WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiles provide examples

  1. Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano provides unusual example of venting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P. R.; Cherkashev, G.; Ginsburg, G.; Ivanov, G.; Milkov, A.; Crane, K.; Sundvor, A.; Pimenov, N.; Egorov, A.

    A seafloor mud volcano north of Norway is presenting researchers with an uncommon example of venting and is raising important questions. Seafloor aqueous vents, gas vents, mud volcanoes, and mud diapirs are found in a variety of geological settings. However, scientists did not expect to discover venting at the northern site, now known as the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV). It is considered especially unusual because of its Arctitc Location (72°N), its development largely within glacial marine sediments, and its lack of association either with salt tectonics or with plate subduction. Further, the volcano is posing questions for investigators about the relationship of methane generation and mud volcanism to thick, rapidly deposited sediments; sediment failure; and gas hydrates (GH).

  2. Students’ Thinking Procesess on Quadrilateral Concept: A Case of Providing Non-Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaju, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    Characteristic of someone understand the concepts is the ability to give the examples and non-examples and the reasons. The thinking process in determining the example and non-examples of a concept will be different because of its cognitive style. This is an explorative study which qualitatively analyze the thinking processes of field independent (FI) and field dependent (FD) students in providing non examples of quadrilateral concepts. The results of the study indicate that: 1) The essential characteristics of each shape in the quadrilateral as the basis for the FI participant to determine the non-examples, so that the shape which does not meet those characteristics are selected as non-examples. The selected first non-example tends to be similar with the grouped shapes. 2) The essential characteristics of each shape in the quadrilateral as the basis for the FD participant to determine the non-examples, so the shapes have striking differences are chosen as non-examples to make her be easier to give the reasons. The determination of the essential characteristics of a quadrilateral is important in determining non-example of quadrilateral. Based on the selection of examples and non-examples of quadrilateral will facilitate to determine the relationship of many concepts in the quadrilateral.

  3. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

  4. Modified-release hydrocortisone to provide circadian cortisol profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Ghobadi, Cyrus; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Huatan, Hiep; Campbell, Michael J; Newell-Price, John; Darzy, Ken; Merke, Deborah P; Arlt, Wiebke; Ross, Richard J

    2009-05-01

    Cortisol has a distinct circadian rhythm regulated by the brain's central pacemaker. Loss of this rhythm is associated with metabolic abnormalities, fatigue, and poor quality of life. Conventional glucocorticoid replacement cannot replicate this rhythm. Our objectives were to define key variables of physiological cortisol rhythm, and by pharmacokinetic modeling test whether modified-release hydrocortisone (MR-HC) can provide circadian cortisol profiles. The study was performed at a Clinical Research Facility. Using data from a cross-sectional study in healthy reference subjects (n = 33), we defined parameters for the cortisol rhythm. We then tested MR-HC against immediate-release hydrocortisone in healthy volunteers (n = 28) in an open-label, randomized, single-dose, cross-over study. We compared profiles with physiological cortisol levels, and modeled an optimal treatment regimen. The key variables in the physiological cortisol profile included: peak 15.5 microg/dl (95% reference range 11.7-20.6), acrophase 0832 h (95% confidence interval 0759-0905), nadir less than 2 microg/dl (95% reference range 1.5-2.5), time of nadir 0018 h (95% confidence interval 2339-0058), and quiescent phase (below the mesor) 1943-0531 h. MR-HC 15 mg demonstrated delayed and sustained release with a mean (sem) maximum observed concentration of 16.6 (1.4) microg/dl at 7.41 (0.57) h after drug. Bioavailability of MR-HC 5, 10, and 15 mg was 100, 79, and 86% that of immediate-release hydrocortisone. Modeling suggested that MR-HC 15-20 mg at 2300 h and 10 mg at 0700 h could reproduce physiological cortisol levels. By defining circadian rhythms and using modern formulation technology, it is possible to allow a more physiological circadian replacement of cortisol.

  5. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  6. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  7. Extracting Uplift Rate Histories From Longitudinal River Profiles: Examples From North America and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth G.; White, Nicky; Paul, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    The physiography of the Earth's surface is a manifestation of vertical motions, erosion, and deposition of sediment. We show that a history of uplift rate of the continents during the last ~ 100 million years can be determined by jointly inverting the longitudinal profiles of rivers. We assume that the shape of a river profile is controlled by the history of uplift rate and moderated by the erosional process. We have parameterized fluvial erosion using a nonlinear advective-diffusive formulation. A river profile per se contains no information about the erosional timescale; values of erosional parameters must be calibrated. If either vertical incision rate or knickzone retreat rate is known independently, for example when palaeo-river profiles are preserved, we can calibrate the erosional model directly. Independent spot measurements of uplift offer another way to calibrate a regional model. In our inverse model, uplift rate is allowed to vary smoothly as a function of space and time, and upstream drainage area is invariant. Using this inverse methodology, we show that there exist time-correlative commonalities in the shapes of river profiles draining uplifted regions. We find that the rate at which knickzones propagate upstream is linearly dependent on slope in nearly all cases (i.e. n = 1 in the detachment-limited erosional model for ~ 600 North American and African rivers). The exponent on upstream drainage, m, which controls knickzone retreat rate, is typically Zambezi rivers and their major tributaries indicates that domal swells in Africa have experienced a staged uplift history. The West African margin has experienced at least two phases of uplift during the last 30 Ma. Uplift in Afar began ~ 35 Ma. The Hoggar and Tibesti swells, in central North Africa, have an older history of uplift. These results are consistent with a staged magmatic history, delivery of sediment to the continental margins and stratigraphic observations, which suggest that the African

  8. Physical Profiling Performance of Air Force Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    MTF medical treatment facility OR odds ratio PCP primary care provider PHA Periodic Health Assessment SE standard error SME subject matter expert ...ascertain if predictors existed to augment PCP screening. This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective medical records review of active duty U.S. Air...Force (AF) members receiving care in an AF medical treatment facility (MTF) between October 31, 2013, and September 30, 2014, who had at least one

  9. Social Media in Health Research: An Example from Childcare Provider Message Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Social media sites, such as message boards and blogs, provide innovative data sources for researchers as these sites feature people sharing advice and discussing issues in a public arena. Research has found the online context can encourage people to reveal more information than do such traditional methods as interviews or focus groups. However,…

  10. Providing Students with Foundational Field Instruction within a 50 Minute Class Period: A Practical Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, M.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing recognition among secondary educators and administrators that students need to have a science education that provides connections between familiar classes like biology, chemistry, and physics. Because of this waxing interest in an integrative approach to the sciences, there is a broader push for school districts to offer classes geared towards the earth sciences, a field that incorporates knowledge and skills gleaned from the three core science subjects. Within the contexts of a regular secondary school day on a traditional schedule (45- to 50-minute long classes), it is challenging to engage students in rigorous field-based learning, critical for students to develop a deeper understanding of geosciences content, without requiring extra time outside of the regular schedule. We suggest instruction using common, manmade features like drainage retention ponds to model good field practices and provide students with the opportunity to calculate basic hydrologic budgets, take pH readings, and, if in an area with seasonal rainfall, make observations regarding soils by way of trenching, and near-surface processes, including mass wasting and the effects of vegetation on geomorphology. Gains in student understanding are discussed by analyzing the difference in test scores between exams provided to the students after they had received only in-class instruction, and after they had received field instruction in addition to the in-class lectures. In an advanced setting, students made measurements regarding ion contents and pollution that allowed the classes to practice lab skills while developing a data set that was analyzed after field work was completed. It is posited that similar fieldwork could be an effective approach at an introductory level in post-secondary institutions.

  11. Provider Profiling: A Population Health Improvement Tool for the Southeast Military Health System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pemberton, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    ...). Profiling with Provider Perspectives, a Primary Care Management Tool, provides the SEMHS with a standardized performance measurement system that offers feedback in a user friendly and non-threatening format...

  12. Example-based learning: comparing the effects of additionally providing three different integrative learning activities on physiotherapy intervention knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-O. Dyer (Joseph-Omer); A. Hudon (Anne); K. Montpetit-Tourangeau (Katherine); B. Charlin (Bernard); S. Mamede (Silvia); T.A.J.M. van Gog (Tamara)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Example-based learning using worked examples can foster clinical reasoning. Worked examples are instructional tools that learners can use to study the steps needed to solve a problem. Studying worked examples paired with completion examples promotes acquisition of

  13. Designing a Programme Profile: An Example of a Bachelor Business Study Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Skrbinjek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the issue of developing a study programme profile, by which the competencies and learning outcomes at the level of a study programme are systematically related to the competencies and learning outcomes at the level of a course. We describe a model of designing a programme profile for a particular bachelor’s study programme in the field of business. Our approach adopts concepts of general and specific competencies designated from the Tuning project to link learning outcomes at the course level with the learning outcomes at the programme level with involvement of all the relevant stakeholders by using a triangulation technique (involving the students, employers and teachers. The results elaborate a clearer picture of programme characteristics with precisely defined key competencies and learning outcomes linked with the study courses, as well as a clearer description of the employment potential.

  14. Fusion RNA profiling provides hints on cell of origin of mysterious tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhongqiu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Biological samples can be grouped into separate clusters based on their gene expression profiles. This approach has yielded meaningful biological insights and facilitated biomarker discoveries. Recently, we developed another approach to study connections between biological samples based on their fusion RNA expression. We have used this approach to provide insights into the cell of origin for a mysterious tumor, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

  15. Globus Nexus: A Platform-as-a-Service provider of research identity, profile, and group management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chard, Kyle; Lidman, Mattias; McCollam, Brendan; Bryan, Josh; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Tuecke, Steven; Foster, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Globus Nexus is a professionally hosted Platform-as-a-Service that provides identity, profile and group management functionality for the research community. Many collaborative e-Science applications need to manage large numbers of user identities, profiles, and groups. However, developing and maintaining such capabilities is often challenging given the complexity of modern security protocols and requirements for scalable, robust, and highly available implementations. By outsourcing this functionality to Globus Nexus, developers can leverage best-practice implementations without incurring development and operations overhead. Users benefit from enhanced capabilities such as identity federation, flexible profile management, and user-oriented group management. In this paper we present Globus Nexus, describe its capabilities and architecture, summarize how several e-Science applications leverage these capabilities, and present results that characterize its scalability, reliability, and availability.

  16. Dynamic transcriptional profiling provides insights into tuberous root development in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eSun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a herb of the Scrophulariaceae family, is widely cultivated in the Northern part of China. The tuberous root has well known medicinal properties; however, yield and quality are threatened by abiotic and biotic stresses. Understanding the molecular process of tuberous root development may help identify novel targets for its control. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly strategies to obtain a reference transcriptome that is relevant to tuberous root development. We then conducted RNA-seq quantification analysis to determine gene expression profiles of the adventitious root (AR, thickening adventitious root (TAR, and the developing tuberous root (DTR. Expression profiling identified a total of 6,974 differentially expressed unigenes during root developmental. Bioinformatics analysis and gene expression profiling revealed changes in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone biosynthesis during root development. Moreover, we identified and allocated putative functions to the genes involved in tuberous root development, including genes related to major carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transcription regulation. The present study provides the initial description of gene expression profiles of AR, TAR, and DTR, which facilitates identification of genes of interest. Moreover, our work provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tuberous root development and may assist in the design and development of improved breeding schemes for different R. glutinosa varieties through genetic manipulation.

  17. Using data mining techniques to explore physicians' therapeutic decisions when clinical guidelines do not provide recommendations: methods and example for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussi, Massoud; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Venot, Alain

    2009-06-10

    Clinical guidelines carry medical evidence to the point of practice. As evidence is not always available, many guidelines do not provide recommendations for all clinical situations encountered in practice. We propose an approach for identifying knowledge gaps in guidelines and for exploring physicians' therapeutic decisions with data mining techniques to fill these knowledge gaps. We demonstrate our method by an example in the domain of type 2 diabetes. We analyzed the French national guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes to identify clinical conditions that are not covered or those for which the guidelines do not provide recommendations. We extracted patient records corresponding to each clinical condition from a database of type 2 diabetic patients treated at Avicenne University Hospital of Bobigny, France. We explored physicians' prescriptions for each of these profiles using C5.0 decision-tree learning algorithm. We developed decision-trees for different levels of detail of the therapeutic decision, namely the type of treatment, the pharmaco-therapeutic class, the international non proprietary name, and the dose of each medication. We compared the rules generated with those added to the guidelines in a newer version, to examine their similarity. We extracted 27 rules from the analysis of a database of 463 patient records. Eleven rules were about the choice of the type of treatment and thirteen rules about the choice of the pharmaco-therapeutic class of each drug. For the choice of the international non proprietary name and the dose, we could extract only a few rules because the number of patient records was too low for these factors. The extracted rules showed similarities with those added to the newer version of the guidelines. Our method showed its usefulness for completing guidelines recommendations with rules learnt automatically from physicians' prescriptions. It could be used during the development of guidelines as a complementary source from

  18. Using data mining techniques to explore physicians' therapeutic decisions when clinical guidelines do not provide recommendations: methods and example for type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toussi Massoud

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines carry medical evidence to the point of practice. As evidence is not always available, many guidelines do not provide recommendations for all clinical situations encountered in practice. We propose an approach for identifying knowledge gaps in guidelines and for exploring physicians' therapeutic decisions with data mining techniques to fill these knowledge gaps. We demonstrate our method by an example in the domain of type 2 diabetes. Methods We analyzed the French national guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes to identify clinical conditions that are not covered or those for which the guidelines do not provide recommendations. We extracted patient records corresponding to each clinical condition from a database of type 2 diabetic patients treated at Avicenne University Hospital of Bobigny, France. We explored physicians' prescriptions for each of these profiles using C5.0 decision-tree learning algorithm. We developed decision-trees for different levels of detail of the therapeutic decision, namely the type of treatment, the pharmaco-therapeutic class, the international non proprietary name, and the dose of each medication. We compared the rules generated with those added to the guidelines in a newer version, to examine their similarity. Results We extracted 27 rules from the analysis of a database of 463 patient records. Eleven rules were about the choice of the type of treatment and thirteen rules about the choice of the pharmaco-therapeutic class of each drug. For the choice of the international non proprietary name and the dose, we could extract only a few rules because the number of patient records was too low for these factors. The extracted rules showed similarities with those added to the newer version of the guidelines. Conclusion Our method showed its usefulness for completing guidelines recommendations with rules learnt automatically from physicians' prescriptions. It could be used

  19. WoSIS: providing standardised soil profile data for the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batjes, Niels H.; Ribeiro, Eloi; van Oostrum, Ad; Leenaars, Johan; Hengl, Tom; Mendes de Jesus, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the World Soil Information Service (WoSIS) is to serve quality-assessed, georeferenced soil data (point, polygon, and grid) to the international community upon their standardisation and harmonisation. So far, the focus has been on developing procedures for legacy point data with special attention to the selection of soil analytical and physical properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications (e.g. organic carbon, soil pH, soil texture (sand, silt, and clay), coarse fragments ( Profile data managed in WoSIS were contributed by a wide range of soil data providers; the data have been described, sampled, and analysed according to methods and standards in use in the originating countries. Hence, special attention was paid to measures for soil data quality and the standardisation of soil property definitions, soil property values, and soil analytical method descriptions. At the time of writing, the full WoSIS database contained some 118 400 unique shared soil profiles, of which some 96 000 are georeferenced within defined limits. In total, this corresponds with over 31 million soil records, of which some 20 % have so far been quality-assessed and standardised using the sequential procedure discussed in this paper. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Overall, the data lineage strongly determined which data could be standardised with acceptable confidence in accord with WoSIS procedures, corresponding to over 4 million records for 94 441 profiles. The publicly available data - WoSIS snapshot of July 2016 - are persistently accessible from ISRIC WDC-Soils through doi:10.17027/isric-wdcsoils.20160003.

  20. Hierarchical partitioning of metazoan protein conservation profiles provides new functional insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Witztum

    Full Text Available The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles. We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the "universal proteins", those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the "non-universal proteins". A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the "tree of life" (TOL consistent, as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the "life style" of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are "bottom up", studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is "top down". We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life.

  1. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-E. Mamouri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN and ice nucleating particle (INP number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius  > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols, n100, dry (particles with dry radius  >  100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN, and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius  >  250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP, as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5–2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25–50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input and available INP

  2. Influence of provider factors and race on uptake of breast cancer gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Baggett, Christopher D; Zhou, Xi; Meng, Ke; Roberts, Megan C; Carey, Lisa A; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2018-01-16

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) has been rapidly adopted for early breast cancer and can aid in chemotherapy decision making. Study results regarding racial disparities in testing are conflicting, and may reflect different care settings. To the authors' knowledge, data regarding the influence of provider factors on testing are scarce. The authors used a statewide, multipayer, insurance claims database linked to cancer registry records to examine the impact of race and provider characteristics on GEP uptake in a cohort of patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer between 2005 and 2012. Incidence proportion models were used to examine the adjusted likelihood of testing. Models were stratified by lymph node status (N0 vs N1). Among 11,958 eligible patients, 23% of black and 26% of non-Hispanic white patients received GEP. Among patients with N0 disease, black individuals were 16% less likely to receive testing after adjustment for clinical factors and the provider's specialty and volume of patients with breast cancer (95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.93). Adjustment for provider characteristics did not attenuate the effect of race on testing. Patients of middle-volume providers were more likely to be tested compared with those with either high-volume or low-volume providers, whereas patients seeing a medical oncologist were more likely to be tested compared with those whose only providers were from surgical specialties. Provider volume and specialty were found to be significant predictors of GEP use, but did not explain racial disparities in testing. Further research concerning the key contributors to lagging test use among black women is needed to optimize the equitable use of GEPs and support personalized treatment decision making for all patients. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  3. Diffuse scattering provides material parameters and electron density profiles of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufeng; Nagle, John F

    2004-04-01

    Fully hydrated stacks of DOPC lipid bilayer membranes generate large diffuse x-ray scattering that corrupts the Bragg peak intensities that are used in conventional biophysical structural analysis, but the diffuse scattering actually contains more information. Using an efficient algorithm for fitting extensive regions of diffuse data to classical smectic liquid crystalline theory we first obtain the compressional modulus B= 10(13) erg/ cm(4), which involves interactions between membranes, and the bending modulus K(c) =8x 10(-13) erg of the membranes. The membrane form factor F ( q(z) ) is then obtained for most values of q(z) up to 0.8 A(-1). The electron density profile rho(z) is obtained by fitting models to F( q(z) ). Constraining the models to conform to other measurements provides structural quantities such as area A=72.1+/-0.5 A(2) per lipid at the interface.

