movement of BSISO precipitation maxima. Commensurate with the northward propagating BSISO precipitation maxima, the CW anomalies exhibit positive ice (liquid) CW maxima in the upper (middle/low) troposphere with a prominent tilting structure in which the low-tropospheric (upper-tropospheric) liquid (ice) CW maximum leads (lags) the BSISO precipitation maximum. The BSISO-related shortwave heating (QSW) heats (cools) the upper (low) troposphere; the longwave heating (QLW) cools (heats) the upper (middle/low) troposphere. The resulting net radiative heating (QRN), being dominated by QLW, cools (heats) the atmosphere most prominently above the 200 hPa level (below the 600 hPa level). Enhanced clouds in the upper and middle troposphere appears to play a critical role in increasing low-level QLW and QRN. The vertically-integrated QSW, QLW and QRN are positive in the region of enhanced CW with the maximum QRN near the latitude of the BSISO precipitation maximum. The bottom-heavy radiative heating anomaly resulting from the cloud-radiation interaction may act to strengthen convection.

  14. Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Barwick, S W; Schneider, E; Bhattacharya, A; Bower, C; Musser, J A; Labrador, A W; Müller, D; Swordy, S P; Torbet, E; Chaput, C; McKee, S; Tarle, G; Tomasch, A D; Nutter, S L; De Nolfo, G A

    2000-01-01

    We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

  15. Impact of partitioning and oxidative processing of PAH in fogs and clouds on atmospheric lifetimes of PAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Jershon Dale; Ervens, Barbara; Herckes, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    The importance of the atmospheric aqueous phase of fogs and clouds, for the processing and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well known. A multiphase model was developed to determine the fate and lifetime of PAHs in fogs and clouds for a limited set of daytime conditions. The model describes partitioning between three phases (aqueous, liquid organic, and gas), experimental and estimated (photo)oxidation rates. Using a limited set of microphysical and chemical input conditions, the loss rates of PAHs in the complex three-phase system are explored. At 25 °C, PAHs with two, three and four rings are predicted to be primarily in the gas phase (fraction in the gas phase xg > 90%) while five- and six-ring PAHs partition significantly into droplets with aqueous phase fractions of 1-6% and liquid organic phase fractions of 31-91%, respectively. The predicted atmospheric chemical lifetimes of PAHs in the presence of fog or cloud droplets (<8 h) are significantly shorter than literature predictions of PAH lifetimes due to wet and dry deposition (1-14 days and 5-15 months, respectively) and shorter than or equal to predicted lifetimes due to chemical reactions in the gas and organic particulate phases (1-300 h). Even though PAH solubilities are ≤4 × 10-2 g L-1, the results of the current study show that often the condensed phase of fog and cloud droplets cannot be neglected as a PAH sink.

  16. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2017-08-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei production associated with atmospheric nucleation: a synthesis based on existing literature and new results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthesizes the available scientific information connecting atmospheric nucleation with subsequent cloud condensation nuclei (CCN formation. We review both observations and model studies related to this topic, and discuss the potential climatic implications. We conclude that CCN production associated with atmospheric nucleation is both frequent and widespread phenomenon in many types of continental boundary layers, and probably also over a large fraction of the free troposphere. The contribution of nucleation to the global CCN budget spans a relatively large uncertainty range, which, together with our poor understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions, results in major uncertainties in the radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. In order to better quantify the role of atmospheric nucleation in CCN formation and Earth System behavior, more information is needed on (i the factors controlling atmospheric CCN production and (ii the properties of both primary and secondary CCN and their interconnections. In future investigations, more emphasis should be put on combining field measurements with regional and large-scale model studies.

  18. The balanced radiative effect of tropical anvil clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.; Berry, Sara E.

    2017-05-01

    Coincident instantaneous broadband radiation budget measurements from Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System and cloud vertical structure information from CloudSat-Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations radar-lidar observations are combined to study the relationship of cloud vertical structure to top-of-atmosphere energy balance fluctuations. Varying optical and physical thickness of high ice clouds produces most of the covariation between albedo and outgoing longwave radiation in regions of tropical convection. Rainy cores of tropical convective clouds have a negative impact on the radiation balance, while nonprecipitating anvil clouds have a positive effect. The effect of anvil clouds on the radiative heating profile is to warm near cloud base and cool near cloud top, and to reduce the radiative cooling rate in the clear air below the cloud. The cooling rate in the clear air below the anvil is reduced to small values for moderately thick anvils, and the driving of instability in the anvil itself also saturates for relatively thin clouds. It is hypothesized that the dependence of radiative heating on cloud thickness may be important in driving the distribution of tropical cloud structures toward one that produces net neutrality of the cloud radiative effect at the top-of-the-atmosphere, as is found in regions of deep convection over ocean areas with high and relatively uniform surface temperatures. This idea is tested with a single-column model, which indicates that cloud-radiation interactions affect anvil cloud properties, encouraging further investigation of the hypothesis.

  19. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  20. Aura MLS Cloud Measurements: First-Year Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.

    2005-01-01

    Aura MLS provides the first vertical upper tropospheric cloud profiling from space, enabling global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems, with seasonal and geographical variations, needed to evaluate the way clouds are parameterized in global models, thereby contributing to the understanding of cloud-climate feedbacks, and improved weather and climate predictions. The vertical structure of cloud systems is fundamentally important for understanding how clouds affect both their regional and large-scale atmospheric and radiative environments. The regional cloud profiles provide a critical tests of important parameterizations that enable the calculation of radiative flux profiles and heating rates throughout the atmospheric column, which in turn also regulates the water and energy cycles in the upper troposphere

  1. Atmospheric brown clouds reach the Tibetan Plateau by crossing the Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. Lüthi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau region (HTP, despite being a remote and sparsely populated area, is regularly exposed to polluted air masses with significant amounts of aerosols including black carbon. These dark, light-absorbing particles are known to exert a great melting potential on mountain cryospheric reservoirs through albedo reduction and radiative forcing. This study combines ground-based and satellite remote sensing data to identify a severe aerosol pollution episode observed simultaneously in central Tibet and on the southern side of the Himalayas during 13–19 March 2009 (pre-monsoon. Trajectory calculations based on the high-resolution numerical weather prediction model COSMO are used to locate the source regions and study the mechanisms of pollution transport in the complex topography of the HTP. We detail how polluted air masses from an atmospheric brown cloud (ABC over South Asia reach the Tibetan Plateau within a few days. Lifting and advection of polluted air masses over the great mountain range is enabled by a combination of synoptic-scale and local meteorological processes. During the days prior to the event, winds over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP are generally weak at lower levels, allowing for accumulation of pollutants and thus the formation of ABCs. The subsequent passing of synoptic-scale troughs leads to southwesterly flow in the middle troposphere over northern and central India, carrying the polluted air masses across the Himalayas. As the IGP is known to be a hotspot of ABCs, the cross-Himalayan transport of polluted air masses may have serious implications for the cryosphere in the HTP and impact climate on regional to global scales. Since the current study focuses on one particularly strong pollution episode, quantifying the frequency and magnitude of similar events in a climatological study is required to assess the total impact.

  2. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sjogren

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges. One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2.

    The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m−2 s−1% RH−1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s−1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min−1 (0.35 m3 h−1 aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min−1. The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l. in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  3. Atmospheric stability index using radio occultation refractivity profiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Physics, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 102, India. Atmospheric Sciences and Oceanography Group, National Remote Sensing Centre, Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 625, India. Meteorology and Oceanography Group, Remote Sensing Applications Area, Space Applications Centre, Ahmedabad 380 015, India.

  4. Modelling atmospheric structure, cloud and their response to CCN in the central Arctic: ASCOS case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Birch

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations made during late summer in the central Arctic Ocean, as part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, are used to evaluate cloud and vertical temperature structure in the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM. The observation period can be split into 5 regimes; the first two regimes had a large number of frontal systems, which were associated with deep cloud. During the remainder of the campaign a layer of low-level cloud occurred, typical of central Arctic summer conditions, along with two periods of greatly reduced cloud cover. The short-range operational NWP forecasts could not accurately reproduce the observed variations in near-surface temperature. A major source of this error was found to be the temperature-dependant surface albedo parameterisation scheme. The model reproduced the low-level cloud layer, though it was too thin, too shallow, and in a boundary-layer that was too frequently well-mixed. The model was also unable to reproduce the observed periods of reduced cloud cover, which were associated with very low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations (<1 cm−3. As with most global NWP models, the MetUM does not have a prognostic aerosol/cloud scheme but uses a constant CCN concentration of 100 cm−3 over all marine environments. It is therefore unable to represent the low CCN number concentrations and the rapid variations in concentration frequently observed in the central Arctic during late summer. Experiments with a single-column model configuration of the MetUM show that reducing model CCN number concentrations to observed values reduces the amount of cloud, increases the near-surface stability, and improves the representation of both the surface radiation fluxes and the surface temperature. The model is shown to be sensitive to CCN only when number concentrations are less than 10–20 cm−3.

  5. An Energy Budget Model to Calculate the Low Atmosphere Profiles of Effective Sound Speed at Night

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tunick, Arnold

    2003-01-01

    ...) for generating low atmosphere profiles of effective sound speed at night. The alternate model is based on the solution of a quartic equation for surface temperature, which assumes a balance between the net long wave...

  6. MGS RS: ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE-PRESSURE PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains over 21000 temperature-pressure profiles (TPS files) of the neutral atmosphere derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data....

  7. The Earthcare Cloud Profiling Radar, its PFM development status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eichi; Aida, Yoshihisa; Seki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Kenta; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tomiyama, Nobuhiro; Ohno, Yuichi; Horie, Hiroaki; Sato, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is joint mission between Europe and Japan for the launch year of 2018. Mission objective is to improve scientific understanding of cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions that is one of the biggest uncertain factors for numerical climate and weather predictions. The EarthCARE spacecraft equips four instruments such as an ultra violet lidar (ATLID), a cloud profiling radar (CPR), a broadband radiometer (BBR), and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) and perform complete synergy observation to observe aerosols, clouds and their interactions simultaneously from the orbit. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is responsible for development of the CPR in this EarthCARE mission and the CPR will be the first space-borne W-band Doppler radar. The CPR is defined with minimum radar sensitivity of -35dBz (6dB better than current space-borne cloud radar, i.e. CloudSat, NASA), radiometric accuracy of 2.7 dB, and Doppler velocity measurement accuracy of less than 1.3 m/s. These specifications require highly accurate pointing technique in orbit and high power source with large antenna dish. JAXA and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have been jointly developed this CPR to meet these strict requirements so far and then achieved the development such as new CFRP flex-core structure, long life extended interaction klystron, low loss quasi optical feed technique, and so on. Through these development successes, CPR development phase has been progressed to critical design phase. In addition, new ground calibration technique is also being progressed for launch of EarthCARE/CPR. The unique feature of EarthCARE CPR is vertical Doppler velocity measurement capability. Vertical Doppler velocity measurement is very attractive function from the science point of view, because vertical motions of cloud particles are related with cloud microphysics and dynamics. However, from engineering point of

  8. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  9. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  10. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  11. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  12. Exploring clouds, weather, climate, and modeling using bilingual content and activities from the Windows to the Universe program and the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D.; Denning, S.; Russell, R.; Gardiner, L.; Hatheway, B.; Genyuk, J.; Bergman, J.

    2008-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its third year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences through its affiliation with the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). W2U web pages are written at three levels in English and Spanish. This information targets learners at all levels, educators, and families who seek to understand and share resources and information about the nature of weather and the climate system, and career role models from related research fields. This resource can also be helpful to educators who are building bridges in the classroom between the sciences, the arts, and literacy. Visitors to the W2U's CMMAP web portal can access a beautiful new clouds image gallery; information about each cloud type and the atmospheric processes that produce them; a Clouds in Art interactive; collections of weather-themed poetry, art, and myths; links to games and puzzles for children; and extensive classroom- ready resources and activities for K-12 teachers. Biographies of CMMAP scientists and graduate students are featured. Basic science concepts important to understanding the atmosphere, such as condensation, atmosphere pressure, lapse rate, and more have been developed, as well as 'microworlds' that enable students to interact with experimental tools while building fundamental knowledge

  13. Large-Scale, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Hybrid Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, MODIS, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over decades. Moving to multi-sensor, long-duration presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over 10 years of data. HySDS is a Hybrid-Cloud Science Data System that has been developed and applied under NASA AIST, MEaSUREs, and ACCESS grants. HySDS uses the SciFlow workflow engine to partition analysis workflows into parallel tasks (e.g. segmenting by time or space) that are pushed into a durable job queue. The tasks are "pulled" from the queue by worker Virtual Machines (VM's) and executed in an on-premise Cloud (Eucalyptus or OpenStack) or at Amazon in the public Cloud or govCloud. In this way, years of data (millions of files) can be processed in a massively parallel way. Input variables (arrays) are pulled on-demand into the Cloud using OPeNDAP URLs or other subsetting services, thereby minimizing the size of the transferred data. We are using HySDS to automate the production of multiple versions of a ten-year A-Train water vapor climatology under a MEASURES grant. We will present the architecture of HySDS, describe the achieved "clock time" speedups in fusing datasets on our own nodes and in the Amazon Cloud, and discuss the Cloud cost tradeoffs for storage, compute, and data transfer. Our system demonstrates how one can pull A-Train variables (Levels 2 & 3) on-demand into the Amazon Cloud, and cache only those variables that are heavily used, so that any number of compute jobs can be

  14. Overlap Properties of Clouds Generated by a Cloud Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2002-01-01

    In order for General Circulation Models (GCMs), one of our most important tools to predict future climate, to correctly describe the propagation of solar and thermal radiation through the cloudy atmosphere a realistic description of the vertical distribution of cloud amount is needed. Actually, one needs not only the cloud amounts at different levels of the atmosphere, but also how these cloud amounts are related, in other words, how they overlap. Currently GCMs make some idealized assumptions about cloud overlap, for example that contiguous cloud layers overlap maximally and non-contiguous cloud layers overlap in a random fashion. Since there are difficulties in obtaining the vertical profile of cloud amount from observations, the realism of the overlap assumptions made in GCMs has not been yet rigorously investigated. Recently however, cloud observations from a relatively new type of ground radar have been used to examine the vertical distribution of cloudiness. These observations suggest that the GCM overlap assumptions are dubious. Our study uses cloud fields from sophisticated models dedicated to simulate cloud formation, maintenance, and dissipation called Cloud Resolving Models . These models are generally considered capable of producing realistic three-dimensional representation of cloudiness. Using numerous cloud fields produced by such a CRM we show that the degree of overlap between cloud layers is a function of their separation distance, and is in general described by a combination of the maximum and random overlap assumption, with random overlap dominating as separation distances increase. We show that it is possible to parameterize this behavior in a way that can eventually be incorporated in GCMs. Our results seem to have a significant resemblance to the results from the radar observations despite the completely different nature of the datasets. This consistency is encouraging and will promote development of new radiative transfer codes that will

  15. Mapping the mesospheric CO 2 clouds on Mars: MEx/OMEGA and MEx/HRSC observations and challenges for atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Gondet, B.; Scholten, F.; Hoffmann, H.; González-Galindo, F.; Spiga, A.; Forget, F.; Hauber, E.; Neukum, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2010-10-01

    This study presents the latest results on the mesospheric CO 2 clouds in the martian atmosphere based on observations by OMEGA and HRSC onboard Mars Express. We have mapped the mesospheric CO 2 clouds during nearly three martian years of OMEGA data yielding a cloud dataset of ˜60 occurrences. The global mapping shows that the equatorial clouds are mainly observed in a distinct longitudinal corridor, at seasons Ls = 0-60° and again at and after Ls = 90°. A recent observation shows that the equatorial CO 2 cloud season may start as early as at Ls = 330°. Three cases of mesospheric midlatitude autumn clouds have been observed. Two cloud shadow observations enabled the mapping of the cloud optical depth ( τ = 0.01-0.6 with median values of 0.13-0.2 at λ = 1 μm) and the effective radii (mainly 1-3 μm with median values of 2.0-2.3 μm) of the cloud crystals. The HRSC dataset of 28 high-altitude cloud observations shows that the observed clouds reside mainly in the altitude range ˜60-85 km and their east-west speeds range from 15 to 107 m/s. Two clouds at southern midlatitudes were observed at an altitude range of 53-62 km. The speed of one of these southern midlatitude clouds was measured, and it exhibited west-east oriented speeds between 5 and 42 m/s. The seasonal and geographical distribution as well as the observed altitudes are mostly in line with previous work. The LMD Mars Global Climate Model shows that at the cloud altitude range (65-85 km) the temperatures exhibit significant daily variability (caused by the thermal tides) with the coldest temperatures towards the end of the afternoon. The GCM predicts the coldest temperatures of this altitude range and the season Ls = 0-30° in the longitudinal corridor where most of the cloud observations have been made. However, the model does not predict supersaturation, but the GCM-predicted winds are in fair agreement with the HRSC-measured cloud speeds. The clouds exhibit variable morphologies, but mainly cirrus

  16. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  17. A solid state 94 GHz FMCW Doppler radar demonstrator for cloud profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.

    2017-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a ground-based, zenith-pointing, 94 GHz FMCW Doppler radar demonstrator for cloud profiling. The radar uses an all solid-state and relatively simple homodyne architecture and two, low sidelobe 0.5 m diameter Fresnel zone plate antennas to reduce system costs. The low-phase noise, coherent radar employs a direct digital synthesis (DDS) chip for highly linear chirp generation. The design will be able to leverage ongoing future improvements in mm-wave low noise and power amplifier technology to maximize sensitivity. Once the radar is installed in a rooftop location, the processor will perform real-time range-Doppler measurements with averaging, to yield target velocity spectra as a function of altitude

  18. The influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18O exhanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Biraud, S.C.; Noone, D.C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J.T.; Torn, M.S.; Welker, J.; White, J.W.C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G.D.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} isotope fluxes ('isofluxes') in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C{sub 4} grassland), in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model, ISOLSM. Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest canopy photosynthesis was substantially higher than on clear, sunny days, and the highest carbon uptake was achieved on the cloudiest day. This effect was driven by a large increase in light-limited shade leaf photosynthesis following an increase in the diffuse fraction of irradiance. Photosynthetic isofluxes, by contrast, were largest on partly cloudy days, as leaf water isotopic composition was only slightly depleted and photosynthesis was enhanced, as compared to adjacent clear sky days. On the cloudiest day, the forest exhibited intermediate isofluxes: although photosynthesis was highest on this day, leaf-to-atmosphere isofluxes were reduced from a feedback of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced in the C{sub 4} grass canopy with increasing cloud cover and diffuse fraction as a result of near-constant light limitation of photosynthesis. These results suggest that some of the unexplained variation in global mean {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} may be driven by large-scale changes in clouds and aerosols and their impacts on diffuse radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity.

  19. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  20. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Diak, George R.; Hayden, Cristopher M.; Young, John A.

    1995-01-01

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation. The assimilation of satellite-observed moisture and cloud water, together withy three-mode diabatic initialization, significantly alleviates the model precipitation spinup problem, especially in the first 3 h of the forecast. Experimental forecasts indicate that the impact of satellite-observed temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud water alone in the initialization procedure shortens the spinup time for precipitation rates by 1-2 h and for regeneration of the areal coverage by 3 h. The diabatic initialization further reduces the precipitation spinup time (compared to adiabatic initialization) by 1 h.

  1. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on Clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. In this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific, In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection. The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether high CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Stronger evaporative cooling can produce a stronger cold pool and thus stronger low-level convergence through interactions

  2. Use of In Situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Extinction, and Aerosol Size Distribution Measurements to Test a Method for Retrieving Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profiles From Surface Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghan, Stephen J.; Rissman, Tracey A.; Ellman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Flynn, Connor; Wang, Jian; Ogren, John; Hudson, James; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; hide

    2006-01-01

    If the aerosol composition and size distribution below cloud are uniform, the vertical profile of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration can be retrieved entirely from surface measurements of CCN concentration and particle humidification function and surface-based retrievals of relative humidity and aerosol extinction or backscatter. This provides the potential for long-term measurements of CCN concentrations near cloud base. We have used a combination of aircraft, surface in situ, and surface remote sensing measurements to test various aspects of the retrieval scheme. Our analysis leads us to the following conclusions. The retrieval works better for supersaturations of 0.1% than for 1% because CCN concentrations at 0.1% are controlled by the same particles that control extinction and backscatter. If in situ measurements of extinction are used, the retrieval explains a majority of the CCN variance at high supersaturation for at least two and perhaps five of the eight flights examined. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the humidification factor is not the major limitation of the CCN retrieval scheme. Vertical structure in the aerosol size distribution and composition is the dominant source of error in the CCN retrieval, but this vertical structure is difficult to measure from remote sensing at visible wavelengths.

  3. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  4. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  5. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  6. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  7. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  8. A CloudSat Perspective of the Atmospheric Water Cycle and Precipitation: Recent Progress and Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Im, Eastwood; Vane, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Global - mean precipitation - is controlled by Earth's energy balance and is a quantifiable consequence of the water vapor feedback. Predictability rests on the degree to which the water vapor feedback is predictable. Regional scale - to a significant extent, changes are shaped by atmospheric circulation changes but we do not know the extent to which regional scale changes are predictable. The impacts of changes to atmospheric circulation on regional scale water cycle changes can be dramatic. Process - scale - significant biases to the CHARACTER of precipitation (frequency and intensity) is related to how the precipitation process is parameterized in models. Aerosol - We still do not know the extent to which the water cycle is influenced by aerosol but anecdotal evidence is building. The character of precipitation is affected by the way aerosol influence clouds and thus affects the forcing of the climate system through the albedo effect. Observations - we still have a way to go and need to approach the problem in a more integrated way (tie clouds, aerosol and precipitation together and then link to soil moisture, etc). Globally our capabilities seriously lag behind the science and model development.

  9. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS protonstorage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T

    2003-01-01

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electron cloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure.

  10. Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    we consider the capabilities of a millimeter-wave radar to make atmospheric air flow measurements relevant to naval operations . The measurements could...Conclusions 14 References 14 1iii Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations Ben Rock... operations . We begin with a discussion of previous efforts to mitigate the aforementioned difficulties, and argue that millimeter wave radar techniques can be

  11. Lidar characterization of the Arctic atmosphere during ASTAR 2007: four cases studies of boundary layer, mixed-phase and multi-layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lampert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR, which was conducted in Svalbard in March and April 2007, tropospheric Arctic clouds were observed with two ground-based backscatter lidar systems (micro pulse lidar and Raman lidar and with an airborne elastic lidar. In the time period of the ASTAR 2007 campaign, an increase in low-level cloud cover (cloud tops below 2.5 km from 51% to 65% was observed above Ny-Ålesund. Four different case studies of lidar cloud observations are analyzed: With the ground-based Raman lidar, a layer of spherical particles was observed at an altitude of 2 km after the dissolution of a cloud. The layer probably consisted of small hydrated aerosol (radius of 280 nm with a high number concentration (around 300 cm−3 at low temperatures (−30 °C. Observations of a boundary layer mixed-phase cloud by airborne lidar and concurrent airborne in situ and spectral solar radiation sensors revealed the localized process of total glaciation at the boundary of different air masses. In the free troposphere, a cloud composed of various ice layers with very different optical properties was detected by the Raman lidar, suggesting large differences of ice crystal size, shape and habit. Further, a mixed-phase double layer cloud was observed by airborne lidar in the free troposphere. Local orography influenced the evolution of this cloud. The four case studies revealed relations of cloud properties and specific atmospheric conditions, which we plan to use as the base for numerical simulations of these clouds.

  12. Signatures of dynamical processes in Raman lidar profiles of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Hallen, Hans D.

    2017-05-01

    Raman lidar measurements provide profiles of several different tracers of spatial and temporal variations, which are excellent signatures for studies of dynamical processes in the atmosphere. An examination of Raman lidar data collected during the last four decades clearly show signatures of atmospheric planetary waves, gravity waves, low-level jets, weather fronts, turbulence from wind shear at surfaces and at the interface of the boundary layer with the free troposphere. Water vapor profiles are found to be important as a tracer of the sources of turbulence eddies associated with thermal convection, pressure waves, and wind shears, which result from surface heating, winds, weather systems, orographic forcing, and regions of reduced atmospheric stability. Examples of these processes are selected to show the influence of turbulence on profiles of atmospheric properties. Turbulence eddies generated in the wind shear region near the top of the boundary layer are found to mix into the atmospheric boundary layer. Results from several prior research projects are examined to gain a better understanding of processes impacting optical propagation through the many sources of turbulence observed in the lower atmosphere. Advances in lasers, detectors, and particularly in high-speed electronics now available are expected to provide important opportunities to improve our understanding of the formation processes, as well as for tracking of the sources and dissipation of turbulence eddies.

  13. Detection of Atmospheric Composition Based on Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinye; Tong Yala; Yang Xiaoling; Gong Jiaoli [School of science, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China); Gong Wei, E-mail: yezi.zh@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A summary overview about the types of lidar and their own applications on atmosphere detection is presented. Measurement of atmospheric aerosols by Mie lidar and Raman lidar is focused. The vertical profiles of aerosols in the atmosphere are retrieved. And at the same time, through analyzing aerosol vertical content distribution, the atmosphere boundary layer and the cloud are also observed. All the results show that the lidar has good performance on detecting the atmospheric composition.

  14. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx: goals, platforms, and field operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The VAMOS1 Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

    1 Variability of the American Monsoon Systems, an international CLIVAR program.

  15. Aerosol detection using lidar-based atmospheric profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakary, Mohamed I.; Abdelghaffar, Hossam M.; Afrifa, Kwasi; Rakha, Hesham A.; Cetin, Mecit; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2017-08-01

    A compact light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is a system that provides aerosols profile measurements by identifying the aerosol scattering ratio as function of the altitude. The aerosol scattering ratios are used to obtain multiple aerosol intensive ratio parameters known as backscatter color ratio, depolarization ratio, and lidar ratio. The aerosol ratio parameters are known to vary with aerosol type, size, and shape. In this paper, we employed lidar measurements to detect the potential source of the aerosol in the neighborhood of the campus of Old Dominion University. The lidar is employed to collect measurements at several locations in the area of study. Then, the lidar ratio and the color ratio are retrieved from collected measurements. To find the source of aerosol in the measurements, a tracking algorithm is implemented and employed to track the concentration of that pollution in the data. The results show that the source of soot pollution in the area of study is Hampton Blvd, a major street, in the area of the campus where the diesel trucks travel between the ports in the city of Norfolk.

  16. Snow and cloud feedbacks modelled by an atmospheric general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R.A.; McAvaney, B.J.; Fraser, J.R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Center, Victoria (Austria)] [and others

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important parametrizations in general circulation models used for climate change experiments is that of the surface albedo. The results an albedo feedback experiment carried out under the auspices of the US Department of Energy are presented. An analysis of long and short wave components of the model response shows that short wave response dominates changes in fixed to variable albedo experiments, but that long wave response dominates in clear to cloudy sky changes. Cloud distribution chances are also discussed and are related to changes in global sensitivity. At the surface, the heat balance change for perturbed sea surface temperatures is dominated by changes in latent heat flux and downward long wave radiation. If albedo is freed up however, the major contrast lies in the change in surface reflected short wave radiation, amplified by changes in downward short wave radiation caused by cloud amount changes. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods and Eras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Similar cloud features are seen in maps generated with each method with no obvious outliers. The temperature differencing method appears to possibly be somewhat more sensitive to weaker water ice signatures. We have also generated correlation plots comparing the two methods. At strong delta-T signals, the correlation between the two methods is quite good, and therefore extraction of opacities from earlier Viking data may be possible for these stronger detection levels. Weaker detections do not, however, show such a good correlation. We are currently analyzing why the correlation becomes poor at weak signal levels, though it may be due to the fact that the differencing method may be more sensitive to thin cloud hazes. Results of this ongoing analysis will be presented. A comparison of the Viking and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) eras are also presented.

  18. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    To date, the only two data sets offer the potential to examine year-to-year changes in cloud features over an entire Martian year: the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data set and the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data set. We have examined the TES data in the same way in which we examined the Viking IRTM data. This provides water-ice cloud information separated in time by 12 Martian years. Since the data are analyzed with the same method, we obtain a very accurate 'apples to apples' comparison, and can generate a historical record of the subtleties of this annual event. Consequently, it is desirable to compare their results to ours to see what differences exist.

  19. The Impact of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles on Short-term Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced spacebased atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AlRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used to retrieve temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers under both clear and partly cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived humidity profiles is 15% in 2 km layers. Critical to the successful use of AIRS profiles for weather and climate studies is the use of profile quality indicators and error estimates provided with each profile Aside form monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information of sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse region, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate highresolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper will focus on the impact of AIRS profiles on a rapidly developing east coast storm and will also discuss preliminary results for a 30-day forecast period, simulating a quasi-operation environment. Temperature and moisture profiles were obtained from the prototype version 5.0 EOS science team retrieval algorithm which includes explicit error information for each profile. The error profile information was used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for every profile location and pressure level for assimilation into the ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS). The AIRS-enhanced analyses were used as initial fields for the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) system used by the SPORT project for regional weather forecast studies. The ADASWRF system will be run on CONUS domain with an emphasis on the east coast. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS

  20. Chemistry in the clouds: the role of aerosols in atmospheric chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jonathan P; Sayer, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the ozone hole over the Antarctic and the recognition of the damaging effects of acid rain, the role of atmospheric aerosol particles in determining the chemical balance of the atmosphere has received much attention. Aerosol particles produced in combustion can also have a deleterious effect on human health. In this article we review the chemistry that can occur on aerosol particles, particularly on aqueous based aerosols in the troposphere. The sources, transformation and loss mechanisms of atmospheric aerosol will be discussed. In particular, we will focus on the role of chemical transformation on aerosol particles in promoting reactions that would otherwise be too slow in the homogeneous atmospheric gas phase. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of some key chemical reactions will be described. Recent observations of a high organic content of tropospheric aerosol particles will be described and a model of organic coated aerosols will be reviewed.

  1. Visualizing nD Point Clouds as Topological Landscape Profiles to Guide Local Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterling, Patrick [Univ. of Leipzig (Germany). Computer Science Dept.; Heine, Christian [Univ. of Leipzig (Germany). Computer Science Dept.; Federal Inst. of Technology (ETH), Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Computer Science; Weber, Gunther H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Scheuermann, Gerik [Univ. of Leipzig (Germany). Computer Science Dept.