  4. Digital gene expression tag profiling of bat digits provides robust candidates contributing to wing formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rebecca L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the only truly flying mammals, bats use their unique wing - consisting of four elongated digits (digits II-V connected by membranes - to power their flight. In addition to the elongated digits II-V, the forelimb contains one shorter digit (digit I that is morphologically similar to the hindlimb digits. Here, we capitalized on the morphological variation among the bat forelimb digits to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying digit elongation and wing formation. Using next generation sequencing technology, we performed digital gene expression tag profiling (DGE-tag profiling of developing digits in a pooled sample of two Myotis ricketti and validated our sequencing results using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR of gene expression in the developing digits of two Hipposideros armiger. Results Among hundreds of genes exhibiting significant differences in expression between the short and long digits, we highlight 14 genes most related to digit elongation. These genes include two Tbx genes (Tbx3 and Tbx15, five BMP pathway genes (Bmp3, RGMB, Smad1, Smad4 and Nog, four Homeobox genes (Hoxd8, Hoxd9, Hoxa1 and Satb1, and three other genes (Twist1, Tmeff2 and Enpp2 related to digit malformations or cell proliferation. In addition, our results suggest that Tbx4 and Pitx2 contribute to the morphological similarity and five genes (Acta1, Tnnc2, Atp2a1, Hrc and Myoz1 contribute to the functional similarity between the thumb and hindlimb digits. Conclusions Results of this study not only implicate many developmental genes as robust candidates underlying digit elongation and wing formation in bats, but also provide a better understanding of the genes involved in autopodial development in general.

  5. A study on socio-demographic profile and feasibility of DOTS provider registered under RNTCP in Varanasi district Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Afzalul Haque

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is a major chronic disorder affecting the larger population more than any other disease in the country. DOTS was introduced in India in 1993 as part of the Revised National Tuberculosis Programme (RNTCP following a review of India’s National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP a year earlier (1 .Patient satisfaction is an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services. There is need to assess the health care provider regarding the consumer satisfaction as often as possible, this paper summarizes our experience about role of DOTS provider in the management of TB patient in rural population of Varanasi districts Utter Pradesh. Objective: (1 To assess the perception of registered tuberculosis patients regarding DOTS provider for the treatment of tuberculosis. (2 To assess the accessibility, acceptability & availability of community DOTS provider. Design: A longitudinal study. Setting: Three microscopic centre of Cholapur Tuberculosis unit of Varanasi districts. Methods: Registered patients were interviewed twice: once in the beginning and another at the completion of the treatment or after the permanent discontinuation of the treatment. Patients were interviewed for their socio-demographic profiles, opinion about DOTS and its providers. Side effects experienced and action taken etc. Data was collected on a semi-structured, pre-tested questionnaire. DOTS providers were interviewed and treatment cards analyzed for any interruption of treatment and action taken. Data was collected from 1st June 2004 to 31th June 2005 till the completion of the regimen. Results: Majority of DOTS providers were young males (82.7% of 26 years to 40 years, while the representation of females was only 5 (17.3%. Almost more than 80% of the patients started their treatment within 1-10 days. For majority of cases (83% the distance of DOTS provider from patient’s house was within 1 km. Mean time spent to go to DOTS provider was 27

  6. Transcriptional profiling of a yeast colony provides new insight into the heterogeneity of multicellular fungal communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Traven

    Full Text Available Understanding multicellular fungal structures is important for designing better strategies against human fungal pathogens. For example, the ability to form multicellular biofilms is a key virulence property of the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans biofilms form on indwelling medical devices and are drug resistant, causing serious infections in hospital settings. Multicellular fungal communities are heterogeneous, consisting of cells experiencing different environments. Heterogeneity is likely important for the phenotypic characteristics of communities, yet it is poorly understood. Here we used colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model fungal multicellular structure. We fractionated the outside colony layers from the cells in the center by FACS, using a Cit1-GFP marker expressed exclusively on the outside. Transcriptomics analysis of the two subpopulations revealed that the outside colony layers are actively growing by fermentative metabolism, while the cells residing on the inside are in a resting state and experience changes to mitochondrial activity. Our data shows several parallels with C. albicans biofilms providing insight into the contributions of heterogeneity to biofilm phenotypes. Hallmarks of C. albicans biofilms - the expression of ribosome and translation functions and activation of glycolysis and ergosterol biosynthesis occur on the outside of colonies, while expression of genes associates with sulfur assimilation is observed in the colony center. Cell wall restructuring occurs in biofilms, and cell wall functions are enriched in both fractions: the outside cells display enrichment of cell wall biosynthesis enzymes and cell wall proteins, while the inside cells express cell wall degrading enzymes. Our study also suggests that noncoding transcription and posttranscriptional mRNA regulation play important roles during growth of yeast in colonies, setting the scene for investigating these pathways in the development

  7. Example-based learning: Comparing the effects of additionally providing three different integrative learning activities on physiotherapy intervention knowledge Approaches to teaching and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-O. Dyer (Joseph-Omer); A. Hudon (Anne); K. Montpetit-Tourangeau (Katherine); B. Charlin (Bernard); S. Mamede (Silvia); T.A.J.M. van Gog (Tamara)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Example-based learning using worked examples can foster clinical reasoning. Worked examples are instructional tools that learners can use to study the steps needed to solve a problem. Studying worked examples paired with completion examples promotes acquisition of

  8. Unraveling Motivational Profiles of Health Care Professionals for Continuing Education: The Example of Pharmacists in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) can support health care professionals in maintaining and developing their knowledge and competencies. Although lack of motivation is one of the most important barriers of pharmacists' participation in CE, we know little about the quality or the quantity of motivation. We used the self-determination theory, which describes autonomous motivation (AM) as originating from within an individual and controlled motivation (CM) as originating from external factors, as a framework for this study. Our aim was to obtain insight into the quality and quantity of pharmacists' motivation for CE. The scores of 425 pharmacists on Academic Motivation Scale were subjected to K-means cluster analysis to generate motivational profiles. We unraveled four motivational profiles: (1) good quality with high AM/low CM, (2) high quantity with high AM/high CM, (3) poor quality with low AM/high CM, and (4) low quantity with low AM/low CM. Female pharmacists, pharmacists working in a hospital pharmacy, pharmacists working for more than 10 years, and pharmacists not in training were highly represented in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists working in a community pharmacy, pharmacists working for less than 10 years, and pharmacists in training were highly represented in the high-quantity profile. Male pharmacists were more or less equally distributed over the four profiles. The highest percentage of pharmacy owners was shown in the low-quantity profile, and the highest percentage of the nonowners was shown in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists exhibit different motivational profiles, which are associated with their background characteristics, such as gender, ownership of business, practice setting, and current training. Motivational profiles could be used to tailor CE courses for pharmacists.

  9. Transcriptome profiling of Gossypium barbadense inoculated with Verticillium dahliae provides a resource for cotton improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xing Fen; Ding, Ze Guo; Ma, Qing; Zhang, Gui Rong; Zhang, Shu Ling; Li, Zhi Kun; Wu, Li Qiang; Zhang, Gui Yin; Ma, Zhi Ying

    2013-09-22

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, is the most severe disease in cotton (Gossypium spp.), causing great lint losses worldwide. Disease management could be achieved in the field if genetically improved, resistant plants were used. However, the interaction between V. dahliae and cotton is a complicated process, and its molecular mechanism remains obscure. To understand better the defense response to this pathogen as a means for obtaining more tolerant cultivars, we monitored the transcriptome profiles of roots from resistant plants of G. barbadense cv. Pima90-53 that were challenged with V. dahliae. In all, 46,192 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from a full-length cDNA library of G. barbadense. They were clustered and assembled into 23126 unigenes that comprised 2661 contigs and 20465 singletons. Those unigenes were assigned Gene Ontology terms and mapped to 289 KEGG pathways. A total of 3027 unigenes were found to be homologous to known defense-related genes in other plants. They were assigned to the functional classification of plant-pathogen interactions, including disease defenses and signal transduction. The branch of "SA→NPR1→TGA→PR-1→Disease resistance" was first discovered in the interaction of cotton-V. dahliae, indicating that this wilt process includes both biotrophic and necrotrophic stages. In all, 4936 genes coding for putative transcription factors (TF) were identified in our library. The most abundant TF family was the NAC group (527), followed by G2-like (440), MYB (372), BHLH (331), bZIP (271) ERF, C3H, and WRKY. We also analyzed the expression of genes involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognition, the activation of effector-triggered immunity, TFs, and hormone biosynthesis, as well as genes that are pathogenesis-related, or have roles in signaling/regulatory functions and cell wall modification. Their differential expression patterns were compared among

  10. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes. These li......Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes...... (criteria: fold change, ≥2.0; false discovery rate ≤0.05) in lesional versus nonlesional skin from 18 patients with moderate-to-severe AD, with real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry used for validation. Results: Both platforms showed robust disease transcriptomes and correlated well with RT-PCR...... RNA-seq showed somewhat better agreement with RT-PCR (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.57 and 0.70 for microarrays and RNA-seq vs RT-PCR, respectively), bias was not eliminated. Among genes uniquely identified by using RNA-seq were triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1...

  11. Proteoform profiling of peripheral blood serum proteins from pregnant women provides a molecular IUGR signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölter, M; Röwer, C; Koy, C; Rath, W; Pecks, U; Glocker, M O

    2016-10-21

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality and contributes substantially to medically indicated preterm birth; preventing fetal death. Molecular profiling of the mothers' peripheral blood was desired to monitor the health conditions of the fetuses. To develop such a minimally invasive assay, we applied a protein affinity fractionation method to peripheral blood serum samples from pregnant women belonging to either the IUGR or to the control group. Proof-of-principle was shown by relative quantitation analysis of mixtures of intact proteoforms using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The two best differentiating proteins and proteoforms, respectively, were apolipoprotein C-II and apolipoprotein C-III0. Together with three robustly expressed protein proteoforms proapolipoprotein C-II, apolipoprotein C-III1, and apolipoprotein C-III2, which served as landmarks for relative quantitation analysis, they constituted the maternal IUGR proteome signature. Separation confidence of our IUGR proteoform signature reached a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.87 with an area under curve of 0.86 in receiver operator characteristics. Identification of IUGR newborns in the case room is required as children are severely diseased and need specialized care during infancy. Yet, at time of birth there is no readily applicable clinical test available. Hence, a molecular profiling assay is highly desired. It needs to be mentioned that current clinical definitions and recommendations for IUGR are unfortunately misleading and are not universally applicable. The most commonly adopted definition is an abdominal circumference (AC) or estimated fetal weight measurement IUGR for some constitutionally small fetuses. It needs to be pointed out that the above mentioned criteria can only be determined during pregnancy in case mothers report from early on during pregnancy. We have developed a test that relies on mass spectrometric analysis of

  12. Tinzaparin Provides Lower Lipid Profiles in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a low-molecular-weight heparin, tinzaparin has effectively been used as an anticoagulant during hemodialysis sessions. However, the impact of different heparin types on dyslipidemia is still controversial. In our study, 434 chronic hemodialysis patients were evaluated. The mean age was 65 ± 13. Forty-eight patients (11% and 386 patients (89% were in the tinzaparin and unfractionated heparin (UFH groups, respectively. Triglyceride had significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001 but total cholesterol, HDL, or LDL did not. In the univariate analysis, the triglyceride level was significantly associated with tinzaparin use [β: −39.9, 95% confidence interval (CI: −76.7 to −3.0], and this association remained following the multivariate analysis (β: −40.8, 95% CI: −75.1 to −6.5. The difference in serum total cholesterol level between tinzaparin and UFH became significant (β: −13, 95% CI: −24.5 to −1.56 after adjustment in the multivariate analysis. Moreover, in a subgroup analysis, male diabetic patients showed lower serum triglyceride levels with the use of tinzaparin, while older, nondiabetic, male patients showed significant advantages in total cholesterol levels with the use of tinzaparin. Based on our findings, tinzaparin shows a significant association with a lower lipid profile in patients with chronic hemodialysis when compared to UFH.

  13. System and Method for Providing Vertical Profile Measurements of Atmospheric Gases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A system and method for using an air collection device to collect a continuous air sample as the device descends through the atmosphere are provided. The air...

  14. Identification of Metabolites from LC-EC Profiling: GC-MS and Re-Fractionation Provide Essential Information Orthogonal to LCMS/microNMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathungu, Rose M.; Bird, Susan S.; Sheldon, Diane P.; Kautz, Roger; Vouros, Paul; Matson, Wayne R.; Kristal, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    HPLC-coulometric electrode-array detection (LC-EC) is a sensitive, quantitative and robust metabolomics profiling tool that complements the commonly used MS and NMR-based approaches. However, LC-EC provides little structural information. We recently demonstrated a workflow for the structural characterization of metabolites detected by LC-EC profiling, combined with LC-ESI-MS and microNMR. This methodology is now extended to include: (i) GC-EI-MS analysis to fill structural gaps left by LC-ESI-MS and NMR, and (ii) secondary fractionation of LC-collected fractions containing multiple co-eluting analytes. GC-EI-MS spectra have more informative fragment ions that are reproducible for database searches. Secondary fractionation provides enhanced metabolite characterization by reducing spectral overlap in NMR and ion-suppression in LC-ESI-MS. The need for these additional methods in the analysis of the broad chemical classes and concentration ranges found in plasma is illustrated with discussion of four specific examples, including: (i) characterization of compounds for which one or more of the detectors is insensitive (e.g., positional isomers in LC-MS, the direct detection of carboxylic groups and sulfonic groups in 1H NMR, or non-volatile species in GC-MS).; (ii) detection of labile compounds, (iii) resolution of closely eluting and/or co-eluting compounds and, (iv) the capability to harness structural similarities common in many biologically-related, LC-EC detectable compounds. PMID:24657819

  15. Transcriptomic profiling provides molecular insights into hydrogen peroxide-induced adventitious rooting in mung bean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Weng; Leng, Yan; Shi, Rui-Fang

    2017-02-17

    ARFs, IAAs, AUXs, NACs, RD22, AHKs, MYBs, PIN1, AUX15A, LBD29, LBD41, ADH1b, and QORL were significantly up-regulated at the 6- and/or 24-h time points. In contrast, PER1 and PER2 were significantly down-regulated by H2O2 treatment. These qRT-PCR results strongly correlated with the RNA-Seq data. Using RNA-Seq and qRT-PCR techniques, we analysed the global changes in gene expression and functional profiling during H2O2-induced adventitious rooting in mung bean seedlings. These results strengthen the current understanding of H2O2-induced adventitious rooting and the molecular traits of H2O2 priming in plants.

  16. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kao

    2009-07-01

    genes.Overall, breast cancer cell lines were genetically more complex than tumors, but retained expression patterns with relevance to the luminal-basal subtype distinction. The compendium of molecular profiles defines cell lines suitable for investigations of subtype-specific pathobiology, cancer stem cell biology, biomarkers and therapies, and provides a resource for discovery of new breast cancer genes.

  17. Can profiles of poly- and Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human serum provide information on major exposure sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xindi C; Dassuncao, Clifton; Zhang, Xianming; Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pál; Webster, Glenys M; Nielsen, Flemming; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2018-02-01

    Humans are exposed to poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from diverse sources and this has been associated with negative health impacts. Advances in analytical methods have enabled routine detection of more than 15 PFASs in human sera, allowing better profiling of PFAS exposures. The composition of PFASs in human sera reflects the complexity of exposure sources but source identification can be confounded by differences in toxicokinetics affecting uptake, distribution, and elimination. Common PFASs, such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and their precursors are ubiquitous in multiple exposure sources. However, their composition varies among sources, which may impact associated adverse health effects. We use available PFAS concentrations from several demographic groups in a North Atlantic seafood consuming population (Faroe Islands) to explore whether chemical fingerprints in human sera provide insights into predominant exposure sources. We compare serum PFAS profiles from Faroese individuals to other North American populations to investigate commonalities in potential exposure sources. We compare individuals with similar demographic and physiological characteristics and samples from the same years to reduce confounding by toxicokinetic differences and changing environmental releases. Using principal components analysis (PCA) confirmed by hierarchical clustering, we assess variability in serum PFAS concentrations across three Faroese groups. The first principal component (PC)/cluster consists of C9-C12 perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and is consistent with measured PFAS profiles in consumed seafood. The second PC/cluster includes perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS) and the PFOS precursor N-ethyl perfluorooctane sulfonamidoacetate (N-EtFOSAA), which are directly used or metabolized from fluorochemicals in consumer products such as carpet and food packaging. We find that the same compounds are associated with the same

  18. Comprehensive analysis of human small RNA sequencing data provides insights into expression profiles and miRNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jing; Wu, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiantong; Liao, Yifang; Sibanda, Vusumuzi Leroy; Liu, Wei; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in various biological processes and diseases. A comprehensive analysis of large scale small RNA sequencing data (smRNA-seq) will be very helpful to explore tissue or disease specific miRNA markers and uncover miRNA variants. Here, we systematically analyzed 410 human smRNA-seq datasets, which samples are from 24 tissue/disease/cell lines. We tested the mapping strategies and found that it was necessary to make multiple-round mappings with different mismatch parameters. miRNA expression profiles revealed that on average ∼70% of known miRNAs were expressed at low level or not expressed (RPM 100). About 30% known miRNAs were not expressed in all of our used samples. The miRNA expression profiles were compiled into an online database (HMED, http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/smallRNA/). Dozens of tissue/disease specific miRNAs, disease/control dysregulated miRNAs and miRNAs with arm switching events were discovered. Further, we identified some highly confident editing sites including 24 A-to-I sites and 23 C-to-U sites. About half of them were widespread miRNA editing sites in different tissues. We characterized that the 2 types of editing sites have different features with regard to location, editing level and frequency. Our analyses for expression profiles, specific miRNA markers, arm switching, and editing sites, may provide valuable information for further studies of miRNA function and biomarker finding.