    2012-05-04

    Analyzing high-dimensional point clouds is a classical challenge in visual analytics. Traditional techniques, such as projections or axis-based techniques, suffer from projection artifacts, occlusion, and visual complexity.We propose to split data analysis into two parts to address these shortcomings. First, a structural overview phase abstracts data by its density distribution. This phase performs topological analysis to support accurate and non-overlapping presentation of the high-dimensional cluster structure as a topological landscape profile. Utilizing a landscape metaphor, it presents clusters and their nesting as hills whose height, width, and shape reflect cluster coherence, size, and stability, respectively. A second local analysis phase utilizes this global structural knowledge to select individual clusters or point sets for further, localized data analysis. Focusing on structural entities significantly reduces visual clutter in established geometric visualizations and permits a clearer, more thorough data analysis. In conclusion, this analysis complements the global topological perspective and enables the user to study subspaces or geometric properties, such as shape.

  2. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo- chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10−5 s−1 for JO1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-Air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber

  3. Impact of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the ventilation of a cubic building with two large opposite openings

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Alain; Lucas, Franck; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to show the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the distribution of velocity in a building having two large openings. The knowledge of the flow form inside a building is useful to define a thermal environment favourable with thermal comfort and good air quality. In computational fluid dynamics, several profiles of atmospheric boundary layer can be used like logarithmic profiles or power profiles. This paper shows the impact o...

  4. Atmospheric movies acquired at the Mars Science Laboratory landing site: Cloud morphology, frequency and significance to the Gale Crater water cycle and Phoenix mission results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, John E.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Francis, Raymond; Pla-Garcia, Jorge; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Bean, Keri; Kass, David; Haberle, Robert; Newman, Claire; Mischna, Michael; Vasavada, Ashwin; Rennó, Nilton; Bell, Jim; Calef, Fred; Cantor, Bruce; Mcconnochie, Timothy H.; Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Wong, Michael; Smith, Michael D.; Javier Martín-Torres, F.; Zorzano, María-Paz; Kemppinen, Osku; McCullough, Emily

    2015-05-01

    We report on the first 360 sols (LS 150° to 5°), representing just over half a Martian year, of atmospheric monitoring movies acquired using the NavCam imager from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity. Such movies reveal faint clouds that are difficult to discern in single images. The data set acquired was divided into two different classifications depending upon the orientation and intent of the observation. Up to sol 360, 73 Zenith movies and 79 Supra-Horizon movies have been acquired and time-variable features could be discerned in 25 of each. The data set from MSL is compared to similar observations made by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) onboard the Phoenix Lander and suggests a much drier environment at Gale Crater (4.6°S) during this season than was observed in Green Valley (68.2°N) as would be expected based on latitude and the global water cycle. The optical depth of the variable component of clouds seen in images with features are up to 0.047 ± 0.009 with a granularity to the features observed which averages 3.8°. MCS also observes clouds during the same period of comparable optical depth at 30 and 50 km that would suggest a cloud spacing of 2.0 to 3.3 km. Multiple motions visible in atmospheric movies support the presence of two distinct layers of clouds. At Gale Crater, these clouds are likely caused by atmospheric waves given the regular spacing of features observed in many Zenith movies and decreased spacing towards the horizon in sunset movies consistent with clouds forming at a constant elevation. Reanalysis of Phoenix data in the light of the NavCam equatorial dataset suggests that clouds may have been more frequent in the earlier portion of the Phoenix mission than was previously thought.

  5. On-demand Simulation of Atmospheric Transport Processes on the AlpEnDAC Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinger, S.; Harsch, C.; Meyer-Arnek, J.; Frank, A.; Heller, H.; Giemsa, E.

    2016-12-01

    The "Alpine Environmental Data Analysis Centre" (AlpEnDAC) develops a data-analysis platform for high-altitude research facilities within the "Virtual Alpine Observatory" project (VAO). This platform, with its web portal, will support use cases going much beyond data management: On user request, the data are augmented with "on-demand" simulation results, such as air-parcel trajectories for tracing down the source of pollutants when they appear in high concentration. The respective back-end mechanism uses the Compute Cloud of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) to transparently calculate results requested by the user, as far as they have not yet been stored in AlpEnDAC. The queuing-system operation model common in supercomputing is replaced by a model in which Virtual Machines (VMs) on the cloud are automatically created/destroyed, providing the necessary computing power immediately on demand. From a security point of view, this allows to perform simulations in a sandbox defined by the VM configuration, without direct access to a computing cluster. Within few minutes, the user receives conveniently visualized results. The AlpEnDAC infrastructure is distributed among two participating institutes [front-end at German Aerospace Centre (DLR), simulation back-end at LRZ], requiring an efficient mechanism for synchronization of measured and augmented data. We discuss our iRODS-based solution for these data-management tasks as well as the general AlpEnDAC framework. Our cloud-based offerings aim at making scientific computing for our users much more convenient and flexible than it has been, and to allow scientists without a broad background in scientific computing to benefit from complex numerical simulations.

  6. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  7. Validation of cloud forcing simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model using observations from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the effect of clouds on the top of atmosphere radiative energy budget are used to validate model simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (NCAR CCM). The ability of the NCAR CCM to reproduce the monthly mean global distribution and temporal variability on both daily and seasonal time scales is assessed. The comparison reveals several deficiencies in the CCM cloud representation. Most notable are the difficulties in properly simulating the effect of clouds on the planetary albedo. This problem arises from discrepancies in the model's portrayal of low-level cloudiness and leads to significant errors in the absorbed solar radiation simulated by the model. The CCM performs much better in simulating the effect of clouds on the longwave radiation emitted to space, indicating its relative success in capturing the vertical distribution of cloudiness. The daily variability of the radiative effects of clouds in both the shortwave and longwave spectral regions is systematically overestimated. Analysis of the seasonal variations illustrates a distinct lack of coupling in the seasonal changes in the radiative effects of cloudiness between the tropics and mid-latitudes and between the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. Much of this problem also arises from difficulties in simulating low-level cloudiness, placing further emphasis on the need for better model parameterizations of boundary layer clouds.

  8. New atmospheric profiles for H.E.S.S. data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seglar-Arroyo Mónica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Particles arriving to Earth allow us to scan and improve our understanding of the Universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. For ground-based experiments in astroparticle physics, the atmosphere plays a key role and its understanding, monitoring and modelling is essential for a realistic description in data analysis and simulations. In this work we present the development of a novel experimental atmospheric model, the GNNA120 model, describing the atmosphere above the H.E.S.S. gamma-ray observatory in Namibia. This new description is the most realistic to date and introduces the possibility to study variations at different time scales. This enables us to provide the first ever study of seasonal effects based on actual measured atmospheric profiles for the H.E.S.S. observatory and opens up the window to further improvements of the H.E.S.S. Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  10. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  11. Dissolution process of atmospheric aerosol particles into cloud droplets; Processus de dissolution des aerosols atmospheriques au sein des gouttes d'eau nuageuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desboeufs, K.

    2001-01-15

    Clouds affect both climate via the role they play in the Earth's radiation balance and tropospheric chemistry since they are efficient reaction media for chemical transformation of soluble species. Cloud droplets are formed in the atmosphere by condensation of water vapour onto aerosol particles, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The water soluble fraction of these CCN governs the cloud micro-physics, which is the paramount factor playing on the radiative properties of clouds. Moreover, this soluble fraction is the source of species imply in the oxidation/reduction reactions in the aqueous phase. Thus, it is of particular importance to understand the process controlling the solubilization of aerosols in the cloud droplets. The main purpose of this work is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the dissolution of particles incorporated in the aqueous phase. From the studies conducted up to now, we have identify several factors playing on the dissolution reaction of aerosols. However, the quantification of the effects of these factors is difficult since the current means of study are not adapted to the complexity of cloud systems. First, this work consisted to perform a experimental system, compound by an open flow reactor, enabling to follow the kinetic of dissolution in conditions representative of cloud. This experimental device is used to a systematic characterisation of the known factors playing on the dissolution, i.e. pH, aerosol nature, aerosol weathering... and also for the identification and the quantification of the effects of other factors: ionic strength, acid nature, clouds processes. These experiments gave quantitative results, which are used to elaborate a simple model of aerosol dissolution in the aqueous phase. This model considers the main factors playing on the dissolution and results in a general mechanism of aerosol dissolution extrapolated to the cloud droplets. (author)

  12. Using Voxelized Point-Cloud Forest Reconstructions from Ground-Based Full-Waveform Lidar to Retrieve Leaf Area Index and Foliage Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Li, Z.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Wang, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D.; Culvenor, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a new methodology to directly retrieve two important biophysical parameters, Leaf Area Index (LAI; m^2) and Foliage Area Volume Density (FAVD; m^2 LAI/m^3 volume) profiles through the voxelization of point-cloud forest reconstructions from multiple ground-based full-waveform Echidna® lidar scans. Previous studies have verified that estimates of LAI and FAVD made from single EVI scans, using azimuth-averaged gap probability with zenith angle (Jupp et al. 2009; Zhao et al. 2011), agree well with those of traditional hemispherical photos and LAI-2000 measurements. Strahler et al. (2008) and Yang et al. (2012) established a paradigm for the 3-D reconstruction of forest stands using a full-waveform, ground-based, scanning lidar by merging point clouds constructed from overlapping EVI scans, thereby allowing virtual direct representation of forest biomass. Classification procedures (Yang et al. 2012), based on the shape of the laser pulse returned to the instrument, can separate trunk from foliage scattering events. Volumetric datasets are produced by properly assigning attributes, such as gap probability, apparent reflectance, and volume associated with the laser pulse footprint at the observed range, to the foliage scattering events in the reconstructed point cloud. Leaf angle distribution is accommodated with a simple model based on gap probability with zenith angle as observed in individual scans of the stand. Clumping occurring at scales coarser than elemental volumes associated with scattering events is observed directly and therefore does not require parametric correction. For validation, comparisons are made between LAI and FAVD profiles retrieved directly from the voxelized 3-D forest reconstructions and those observed from airborne and field measurements. The voxelized 3-D forest reconstructions derived from EVI point clouds provide a pathway to estimate "ground truth" FAVD, LAI, and above-ground biomass without destructive sampling. These

  13. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  14. The earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology. I - Observations of the clear sky greenhouse effect. II - Observations of cloud effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky components of the earth's radiation budget (ERB), the relationship of these components to the sea surface temperature (SST), and microwave-derived water-vapor amount are analyzed in an observational study along with the relationship between the cloudy-sky components of ERB and space/time coincident observations of SST, microwave-derived cloud liquid water, and cloud cover. The purpose of the study is to use these observations for establishing an understanding of the couplings between radiation and the atmosphere that are important to understanding climate feedback. A strategy for studying the greenhouse effect of earth by analyzing the emitted clear-sky longwave flux over the ocean is proposed. It is concluded that the largest observed influence of clouds on ERB is more consistent with macrophysical properties of clouds as opposed to microphysical properties. The analysis for clouds and the greenhouse effect of clouds is compared quantitatively with the clear sky results. Land-ocean differences and tropical-midlatitude differences are shown and explained in terms of the cloud macrostructure.

  15. Shortwave radiative heating rate profiles in hazy and clear atmosphere: a sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, Lionel; Fischer, Jürgen; Ravetta, François; Pelon, Jacques; Preusker, René

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols have an impact on shortwave heating rate profiles (additional heating or cooling). In this survey, we quantify the impact of several key-parameters on the heating rate profiles of the atmosphere with and without aerosols. These key-parameters are: (1) the atmospheric model (tropical, midlatitude summer or winter, US Standard), (2) the integrated water vapor amount (IWV ), (3) the ground surface (flat and rough ocean, isotropic surface albedo for land), (4) the aerosol composition (dusts, soots or maritimes mixtures with respect to the OPAC-database classification), (5) the aerosol optical depth and (6) vertical postion, and (7) the single-scattering albedo (?o) of the aerosol mixture. This study enables us to evaluate which parameters are most important to take into account in a radiative energy budget of the atmosphere and will be useful for a future study: the retrieval of heating rates profiles from satellite data (CALIPSO, MODIS, MERIS) over the Mediterranean Sea. All the heating rates are computed by using the vector irradiances computed at each pressure level in the spectral interval 0.2 - 3.6μm (shortwave) by the 1D radiative transfer model for atmosphere and ocean: MOMO (Matrix-Operator MOdel) of the Institute for Space Science, FU Berlin 1

  16. Effectiveness and limitations of parameter tuning in reducing biases of top-of-atmosphere radiation and clouds in MIROC version 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Tomoo; Shiogama, Hideo; Watanabe, Masahiro; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Yokohata, Tokuta; Annan, James D.; Hargreaves, Julia C.; Ushigami, Naoto; Hirota, Kazuya; Someya, Yu; Kamae, Youichi; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Kimoto, Masahide

    2017-12-01

    This study discusses how much of the biases in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation and clouds can be removed by parameter tuning in the present-day simulation of a climate model in the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) generation. We used output of a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE) experiment conducted with an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) without flux adjustment. The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate version 5 (MIROC5) was used for the PPE experiment. Output of the PPE was compared with satellite observation data to evaluate the model biases and the parametric uncertainty of the biases with respect to TOA radiation and clouds. The results indicate that removing or changing the sign of the biases by parameter tuning alone is difficult. In particular, the cooling bias of the shortwave cloud radiative effect at low latitudes could not be removed, neither in the zonal mean nor at each latitude-longitude grid point. The bias was related to the overestimation of both cloud amount and cloud optical thickness, which could not be removed by the parameter tuning either. However, they could be alleviated by tuning parameters such as the maximum cumulus updraft velocity at the cloud base. On the other hand, the bias of the shortwave cloud radiative effect in the Arctic was sensitive to parameter tuning. It could be removed by tuning such parameters as albedo of ice and snow both in the zonal mean and at each grid point. The obtained results illustrate the benefit of PPE experiments which provide useful information regarding effectiveness and limitations of parameter tuning. Implementing a shallow convection parameterization is suggested as a potential measure to alleviate the biases in radiation and clouds.

  17. The power of vertical geolocation of atmospheric profiles from GNSS radio occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwärz, Marc; Leroy, Stephen S

    2017-02-16

    High-resolution measurements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provide atmospheric profiles with independent information on altitude and pressure. This unique property is of crucial advantage when analyzing atmospheric characteristics that require joint knowledge of altitude and pressure or other thermodynamic atmospheric variables. Here we introduce and demonstrate the utility of this independent information from RO and discuss the computation, uncertainty, and use of RO atmospheric profiles on isohypsic coordinates-mean sea level altitude and geopotential height-as well as on thermodynamic coordinates (pressure and potential temperature). Using geopotential height as vertical grid, we give information on errors of RO-derived temperature, pressure, and potential temperature profiles and provide an empirical error model which accounts for seasonal and latitudinal variations. The observational uncertainty of individual temperature/pressure/potential temperature profiles is about 0.7 K/0.15%/1.4 K in the tropopause region. It gradually increases into the stratosphere and decreases toward the lower troposphere. This decrease is due to the increasing influence of background information. The total climatological error of mean atmospheric fields is, in general, dominated by the systematic error component. We use sampling error-corrected climatological fields to demonstrate the power of having different and accurate vertical coordinates available. As examples we analyze characteristics of the location of the tropopause for geopotential height, pressure, and potential temperature coordinates as well as seasonal variations of the midlatitude jet stream core. This highlights the broad applicability of RO and the utility of its versatile vertical geolocation for investigating the vertical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  18. NEW HYPOTHESIS AND ELECTROPHYSICS NATURE OF ADDITIONAL MECHANISMS OF ORIGIN, ACCUMULATION AND DIVISION OF ELECTRIC CHARGES IN THE ATMOSPHERIC CLOUDS OF EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of new hypothesis about the possible additional mechanisms of origin, accumulation and division of electric charges in atmospheric clouds, containing shallow dispersible drops of water, shallow particulate dielectric matters and crystals of ice. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage, theoretical bases of the electrical engineering, theoretical electrophysics, theory of the electromagnetic field, technique of the high electric and magnetic fields. Results. Pulled out and grounded new scientific supposition, related to possible existence in earthly troposphere of additional mechanisms of origin, accumulation and division of electric charges in the atmospheric clouds of Earth, being based on electrization in the warm ascending currents of air of shallow round particulate dielectric matters, getting in an air atmosphere from a terrene and from the smoke extras of industrial enterprises. By a calculation a way it is shown that the offered additional electrophysics mechanisms are able to provide achievement in the atmospheric clouds of such values of volume closeness of charges, total electric charge and tension of the electrostatic field stocked in them inwardly and on the external border of storm clouds which correspond modern experimental information from an area atmospheric electricity. The calculation estimations of levels of electric potential and stocked electric energy executed on the basis of the offered hypothesis in storm clouds specify on possibility of receipt in them of ever higher electric potentials and large supplies of electric energy. The obtained results are supplemented by the known approaches of forming and development in earthly troposphere of the electric charged atmospheric clouds, being based on electrization in the warm ascending streams of air the masses of shallow round aquatic drops. Originality. First on the basis of the well-known theses of technique and electrophysics of

  19. From airborne cloud remote sensing observations to cloud regime classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Heike; Ament, Felix

    2017-04-01

    The representation of cloud and precipitation processes is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate and weather predictions. To validate model predictions of convective processes over the Atlantic ocean, usually satellite data are used. However, satellite products provide just a coarse view with poor temporal resolution of convective maritime clouds. Aircraft-based observations such as the cloud remote sensing configuration NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) on the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude Long Range Research Aircraft) offer a more detailed insight due to lower altitude and higher sampling rates than satellite data. Part of the NARVAL payload on HALO is the HALO Microwave Package (HAMP) which consists a suite of passive microwave radiometers with 26 frequencies in different bands between 22.24 and 183.31 ± 12.5 GHz and a cloud radar at 36 GHz. This payload was flown on HALO between 2013 and 2016 on several campaigns: NARVAL-I (2013 and 2014), NARVAL-II (2016), NAWDEX (2016, North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment). Cloud regimes can be characterized by cloud macrophysical parameters such as cloud fraction, cloud top height, cloud length, etc. During all campaigns, a range of different cloud regimes were investigated. For example, during NARVAL-I (South) and NARVAL-II, cloud fraction observed by HAMP instruments ranged between 10 % and 40 % over the duration of the individual flights. During NARVAL-I (North) and NAWDEX, cloud fraction was between 50 % and 80 %. This shows the range of cloud parameters in different regimes. Cloud regime classification can be approached in two different ways: regimes can be deduced by analyzing a priori information such as atmospheric thermodynamic profiles and satellite data and then infer the cloud characteristics in these conditions. The second, inductive, approach is to characterize cloudy scenes by cloud macrophysical parameters. We will

  20. Using Browser Notebooks to Analyse Big Atmospheric Data-sets in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N.; Tomlinson, J.; Arribas, A.; Prudden, R.

    2016-12-01

    We are presenting an account of our experience building an ecosystem for the analysis of big atmospheric data-sets. By using modern technologies we have developed a prototype platform which is scaleable and capable of analysing very large atmospheric datasets. We tested different big-data ecosystems such as Hadoop MapReduce, Spark and Dask, in order to find the one which was best suited for analysis of multidimensional binary data such as NetCDF. We make extensive use of infrastructure-as-code and containerisation to provide a platform which is reusable, and which can scale to accommodate changes in demand. We make this platform readily accessible using browser based notebooks. As a result, analysts with minimal technology experience can, in tens of lines of Python, make interactive data-visualisation web pages, which can analyse very large amounts of data using cutting edge big-data technology

  1. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  2. Improving cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY Oxygen A-band measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fournier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrieval of column densities and concentration profiles of atmospheric trace gas species from satellites is sensitive to light scattered by clouds. The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY instrument on the Envisat satellite, principally designed to retrieve trace gases in the atmosphere, is also capable of detecting clouds. FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band is a fast and robust algorithm providing cloud information from the O2 A-band for cloud correction of ozone. FRESCO provides a consistent set of cloud products by retrieving simultaneously effective cloud fraction and cloud top pressure. The FRESCO retrieved values are compared with the SCIAMACHY Level 2 operational cloud fraction of OCRA (Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm but, also, with cloud information from HICRU (Heidelberg Iterative Cloud Retrieval Utilities, SACURA (SemiAnalytical CloUd Retrieval Algorithm and the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument. The results correlate well, but FRESCO overestimates cloud fraction over deserts. Thus, to improve retrievals at these locations, the FRESCO surface albedo databases are decontaminated from the presence of desert dust aerosols. This is achieved by using the GOME Absorbing Aerosol Index. It is shown that this approach succeeds well in producing more accurate cloud information over the Sahara.

  3. Dynamic mineral clouds on HD 189733b. II. Monte Carlo radiative transfer for 3D cloudy exoplanet atmospheres: combining scattering and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. K. H.; Wood, K.; Dobbs-Dixon, I.; Rice, A.; Helling, Ch.

    2017-05-01

    Context. As the 3D spatial properties of exoplanet atmospheres are being observed in increasing detail by current and new generations of telescopes, the modelling of the 3D scattering effects of cloud forming atmospheres with inhomogeneous opacity structures becomes increasingly important to interpret observational data. Aims: We model the scattering and emission properties of a simulated cloud forming, inhomogeneous opacity, hot Jupiter atmosphere of HD 189733b. We compare our results to available Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Spitzer data and quantify the effects of 3D multiple scattering on observable properties of the atmosphere. We discuss potential observational properties of HD 189733b for the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) missions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and applied it to post-process output of our 3D radiative-hydrodynamic, cloud formation simulation of HD 189733b. We employed three variance reduction techniques, I.e. next event estimation, survival biasing, and composite emission biasing, to improve signal to noise of the output. For cloud particle scattering events, we constructed a log-normal area distribution from the 3D cloud formation radiative-hydrodynamic results, which is stochastically sampled in order to model the Rayleigh and Mie scattering behaviour of a mixture of grain sizes. Results: Stellar photon packets incident on the eastern dayside hemisphere show predominantly Rayleigh, single-scattering behaviour, while multiple scattering occurs on the western hemisphere. Combined scattered and thermal emitted light predictions are consistent with published HST and Spitzer secondary transit observations. Our model predictions are also consistent with geometric albedo constraints from optical wavelength ground-based polarimetry and HST B band measurements. We predict an apparent geometric albedo for HD 189733b of 0.205 and 0.229, in the

  4. Ship impacts on the marine atmosphere: insights into the contribution of shipping emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, M. M.; Sorooshian, A.; Wang, Z.; Metcalf, A. R.; Frossard, A. A.; Lin, J. J.; Craven, J. S.; Nenes, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Russell, L. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    We report properties of marine aerosol and clouds measured in the shipping lanes between Monterey Bay and San Francisco off the coast of Central California. Using a suite of aerosol instrumentation onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft, these measurements represent a unique set of data contrasting the properties of clean and ship-impacted marine air masses in dry aerosol and cloud droplet residuals. Below-cloud aerosol exhibited average mass and number concentrations of 2 μg m-3 and 510 cm-3, respectively, which are consistent with previous studies performed off the coast of California. Enhancements in vanadium and cloud droplet number concentrations are observed concurrently with a decrease in cloud water pH, suggesting that periods of high aerosol loading are primarily linked to increased ship influence. Mass spectra from a compact time-of-flight Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer reveal an enhancement in the fraction of organic at m/z 42 (f42) and 99 (f99) in ship-impacted clouds. These ions are well correlated to each other (R2>0.64) both in and out of cloud and constitute 14% (f44) and 3% (f99) of organic mass during periods of enhanced sulfate. High-resolution mass spectral analysis of these masses from ship measurements suggests that the ions responsible for this variation were oxidized, possibly due to cloud processing. We propose that the organic fractions of these ions be used as a metric for determining the extent to which cloud-processed ship emissions impact the marine atmosphere where (f42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04) would imply heavy influence from shipping emissions, (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04) would imply moderate, but persistent, influences from ships, and (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) would imply clean, non-ship-influenced air.

  5. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemical Composition Measurements for the Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    We received funding to provide measurements of the chemical composition of aerosols aboard the NASA Ames DC-8 research aircraft during the SUCCESS mission. These measurements were successfully completed and the final data resides in the Cloud I computer archive at NASA Ames Research Center. The interpretation of the data obtained on this mission over the central United States has been published in special issues of Geophysical Research Letters. The papers with the University of New Hampshire as first author constitute this report and summarize the salient features of our data. The paper by Talbot et al. discusses the impact of vertical transport on free tropospheric chemistry over the the central USA in springtime. This transport was a dominant feature of the aerosol chemistry during SUCCESS. The paper by Dibb et al. discusses aerosol chemistry specifically as it related to free tropospheric sulfate related to jet exhaust and surface sources. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that surface sources appeared to dominant the distribution of aerosol sulfate in the free troposphere. In addition to these first authored papers, researchers from the University of New Hampshire were co-authors on numerous other companion papers in the special issues.

  6. Reaction Profiles and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cyanide Radical Reactions Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad Pérez-Rivera, Danilo; Romani, Paul N.; Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is arguably the atmosphere of greatest interest that we have an abundance of data for from both ground based and spacecraft observations. As we have learned more about Titan's atmospheric composition, the presence of pre-biotic molecules in its atmosphere has generated more and more fascination about the photochemical process and pathways it its atmosphere. Our computational laboratory has been extensively working throughout the past year characterizing nitrile synthesis reactions, making significant progress on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions of .CN with the hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2), propylene (CH3CCH), and benzene (C6H6), developing a clear picture of the mechanistic aspects through which these three reactions proceed. Specifically, first principles calculations of the reaction profiles and molecular dynamics studies for gas-phase reactions of .CN and C2H2, .CN and CH3CCH, and .CN and C6H6 have been carried out. A very accurate determination of potential energy surfaces of these reactions will allow us to compute the reaction rates which are indispensable for photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere.The work at University of Puerto Rico at Cayey was supported by Puerto Rico NASA EPSCoR IDEAS-ER program (2015-2016) and DTPR was sponsored by the Puerto Rico NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship. *E-mail: juan.lopez15@upr.edu

  7. The backscatter cloud probe - a compact low-profile autonomous optical spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, K.; Baumgardner, D.; Gallagher, M.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Nedelec, P.; Wang, K.-Y.; Lance, S.

    2014-05-01

    A compact (500 cm3), lightweight (500 g), near-field, single particle backscattering optical spectrometer is described that mounts flush with the skin of an aircraft and measures the concentration and optical equivalent diameter of particles from 5 to 75 μm. The backscatter cloud probe (BCP) was designed as a real-time qualitative cloud detector primarily for data quality control of trace gas instruments developed for the climate monitoring instrument packages that are being installed on commercial passenger aircraft as part of the European Union In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System (IAGOS) program (http://www.iagos.org/). Subsequent evaluations of the BCP measurements on a number of research aircraft, however, have revealed it capable of delivering quantitative particle data products including size distributions, liquid-water content and other information on cloud properties. We demonstrate the instrument's capability for delivering useful long-term climatological, as well as aviation performance information, across a wide range of environmental conditions. The BCP has been evaluated by comparing its measurements with those from other cloud particle spectrometers on research aircraft and several BCPs are currently flying on commercial A340/A330 Airbus passenger airliners. The design and calibration of the BCP is described in this article, along with an evaluation of measurements made on the research and commercial aircraft. Preliminary results from more than 7000 h of airborne measurements by the BCP on two Airbus A340s operating on routine global traffic routes (one Lufthansa, the other China Airlines) show that more than 340 h of cloud data have been recorded at normal cruise altitudes (> 10 km) and more than 40% of the > 1200 flights were through clouds at some point between takeoff and landing. These data are a valuable contribution to databases of cloud properties, including sub-visible cirrus, in the upper troposphere and useful for validating

  8. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude-resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, R.; Aviles, J. L.; Wilson, R. W.; Chun, M.; Butterley, T.; Carrasco, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalized Scidar (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1- m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star...

  9. Effect of nozzle profile on gas mixing in an atmospheric and low pressure DC plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmane, M.; Soucy, G.; Boulos, M.I. [Univ. of Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Henne, R. [Inst. for Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The study combines enthalpy probe and mass spectrometer measurements in a DC-plasma jet under atmospheric and low pressure conditions. Both, standard cylindrical and laval nozzle were used as anode profiles. A detailed description of the experimental technique is given together with preliminary results. These confirm the role by which enthalpy probe measurements can be used to bridge the gap in temperature range between emission spectroscopic techniques and standard thermocouple probing.

  10. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  11. Development and evaluation of a high sensitivity dial system for profiling atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 ( laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  12. New model simulations of the global atmospheric electric circuit driven by thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds: The roles of lightning and sprites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rycroft, Michael J.; Odzimek, Anna; Arnold, Neil F.

    2007-01-01

    Several processes acting below, in and above thunderstorms and in electrified shower clouds drive upward currents which close through the global atmospheric electric circuit, These are all simulated in a novel way using the software package PSpice. A moderate negative cloud-to-ground lightning di...... that conduction and convection currents associated with "batteries" within thunderclouds and electrified shower clouds contribute essentially equally (similar to 500 A each) to maintaining the ionospheric potential....... cloud-to-ground lightning discharge from the bottom of a thunderstorm decreases the ionospheric potential by 0.014%. Such a discharge may trigger a sprite, causing the ionospheric potential to decrease by similar to 1 V. The time scales for the recovery of the ionospheric potential are shown...... to be similar to 250 s, which is of the same order as the CR time constant for the global circuit. Knowing the global average rate of lightning discharges, it is found that negative cloud-to-ground discharges increase the ionospheric potential by only similar to 4%, and that positive cloud-to-ground discharges...