  19. Identification of metabolites from liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection profiling: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and refractionation provide essential information orthogonal to LC-MS/microNMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathungu, Rose M; Bird, Susan S; Sheldon, Diane P; Kautz, Roger; Vouros, Paul; Matson, Wayne R; Kristal, Bruce S

    2014-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection (LC-EC) is a sensitive, quantitative, and robust metabolomics profiling tool that complements the commonly used mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based approaches. However, LC-EC provides little structural information. We recently demonstrated a workflow for the structural characterization of metabolites detected by LC-EC profiling combined with LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and microNMR. This methodology is now extended to include (i) gas chromatography (GC)-electron ionization (EI)-MS analysis to fill structural gaps left by LC-ESI-MS and NMR and (ii) secondary fractionation of LC-collected fractions containing multiple coeluting analytes. GC-EI-MS spectra have more informative fragment ions that are reproducible for database searches. Secondary fractionation provides enhanced metabolite characterization by reducing spectral overlap in NMR and ion suppression in LC-ESI-MS. The need for these additional methods in the analysis of the broad chemical classes and concentration ranges found in plasma is illustrated with discussion of four specific examples: (i) characterization of compounds for which one or more of the detectors is insensitive (e.g., positional isomers in LC-MS, the direct detection of carboxylic groups and sulfonic groups in (1)H NMR, or nonvolatile species in GC-MS), (ii) detection of labile compounds, (iii) resolution of closely eluting and/or coeluting compounds, and (iv) the capability to harness structural similarities common in many biologically related, LC-EC-detectable compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariou, Ronan, E-mail: laberca@oniris-nantes.fr; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(−)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. - Highlights: • We address the screening of halogenated compounds in large Full Scan HRMS datasets. • The workflow involves peak picking, pairing script and review of paired features. • The pairing script is based on exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. • H/Cl scale mass defect plots are used to

  1. Prospective molecular profiling of canine cancers provides a clinically relevant comparative model for evaluating personalized medicine (PMed trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Paoloni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting. METHODOLOGY: A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77% successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days. Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type. CONCLUSIONS: Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (<1 week. Clustering data show robust signatures by cancer type but also showed patient-to-patient heterogeneity in drug predictions. This lends further support to the inclusion of a heterogeneous population of

  2. The Tubulin-Based-Polymorphism Method Provides a Simple and Effective Alternative to the Genomic Profiling of Grape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Gavazzi

    Full Text Available The TBP (Tubulin-Based-Polymorphism method, based on a nuclear ILP (Intron-Length-Polymorphism molecular marker, has been used for genotyping 37 accessions of the genus Vitis inclusive of different species, rootstocks, wild and cultivated subspecies. A distinct DNA barcode made up by a different number of amplicons, was attributed to each of the different accessions. TBP data were compared with those obtained, with the use of an internationally validated set of six SSR markers. Genetic relationships among the different accessions, dendrogram distributions, correlation values and polymorphic index values (PICs were definitively comparable when not in favor of TBP. Such an experimental consistency is based upon a genomic organization of the multiple members of the β-tubulin gene family, the targets of TBP-mediated amplification, that is conserved in Vitis as in any other plant species. The TBP amplicons can actually be used as a useful source of sequence polymorphisms for generating primer pairs capable of identifying specific cultivars in a simple assay. An example for the identification of the 'Sangiovese' cv. is reported. More generally, these data are discussed in terms of the actual advantages that the introduction of the TBP method in the field of grape characterization and genotyping can provide.

  3. The Tubulin-Based-Polymorphism Method Provides a Simple and Effective Alternative to the Genomic Profiling of Grape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Floriana; Braglia, Luca; Mastromauro, Francesco; Gianì, Silvia; Morello, Laura; Breviario, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The TBP (Tubulin-Based-Polymorphism) method, based on a nuclear ILP (Intron-Length-Polymorphism) molecular marker, has been used for genotyping 37 accessions of the genus Vitis inclusive of different species, rootstocks, wild and cultivated subspecies. A distinct DNA barcode made up by a different number of amplicons, was attributed to each of the different accessions. TBP data were compared with those obtained, with the use of an internationally validated set of six SSR markers. Genetic relationships among the different accessions, dendrogram distributions, correlation values and polymorphic index values (PICs) were definitively comparable when not in favor of TBP. Such an experimental consistency is based upon a genomic organization of the multiple members of the β-tubulin gene family, the targets of TBP-mediated amplification, that is conserved in Vitis as in any other plant species. The TBP amplicons can actually be used as a useful source of sequence polymorphisms for generating primer pairs capable of identifying specific cultivars in a simple assay. An example for the identification of the 'Sangiovese' cv. is reported. More generally, these data are discussed in terms of the actual advantages that the introduction of the TBP method in the field of grape characterization and genotyping can provide.

  4. Integration of gene expression and DNA methylation profiles provides a molecular subtype for risk assessment in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Hui-Ping; Kong, Fan-Qi; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Cheng; He, Yang-Yang; Wang, Yan-Hua; Yang, An-Ning; Tian, Ju; Yang, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Ming-Hao; Xu, Hua; Jiang, Yi-Deng; Yu, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify an effective method for detecting early‑phase atherosclerosis (AS), as well as to provide useful DNA methylation profiles to serve as biomarkers for the detection of AS. A total of 300 individuals (150 AS patients and 150 healthy subjects) were recruited for peripheral blood DNA methylation analyses at 12 gene promoter loci using nested methylation‑specific polymerase chain reaction in a test set. Based on the test set, the promoter methylation of TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1 (TIMP1), ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were determined to be candidate biomarkers; demonstrating the highest sensitivity (88%) and specificity (90%). The biomarkers that were candidates for early AS detection were validated in an independent validation set (n=100). In the validation set, the combination of TIMP1, ABCA1 and ACAT1 methylation achieved sensitivity, specificity and coincidence rate values of 88, 70 and 79%, respectively. In the current pilot study, the patterns of DNA methylation of AS‑associated genes were observed to be significantly altered in the peripheral blood of AS patients. Thus, the AS-specific methylation of the three‑gene panel (TIMP1, ABCA1, and ACAT1) may serve as a valuable biomarker for the early detection of AS.

  5. Transcriptomic analyses on muscle tissues of Litopenaeus vannamei provide the first profile insight into the response to low temperature stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Huang

    Full Text Available The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei is an important cultured crustacean species worldwide. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this species involved in the response to cold stress. In this study, four separate RNA-Seq libraries of L. vannamei were generated from 13°C stress and control temperature. Total 29,662 of Unigenes and overall of 19,619 annotated genes were obtained. Three comparisons were carried out among the four libraries, in which 72 of the top 20% of differentially-expressed genes were obtained, 15 GO and 5 KEGG temperature-sensitive pathways were fished out. Catalytic activity (GO: 0003824 and Metabolic pathways (ko01100 were the most annotated GO and KEGG pathways in response to cold stress, respectively. In addition, Calcium, MAPK cascade, Transcription factor and Serine/threonine-protein kinase signal pathway were picked out and clustered. Serine/threonine-protein kinase signal pathway might play more important roles in cold adaptation, while other three signal pathway were not widely transcribed. Our results had summarized the differentially-expressed genes and suggested the major important signaling pathways and related genes. These findings provide the first profile insight into the molecular basis of L. vannamei response to cold stress.

  6. Which level of evidence does the US National Toxicology Program provide? Statistical considerations using the Technical Report 578 on Ginkgo biloba as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaus, Wilhelm

    2014-09-02

    The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) is assessed by a statistician. In the NTP-program groups of rodents are fed for a certain period of time with different doses of the substance that is being investigated. Then the animals are sacrificed and all organs are examined pathologically. Such an investigation facilitates many statistical tests. Technical Report TR 578 on Ginkgo biloba is used as an example. More than 4800 statistical tests are possible with the investigations performed. Due to a thought experiment we expect >240 false significant tests. In actuality, 209 significant pathological findings were reported. The readers of Toxicology Letters should carefully distinguish between confirmative and explorative statistics. A confirmative interpretation of a significant test rejects the null-hypothesis and delivers "statistical proof". It is only allowed if (i) a precise hypothesis was established independently from the data used for the test and (ii) the computed p-values are adjusted for multiple testing if more than one test was performed. Otherwise an explorative interpretation generates a hypothesis. We conclude that NTP-reports - including TR 578 on Ginkgo biloba - deliver explorative statistics, i.e. they generate hypotheses, but do not prove them. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacopeial HPLC identification methods are not sufficient to detect adulterations in commercial bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) extracts. Anthocyanin profile provides additional clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Suresh

    2014-12-01

    Current pharmacopeias provide HPLC anthocyanin profiles to identify commercial bilberry extracts. However, the pharmacopeial identification protocols may not be sufficient enough to distinguish genuine bilberry extracts from adulterated material. This is primarily due to the non-inclusion of literature-reported anthocyanin profile and compositional variations in bilberry when sourced from different geographical regions. Using anthocyanin profiles of both authentic bilberry extracts and literature reports, we attempted to provide appropriate identification protocol for genuine bilberry extracts. We compared HPLC anthocyanin profiles of selected 'suspected' adulterant species and adulterant-spiked bilberry extracts to decipher clues to infer adulteration. The clues include appearance of new anthocyanin peaks and changes in compositional ratios of anthocyanins. In addition, we attempted to provide likely adulterants based on 'economic motivation' and market place information and appropriate clues to identify them in adulterated commercial bilberry extracts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. APPLICATION OF ONTOLOGICAL MODELS OF KNOWLEDGE FOR TIMELY CORRECTION OF MEDICAL STANDARDS (FOR ExAMPLE PROVIDING MEDICAL CARE TO PATIENTS WITH ECZEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Boyko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented data comparing the literature on «Protocol of care for patients with eczema». The instrument chosen comparison ontological model that today have become a popular form of structuring knowledge. It is shown that ontology knowledge on eczema allows structured data to provide medical care for patients of this disease and recommend a number of additions to the existing «Protocol of care for patients with eczema». When building a graphology scheme identified differences in pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and the diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It is proposed to supplement the existing protocol over the latest data reflected in contemporary literature.

  9. The Transposon Provides Messages That Yield Unique Profiles of Protein Isoforms and Acts Synergistically With to Enrich Proteome Complexity via Exonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Chyang Charng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In exonization events, Ds1 may provide donor and/or acceptor sites for splicing after inserting into genes and be incorporated into new transcripts with new exon(s. In this study, the protein variants of Ds1 exonization yielding additional functional profile(s were studied. Unlike Ds exonization, which creates new profiles mostly by incorporating flanking intron sequences with the Ds message, Ds1 exonization additionally creates new profiles through the presence or absence of Ds1 messages. The number of unique functional profiles harboring Ds1 messages is 1.3-fold more than that of functional profiles without Ds1 messages. The highly similar 11 protein isoforms at a single insertion site also contribute to proteome complexity enrichment by exclusively creating new profiles. Particularly, Ds1 exonization produces 459 unique profiles, of which 129 cannot be built by Ds . We thus conclude that Ds and Ds1 are independent but synergistic in their capacity to enrich proteome complexity through exonization.

  10. Wasted research when systematic reviews fail to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis: the example of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créquit, Perrine; Trinquart, Ludovic; Yavchitz, Amélie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-20

    Multiple treatments are frequently available for a given condition, and clinicians and patients need a comprehensive, up-to-date synthesis of evidence for all competing treatments. We aimed to quantify the waste of research related to the failure of systematic reviews to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis over time. We performed a series of systematic overviews and networks of randomized trials assessing the gap between evidence covered by systematic reviews and available trials of second-line treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other resources sequentially by year from 2009 to March 2, 2015. We sequentially compared the amount of evidence missing from systematic reviews to the randomized evidence available for inclusion each year. We constructed cumulative networks of randomized evidence over time and evaluated the proportion of trials, patients, treatments, and treatment comparisons not covered by systematic reviews on December 31 each year from 2009 to 2015. We identified 77 trials (28,636 patients) assessing 47 treatments with 54 comparisons and 29 systematic reviews (13 published after 2013). From 2009 to 2015, the evidence covered by existing systematic reviews was consistently incomplete: 45 % to 70 % of trials; 30 % to 58 % of patients; 40 % to 66 % of treatments; and 38 % to 71 % of comparisons were missing. In the cumulative networks of randomized evidence, 10 % to 17 % of treatment comparisons were partially covered by systematic reviews and 55 % to 85 % were partially or not covered. We illustrate how systematic reviews of a given condition provide a fragmented, out-of-date panorama of the evidence for all treatments. This waste of research might be reduced by the development of live cumulative network meta-analyses.

  11. Fossil insects may provide unique information on structures and disturbances in past forest ecosystems - examples from Holocene studies in southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemdahl, Geoffrey; Gustavsson, Gunnar; Olsson, Fredrik; Gaillard, Marie-José

    2010-05-01

    Insects are complex organisms that play an important role in all types of forest ecosystems. Insect remains are often abundant in waterlogged sediments and peat, and the majority of the fossils may be identified to species level, thus contributing with specific information. The occurrence of species feeding or confined to one or a few species of herbaceous plants, shrubs and trees may confirm or improve/refine the interpretations based on pollen and plant macrofossil analyses. Many insects, particularly ground living animals, select open, sun exposed habitats or closed shaded areas. Such indicators are valuable for reconstructions of forest/landscape openness. However, unique information can be provided by fossil insect assemblages. Insect studies carried out at two natural sites in southern Sweden with complete Holocene peat stratigraphies (Olsson and Lemdahl 2009) and a number of sites covering parts of the Holocene (e.g. Gaillard and Lemdahl 1994, Gustavsson et al. 2009) provide strong evidence on changes in forest structure and the occurrence and nature of disturbances. Studies in Britain have yielded similar results (e.g. Whitehouse 2006). Saproxylic beetles indicate the presence of dead wood, which clearly was a more prominent component in ancient woodlands than in present forests, and beetles confined to wood mould suggest the presence of large hollow trees. Finds of pyrophilic species, of which some are very rare in European woodlands today, together with layers of charcoal, suggest that fire was a major disturbance factor during most of the Holocene in southern Sweden. Whereas macroscopic charcoal fragments indicate local fires, the presence of pyrophilic insects is an indication of continuous fire activity at the regional spatial scale. Remains of dung beetles indicate extensive grazing by megaherbivores during early Holocene, and more intensive grazing during late Holocene, whereas such indicators are absent from mid Holocene records, which correlates

  12. Serum peptide/protein profiling by mass spectrometry provides diagnostic information independently of CA125 in women with an ovarian tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne; Madsen, Jonna S; Iachina, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the use of a robust and sensitive mass spectrometry based protein profiling analysis was tested as diagnostic tools for women with an ovarian tumor. The potential additional diagnostic value of serum protein profiles independent of the information provided by CA125 were also...... investigated. Protein profiles of 113 serum samples from women with an ovarian tumor (54 malign and 59 benign) were generated using MALDI-TOF MS. A total of 98 peaks with a significant difference (povarian tumors were identified. After...... average linkage clustering, a profile of 46 statistical significant mass peaks was identified to distinguish malignant tumors and benign tumors/cysts. In the subgroup of women with normal CA125 values (

  13. Optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling provides novel biomarker assessment of clinical prostate and breast cancer biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedele Vita

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs are mechanistically involved in the development of various human malignancies, suggesting that they represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. However, previously reported methods for measuring miRNA expression consume large amounts of tissue, prohibiting high-throughput miRNA profiling from typically small clinical samples such as excision or core needle biopsies of breast or prostate cancer. Here we describe a novel combination of linear amplification and labeling of miRNA for highly sensitive expression microarray profiling requiring only picogram quantities of purified microRNA. Results Comparison of microarray and qRT-PCR measured miRNA levels from two different prostate cancer cell lines showed concordance between the two platforms (Pearson correlation R2 = 0.81; and extension of the amplification, labeling and microarray platform was successfully demonstrated using clinical core and excision biopsy samples from breast and prostate cancer patients. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the prostate biopsy microarrays separated advanced and metastatic prostate cancers from pooled normal prostatic samples and from a non-malignant precursor lesion. Unsupervised clustering of the breast cancer microarrays significantly distinguished ErbB2-positive/ER-negative, ErbB2-positive/ER-positive, and ErbB2-negative/ER-positive breast cancer phenotypes (Fisher exact test, p = 0.03; as well, supervised analysis of these microarray profiles identified distinct miRNA subsets distinguishing ErbB2-positive from ErbB2-negative and ER-positive from ER-negative breast cancers, independent of other clinically important parameters (patient age; tumor size, node status and proliferation index. Conclusion In sum, these findings demonstrate that optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling offers novel biomarker identification from typically small clinical samples such as breast

  14. Aerospace Example

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a textbook, created example for illustration purposes. The System takes inputs of Pt, Ps, and Alt, and calculates the Mach number using the Rayleigh Pitot...

  15. Haematological profile of rats (Rattus norvegicus) induced BCG and provided leaf extract of Plectranthus amboinicus Lour Spreng)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silitonga, Melva; Silitonga, Pasar M.

    2017-08-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus Lour Spreng is a medicinal plant that has many benefits, such as an antioxidant, hepatoprotective and immunostimulan. Immune status can be seen from hematological profile. This study aims to investigate hematology profile on rats induced BCG and leaf extract of Plectranthus amboinicus. 24 male rats aged 3 months and weighing between 140-200 grams divided equally into six groups, P0, P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5. P0 as controle was given aquadest. The P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5 treatment groups were given 19 g / kg AEP + BCG, 31.5 g / kg AEP + BCG, 19g / kg AEP, 31.5 g / kg AEP and BCG consecutively. The BCG were used as antigen. The AEP was administered orally for 30 days and 100 µl BCG were intramusculary administered on day 14 th and day 21. On day 31st, the rats we decapitated and their blood were collected for hematology (leucocyte (WBC), Erythrocyte (RBC), thrombocyte (PLT) count, Haemoglobin (Hb), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), MCV, MHC, and MHCH analysis. Data were analyzed with ANOVA. WBC increased significantly in treatment AEP 31.5 g / kg bw, 31.5 g AEP / kg bw + BCG and so were only given BCG. RBC tend to increase in all AEP treatment but tends to increase again when given a BCG. Hb increased in treatment P1, P2, T3 and P4, but the improvement was significant only in treatment P1. While PLT increase significantly in all treatments compared to the controls. HCT did not show significant differences but all of them were in the normal range. EAP without BCG and with the addition of BCG lowered ESR significantly, whereas BCG alone increased the ESR significantly. MCV increased significantly only in the treatment of P1 and show the same pattern with the MHC and MHCH. The conclusion that Plectranthus amboinicus Lour a positive impact on blood profiles with and without BCG. Plectranthus amboinicus Lour managed blood profile when administered together with BCG

  16. Extensive surface protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells may provide diagnostic signatures from blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Belov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV are membranous particles (30–1,000 nm in diameter secreted by cells. Important biological functions have been attributed to 2 subsets of EV, the exosomes (bud from endosomal membranes and the microvesicles (MV; bud from plasma membranes. Since both types of particles contain surface proteins derived from their cell of origin, their detection in blood may enable diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We have used an antibody microarray (DotScan to compare the surface protein profiles of live cancer cells with those of their EV, based on their binding patterns to immobilized antibodies. Initially, EV derived from the cancer cell lines, LIM1215 (colorectal cancer and MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia; CLL, were used for assay optimization. Biotinylated antibodies specific for EpCAM (CD326 and CD19, respectively, were used to detect captured particles by enhanced chemiluminescence. Subsequently, this approach was used to profile CD19+ EV from the plasma of CLL patients. These EV expressed a subset (~40% of the proteins detected on CLL cells from the same patients: moderate or high levels of CD5, CD19, CD31, CD44, CD55, CD62L, CD82, HLA-A,B,C, HLA-DR; low levels of CD21, CD49c, CD63. None of these proteins was detected on EV from the plasma of age- and gender-matched healthy individuals.

  17. Competence profile of an in-house educator of professionals providing elderly care (ComPro project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbińska, Katarzyna E; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Niedźwiedzka, Barbara

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the study, conducted within the multicenter ComPro project (Competence Profiles for Learning Supporters in Elderly Care) and funded by the Leonardo da Vinci Programme in 2006-2008, was to define the competences profile of a person responsible for the inhouse education of professionals caring for the elderly persons in social care institutions. The qualitative (3 focus group interviews) and quantitative (the KODE®X questionnaire) approach was used to study opinions of 106 care professionals and 39 managers in social care institutions, and 35 teachers in vocational schools for workers in social care about desired competences of an in-house educator. The factor analysis with Varimax rotation performed separately for each group of surveyed professionals showed 4 factors in each, which had different components with the highest correlation rates. In the managers group--factor 1 correlated most with communication and organisational competences; among care professionals--with professional knowledge and their job specific skills; among teachers--with social and didactical competences. The most expected competences were different in each position, what may reflect the need of creation of a job description and a post of an in-house educator in social care institutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of 3D Voronoi Tessellation Nearest Neighbor Lipid Shells Provides Atomistic Lipid Disruption Profile of Protein Containing Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Duong, Hai V.; Compton, Campbell; Vaughn, Mark W.; Nguyen, Hoa; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying protein-induced lipid disruptions at the atomistic level is a challenging problem in membrane biophysics. Here we propose a novel 3D Voronoi tessellation nearest-atom-neighbor shell method to classify and characterize lipid domains into discrete concentric lipid shells surrounding membrane proteins in structurally heterogeneous lipid membranes. This method needs only the coordinates of the system and is independent of force fields and simulation conditions. As a proof-of-principle, we use this multiple lipid shell method to analyze the lipid disruption profiles of three simulated membrane systems: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol, and beta-amyloid/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol. We observed different atomic volume disruption mechanisms due to cholesterol and beta-amyloid Additionally, several lipid fractional groups and lipid-interfacial water did not converge to their control values with increasing distance or shell order from the protein. This volume divergent behavior was confirmed by bilayer thickness and chain orientational order calculations. Our method can also be used to analyze high-resolution structural experimental data. PMID:25637891

  19. iTRAQ-based protein profiling provides insights into the central metabolism changes driving grape berry development and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Esteso, María José; Vilella-Antón, María Teresa; Pedreño, María Ángeles; Valero, María Luz; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2013-10-24

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is an economically important fruit crop. Quality-determining grape components such as sugars, acids, flavors, anthocyanins, tannins, etc., accumulate in the different grape berry development stages. Thus, correlating the proteomic profiles with the biochemical and physiological changes occurring in grape is of paramount importance to advance in our understanding of berry development and ripening processes. We report the developmental analysis of Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat Hamburg berries at the protein level from fruit set to full ripening. An iTRAQ-based bottom-up proteomic approach followed by tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification and quantitation of 411 and 630 proteins in the green and ripening phases, respectively. Two key points in development relating to changes in protein level were detected: end of the first growth period (7 mm-to-15 mm) and onset of ripening (15 mm-to-V100, V100-to-110). A functional analysis was performed using the Blast2GO software based on the enrichment of GO terms during berry growth. The study of the proteome contributes to decipher the biological processes and metabolic pathways involved in the development and quality traits of fruit and its derived products. These findings lie mainly in metabolism and storage of sugars and malate, energy-related pathways such as respiration, photosynthesis and fermentation, and the synthesis of polyphenolics as major secondary metabolites in grape berry. In addition, some key steps in carbohydrate and malate metabolism have been identified in this study, i.e., PFP-PFK or SuSy-INV switches among others, which may influence the final sugar and acid balance in ripe fruit. In conclusion, some proteins not reported to date have been detected to be deregulated in specific tissues and developmental stages, leading to formulate new hypotheses on the metabolic processes underlying grape berry development. These results open up new lines to decipher the

  20. Differential Proteomic Profiles of Pleurotus ostreatus in Response to Lignocellulosic Components Provide Insights into Divergent Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qiuyun; Ma, Fuying; Li, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Li, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a white rot fungus that grows on lignocellulosic biomass by metabolizing the main constituents. Extracellular enzymes play a key role in this process. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulose, potentially toxic molecules are released from lignin, and the molecules are derived from hemicellulose or cellulose that trigger various responses in fungus, thereby influencing mycelial growth. In order to characterize the mechanism underlying the response of P. ostreatus to lignin, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulose substrates. In this work, the mycelium proteome of P. ostreatus grown in liquid minimal medium with lignin, xylan, and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was analyzed using the complementary two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) approach; 115 proteins were identified, most of which were classified into five types according to their function. Proteins with an antioxidant function that play a role in the stress response were upregulated in response to lignin. Most proteins involving in carbohydrate and energy metabolism were less abundant in lignin. Xylan and CMC may enhanced the process of carbohydrate metabolism by regulating the level of expression of various carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins. The change of protein expression level was related to the adaptability of P. ostreatus to lignocellulose. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the response of white-rot fungus to lignocellulose.

  1. Comparative transcriptional profiling provides insights into the evolution and development of the zygomorphic flower of Vicia sativa (Papilionoideae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vicia sativa (the common vetch possesses a predominant zygomorphic flower and belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae, which is related to Arabidopsis thaliana in the eurosid II clade of the core eudicots. Each vetch flower consists of 21 concentrically arranged organs: the outermost five sepals, then five petals and ten stamens, and a single carpel in the center. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the floral transcriptome to examine a genome-scale genetic model of the zygomorphic flower of vetch. mRNA was obtained from an equal mixture of six floral organs, leaves and roots. De novo assembly of the vetch transcriptome using Illumina paired-end technology produced 71,553 unigenes with an average length of 511 bp. We then compared the expression changes in the 71,553 unigenes in the eight independent organs through RNA-Seq Quantification analysis. We predominantly analyzed gene expression patterns specific to each floral organ and combinations of floral organs that corresponded to the traditional ABC model domains. Comparative analyses were performed in the floral transcriptomes of vetch and Arabidopsis, and genomes of vetch and Medicago truncatula. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our comparative analysis of vetch and Arabidopsis showed that the vetch flowers conform to a strict ABC model. We analyzed the evolution and expression of the TCP gene family in vetch at a whole-genome level, and several unigenes specific to three different vetch petals, which might offer some clues toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying floral zygomorphy. Our results provide the first insights into the genome-scale molecular regulatory network that controls the evolution and development of the zygomorphic flower in Papilionoideae.

  2. River profile response to normal fault growth and linkage: an example from the Hellenic forearc of south-central Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Sean F.; Wegmann, Karl W.

    2017-02-01

    Topography is a reflection of the tectonic and geodynamic processes that act to uplift the Earth's surface and the erosional processes that work to return it to base level. Numerous studies have shown that topography is a sensitive recorder of tectonic signals. A quasi-physical understanding of the relationship between river incision and rock uplift has made the analysis of fluvial topography a popular technique for deciphering relative, and some argue absolute, histories of rock uplift. Here we present results from a study of the fluvial topography from south-central Crete, demonstrating that river longitudinal profiles indeed record the relative history of uplift, but several other processes make it difficult to recover quantitative uplift histories. Prior research demonstrates that the south-central coastline of Crete is bound by a large ( ˜ 100 km long) E-W striking composite normal fault system. Marine terraces reveal that it is uplifting between 0.1 and 1.0 mm yr-1. These studies suggest that two normal fault systems, the offshore Ptolemy and onshore South-Central Crete faults, linked together in the recent geologic past (ca. 0.4-1 My BP). Fault mechanics predict that when adjacent faults link into a single fault the uplift rate in footwalls of the linkage zone will increase rapidly. We use this natural experiment to assess the response of river profiles to a temporal jump in uplift rate and to assess the applicability of the stream power incision model to this setting. Using river profile analysis we show that rivers in south-central Crete record the relative uplift history of fault growth and linkage as theory predicts that they should. Calibration of the commonly used stream power incision model shows that the slope exponent, n, is ˜ 0.5, contrary to most studies that find n ≥ 1. Analysis of fluvial knickpoints shows that migration distances are not proportional to upstream contributing drainage area, as predicted by the stream power incision model

  3. On the representation of IAGOS/MOZAIC vertical profiles in chemical transport models : contribution of different error sources in the example of carbon monoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschetti, Fabio; Chen, Huilin; Thouret, Valerie; Nedelec, Philippe; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Gerbig, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Utilising a fleet of commercial airliners, MOZAIC/IAGOS provides atmospheric composition data on a regular basis that are widely used for modelling applications. Due to the specific operational context of the platforms, such observations are collected close to international airports and hence in an

  4. Yeast Interspecies Comparative Proteomics Reveals Divergence in Expression Profiles and Provides Insights into Proteome Resource Allocation and Evolutionary Roles of Gene Duplication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Keiji; Ito, Haruka; Nohara, Takehiro; Ohnishi, Mihoko; Ishibashi, Yuko; Takeda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Omics analysis is a versatile approach for understanding the conservation and diversity of molecular systems across multiple taxa. In this study, we compared the proteome expression profiles of four yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces mikatae, Kluyveromyces waltii, and Kluyveromyces lactis) grown on glucose- or glycerol-containing media. Conserved expression changes across all species were observed only for a small proportion of all proteins differentially expressed between the two growth conditions. Two Kluyveromyces species, both of which exhibited a high growth rate on glycerol, a nonfermentative carbon source, showed distinct species-specific expression profiles. In K. waltii grown on glycerol, proteins involved in the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis were expressed in high abundance. In K. lactis grown on glycerol, the expression of glycolytic and ethanol metabolic enzymes was unexpectedly low, whereas proteins involved in cytoplasmic translation, including ribosomal proteins and elongation factors, were highly expressed. These marked differences in the types of predominantly expressed proteins suggest that K. lactis optimizes the balance of proteome resource allocation between metabolism and protein synthesis giving priority to cellular growth. In S. cerevisiae, about 450 duplicate gene pairs were retained after whole-genome duplication. Intriguingly, we found that in the case of duplicates with conserved sequences, the total abundance of proteins encoded by a duplicate pair in S. cerevisiae was similar to that of protein encoded by nonduplicated ortholog in Kluyveromyces yeast. Given the frequency of haploinsufficiency, this observation suggests that conserved duplicate genes, even though minor cases of retained duplicates, do not exhibit a dosage effect in yeast, except for ribosomal proteins. Thus, comparative proteomic analyses across multiple species may reveal not only species-specific characteristics of metabolic processes under

  5. Generic ICT Skills Profiles: Future Skills for Tomorrow's World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Co-operation Europe Ltd. (ICEL), Brussels, Belgium.

    This document describes generic skills profiles relevant to key jobs in information and communications technology (ICT). The profiles cover the main job areas for which the ICT industry is experiencing skills shortages. These types of information are provided for 18 generic job profiles: job description (vision, role, lifestyle); examples of job…

  6. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse C Cnossen

    Full Text Available The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI study.We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions.All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%, designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68% and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%. The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57% had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU, 36 (51% had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45 of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers.Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches.

  7. RNA-seq Transcriptional Profiling of an Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Provides Insights into Regulated and Coordinated Gene Expression in Lotus japonicus and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Nishide, Hiroyo; Takeda, Naoya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression during arbuscular mycorrhizal development is highly orchestrated in both plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. To elucidate the gene expression profiles of the symbiotic association, we performed a digital gene expression analysis of Lotus japonicus and Rhizophagus irregularis using a HiSeq 2000 next-generation sequencer with a Cufflinks assembly and de novo transcriptome assembly. There were 3,641 genes differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal development in L. japonicus, approximately 80% of which were up-regulated. The up-regulated genes included secreted proteins, transporters, proteins involved in lipid and amino acid metabolism, ribosomes and histones. We also detected many genes that were differentially expressed in small-secreted peptides and transcription factors, which may be involved in signal transduction or transcription regulation during symbiosis. Co-regulated genes between arbuscular mycorrhizal and root nodule symbiosis were not particularly abundant, but transcripts encoding for membrane traffic-related proteins, transporters and iron transport-related proteins were found to be highly co-up-regulated. In transcripts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, expansion of cytochrome P450 was observed, which may contribute to various metabolic pathways required to accommodate roots and soil. The comprehensive gene expression data of both plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi provide a powerful platform for investigating the functional and molecular mechanisms underlying arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Temperature and salinity profiles to provide supporting data between MiniBat tows off the Oregon coast, June 2003 (NODC Accession 0002113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from the NEW HORIZON from 24 June 2003 to 30 June 2003. Data were submitted by...

  9. Maple by example

    CERN Document Server

    Abell, Martha L

    2005-01-01

    Maple by Example, Third Edition, is a reference/text with CD for beginning and experienced students, professional engineers, and other Maple users. This new edition has been updated to be compatible with the most recent release of the Maple software. Coverage includes built-in Maple commands used in courses and practices that involve calculus, linear algebra, business mathematics, ordinary and partial differential equations, numerical methods, graphics and more. The CD-ROM provides updated Maple input and all text from the book.* Updated coverage of Maple features and functions * Backwards compatible for all versions* New applications from a variety of fields, including biology, physics and engineering* Expanded topics with many additional examples

  10. Rent Seeking: A Textbook Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorino, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The author argues that the college textbook market provides a clear example of monopoly seeking as described by Tullock (1967, 1980). This behavior is also known as rent seeking. Because this market is important to students, this example of rent seeking will be of particular interest to them. (Contains 24 notes.)

  11. Can PEP-3 Provide a Cognitive Profile in Children with ASD? A Comparison between the Developmental Ages of PEP-3 and IQ of Leiter-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giacomo, Andrea; Craig, Francesco; Cristella, Arcangelo; Terenzio, Vanessa; Buttiglione, Maura; Margari, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background: The assessment of the intelligence quotient (IQ) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is important to plan a detailed therapeutic-educative programme. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) to estimate the general cognitive development of children with ASD.…

  12. Participatory Publics - Examples from Higher Education in Fragile Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola

    This paper presents two cases of local communities, defined by being constituted by students in higher education in polities that have a relatively short tradition of democracy. The first case is a college in Bhutan. The second example is a Madrasa in Bangladesh, a privately run institution...... with theological profile, and at the centre of attention due to national social unrest. The examples are provided as a base for thinking on how social media can be redesigned to support local democratic activity. The paper concludes by proposing some aspects of the local communities that are intriguing...... but challenging to design for....