  13. Controlled meteorological (CMET) balloon profiling of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Hole, Lars; Voss, Paul

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer over Arctic ice-free and sea-ice covered regions by free-floating controllable CMET balloons. The CMET observations (temperature, humidity, wind-speed, pressure) provide in-situ meteorological datasets in very remote regions for comparison to atmospheric models. Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons are small airborne platforms that use reversible lift-gas compression to regulate altitude. These balloons have approximately the same payload mass as standard weather balloons but can float for many days, change altitude on command, and transmit meteorological and system data in near-real time via satellite. Five Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons were launched from Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard (Spitsbergen) over 5-12 May 2011 and measured vertical atmospheric profiles (temperature, humidity, wind) over coastal and remote areas to both the east and west. One notable CMET flight achieved a suite of 18 continuous soundings that probed the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over a period of more than 10 h. Profiles from two CMET flights are compared to model output from ECMWF Era-Interim reanalysis (ERA-I) and to a high-resolution (15 km) Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) product. To the east of Svalbard over sea-ice, the CMET observed a stable ABL profile with a temperature inversion that was reproduced by ASR but not captured by ERA-I. In a coastal ice-free region to the west of Svalbard, the CMET observed a stable ABL with strong wind-shear. The CMET profiles document increases in ABL temperature and humidity that are broadly reproduced by both ASR and ERA-I. The ASR finds a more stably stratified ABL than observed but captured the wind shear in contrast to ERA-I. Detailed analysis of the coastal CMET-automated soundings identifies small-scale temperature and humidity variations with a low-level flow and provides an estimate of local wind fields. We show that CMET balloons are a valuable approach for

  14. Scattering by Atmospheric Particles: From Aerosols to Clouds with the Point-Spread Function ... using Water, Milk, Plastic Cups, and a Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres are made primarily of molecules, and their optical properties are well known. They scatter sunlight across the spectrum, but far more potently at shorter wavelengths. Consequently, they redden the Sun as it sets and, at the same time, endow the daytime sky with its characteristic blue hue. There are also microscopic atmospheric particulates that are equally omnipresent because small enough (up to ~10s of microns) to remain lofted for long periods of time. However, in contrast with molecules of the major gases, their concentrations are highly variable in space and time. Their optical properties are also far more interesting. These airborne particles are either solid---hence the word "aerosols"---or liquid, most notably in the form of cloud droplets. Needless to say that both aerosols and clouds have major impacts on the balance of the Earth's climate system. Harder to understand, but nonetheless true, is that their climate impacts are much harder to assess by Earth system modelers than those of greenhouse gases such as CO2. That makes them prime targets of study by multiple approaches, including ground- and space-based remote sensing. To characterize aerosols and clouds quantitatively by optical remote sensing methods, either passive (sunlight-based) or active (laser-based), we need predictive capability for the signals recorded by sensors, whether ground-based, airborne, or carried by satellites. This in turn draws on the physical theory of "radiative transfer" that describes how the light propagates and scatters in the molecular-and-particulate atmosphere. This is a challenge for remote sensing scientists. I will show why by simulating with simple means the point spread function or "PSF" of scattering particulate atmospheres with varying opacity, thus covering tabletop analogs of the pristine air, the background aerosol, all the way to optically thick cloudy airmasses. I will also show PSF measurements of real clouds over New Mexico and

  15. Low-cloud characteristics over the tropical western Pacific from ARM observations and CAM5 simulations: LOW CLOUDS IN ARM OBSERVATIONS AND CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Arunchandra S. [Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami Florida USA; Zhang, Chidong [Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami Florida USA; Klein, Stephen A. [Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California USA; Ma, Hsi-Yen [Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California USA

    2015-09-10

    This study evaluates the ability of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) to reproduce low clouds observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radar at Manus Island of the tropical western Pacific during the Years of Tropical Convection. Here low clouds are defined as clouds with their tops below the freezing level and bases within the boundary layer. Low-cloud statistics in CAM5 simulations and ARM observations are compared in terms of their general occurrence, mean vertical profiles, fraction of precipitating versus nonprecipitating events, diurnal cycle, and monthly time series. Other types of clouds are included to put the comparison in a broader context. The comparison shows that the model overproduces total clouds and their precipitation fraction but underestimates low clouds in general. The model, however, produces excessive low clouds in a thin layer between 954 and 930 hPa, which coincides with excessive humidity near the top of the mixed layer. This suggests that the erroneously excessive low clouds stem from parameterization of both cloud and turbulence mixing. The model also fails to produce the observed diurnal cycle in low clouds, not exclusively due to the model coarse grid spacing that does not resolve Manus Island. This study demonstrates the utility of ARM long-term cloud observations in the tropical western Pacific in verifying low clouds simulated by global climate models, illustrates issues of using ARM observations in model validation, and provides an example of severe model biases in producing observed low clouds in the tropical western Pacific.

  16. A model for the estimation of the surface fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture of the cloud topped marine atmospheric boundary layer from satellite measurable parameters. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed for the estimation of the surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture of the cloud topped marine atmospheric boundary layer by use of satellite remotely sensed parameters. The parameters chosen for the problem are the integrated liquid water content, q sub li, the integrated water vapor content, q sub vi, the cloud top temperature, and either a measure of the 10 meter neutral wind speed or the friction velocity at the surface. Under the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous, well-mixed boundary layer, the model calculates the equivalent potential temperature and total water profiles of the boundary layer along with the boundary layer height from inputs of q sub li, q sub vi, and cloud top temperature. These values, along with the 10m neutral wind speed or friction velocity and the sea surface temperature are then used to estimate the surface fluxes. The development of a scheme to parameterize the integrated water vapor outside of the boundary layer for the cases of cold air outbreak and California coastal stratus is presented.

  17. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovee, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimension variational (3DVAR) analysis component (WRF-Var). Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in both clear and partly cloudy regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts due to instability added in the forecast soundings by the AIRS profiles. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  18. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  19. Software for retrieving the ozone altitude profiles from data of atmospheric laser sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey V.; Nevzorov, Aleksey A.; Romanovskii, Oleg A.

    2014-11-01

    In the report, we describe the software developed to retrieve the ozone altitude profiles from data of lidar measurements. The software is written in the programming language R#. At present, the C# language is one of the most advanced and modern programming languages. Many programs are written in this language since it is very easy to understand. The software makes it possible to calculate the ozone altitude profiles according to the method of differential absorption and scattering for three wavelength pairs 272/289 nm, 299/341 nm, and 308/353 nm. These wavelength pairs were chosen in view of the availability of lidar measurement data. The software has a suitable graphical interface, which displays all the steps of retrieving the ozone profiles in real time. The software makes it possible: to read off the lidar data and write the retrieval results in ASCII format; and smooth the lidar signals and the retrieval results with sliding averaging. The temperature correction of zone absorption coefficients is introduced in the software to reduce the retrieval errors. The aerosol backscattering is several times stronger than molecular backscattering when aerosol loading of the atmosphere is large; therefore, the retrieved ozone profile is substantially distorted when the scattering and attenuating properties of the atmosphere at the sensing wavelengths are not taken into consideration. An aerosol correction is introduced in this software. The latitudinally average seasonal model values of the altitudinal distribution of temperature and molecular backscattering coefficient for winter and summer are introduced in the software for the calculation.

  20. Retrieval of atmospheric CH4 profiles from Fourier transform infrared data using dimension reduction and MCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiainen, S.; Railo, J.; Laine, M.; Hakkarainen, J.; Kivi, R.; Heikkinen, P.; Chen, H.; Tamminen, J.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce an inversion method that uses dimension reduction for the retrieval of atmospheric methane (CH4) profiles. Uncertainty analysis is performed using the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) statistical estimation. These techniques are used to retrieve CH4 profiles from the ground-based spectral measurements by the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) instrument at Sodankylä (67.4°N, 26.6°E), Northern Finland. The Sodankylä FTS is part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), a global network that observes solar spectra in near-infrared wavelengths. The high spectral resolution of the data provides approximately 3 degrees of freedom about the vertical structure of CH4 between around 0 and 40 km. We reduce the dimension of the inverse problem by using principal component analysis. Smooth and realistic profiles are sought by estimating three parameters for the profile shape. We use Bayesian framework with adaptive MCMC to better characterize the full posterior distribution of the solution and uncertainties related to the retrieval. The retrieved profiles are validated against in situ AirCore soundings which provide an accurate reference up to 20-30 km. The method is presented in a general form, so that it can easily be adapted for other applications, such as different trace gases or satellite-borne measurements where more accurate profile information and better analysis of the uncertainties would be highly valuable.

  1. Atmospheric chemistry of a 33-34 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling and the application of chemical box modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, William I.; Millard, G.A.; Mather, T.A.; Hunton, D.E.; Anderson, B.; Oppenheimer, C.; Thornton, B.F.; Gerlach, T.M.; Viggiano, A.A.; Kondo, Y.; Miller, T.M.; Ballenthin, J.O.

    2006-01-01

    On 28 February 2000, a volcanic cloud from Hekla volcano, Iceland, was serendipitously sampled by a DC-8 research aircraft during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE I). It was encountered at night at 10.4 km above sea level (in the lower stratosphere) and 33-34 hours after emission. The cloud is readily identified by abundant SO2 (???1 ppmv), HCl (???70 ppbv), HF (???60 ppbv), and particles (which may have included fine silicate ash). We compare observed and modeled cloud compositions to understand its chemical evolution. Abundances of sulfur and halogen species indicate some oxidation of sulfur gases but limited scavenging and removal of halides. Chemical modeling suggests that cloud concentrations of water vapor and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201-203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), and liquid ternary solution H2SO4/H2O/HNO3 (STS) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated volcanogenic halogens in the cloud producing >2 ppbv ClOx. This would have destroyed ozone during an earlier period of daylight, consistent with the very low levels of ozone observed. This combination of volcanogenic PSCs and chlorine destroyed ozone at much faster rates than other PSCs that Arctic winter. Elevated levels of HNO3 and NOy in the cloud can be explained by atmospheric nitrogen fixation in the eruption column due to high temperatures and/or volcanic lightning. However, observed elevated levels of HOx remain unexplained given that the cloud was sampled at night. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Effectiveness and limitations of parameter tuning in reducing biases of top-of-atmosphere radiation and clouds in MIROC version 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses how much of the biases in top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiation and clouds can be removed by parameter tuning in the present-day simulation of a climate model in the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5 generation. We used output of a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE experiment conducted with an atmosphere–ocean general circulation model (AOGCM without flux adjustment. The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate version 5 (MIROC5 was used for the PPE experiment. Output of the PPE was compared with satellite observation data to evaluate the model biases and the parametric uncertainty of the biases with respect to TOA radiation and clouds. The results indicate that removing or changing the sign of the biases by parameter tuning alone is difficult. In particular, the cooling bias of the shortwave cloud radiative effect at low latitudes could not be removed, neither in the zonal mean nor at each latitude–longitude grid point. The bias was related to the overestimation of both cloud amount and cloud optical thickness, which could not be removed by the parameter tuning either. However, they could be alleviated by tuning parameters such as the maximum cumulus updraft velocity at the cloud base. On the other hand, the bias of the shortwave cloud radiative effect in the Arctic was sensitive to parameter tuning. It could be removed by tuning such parameters as albedo of ice and snow both in the zonal mean and at each grid point. The obtained results illustrate the benefit of PPE experiments which provide useful information regarding effectiveness and limitations of parameter tuning. Implementing a shallow convection parameterization is suggested as a potential measure to alleviate the biases in radiation and clouds.

  3. Assessing the Impacts of Atmospheric Conditions under Climate Change on Air Quality Profile over Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei Tong, Cheuk

    2017-04-01

    Small particulates can cause long term impairment to human health as they can penetrate deep and deposit on the wall of the respiratory system. Under the projected climate change as reported by literature, atmospheric stability, which has strong effects on vertical mixing of air pollutants and thus air quality Hong Kong, is also varying from near to far future. In addition to domestic emission, Hong Kong receives also significant concentration of cross-boundary particulates that their natures and movements are correlated with atmospheric condition. This study aims to study the relation of atmospheric conditions with air quality over Hong Kong. Past meteorological data is based on Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data. Radiosonde data provided from HKO are also adopted in testing and validating the data. Future meteorological data is simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), which dynamically downscaled the past and future climate under the A1B scenario simulated by ECHAM5/MPIOM. Air quality data is collected on one hand from the ground station data provided by Environment Protection Department, with selected stations revealing local emission and trans-boundary emission respectively. On the other hand, an Atmospheric Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which operates using the radar principle to detect Rayleigh and Mie scattering from atmospheric gas and aerosols, has also been adopted to measure vertical aerosol profile, which has been observed tightly related to the high level meteorology. Data from scattered signals are collected, averaged or some episode selected for characteristic comparison with the atmospheric stability indices and other meteorological factors. The relation between atmospheric conditions and air quality is observed by statistical analysis, and statistical models are built based on the stability indices to project the changes in sulphur dioxide, ozone and particulate

  4. Application of the NASA A-Train to Evaluate Clouds Simulated by the Weather Research and Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The CloudSat Mission, part of the NASA A-Train, is providing the first global survey of cloud profiles and cloud physical properties, observing seasonal and geographical variations that are pertinent to evaluating the way clouds are parameterized in weather and climate forecast models. CloudSat measures the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation from space through the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a 94 GHz nadir-looking radar measuring the power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the radar. One of the goals of the CloudSat mission is to evaluate the representation of clouds in forecast models, thereby contributing to improved predictions of weather, climate and the cloud-climate feedback problem. This paper highlights potential limitations in cloud microphysical schemes currently employed in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) modeling system. The horizontal and vertical structure of explicitly simulated cloud fields produced by the WRF model at 4-km resolution are being evaluated using CloudSat observations in concert with products derived from MODIS and AIRS. A radiative transfer model is used to produce simulated profiles of radar reflectivity given WRF input profiles of hydrometeor mixing ratios and ambient atmospheric conditions. The preliminary results presented in the paper will compare simulated and observed reflectivity fields corresponding to horizontal and vertical cloud structures associated with midlatitude cyclone events.

  5. Planning, implementation, and scientific goals of the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Maring, Hal; Dibb, Jack; Ferrare, Richard; Jacob, Daniel J.; Jensen, Eric J.; Luo, Z. Johnny; Mace, Gerald G.; Pan, Laura L.; Pfister, Lenny; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Redemann, Jens; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Yokelson, Robert; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Gao; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Pszenny, Alex

    2016-05-01

    The Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission based at Ellington Field, Texas, during August and September 2013 employed the most comprehensive airborne payload to date to investigate atmospheric composition over North America. The NASA ER-2, DC-8, and SPEC Inc. Learjet flew 57 science flights from the surface to 20 km. The ER-2 employed seven remote sensing instruments as a satellite surrogate and eight in situ instruments. The DC-8 employed 23 in situ and five remote sensing instruments for radiation, chemistry, and microphysics. The Learjet used 11 instruments to explore cloud microphysics. SEAC4RS launched numerous balloons, augmented AErosol RObotic NETwork, and collaborated with many existing ground measurement sites. Flights investigating convection included close coordination of all three aircraft. Coordinated DC-8 and ER-2 flights investigated the optical properties of aerosols, the influence of aerosols on clouds, and the performance of new instruments for satellite measurements of clouds and aerosols. ER-2 sorties sampled stratospheric injections of water vapor and other chemicals by local and distant convection. DC-8 flights studied seasonally evolving chemistry in the Southeastern U.S., atmospheric chemistry with lower emissions of NOx and SO2 than in previous decades, isoprene chemistry under high and low NOx conditions at different locations, organic aerosols, air pollution near Houston and in petroleum fields, smoke from wildfires in western forests and from agricultural fires in the Mississippi Valley, and the ways in which the chemistry in the boundary layer and the upper troposphere were influenced by vertical transport in convective clouds.

  6. The role of epiphytic bryophytes in interception, storage, and the regulated release of atmospheric moisture in a tropical montane cloud forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Peng, Claudine; Cardoso, Anabelle Williamson; Flores, Olivier; West, Adam; Wilding, Nicholas; Strasberg, Dominique; Hedderson, Terry A. J.

    2017-05-01

    Epiphytes in tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) intercept atmospheric water and, as a result, form a vital part of the hydrological cycle of this ecosystem. Our study investigates the role of bryophytes in such systems on La Réunion Island (Mascarenes). To better understand ecohydrological functioning of the forest, we investigated cloud water interception (CWI) by two locally abundant liverwort species (Bazzania decrescens and Mastigophora diclados) using a novel lysimetric approach. We also evaluated biomass and water storage capacity of our study species, as well as of the entire bryophyte community in our plots, which we extrapolated to the forest community level. Both study species exhibited excellent abilities to intercept and store cloud water, and showed distinct diurnal variation in this ability according to varying climatic conditions. The two liverwort species' response to climatic conditions differed dramatically from one another, with B. decrescens storing double the mean and maximum litres of water per hectare despite having less than half the abundance of M. diclados. Despite its lower water storage capacity, M. diclados had a greater ability to intercept atmospheric moisture than B. decrescens. The differences in CWI were attributed to differences in plant structure of these two species, which explains their microhabitat requirements in this system. Our two species in this system were estimated to store 34,569 l.ha-1 of water, the equivalent of 3.46 mm of rainfall. The abundance of our study species combined with their atmospheric water interception, storage, and regulated release ability make both species ecologically important in the forest's microhydrological cycle. For the first time these data allow us to better understand the role of these plants in the microhydrological cycle of tropical montane cloud forests and to determine whether the diversity and functioning of these and similar systems will be at risk from predicted cloud layer

  7. A Compact Mobile Ozone Lidar for Atmospheric Ozone and Aerosol Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-01-01

    A compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone air quality campaigns. This lidar is integrated into the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. The system has been configured to enable mobile operation from a trailer and was deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 supporting the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. Ozone curtain plots and the resulting science are presented.

  8. A compact mobile ozone lidar for atmospheric ozone and aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-10-01

    A compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone air quality campaigns. This lidar is integrated into the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consists of a Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. The system has been configured to enable mobile operation from a trailer and was deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 supporting the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. Ozone curtain plots and the resulting science are presented.

  9. Satellite data sets for the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L.; Bernstein, R.L. [SeaSpace Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This abstract describes the type of data obtained from satellite measurements in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data sets have been widely used by the ARM team to derive cloud-top altitude, cloud cover, snow and ice cover, surface temperature, water vapor, and wind, vertical profiles of temperature, and continuoous observations of weather needed to track and predict severe weather.

  10. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK ADVANCED VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC PROFILING SYSTEM (AVAPS) DROPSONDE SYSTEM V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) Dropsonde System dataset was collected by the...

  11. The effect of cloud liquid water on temperature retrievals from microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Leonie; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometry provides atmospheric profiles for both clear sky and cloudy weather conditions. The effect of clouds on measurements from microwave radiometers is low compared to other remote sensing techniques but cannot be neglected at certain frequencies. In this study, clouds have been characterized and included in microwave retrievals in order to investigate their effect on tropospheric temperature profiles measured by the TEMPERA microwave radiometer. TEMPERA retrieves atmospheric temperature profiles by measuring emitted radiation of molecular oxygen at around 60 GHz. Because cloud liquid water also absorbs and emits radiation at the used frequency range, it is important to analyse the influence of liquid water on the microwave retrieval. In order to characterize the clouds, data from various instruments have been used, all located at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss at Payerne (Switzerland). Cloud base altitudes were detected using ceilometer measurements while the integrated liquid water (ILW) was measured by a HATPRO radiometer. Additional cloud information was obtained from a co-located sky camera and using an automatic partial cloud amount detection algorithm (APCADA). All this information has been used to characterize the clouds by means of a Liquid Water Content (LWC) profile. Different LWC profiles (shapes and values) have been tested to find the best cloud characterization depending on cloud type, altitude and ILW. Temperature profiles have been obtained incorporating this liquid water profile in the inversion algorithm and they have been evaluated against retrievals without considering clouds, in order to assess the liquid water effect on microwave measurements. The results have been compared with the temperature profiles from radiosondes which are regularly launched twice a day at the aerological station. Two years of data have been analyzed and almost 300 non-precipitating cloud cases were studied. The statistical analysis

  12. Linking evaporative fluxes from bare soils across surface viscous sublayer with the Monin-Obukhov atmospheric flux-profile estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi Erfan; Or Dani

    2015-01-01

    The Monin–Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) provides the theoretical basis for many “atmospheric based” methods (such as eddy covariance and flux profile methods) that are widely used for quantifying surface–atmosphere exchange processes. The turbulence driven and highly nonlinear profiles of momentum air temperature and vapor densities require complex resistance expressions applied to simple gradients deduced from a single or few height measurements. Notwithstanding the success of these atmos...

  13. Clouds, weather, climate, and modeling for K-12 and public audiences from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Russell, R. M.; Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; Burt, M. A.; Genyuk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fifth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  14. Retrieval of atmospheric-temperature and water-vapor profiles by use of combined satellite and ground-based infrared spectral-radiance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shu-Peng; Smith, William L; Huang, Hung-Lung

    2002-07-10

    A nonlinear sounding retrieval algorithm is used to produce vertical-temperature and water-vapor profiles from coincident observations taken by the airborne High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) and the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) during the SUbsonic Contrails and Clouds Effects Special Study (SUCCESS). Also, clear sky Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and AERI radiance measurements, achieved on a daily real-time basis at the Department of Energy's Oklahoma CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site, are used to demonstrate the current profiling capability by use of simultaneous geostationary satellite and ground-based remote sensing observations under clear-sky conditions. The discrepancy principle, a method to find the proper smoothing parameters from the minimum value between the normalized spectral residual norm and the a priori upper bound, is used to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of on-line simultaneous tuning of the multiple weighting and smoothing parameters from the combined satellite/airborne and ground-based measurements for the temperature and water-vapor retrieval in this nonlinear-retrieval process. An objective method to determine the degrees of freedom (d.f.) of the observation signal is derived. The d.f. of the radiance signal for the combined GOES and AERI measurements is larger than that for either instrument alone; while the d.f. of the observation signal for the combined GOES and AERI measurements is larger than that for either instrument alone and of the combined GOES and AERI measurements. The use of simultaneous clear-sky AERI and GOES data now provides improved vertical temperature and moisture soundings on an hourly basis for use in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program [J. Appl. Meteorol. 37, 875 (1998)].

  15. Seasonal Clear-Sky Flux and Cloud Radiative Effect Anomalies in the Arctic Atmospheric Column Associated with the Arctic Oscillation and Arctic Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Bradley M.; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Arctic Dipole (AD) on the radiative flux into the Arctic mean atmospheric column is quantified. 3-month-averaged AO and AD indices are regressed with corresponding surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes from the CERES-SFC and CERES-TOA EBAF datasets over the period 2000-2014. An increase in clear-sky fluxes into the Arctic mean atmospheric column during fall is the largest net flux anomaly associated with AO, primarily driven by a positive net longwave flux anomaly (i.e. increase of net flux into the atmospheric column) at the surface. A decrease in the Arctic mean atmospheric column cloud radiative effect during winter and spring is the largest flux anomaly associated with AD, primarily driven by a change in the longwave cloud radiative effect at the surface. These prominent responses to AO and AD are widely distributed across the ice-covered Arctic, suggesting that the physical process or processes that bring about the flux change associated with AO and AD are distributed throughout the Arctic.

  16. Sensitivity of the southern West African mean atmospheric state to variations in low-level cloud cover as simulated by ICON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffka, Anke; Knippertz, Peter; Fink, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents first results of numerical sensitivity experiments that are carried out in the framework of the project DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa). DACCIWA aims to investigate the impact of the drastic increase in anthropogenic emissions in West Africa on the local weather and climate, for example through cloud-aerosol interactions or impacts on radiation and stability. DACCIWA organised a major international field campaign in West Africa in June-July 2016 and involves a wide range of modelling activities. Several studies have shown - and first results of the DACCIWA campaign confirm - that extensive ultra-low stratus clouds form in the southern parts of West Africa (8°W-8°E, 5-10°N) at night in connection with strong nocturnal low-level jets. The clouds persist long after sunrise and have therefore a substantial impact on the surface radiation budget and consequently on the diurnal evolution of the daytime, convectively mixed boundary layer. The objective of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of the West African monsoon system and its diurnal cycle to the radiative effects of these low clouds. The study is based on a series of daily 5-day sensitivity simulations using ICON, the operational numerical weather prediction model of the German Weather Service during the months July - September 2006. In these simulations, low clouds are made transparent, by artificially lowering the optical thickness information passed on to the model's radiation scheme. Results reveal a noticeable influence of the low-level cloud cover on the atmospheric mean state of our region of interest and beyond. Also the diurnal development of the convective boundary layer is influenced by the cloud modification. In the transparent-cloud experiments, the cloud deck tends to break up later in the day and is shifted to a higher altitude, thereby causing a short-lived intensification around 11 LT. The average rainfall patterns are

  17. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  18. An extended Kalman-Bucy filter for atmospheric temperature profile retrieval with a passive microwave sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledsham, W. H.; Staelin, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extended Kalman-Bucy filter has been implemented for atmospheric temperature profile retrievals from observations made using the Scanned Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) instrument carried on the Nimbus 6 satellite. This filter has the advantage that it requires neither stationary statistics in the underlying processes nor linear production of the observed variables from the variables to be estimated. This extended Kalman-Bucy filter has yielded significant performance improvement relative to multiple regression retrieval methods. A multi-spot extended Kalman-Bucy filter has also been developed in which the temperature profiles at a number of scan angles in a scanning instrument are retrieved simultaneously. These multi-spot retrievals are shown to outperform the single-spot Kalman retrievals.

  19. Ocean and Atmospheric Profiling Lidar Observations and Its Link to Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces space-based ocean and atmospheric profiling lidar for improving modeling and understanding of ocean carbon cycle. Unique measurements from space-based profiling lidars include (1) the global ocean surface mean square slope measurements for improving air-sea turbulence exchange estimates; (2) the backscatter and beam attenuation measurements for improving the global estimate of partial pressure of CO2 of the ocean with the reduction of uncertainties in primary productivity estimates. Global statistics of CALIOP integrated ocean subsurface backscatter measurements of coastal waters will be presented. The study will also assess the impact of CALIOP on the uncertainty reduction of primary productivity and the improvement of CO2 partial pressure estimates. Ocean surface roughness statistics, its applications in air-sea interaction and its comparisons with other measurements will also be presented

  20. Statistical Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Vertical Properties between Two Eastern China Regions Based on CloudSat/CALIPSO Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cloud and aerosol properties was investigated over two 4° × 4° adjacent regions in the south (R1 and in the north (R2 in eastern China. The CloudSat/CALIPSO data were used to extract the cloud and aerosol profiles properties. The mean value of cloud occurrence probability (COP was the highest in the mixed cloud layer (−40°C~0°C and the lowest in the warm cloud layer (>0°C. The atmospheric humidity was more statistically relevant to COP in the warm cloud layer than aerosol condition. The differences in COP between the two regions in the mixed cloud layer and ice cloud layer (<−40°C had good correlations with those in the aerosol extinction coefficient. A radar reflectivity factor greater than −10 dBZ occurred mainly in warm cloud layers and mixed cloud layers. A high-COP zone appeared in the above-0°C layer with cloud thicknesses of 2-3 km in both regions and in all the four seasons, but the distribution of the zonal layer in R2 was more continuous than that in R1, which was consistent with the higher aerosol optical thickness in R2 than in R1 in the above-0°C layer, indicating a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud probability.

  1. Assessment of Atmospheric Wet Profiles Obtained from COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirong Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmosperic profiles derived from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC radio occultation (RO measurements make up for the lack of operational radiosonde soundings with a high spatiotemporal distribution, and their performance over China is assessed in this paper. COSMIC-retrieved atmospheric wet profiles from 2014 to 2015 are compared to the contemporaneous radiosonde profiles from 120 stations, and the vertical mean differences are used. The results show that the vertical mean biases of temperature, pressure and vapor pressure are −0.10 K, 0.69 hPa and −0.01 hPa, respectively, and that for refractivity is 0.17 N. Moreover, the temperature differences are positively correlated with station altitude, yet both the pressure and vapor pressure differences are negatively correlated with station latitude, as is the refractivity difference. The large temperature difference arising from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP region may be associated with the complex topography of the area and the limitations in the background model used in the COSMIC profile retrieval. Furthermore, negative refractivity bias between COSMIC and radiosonde data occurs below 5 km and is large in wet southern China, with a value of less than 1%. This result may be related to more humid conditions and super-refraction.

  2. The Profile Envision and Splicing Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Launch vehicle programs require vertically complete atmospheric profiles. Many systems at the ER to make the necessary measurements, but all have different EVR, vertical coverage, and temporal coverage. MSFC Natural Environments Branch developed a tool to create a vertically complete profile from multiple inputs using Python. Forward work: Finish Formal Testing Acceptance Testing, End-to-End Testing. Formal Release

  3. Remote Determination of Cloud Temperature and Transmittance from Spectral Radiance Measurements: Method and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    CONTROL DATA 2. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1...atmospherics temperatura and humidity profiles. Validation tests performed on experimental spectra demonstrate the occuracy of the method with typical...indicated as with the title.) Passive Remota Sensing Infrared Spectra Cloud Temperatura Cloud Transmittance FTIR Spectrometer Icing Hazard Detection (DCD03E.IFO - 95.02.22) UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF FORM

  4. Ship impacts on the marine atmosphere: insights into the contribution of shipping emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Coggon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report properties of marine aerosol and clouds measured in the shipping lanes between Monterey Bay and San Francisco off the coast of Central California. Using a suite of aerosol instrumentation onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft, these measurements represent a unique set of data contrasting the properties of clean and ship-impacted marine air masses in dry aerosol and cloud droplet residuals. Below-cloud aerosol exhibited average mass and number concentrations of 2 μg m−3 and 510 cm−3, respectively, which are consistent with previous studies performed off the coast of California. Enhancements in vanadium and cloud droplet number concentrations are observed concurrently with a decrease in cloud water pH, suggesting that periods of high aerosol loading are primarily linked to increased ship influence. Mass spectra from a compact time-of-flight Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer reveal an enhancement in the fraction of organic at m/z 42 (f42 and 99 (f99 in ship-impacted clouds. These ions are well correlated to each other (R2>0.64 both in and out of cloud and constitute 14% (f44 and 3% (f99 of organic mass during periods of enhanced sulfate. High-resolution mass spectral analysis of these masses from ship measurements suggests that the ions responsible for this variation were oxidized, possibly due to cloud processing. We propose that the organic fractions of these ions be used as a metric for determining the extent to which cloud-processed ship emissions impact the marine atmosphere where (f42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04 would imply heavy influence from shipping emissions, (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04 would imply moderate, but persistent, influences from ships, and (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01 would imply clean, non

  5. Combined Atmospheric and Ocean Profiling from an Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First of its kind combined atmospheric and ocean profile data were collected by the recently upgraded NASA Langley Research Center’s (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 during the 17 July – 7 August 2014 Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research Experiment (SABOR. This mission sampled over a region that covered the Gulf of Maine, open-ocean near Bermuda, and coastal waters from Virginia to Rhode Island. The HSRL-1 and the Research Scanning Polarimeter from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies collected data onboard the NASA LaRC King Air aircraft and flight operations were closely coordinated with the Research Vessel Endeavor that made in situ ocean optical measurements. The lidar measurements provided profiles of atmospheric backscatter and particulate depolarization at 532nm, 1064nm, and extinction (532nm from approximately 9km altitude. In addition, for the first time HSRL seawater backscatter, depolarization, and diffuse attenuation data at 532nm were collected and compared to both the ship measurements and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (NASA MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean retrievals.