  13. An Enumerative Combinatorics Model for Fragmentation Patterns in RNA Sequencing Provides Insights into Nonuniformity of the Expected Fragment Starting-Point and Coverage Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Celine; Haeseler, Arndt Von

    2017-03-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged as the method of choice for measuring the expression of RNAs in a given cell population. In most RNA-seq technologies, sequencing the full length of RNA molecules requires fragmentation into smaller pieces. Unfortunately, the issue of nonuniform sequencing coverage across a genomic feature has been a concern in RNA-seq and is attributed to biases for certain fragments in RNA-seq library preparation and sequencing. To investigate the expected coverage obtained from fragmentation, we develop a simple fragmentation model that is independent of bias from the experimental method and is not specific to the transcript sequence. Essentially, we enumerate all configurations for maximal placement of a given fragment length, F, on transcript length, T, to represent every possible fragmentation pattern, from which we compute the expected coverage profile across a transcript. We extend this model to incorporate general empirical attributes such as read length, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules of the transcript. We further introduce the fragment starting-point, fragment coverage, and read coverage profiles. We find that the expected profiles are not uniform and that factors such as fragment length to transcript length ratio, read length to fragment length ratio, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules influence the variability of coverage across a transcript. Finally, we explore a potential application of the model where, with simulations, we show that it is possible to correctly estimate the transcript copy number for any transcript in the RNA-seq experiment.

  14. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles of Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae), along with pupal development provide insight into diapause program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Fan, Huan; Xiong, Ke-Cai; Liu, Ying-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Enderlein), is a devastating citrus pest in Asia. This univoltine insect enters obligatory pupal diapause in each generation, while little is known about the course and the molecular mechanisms of diapause. In this study, the course of diapause was determined by measuring the respiratory rate throughout the pupal stage. In addition, the variation of transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles of pupae at five developmental stages (pre-, early-, middle-, late-, and post-diapause) were evaluated by next-generation sequencing technology and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), respectively. A total of 4,808 genes were significantly altered in ten pairwise comparisons, representing major shifts in metabolism and signal transduction as well as endocrine system and digestive system. Gene expression profiles were validated by qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, 48 metabolites were identified and quantified by 1H NMR. Nine of which significantly contributed to the variation in the metabolomic profiles, especially proline and trehalose. Moreover, the samples collected within diapause maintenance (early-, middle-, and late-diapause) only exhibited marginal transcriptomic and metabolomic variation with each other. These findings greatly improve our understanding of B. minax diapause and lay the foundation for further pertinent studies.

  15. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles of Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae, along with pupal development provide insight into diapause program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available The Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Enderlein, is a devastating citrus pest in Asia. This univoltine insect enters obligatory pupal diapause in each generation, while little is known about the course and the molecular mechanisms of diapause. In this study, the course of diapause was determined by measuring the respiratory rate throughout the pupal stage. In addition, the variation of transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles of pupae at five developmental stages (pre-, early-, middle-, late-, and post-diapause were evaluated by next-generation sequencing technology and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, respectively. A total of 4,808 genes were significantly altered in ten pairwise comparisons, representing major shifts in metabolism and signal transduction as well as endocrine system and digestive system. Gene expression profiles were validated by qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, 48 metabolites were identified and quantified by 1H NMR. Nine of which significantly contributed to the variation in the metabolomic profiles, especially proline and trehalose. Moreover, the samples collected within diapause maintenance (early-, middle-, and late-diapause only exhibited marginal transcriptomic and metabolomic variation with each other. These findings greatly improve our understanding of B. minax diapause and lay the foundation for further pertinent studies.

  16. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  17. Reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a powerful tool for metabolic profiling of vegetables: Lactuca sativa as an example of its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Reidah, I M; Contreras, M M; Arráez-Román, D; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2013-10-25

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa), a leafy vegetal widely consumed worldwide, fresh cut or minimally processed, constitutes a major dietary source of natural antioxidants and bioactive compounds. In this study, reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-UHPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of polar and semi-polar metabolites from three lettuce cultivars (baby, romaine, and iceberg). The UHPLC systems allowed the use of a small-particle-size C18 column (1.8 μm), with very fine resolution for the separation of up to seven isomers, and the QTOF mass analyzer enabled sensitive detection with high mass resolution and accuracy in full scan. Thus, a total of 171 compounds were tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals and suggested molecular formula with those previously reported in family Asteraceae. Afterwards, their structures were also corroborated by the MS/MS data provided by the QTOF analyzer. Well-known amino acids, organic acids, sesquiterpene lactones, phenolic acids and flavonoids were characterized, e.g. lactucin, lactucopicrin, caftaric acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeoylmalic acid, chicoric acid, isochlorogenic acid A, luteolin, and quercetin glycosides. For this plant species, this is the first available report of several isomeric forms of the latter polyphenols and other types of components such as nucleosides, peptides, and tryptophan-derived alkaloids. Remarkably, 10 novel structures formed by the conjugation of known amino acids and sesquiterpene lactones were also proposed. Thus, the methodology applied is a useful option to develop an exhaustive metabolic profiling of plants that helps to explain their potential biological activities and folk uses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the Quality and Maintenance Issues of Bibliographic Records Provided by the e-Book Supply Chain: Using the Operation of the Taiwan Academic E-Book &Database Consortium as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Chen Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an important trend to expand the use of bibliographic records from the supply chain for libraries. However, what are the sources of vendors’ bibliographic records? Their quality? How do libraries deal with these bibliographic records? Are they satisfied them? This study first drawn 1,080 bibliographic records from 29 e-book products, and MarcEdit was used to check their quality and 14% were found to contain errors. Secondly, this study interviewed 12 vendors and found out that bibliographic records of western books were mostly copied from the OCLC, and there were also bibliographic records from the original vendors who commissioned outsource companies to do the cataloging process. In addition, there were those cataloged by Taiwanese manufacturers themselves. Lastly, this study sent questionnaires to Taiwan Academic E-Book & Database Consortium members to survey their satisfaction on bibliographic records provided by vendors and their recommendations thereof. This study shows that most libraries have inputted the bibliographic records of the e-books into their OPAC system and are generally satisfied with the bibliographic records provided by the vendors, though opinions vary on the accuracy of these records.

  19. The Price per Prospective Consumer of Providing Therapist Training and Consultation in Seven Evidence-Based Treatments within a Large Public Behavioral Health System: An Example Cost-Analysis Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie H. Okamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePublic-sector behavioral health systems seeking to implement evidence-based treatments (EBTs may face challenges selecting EBTs given their limited resources. This study describes and illustrates one method to calculate cost related to training and consultation to assist system-level decisions about which EBTs to select.MethodsTraining, consultation, and indirect labor costs were calculated for seven commonly implemented EBTs. Using extant literature, we then estimated the diagnoses and populations for which each EBT was indicated. Diagnostic and demographic information from Medicaid claims data were obtained from a large behavioral health payer organization and used to estimate the number of covered people with whom the EBT could be used and to calculate implementation-associated costs per consumer.ResultsFindings suggest substantial cost to therapists and service systems related to EBT training and consultation. Training and consultation costs varied by EBT, from Dialectical Behavior Therapy at $238.07 to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy at $0.18 per potential consumer served. Total cost did not correspond with the number of prospective consumers served by an EBT.ConclusionA cost-metric that accounts for the prospective recipients of a given EBT within a given population may provide insight into how systems should prioritize training efforts. Future policy should consider the financial burden of EBT implementation in relation to the context of the population being served and begin a dialog in creating incentives for EBT use.

  20. Variation in structure and process of care in traumatic brain injury: Provider profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); S. Polinder (Suzanne); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); G. Audibert (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); Bartels, R. (Ronald); Barzó, P. (Pál); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); Beretta, L. (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Borgen, L.S. (Lund Stine); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); A. Brazinova (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bučková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); Carpenter, C.; Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F. Della Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); P. Gagliardo (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, A.K. (Asta Kristine); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); J.-Y. Jiang (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); J. Kettunen (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); C. McMahon (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); T. Menovsky (Tomas); C. Morganti-Kossmann (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); D. Nelson (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); Oldenbeuving, A. (Annemarie); M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); W.C. Peul (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); Pili, F.S. (Floury Sébastien); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); Raj, R. (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorčíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); Roks, G. (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); Rueckert, D.L. (Danie L.); Ruiz De Arcaute, F. (Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; R. Schou (Rico); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (Özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dirk); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); Stamatakis, E.L. (Emmanue L.); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te Ao, B. (Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); W. van Hecke (Wim); D. Van Praag (Dominique); D. Van Roost (Dirk); Van Vlierberghe, E. (Eline); Vande Vyvere, T. (Thijs); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); P.M. Vespa (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); Wildschut, E. (Eno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); L. Wilson (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K. L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); De Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); Den Boogert, H. (Hugo); Van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map

  1. Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May Provide Wildlife Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Walsh; M. North

    2012-01-01

    The photos in this appendix may help identify some of the unique branching formations or bole characteristics in trees that can make a tree particularly valuable for wildlife, either for nesting, roosting, and use as hunting perches, or other uses. We have organized these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees...

  2. Reliability and Validity of Kurdish Language Version of Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II among Kurdish Healthcare Providers Kurdish Version of HPLP-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Aram Salih Mohammed Amin; Sadeghi, Roya; Tol, Azar; Yaseri, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Unhealthy lifestyles pose significant threat to public health. This study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of a Kurdish version of the HPLP-II instrument among Kurdish healthcare providers, whose society and culture differ from that of North America and Spain, where the instrument was developed. The instrument was translated into Kurdish, back translated, and pilot tested to ascertain cultural sensitivity. It was then evaluated using a convenience sample of 460 healthcare providers in the Kurdistan region, northern Iraq using a principal components factor analysis. The order of factors was entirely identical to those isolated previously during the psychometric assessment of the English language version. The majority of our study participants were male (55%). In addition, 39.2% of participants were nurses. In addition, 42% of participants had less than five years of working experience. Furthermore, 82.1% of our study population held a high school diploma. The mean (SE) of Physical Activities dimension was low (15.3 ± 4.8) compared to Spiritual Growth dimension (24.5 ± 4.4). Moreover, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall HPLP-II questionnaire was 0.870; however, the nutrition dimension was low (0.622) compared to Physical Activities dimension (0.792). Furthermore, the correlation between items ranged from 0.099 to 0.611. The Kurdish version of the HPLP-II demonstrated initial reliability and validity. It is a precious tool to evaluate and assess lifestyle and lifestyle interventions built to improve the health of Kurds.

  3. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs t...... that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks.......Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...

  4. Transcriptomes and expression profiling of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provide insight into the biology of azooxanthellate corals

    KAUST Repository

    Yum, Lauren

    2017-07-19

    Despite the importance of deep-sea corals, our current understanding of their ecology and evolution is limited due to difficulties in sampling and studying deep-sea environments. Moreover, a recent re-evaluation of habitat limitations has been suggested after characterization of deep-sea corals in the Red Sea, where they live at temperatures of above 20 °C at low oxygen concentrations. To gain further insight into the biology of deep-sea corals, we produced reference transcriptomes and studied gene expression of three deep-sea coral species from the Red Sea, i.e. Dendrophyllia sp., Eguchipsammia fistula, and Rhizotrochus typus. Our analyses suggest that deep-sea coral employ mitochondrial hypometabolism and anaerobic glycolysis to manage low oxygen conditions present in the Red Sea. Notably, we found expression of genes related to surface cilia motion that presumably enhance small particle transport rates in the oligotrophic deep-sea environment. This is the first study to characterize transcriptomes and in situ gene expression for deep-sea corals. Our work offers several mechanisms by which deep-sea corals might cope with the distinct environmental conditions present in the Red Sea As such, our data provide direction for future research and further insight to organismal response of deep-sea coral to environmental change and ocean warming.

  5. Transcriptomes and expression profiling of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea provide insight into the biology of azooxanthellate corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Lauren K; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Röthig, Till; Roder, Cornelia; Roik, Anna; Michell, Craig; Voolstra, Christian R

    2017-07-25

    Despite the importance of deep-sea corals, our current understanding of their ecology and evolution is limited due to difficulties in sampling and studying deep-sea environments. Moreover, a recent re-evaluation of habitat limitations has been suggested after characterization of deep-sea corals in the Red Sea, where they live at temperatures of above 20 °C at low oxygen concentrations. To gain further insight into the biology of deep-sea corals, we produced reference transcriptomes and studied gene expression of three deep-sea coral species from the Red Sea, i.e. Dendrophyllia sp., Eguchipsammia fistula, and Rhizotrochus typus. Our analyses suggest that deep-sea coral employ mitochondrial hypometabolism and anaerobic glycolysis to manage low oxygen conditions present in the Red Sea. Notably, we found expression of genes related to surface cilia motion that presumably enhance small particle transport rates in the oligotrophic deep-sea environment. This is the first study to characterize transcriptomes and in situ gene expression for deep-sea corals. Our work offers several mechanisms by which deep-sea corals might cope with the distinct environmental conditions present in the Red Sea As such, our data provide direction for future research and further insight to organismal response of deep-sea coral to environmental change and ocean warming.

  6. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Provides Insight into the Transcript Profile of the Genes Involved in Aporphine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Zhu, Lingping; Li, Ling; Li, Juanjuan; Xu, Liming; Feng, Ji; Liu, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    transcriptomic database provides new directions for future studies on clarifying the aporphine alkaloid pathway. PMID:28197160

  7. Transcriptome-based gene profiling provides novel insights into the characteristics of radish root response to Cr stress with next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eXie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Radish (Raphanus sativus L. is an important worldwide root vegetable crop with high nutrient values and is adversely affected by non-essential heavy metals including chromium (Cr. Little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying Cr stress response in radish. In this study, RNA-Seq technique was employed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs under Cr stress. Based on de novo transcriptome assembly, there were 30,676 unigenes representing 60,881 transcripts isolated from radish root under Cr stress. Differential gene analysis revealed that 2,985 uingenes were significantly differentially expressed between Cr-free (CK and Cr-treated (Cr600 libraries, among which 1,424 were up-regulated and 1,561 down-regulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that these DEGs were mainly involved in primary metabolic process, response to abiotic stimulus, cellular metabolic process and small molecule metabolic process. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs were mainly involved in protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, starch and sucrose metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, drug and xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 metabolism. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the expression patterns of 12 randomly selected DEGs were highly accordant with the results from RNA-seq. Furthermore, many candidate genes including signaling protein kinases, transcription factors and metal transporters, chelate compound biosynthesis and antioxidant system, were involved in defense and detoxification mechanisms of Cr stress response regulatory networks. These results would provide novel insight into molecular mechanism underlying plant responsiveness to Cr stress and facilitate further genetic manipulation on Cr uptake and accumulation in radish.

  8. Contrasting views of the annual carbon cycle observed with SOCCOM profiling floats in the Pacific and the Atlantic sectors of the Southern Ocean: A glimpse of future views provided by global observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. S.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Riser, S.; Talley, L. D.; Gray, A. R.; Williams, N. L.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate, Observations and Modeling program (SOCCOM) is building an array of profiling floats equipped with biogeochemical sensors. These profiling floats, with 6 year lifetimes, are designed to extend the decadal-scale observations of the GO-SHIP repeat hydrography program into the seasonal and interannual domain. Profiling floats that are equipped with oxygen, nitrate, pH, and biooptical sensors are deployed from GO-SHIP sections, or from ships of opportunity that make GO-SHIP quality observations, to ensure the consistency of the float observations with the long-term climatology. Observations are made from near 2000 m to the surface at 10 day intervals. SOCCOM has deployed arrays of these floats along the P16S line at 150°W in the Pacific and along the A12 line at 0° in the Atlantic. Data from the floats are quality controlled and made available in real time at http://soccom.princeton.edu. The floats are equipped with ice avoidance software to enable operations under ice and floats have been deployed as far south at 68°. At the time of the meeting, nearly two years of data will be available from the Pacific and one year of data in the Atlantic. Dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations are derived from the observed pH and estimates of total alkalinity that are estimated from global climatologies. Initial assessments of air-sea gas exchange and net community production derived from the annual changes in dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, and nitrate concentrations along these sections, which were developed using 1D mixed layer models, will be presented. The contrasting views from these floats provide a suggestion of the future capabilities of basin scale observing systems based on profiling floats with biogeochemical sensors.