  6. Distortion of particulate extinction profiles measured with lidar in a two-component atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, V A; Moosmüller, H

    1994-09-20

    Distortions of particular extinction-coefficient profiles measured with lidar in a two-component (molecular and aerosol) scattering atmosphere are analyzed. The error of the extinction coefficient measured at range r depends on the location of the point r(b), where a boundary value is specified, and the particulate optical depth of the atmosphere between r and r(b); the particulate backscatter-to-extinction ratio; and the ratio of particulate and molecular scattering extinction. If the near-end solution is used, small measurement errors can produce a significant divergence between the actual and the retrieved extinction-coefficient profiles, even if the boundary value and the particulate backscatter-to-extinction ratio are specified accurately. This effect is exacerbated at small values of the particulate scattering coefficient and the backscatter-to-extinction ratio. When reasonable criteria are used, feasible minimum and maximum boundary values can be specified to restrict the range of lidar equation solutions from below and from above.

  7. Liquid water content variation with altitude in clouds over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Cloud water content is one of the most fundamental measurements in cloud physics. Knowledge of the vertical variability of cloud microphysical characteristics is important for a variety of reasons. The profile of liquid water content (LWC) partially governs the radiative transfer for cloudy atmospheres, LWC profiles improves our understanding of processes acting to form and maintain cloud systems and may lead to improvements in the representation of clouds in numerical models. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote sensing techniques. The aim of this paper was to analyze the liquid water content (LWC) measurements in clouds, in time of the aircraft flights. The aircraft and its platform ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research is property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania. The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 m). The processed and analyzed measurements are acquired during 4 flights from Romania (Bucharest, 44°25'57″N 26°06'14″E) to Germany (Berlin 52°30'2″N 13°23'56″E) above the same region of Europe. The flight path was starting from Bucharest to the western part of Romania above Hungary, Austria at a cruse altitude between 6000-8500 m, and after 5 hours reaching Berlin. In total we acquired data during approximately 20 flight hours and we presented the vertical and horizontal LWC variations for different cloud types. The LWC values are similar for each type of cloud to values from literature. The vertical LWC profiles in the atmosphere measured during takeoff and landing of the aircraft have shown their

  8. Transmission spectroscopy of HAT-P-32b with the LBT: confirmation of clouds/hazes in the planetary atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonn, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Spectroscopic observations of a transit event of an extrasolar planet offer the opportunity to study the composition of the planetary atmosphere. This can be done with comparably little telescope time using a low-resolution multi-object spectrograph at a large aperture telescope. We observed a transit of the inflated hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph at the Large Binocular Telescope to characterize its atmosphere from 3300 to 10 000 Å. Methods: A time series of target and reference star spectra was binned in two broad-band wavelength channels, from which differential transit light curves were constructed. These broad-band light curves were used to confirm previous transit parameter determinations. To derive the planetary transmission spectrum with a resolution of R ~ 60, we created a chromatic set of 62 narrow-band light curves. The spectrum was corrected for the third light of a nearby M star. Additionally, we undertook a photometric monitoring campaign of the host star to correct for the influence of starspots. Results: The transmission spectrum of HAT-P-32b shows no pressure-broadened absorption features from Na and K, which is interpreted by the presence of clouds or hazes in the planetary atmosphere. This result is in agreement with previous studies on the same planet. The presence of TiO in gas phase could be ruled out. We find a 2.8σ indication of increased absorption in the line core of potassium (K I 7699 Å). No narrow absorption features of Na and Hα were detected. Furthermore, tentative indications were found for a slope of increasing opacity toward blue wavelengths from the near-IR to the near-UV with an amplitude of two scale heights. If confirmed by follow-up observations, it can be explained by aerosols either causing Mie scattering or causing Rayleigh scattering with an aerosol - gas scale height ratio below unity. The host star was found to be photometrically stable within the measurement precision. Based on

  9. Influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO 2 and CO 18 O exchanges

    OpenAIRE

    Still, C.J.; W. J. Riley; S. C. Biraud; Noone, D. C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J. T.; M. S. Torn; Welker, J.; White, J. W. C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G. D.; J. A. Berry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO2 and CO2 isotope fluxes (“isofluxes”) in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C4 grassland) in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM). Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO2 fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest c...

  10. Meridional and Zonal winds at Venus' atmosphere from Cloud-tracking, Doppler techniques and comparison with modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, P.; Widemann, T.; Peralta, J.; Gonçalves, R.; Gilli, G.; Silva, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present final results of the meridional wind in both Venus' hemispheres and spatial and temporal variability of the zonal wind, based on coordinated observations at Venus cloud-tops with two complementary techniques: Ground-based Doppler velocimetry and cloud-tracked winds using VEx/VIRTIS-M. We also present final results based on observations of Venus' bottom of the cloud deck at nightside, carried out with NICS/TNG.The observational results will be compared with the ground-to-thermosphere 3D model developed at LMD (Paris).

  11. The effect of cloud liquid water on tropospheric temperature retrievals from microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Leonie; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2017-11-01

    Microwave radiometry is a suitable technique to measure atmospheric temperature profiles with high temporal resolution during clear sky and cloudy conditions. In this study, we included cloud models in the inversion algorithm of the microwave radiometer TEMPERA (TEMPErature RAdiometer) to determine the effect of cloud liquid water on the temperature retrievals. The cloud models were built based on measurements of cloud base altitude and integrated liquid water (ILW), all performed at the aerological station (MeteoSwiss) in Payerne (Switzerland). Cloud base altitudes were detected using ceilometer measurements while the ILW was measured by a HATPRO (Humidity And Temperature PROfiler) radiometer. To assess the quality of the TEMPERA retrieval when clouds were considered, the resulting temperature profiles were compared to 2 years of radiosonde measurements. The TEMPERA instrument measures radiation at 12 channels in the frequency range from 51 to 57 GHz, corresponding to the left wing of the oxygen emission line complex. When the full spectral information with all the 12 frequency channels was used, we found a marked improvement in the temperature retrievals after including a cloud model. The chosen cloud model influenced the resulting temperature profile, especially for high clouds and clouds with a large amount of liquid water. Using all 12 channels, however, presented large deviations between different cases, suggesting that additional uncertainties exist in the lower, more transparent channels. Using less spectral information with the higher, more opaque channels only also improved the temperature profiles when clouds where included, but the influence of the chosen cloud model was less important. We conclude that tropospheric temperature profiles can be optimized by considering clouds in the microwave retrieval, and that the choice of the cloud model has a direct impact on the resulting temperature profile.

  12. Effect of surface albedo, water vapour, and atmospheric aerosols on the cloud-free shortwave radiative budget in the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Biagio, C. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); University of Siena, Department of Earth Science, Siena (Italy); Di Sarra, A. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); Eriksen, P. [Danish Climate Centre, DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ascanius, S.E. [DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Qaanaaq (Greenland); Muscari, G. [INGV, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Holben, B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study is based on ground-based measurements of downward surface shortwave irradiance (SW), columnar water vapour (wv), and aerosol optical depth ({tau}) obtained at Thule Air Base (Greenland) in 2007-2010, together with MODIS observations of the surface shortwave albedo (A). Radiative transfer model calculations are used in combination with measurements to separate the radiative effect of A ({Delta}SW{sub A}), wv ({Delta}SW{sub wv}), and aerosols ({Delta}SW{sub {tau}}) in modulating SW in cloud-free conditions. The shortwave radiation at the surface is mainly affected by water vapour absorption, which produces a reduction of SW as low as -100 Wm{sup -2} (-18%). The seasonal change of A produces an increase of SW by up to +25 Wm{sup -2} (+4.5%). The annual mean radiative effect is estimated to be -(21-22) Wm{sup -2} for wv, and +(2-3) Wm{sup -2} for A. An increase by +0.065 cm in the annual mean wv, to which corresponds an absolute increase in {Delta}SW{sub wv} by 0.93 Wm{sup -2} (4.3%), has been observed to occur between 2007 and 2010. In the same period, the annual mean A has decreased by -0.027, with a corresponding decrease in {Delta}SW{sub A} by 0.41 Wm{sup -2} (-14.9%). Atmospheric aerosols produce a reduction of SW as low as -32 Wm{sup -2} (-6.7%). The instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF{sub {tau}}) reaches values of -28 Wm{sup -2} and shows a strong dependency on surface albedo. The derived radiative forcing efficiency (FE{sub {tau}}) for solar zenith angles between 55 and 70 is estimated to be (-120.6 {+-} 4.3) for 0.1 < A < 0.2, and (-41.2 {+-} 1.6) Wm{sup -2} for 0.5 < A < 0.6. (orig.)

  13. Retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of clouds from multispectral infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Saito, Masanori; Tokoro, Yuka; Putri, Nurfiena Sagita; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the macroscopic, microphysical, and optical properties of clouds are useful for studying spatial and temporal variations of clouds at various scales and constraining cloud physical processes in climate and weather prediction models. Instead of using separate independent algorithms for different cloud properties, a unified, optimal estimation-based cloud retrieval algorithm is developed and applied to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations using ten thermal infrared bands. The model considers sensor configurations, background surface and atmospheric profile, and microphysical and optical models of ice and liquid cloud particles and radiative transfer in a plane-parallel, multilayered atmosphere. Measurement and model errors are thoroughly quantified from direct comparisons of clear-sky observations over the ocean with model calculations. Performance tests by retrieval simulations show that ice cloud properties are retrieved with high accuracy when cloud optical thickness (COT) is between 0.1 and 10. Cloud-top pressure is inferred with uncertainty lower than 10 % when COT is larger than 0.3. Applying the method to a tropical cloud system and comparing the results with the MODIS Collection 6 cloud product shows good agreement for ice cloud optical thickness when COT is less than about 5. Cloud-top height agrees well with estimates obtained by the CO2 slicing method used in the MODIS product. The present algorithm can detect optically thin parts at the edges of high clouds well in comparison with the MODIS product, in which these parts are recognized as low clouds by the infrared window method. The cloud thermodynamic phase in the present algorithm is constrained by cloud-top temperature, which tends not to produce results with an ice cloud that is too warm and liquid cloud that is too cold.

  14. An Analysis of Titan's Tropical Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Caitlin; Penteado, Paulo; Le Mouelic, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    For the past 8 years, methane clouds have appeared primarily within 30 degrees of the south pole, and in a band centered at 40S latitude, where updrafts are predicted in Titan's circulation. The association of clouds with rising circulation branches is also seen on Earth. But unlike Earth, Titan's circulation is expected to change dramatically with season, with the roughly pole-to-pole circulation flipping such that rising branches occur in the summer hemisphere. Titan is currently approaching equinox, which will occur in 2010. Ground-based and Cassini observations indicate an increasingly greater prevalence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. These clouds are of interest not only because they are newcomers, and may manifest seasonal variations in Titan's atmosphere, but also because they occur very close to the Huygens landing site, where the methane and temperature profiles have been determined. Here we discuss radiative transfer derivation of the structure of Titan's tropical clouds, detected from VIMS observations, in concert with the structural information of the atmosphere, determined from Huygens observations, to understand the clouds' origins.

  15. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  16. A Variational Method to Retrieve the Extinction Profile in Liquid Clouds Using Multiple Field-of-View Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Nicola L.; Hogan, Robin J.; Varnai, Tamas; Battaglia, Alessandro; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    While liquid clouds playa very important role in the global radiation budget, it's been very difficult to remotely determine their internal cloud structure. Ordinary lidar instruments (similar to radars but using visible light pulses) receive strong signals from such clouds, but the information is limited to a thin layer near the cloud boundary. Multiple field-of-view (FOV) lidars offer some new hope as they are able to isolate photons that were scattered many times by cloud droplets and penetrated deep into a cloud before returning to the instrument. Their data contains new information on cloud structure, although the lack of fast simulation methods made it challenging to interpret the observations. This paper describes a fast new technique that can simulate multiple-FOV lidar signals and can even estimate the way the signals would change in response to changes in cloud properties-an ability that allows quick refinements in our initial guesses of cloud structure. Results for a hypothetical airborne three-FOV lidar suggest that this approach can help determine cloud structure for a deeper layer in clouds, and can reliably determine the optical thickness of even fairly thick liquid clouds. The algorithm is also applied to stratocumulus observations by the 8-FOV airborne "THOR" lidar. These tests demonstrate that the new method can determine the depth to which a lidar provides useful information on vertical cloud structure. This work opens the way to exploit data from spaceborne lidar and radar more rigorously than has been possible up to now.

  17. Elevation Change of Drangajokull, Iceland, from Cloud-Cleared ICESat Repeat Profiles and GPS Ground-Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Sigurdsson, Oddur; Williams, Richard, Jr.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2009-01-01

    Located on the Vestfirdir Northwest Fjords), DrangaJokull is the northernmost ice map in Iceland. Currently, the ice cap exceeds 900 m in elevation and covered an area of approx.l46 sq km in August 2004. It was about 204 sq km in area during 1913-1914 and so has lost mass during the 20th century. Drangajokull's size and accessibility for GPS surveys as well as the availability of repeat satellite altimetry profiles since late 2003 make it a good subject for change-detection analysis. The ice cap was surveyed by four GPS-equipped snowmobiles on 19-20 April 2005 and has been profiled in two places by Ice, Cloud. and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) 'repeat tracks,' fifteen times from late to early 2009. In addition, traditional mass-balance measurements have been taken seasonally at a number of locations across the ice cap and they show positive net mass balances in 2004/2005 through 2006/2007. Mean elevation differences between the temporally-closest ICESat profiles and the GPS-derived digital-elevation model (DEM)(ICESat - DEM) are about 1.1 m but have standard deviations of 3 to 4 m. Differencing all ICESat repeats from the DEM shows that the overall elevation difference trend since 2003 is negative with losses of as much as 1.5 m/a from same season to same season (and similar elevation) data subsets. However, the mass balance assessments by traditional stake re-measurement methods suggest that the elevation changes where ICESat tracks 0046 and 0307 cross Drangajokull are not representative of the whole ice cap. Specifically, the area has experienced positive mass balance years during the time frame when ICESat data indicates substantial losses. This analysis suggests that ICESat-derived elevations may be used for multi-year change detection relative to other data but suggests that large uncertainties remain. These uncertainties may be due to geolocation uncertainty on steep slopes and continuing cloud cover that limits temporal and spatial coverage across the

  18. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R.; Avilés, J. L.; Wilson, R. W.; Chun, M.; Butterley, T.; Carrasco, E.

    2008-07-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer SCIDAR (Scintillation Detection and Ranging) (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude resolution. The method is based on the Generalized SCIDAR (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1-m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star targets, which enables the high altitude resolution. Using a 200-arcsec-separation double star, we have obtained turbulence profiles with unprecedented 12-m resolution. The system incorporates necessary novel algorithms for autoguiding, autofocus and image stabilization. The results presented here were obtained at Mauna Kea Observatory. They show LOLAS capabilities but cannot be considered as representative of the site. A forthcoming paper will be devoted to the site characterization. The instrument was built as part of the Ground Layer Turbulence Monitoring Campaign on Mauna Kea for Gemini Observatory.

  19. Statistics of atmospheric turbulence at Cerro Pachon using the GeMS profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Neichel, Benoit; Béchet, Clémentine; Guzmán, Dani; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-08-01

    The knowledge of the atmospheric turbulence profile directly above the telescope using the telemetry from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements can be extremely useful for the optimization of the correction in the new generation of AO systems. For this purpose, two techniques have been recently implemented at the Gemini South MCAO System (GeMS); both based on the SLODAR method. The first technique uses a matrix inversion approach of the slopes covariance matrices and the second deconvolves the cross-correlation functions between all combinations of slopes using the auto-correlation responses. The deconvolution approach has proved to be more reliable that the one based on matrices inversion, so we use it for estimating the profiles from on-sky telemetry gathered over three years (2012 - 2014), obtaining statistical parameters of the turbulence at Cerro Pachón. These results are summarized in this article. Particular attention is paid to the occurrence of turbulence in the dome of the Gemini South telescope.

  20. Calculated resonance line profiles of [Mg II], [C II], and [Si IV] in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrett, E.; McKillop, S. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space mission, launched 2013 June 27, is intended to study the structure of the solar chromosphere and the transition region between the chromosphere and corona. The spectral lines to be observed include the Mg II k line at 2796.5 Å, the C II 1334.5 Å line, and the Si IV line at 1393.8 Å, which are formed in the middle chromosphere, the upper chromosphere, and the lower transition region, respectively. Here we calculate the profiles of these lines from four models of the solar atmosphere, intended to represent the faint and mean internetwork, a network lane, and bright network. We show how the profiles change from the center of the solar disk toward the limb of the Sun and in response to outflows and inflows. These results are intended to cover the range of expected quiet-Sun observations and assist in their interpretation. We expect that the observations will lead to improvements in the models, which can then be used to estimate the required non-radiative heating in the different regions.

  1. Satellite mapping the CCN and cloud vertical microphysical and precipitation profiles in and outside the Manaus plume by using clouds as CCN chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, D.; Krüger, M. L.; Andreae, M. O.; Kraemer, M.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The newly acquired possibility of retrieving from the SUOMI/NPP satellite the cloud base drop concentrations and updrafts made it possible to calculate cloud base vapor super saturation (S) and thus the CCN(S) over the GOAmazon domain, and validate it against surface and aircraft measurements. This was used to map the Manaus air pollution plume and observe its impact on cloud drop effective radius, precipitation forming processes and glaciation temperatures. These observations allow completing and extending the patchy picture obtained by the aircraft measurements over the full domain of interest. The methodology will be shown, as well as the main findings. By the time of the writing of this abstract we have already documented that during pristine conditions the CCN(S) is nearly double in the Manaus plume with respect to the background of ~200 cm-3 at S = 0.25 to 0.3%. The S of cloud base in the Manaus pollution plume is lower by about 0.05 to 0.1%. The cloud depth for initiation of warm rain increases by more than one km due to the decrease in cloud drop effective radius, as indicated by the increase in the isotherm level where it reaches the threshold of 14 micrometer. During smoky conditions, caused by distant biomass burning, the background CCN overwhelms the Manaus plume; CCN can exceed 1000 cm-3 at S Manaus pollution plume.

  2. Modeling the vertical profiles of the index of refraction and (C(sub n))(exp 2) in marine atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Jacques; Hurtaud, Yvonick; Defromont, Yannick; Junchat, Alain

    1995-02-01

    The determination of the conditions of propagation, for systems evolving/moving in the CLSO (Boundary layer of Oceanic Surface), requires the knowledge of the vertical profile of index of refraction. From simple weather measurements, the model PIRAM (Profiles of Index of Refraction in Atmosphere Navy) makes it possible to calculate this profile starting from the vertical profiles of temperature and moisture. PIRAM takes again, with the help of some modifications, the step followed in the Bulk-CELAR model conceived initially for the radio frequencies. Calculations from now on were extended to the optical field. PIRAM also allows the modeling of the vertical profile of the structural parameter of the index of refraction of the air (C(sub n))(exp 2). This new modeling will have to be validated by experimental data. Near the coasts, the knowledge of the vertical profiles is however not always sufficient, because in particular of the horizontal inhomogeneousness of the channel of propagation.

  3. DEVELOPING ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVAL METHODS FOR DIRECT IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS GIANTS IN REFLECTED LIGHT. I. METHANE ABUNDANCES AND BASIC CLOUD PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, Roxana E. [BAER Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Lewis, Nikole [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Line, Michael [Univ. California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Traub, Wesley A., E-mail: Roxana.E.Lupu@nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Upcoming space-based coronagraphic instruments in the next decade will perform reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool directly imaged extrasolar giant planets. We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs a geometric albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler ( emcee ) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm ( MultiNest ) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. As a proof of concept, our current atmospheric model contains one or two cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H{sub 2}–He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492c, a model observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high confidence, while parameter uncertainties are model dependent and correlated. Such general methods will also be applicable to the interpretation of direct imaging spectra of cloudy terrestrial planets.

  4. Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave Broadband Observed Radiance and Estimated Irradiance over Polar Regions from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Instruments on Terra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.

    2004-01-01

    Empirical angular distribution models for estimating top-of-atmosphere shortwave irradiances from radiance measurements over permanent snow, fresh snow and sea ice are developed using CERES measurements on Terra. Permanent snow angular distribution models depend on cloud fraction, cloud optical thickness, and snow brightness. Fresh snow and sea ice angular distribution models depend on snow and sea ice fraction, cloud fraction, cloud optical thickness, and snow and ice brightness. These classifications lead to 10 scene types for permanent snow and 25 scene types for fresh snow and sea ice. The average radiance over clear-sky permanent snow is more isotropic with satellite viewing geometry than that over overcast permanent snow. On average, the albedo of clear-sky permanent snow varies from 0.65 to 0.68 for solar zenith angles between 60$logical and\\circ$ and 80 deg, while the corresponding albedo of overcast scenes varies from 0.70 to 0.73. Clear-sky permanent snow albedos over Antarctica estimated from two independent angular distribution models are consistent to within 0.6%, on average. Despite significant variability in sea ice optical properties with season, the estimated mean relative albedo error is -1 % for very dark sea ice and 0.1% for very bright sea ice when albedos derived from different viewing angles are averaged. The estimated regional root-mean-square (RMS) relative albedo error is 5.6% and 2.6% when the sea ice angular distribution models are applied to a region that contains very dark and very bright sea ice, respectively. Similarly, the estimated relative albedo bias error for fresh snow is -0.1% for very dark snow.

  5. The Impact of Land-Surface Parameter Properties and Resolution on the Simulated Cloud-Topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Leonhard; Maurer, Vera; Kalthoff, Norbert; Kiseleva, Olga

    2017-12-01

    Sensitivity tests using the `Consortium for Small Scale Modeling' model in large-eddy simulation mode with a grid spacing of 100 m are performed to investigate the impact of the resolution of soil- and vegetation-related parameters on a cloud-topped boundary layer in a real-data environment. The reference simulation uses the highest land-surface parameter resolution available for operational purposes (300 m). The sensitivity experiments were conducted using spatial averaging of about 2.5 km× 2.5 km and 10 km × 10 km for the land-surface parameters and a completely homogeneous distribution for the whole model domain of about 70 km × 70 km. Additionally, one experiment with a higher mean soil moisture and another with six mesoscale patches of enhanced or reduced soil moisture are performed. Boundary-layer clouds developed in all simulations. To assess the deviations of cloud cover on different scales within the model domain, we calculated the root-mean-square deviation ( RMSD) between the sensitivity experiments and the reference simulation. The RMSD depends strongly on the spatial resolution at which cloud fields are compared. Different spatial resolutions of the cloud fields were generated by applying a low-pass filter. For all sensitivity experiments, large RMSD values occur for cut-off wavelengths {}5 km, the RMSD is still pronounced for the simulation with higher mean soil moisture. Additionally, for cut-off wavelengths between 5 and 30 km, considerable differences can be found for the experiment with mesoscale patches and for that with homogeneous land-surface parameters. Spatial averaging of land-surface parameters for areas of 2.5 km × 2.5 km and 10 km × 10 km results in larger patch sizes but simultaneously in reduced amplitudes of land-surface parameter anomalies and shows the lowest RMSD for all cut-off wavelengths.

  6. Total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and the vertical profiles of atmospheric parameters in the lowest 200M

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical profiles of air temperature, wind and humidity at Raichur (16 degrees 12'N and 77 degrees 21'E) in the lowest 200m of the atmosphere are presented for the period 15-18 February 1980. The effect of the total solar eclipse, on 16 February...

  7. High Resolution Infrared Radiative Transfer of Earth-like planets Influenced by Multiple Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Mayte; Schreier, Franz; Trautmann, Thomas; Rauer, Heike; Kitzmann, Daniel; Patzer, A. B. C.; Gimeno Garc&ía, Sebastián.

    2012-07-01

    Background:, The emission spectrum of the modern Earth around different types of stars has been modeled in order to study the effects of different incident stellar radiation in the atmosphere. The Earth-like planetary spectra have also been studied in the presence of clouds. Clouds have an impact on the radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres by changing the spectra (intensities and shapes) due to extinction events (scattering and absorption). Thereby, they can influence the atmospheric and surface temperatures and can also generate false-negative biomarker signatures. Methods:, The spectra of Earth-like have been modeled using a line-by-line radiative transfer model coupled with a multiple scattering solver. The atmospheres of these planets were calculated using a convective climate model taking as reference the atmospheric profile from the modern Earth. All main molecular bands found in the thermal region (H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4 and O3) were analyzed at high resolution in order to assess their detectability in the presence of low (water) and high-level (ice) clouds for different percent coverage. Results:, The resulting calculations indicate that the modern Earth spectrum for a cloud-free atmosphere changes in the presence of different stellar types. The pressure-temperature profile and the molecular concentrations of the Earth were altered. In the presence of clouds, the atmospheric temperatures were modified as well. The water cloud cooled down the surface and tropospheric temperatures of the planets while the ice cloud warmed them up. The presence of clouds also decreased the depth of the absorption bands and modified their shapes, consequently producing a false-negative detection of some of the bands. Keywords:, radiation, planets, atmospheres, clouds, aerosols, molecules, scattering, habitability, modeling.

  8. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2010-04-01

    OPTRA has developed an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize the design and build and detail system characterization and test of a prototype I-OP-FTIR instrument. System characterization includes radiometric performance and spectral resolution. Results from a series of tomographic reconstructions of sulfur hexafluoride plumes in a laboratory setting are also presented.

  9. Atmospheric temperature profiles derived through the inversion of a system of first order differential equations. [radiance data from satellite sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, J. A.; Englar, T. S.

    1976-01-01

    Generation of vertical temperatures profiles from remotely sensed atmospheric radiance data is described as an analogous communications system. The radiative transport characteristics of the atmosphere encodes the continuous temperature profile into an 'n' element vector where 'n' is the number of channels in the satellite instrument. The temperature profile is a message transmitted from station A to station B and the link is the satellite instrument. At station B the decoder reproduces a continuous function which is the best estimate of the message encoded at station A. It is shown that the decoder must operate in a tuned mode where the parameters used in the encoder precisely determine the decoder parameters, and that the characteristics of the total message block must be given by a set of decoder constraints

  10. Aerosol-Induced Changes of Convective Cloud Anvils Produce Strong Climate Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Altaratz, O.; Martins, J. V.; Davidi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of aerosol on clouds poses one of the largest uncertainties in estimating the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Small human-induced perturbations to cloud characteristics via aerosol pathways can create a change in the top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing of hundreds of Wm(exp-2) . Here we focus on links between aerosol and deep convective clouds of the Atlantic and Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zones, noting that the aerosol environment in each region is entirely different. The tops of these vertically developed clouds consisting of mostly ice can reach high levels of the atmosphere, overshooting the lower stratosphere and reaching altitudes greater than 16 km. We show a link between aerosol, clouds and the free atmosphere wind profile that can change the magnitude and sign of the overall climate radiative forcing. We find that increased aerosol loading is associated with taller cloud towers and anvils. The taller clouds reach levels of enhanced wind speeds that act to spread and thin the anvi1 clouds, increasing areal coverage and decreasing cloud optical depth. The radiative effect of this transition is to create a positive radiative forcing (warming) at top-of-atmosphere. Furthermore we introduce the cloud optical depth (r), cloud height (Z) forcing space and show that underestimation of radiative forcing is likely to occur in cases of non homogenous clouds. Specifically, the mean radiative forcing of towers and anvils in the same scene can be several times greater than simply calculating the forcing from the mean cloud optical depth in the scene. Limitations of the method are discussed, alternative sources of aerosol loading are tested and meteorological variance is restricted, but the trend of taller clouds; increased and thinner anvils associated with increased aerosol loading remains robust through all the different tests and perturbations.

  11. Neptune's clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  12. Spatiotemporal High-Resolution Cloud Mapping with a Ground-Based IR Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Brede

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high spatiotemporal variability of clouds requires automated monitoring systems. This study presents a retrieval algorithm that evaluates observations of a hemispherically scanning thermal infrared radiometer, the NubiScope, to produce georeferenced, spatially explicit cloud maps. The algorithm uses atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles and an atmospheric radiative transfer code to differentiate between cloudy and cloudless measurements. In case of a cloud, it estimates its position by using the temperature profile and viewing geometry. The proposed algorithm was tested with 25 cloud maps generated by the Fmask algorithm from Landsat 7 images. The overall cloud detection rate was ranging from 0.607 for zenith angles of 0 to 10° to 0.298 for 50–60° on a pixel basis. The overall detection of cloudless pixels was 0.987 for zenith angles of 30–40° and much more stable over the whole range of zenith angles compared to cloud detection. This proves the algorithm’s capability in detecting clouds, but even better cloudless areas. Cloud-base height was best estimated up to a height of 4000 m compared to ceilometer base heights but showed large deviation above that level. This study shows the potential of the NubiScope system to produce high spatial and temporal resolution cloud maps. Future development is needed for a more accurate determination of cloud height with thermal infrared measurements.

  13. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  14. SCAN PROFILES BASED METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION AND EXTRACTION OF PLANAR OBJECTS IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s. The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc. that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  15. An Examination of the Nature of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji; Huffman, George J.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce global cloud regimes (previously also referred to as "weather states") derived from cloud retrievals that use measurements by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites. The regimes are obtained by applying clustering analysis on joint histograms of retrieved cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. By employing a compositing approach on data sets from satellites and other sources, we examine regime structural and thermodynamical characteristics. We establish that the MODIS cloud regimes tend to form in distinct dynamical and thermodynamical environments and have diverse profiles of cloud fraction and water content. When compositing radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument and surface precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, we find that regimes with a radiative warming effect on the atmosphere also produce the largest implied latent heat. Taken as a whole, the results of the study corroborate the usefulness of the cloud regime concept, reaffirm the fundamental nature of the regimes as appropriate building blocks for cloud system classification, clarify their association with standard cloud types, and underscore their distinct radiative and hydrological signatures.