  9. Regression analysis by example

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Samprit

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Fourth Edition: ""This book is . . . an excellent source of examples for regression analysis. It has been and still is readily readable and understandable."" -Journal of the American Statistical Association Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition has been expanded

  10. Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Bisgaard, Soren

    2011-01-01

    An intuition-based approach enables you to master time series analysis with ease Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example provides the fundamental techniques in time series analysis using various examples. By introducing necessary theory through examples that showcase the discussed topics, the authors successfully help readers develop an intuitive understanding of seemingly complicated time series models and their implications. The book presents methodologies for time series analysis in a simplified, example-based approach. Using graphics, the authors discuss each presented example in

  11. Histone profiles in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Simone S; Neff, Tobias; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2015-10-01

    While DNA abnormalities have long been recognized as the cause of cancer, the contribution of chromatin is a relatively recent discovery. Excitement in the field of cancer epigenetics is driven by 3 key elements: 1. Chromatin may play an active and often critical role in controlling gene expression, DNA stability and cell identity. 2. Chromatin modifiers are frequent targets of DNA aberrations, in some cancers reaching near 100%. Particularly in cancers with low rates of DNA mutations, the key "driver" of malignancy is often a chromatin modifier. 3. Cancer-associated aberrant chromatin is amenable to pharmacologic modulation. This has sparked the rapidly expanding development of small molecules targeting chromatin modifiers or reader domains, several of which have shown promise in clinical trials. In parallel, technical advances have greatly enhanced our ability to perform comprehensive chromatin/histone profiling. Despite the discovery that distinct histone profiles are associated with prognostic subgroups, and in some instances may point towards an underlying aberration that can be targeted, histone profiling has not entered clinical diagnostics. Even eligibility for clinical trials targeting chromatin hinges on traditional histologic or DNA-based molecular criteria rather than chromatin profiles. This review will give an overview of the philosophical debate around the role of histones in controlling or modulating gene expression and discuss the most common techniques for histone profiling. In addition, we will provide prominent examples of aberrantly expressed or mutated chromatin modifiers that result in either globally or locally aberrant histone profiles, and that may be promising therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  13. Code query by example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  14. Active Learning with Irrelevant Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    An improved active learning method has been devised for training data classifiers. One example of a data classifier is the algorithm used by the United States Postal Service since the 1960s to recognize scans of handwritten digits for processing zip codes. Active learning algorithms enable rapid training with minimal investment of time on the part of human experts to provide training examples consisting of correctly classified (labeled) input data. They function by identifying which examples would be most profitable for a human expert to label. The goal is to maximize classifier accuracy while minimizing the number of examples the expert must label. Although there are several well-established methods for active learning, they may not operate well when irrelevant examples are present in the data set. That is, they may select an item for labeling that the expert simply cannot assign to any of the valid classes. In the context of classifying handwritten digits, the irrelevant items may include stray marks, smudges, and mis-scans. Querying the expert about these items results in wasted time or erroneous labels, if the expert is forced to assign the item to one of the valid classes. In contrast, the new algorithm provides a specific mechanism for avoiding querying the irrelevant items. This algorithm has two components: an active learner (which could be a conventional active learning algorithm) and a relevance classifier. The combination of these components yields a method, denoted Relevance Bias, that enables the active learner to avoid querying irrelevant data so as to increase its learning rate and efficiency when irrelevant items are present. The algorithm collects irrelevant data in a set of rejected examples, then trains the relevance classifier to distinguish between labeled (relevant) training examples and the rejected ones. The active learner combines its ranking of the items with the probability that they are relevant to yield a final decision about which item

  15. Neutrosophic Examples in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy can be widely applied in physics and the like. For example, one of the reasons for 2011 Nobel Prize for physics is "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae", but according to neutrosophy, there exist seven or nine states of accelerating expansion and contraction and the neutrosophic state in the universe. Another two examples are "a revision to Gödel's incompleteness theorem by neutrosophy" and "six neutral (neutrosophic fundamental interactions". In addition, the "partial and temporary unified theory so far" is discussed (including "partial and temporary unified electromagnetic theory so far", "partial and temporary unified gravitational theory so far", "partial and temporary unified theory of four fundamental interactions so far", and "partial and temporary unified theory of natural science so far".

  16. From Utterance to Example Sentence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard

    This poster will address some of the problems on excerption of example sentences for the online dictionary of Danish Sign Language (DTS) from a raw corpus of dialogues and monologues. In the Danish Sign Language Dictionary every meaning is illustrated by one or more sentences showing the sign...... in context. The goal of our project has been that every sentence should be taken from real language samples, but due to restriction on time and money we only managed to let approximately 50% of the sentences originate from real language samples. The remaining half of the sentences was constructed by deaf...... is to help the dictionary user to gain additional knowledge of a meaning of a sign, as well as to provide sentence constructions that can be adopted by the L2 learner. The process from the moment when a sentence has been excerpted from the corpus to the point when an example sentence is finally accepted...

  17. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overal...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  18. Procedure and Program Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britz, Dieter

    Here some modules, procedures and whole programs are described, that may be useful to the reader, as they have been, to the author. They are all in Fortran 90/95 and start with a generally useful module, that will be used in most procedures and programs in the examples, and another module useful for programs using a Rosenbrock variant. The source texts (except for the two modules) are not reproduced here, but can be downloaded from the web site www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=issue &issn=1616-6361&volume=666 (the two lines form one contiguous URL!).

  19. New insulin glargine 300 Units · mL-1 provides a more even activity profile and prolonged glycemic control at steady state compared with insulin glargine 100 Units · mL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Reinhard H A; Dahmen, Raphael; Bergmann, Karin; Lehmann, Anne; Jax, Thomas; Heise, Tim

    2015-04-01

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a new insulin glargine comprising 300 units · mL(-1) (Gla-300), compared with insulin glargine 100 units · mL(-1) (Gla-100) at steady state in people with type 1 diabetes. A randomized, double-blind, crossover study (N = 30) was conducted, applying the euglycemic clamp technique over a period of 36 h. In this multiple-dose to steady-state study, participants received once-daily subcutaneous administrations of either 0.4 (cohort 1) or 0.6 units · kg(-1) (cohort 2) Gla-300 for 8 days in one treatment period and 0.4 units · kg(-1) Gla-100 for 8 days in the other. Here we focus on the results of a direct comparison between 0.4 units · kg(-1) of each treatment. PK and PD assessments performed on the last treatment day included serum insulin measurements using a radioimmunoassay and the automated euglycemic glucose clamp technique over 36 h. At steady state, insulin concentration (INS) and glucose infusion rate (GIR) profiles of Gla-300 were more constant and more evenly distributed over 24 h compared with those of Gla-100 and lasted longer, as supported by the later time (∼ 3 h) to 50% of the area under the serum INS and GIR time curves from time zero to 36 h post dosing. Tight blood glucose control (≤ 105 mg · dL(-1)) was maintained for approximately 5 h longer (median of 30 h) with Gla-300 compared with Gla-100. Gla-300 provides more even steady-state PK and PD profiles and a longer duration of action than Gla-100, extending blood glucose control well beyond 24 h. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Bottomland Hardwood Planting: Example Contract Specifications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humprey, Monica

    2002-01-01

    This technical note provides an example of contract specifications that can be used as a template by USACE biologists, engineers, or contracting officers for contracting the planting of bottomland hardwood (BLH) seedlings...

  1. Examples and problems in mathematical statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zacks, Shelemyahu

    2013-01-01

    This book presents examples that illustrate the theory of mathematical statistics and details how to apply the methods for solving problems.  While other books on the topic contain problems and exercises, they do not focus on problem solving. This book fills an important niche in the statistical theory literature by providing a theory/example/problem approach.  Each chapter is divided into four parts: Part I provides the needed theory so readers can become familiar with the concepts, notations, and proven results; Part II presents examples from a variety of fields including engineering, mathem

  2. Risk management profile of etoricoxib: an example of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Patrignani

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Paola Patrignani, Stefania Tacconelli, Marta L CaponeDepartment of Medicine and Center of Excellence on Aging, “G. D’Annunzio” University School of Medicine, and “Gabriele D’Annunzio” University Foundation, CeSI, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: The development of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs selective for cyclooxygenase (COX-2 (named coxibs has been driven by the aim of reducing the incidence of serious gastrointestinal (GI adverse events associated with the administration of traditional (t NSAIDs – mainly dependent on the inhibition of COX-1 in GI tract and platelets. However, their use has unravelled the important protective role of COX-2 for the cardiovascular (CV system, mainly through the generation of prostacyclin. In a recent nested-case control study, we found that patients taking NSAIDs (both coxibs and tNSAIDs had a 35% increase risk of myocardial infarction. The increased incidence of thrombotic events associated with profound inhibition of COX-2-dependent prostacyclin by coxibs and tNSAIDs can be mitigated, even if not obliterated, by a complete suppression of platelet COX-1 activity. However, most tNSAIDs and coxibs are functional COX-2 selective for the platelet (ie, they cause a profound suppression of COX-2 associated with insufficient inhibition of platelet COX-1 to translate into inhibition of platelet function, which explains their shared CV toxicity. The development of genetic and biochemical markers will help to identify the responders to NSAIDs or who are uniquely susceptible at developing thrombotic or GI events by COX inhibition. We will describe possible strategies to reduce the side effects of etoricoxib by using biochemical markers of COX inhibition, such as whole blood COX-2 and the assessment of prostacyclin biosynthesis in vivo.Keywords: etoricoxib, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, COX-2, gastrointestinal toxicity, cardiovascular toxicity, prostacyclin

  3. The power of example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  4. Sample Differentiation: Cocaine Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, L D; Liu, R H

    1991-12-01

    Since the analyses of drug samples in crime laboratories are often associated with investigations, potential differentiations of test samples are frequently requested and explored. Cocaine sample differentiation requires the determination of synthetic or natural origin. Synthetic samples are characterized by the presence of optical isomers, certain diastereoisomers and other by-products, and chemical residues used in synthesis. Samples derived from a natural origin (coca leaves) are characterized by the presence of certain natural products or their derivatives that are carried through the overall process and by residual chemicals reflecting the treatment procedures. Various approaches and analytical data available in the literature concerning the differentiation of cocaine samples are reviewed. Each sample must carry its own "signature"; however, true sample "individualization" cannot be accomplished using the technologies commonly available and used in crime laboratories, and is not usually needed. Alternatively, "classifying" cocaine samples in certain categories or groups can be accomplished routinely and often provides adequate information for investigatory purposes. Copyright © 1991 Central Police University.

  5. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface prof...

  6. Insure Kids Now (IKN) (Dental Care Providers)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Insure Kids Now (IKN) Dental Care Providers in Your State locator provides profile information for oral health providers participating in Medicaid and Children's...

  7. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  8. Examples and counter-examples of log-symplectic manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcanti, Gil R.

    We study topological properties of log-symplectic structures and produce examples of compact manifolds with such structures. Notably, we show that several symplectic manifolds do not admit bona fide log-symplectic structures and several bona fide log-symplectic manifolds do not admit symplectic

  9. Deep Proteome Coverage Based on Ribosome Profiling Aids Mass Spectrometry-based Protein and Peptide Discovery and Provides Evidence of Alternative Translation Products and Near-cognate Translation Initiation Events*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menschaert, Gerben; Van Criekinge, Wim; Notelaers, Tineke; Koch, Alexander; Crappé, Jeroen; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies involve integrative analysis of gene and protein expression data, taking advantage of new technologies such as next-generation transcriptome sequencing and highly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Recently, a strategy, termed ribosome profiling (or RIBO-seq), based on deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments, indirectly monitoring protein synthesis, has been described. We devised a proteogenomic approach constructing a custom protein sequence search space, built from both Swiss-Prot- and RIBO-seq-derived translation products, applicable for MS/MS spectrum identification. To record the impact of using the constructed deep proteome database, we performed two alternative MS-based proteomic strategies as follows: (i) a regular shotgun proteomic and (ii) an N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) approach. Although the former technique gives an overall assessment on the protein and peptide level, the latter technique, specifically enabling the isolation of N-terminal peptides, is very appropriate in validating the RIBO-seq-derived (alternative) translation initiation site profile. We demonstrate that this proteogenomic approach increases the overall protein identification rate 2.5% (e.g. new protein products, new protein splice variants, single nucleotide polymorphism variant proteins, and N-terminally extended forms of known proteins) as compared with only searching UniProtKB-SwissProt. Furthermore, using this custom database, identification of N-terminal COFRADIC data resulted in detection of 16 alternative start sites giving rise to N-terminally extended protein variants besides the identification of four translated upstream ORFs. Notably, the characterization of these new translation products revealed the use of multiple near-cognate (non-AUG) start codons. As deep sequencing techniques are becoming more standard, less expensive, and widespread, we anticipate that mRNA sequencing

  10. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  11. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  12. Interactive example-based hatching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerl, Moritz; Isenberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach for interactively generating pen-and-ink hatching renderings based on hand-drawn examples. We aim to overcome the regular and synthetic appearance of the results of existing methods by incorporating human virtuosity and illustration skills in the computer generation of such

  13. A retrospective analysis of 3954 patients in phase 2/3 trials of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma: towards providing a benchmark for the cardiac safety profile of proteasome inhibition in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Jacob P; Moslehi, Javid J; Francis, Sanjeev A; San Miguel, Jesús F; Sonneveld, Pieter; Orlowski, Robert Z; Moreau, Philippe; Rosiñol, Laura; Faber, Edward A; Voorhees, Peter; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Marquez, Loreta; Feng, Huaibao; Desai, Avinash; van de Velde, Helgi; Elliott, Jennifer; Shi, Hongliang; Dow, Edward; Jobanputra, Nishith; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Niculescu, Liviu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Lonial, Sagar; Richardson, Paul G

    2017-08-01

    This retrospective analysis aimed to establish the overall cardiac safety profile of bortezomib using patient-level data from one phase 2 and seven phase 3 studies in previously untreated and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Seven clinically relevant primary [congestive heart failure (CHF), arrhythmias, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cardiac death] and secondary (hypertension, dyspnoea, oedema) cardiac endpoints were defined based on MedDRA v16.0 preferred terms. 2509 bortezomib-treated patients and 1445 patients in non-bortezomib-based control arms were included. The incidence of grade ≥3 CHF was 1·3-4·0% in studies in relapsed/refractory MM and 1·2-4·7% in previously untreated MM (2·0-7·6% all grades), with no significant differences between bortezomib- and non-bortezomib-based arms in comparative studies. Incidences of arrhythmias (1·3-5·9% grade ≥2; 0·6-4·1% grade ≥3), IHD (1·2-2·9% all grades; 0·4-2·7% grade ≥3) and cardiac death (0-1·4%) were low, with no differences between bortezomib-based and non-bortezomib-based arms. Higher rates of oedema (mostly grade 1/2) were seen in bortezomib-based versus non-bortezomib-based arms in one study and a pooled transplant study analysis. Logistic regression analyses of comparative studies showed no impact on cardiac risk with bortezomib-based versus non-bortezomib-based treatment. Bortezomib-based treatment was associated with low incidences of cardiac events. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISRIC-WISE International soil profile data set consists of a homogenized, global set of 1,125 soil profiles for use by global modelers. These profiles provided...

  15. Wireless communication electronics by example

    CERN Document Server

    Sobot, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended for senior undergraduate and graduate students as well as practicing engineers who are involved in design and analysis of radio frequency (RF) circuits.  Fully-solved, tutorial-like examples are used to put into practice all major topics required to understand the principles underlying the main sub-circuits required to design an RF transceiver and the whole communication system. Starting with review of principles in electromagnetic (EM) transmission and signal propagation, through detailed practical analysis of RF amplifier, mixer, modulator, demodulator, and oscillator circuit topologies, all the way to the system communication theory behind the RF transceiver operation, this book systematically covers all relevant aspects in a way that is suitable for a single semester university level course. Readers will benefit from the author’s sharp focus on radio receiver design, demonstrated through hundreds of fully-solved, realistic examples, as opposed to texts that cover many aspects of e...

  16. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Kossko; A.A. Onoprienko; T.G. Kossko

    2013-01-01

    Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal) wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – ...

  17. 77 FR 23429 - Examples of Program-Related Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... additional PRI examples that reflect current investment practices and illustrate certain principles... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 53 RIN 1545-BK76 Examples of Program-Related Investments AGENCY... contains proposed regulations that provide guidance to private foundations on program-related investments...

  18. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kossko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – metal for data recording are discussed.

  19. From Utterance to Example Sentence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard

    2010-01-01

    This poster will address some of the problems on excerption of example sentences for the online dictionary of Danish Sign Language (DTS) from a raw corpus of dialogues and monologues. In the Danish Sign Language Dictionary every meaning is illustrated by one or more sentences showing the sign...... and contains 9 parts that are assessed in the process. We allow for adjusting the real utterance if this necessarily to follow the guidelines, eg. anaphoric reference may in the real sample only occur as an eye gaze in a direction of a locus, but when we copy only a part of an utterance, this kind of reference...

  20. Perfil e processo da assistência prestada ao recém-nascido de risco no Sul do Brasil Profile and process of the care provided to high-risk newborns in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Augusto de Melo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar os recém-nascidos (RN de risco e verificar o processo de assistência dispensado pelo Programa de Vigilância ao Recém-nascido de Risco do município de Maringá, PR. METODOLOGIA: Os dados foram coletados dos prontuários e das Fichas de Acompanhamento de uma amostragem estratificada composta por 505 RN de risco nascidos em 2007. As variáveis maternas, neonatais e assistenciais foram analisadas descritivamente utilizando o software Statistica 7.1. RESULTADOS: O Programa considerou somente os riscos biológicos como critério de inclusão, podendo os mesmos estar isolados (63,2% ou associados entre si (36,8%. Sobre as mães, 71,5% eram adultas, 78,2% com escolaridade > 8 anos de estudo, 57,2% sem companheiro, 55,3% com ocupação não remunerada, 69,5% com > 6 consultas pré-natal, 87,3% de gravidez única e 65,4% realizaram parto cesáreo. Sobre os RN de risco, 51% eram masculinos, 50,3% com baixo peso ao nascer, 51,5% a termo, 95,8% sem anomalias congênitas e 90,3% com Apgar > 7 no 5º minuto. Sobre a assistência prestada às crianças de risco 69,5% foram acompanhadas pelo Programa, 71% dos prontuários foram localizados, 82,6% com nenhuma visita domiciliar, 8,9% receberam > 12 consultas médicas, 33,1% não receberam nenhuma orientação, 5,8% foram hospitalizados, 18,7% apresentaram > 12 pesagens, e 19,8% apresentaram registro de imunização completa. CONCLUSÃO: Faz-se necessário reorganizar a atenção básica que assegure a integralidade da assistência e à continuidade do acompanhamento do desenvolvimento e crescimento biopsicossocial da criança de risco.OBJECTIVE: To describe newborns at risk and check the process of care provided by the High Risk Newborn Surveillance Program in Maringá-PR. METHODS: Data were collected from medical records and monitoring sheets of a stratified sample consisting of 505 newborns at risk, born in 2007. Maternal and neonatal care were analyzed descriptively using Statistica

  1. Exploratory multivariate analysis by example using R

    CERN Document Server

    Husson, Francois; Pages, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Full of real-world case studies and practical advice, Exploratory Multivariate Analysis by Example Using R focuses on four fundamental methods of multivariate exploratory data analysis that are most suitable for applications. It covers principal component analysis (PCA) when variables are quantitative, correspondence analysis (CA) and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) when variables are categorical, and hierarchical cluster analysis.The authors take a geometric point of view that provides a unified vision for exploring multivariate data tables. Within this framework, they present the prin

  2. FPGA prototyping by Verilog examples Xilinx Spartan-3 version

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Pong P

    2008-01-01

    FPGA Prototyping Using Verilog Examples will provide you with a hands-on introduction to Verilog synthesis and FPGA programming through a "learn by doing" approach. By following the clear, easy-to-understand templates for code development and the numerous practical examples, you can quickly develop and simulate a sophisticated digital circuit, realize it on a prototyping device, and verify the operation of its physical implementation. This introductory text that will provide you with a solid foundation, instill confidence with rigorous examples for complex systems and prepare you for future development tasks.

  3. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  4. Country Education Profiles: Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Bureau of Education, Geneva (Switzerland).

    One of a series of profiles prepared by the Cooperative Educational Abstracting Service, this brief outline provides basic background information on educational principles, system of administration, structure and organization, curricula, and teacher training in Algeria. Statistics provided by the Unesco Office of Statistics show enrollment at all…

  5. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  6. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  7. Template for safety reports with descriptive example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report provides a template for future safety reports on long-term safety in support of important decisions and permit applications in connection with the construction of a deep repository system. The template aims at providing a uniform structure for describing long-term safety, after the repository has been closed and sealed. The availability of such a structure will simplify both preparation and review of the safety reports, and make it possible to follow how safety assessments are influenced by the progressively more detailed body of data that emerges. A separate section containing `descriptive examples` has been appended to the template. This section illustrates what the different chapters of the template should contain. 279 refs.

  8. INACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT ELA2B PROVIDES A NEW EXAMPLE OF EVOLUTIONARY ELASTASE SILENCING IN HUMANS

    OpenAIRE

    Szepessy, Edit; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The archetypal mammalian elastase (ELA1) is not expressed in the human pancreas, because evolutionary mutations suppressed transcription of the ELA1 gene. AIMS. In this study we tested the theory that the unique duplication of the ELA2 gene in humans might compensate for the loss of ELA1. METHODS. Recombinant ELA2A and ELA2B were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their activity was tested on Glt-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu-p-nitroanilide, DQ elastin and bovine milk protein. RESULTS. Surprisi...

  9. Using Contests to Provide Business Students Project-Based Learning in Humanitarian Logistics: PSAid Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpolat, Koray; Chen, Yuwen; Hales, Doug; Yu, Degan; Yalcin, Mehmet G.

    2014-01-01

    Business students appreciate working on classroom projects that are both enjoyable and useful in preparing them for future careers. Promoting competition among project teams is also used as a method to motivate students. The Humanitarian Logistics Project (HLP) teaches undergraduate students the logistical implications of unsolicited material…

  10. The role of culture collections as an interface between providers and users: the example of yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Prasad, Gandham S

    2010-01-01

    The importance and species diversity of yeasts in food production are described, including a listing of agricultural applications. Two yeast species were selected for case studies on distribution patterns from microbial culture collections: the high representation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in culture collections enabled global comparison, while Dekkera bruxellensis deposits and distributions were analyzed from the perspective of a single culture collection. In conclusion, culture collections need to cover temporal gaps between deposit and application of strains. The further development of culture collections in countries of high but underexplored species diversity should facilitate the conservation and management of microbial resources. (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadus, Martin R.; Natividad, Josephine; Mai, Anthony; Ouyang, Yi; Lambrecht, Nils; Szabo, Sandor; Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil; Dacosta-Iyer, Maria G.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers remain one of the most common and deadly cancers in the world today (12.5% of newly diagnosed cancers) despite current advances in chemo- and radiation therapies. Often, by the time these tumors are diagnosed, they have already metastasized. These tumors demonstrate the classic hallmarks of cancer in that they have advanced defensive strategies allowing them to escape various standard oncological treatments. Immunotherapy is making inroads towards effectively treating other fatal cancers, such as melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and castrate-resistant prostate cancers. This paper will cover the escape mechanisms of bronchogenic lung cancer that must be overcome before they can be successfully treated. We also review the history of immunotherapy directed towards lung cancers. PMID:22899945

  12. Metrically adjusted questionnaires can provide more information for scientists- an example from the tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindik, Joško; Miljanović, Maja

    2017-03-01

    The article deals with the issue of research methodology, illustrating the use of known research methods for new purposes. Questionnaires that originally do not have metric characteristics can be called »handy questionnaires«. In this article, the author is trying to consider the possibilities of their improved scientific usability, which can be primarily ensured by improving their metric characteristics, consequently using multivariate instead of univariate statistical methods. In order to establish the base for the application of multivariate statistical procedures, the main idea is to develop strategies to design measurement instruments from parts of the handy questionnaires. This can be accomplished in two ways: before deciding upon the methods for data collection (redesigning the handy questionnaires) and before the collection of the data (a priori) or after the data has been collected, without modifying the questionnaire (a posteriori). The basic principles of applying these two strategies of the metrical adaptation of handy questionnaires are described.

  13. METRICALLY ADJUSTED QUESTIONNAIRES CAN PROVIDE MORE INFORMATION FOR SCIENTISTS- AN EXAMPLE FROM THE TOURISM

    OpenAIRE

    Sindik, Joško; Miljanović, Maja

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of research methodology, illustrating the use of known research methods for new purposes. Questionnaires that originally do not have metric characteristics can be called “handy questionnaires”. In this article, the author is trying to consider the possibilities of their improved scientific usability, which can be primarily ensured by improving their metric characteristics, consequently using multivariate instead of univariate statistical methods. In order to e...

  14. Can seamounts provide a good habitat for polychaete annelids? Example of the northeastern Atlantic seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surugiu, Victor; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Gillet, Patrick; Ruellet, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    Two seamount groups in the northeastern Atlantic were investigated during the 1980s and 1990s: the first was located along the Iberian and African coasts (Galicia, to the north of Portugal; and the Ampere, Gorringe, Josephine and Seine banks near the Madeira-Canary Islands) and the second was located offshore of the southern part of the Azores Islands, included the Atlantis, Hyeres, Irving, Meteor and Plato banks. Among the invertebrates, Annelida, specifically Polychaeta, were studied as surrogates for the biogeographical relationship between coastal and mid-oceanic seamounts in the northeastern Atlantic and the fauna in these areas. The dominant families were Onuphidae (27.46%), Syllidae (18.23%), Eunicidae (15.65%), Amphinomidae (11.45%) and Nereididae (5.61%), representing 78.4% of the total fauna. Data analyses clearly distinguished two seamount groups, one for coastal seamounts and the other offshore. Although the species distinguished and the family composition at the sampled sites were different (i.e., most diversified at the Josephine site and most impoverished at the Irving site), no coastal/offshore faunal impoverishment gradient could be identified. Thus, it seems that seamount environments do not favour any relationship between planktotrophic development and the direct development of polychaetes. Though the number of apparent endemic species was low (<7%), it remained in keeping with other invertebrate groups. Still, while seamounts may well encourage oceanic biodiversity in some zoological groups, this was clearly not the case for the polychaetes. We offer two explanations for this paradox: pelagic productivity and local environmental conditions.

  15. Effects of Worked Examples, Example-Problem Pairs, and Problem-Example Pairs Compared to Problem Solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Van Gog, T., Kester, L., & Paas, F. (2010, August). Effects of worked examples, example-problem pairs, and problem-example pairs compared to problem solving. Paper presented at the Biannual EARLI SIG meeting of Instructional design and Learning and instruction with computers, Ulm, Germany.

  16. Example Elaboration as a Neglected Instructional Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girill, T R

    2001-07-18

    Over the last decade an unfolding cognitive-psychology research program on how learners use examples to develop effective problem solving expertise has yielded well-established empirical findings. Chi et al., Renkl, Reimann, and Neubert (in various papers) have confirmed statistically significant differences in how good and poor learners inferentially elaborate (self explain) example steps as they study. Such example elaboration is highly relevant to software documentation and training, yet largely neglected in the current literature. This paper summarizes the neglected research on example use and puts its neglect in a disciplinary perspective. The author then shows that differences in support for example elaboration in commercial software documentation reveal previously over looked usability issues. These issues involve example summaries, using goals and goal structures to reinforce example elaborations, and prompting readers to recognize the role of example parts. Secondly, I show how these same example elaboration techniques can build cognitive maturity among underperforming high school students who study technical writing. Principle based elaborations, condition elaborations, and role recognition of example steps all have their place in innovative, high school level, technical writing exercises, and all promote far transfer problem solving. Finally, I use these studies to clarify the constructivist debate over what writers and readers contribute to text meaning. I argue that writers can influence how readers elaborate on examples, and that because of the great empirical differences in example study effectiveness (and reader choices) writers should do what they can (through within text design features) to encourage readers to elaborate examples in the most successful ways. Example elaboration is a uniquely effective way to learn from worked technical examples. This paper summarizes years of research that clarifies example elaboration. I then show how example

  17. Dimensional analysis examples of the use of symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hornung, Hans G

    2006-01-01

    Derived from a course in fluid mechanics, this text for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students employs symmetry arguments to demonstrate the principles of dimensional analysis. The examples provided illustrate the effectiveness of symmetry arguments in obtaining the mathematical form of the functions yielded by dimensional analysis. Students will find these methods applicable to a wide field of interests.After discussing several examples of method, the text examines pipe flow, material properties, gasdynamical examples, body in nonuniform flow, and turbulent flow. Additional t

  18. Testing the model-observer similarity hypothesis with text-based worked examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerheide, V.; Loyens, S.M.M.; Jadi, Fedora; Vrins, Anna; van Gog, T.

    2017-01-01

    Example-based learning is a very effective and efficient instructional strategy for novices. It can be implemented using text-based worked examples that provide a written demonstration of how to perform a task, or (video) modelling examples in which an instructor (the ‘model’) provides a

  19. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremsky, Isaac; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc.) and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.). We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  20. Ribosome Profiling in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Stiffler, Nicholas; Watkins, Kenneth P; Barkan, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Ribosome profiling (also known as Ribo-seq) provides a genome-wide, high-resolution, and quantitative accounting of mRNA segments that are occupied by ribosomes in vivo. The method has been used to address numerous questions in bacteria, yeast, and metazoa, but its application to questions in plant biology is just beginning. This chapter provides a detailed protocol for profiling ribosomes in plant leaf tissue. The method was developed and optimized with maize, but it has been used successfully with Arabidopsis and tobacco as well. The method captures ribosome footprints from the chloroplast and cytosol in the same preparation, but it is not optimal for detecting the footprints of mitochondrial ribosomes. The protocol is robust and simpler than many of the methods reported previously for ribosome profiling in plants.

  1. Examples in parametric inference with R

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Ulhas Jayram

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses examples in parametric inference with R. Combining basic theory with modern approaches, it presents the latest developments and trends in statistical inference for students who do not have an advanced mathematical and statistical background. The topics discussed in the book are fundamental and common to many fields of statistical inference and thus serve as a point of departure for in-depth study. The book is divided into eight chapters: Chapter 1 provides an overview of topics on sufficiency and completeness, while Chapter 2 briefly discusses unbiased estimation. Chapter 3 focuses on the study of moments and maximum likelihood estimators, and Chapter 4 presents bounds for the variance. In Chapter 5, topics on consistent estimator are discussed. Chapter 6 discusses Bayes, while Chapter 7 studies some more powerful tests. Lastly, Chapter 8 examines unbiased and other tests. Senior undergraduate and graduate students in statistics and mathematics, and those who have taken an introductory cou...

  2. Best Practice Examples of Circular Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldmann, Eva

    the potential to provide significant economic benefits in addition to new ways of forming partnerships with suppliers and connecting with customers. Furthermore, circular business models generate essential environmental benefits as a result of the improved resource productivity they offer. These benefits are......Best practice examples of circular business models are presented in this report. The purpose is to inform and inspire interested readers, in particular companies that aspire to examine the potentials of the circular economy. Circular business models in two different sectors are examined, namely...... the textile and clothing sector as well as the durable goods sector. In order to appreciate the notion of circular business models, the basics of the circular economy are outlined along with three frameworks for categorizing the various types of circular business models. The frameworks take point of departure...

  3. Examples of reflection positive field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchero, R.

    The requirement of reflection positivity (RP) for Euclidean field theories is considered. This is done for the cases of a scalar field, a higher derivative scalar field theory and the scalar field theory defined on a non-integer dimensional space (NIDS). It is shown that regarding RP, the analytical structure of the corresponding Schwinger functions plays an important role. For the higher derivative scalar field theory, RP does not hold. However for the scalar field theory on a NIDS, RP holds in a certain range of dimensions where the corresponding Minkowskian field is defined on a Hilbert space with a positive definite scalar product that provides a unitary representation of the Poincaré group. In addition, and motivated by the last example, it is shown that, under certain conditions, one can construct non-local reflection positive Euclidean field theories starting from the corrected two point functions of interacting local field theories.

  4. Planetary gear profile modification design based on load sharing modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Miguel; Fernández Del Rincón, Alfonso; De-Juan, Ana Magdalena; Garcia, Pablo; Diez, Alberto; Viadero, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  5. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, Ron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Polly, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bianchi, Marcus [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, Joel [J. Neymark & Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  6. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  7. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  8. C*-algebras by example

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Kenneth R

    1996-01-01

    The subject of C*-algebras received a dramatic revitalization in the 1970s by the introduction of topological methods through the work of Brown, Douglas, and Fillmore on extensions of C*-algebras and Elliott's use of K-theory to provide a useful classification of AF algebras. These results were the beginning of a marvelous new set of tools for analyzing concrete C*-algebras. This book is an introductory graduate level text which presents the basics of the subject through a detailed analysis of several important classes of C*-algebras. The development of operator algebras in the last twenty yea

  9. How examples may (and may not) constrain creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, R L; Landau, J D; Hicks, J L

    1996-09-01

    Three experiments were performed to test Smith, Ward, and Schumacher's (1993) conformity hypothesis-that people's ideas will conform to examples they are shown in a creative generation task. Conformity was observed in all three experiments; participants tended to incorporate critical features of experimenter-provided examples. However, examination of total output, elaborateness of design, and the noncritical features did not confirm that the conformity effect constrained creative output in any of the three experiments. Increasing the number of examples increased the conformity effect (Experiment 1). Examples that covaried features that are naturally uncorrelated in the real world led to a greater subjective rating of creativity (Experiment 2). A delay between presentation and test increased conformity (Experiment 3), just as models of inadvertent plagiarism would predict. The explanatory power of theoretical accounts such as activation, retrieval blocking, structured imagination, and category abstraction are evaluated.

  10. Teaching assistants' beliefs regarding example solutions in introductory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Mamudi, William; Singh, Chandralekha; Yerushalmi, Edit

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger study to understand instructors' considerations regarding the learning and teaching of problem solving in an introductory physics course, we investigated beliefs of first-year graduate teaching assistants (TAs) regarding the use of example solutions in introductory physics. In particular, we examine how the goal of promoting expert-like problem solving is manifested in the considerations of graduate TAs choices of example solutions. Twenty-four first-year graduate TAs were asked to discuss their goals for presenting example solutions to students. They were also provided with different example solutions and asked to discuss their preferences for prominent solution features. TAs' awareness, preferences and actual practices related to solution features were examined in light of recommendations from the literature for the modeling of expert-like problem solving approaches. The study concludes that the goal of helping students develop an expert-like problem solving approach underlies many TAs' ...

  11. Ecosystem services provided by waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy J; Elmberg, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Ecosystem services are ecosystem processes that directly or indirectly benefit human well-being. There has been much recent literature identifying different services and the communities and species that provide them. This is a vital first step towards management and maintenance of these services. In this review, we specifically address the waterbirds, which play key functional roles in many aquatic ecosystems, including as predators, herbivores and vectors of seeds, invertebrates and nutrients, although these roles have often been overlooked. Waterbirds can maintain the diversity of other organisms, control pests, be effective bioindicators of ecological conditions, and act as sentinels of potential disease outbreaks. They also provide important provisioning (meat, feathers, eggs, etc.) and cultural services to both indigenous and westernized societies. We identify key gaps in the understanding of ecosystem services provided by waterbirds and areas for future research required to clarify their functional role in ecosystems and the services they provide. We consider how the economic value of these services could be calculated, giving some examples. Such valuation will provide powerful arguments for waterbird conservation. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  12. GPR and GPS data integration: examples of application in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gandolfi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR and Global Positioning System (GPS techniques were employed in snow accumulation studies during the Italian leg of the International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE. The acquired data were useful both for glaciological and climatological studies. This paper presents some results obtained by GPR and GPS data integration employed to determine accumulation/ablation processes along the profile of the traverse that show how the snow-sublayer thickness can vary quickly in just a few kilometres. Some examples of data integration employed in detection and characterisation of buried crevasses are also presented.