  16. System and Method for Providing Vertical Profile Measurements of Atmospheric Gases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A system and method for using an air collection device to collect a continuous air sample as the device descends through the atmosphere are provided. The air...

  17. Atmospheric Brown Clouds in the Himalayas: first two years of continuous observations at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (5079 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bonasoni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed description of the atmospheric conditions characterizing the high Himalayas, thanks to continuous observations begun in March 2006 at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (NCO-P located at 5079 m a.s.l. on the southern foothills of Mt. Everest, in the framework of ABC-UNEP and SHARE-Ev-K2-CNR projects. The work presents a characterization of meteorological conditions and air-mass circulation at NCO-P during the first two years of activity. The mean values of atmospheric pressure, temperature and wind speed recorded at the site were: 551 hPa, −3.0 °C, 4.7 m s−1, respectively. The highest seasonal values of temperature (1.7 °C and relative humidity (94% were registered during the monsoon season, which was also characterized by thick clouds, present in about 80% of the afternoon hours, and by a frequency of cloud-free sky of less than 10%. The lowest temperature and relative humidity seasonal values were registered during winter, −6.3 °C and 22%, respectively, the season being characterised by mainly cloud-free sky conditions and rare thick clouds. The summer monsoon influenced rain precipitation (seasonal mean: 237 mm, while wind was dominated by flows from the bottom of the valley (S–SW and upper mountain (N–NE.

    The atmospheric composition at NCO-P has been studied thanks to measurements of black carbon (BC, aerosol scattering coefficient, PM1, coarse particles and ozone. The annual behaviour of the measured parameters shows the highest seasonal values during the pre-monsoon (BC: 316.9 ng m−3, PM1: 3.9 μg m−3, scattering coefficient: 11.9 Mm−1, coarse particles: 0.37 cm−3 and O3: 60.9 ppbv, while the lowest concentrations occurred during the monsoon (BC: 49.6 ng m−3, PM1: 0.6 μg m−3, scattering coefficient: 2.2 Mm−1, and O3: 38.9 ppbv

  18. Comparison of Temperature Measurements in the Middle Atmosphere by Satellite with Profiles Obtained by Meteorological Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Feofilov, Artem; Bedrick, M.; Rose, R. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere technique have occasionally been used to obtain temperature results from density data and thereby provide comparison with temperature profiles obtained by satellite sounders in the mesosphere and stratosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within seconds of the nearly overhead satellite pass. Sphere measurements can be used to validate remotely measured temperatures but also have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres available (the manufacture of these systems has been discontinued), it may be time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Three field studies are considered, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden, and two in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific and from Barking Sands, Hawaii. All three sites are used to compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ falling spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for detailed studies in space and time, compare sufficiently well to be highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less frequently. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to those obtained from the falling sphere, thereby providing a reliable measure of global temperature

  19. Venus: Tickling the clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcq, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Even though a thick atmosphere stands between Venus's cloud top and its surface, recent observations now establish the impact of Venus's topography on its upper atmospheric dynamics. Understanding how this is possible will lead to substantial progress in atmospheric computer models.

  20. The Exoplanet Cloud Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Marley, Mark S.; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-10-01

    Clouds have been readily inferred from observations of exoplanet atmospheres, and there exists great variability in cloudiness between planets, such that no clear trend in exoplanet cloudiness has so far been discerned. Equilibrium condensation calculations suggest a myriad of species - salts, sulfides, silicates, and metals - could condense in exoplanet atmospheres, but how they behave as clouds is uncertain. The behavior of clouds - their formation, evolution, and equilibrium size distribution - is controlled by cloud microphysics, which includes processes such as nucleation, condensation, and evaporation. In this work, we explore the cloudy exoplanet phase space by using a cloud microphysics model to simulate a suite of cloud species ranging from cooler condensates such as KCl/ZnS, to hotter condensates like perovskite and corundum. We investigate how the cloudiness and cloud particle sizes of exoplanets change due to variations in temperature, metallicity, gravity, and cloud formation mechanisms, and how these changes may be reflected in current and future observations. In particular, we will evaluate where in phase space could cloud spectral features be observable using JWST MIRI at long wavelengths, which will be dependent on the cloud particle size distribution and cloud species.

  1. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats,viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N2-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  2. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  3. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1 quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2 surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3 multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997–2009 sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  4. Cloud Condensation in Titan's Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Paul N.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    A 1-D condensation model is developed for the purpose of reproducing ice clouds in Titan's lower stratosphere observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), and ethane (C2H6) vapors are treated as chemically inert gas species that flow from an upper boundary at 500 km to a condensation sink near Titan's tropopause (-45 km). Gas vertical profiles are determined from eddy mixing and a downward flux at the upper boundary. The condensation sink is based upon diffusive growth of the cloud particles and is proportional to the degree of supersaturation in the cloud formation regIOn. Observations of the vapor phase abundances above the condensation levels and the locations and properties of the ice clouds provide constraints on the free parameters in the model. Vapor phase abundances are determined from CIRS mid-IR observations, whereas cloud particle sizes, altitudes, and latitudinal distributions are derived from analyses of CIRS far-IR observations of Titan. Specific cloud constraints include: I) mean particle radii of2-3 J.lm inferred from the V6 506 cm- band of HC3N, 2) latitudinal abundance distributions of condensed nitriles, inferred from a composite emission feature that peaks at 160/cm , and 3) a possible hydrocarbon cloud layer at high latitudes, located near an altitude of 60 km, which peaks between 60 and 80 cm l . Nitrile abundances appear to diminish substantially at high northern latitudes over the time period 2005 to 2010 (northern mid winter to early spring). Use of multiple gas species provides a consistency check on the eddy mixing coefficient profile. The flux at the upper boundary is the net column chemical production from the upper atmosphere and provides a constraint on chemical pathways leading to the production of these compounds. Comparison of the differing lifetimes, vapor phase transport, vapor phase loss rate, and particle sedimentation, sheds light on temporal stability

  5. Single-footprint retrievals for AIRS using a fast TwoSlab cloud-representation model and the SARTA all-sky infrared radiative transfer algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. DeSouza-Machado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional variational retrievals of temperature and moisture fields from hyperspectral infrared (IR satellite sounders use cloud-cleared radiances (CCRs as their observation. These derived observations allow the use of clear-sky-only radiative transfer in the inversion for geophysical variables but at reduced spatial resolution compared to the native sounder observations. Cloud clearing can introduce various errors, although scenes with large errors can be identified and ignored. Information content studies show that, when using multilayer cloud liquid and ice profiles in infrared hyperspectral radiative transfer codes, there are typically only 2–4 degrees of freedom (DOFs of cloud signal. This implies a simplified cloud representation is sufficient for some applications which need accurate radiative transfer. Here we describe a single-footprint retrieval approach for clear and cloudy conditions, which uses the thermodynamic and cloud fields from numerical weather prediction (NWP models as a first guess, together with a simple cloud-representation model coupled to a fast scattering radiative transfer algorithm (RTA. The NWP model thermodynamic and cloud profiles are first co-located to the observations, after which the N-level cloud profiles are converted to two slab clouds (TwoSlab; typically one for ice and one for water clouds. From these, one run of our fast cloud-representation model allows an improvement of the a priori cloud state by comparing the observed and model-simulated radiances in the thermal window channels. The retrieval yield is over 90 %, while the degrees of freedom correlate with the observed window channel brightness temperature (BT which itself depends on the cloud optical depth. The cloud-representation and scattering package is benchmarked against radiances computed using a maximum random overlap (RMO cloud scheme. All-sky infrared radiances measured by NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and NWP

  6. Seasonal Changes In Saturn's Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Patricia A.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Momary, T. W.; Kim, J. H.; Baines, K. H.

    2008-09-01

    Previous investigations indicate that Saturn's atmosphere consists of many hydrocarbons and trace chemical species such as methane (CH4), ammonia (NH3), and phosphine (PH3). NIR observations acquired from 1995 to 2006, equivalent to half a Saturnian year, are reduced and analyzed to study seasonal changes in the global distribution of these species in Saturn's clouds. The data was acquired from ground-based NASA/InfraRed Telescope Facility with NSFCAM and NSFCAM2 (1995-2006) and spacecraft Cassini/VIMS (2004-2006). Global cylindrical maps of reflectivitiy (or I/F) were created to extract latitudinal and pole-to-pole profiles of the planet's albedo. Since 1995, as Saturn's south pole received increasing solar insolation, the albedo maps (for wavelengths shorter than 3.0-microns) exhibit an increase in reflectivity at mid-latitudes in the southern hemisphere, decreasing towards the equator and the south pole. Our preliminary results indicate that at deeper levels in the atmosphere probed at 5.2-microns, Saturn's south pole is brightest, displaying trends opposite to those observed at shorter wavelengths. Baines et al. (2007, BAAS 38, 488) report north-south atmospheric asymmetry at 5-microns, based on Cassini/VIMS data. Data acquired from IRTF in February 2004 are consistent with Cassini/VIMS July 2004 data. We use this intersection of 2004 data sets as a benchmark to extend cloud models to the last ring plane crossing of 1995. We will apply Momary et al.'s (2007, BAAS 38, 487) cloud model to both IRTF and Cassini/VIMS data of 2004. Any difference between model and data will be quantified by adjusting the model input parameters to better match model output with observation. This project is pertinent for understanding the changing nature of Saturn;s clouds - differences in the opacity of different species, as Saturn approachs equinox in the near future. This project was supported by the NASA/Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP) office.

  7. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Cummings, K.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E. C.; MacGorman, D. R.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rutledge, S. A.; Koshak, W. J.; Carey, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NOx (= NO + NO2) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NOx production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NOx production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. This talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques, which are being used to achieve them. Observations of NOx were made on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Analysis techniques include initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates, and calculations of the flux of NOx through the anvils, which are combined with observed flash rates to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. We plan to run the WRF-Chem model for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NOx production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. In addition, a specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA's Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NOx to NO2 ratios from the

  8. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Koshak, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A.; Ryerson, T.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E.; MacGorman, D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NO(x) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NO(x) production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NO(x) production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. The talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques which are being used to achieve them. NO(x) was observed on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates have been conducted, which will be followed with calculations of the flux of NO(x) through the anvils, which when combined with observed flash rates can be used to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. The WRF-Chem model will be run for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NO(x) production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. A specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA fs Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NO(x) to NO2 ratios from the

  9. The Høvsøre Tall Wind-Profile Experiment: A Description of Wind Profile Observations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Floors, Rogier Ralph; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    at a meteorological mast. The sonic measurements cover the first 100mand the wind lidar measures above 100m every 50min the vertical. Results of the analysis of observations of the horizontal wind-speed components in the range 10–1200 m and surface turbulence fluxes are illustrated in detail, combined with forcing...... for the analysis of vertical wind-speed profiles under a wide range of atmospheric stability, turbulence, and forcing conditions. One of the objectives of the campaign was to serve as a benchmark for flow over flat terrain models. The observations consist of combined wind lidar and sonic anemometer measurements...

  10. Cloud-Resolving Model and GPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Adler, R.; Hou, A.; Li, X.; Shie, C.-L.; Olson, W.; Kummerow, C.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, rainfall retrieval algorithms have been developed to retrieve rainfall and vertical hydrometeor structures from passive microwave observations by making use of the fact that weighting functions for various frequencies peak at different levels within a rainy atmosphere. GPROF is one of two TMI rainfall algorithms. It is physically based retrieval that finds the vertical hydrometeor profile that best fits the brightness temperatures in the available passive radiometer channels. Matching is achieved using a library of hydrometeor profiles generated by cloud-resolving models (CRMs). The hydrometeor profiles have a corresponding surface precipitation rate. The algorithm retrieves the hydrometeor profiles and associated surface rainfall using a Bayesian approach that gives the estimated expected values. The ability of CRMs to produce cloud structures that are reliable and representative of observed storms is crucial for the success of GPROF. The cloud mycrophysics are one of the keys to achieving this. In addition, CRMs have been a very useful tool for GPM-algorithm developers through Cloud-Radiation Simulations (CRS), one of the nine GPM disciplinary research themes. This paper will discuss how to generate consistent and comprehensive 4D cloud datasets from an improved (i.e., in regard to bulk and multi-moment microphysics) CRM for TRMM and GPM rainfall retrieval algorithm developers. These cloud datasets include CRM-simulated clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations in the tropics and midlatitudes. By linking the CRM with a passive microwave radiative-transfer model and using satellite and airborne data, the performance of the "cloud physics" can be assessed and in turn modified and improved. This paper will also address how to assess and improve the performance of various latent and diabatic heating algorithms and develop an algorithm to retrieve the vertical structure of apparent moistening (Q2). Considering that the

  11. Analyzing the Dynamic and Morphological Characteristics of Clouds on Titan using the Cassini VIMS Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, John; Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2017-10-01

    We present here a comprehensive analysis of tropospheric methane clouds in Titan's atmosphere as imaged by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini spacecraft. When incoming light reaches Titan, increased scattering off cloud particles leads to brightening in certain wavelengths of albedo spectra, and we visually identify cloudy regions using the relative reflectivity of individual pixels in tropospheric channels. By manually progressing through the entirety of the VIMS dataset (~25,000 applicable image cubes), we have used this method to analyze the morphologies and spatial evolutions of 200+ discrete cloud systems over various timescales. Imaged cloud coverage areas range up to ~4.4% of Titan's total surface area, and we resolve speeds up to greater than 25 m/s for sequences spanning observational durations of seconds to days. Applying a radiative transfer model to the cloud sequences provides for the calculation of meridional wind speed profiles, and we observe cloud displacement velocities generally exceeding equatorial wind speeds measured by the Huygens probe. In addition to characterization, our mapping efforts offer both a global distribution of cloud coverage frequency and a long-term picture of latitudinal cloud distribution as a function of time. These seasonal variations illustrate the dynamic nature of methane in Titan's atmosphere, so a comprehensive cloud dataset is conducive to placing better constraints on general circulation models (GCMs). Connections between characterization and mapping can also be made using the search results, for morphologic variations can be indexed in order to explore cloud formation mechanisms.

  12. The Role of Emissivity in the Detection of Arctic Night Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Romano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of clouds over polar areas from satellite radiometric measurements in the visible and IR atmospheric window region is rather difficult because of the high albedo of snow, possible ice covered surfaces, very low humidity, and the usual presence of atmospheric temperature inversion. Cold and highly reflective polar surfaces provide little thermal and visible contrast between clouds and the background surface. Moreover, due to the presence of temperature inversion, clouds are not always identifiable as being colder than the background. In addition, low humidity often causes polar clouds to be optically thin. Finally, polar clouds are usually composed of a mixture of ice and water, which leads to an unclear spectral signature. Single and bi-spectral threshold methods are sometimes inappropriate due to a large variability of surface emissivity and cloud conditions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the crucial role played by surface emissivity in the detection of polar winter clouds and the potential improvement offered by infrared hyperspectral observations, such as from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. In this paper a new approach for cloud detection is proposed and validated exploiting active measurements from satellite sensors, i.e., the CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO. For a homogenous IASI field of view (FOVs, the proposed cloud detection scheme tallies with the combined CPR and CALIOP product in classifying 98.11% of the FOVs as cloudy and also classifies 97.54% of the FOVs as clear. The Hansen Kuipers discriminant reaches 0.95.

  13. LBA-ECO TG-06 Vertical Profiles of Atmospheric Trace Gases over the Amazon Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and sulfur...

  14. LBA-ECO TG-06 Vertical Profiles of Atmospheric Trace Gases over the Amazon Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and...

  15. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  16. What do satellite backscatter ultraviolet and visible spectrometers see over snow and ice? A study of clouds and ozone using the A-train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Vasilkov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine how clouds over snow and ice affect ozone absorption and how these effects may be accounted for in satellite retrieval algorithms. Over snow and ice, the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI Raman cloud pressure algorithm derives an effective scene pressure. When this scene pressure differs appreciably from the surface pressure, the difference is assumed to be caused by a cloud that is shielding atmospheric absorption and scattering below cloud-top from satellite view. A pressure difference of 100 hPa is used as a crude threshold for the detection of clouds that significantly shield tropospheric ozone absorption. Combining the OMI effective scene pressure and the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS cloud top pressure, we can distinguish between shielding and non-shielding clouds.

    To evaluate this approach, we performed radiative transfer simulations under various observing conditions. Using cloud vertical extinction profiles from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR, we find that clouds over a bright surface can produce significant shielding (i.e., a reduction in the sensitivity of the top-of-the-atmosphere radiance to ozone absorption below the clouds. The amount of shielding provided by clouds depends upon the geometry (solar and satellite zenith angles and the surface albedo as well as cloud optical thickness. We also use CloudSat observations to qualitatively evaluate our approach. The CloudSat, Aqua, and Aura satellites fly in an afternoon polar orbit constellation with ground overpass times within 15 min of each other.

    The current Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS total column ozone algorithm (that has also been applied to the OMI assumes no clouds over snow and ice. This assumption leads to errors in the retrieved ozone column. We show that the use of OMI effective scene pressures over snow and ice reduces these errors and leads to a more homogeneous spatial

  17. GPM Ground Validation UND Citation Cloud Microphysics OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation UND Citation Cloud Microphysics OLYMPEX dataset includes measurements of cloud microphysics, state of the atmosphere parameters,...

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION UND CITATION CLOUD MICROPHYSICS GCPEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation UND Citation Cloud Microphysics GCPEx dataset includes instrument measurements of cloud microphysics, state of atmosphere parameters. bulk...

  19. The Relationship between Decadal Changes in Surface Shortwave Radiation,Cloud Cover and other Atmospheric Processes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiacchio, M.; Wild, M.

    2009-04-01

    This study is an analysis of the surface long-term solar radiation variability in Europe beginning in 1970 through 2000 using surface observations from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). The time series of their annual and seasonal means are presented with a major focus on the seasonal dependence of their variations. Based on the 1970-1985 period from the annual means, there is a statistically significant decline of -3.0% decade-1 (-3.8 Wm-2 decade-1) followed by a rise of 0.3% decade-1 (0.4 Wm-2 decade-1) during 1985-2000. For the winter mean time series a trend close to zero is reported but does give some indication for a slight overall increase. The behavior of the solar radiation for spring is similar to the annual series and has the strongest increases of 1.6% decade-1 (2.5 Wm-2 decade-1) during 1985-2000. In summer the changes show a similar evolution to the annual and spring time series but are slightly greater with a trend of -3.2% decade-1 (-6.8 Wm-2 decade-1) for 1970-1985. The autumn series shows a statistically significant downward trend of -2.5% decade-1 (-2.1 Wm-2 decade-1) from 1970-2000. While the annual mean evolution over Europe as a whole is in line with reported changes in aerosols, circulation and associated cloud cover changes play a major role to explain the seasonal mean variations. Further discussion is made with regard to the circulation pattern to explain the seasonal mean trends.

  20. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  1. Determination of the atmospheric optical depth due to the El Chichon stratospheric aerosol cloud in the polluted atmosphere of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, Ignacio [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones en Ciencia del Ambiente, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Colima, (Mexico); Kondratyev, Kirill Ya. [Academician, Counsellor Center for Ecological Safety, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zenteno, Gerardo [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1996-01-01

    Direct solar radiation measurements were used to determine the aerosol optical depth (AOD) increase associated with the presence of aerosol and large particles (ash) originating from the 28 March to 4 April 1982 El Chichon eruptions (17.5 degrees N, 93.3 degrees W; Mexico) on Mexico City's polluted atmospheric aerosol layer. The results are compared with those obtained at Vancouver, British Columbia, revealing that a first AOD increase occurred in both locations during May, June, and July 1982, the Mexico City AOD decay is more extended, not reaching normal climatological values until February 1983. Meanwhile, Vancouver's AOD reached minimum values in September 1982, which subsequently increased over a period from October 1982 to September 1983. This secondary maximum was recorded in Mexico City from March to August 1983. Results suggest that the first AOD increases in May, June and July 1982, both at Vancouver and Mexico City, are due chiefly to short life-time volcanic ash particles being located near the surface. However, the second AOD increases, associated with anomalously colored twilights, corresponds to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. [Spanish] Se utilizaron mediciones de radiacion solar directa para determinar el incremento de la profundidad optica del aerosol (AOD) asociada a la presencia de aerosoles y particulas grandes (cenizas) organizadas por las erupciones de El Chichon (17.5 grados N, 93.3 grados W; Mexico) del 28 de marzo al 4 de abril de 1982 sobre la capa atmosferica contaminada de la Ciudad de Mexico. Los resultados se comparan con los obtenidos en Vancouver, Colombia Britanica, relevando que un primer aumento de AOD ocurrio en ambos lugares durante mayo, junio y julio de 1982. Sin embargo, la AOD decayo en Ciudad de Mexico mas lentamente, alcanzando los valores climatologicos normales hasta febrero de 1983. Mientras tanto la AOD para Vancouver alcanzo valores minimos en septiembre de 1982; estos subsecuentemente se incrementaron en

  2. Review and uncertainty assessment of size-resolved scavenging coefficient formulations for below-cloud snow scavenging of atmospheric aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical parameterizations for the size-resolved scavenging coefficient for atmospheric aerosol particles scavenged by snow (Λsnow need assumptions regarding (i snow particle–aerosol particle collection efficiency E, (ii snow-particle size distribution N(Dp, (iii snow-particle terminal velocity VD, and (iv snow-particle cross-sectional area A. Existing formulas for these parameters are reviewed in the present study, and uncertainties in Λsnow caused by various combinations of these parameters are assessed. Different formulations of E can cause uncertainties in Λsnow of more than one order of magnitude for all aerosol sizes for typical snowfall intensities. E is the largest source of uncertainty among all the input parameters, similar to rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols (Λrain as was found in a previous study by Wang et al. (2010. However, other parameters can also cause significant uncertainties in Λsnow, and the uncertainties from these parameters are much larger than for Λrain. Specifically, different N(Dp formulations can cause one-order-of-magnitude uncertainties in Λsnow for all aerosol sizes, as is also the case for a combination of uncertainties from both VD and A. Assumptions about dominant snow-particle shape (and thus different VD and A will cause an uncertainty of up to one order of magnitude in the calculated scavenging coefficient. In comparison, uncertainties in Λrain from N(Dp are smaller than a factor of 5, and those from VD are smaller than a factor of 2. As expected, Λsnow estimated from empirical formulas generated from field measurements falls in the upper range of, or is higher than, the theoretically estimated values, which can be explained by additional processes/mechanisms that influence field-derived Λsnow but that are not considered in the theoretical Λsnow formulas. Predicted aerosol concentrations obtained by using upper range vs. lower range of Λsnow values (a difference of around two orders

  3. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  4. Remote Sensing of Multiple Cloud Layer Heights Using Multi-Angular Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kenneth; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Mcgill, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Cloud top height (CTH) affects the radiative properties of clouds. Improved CTH observations will allow for improved parameterizations in large-scale models and accurate information on CTH is also important when studying variations in freezing point and cloud microphysics. NASAs airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is able to measure cloud top height using a novel multi-angular contrast approach. For the determination of CTH, a set of consecutive nadir reflectances is selected and the cross-correlations between this set and co-located sets at other viewing angles are calculated for a range of assumed cloud top heights, yielding a correlation profile. Under the assumption that cloud reflectances are isotropic, local peaks in the correlation profile indicate cloud layers. This technique can be applied to every RSP footprint and we demonstrate that detection of multiple peaks in the correlation profile allow retrieval of heights of multiple cloud layers within single RSP footprints. This paper provides an in-depth description of the architecture and performance of the RSPs CTH retrieval technique using data obtained during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC(exp. 4)RS) campaign. RSP retrieved cloud heights are evaluated using collocated data from the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). The method's accuracy associated with the magnitude of correlation, optical thickness, cloud thickness and cloud height are explored. The technique is applied to measurements at a wavelength of 670 nm and 1880 nm and their combination. The 1880-nm band is virtually insensitive to the lower troposphere due to strong water vapor absorption.

  5. Understanding the responses of deep convective clouds to changing thermodynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Marieanne; Dobbie, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Clouds cover a significant part of the globe and have profound impact on the Earth's radiative budget because of their interaction with the propagation of radiation through scattering, absorption and emission processes. Clouds also play an important role in regulating the hydrological cycle through the transport of heat and moisture, which leads to precipitation that is essential in maintaining the biosphere. Berg et al. (2013) reported that convective precipitation is sensitive to temperature change. It is also expected that cloud processes and their radiative effects may change with global warming (Ceppi and Hartmann, 2015). However, cloud responses remain a significant contributor to uncertainties in the climate sensitivity of global warming simulations (Soden and Held, 2006) due to the complex interactions between clouds and other atmospheric processes. Clouds are sensitive to changes in thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and large-scale circulation (Bony et al. (2004). Past studies have looked at the effects of dynamical variability and external perturbations (e.g. aerosol loading and temperature) on cloud and radiation (e.g. Fan et al., 2008; Sherwood et al., 2015). Other studies also looked at the microphysical scale of cloud evolution as computing power improved (Morrison, 2010). However, there is a lack of knowledge about the thermodynamic effects on clouds, especially on convection. Therefore, it is important to understand how changes in the thermodynamic structure predicted from global warming simulations affect the formation and growth of clouds, with a particular focus on the microphysical processes during the cloud evolution and associated cloud radiative properties. Results will be presented from WRF simulations of deep convective clouds that were run based on past and future thermodynamic profiles derived from climate model simulations (CCSM3). Simulations were performed for a range of locations in the USA and cloud and radiative property

  6. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...... drop will only form in the presence of an aerosol, which acts as a condensation site. The droplet distribution of a cloud will then depend on the number of aerosols activated as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the level of super saturation. Based on observational evidence it is argued...

  7. Space-borne clear air lidar measurements in the presence of broken cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Astin

    Full Text Available A number of proposed lidar systems, such as ESA’s AEOLUS (formerly ADM and DIAL missions (e.g. WALES are to make use of lidar returns in clear air. However, on average, two-thirds of the globe is covered in cloud. Hence, there is a strong likelihood that data from these instruments may be contaminated by cloud. Similarly, optically thick cloud may not be penetrated by a lidar pulse, resulting in unobservable regions that are overshadowed by the cloud. To address this, it is suggested, for example, in AEOLUS, that a number of consecutive short sections of lidar data (between 1 and 3.5 km in length be tested for cloud contamination or for overshadowing and only those that are unaffected by cloud be used to derive atmospheric profiles. The prob-ability of obtaining profiles to near ground level using this technique is investigated both analytically and using UV air-borne lidar data recorded during the CLARE’98 campaign. These data were measured in the presence of broken cloud on a number of flights over southern England over a four-day period and were chosen because the lidar used has the same wavelength, footprint and could match the along-track spacing of the proposed AEOLUS lidar.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques; general circulation

  8. Estimating cloud field coverage using morphological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Or, Rotem Z; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit, E-mail: ilan.koren@weizmann.ac.i [Department of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-01-15

    The apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds ('the twilight zone') is often affected by undetectable weak signature clouds and humidified aerosols. It is suggested here to classify the atmosphere into two classes: cloud fields, and cloud-free (away from a cloud field), while detectable clouds are included in the cloud field class as a subset. Since the definition of cloud fields is ambiguous, a robust cloud field masking algorithm is presented here, based on the cloud spatial distribution. The cloud field boundaries are calculated then on the basis of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask products and the total cloud field area is estimated for the Atlantic Ocean (50 deg. S-50 deg. N). The findings show that while the monthly averaged cloud fraction over the Atlantic Ocean during July is 53%, the cloud field fraction may reach 97%, suggesting that cloud field properties should be considered in climate studies. A comparison between aerosol optical depth values inside and outside cloud fields reveals differences in the retrieved radiative properties of aerosols depending on their location. The observed mean aerosol optical depth inside the cloud fields is more than 10% higher than outside it, indicating that such convenient cloud field masking may contribute to better estimations of aerosol direct and indirect forcing.

  9. NASA's atmospheric variability experiments /AVE/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    A series of seven mesoscale experiments were conducted under the NASA program, Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE). Rawinsonde, satellite, aircraft, and ground observations were recorded during specially selected meteorological periods lasting from 1 to 3 days. Details are presented for each AVE relative to observation times, experiment size and location, and significant weather. Some research results based on the use of these AVE data are referenced. These include contributions to regional numerical prediction; relations between wind shears, instability, and thunderstorm motion and development; relations between moisture and temperature and the probability of convection; retrieval of tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated satellite data; variation of convection intensity as a result of atmospheric variability; and effects of cloud rotation on their trajectories.

  10. Characterisation of volatile profile and sensory analysis of fresh-cut "Radicchio di Chioggia" stored in air or modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Martignetti, Antonella; Pellicano, Mario Paolo; Stocchero, Matteo; Cefola, Maria; Pace, Bernardo; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-02-01

    The volatile profile of two hybrids of "Radicchio di Chioggia", Corelli and Botticelli, stored in air or passive modified atmosphere (MAP) during 12 days of cold storage, was monitored by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) GC-MS. Botticelli samples were also subjected to sensory analysis. Totally, 61 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified in the headspace of radicchio samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that fresh product possessed a metabolic content similar to that of the MAP samples after 5 and 8 days of storage. Projection to latent structures by partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis showed the volatiles content of the samples varied depending only on the packaging conditions. Specifically, 12 metabolites describing the time evolution and explaining the effects of the different storage conditions were highlighted. Finally, a PCA analysis revealed that VOCs profile significantly correlated with sensory attributes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolating the Liquid Cloud Response to Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability Using Spaceborne Lidar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A. L.; Kay, J. E.; Chepfer, H.; Guzman, R.; Yettella, V.

    2018-01-01

    While the radiative influence of clouds on Arctic sea ice is known, the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic clouds is challenging to detect, separate from atmospheric circulation, and attribute to human activities. Providing observational constraints on the two-way relationship between sea ice cover and Arctic clouds is important for predicting the rate of future sea ice loss. Here we use 8 years of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) spaceborne lidar observations from 2008 to 2015 to analyze Arctic cloud profiles over sea ice and over open water. Using a novel surface mask to restrict our analysis to where sea ice concentration varies, we isolate the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic Ocean clouds. The study focuses on clouds containing liquid water because liquid-containing clouds are the most important cloud type for radiative fluxes and therefore for sea ice melt and growth. Summer is the only season with no observed cloud response to sea ice cover variability: liquid cloud profiles are nearly identical over sea ice and over open water. These results suggest that shortwave summer cloud feedbacks do not slow long-term summer sea ice loss. In contrast, more liquid clouds are observed over open water than over sea ice in the winter, spring, and fall in the 8 year mean and in each individual year. Observed fall sea ice loss cannot be explained by natural variability alone, which suggests that observed increases in fall Arctic cloud cover over newly open water are linked to human activities.

  12. Development of EarthCARE/MSI ice and water cloud properties products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, S.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishida, H.; Letu, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and aerosols are the major uncertainty in the understanding of the Earth's climate system. An improvement of understanding and better modeling of the relationship of clouds, aerosols and radiation are therefore prominent part in climate research and weather prediction. It is important to obtain the global data of clouds and aerosols occurrence, structure and physical properties that are derived from measurements of solar and thermal radiation. EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer) is one of the future earth observation mission of ESA and JAXA. The satellite will carry four instruments for observation of clouds and aerosols; Atmospheric Lidar (ATLID), Cloud Profiling Rader (CPR), Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), and Broad-Band Radiometer (BBR). This mission aims at understanding of the role that clouds and aerosols play in reflecting incident solar radiation back into space and trapping infrared radiation emitted from Earth's surface. These observations are needed to improve the precision of climate variability prediction. MSI provides across-track information on cloud with channels in the visible, near infrared, shortwave and thermal infrared. Water cloud optical properties are derived in using EarthCARE/MSI standard product based on CLAUDIA [Ishida and Nakajima, 2009] and CAPCOM [Nakajima and Nakajima, 1995; Kawamoto et al., 2001]. Research product based on MWP method [M. Hashimoto, 2015. PhD Thesis] is advanced to obtain the ice cloud optical properties. In this presentation, development of the products and retrieved cloud properties will be introduced.

  13. Atmospheric circulation patterns, cloud-to-ground lightning, and locally intense convective rainfall associated with debris flow initiation in the Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Schultz, Michael D.; Berti, Metteo; Gregoretti, Carlo; Simoni, Alessandro; Mote, Thomas L.; Saylor, Anthony M.

    2016-02-01

    The Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy experience debris flows with great frequency during the summer months. An ample supply of unconsolidated material on steep slopes and a summer season climate regime characterized by recurrent thunderstorms combine to produce an abundance of these destructive hydro-geologic events. In the past, debris flow events have been studied primarily in the context of their geologic and geomorphic characteristics. The atmospheric contribution to these mass-wasting events has been limited to recording rainfall and developing intensity thresholds for debris mobilization. This study aims to expand the examination of atmospheric processes that preceded both locally intense convective rainfall (LICR) and debris flows in the Dolomite region. 500 hPa pressure level plots of geopotential heights were constructed for a period of 3 days prior to debris flow events to gain insight into the synoptic-scale processes which provide an environment conducive to LICR in the Dolomites. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data recorded at the meso-scale were incorporated to assess the convective environment proximal to debris flow source regions. Twelve events were analyzed and from this analysis three common synoptic-scale circulation patterns were identified. Evaluation of CG flashes at smaller spatial and temporal scales illustrated that convective processes vary in their production of CF flashes (total number) and the spatial distribution of flashes can also be quite different between events over longer periods. During the 60 min interval immediately preceding debris flow a majority of cases exhibited spatial and temporal colocation of LICR and CG flashes. Also a number of CG flash parameters were found to be significantly correlated to rainfall intensity prior to debris flow initiation.

  14. The Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Tropospheric winds are an important driver of the design and operation of space launch vehicles. Multiple types of weather balloons and Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), that are capable of measuring atmospheric winds. Meteorological data gathered by these instruments are being used in the design of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and other space launch vehicles, and will be used during the day-of-launch (DOL) of SLS to aid in loads and trajectory analyses. For the purpose of SLS day-of-launch needs, the balloons have the altitude coverage needed, but take over an hour to reach the maximum altitude and can drift far from the vehicle's path. The DRWPs have the spatial and temporal resolutions needed, but do not provide complete altitude coverage. Therefore, the Natural Environments Branch (EV44) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed the Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO) to combine balloon profiles and profiles from multiple DRWPs, filter the spliced profile to a common wavelength, and allow the operator to generate output files as well as to visualize the inputs and the spliced profile for SLS DOL operations. PRESTO was developed in Python taking advantage of NumPy and SciPy for the splicing procedure, matplotlib for the visualization, and Tkinter for the execution of the graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes in detail the Python coding implementation for the splicing, filtering, and visualization methodology used in PRESTO.

  15. Structural characteristics of atmospheric temperature and humidity inside clouds of convective and stratiform precipitation in the rainy season over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Fu, Yunfei

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a merged dataset constructed from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar rain products and Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive data is used to investigate the thermal structural characteristics of convective and stratiform precipitation in the rainy season (May-August) of 1998-2012 over East Asia. The results show that the storm tops for convective precipitation are higher than those for stratiform precipitation, because of the more unstable atmospheric motions for convective precipitation. Moreover, the storm tops are higher at 1200 UTC than at 0000 UTC over land regions for both convective and stratiform precipitation, and vice versa for ocean region. Additionally, temperature anomaly patterns inside convective and stratiform precipitating clouds show a negative anomaly of about 0-2 K, which results in cooling effects in the lower troposphere. This cooling is more obvious at 1200 UTC for stratiform precipitation. The positive anomaly that appears in the middle troposphere is more than 2 K, with the strongest warming at 300 hPa. Relative humidity anomaly patterns show a positive anomaly in the middle troposphere (700-500 hPa) prior to the occurrence of the two types of precipitation, and the increase in moisture is evident for stratiform precipitation.

  16. Evaluation of radiative heating rate profiles in eight GCMs using A-train satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Gregory; Waliser, D. E.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Jiang, X.; Li, J.-L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we take advantage of two modeling experiments and A-train satellite observations to characterize the impact of cloud biases in the vertical distribution of radiative heating rates in eight general circulation models General Circulation Models (GCMs). We compare the modeled vertical distribution of clouds against the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosols Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) using a simulator approach. Although the overall pattern of modeled zonal cloud frequency profiles is relatively good (r=0.92 for the multi-model mean), we show two main systematic biases in the cloud frequency profiles: a positive bias above 7km (up to 10%), particularly in the tropics; and a negative bias below 3km (up to -10%), which reaches a maximum over the stratocumulus cloud regions. Using radiative heating rate profiles calculated with constraints from CloudSat, CALIPSO and other satellite observations, we show that the excess of clouds in the upper troposphere (>7km) results in excess infrared and solar heating in the vicinity of the clouds as well as more infrared heating for the entire column below the cloud. On the other hand, the lack of clouds in the lower troposphere reduces the infrared cooling near the missing cloud levels and increases the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor below. The global radiative heating rate between 50°S and 50°N is too warm in the models (-0.81K/day vs. -1.01K/day). The representation of clouds in GCMs remains challenging, but reducing the cloud biases would lead to an improvement of the heating rate profiles, which in turn would help in improving other aspects of models' simulations such as the dynamics, cloud feedbacks and surface-atmosphere interactions.

  17. Meteorological observations in support of a hill cap cloud experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-06-01

    Humid air flows form a hill cap cloud over the Agana mountain ridge in the north-east of Tenerife. The HILLCLOUD project utilised this cloud formation to investigate the chemical and physical properties of cloud aerosols by land based observations. The project was part of the second Aerosol characterisation Experiment (ACE-2) of the International Global Atmospheric chemistry project (IGAC). The present report describes meteorological observations in support of the hill cap cloud experiment. Time-series of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and humidity were collected at ground-based meteorological stations during a period starting one year in advance of the main campaign. A series of radiosonde detecting the upstream stability and wind profile were launched during the main campaign. (au) 5 tabs., 32 ills., 6 refs.

  18. Study of Clouds Behavior in Central Amazonia Region around Manaus City, using Caliop Information and Comparison with Measurements from Ground Based Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, H. M.; Barja Gonzalez, B.; Rosas, J.; Gouveia, D. A.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds are very important in the climatic system. They can affect the atmospheric radiation budget by reflecting the incoming solar radiation and absorbing the outgoing terrestrial radiation. Semitransparent or optically thin cirrus clouds are almost all the time in the tropics region. They are composed by ice crystals. They are related with the dehydration of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In despite of the importance of the clouds, the understanding of cloud characteristics and their effect on radiation is limited. Climate observations and the models outputs have been indicating cloud properties have changed and continue to change with climate warming. Inclusion of active remote sensors as Lidar on board satellites has constituted a great advance on the atmospheric remote sensing. This type of instrument is able to retrieve the profile of clouds mainly semitransparent ones determining multiple layers of these cloud types. We present in this paper a study of the cloud optical depth (COD) and the occurrence frequency and frequency profile of clouds in a region around Embrapa measurement site at Manaus (2.89 ºS, 59.97 ºW, 100 masl). For this purpose level 2 version 3 cloud profile data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite is used. The studied period extend from June 2006 to June 2014. The cloud optical depth frequency distributions are determined for all cloud types; resulting more frequent the semitransparent cloud types with lowest COD values. The higher COD values correcponding to the opaque cloud types. Mean monthly and hourly behaviors of the occurrence frequency of cloud types are studied. Cirrus transparent is the most frequent cloud type in all months and hours, with a maximum in September and 5 at GMT. Also, are presented and discussed the monthly and hourly frequency profile of all cloud types and the

  19. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  20. Ice cloud microphysical properties in tropical Pacific regions derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoya; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Okamoto, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    We revealed the difference in tropical ice cloud microphysical properties between the western Pacific (WP) and the eastern Pacific (EP), based on satellite retrievals. Vertical profile of effective particle radius of ice cloud (re) was estimated from active sensors on board CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites. In this study, we focused only on ice cloud which is defined as clouds with the cloud top temperature lower than 0°C. To investigate the relationship between cloud optical properties and cloud vertical structures, these ice clouds were classified into five types based on cloud optical thickness values. Compared the vertical profile of re in WP with that in the EP, re around the freezing level within convective cloud in EP slightly larger than that in WP. This analysis also shows that re of optically thick cloud is larger than that of optically thin cloud. The difference in re may be caused by differences in moisture convergence, upward motion, aerosols.

  1. Remote Sensing of Turbulence and Transverse Atmospheric Wind Profiles using Optical Reference Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    traveling from space to Earth are distorted when they pass through the Earth’s atmosphere. This distortion gives rise to the well known twinkling...same point in space at all times. Such an approach requires knowledge of the quantity being measured, therefore the variance of the intersection will...IEEE, 66:651-697 (June 1978). 9. Kolmogoroff , A. N. "The Local Structure of Turbulence in Incompressible Viscous Fluids for Very Large Reynolds

  2. Preliminary Work in Atmospheric Turbulence Profiles with the Differential Multi-image Motion Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import scipy.io as sio from OCCIMA.atmosphere.atmosgeo import geo , atmos # T a r g e t s e p a r a t i o n s i n m e...Viscous Fluid for Very Large Reynolds Numbers.” Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, vol. 30, pp. 299–303. 4. Fried, D. L. 1965. “Statistics of a Geometric

  3. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Top-of-Atmosphere Irradiance and Cloud Cover over Polar Regions Derived from the CERES Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Minnis, Patrick; Francis, Jennifer A.; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutan, David A.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Sun-Mack, Szedung

    2006-01-01

    The semi-direct effects of dust aerosols are analyzed over eastern Asia using 2 years (June 2002 to June 2004) of data from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite, and 18 years (1984 to 2001) of International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. The results show that the water path of dust-contaminated clouds is considerably smaller than that of dust-free clouds. The mean ice water path (IWP) and liquid water path (LWP) of dusty clouds are less than their dust-free counterparts by 23.7% and 49.8%, respectively. The long-term statistical relationship derived from ISCCP also confirms that there is significant negative correlation between dust storm index and ISCCP cloud water path. These results suggest that dust aerosols warm clouds, increase the evaporation of cloud droplets and further reduce cloud water path, the so-called semi-direct effect. The semi-direct effect may play a role in cloud development over arid and semi-arid areas of East Asia and contribute to the reduction of precipitation.

  4. The Mathematical Representation of Wind Speed and Temperature Profiles in the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical expressions which specify non-dimensionalized wind speed and potential temperature gradients as functions of stability are integrated. The integrated equations are tested against Swinhank's wind and temperature profiles measured at Kerang, Australia. It is found that a representation s...

  5. Sensitivity of Landsat 8 Surface Temperature Estimates to Atmospheric Profile Data: A Study Using MODTRAN in Dryland Irrigated Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2017-09-26

    The land surface temperature (LST) represents a critical element in efforts to characterize global surface energy and water fluxes, as well as being an essential climate variable in its own right. Current satellite platforms provide a range of spatial and temporal resolution radiance data from which LST can be determined. One of the most complete records of data comes via the Landsat series of satellites, which provide a continuous sequence that extends back to 1982. However, for much of this time, Landsat thermal data were provided through a single broadband thermal channel, making surface temperature retrieval challenging. To fully exploit the valuable time-series of thermal information that is available from these satellites requires efforts to better describe and understand the accuracy of temperature retrievals. Here, we contribute to these efforts by examining the impact of atmospheric correction on the estimation of LST, using atmospheric profiles derived from a range of in-situ, reanalysis, and satellite data. Radiance data from the thermal infrared (TIR) sensor onboard Landsat 8 was converted to LST by using the MODTRAN version 5.2 radiative transfer model, allowing the production of an LST time series based upon 28 Landsat overpasses. LST retrievals were then evaluated against in-situ thermal measurements collected over an arid zone farmland comprising both bare soil and vegetated surface types. Atmospheric profiles derived from AIRS, MOD07, ECMWF, NCEP, and balloon-based radiosonde data were used to drive the MODTRAN simulations. In addition to examining the direct impact of using various profile data on LST retrievals, randomly distributed errors were introduced into a range of forcing variables to better understand retrieval uncertainty. Results indicated differences in LST of up to 1 K for perturbations in emissivity and profile measurements, with the analysis also highlighting the challenges in modeling aerosol optical depth (AOD) over arid lands and

  6. Major Characteristics of Southern Ocean Cloud Regimes and Their Effects on the Energy Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John M.; Jakob, Christian; Rossow, William B.; Tselioudis, George; Brown, Josephine

    2011-01-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are often poorly represented by climate models, but they make a significant contribution to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, particularly in the shortwave portion of the energy spectrum. This study seeks to better quantify the organization and structure of Southern Hemisphere midlatitude clouds by combining measurements from active and passive satellite-based datasets. Geostationary and polar-orbiter satellite data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are used to quantify large-scale, recurring modes of cloudiness, and active observations from CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are used to examine vertical structure, radiative heating rates, and precipitation associated with these clouds. It is found that cloud systems are organized into eight distinct regimes and that ISCCP overestimates the midlevel cloudiness of these regimes. All regimes contain a relatively high occurrence of low cloud, with 79%of all cloud layers observed having tops below 3 km, but multiple-layered clouds systems are present in approximately 34% of observed cloud profiles. The spatial distribution of regimes varies according to season, with cloud systems being geometrically thicker, on average, during the austral winter. Those regimes found to be most closely associated with midlatitude cyclones produce precipitation the most frequently, although drizzle is extremely common in low-cloud regimes. The regimes associated with cyclones have the highest in-regime shortwave cloud radiative effect at the TOA, but the low-cloud regimes, by virtue of their high frequency of occurrence over the oceans, dominate both TOA and surface shortwave effects in this region as a whole.

  7. Global Weather States and Their Properties from Passive and Active Satellite Cloud Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselioudis, George; Rossow, William; Zhang, Yuanchong; Konsta, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors apply a clustering algorithm to International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud optical thickness-cloud top pressure histograms in order to derive weather states (WSs) for the global domain. The cloud property distribution within each WS is examined and the geographical variability of each WS is mapped. Once the global WSs are derived, a combination of CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) vertical cloud structure retrievals is used to derive the vertical distribution of the cloud field within each WS. Finally, the dynamic environment and the radiative signature of the WSs are derived and their variability is examined. The cluster analysis produces a comprehensive description of global atmospheric conditions through the derivation of 11 WSs, each representing a distinct cloud structure characterized by the horizontal distribution of cloud optical depth and cloud top pressure. Matching those distinct WSs with cloud vertical profiles derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO retrievals shows that the ISCCP WSs exhibit unique distributions of vertical layering that correspond well to the horizontal structure of cloud properties. Matching the derived WSs with vertical velocity measurements shows a normal progression in dynamic regime when moving from the most convective to the least convective WS. Time trend analysis of the WSs shows a sharp increase of the fair-weather WS in the 1990s and a flattening of that increase in the 2000s. The fact that the fair-weather WS is the one with the lowest cloud radiative cooling capability implies that this behavior has contributed excess radiative warming to the global radiative budget during the 1990s.

  8. Earth cloud, aerosol, and radiation explorer optical payload development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélière, A.; Wallace, K.; Pereira do Carmo, J.; Lefebvre, A.

    2017-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are co-operating to develop as part of ESA's Living Planet Programme, the third Earth Explorer Core Mission, EarthCARE, with the ojective of improving the understanding of the processes involving clouds, aerosols and radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. EarthCARE payload consists of two active and two passive instruments: an ATmospheric LIDar (ATLID), a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI) and a Broad-Band Radiometer (BBR). The four instruments data are processed individually and in a synergetic manner to produce a large range of products, which include vertical profiles of aerosols, liquid water and ice, observations of cloud distribution and vertical motion within clouds, and will allow the retrieval of profiles of atmospheric radiative heating and cooling. MSI is a compact instrument with a 150 km swath providing 500 m pixel data in seven channels, whose retrieved data will give context to the active instrument measurements, as well as providing cloud and aerosol information. BBR measures reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the scene. Operating in the UV range at 355 nm, ATLID provides atmospheric echoes from ground to an altitude of 40 km. Thanks to a high spectral resolution filtering, the lidar is able to separate the relative contribution of aerosol and molecular scattering, which gives access to aerosol optical depth. Co-polarised and cross-polarised components of the Mie scattering contribution are measured on dedicated channels. This paper will provide a description of the optical payload implementation, the design and characterisation of the instruments.

  9. Modeling of Carbon Concentration Profile Development During Both Atmosphere and Low Pressure Carburizing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Heat treaters need an effective simulation tool to predict the carburization performance of a variety of steels. The tool is needed to not only predict the carbon profile but also optimize the process in terms of the cycle time and the total cost. CarbToolhas been developed to meet these needs for gas and vacuum carburization. In this article, CarbToolpredictions were compared with industrial experimental results for three types of steels (AISI 8620, 5120, and 4320), heat treated by both gas and vacuum carburizing processes. Based on the agreement of model predictions and experimental results, it is found that CarbToolcould be used to predict the carbon concentration profile for a variety of alloys in both gas and vacuum carburizing processes.

  10. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  11. Warming Ancient Mars with Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwick, V. L.; Toon, O. B.

    2017-10-01

    High altitude clouds in the present day Mars atmosphere may form on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Paleo fluences of IDPs were likely higher, and similar clouds are expected to influence the Mars paleo-climate.

  12. A study of the 3D radiative transfer effect in cloudy atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okata, M.; Teruyuki, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the effect of clouds in the atmosphere is a significant problem in the Earth's radiation budget study with their large uncertainties of microphysics and the optical properties. In this situation, we still need more investigations of 3D cloud radiative transer problems using not only models but also satellite observational data.For this purpose, we have developed a 3D-Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is implemented with various functions compatible with the OpenCLASTR R-Star radiation code for radiance and flux computation, i.e. forward and backward tracing routines, non-linear k-distribution parameterization (Sekiguchi and Nakajima, 2008) for broad band solar flux calculation, and DM-method for flux and TMS-method for upward radiance (Nakajima and Tnaka 1998). We also developed a Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as a method for a construction of 3D cloud field with MODIS/AQUA and CPR/CloudSat data. We then selected a best-matched radar reflectivity factor profile from the library for each of off-nadir pixels of MODIS where CPR profile is not available, by minimizing the deviation between library MODIS parameters and those at the pixel. In this study, we have used three cloud microphysical parameters as key parameters for the MIDPM, i.e. effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and top of cloud temperature, and estimated 3D cloud radiation budget. We examined the discrepancies between satellite observed and mode-simulated radiances and three cloud microphysical parameter's pattern for studying the effects of cloud optical and microphysical properties on the radiation budget of the cloud-laden atmospheres.

  13. Studies of Dark Spots and Their Companion Clouds on the Ice Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhure, Sakhee; Sankar, Ramanakumar; Hadland, Nathan; Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Koutas, Nikko

    2017-10-01

    Observations of ice giant planets in our Solar System have shown several large-scale dark spots with varying lifespans. Some of these features were directly observed, others were diagnosed from their orographic companion clouds. Historically, numerical simulations have been able to model certain characteristics of these storms such as the shape variability of the Neptune Great Dark Spot (GDS-89) (Deng and Le Beau, 2006), but have not been able to match observed drift rates and lifespans using the standard zonal wind profiles (Hammel et al. 2009). Common amongst these studies has been the lack of condensable species in the atmosphere and an explicit treatment of cloud microphysics. Yet, observations show that dark spots can affect neighboring cloud features, such as in the case of bright companion clouds or the “Berg” on Uranus. An analysis of the cloud structure is therefore required to gain a better understanding of the underlying atmospheric physics and dynamics of these vortices.For our simulations, we use the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) general circulation model (Dowling et al. 1998, 2006) and adapt its jovian cloud microphysics module which successfully reproduced the cloud structure of jovian storms, such as the Great Red Spot and the Oval BA (Palotai and Dowling 2008, Palotai et al. 2014). EPIC was recently updated to account for the condensation of methane and hydrogen sulfide (Palotai et al. 2016), which allows us to account for both the high-altitude methane ice-cloud and the deep atmosphere hydrogen sulfide ice-cloud layers.In this work, we simulate large-scale vortices on Uranus and Neptune with varying cloud microphysical parameters such as the deep abundance and the ambient supersaturation. We examine the effect of cloud formation on their lifespan and drift rates to better understand the underlying processes which drive these storms.

  14. ATLID, ESA Atmospheric LIDAR Developement Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    do Carmo João Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATmospheric LIDAR ATLID[1] is part of the payload of the Earth Cloud and Aerosol Explorer[2] (EarthCARE satellite mission, the sixth Earth Explorer Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA Living Planet Programme. EarthCARE is a joint collaborative satellite mission conducted between ESA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (JAXA that delivers the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR instrument. The payload consists of four instruments on the same platform with the common goal to provide a picture of the 3D-dimensional spatial and the temporal structure of the radiative flux field at the top of atmosphere, within the atmosphere and at the Earth’s surface. This paper is presenting an updated status of the development of the ATLID instrument and its subsystem design. The instrument has recently completed its detailed design, and most of its subsystems are already under manufacturing of their Flight Model (FM parts and running specific qualification activities. Clouds and aerosols are currently one of the biggest uncertainties in our understanding of the atmospheric conditions that drive the climate system. A better modelling of the relationship between clouds, aerosols and radiation is therefore amongst the highest priorities in climate research and weather prediction.

  15. Comparison of statistical properties of simulated and observed cumulus clouds during GoMACCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Feingold, G.; Jonsson, H.; Lu, M.; Chuang, P. Y.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    We present comparisons of the statistical properties of clouds generated by Large Eddy Simulations (LES) with aircraft observations of non-precipitating, warm cumulus clouds made during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS). Aircraft data were sampled with the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter airplane. Five flights that are most suitable for studying aerosol-cloud interactions are selected. The model simulations are initiated with observed environmental profiles. The simulations are used to generate an ensemble of thousands of cumulus clouds for statistically meaningful evaluations. Comparison focuses on the statistical properties of a set of dynamical and thermodynamical variables: cloud liquid water content, number mixing ratio of cloud droplets, drop effective radius, updraft velocity, and the distribution of cloud sizes. In general, good agreement between the simulated and observed clouds is achieved, despite big differences in sample size between the model output and the aircraft data. These comparisons, together with the excellent agreement between observed and simulated cloud size distributions, suggest that the LES is able to successfully generate the cumulus cloud populations that were present during GoMACCS.

  16. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  17. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  18. Venus: Jet-setting atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain

    2017-09-01

    A fast equatorial jet in the Venusian cloud layer has been revealed by the Akatsuki orbiter by tracking cloud movement in near-infrared images. The findings suggest that the Venusian atmosphere is more variable than previously thought.

  19. Performance of greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation in cloudy air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proschek, V.; Kirchengast, G.; Emde, C.; Schweitzer, S.

    2012-12-01

    ACCURATE is a proposed future satellite mission enabling simultaneous measurements of greenhouse gases (GHGs), wind and thermodynamic variables from Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The measurement principle is a combination of LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) and microwave occultation (LMO), the LMIO method, where the LIO signals are very sensitive to clouds. The GHG retrieval will therefore be strongly influenced by clouds in parts of the troposphere. The IR-laser signals, at wavelengths within 2--2.5μ m, are chosen to measure six GHGs (H2O, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CO; incl.~key isotopes 13CO2, C18OO, HDO). The LMO signals enable to co-measure the thermodynamic variables. In this presentation we introduce the algorithm to retrieve GHG profiles under cloudy-air conditions by using quasi-realistic forward simulations, including also influence of Rayleigh scattering, scintillations and aerosols. Data from CALIPSO--Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations--with highest vertical resolution of about 60 m and horizontal resolution of about 330 m were used for simulation of clouds. The IR-laser signals consist for each GHG of a GHG-sensitive and a close-by reference signal. The key process, ``differencing'' of these two signals, removes the atmospheric ``broadband'' effects, resulting in a pure GHG transmission profile. Very thin ice clouds, like sub-visible cirrus, are fairly transparent to the IR-laser signals, thicker and liquid water clouds block the signals. The reference signal is used to produce a cloud layering profile from zero to blocking clouds and is smoothed in a preprocess to suppress scintillations. Sufficiently small gaps, of width <2 km in the cloud layering profile, are found to enable a decent retrieval of entire GHG profiles over the UTLS under broken cloudiness and are therefore bridged by interpolation. Otherwise in case of essentially continuous cloudiness the profiles are found to terminate at cloud top level. The accuracy of

  20. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  1. The impacts of light scattering by clouds on longwave radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Huang, X.; Feldman, D.; Flanner, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the longwave spectrum, clouds modulate energy budgets in the climate system through scattering, absorbing and emitting radiation. On the average, ice clouds tend to warm the climate, while liquid water clouds cool the climate, due to the distinct physical and optical properties of ice and liquid water clouds. General circulation models (GCMs) are the most popular tool to investigate the influences of clouds on climate. However, most GCMs, due to computational complexity, neglect multiple scattering effects in longwave radiative transfer calculations. To evaluate the potential impacts of neglecting longwave multiple scattering, we conduct sensitivity studies, utilizing the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) reanalysis atmospheric profiles, a modified RRTMG_LW (Longwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for GCM applications) and the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) collection 6 level 3 cloud retrieval products. The modified RRTMG_LW uses the 16-stream DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer Program for a Multi-Layered Plane-Parallel Medium) as a robust radiative solver to calculate longwave fluxes. In the study, the bias in longwave flux (simulated without, minus simulated with, light scattering by ice and liquid water clouds) represents the influence of neglecting light scattering. Biases of upward flux at the top of the atmosphere, downward flux at the surface, and net flux into the atmosphere are presented. The preliminary results show that the absence of longwave light scattering could lead to considerable biases in global and regional flux simulations.

  2. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  3. Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar: Ozone and Aerosol Atmospheric Profiling for Air Quality Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Ganoe, Rene; Pliutau, Denis; Gronoff, Guillaume; Berkoff, Timothy; Kuang, Shi

    2017-01-01

    The Langley mobile ozone lidar (LMOL) is a mobile ground-based ozone lidar system that consists of a pulsed UV laser producing two UV wavelengths of 286 and 291 nm with energy of approximately 0.2 mJ/pulse 0.2 mJ/pulse and repetition rate of 1 kHz. The 527 nm pump laser is also transmitted for aerosol measurements. The receiver consists of a 40 cm parabolic telescope, which is used for both backscattered analog and photon counting. The lidar is very compact and highly mobile. This demonstrates the utility of very small lidar systems eventually leading to space-based ozone lidars. The lidar has been validated by numerous ozonesonde launches and has provided ozone curtain profiles from ground to approximately 4 km in support of air quality field missions.

  4. Modes of variability of the vertical temperature profile of the middle atmosphere at mid-latitude: Similarities with solar forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Angot, Guillaume

    2012-02-01

    A long and continuous temperature data set from ground to mesopause was obtained in merging lidar and radiosonde data at mid-latitude over south of France (44°N). The analyses using Empirical Orthogonal Functions has been applied on vertical temperature profiles to investigate the variability differently than it has been done in previous investigations. This study reveals as the first mode in winter, a strong anti-correlation between upper stratosphere and mesosphere that is most probably link with planetary waves propagation and associated stratospheric warmings. While in summer the variability is located in the mesosphere and associated with mesospheric inversions that are probably generated by gravity waves breaking. This study shows that even if the daily temperature variability appears to be complex, a large part (30%) can be modeled, each season, using the first EOF. These vertical patterns exhibit some similarities with solar-atmospheric responses, suggesting a potential feedback of the dynamic. This is already observed for winter response, but during summer the contribution of gravity waves on the mesospheric solar response suggests future investigations to explore the role of this potential mechanism in solar-atmospheric connections.

  5. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2017-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  6. Simultaneous Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Temperature profiles using 1.6 μm DIAL in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2016-12-01

    High-accurate vertical carbon dioxide (CO2) profiles are highly desirable in the inverse method to improve quantification and understanding of the global sink and source of CO2, and also global climate change. We have developed a ground based 1.6μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to achieve measurements of vertical CO2 profiles in the atmosphere. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature and pressure in the atmosphere, it is important to measure them simultaneously so that the better accuracy of the DIAL measurement is realized. The barometric formula can derive atmospheric pressure of each altitude using atmospheric pressure of ground level at the lidar site. Comparison of atmospheric pressure prlofiles calculated from this equation and those obtained from radiosonde observations at Tateno, Japan are consisted within 0.2 % below 3 km altitude. So, we have developed a 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL system for simultaneous measurements of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in the lower-atmosphere. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption spectrum is transmitted alternately to the atmosphere. Moreover, the value of the retrieved CO2 concentration will be improved remarkably by processing the iteration assignment of CO2 concentration and temperature, which measured by these DIAL techniques. We have acheived vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profile from 0.5 to 2.0 km altitude by this DIAL system. In the next step, we will use this high accuracy CO2 concentration profile and back-trajectory analysis for the behavior analysis of the CO2 mass. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  7. Characterization of the cloud conditions at Ny-Ålesund using sensor synergy and representativeness of the observed clouds across Arctic sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomokonova, Tatiana; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Maturilli, Marion

    2017-04-01

    structure of the atmosphere is obtained from long-term radiosonde launches. In addition, continuous vertical profiles of temperature and humidity are provided by the microwave radiometer HATPRO. A set of active remote sensing instruments performs cloud observations at Ny-Ålesund: a ceilometer and a Doppler lidar operating since 2011 and 2013, respectively, are now complemented with a novel 94 GHz FMCW cloud radar. As a first step, the CLOUDNET algorithms, including a target categorization and classification, are applied to the observations. In this study, we will present a first analysis of cloud properties at Ny-Ålesund including for example cloud occurrence, cloud geometry (cloud base, cloud top, and thickness) and cloud type (liquid, ice, mixed-phase). The different types of clouds are set into context to the environmental conditions such as temperature, amount of water vapour, and liquid water. We also expect that the cloud properties strongly depend on the wind direction. The first results of this analysis will be also shown.

  8. Atmospheric Profile Retrieval Algorithm for Next Generation Geostationary Satellite of Korea and Its Application to the Advanced Himawari Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jeong Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the 2nd geostationary multi-purpose satellite of Korea with a 16-channel Advanced Meteorological Imager; an algorithm has been developed to retrieve clear-sky vertical profiles of temperature (T and humidity (Q based on a nonlinear optimal estimation method. The performance and characteristics of the algorithm have been evaluated using the measured data of the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI on board the Himawari-8 of Japan, launched in 2014. Constraints for the optimal estimation solution are provided by the forecasted T and Q profiles from a global numerical weather prediction model and their error covariance. Although the information contents for temperature is quite low due to the limited number of channels used in the retrieval; the study reveals that useful moisture information (2~3 degrees of freedom for signal is provided from the three water vapor channels; contributing to the increase in the moisture retrieval accuracy upon the model forecast. The improvements are consistent throughout the tropospheric atmosphere with almost zero mean bias and 9% (relative humidity of root mean square error between 100 and 1000 hPa when compared with the quality-controlled radiosonde data from 2016 August.

  9. A Numerical Study of Convection in a Condensing CO2 Atmosphere under Early Mars-Like Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kensuke; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Odaka, Masatsugu; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Nishizawa, Seiya; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki

    2017-10-01

    Cloud convection of a CO2 atmosphere where the major constituent condenses is numerically investigated under a setup idealizing a possible warm atmosphere of early Mars, utilizing a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model forced by a fixed cooling profile as a substitute for a radiative process. The authors compare two cases with different critical saturation ratios as condensation criteria and also examine sensitivity to number mixing ratio of condensed particles given externally.When supersaturation is not necessary for condensation, the entire horizontal domain above the condensation level is continuously covered by clouds irrespective of number mixing ratio of condensed particles. Horizontal-mean cloud mass density decreases exponentially with height. The circulations below and above the condensation level are dominated by dry cellular convection and buoyancy waves, respectively.When 1.35 is adopted as the critical saturation ratio, clouds appear exclusively as intense, short-lived, quasi-periodic events. Clouds start just above the condensation level and develop upward, but intense updrafts exist only around the cloud top; they do not extend to the bottom of the condensation layer. The cloud layer is rapidly warmed by latent heat during the cloud events, and then the layer is slowly cooled by the specified thermal forcing, and supersaturation gradually develops leading to the next cloud event. The periodic appearance of cloud events does not occur when number mixing ratio of condensed particles is large.

  10. Assessment of observed fog/low-cloud trends in central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Jen; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2017-04-01

    Xitou region, as the epitome of mid-elevation cloud forest ecosystems in Taiwan, it possesses a rich diversity of flora and fauna. It is also a popular forest recreation area. Due to rapid development of the local tourist industry, where tourist numbers increased from 0.3 million/year in 2000 to 2 million/year in 2015, the microclimate has changed continually. Global warming and landscape changes would be also the most likely factors. This study reports findings of monitoring systems including 4 visibility observed sites at different altitude, a self-developed atmospheric profile observation system carried by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and a high temporal cloud base height observation system by a ceilometer. Besides this, the cloud top height of MODIS cloud product is evaluated as well. The results indicated the foggy day ratio in 2015 was 24% lower than that in 2005 around the district of the nursery. The foggy day ratio raised along with the increase of altitude and the sharpest increasing range happened in the summer time. The UAV-observed results showed the top heights of the nighttime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) usually happened under 1300m a.s.l. (250m above ground) and the top heights of daytime ABL rose to 1500m - 2100m a.s.l. Unfortunately, it was difficult to observe the inversion layer/ABL in summer due to the fly height limitation of UAV. The ceilometer-observed results indicated the highest foggy ratio happened around 17:00 (local standard time). The daytime cloudy based height ratio was higher than nighttime and the cloud based height was usually located during 1150m - 1750m a.s.l. which was under the top heights of ABL. In addition, the higher cloud-based-heights-happened ratios were found at 1200m - 1250m a.s.l. and 1350m - 1400m a.s.l.. These results indicated the cloud based height uplifted from ground to at least 150m above ground-level causing the foggy ratio decrease. The MODIS cloud product showed the top height of low cloud uplifted

  11. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Dust formation is thought to play an important role in the mass loss from stars at the asymptotic giant branch (AGB); however, where and how dust forms is still open to debate. Aims: We present visible polarimetric imaging observations of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL as well as high spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations taken with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our goal is to spatially resolve the dust and molecule formation region within a few stellar radii. Methods: We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Hα line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 μm with a spectral resolution of 12000. Results: Taking advantage of the polarimetric imaging capability of SPHERE-ZIMPOL combined with the superb adaptive optics performance, we succeeded in spatially resolving three clumpy dust clouds located at ~50 mas (~2 R⋆) from the central star, revealing dust formation very close to the star. The AMBER data in the individual CO lines suggest a molecular outer atmosphere extending to ~3 R⋆. Furthermore, the SPHERE-ZIMPOL image taken over the Hα line shows emission with a radius of up to ~160 mas (~7 R⋆). We found that dust, molecular gas, and Hα-emitting hot gas coexist within 2-3 R⋆. Our modeling suggests that the observed polarized intensity maps can reasonably be explained by large (0.4-0.5 μm) grains of Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, or MgSiO3 in an optically thin shell (τ550nm = 0.1 ± 0.02) with an inner and outer boundary radius of 1.9-2.0 R⋆ and 3 ± 0.5R⋆, respectively. The observed clumpy structure can be reproduced by a density enhancement of a factor of 4 ± 1. Conclusions: The grain size derived from our modeling of the SPHERE-ZIMPOL polarimetric images is consistent with

  12. Improving Mixed-phase Cloud Parameterization in Climate Model with the ACRF Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhien [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2016-12-13

    Mixed-phase cloud microphysical and dynamical processes are still poorly understood, and their representation in GCMs is a major source of uncertainties in overall cloud feedback in GCMs. Thus improving mixed-phase cloud parameterizations in climate models is critical to reducing the climate forecast uncertainties. This study aims at providing improved knowledge of mixed-phase cloud properties from the long-term ACRF observations and improving mixed-phase clouds simulations in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The key accomplishments are: 1) An improved retrieval algorithm was developed to provide liquid droplet concentration for drizzling or mixed-phase stratiform clouds. 2) A new ice concentration retrieval algorithm for stratiform mixed-phase clouds was developed. 3) A strong seasonal aerosol impact on ice generation in Arctic mixed-phase clouds was identified, which is mainly attributed to the high dust occurrence during the spring season. 4) A suite of multi-senor algorithms was applied to long-term ARM observations at the Barrow site to provide a complete dataset (LWC and effective radius profile for liquid phase, and IWC, Dge profiles and ice concentration for ice phase) to characterize Arctic stratiform mixed-phase clouds. This multi-year stratiform mixed-phase cloud dataset provides necessary information to study related processes, evaluate model stratiform mixed-phase cloud simulations, and improve model stratiform mixed-phase cloud parameterization. 5). A new in situ data analysis method was developed to quantify liquid mass partition in convective mixed-phase clouds. For the first time, we reliably compared liquid mass partitions in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds. Due to the different dynamics in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds, the temperature dependencies of liquid mass partitions are significantly different due to much higher ice concentrations in convective mixed phase clouds. 6) Systematic evaluations

  13. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloud computing; services on a cloud; cloud types; computing utility; risks in using cloud computing. Author Affiliations. V Rajaraman1. Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 22, Issue 11. Current ...

  14. Broken Cloud Field Longwave-Scattering Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, E. E.; Ellingson, R. G.

    2000-05-01

    Throughout most of the shortwave spectrum, atmospheric gases do not absorb the abundant amount of incoming solar radiation. The shortwave-scattering albedo of clouds is very large. The combination of large amounts of incoming solar radiation, low gaseous absorptivity, and large cloud-scattering albedo enables clouds at one level of the atmosphere to affect the shortwave radiative transfer at all other atmospheric levels. Absorption by atmospheric gases is much stronger in the longwave. This localizes the effects of clouds in the longwave. Since longwave absorption is weakest in the window region (8-12 m), cloud effects there will have the greatest chance of propagating to other levels of the atmosphere. In partially overcast conditions, individual cloud geometry and optical properties are important factors. Longwave calculations of most GCMs ignore individual cloud geometry. For liquid water clouds, the optical properties of clouds are also ignored.Previous work in the window region by Takara and Ellingson considered opaque clouds with no absorption or emission by atmospheric gases. Under those conditions, the effect of cloud scattering was comparable to cloud geometry. In this work, the comparison of longwave scattering and geometric effects in the window region is improved by including partially transparent clouds and adding absorption and emission by atmospheric gases. The results show that for optically thick water clouds, it is sufficient to model the geometry; scattering can be neglected. The window region errors are less than 5 W m2 for fluxes and 0.05 K day1 for heating rates. The flat-plate approximation worked for ice clouds; the window region flux errors are less than 3 W m2 with heating rate errors less than 0.05 K day1.

  15. The Effect of Aerosol-Cloud-Vegetation Interactions and Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability on Warm Cloud Development during the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of aerosols on the hydrological cycle remains one of the largest uncertainties in our climate system. Biomass burning, from both deforestation and annual agricultural burning, is the largest anthropogenic source of these aerosols in the Southern Hemisphere. Biomass burning aerosols have competing effects on clouds: Depending on the level of aerosol loading and the background cloud characteristics, biomass burning aerosols have been shown in observational studies to invigorate or inhibit cloud formation and/or growth through microphysical and absorptive pathways, respectively. Many of these previous studies have employed all days during the Amazonian burning season months of August through October to formulate aerosol-cloud correlations, assuming relatively constant meteorological conditions exist throughout these months. This study investigates how intraseasonal trends of precipitable water vapor and aerosol loading between August and October impact these aerosol-cloud correlations. Other factors affecting aerosol-cloud relationships, such as atmospheric stability, are also investigated. This study is focused on a small 3 degree NE x 4 degree WE region in Rondonia, Brazil that encompasses extensive, contiguous areas of both forested and deforested land. High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites, as well as aerosol and water vapor data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are used collectively to explore the effect of aerosols on water vapor loading and warm cloud development over the Amazon. The difference in aerosol effects on the local hydrological cycle over forested and deforested areas is also examined. This final exercise provides insight into the relationship between aerosols, land-atmosphere processes, and warm clouds.

  16. A PROPOSAL FOR OBSERVATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THE TROPOSPHERE AND LOWER STRATOSPHERE OVER ANTARCTICA WITH A NETWORK OF WIND PROFILERS

    OpenAIRE

    カンザワ, ヒロシ; Hiroshi, KANZAWA

    1992-01-01

    The wind profiler is a powerful tool to study atmospheric circulation and transport processes because it can measure not only horizontal components but also the vertical component of wind. A wind profiler developed originally by the U.S. NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories/Wave Propagation Laboratory can measure winds from 0.5-17km above the surface with an altitude resolution of 250m and time resolution under 1 hour. The profiler uses a 400MHz UHF band, and the area of the antenna is ab...

  17. Overview of research and networking with ground based remote sensing for atmospheric profiling at the Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) - the Netherlandse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apituley, A.; Russchenberg, H.; Marel, van der H.; Bosveld, F.; Boers, R.; Brink, ten H.; Leeuw, de G.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Abresser-Rastburg, B.; Röckmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    CESAR, the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, is the Dutch focal point for collaboration on climate monitoring and atmospheric research and is situated on the KNMI meteorological research site near Cabauw in the Netherlands (Cabauw, 51.97 N, 4.93 E). CESAR addresses challenging

  18. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Demory, Brice-Olivier, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric

  19. LIDAR vertical profiles over the Oil Sands Region: an important tool in understanding atmospheric particulate matter transport, mixing and transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    LIDAR technology is an excellent tool to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements, airborne measurements and model verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed an autonomous aerosol LIDAR system that can be deployed to remote areas such as the oil sands. Currently two autonomous LIDAR systems are making measurements in the oil sands region, one since December, 2012 and the other since July, 2013. The LIDAR transmitter emits two wavelengths (1064nm and 532nm) and the detector assembly collects four channels (1064nm backscatter, 532nm backscatter and 532nm depolarization, 607 nm nitrogen channel). Aerosol profiles from near ground to 20 km are collected every 10-60 s providing sufficient resolution to probe atmospheric dynamics, mixing and transport. The depolarization channel provides key information in identifying and discriminating the various aerosol layers aloft such as dust, forest fire plumes, industrial plume sources or ice crystals. The vertical resolution of the LIDAR can determine whether industrial plumes remain aloft or mix down to the surface and also provide estimates as to the concentration of the particulate at various altitudes. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. An intensive measurement campaign will be carried out in August and September of 2013 and will provide coincident airborne and ground-based measurements for the two LIDAR systems. The first results from this field study will be presented as well as some statistics on the frequency and evolution of plume events that were detected by the LIDARs.

  20. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative transcriptional profiling of Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains during growth in CO2-bicarbonate and aerobic atmospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla D Passalacqua

    Full Text Available Bacillus species are spore-forming bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and display a range of virulent and avirulent phenotypes. This range is particularly evident in the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group; where closely related strains cause anthrax, food-borne illnesses, and pneumonia, but can also be non-pathogenic. Although much of this phenotypic range can be attributed to the presence or absence of a few key virulence factors, there are other virulence-associated loci that are conserved throughout the B. cereus group, and we hypothesized that these genes may be regulated differently in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.Here we report transcriptional profiles of three closely related but phenotypically unique members of the Bacillus cereus group--a pneumonia-causing B. cereus strain (G9241, an attenuated strain of B. anthracis (Sterne 34F(2, and an avirulent B. cereus strain (10987--during exponential growth in two distinct atmospheric environments: 14% CO(2/bicarbonate and ambient air. We show that the disease-causing Bacillus strains undergo more distinctive transcriptional changes between the two environments, and that the expression of plasmid-encoded virulence genes was increased exclusively in the CO(2 environment. We observed a core of conserved metabolic genes that were differentially expressed in all three strains in both conditions. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative virulence genes in G9241 suggest that this strain, unlike Bacillus anthracis, may regulate gene expression with both PlcR and AtxA transcriptional regulators, each acting in a different environment.We have shown that homologous and even identical genes within the genomes of three closely related members of the B. cereus sensu lato group are in some instances regulated very differently, and that these differences can have important implications for virulence. This study provides insights into the evolution of the B. cereus group, and

  2. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  3. The effects of different footprint sizes and cloud algorithms on the top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenying; Liang, Lusheng; Miller, Walter F.; Sothcott, Victor E.

    2017-10-01

    Only one Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) and it has been placed in cross-track mode since launch; it is thus not possible to construct a set of angular distribution models (ADMs) specific for CERES on NPP. Edition 4 Aqua ADMs are used for flux inversions for NPP CERES measurements. However, the footprint size of NPP CERES is greater than that of Aqua CERES, as the altitude of the NPP orbit is higher than that of the Aqua orbit. Furthermore, cloud retrievals from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which are the imagers sharing the spacecraft with NPP CERES and Aqua CERES, are also different. To quantify the flux uncertainties due to the footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES, and due to both the footprint size difference and cloud property difference, a simulation is designed using the MODIS pixel-level data, which are convolved with the Aqua CERES and NPP CERES point spread functions (PSFs) into their respective footprints. The simulation is designed to isolate the effects of footprint size and cloud property differences on flux uncertainty from calibration and orbital differences between NPP CERES and Aqua CERES. The footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES introduces instantaneous flux uncertainties in monthly gridded NPP CERES measurements of less than 4.0 W m-2 for SW (shortwave) and less than 1.0 W m-2 for both daytime and nighttime LW (longwave). The global monthly mean instantaneous SW flux from simulated NPP CERES has a low bias of 0.4 W m-2 when compared to simulated Aqua CERES, and the root-mean-square (RMS) error is 2.2 W m-2 between them; the biases of daytime and nighttime LW flux are close to zero with RMS errors of 0.8 and 0.2 W m-2. These uncertainties are within the uncertainties of CERES ADMs. When both footprint size and cloud property

  4. The effects of different footprint sizes and cloud algorithms on the top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instrument on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Su

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Only one Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instrument is onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and it has been placed in cross-track mode since launch; it is thus not possible to construct a set of angular distribution models (ADMs specific for CERES on NPP. Edition 4 Aqua ADMs are used for flux inversions for NPP CERES measurements. However, the footprint size of NPP CERES is greater than that of Aqua CERES, as the altitude of the NPP orbit is higher than that of the Aqua orbit. Furthermore, cloud retrievals from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, which are the imagers sharing the spacecraft with NPP CERES and Aqua CERES, are also different. To quantify the flux uncertainties due to the footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES, and due to both the footprint size difference and cloud property difference, a simulation is designed using the MODIS pixel-level data, which are convolved with the Aqua CERES and NPP CERES point spread functions (PSFs into their respective footprints. The simulation is designed to isolate the effects of footprint size and cloud property differences on flux uncertainty from calibration and orbital differences between NPP CERES and Aqua CERES. The footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES introduces instantaneous flux uncertainties in monthly gridded NPP CERES measurements of less than 4.0 W m−2 for SW (shortwave and less than 1.0 W m−2 for both daytime and nighttime LW (longwave. The global monthly mean instantaneous SW flux from simulated NPP CERES has a low bias of 0.4 W m−2 when compared to simulated Aqua CERES, and the root-mean-square (RMS error is 2.2 W m−2 between them; the biases of daytime and nighttime LW flux are close to zero with RMS errors of 0.8 and 0.2 W m−2. These uncertainties are within the uncertainties of CERES ADMs

  5. The effect of unsteady and baroclinic forcing on predicted wind profiles in Large Eddy Simulations: Two case studies of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    . The applied domain-scale pressure gradient and its height- and time-dependence are estimated from LIDAR measurements of the wind speed above the atmospheric boundary layer in the Høvsøre case, and from radio soundings and a network of ground-based pressure sensors in the Hamburg case. In the two case studies......Due to its fine-resolution requirement and subsequent computational demand, Large Eddy Simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer is limited in most cases to computational domains extending only a few kilometers in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Variations in the flow...... and in relevant atmospheric fields (e.g. temperature) that occur at larger scales must be imposed through boundary conditions or as external forcing. In this work we study the influence of such variations on the wind profile in Large Eddy Simulations of daytime atmospheric boundary layers, by comparing...

  6. Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: an example from M-PACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Boer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice water paths are found to range between 11.0–366.4 (0.5–114.1 gm−2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286–2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm−2.

  7. A study of the effects of vertical resolution and measurement errors on an iteratively inverted temperature profile. [satellite observation of atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, M.-D.

    1975-01-01

    A direct inversion method for inverting the temperature profile from satellite-measured radiation is discussed. The nth power of the weighting function in the integral radiative-transfer equation is used as the weight in the averaging process. The vertical resolution of the inverted temperature profile and the response of the inverted temperature profile to the measurement errors are examined in terms of n. It is found that for smaller values of n, the vertical resolution and the effect of measurement errors are reduced. When n = 0, both the vertical resolution and error effect are minimum. The temperature profile is adjusted by a constant; any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is treated as one layer with a fixed shape of temperature profile. When n approaches infinity, both the vertical resolution and error effect are maximum. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is divided into m (the number of spectral channels) layers. Within each layer, the temperatures are adjusted by a constant, and any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. Also, the shape of the final solution is closer to the initial profile if the value of n is smaller.

  8. Restricting 32-128 km horizontal scales hardly affects the MJO in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model v.3.0 but the number of cloud-resolving grid columns constrains vertical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Michael S.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; DeMott, Charlotte A.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of artificially restricting the 32-128 km horizontal scale regime on MJO dynamics in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model v.3.0 have been explored through reducing the extent of its embedded cloud resolving model (CRM) arrays. Two and four-fold reductions in CRM extent (from 128 to 64 km and 32 km) produce statistical composite MJO signatures with spatial scale, zonal phase speed, and intrinsic wind-convection anomaly structure that are all remarkably similar to the standard SPCAM's MJO. This suggests that the physics of mesoscale convective organization on 32-128 km scales are not critical to MJO dynamics in SPCAM and that reducing CRM extent may be a viable strategy for 400% more computationally efficient analysis of superparameterized MJO dynamics. However several unexpected basic state responses caution that extreme CRM domain reduction can lead to systematic mean state issues in superparameterized models. We hypothesize that an artificial limit on the efficiency of vertical updraft mixing is set by the number of grid columns available for compensating subsidence in the embedded CRM arrays. This can lead to reduced moisture ventilation supporting too much liquid cloud and thus an overly strong cloud shortwave radiative forcing, particularly in regions of deep convection.

  9. AIRS-CloudSat cloud mask and radar reflectivities collocation indexes V3.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is AIRS-AMSU-CloudSat collocation indexes, in ASCII format. These data map CloudSat profile indexes to the collocated AMSU field of views, and AIRS IR...

  10. Improving Estimates of Cloud Radiative Forcing over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Zender, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple driving mechanisms conspire to increase melt extent and extreme melt events frequency in the Arctic: changing heat transport, shortwave radiation (SW), and longwave radiation (LW). Cloud Radiative Forcing (CRF) of Greenland's surface is amplified by a dry atmosphere and by albedo feedback, making its contribution to surface melt even more variable in time and space. Unfortunately accurate cloud observations and thus CRF estimates are hindered by Greenland's remoteness, harsh conditions, and low contrast between surface and cloud reflectance. In this study, cloud observations from satellites and reanalyses are ingested into and evaluated within a column radiative transfer model. An improved CRF dataset is obtained by correcting systematic discrepancies derived from sensitivity experiments. First, we compare the surface radiation budgets from the Column Radiation Model (CRM) driven by different cloud datasets, with surface observations from Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net). In clear skies, CRM-estimated surface radiation driven by water vapor profiles from both AIRS and MODIS during May-Sept 2010-2012 are similar, stable, and reliable. For example, although AIRS water vapor path exceeds MODIS by 1.4 kg/m2 on a daily average, the overall absolute difference in downwelling SW is CRM estimates are within 20 W/m2 range of GC-Net downwelling SW. After calibrating CRM in clear skies, the remaining differences between CRM and observed surface radiation are primarily attributable to differences in cloud observations. We estimate CRF using cloud products from MODIS and from MERRA. The SW radiative forcing of thin clouds is mainly controlled by cloud water path (CWP). As CWP increases from near 0 to 200 g/m2, the net surface SW drops from over 100 W/m2 to 30 W/m2 almost linearly, beyond which it becomes relatively insensitive to CWP. The LW is dominated by cloud height. For clouds at all altitudes, the lower the clouds, the greater the LW forcing. By applying

  11. Marine cloud brightening - as effective without clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlm, Lars; Jones, Andy; Stjern, Camilla W.; Muri, Helene; Kravitz, Ben; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón

    2017-11-01

    Marine cloud brightening through sea spray injection has been proposed as a climate engineering method for avoiding the most severe consequences of global warming. A limitation of most of the previous modelling studies on marine cloud brightening is that they have either considered individual models or only investigated the effects of a specific increase in the number of cloud droplets. Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation-mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of -2.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area. We also find, however, that the global-mean clear-sky ERF by the injected particles is as large as the corresponding total ERF in all three ESMs, indicating a large potential of the aerosol direct effect in regions of low cloudiness. The largest enhancement in ERF due to the presence of clouds occur as expected in the subtropical stratocumulus regions off the west coasts of the American and African continents. However, outside these regions, the ERF is in general equally large in cloudy and clear-sky conditions. These findings suggest a more important role of the aerosol direct effect in sea spray climate engineering than previously thought.

  12. Cloud and Circulation Feedbacks in a Near-Global Aquaplanet Cloud-Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narenpitak, P.; Bretherton, C. S.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2016-12-01

    A near-global aquaplanet cloud-resolving model (CRM) is used to investigate cloud feedbacks due to three climate perturbations: a uniform 4 K increase in sea-surface temperature (SST), a quadrupling of CO2 concentration, and both combined. The CRM has a horizontal resolution of 4 km with no cumulus parameterization. It is a zonally periodic 20480 km-long tropical channel, spanning 46°S-N with rigid walls. An equatorially symmetric QOBS SST distribution is specified for the control simulation. After spin-up, 80 days are analyzed for the control and 4 K SST increase simulations, and 40 days for the simulations with quadrupled CO2. The 4 K SST increase induces a statistically significant increase in subtropical low cloud but decreases midlatitude cloud; its domain-mean shortwave cloud feedbacks are slightly positive. CO2 quadrupling causes a slight shallowing and a statistically insignificant reduction of subtropical low cloud. These results are qualitatively consistent with aquaplanet versions of some conventionally-parameterized climate models [Medeiros et al., 2015, Clim Dyn], and with a superparameterized real-geography version of the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 4 [Bretherton et al., 2014, JAMES], which uses CRMs similar to this study. The geographic structure of warming-induced low cloud changes is strongly correlated with the associated changes in estimated inversion strength (EIS). The EIS increases by 1 K in the subtropics but decreases in the midlatitudes due to poleward jet shifts. Clear-sky boundary-layer radiative cooling plays a key role in the subtropical low cloud increase, as it further destabilizes the cloud layer and produces a positive feedback, in agreement with a hypothesis from Wyant et al. [2009, JAMES]. The subtropical low cloud increase is also associated with stronger vertical velocity variance, although there is little change in the vertical profile of buoyancy flux. The zonal variance of column relative humidity is compared between

  13. Investigating expanded chemistry in CMAQ clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouds and fogs significantly impact the amount, composition, and spatial distribution of gas and particulate atmospheric species, not least of which through the chemistry that occurs in cloud droplets.ᅠ Atmospheric sulfate is an important component of fine aerosol mass an...

  14. Preliminary results from the Stereo-SCIDAR at the VLT Observatory: extraction of reference atmospheric turbulence profiles for E-ELT adaptive optics instrument performance simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Marc S.; Osborn, James; Chacon-Oelckers, Arlette; Dérie, Frédéric J.; Le Louarn, Miska; Milli, Julien; Navarrete, Julio; Wilson, Richard R. W.

    2017-09-01

    The Stereo-SCIDAR (Scintillation Detection and Ranging) atmospheric turbulence profiler, built for ESO by Durham University, observes the scintillation patterns of binary elements with one of the four VLT-Interferometer 1.8m auxiliary telescopes at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The primary products are the vertical profiles of the index of refraction structure coefficient and of the wind velocity which allow to compute the wavefront coherence time and the isoplanatic angle with a vertical resolution of 250m. The several thousands of profiles collected during more than 30 nights of operation are grouped following criteria based on the altitude distribution or on principal component analysis. A set of reference profiles representative of the site is proposed as input for the various simulation models developed by the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) instruments Consortia.

  15. Changes in atmospheric circulation and the Arctic Oscillation preserved within a millennial length reconstruction of summer cloud cover from northern Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Giles H.F.; McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil J.; Gagen, Mary H.; Demmler, Joanne C. [Swansea University, Department of Geography, Swansea (United Kingdom); Kirchhefer, Andreas J. [University of Tromsoe, Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, Tromsoe (Norway); Dendrooekologen, Tromsoe (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    Cloud cover currently represents the single greatest source of uncertainty in General Circulation Models. Stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C) from tree-rings, in areas of low moisture stress, are likely to be primarily controlled by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and therefore should provide a proxy record for cloud cover or sunshine; indeed this association has previously been demonstrated experimentally for Scots pine in Fennoscandia, with sunlight explaining ca 90% of the variance in photosynthesis and temperature only ca 4%. We present a statistically verifiable 1011-year reconstruction of cloud cover from a well replicated, annually-resolved {delta}{sup 13}C record from Forfjord in coastal northwestern Norway. This reconstruction exhibits considerable variability in cloud cover over the past millennium, including extended sunny periods during the cool seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and warm cloudy periods during the eleventh, early fifteenth and twentieth centuries. We find that while a generally positive relationship persists between sunshine and temperature at high-frequency, at lower (multi-decadal) frequencies the relationship is more often a negative one, with cool periods being sunny (most notably the Little Ice Age period from 1600 to 1750 CE) and warm periods more cloudy (e.g. the mediaeval and the twentieth century). We conclude that these long-term changes may be caused by changes in the dominant circulation mode, likely to be associated with the Arctic Oscillation. There is also strong circumstantial evidence that prolonged periods of high summer cloud cover, with low PAR and probably high precipitation, may be in part responsible for major European famines caused by crop failures. (orig.)

  16. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  17. AMF3 CloudSat Overpasses Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matrosov, Sergey [University of Colorado, Boulder; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Hardin, Joseph [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); De Boer, Gijs [University of Colorado, Boulder; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Shupe, Matthew [University of Colorado, Boulder; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Maahn, Maximillian [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Williams, Christopher [University of Colorado, Boulder; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2017-10-15

    Synergy between ground-based and satellite radar observations of clouds and precipitation is important for refining the algorithms to retrieve hydrometeor microphysical parameters, improvements in the retrieval accuracy, and better understanding the advantages and limitations of different retrieval approaches. The new dual-frequency (Ka- and W-band, 35 GHz and 94 GHz) fully polarimetric scanning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facility cloud radars (SACRs-2) are advanced sensors aimed to significantly enhance remote sensing capabilities (Kollias et al. 2016). One of these radars was deployed as part of the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) at Oliktok Point, Alaska (70.495o N, 149.886oW). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CloudSat satellite, which is part of the polar-orbiting A-train satellite constellation, passes over the vicinity of the AMF3 location (typically within 0-7 km depending on a particular overpass) on a descending orbit every 16 days at approximately 13:21 UTC. The nadir pointing W-band CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR) provides vertical profiles of reflectivity that are then used for retrievals of hydrometeor parameters (Tanelli et al. 2008). The main objective of the AMF3 CloudSat overpasses intensive operating period (IOP) campaign was to collect approximately collocated in space and time radar data from the SACR-2 and the CloudSat CPR measurements for subsequent joint analysis of radar variables and microphysical retrievals of cloud and precipitation parameters. Providing the reference for the SACR-2 absolute calibration from the well-calibrated CloudSat CPR was another objective of this IOP. The IOP objectives were achieved by conducting seven special SACR-2 scans during the 10.5-min period centered at the exact time of the CloudSat overpass over the AMF3 (~1321 UTC) on six dates of the CloudSat overpasses during the three-month period allocated to this IOP. These six days

  18. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  19. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1–4 min and  ∼  20 m, respectively in the altitude range  ∼  1.27–4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters. The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  20. Uniform Atmospheric Retrievals of Ultracool Late-T and Early-Y dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ryan; Irwin, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    A significant number of ultracool (NEMESIS atmospheric retrieval code coupled to a Nested Sampling algorithm, along with a standard uniform model for all of our retrievals. The uniform model assumes the atmosphere is described by a gray radiative-convective temperature profile, (optionally) a gray cloud, and a number of relevant gases. We first verify our methods by comparing it to a benchmark retrieval for Gliese 570D, which is found to be consistent. Furthermore, we present the retrieved gaseous composition, temperature structure, spectroscopic mass and radius, cloud structure and the trends associated with decreasing temperature found in this small sample of objects.

  1. A Statistical Review of CALIOP Version 3 and Version 4 Cloud Aerosol Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission has now delivered a 10-year record of high-resolution profiles of backscatter at 532 nm and 1064 nm and linear depolarization at 532 nm. These long-term active sensor measurements at global scale have led to significant advances in our understanding of the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. In the fall of 2016, the CALIPSO science team is scheduled to release a new version of their cloud and aerosol data products. The new cloud and aerosol discrimination products are derived using updated probability density functions that account for numerous improvements to the CALIOP calibration and the use of the GMAO MERRA-2 meteorological data. Moreover, the CAD algorithm is now applied to all layers detected, thus greatly improving the identification of such features as overshooting convective clouds, stratospheric aerosol layers, and high intensity dust storms. Post-processing modules are added to the standard CAD algorithm to ensure proper identification of (for example) the tenuous edges of cirrus clouds and water clouds lying beneath optically dense smoke layers. This work presents statistical comparisons between the CALIOP version 3 and version 4 data sets. Areas of improvement are highlighted, sources of continuing uncertainty are discussed and a list of best practices for data users is provided.

  2. Optical remote measurement of ozone in cirrus clouds; Optische Fernmessung von Ozon in Zirruswolken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    1998-12-31

    The subject of this thesis is theoretical and experimental investigations into the simultaneous optical remote measurement of atmospheric ozone concentration and particle properties. A lidar system was developed that combines the Raman-lidar and the polarization-lidar with the Raman-DIAL technique. An error analysis is given for ozone measurements in clouds. It turns out that the wavelength dependencies of photon multiple scattering and of the particle extinction coefficient necessitate a correction of the measured ozone concentration. To quantify the cloud influence, model calculations based on particle size distributions of spheres are carried out. The most important experimental result of this thesis is the measured evidence of pronounced minima in the ozone distribution in a humid upper troposphere shortly before and during cirrus observation. Good correlation between ozone-depleted altitude ranges and ice clouds is found. This finding is in contrast to ozone profiles measured in a dry and cloud-free troposphere. (orig.) 151 refs.

  3. Cloud optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    Clouds affect the climate of the Earth, and they are an important factor in the weather. Therefore, their radiative properties must be understood in great detail. This book summarizes current knowledge on cloud optical properties, for example their ability to absorb, transmit, and reflect light, which depends on the clouds' geometrical and microphysical characteristics such as sizes of droplets and crystals, their shapes, and structures. In addition, problems related to the image transfer through clouds and cloud remote sensing are addressed in this book in great detail. This book can be an im

  4. 1.6 μm DIAL Measurement and Back Trajectory Analysis of CO2 Concentration Profiles in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activities. In addition to the ground level CO2 network, vertical CO2 concentration profiles also play an important role for the estimation of the carbon budget and global warming in the inversion method. Especially, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, vertical CO2 concentration profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution in the lower atmosphere have been conducted by a differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We have observed several vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations for nighttime and daytime from 0.25 to 2.5 km altitude with range resolution of 300 m and integration time of 1 hour. In order to extract information on the origin of the CO2 masses, one day back trajectories were calculated by using a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric transport model. In many cases, CO2 low concentration layers of over 1.5km altitude were flown by westerly winds from the forest. In another case, high concentration layers of CO2 were flown from the urban areas. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature in the atmosphere, laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption spectrum are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature profiles. Moreover, a few processing algorithms of CO2-DIAL are also performed for improvement of measurement accuracy. For computation of trajectories and drawing their figures, the JRA-25 data provided by the cooperative research project for the JRA-25 long-term reanalysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the NIPR trajectory model (Tomikawa and Sato, 2005; http://firp-nitram.nipr.ac.jp) were used. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and

  5. Atmospheric boundary layer wind profile at a flat coastal site – wind speed lidar measurements and mesoscale modeling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2011-01-01

    Wind profiles up to 600m height are investigated. Measurements of mean wind speed profiles were obtained from a novel wind lidar and compared to model simulations from a mesoscale model (WRFARW v3.1). It is found that WRF is able to predict the mean wind profile rather well and typically within 1......–2ms−1 to the individual measured values. WRF underpredicts the normalized wind profile, especially for stable conditions. The effect of baroclinicity on the upper part of the wind profile is discussed....

  6. Top-down and bottom-up aerosol–cloud closure: towards understanding sources of uncertainty in deriving cloud shortwave radiative flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Sanchez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Top-down and bottom-up aerosol–cloud shortwave radiative flux closures were conducted at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station in Galway, Ireland, in August 2015. This study is part of the BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding European collaborative project, with the goal of understanding key processes affecting aerosol–cloud shortwave radiative flux closures to improve future climate predictions and develop sustainable policies for Europe. Instrument platforms include ground-based unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs1 and satellite measurements of aerosols, clouds and meteorological variables. The ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol size distributions and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentration were used to initiate a 1-D microphysical aerosol–cloud parcel model (ACPM. UAVs were equipped for a specific science mission, with an optical particle counter for aerosol distribution profiles, a cloud sensor to measure cloud extinction or a five-hole probe for 3-D wind vectors. UAV cloud measurements are rare and have only become possible in recent years through the miniaturization of instrumentation. These are the first UAV measurements at Mace Head. ACPM simulations are compared to in situ cloud extinction measurements from UAVs to quantify closure in terms of cloud shortwave radiative flux. Two out of seven cases exhibit sub-adiabatic vertical temperature profiles within the cloud, which suggests that entrainment processes affect cloud microphysical properties and lead to an overestimate of simulated cloud shortwave radiative flux. Including an entrainment parameterization and explicitly calculating the entrainment fraction in the ACPM simulations both improved cloud-top radiative closure. Entrainment reduced the difference between simulated and observation-derived cloud-top shortwave radiative flux (δRF by between 25 and 60 W m−2. After

  7. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  8. Measurement errors in cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Larsen

    Full Text Available The limited accuracy of current cloud microphysics sensors used in cirrus cloud studies imposes limitations on the use of the data to examine the cloud's broadband radiative behaviour, an important element of the global energy balance. We review the limitations of the instruments, PMS probes, most widely used for measuring the microphysical structure of cirrus clouds and show the effect of these limitations on descriptions of the cloud radiative properties. The analysis is applied to measurements made as part of the European Cloud and Radiation Experiment (EUCREX to determine mid-latitude cirrus microphysical and radiative properties.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (cloud physics and chemistry · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Radiative processes · Instruments and techniques

  9. Retrieval of atmospheric properties of cloudy L dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burningham, Ben; Marley, M. S.; Line, M. R.; Lupu, R.; Visscher, C.; Morley, C. V.; Saumon, D.; Freedman, R.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first results from applying the spectral inversion technique in the cloudy L dwarf regime. Our new framework provides a flexible approach to modelling cloud opacity which can be built incrementally as the data require and improves upon previous retrieval experiments in the brown dwarf regime by allowing for scattering in two-stream radiative transfer. Our first application of the tool to two mid-L dwarfs is able to reproduce their near-infrared spectra far more closely than grid models. Our retrieved thermal, chemical and cloud profiles allow us to estimate T_eff = 1796^{+23}_{-25} K and log g = 5.21^{+0.05}_{-0.08} for 2MASS J05002100+0330501, and for 2MASSW J2224438-015852 we find T_eff = 1723^{+18}_{-19} K and log g = 5.31^{+0.04}_{-0.08}, in close agreement with previous empirical estimates. Our best model for both objects includes an optically thick cloud deck which passes τcloud ≥ 1 (looking down) at a pressure of around 5 bar. The temperature at this pressure is too high for silicate species to condense, and we argue that corundum and/or iron clouds are responsible for this cloud opacity. Our retrieved profiles are cooler at depth and warmer at altitude than the forward grid models that we compare, and we argue that some form of heating mechanism may be at work in the upper atmospheres of these L dwarfs. We also identify anomalously high CO abundance in both targets, which does not correlate with the warmth of our upper atmospheres or our choice of cloud model, and find similarly anomalous alkali abundance for one of our targets. These anomalies may reflect unrecognized shortcomings in our retrieval model or inaccuracies in our gas phase opacities.

  10. Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Xiquan [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Wood, Robert [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    With their extensive coverage, low clouds greatly impact global climate. Presently, low clouds are poorly represented in global climate models (GCMs), and the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols remains the major source of uncertainty in climate simulations. The poor representations of low clouds in GCMs are in part due to inadequate observations of their microphysical and macrophysical structures, radiative effects, and the associated aerosol distribution and budget in regions where the aerosol impact is the greatest. The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) is a region of persistent but diverse subtropical marine boundary-layer (MBL) clouds, whose albedo and precipitation are highly susceptible to perturbations in aerosol properties. Boundary-layer aerosol in the ENA region is influenced by a variety of sources, leading to strong variations in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and aerosol optical properties. Recently a permanent ENA site was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility on Graciosa Island in the Azores, providing invaluable information on MBL aerosol and low clouds. At the same time, the vertical structures and horizontal variabilities of aerosol, trace gases, cloud, drizzle, and atmospheric thermodynamics are critically needed for understanding and quantifying the budget of MBL aerosol, the radiative properties, precipitation efficiency, and lifecycle of MBL clouds, and the cloud response to aerosol perturbations. Much of this data can be obtained only through aircraft-based measurements. In addition, the interconnected aerosol and cloud processes are best investigated by a study involving simultaneous in situ aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamics measurements. Furthermore, in situ measurements are also necessary for validating and improving ground-based retrieval algorithms at the ENA site. This project is motivated by the need

  11. Cloud characterization using a particle-counter dropsonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including cloud particles or aerosols. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such convection develop in the vertical direction. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. However, a disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in a cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter is currently being used by the UK Met Office in a ground-based fog monitoring network. It has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, which determines standard meteorological variables and GPS position for transmission back

  12. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  13. Cloud Algorithm Design and Performance for the 2002 Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Hlavka, D. L.; Mahesh, A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A satellite borne lidar instrument, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), is to be launched in late 2002 and will provide continuous profiling of atmospheric clouds and aerosol on a global basis. Data processing algorithms have been developed to provide operational data products in near real time. Basic data products for cloud observations are the height of the top and bottom of single to multiple cloud layers and the lidar calibrated observed backscatter cross section up to the level of signal attenuation. In addition the optical depth and vertical profile of visible extinction cross section of many transmissive cloud layers and most haze layers are to be derived. The optical thickness is derivable in some cases from the attenuation of the molecular scattering below cloud base. In other cases an assumption of the scattering phase function is required. In both cases a estimated correction for multiple scattering is required. The data processing algorithms have been tested in part from aircraft measurements used to simulated satellite data. The GLAS lidar observations will be made from an orbit that will allow inter comparison with all other existing satellite cloud measurements.

  14. Comparisons of the error budgets associated with ground-based FTIR measurements of atmospheric CH4 profiles at Île de la Réunion and Jungfraujoch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaelewyn, Gauthier; Duchatelet, Pierre; Vigouroux, Corinne; Dils, Bart; Kumps, Nicolas; Hermans, Christian; Demoulin, Philippe; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Sussmann, Ralf; de Mazière, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) remote measurements of atmospheric constituents at the observatories at Saint-Denis (20.90°S, 55.48°E, 50 m a.s.l., Île de la Réunion) and Jungfraujoch (46.55°N, 7.98°E, 3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland) are affiliated to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The European NDACC FTIR data for CH4 were improved and homogenized among the stations in the EU project HYMN. One important application of these data is their use for the validation of satellite products, like the validation of SCIAMACHY or IASI CH4 columns. Therefore, it is very important that errors and uncertainties associated to the ground-based FTIR CH4 data are well characterized. In this poster we present a comparison of errors on retrieved vertical concentration profiles of CH4 between Saint-Denis and Jungfraujoch. At both stations, we have used the same retrieval algorithm, namely SFIT2 v3.92 developed jointly at the NASA Langley Research Center, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the National Institute of Water and Atmosphere Research (NIWA) at Lauder, New Zealand, and error evaluation tools developed at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB). The error components investigated in this study are: smoothing, noise, temperature, instrumental line shape (ILS) (in particular the modulation amplitude and phase), spectroscopy (in particular the pressure broadening and intensity), interfering species and solar zenith angle (SZA) error. We will determine if the characteristics of the sites in terms of altitude, geographic locations and atmospheric conditions produce significant differences in the error budgets for the retrieved CH4 vertical profiles

  15. Global Free-tropospheric NO2 Abundances Derived Using a Cloud Slicing Technique from AURA OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S.; Joiner, J.; Choi, Y.; Duncan, B.N.; Vasilkov, A.; Krotkov, N.; Bucsela, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    We derive free-tropospheric NO2 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) by applying a cloud-slicing technique to data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. In the cloud-slicing approach, the slope of the above-cloud NO2 column versus the cloud scene pressure is proportional to the NO2 VMR. In this work, we use a sample of nearby OMI pixel data from a single orbit for the linear fit. The OMI data include cloud scene pressures from the rotational-Raman algorithm and above-cloud NO2 vertical column density (VCD) (defined as the NO2 column from the cloud scene pressure to the top of the atmosphere) from a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm. We compare OMI-derived NO2 VMRs with in situ aircraft profiles measured during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign in 2006. The agreement is generally within the estimated uncertainties when appropriate data screening is applied. We then derive a global seasonal climatology of free-tropospheric NO2 VMR in cloudy conditions. Enhanced NO2 in the free troposphere commonly appears near polluted urban locations where NO2 produced in the boundary layer may be transported vertically out of the boundary layer and then horizontally away from the source. Signatures of lightning NO2 are also shown throughout low and middle latitude regions in summer months. A profile analysis of our cloud-slicing data indicates signatures of lightning-generated NO2 in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the climatology with simulations from the global modeling initiative (GMI) for cloudy conditions (cloud optical depth less than10) shows similarities in the spatial patterns of continental pollution outflow. However, there are also some differences in the seasonal variation of free-tropospheric NO2 VMRs near highly populated regions and in areas affected by lightning-generated NOx.

  16. Multistatic Aerosol Cloud Lidar in Space: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Travis, Larry D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate aerosol and cloud retrievals from space remain quite challenging and typically involve solving a severely ill-posed inverse scattering problem. In this Perspective, we formulate in general terms an aerosol and aerosol-cloud interaction space mission concept intended to provide detailed horizontal and vertical profiles of aerosol physical characteristics as well as identify mutually induced changes in the properties of aerosols and clouds. We argue that a natural and feasible way of addressing the ill-posedness of the inverse scattering problem while having an exquisite vertical-profiling capability is to fly a multistatic (including bistatic) lidar system. We analyze theoretically the capabilities of a formation-flying constellation of a primary satellite equipped with a conventional monostatic (backscattering) lidar and one or more additional platforms each hosting a receiver of the scattered laser light. If successfully implemented, this concept would combine the measurement capabilities of a passive multi-angle multi-spectral polarimeter with the vertical profiling capability of a lidar; address the ill-posedness of the inverse problem caused by the highly limited information content of monostatic lidar measurements; address the ill-posedness of the inverse problem caused by vertical integration and surface reflection in passive photopolarimetric measurements; relax polarization accuracy requirements; eliminate the need for exquisite radiative-transfer modeling of the atmosphere-surface system in data analyses; yield the day-and-night observation capability; provide direct characterization of ground-level aerosols as atmospheric pollutants; and yield direct measurements of polarized bidirectional surface reflectance. We demonstrate, in particular, that supplementing the conventional backscattering lidar with just one additional receiver flown in formation at a scattering angle close to 170deg can dramatically increase the information content of the

  17. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  18. NOAA GOES-R Series Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) Level 2+ Cloud Top Pressure (CTP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cloud Top Pressure product contains an image with pixel values identifying the atmospheric pressure at the top of a cloud layer. The product is generated in...

  19. Modelling the Martian CO2 Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listowski, Constantino; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Lefèvre, F.

    2012-10-01

    Martian CO2 ice cloud formation represents a rare phenomenon in the Solar System: the condensation of the main component of the atmosphere. Moreover, on Mars, condensation occurs in a rarefied atmosphere (large Knudsen numbers, Kn) that limits the growth efficiency. These clouds form in the polar winter troposphere and in the mesosphere near the equator. CO2 ice cloud modeling has turned out to be challenging: recent efforts (e.g. [1]) fail in explaining typical small sizes (80 nm-130 nm) observed for mesospheric clouds [2]. Supercold pockets (TWood, S. E., (1999), Ph.D. thesis, UCLA [6] Young, J. B., J. Geophys. Res., 36, 294-2956, 1993

  20. Evaluating stratiform cloud base charge remotely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri A.; Aplin, Karen L.

    2017-06-01

    Stratiform clouds acquire charge at their upper and lower horizontal boundaries due to vertical current flow in the global electric circuit. Cloud charge is expected to influence microphysical processes, but understanding is restricted by the infrequent in situ measurements available. For stratiform cloud bases below 1 km in altitude, the cloud base charge modifies the surface electric field beneath, allowing a new method of remote determination. Combining continuous cloud height data during 2015-2016 from a laser ceilometer with electric field mill data, cloud base charge is derived using a horizontal charged disk model. The median daily cloud base charge density found was -0.86 nC m-2 from 43 days' data. This is consistent with a uniformly charged region 40 m thick at the cloud base, now confirming that negative cloud base charge is a common feature of terrestrial layer clouds. This technique can also be applied to planetary atmospheres and volcanic plumes.Plain Language SummaryThe idea that clouds in the atmosphere can charge electrically has been appreciated since the time of Benjamin Franklin, but it is less widely recognized that it is not just thunderclouds which contain electric charge. For example, water droplets in simple layer clouds, that are abundant and often responsible for an overcast day, carry electric charges. The droplet charging arises at the upper and lower edges of the layer cloud. This occurs because the small droplets at the edges draw charge from the air outside the cloud. Understanding how strongly layer clouds charge is important in evaluating electrical effects on the development of such clouds, for example, how thick the cloud becomes and whether it generates rain. Previously, cloud charge measurement has required direct measurements within the cloud using weather balloons or aircraft. This work has monitored the lower cloud charge continuously using instruments placed at the surface beneath. From measurements made over 2 years, the

  1. Spatial and temporal variation, source profile, and formation mechanisms of PCDD/FS in the atmosphere of an e-waste recycling area, south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Hu, Jianfang; Chen, Pei; Chen, Deyi; Huang, Weilin; Peng, Ping'an; Ren, Man

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the impact of typical electronic waste (e-waste) dismantling activities on the distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the adjacent atmospheric environment. The target areas included the town of Longtang, a well known e-waste recycling site, and 2 affected neighborhoods, all of which were within the city of Qingyuan,Guangdong Province, China. Air samples were collected from the 3 locations and analyzed following the standard methods. The results showed that the atmospheric PCDD/F level in Longtang was 159.41 pg m(-3), which was approximately 16 to 17 times higher than its neighborhoods and 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than baseline levels reported for urban cities of the world. The homologue profiles were quite different from the typical urban air patterns, as de novo synthesis was likely to be the dominant formation pathway of the detected PCDD/Fs. The seasonal variations were minor, and the concentration change of PCDD/Fs between day and night did not follow a clear pattern. Given the unique atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations, similar homologue profiles, and the elemental carbon/organic carbon relationships of the 3 sampling sites, the relatively high dioxin levels in its 2 neighborhoods were most likely the result of the primitive e-waste dismantling activities undertaken in the town of Longtang. A simple risk assessment also showed that the residents of Qingyuan were at high risk of exposure to PCDD/Fs.

  2. Effect of cirrus clouds on the diurnal cycle of tropical deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gang; Heygster, Georg; Rodriguez, Carlos Augusto Morales

    2006-03-01

    The cirrus clouds tightly connected with tropical deep convective clouds can extend and persist for some hours after the deep convective clouds themselves dissipate. This can result in time lags of the diurnal cycle of deep convective clouds detected from infrared satellite measurements with different brightness temperature thresholds because different amounts of cirrus clouds contaminate the measurement. The diurnal cycles of rain from the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere (TOGA) radar during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Wet Season Atmospheric Mesoscale Campaign (WETAMC) Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) Experiment in Amazonia and the diurnal cycles of deep convective clouds and high cold clouds from the Precipitation Radar (PR), Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) onboard the TRMM satellite over the tropics (30°S-30°N) from November 1998 to April 1999 are investigated to study the influence of cirrus clouds on the observed diurnal cycle of tropical deep convective clouds. A 2-hour time lag of the diurnal cycle of deep convective clouds from the VIRS with respect to that from the PR is found over land. Over ocean the cirrus clouds generated by deep convective clouds enhance the diurnal cycle of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS, and a time lag similar to that over land also occurs. The influence of cirrus clouds leads the diurnal cycle of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS to depend strongly on the selected IR threshold and to be very different from that of the PR over the maritime continent. Moreover, over ocean and the maritime continent, from late afternoon to midnight the strong increase of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS is mainly due to the developing cirrus clouds near and above the tropical tropopause layer.

  3. Controlled meteorological (CMET free balloon profiling of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer around Spitsbergen compared to ERA-Interim and Arctic System Reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from CMET (Controlled Meteorological balloons are analysed to provide insights into tropospheric meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity, wind around Svalbard, European High Arctic. Five Controlled Meteorological (CMET balloons were launched from Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard (Spitsbergen over 5–12 May 2011 and measured vertical atmospheric profiles over coastal areas to both the east and west. One notable CMET flight achieved a suite of 18 continuous soundings that probed the Arctic marine boundary layer (ABL over a period of more than 10 h. Profiles from two CMET flights are compared to model output from ECMWF Era-Interim reanalysis (ERA-I and to a high-resolution (15 km Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR product. To the east of Svalbard over sea ice, the CMET observed a stable ABL profile with a temperature inversion that was reproduced by ASR but not captured by ERA-I. In a coastal ice-free region to the west of Svalbard, the CMET observed a stable ABL with strong wind shear. The CMET profiles document increases in ABL temperature and humidity that are broadly reproduced by both ASR and ERA-I. The ASR finds a more stably stratified ABL than observed but captured the wind shear in contrast to ERA-I. Detailed analysis of the coastal CMET-automated soundings identifies small-scale temperature and humidity variations with a low-level flow and provides an estimate of local wind fields. We demonstrate that CMET balloons are a valuable approach for profiling the free atmosphere and boundary layer in remote regions such as the Arctic, where few other in situ observations are available for model validation.

  4. Temperature profile from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms as part of the ARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment from 1974-08-28 to 1974-09-20 (NCEI Accession 7800314)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using BT and XBT from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the TOGA area - Atlantic from 28 August 1974 to 20...

  5. Parameterization of clouds and radiation in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckner, E. [Max Planck Institute for Meterology, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Clouds are a very important, yet poorly modeled element in the climate system. There are many potential cloud feedbacks, including those related to cloud cover, height, water content, phase change, and droplet concentration and size distribution. As a prerequisite to studying the cloud feedback issue, this research reports on the simulation and validation of cloud radiative forcing under present climate conditions using the ECHAM general circulation model and ERBE top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes.

  6. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  7. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  8. Composition and Chemistry of the Neutral Atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcq, Emmanuel; Mills, Franklin P.; Parkinson, Christopher D.; Vandaele, Ann Carine

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with the composition and chemical processes occurring in the neutral atmosphere of Venus. Since the last synthesis, observers as well as modellers have emphasised the spatial and temporal variability of minor species, going beyond a static and uniform picture that may have prevailed in the past. The outline of this paper acknowledges this situation and follows closely the different dimensions along which variability in composition can be observed: vertical, latitudinal, longitudinal, temporal. The strong differences between the atmosphere below and above the cloud layers also dictate the structure of this paper. Observational constraints, obtained from both Earth and Venus Express, as well as 1D, 2D and 3D models results obtained since 1997 are also extensively referred and commented by the authors. An non-exhaustive list of topics included follows: modelled and observed latitudinal and vertical profiles of CO and OCS below the clouds of Venus; vertical profiles of CO and SO2 above the clouds as observed by solar occultation and modelled; temporal and spatial variability of sulphur oxides above the clouds. As a conclusion, open questions and topics of interest for further studies are discussed.

  9. Screaming Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  10. 2-μm Coherent DIAL for CO2, H2O and Wind Field Profiling in the Lower Atmosphere: Instrumentation and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibert Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 2-μm coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapour (H2O absorption and wind field profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer. The CDIAL uses a Tm:fiber pumped, single longitudinal mode Q-switched seeded Ho:YLF laser and a fibercoupled coherent detection. The laser operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz and emits an output energy of 10 mJ with a pulse width of 40 ns (FWHM. Experimental horizontal and vertical range-resolved measurements were made in the atmospheric boundary layer and compared to colocated in-situ sensor data.

  11. Barbados Cloud Observatory: Raman Lidars for air temperature, humidity, aerosols and cloud characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, Ilya; Linné, Holger; Brügmann, Björn; Kiliani, Johannes; Stevens, Bjorn

    2017-04-01

    Processes governing the development and evolution of shallow cumulus clouds in trades remain a large uncertainty in climate studies. To enrich the experimental database, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in cooperation with Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology have established and maintain since April 2010 the Barbados Cloud Observatory (13.1627 N, 59.4289 W) equipped among other instrumentation with multi-channel Raman lidar to profile routinely the cloud stratification, aerosol properties, air temperature and humidity. More than six years of operation with nearly continuous data flow resulted in quite extensive and statistically representative dataset. In this presentation we describe and evaluate three generations of Raman lidars that have been or are begin deployed at the observatory. Focusing primarily on our first lidar initially deployed on the site, an EARLI system (the MPI-M Raman lidar originally designed for EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork) that gave us most of the lidar data collected, we compare it to the presently deployed instrument, the LICHT system (LIdar for Clouds, Humidity and Temperature) designed to extend the observation with daytime measurements of water vapor. Third-generation lidar, a high power Raman lidar component of the upcoming CORAL system (Cloud Observation with RAdar and Lidar) developed for high resolution water vapor measurement is being prepared for deployment and will be described conceptually. Giving an overview on the technique implemented, we touch briefly the lidar calibration algorithms, some aspects of quality assurance, and present the data available with a particular focus on the ability of the instruments to measure atmospheric humidity and extinction.

  12. Remote sensing of multiple cloud layer heights using multi-angular measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kenneth; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John; Wasilewski, Andrzej; McGill, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Cloud top height (CTH) affects the radiative properties of clouds. Improved CTH observations will allow for improved parameterizations in large-scale models and accurate information on CTH is also important when studying variations in freezing point and cloud microphysics. NASA's airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is able to measure cloud top height using a novel multi-angular contrast approach. For the determination of CTH, a set of consecutive nadir reflectances is selected and the cross correlations between this set and collocated sets at other viewing angles are calculated for a range of assumed cloud top heights, yielding a correlation profile. Under the assumption that cloud reflectances are isotropic, local peaks in the correlation profile indicate cloud layers. This technique can be applied to every RSP footprint and we demonstrate that detection of multiple peaks in the correlation profile allows retrieval of heights of multiple cloud layers within single RSP footprints. This paper provides an in-depth description of the architecture and performance of the RSP's CTH retrieval technique using data obtained during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign. RSP-retrieved cloud heights are evaluated using collocated data from the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). The method's accuracy associated with the magnitude of correlation, optical thickness, cloud thickness and cloud height are explored. The technique is applied to measurements at a wavelength of 670 and 1880 nm and their combination. The 1880 nm band is virtually insensitive to the lower troposphere due to strong water vapor absorption. It is found that each band is well suitable for retrieving heights of cloud layers with optical thicknesses above about 0.1 and that RSP cloud layer height retrievals more accurately correspond to CPL cloud middle than cloud top. It is also found that the 1880 nm band yields the most

  13. Evaluation of the shortwave cloud radiative effect over the ocean by use of ship and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hanschmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the shortwave cloud radiative effect (SWCRE over ocean calculated by the EC