  13. High School Profile Impact Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susanna; McGrath, Elizabeth A.

    In 1988, the Delaware State legislature provided for the development of profile reports (PRs) on all full-time public high schools in the state. To determine the impact of the high school PRs, this study addressed the following: (1) public awareness of the PR program; (2) the percentage of the public that received a high school profile; (3) public…

  14. Doing Business Economy Profile 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    This economy profile for Doing Business 2016 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Guatemala. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2016 is the 13th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it....

  15. SOME EXAMPLES OF APPLIED SYSTEMS WITH SPEECH INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zhitko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three examples of applied systems with a speech interface are considered in the article. The first two of these provide the end user with the opportunity to ask verbally the question and to hear the response from the system, creating an addition to the traditional I / O via the keyboard and computer screen. The third example, the «IntonTrainer» system, provides the user with the possibility of voice interaction and is designed for in-depth self-learning of the intonation of oral speech.

  16. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  17. Dual model of vocational education: Austrian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual education, as a form of secondary vocational education means that education and practical training are held on two locations - in school and in a company (organization, factory and that these two institutions jointly participate in the realization of vocational education. The paper presents an account of the functioning of dual education in Austria. In that framework special attention was paid to law regulations in this field, the modes of dual education, progression through the system and the perspectives of the young in the labour market. Among the key features of dual education which are, at the same time, considered the factors of its successfulness, the following stand out: active role of social partners in the conceptualization and realization of vocational education; intensive practical training of high quality; systemic interrelatedness of vocational schools and firms where practical training is provided, the compliance of the offer of educational profiles and the needs of labour market; the system of stimulation for the firms that provide professional training for students, clear legislation and the system of professional qualifications. Yet, the challenges of dual educations are not neglected in the paper.

  18. Country profile: Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary's energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  19. Country profile: Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary`s energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  20. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  1. Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design…

  2. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  3. State Cancer Profiles Web site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Cancer Profiles (SCP) web site provides statistics to help guide and prioritize cancer control activities at the state and local levels. SCP is a...

  4. Automotive Refinishing Industry: Isocyanates Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    The isocyanates profile document is part of the DfE Auto Refinishing Shop Project and is intended to provide information on refinishing, control technologies, and regulatory status regarding isocyanate compounds

  5. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  6. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  7. Space physics education via examples in the undergraduate physics curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R.; Holland, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The field of space physics is rich with examples of basic physics and analysis techniques, yet it is rarely seen in physics courses or textbooks. As space physicists in an undergraduate physics department we like to use research to inform teaching, and we find that students respond well to examples from magnetospheric science. While we integrate examples into general education courses as well, this talk will focus on physics major courses. Space physics examples are typically selected to illustrate a particular concept or method taught in the course. Four examples will be discussed, from an introductory electricity and magnetism course, a mechanics/nonlinear dynamics course, a computational physics course, and a plasma physics course. Space physics provides examples of many concepts from introductory E&M, including the application of Faraday's law to terrestrial magnetic storm effects and the use of the basic motion of charged particles as a springboard to discussion of the inner magnetosphere and the aurora. In the mechanics and nonlinear dynamics courses, the motion of charged particles in a magnetotail current sheet magnetic field is treated as a Newtonian dynamical system, illustrating the Poincaré surface-of-section technique, the partitioning of phase space, and the KAM theorem. Neural network time series analysis of AE data is used as an example in the computational physics course. Finally, among several examples, current sheet particle dynamics is utilized in the plasma physics course to illustrate the notion of adiabatic/guiding center motion and the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation. We will present short descriptions of our pedagogy and student assignments in this "backdoor" method of space physics education.

  8. Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 déc. 2010 ... Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Couverture du livre Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Directeur(s) : Ronnie Vernooy. Maison(s) d'édition : Cambridge University Press India, CRDI.

  9. Combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy - the example of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... psychotherapy - the example of depressive disorders ... Major depression is used as an example of a disorder where the combination of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy offer great advantages. The evidence for .... channels of communication between psychiatrist and psycho- therapist. How effective is ...

  10. RFID Malware: Design Principles and Examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieback, M.R.; Simpson, P.N.D.; Crispo, B.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of malware for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems - including RFID exploits, RFID worms, and RFID viruses. We present RFID malware design principles together with concrete examples; the highlight is a fully illustrated example of a self-replicating RFID

  11. Dynamic Programming: An Introduction by Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The author introduces some basic dynamic programming techniques, using examples, with the help of the computer algebra system "Maple". The emphasis is on building confidence and intuition for the solution of dynamic problems in economics. To integrate the material better, the same examples are used to introduce different techniques. One covers the…

  12. Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-01

    Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Couverture du livre Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Editor(s):. Ronnie Vernooy. Publisher(s):. Cambridge University Press India, CRDI. December 1, 2010. ISBN:.

  13. Ecological Forecasting Project Management with Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schmidt, Cindy; Estes, Maury; Turner, Woody

    2017-01-01

    Once scientists publish results of their projects and studies, all too often they end up on the shelf and are not otherwise used. The NASA Earth Science Division established its Applied Sciences Program (ASP) to apply research findings to help solve and manage real-world problems and needs. ASP-funded projects generally produce decision support systems for operational applications which are expected to last beyond the end of the NASA funding. Because of NASAs unique perspective of looking down on the Earth from space, ASP studies involve the use of remotely sensed information consisting of satellite data and imagery as well as information from sub-orbital platforms. ASP regularly solicits Earth science proposals that address one or more focus areas; disasters mitigation, ecological forecasting, health and air quality, and water resources. Reporting requirements for ASP-funded projects are different from those typical for research grants from NASA and other granting agencies, requiring management approaches different from other programs. This presentation will address the foregoing in some detail and give examples of three ASP-funded ecological forecasting projects that include: 1) the detection and survey of chimpanzee habitat in Africa from space, 2) harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the California Current System affecting aquaculture facilities and marine mammal populations, and 3) a call for the public to identify North America wildlife in Wisconsin using trail camera photos. Contact information to propose to ASP solicitations for those PIs interested is also provided.

  14. Statistics of Parameter Estimates: A Concrete Example

    KAUST Repository

    Aguilar, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Most mathematical models include parameters that need to be determined from measurements. The estimated values of these parameters and their uncertainties depend on assumptions made about noise levels, models, or prior knowledge. But what can we say about the validity of such estimates, and the influence of these assumptions? This paper is concerned with methods to address these questions, and for didactic purposes it is written in the context of a concrete nonlinear parameter estimation problem. We will use the results of a physical experiment conducted by Allmaras et al. at Texas A&M University [M. Allmaras et al., SIAM Rev., 55 (2013), pp. 149-167] to illustrate the importance of validation procedures for statistical parameter estimation. We describe statistical methods and data analysis tools to check the choices of likelihood and prior distributions, and provide examples of how to compare Bayesian results with those obtained by non-Bayesian methods based on different types of assumptions. We explain how different statistical methods can be used in complementary ways to improve the understanding of parameter estimates and their uncertainties.

  15. Dynamical systems examples of complex behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to introduce, explain, and discuss the fundamental problems, ideas, concepts, results, and methods of the theory of dynamical systems and to show how they can be used in speci?c examples. We do not intend to give a comprehensive overview of the present state of research in the theory of dynamical systems, nor a detailed historical account of its development. We try to explain the important results, often neglecting technical re?nements 1 and, usually, we do not provide proofs. One of the basic questions in studying dynamical systems, i.e. systems that evolve in time, is the construction of invariants that allow us to classify qualitative types of dynamical evolution, to distinguish between qualitatively di?erent dynamics, and to studytransitions between di?erent types. Itis also important to ?nd out when a certain dynamic behavior is stable under small perturbations, as well as to understand the various scenarios of instability. Finally, an essential aspect of a dynamic evolution is the transformat...

  16. Digital signal processing with Matlab examples

    CERN Document Server

    Giron-Sierra, Jose Maria

    2017-01-01

    This is the first volume in a trilogy on modern Signal Processing. The three books provide a concise exposition of signal processing topics, and a guide to support individual practical exploration based on MATLAB programs. This book includes MATLAB codes to illustrate each of the main steps of the theory, offering a self-contained guide suitable for independent study. The code is embedded in the text, helping readers to put into practice the ideas and methods discussed. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which introduces readers to periodic and non-periodic signals. The second part is devoted to filtering, which is an important and commonly used application. The third part addresses more advanced topics, including the analysis of real-world non-stationary signals and data, e.g. structural fatigue, earthquakes, electro-encephalograms, birdsong, etc. The book’s last chapter focuses on modulation, an example of the intentional use of non-stationary signals.

  17. Transforms and applications primer for engineers with examples and Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Poularikas, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    Suitable for engineering and science students, professionals, and those working on problems involving transforms, this title provides a large number of examples to explain the use of transforms in different areas, including circuit analysis, differential equations, signals and systems, and mechanical vibrations.

  18. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Sikora, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wood, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  19. The Economics of Soil Erosion: Theory, Methodology and Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Edward B. Barbier

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the following paper is to provide an overview of an economic analysis of soil erosion, concentrating particularly on explaining the farm-level economics of soil erosion and discussing with examples the appropriate methodology for measuring on and off-site costs.

  20. Psychological Factors Affecting Medical Students' Learning with Erroneous Worked Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Eric; Stark, Robin; Kopp, Veronika; Fischer, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of diagnostic competence is seen as a major goal during the course of study in medicine. One innovative method to foster this goal is problem-based learning with erroneous worked examples provided in a computer learning environment. The present study explores the relationship of attitudinal, emotional and cognitive factors for…

  1. Territoriality: the example of the White Rhinoceros | Owen-Smith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  2. Pedagogical Wishes for a Machine Dictionary: An Example from Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Howard H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the uses for and advantages of a computerized foreign language/ English dictionary. Using Russian as an example, the additional teaching functions such a dictionary could provide include: (1) word frequency; (2) etymological information; (3) word family; (4) tergo listings; (5) synonym listings; (6) thesaurus listings; and (7) literary…

  3. Application Examples for Handle System Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, F.; Weigel, T.; Thiemann, H.; Höck, H.; Stockhause, M.; Lautenschlager, M.

    2012-12-01

    Besides the well-known DOI (Digital Object Identifiers) as a special form of Handles that resolve to scientific publications there are various other applications in use. Others perhaps are just not yet. We present some examples for the existing ones and some ideas for the future. The national German project C3-Grid provides a framework to implement a first solution for provenance tracing and explore unforeseen implications. Though project-specific, the high-level architecture is generic and represents well a common notion of data derivation. Users select one or many input datasets and a workflow software module (an agent in this context) to execute on the data. The output data is deposited in a repository to be delivered to the user. All data is accompanied by an XML metadata document. All input and output data, metadata and the workflow module receive Handles and are linked together to establish a directed acyclic graph of derived data objects and involved agents. Data that has been modified by a workflow module is linked to its predecessor data and the workflow module involved. Version control systems such as svn or git provide Internet access to software repositories using URLs. To refer to a specific state of the source code of for instance a C3 workflow module, it is sufficient to reference the URL to the svn revision or git hash. In consequence, individual revisions and the repository as a whole receive PIDs. Moreover, the revision specific PIDs are linked to their respective predecessors and become part of the provenance graph. Another example for usage of PIDs in a current major project is given in EUDAT (European Data Infrastructure) which will link scientific data of several research communities together. In many fields it is necessary to provide data objects at multiple locations for a variety of applications. To ensure consistency, not only the master of a data object but also its copies shall be provided with a PID. To verify transaction safety and to

  4. Profile of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1998-01-01

    What management skills must Europe's business leaders improve to achieve business excellence? Which country's leaders are best placed for success? Does the next generation have what it takes to compete? In the second half of their study of the leadership styles that drive business excellence, Jens...... Dahlgaard, Anders Nørgaard and Søren Jakobsen describe an excellent leadership profile that provides the answers....

  5. Qualitative Value Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Henrik Johannsen; Bjerre, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative value profiling (QVP) is a relatively unknown method of strategic analysis for companies in international business-to-business settings. The purpose of QVP is to reduce the information complexity that is faced by international companies in dealing with business partners. The QVP method...... and consequently, for the advancement of international development. Further use of QVP is recommended and suggestions for future research are provided....

  6. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  7. HTML5 web application development by example

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafson, JM

    2013-01-01

    The best way to learn anything is by doing. The author uses a friendly tone and fun examples to ensure that you learn the basics of application development. Once you have read this book, you should have the necessary skills to build your own applications.If you have no experience but want to learn how to create applications in HTML5, this book is the only help you'll need. Using practical examples, HTML5 Web Application Development by Example will develop your knowledge and confidence in application development.

  8. PAC-Learning from General Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Hoeffgen, K.- U.; Lefmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    We study a novel view on the PAC learning model in which the examples are more complicated than in the standard model. There, an example usually is an element of the learning domain and its label indicates whether it belongs to the target concept. Here, the examples can be subsets and their labels...... indicate some relation to the target concept, e.g., whether they intersect it or not. We show how this setting can be easily transformed into the standard PAC model; however, for an analysis it is much more natural to stick to the original formulation. Then the central notion is that of the relative...

  9. The virialization density of peaks with general density profiles under spherical collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Douglas [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: dsrubin@physics.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We calculate the non-linear virialization density, Δ{sub c}, of halos under spherical collapse from peaks with an arbitrary initial and final density profile. This is in contrast to the standard calculation of Δ{sub c} which assumes top-hat profiles. Given our formalism, the non-linear halo density can be calculated once the shape of the initial peak's density profile and the shape of the virialized halo's profile are provided. We solve for Δ{sub c} for halos in an Einstein de-Sitter and a ΛCDM universe. As examples, we consider power-law initial profiles as well as spherically averaged peak profiles calculated from the statistics of a Gaussian random field. We find that, depending on the profiles used, Δ{sub c} is smaller by a factor of a few to as much as a factor of 10 as compared to the density given by the standard calculation ( ≈ 200). Using our results, we show that, for halo finding algorithms that identify halos through an over-density threshold, the halo mass function measured from cosmological simulations can be enhanced at all halo masses by a factor of a few. This difference could be important when using numerical simulations to assess the validity of analytic models of the halo mass function.

  10. SAIC - PROFILES

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    violence in the two cities by testing the hypothesis that social cohesion is a critical factor in understanding and preventing violence. Both Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town provide an ideal comparative framework for research. The project will provide theoretical, methodological, and practical insights, which will contribute to ...

  11. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  12. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  13. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  14. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  15. An Elegant Example of Chemoselective Reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 10. An Elegant Example of a Chemoselective Reaction - The Preparation of Sulfonamide Drugs. Gopalpur Nagendrappa. General Article Volume 13 Issue 10 October 2008 pp 929-940 ...

  16. Didaktikogenic Misconception in Physics: An Example

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 4. Didaktikogenic Misconception in Physics: An Example. Dhrubajyoti Chattopadhyay. Classroom Volume 21 Issue 4 April 2016 pp 381-386. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Examples of non integer dimensional geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Trinchero, R.

    2008-01-01

    Two examples of spectral triples with non-integer dimension spectrum are considered. These triples involve commutative C*-algebras. The first example has complex dimension spectrum and trivial differential algebra. The other is a parameter dependent deformation of the canonical spectral triple over S1. Its dimension spectrum includes real non-integer values. It has a non-trivial differential algebra and in contrast with the one dimensional case there are no junk forms for a non-vanishing defo...

  18. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  19. Sustainable Oceanographic Vessels - Setting an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leer, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to climate change, global warming and post “peak oil” fuel scarcity, the oceanographic community should consider reducing its carbon foot print. Why should scientists operate inefficient vessels while lecturing the general public on the need to reduce CO2 emissions? We have already seen curtailment of ship schedules and ship lay-ups, due in part to rising fuel costs, following $140/barrel crude oil. When the global recession ends, upward pressure on oil prices will again commence. Who can forecast how high fuel prices may ultimately rise during the typical 25-30 year lifetime of a research vessel? Are we to curtail future work at sea when oceanic climate research is becoming ever more important? A catamaran research vessel has been designed which can be electrically propelled from by a combination of high efficiency generators, photovoltaic panels and/or sails. Sail produced power is transformed with propellers and motor/generators into electric power which is stored in battery banks. This vessel could operate as the first true hybrid oceanographic research vessel. It could even continue operations without fuel in cases of a severe fuel shortage or fueling denial. Since the power produced by any water turbine increases with the cube of the velocity flowing over its propeller, the low fluid friction and high stability of a catamaran, with reasonably slender hulls, provide an important boost to efficient hybrid operation. The author has chartered a 42’ hybrid catamaran sailboat and found it efficient and extremely easy to operate and control. A 79’ motor sailing catamaran research vessel by Lock Crowther Designs will be presented as one example of a sustainable research vessel with excellent speed and sea-keeping. A center well makes operation as a small drilling/coring ship for coastal climate investigation possible. The center well also supports a host of remote sensing and robotic gear handling capabilities.

  20. Examples of geoscientists women in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognard-Campbel, N.; Cazenave, A.

    2004-12-01

    Although the presence of women in sciences has been increasing in the past few decades in Europe, it remains incredibly low at the top levels. Recent statistics from the European Commission indicate that now women represent 50 percent of first degree students in many countries. However, the proportion of women at each stage of the scientific career decreases almost linearly, reaching less than 10 percent at the highest level jobs. From my own experience, I don't think that this results from sexism nor discrimination. Rather, I think that this is a result of complex cultural factors making women subconsciously persuaded that top level jobs are destined to male scientists only. Many women scientists drop the idea of playing a role at high-level research, considering it as a way of exerting power (a matter reserved to men). Others give up the possibility of combining childcare and high level commitments in research. And too many (married women) still find only natural to sacrifice their own scientific ambitions to the benefit of their spouse's career. Examples of personal experiences in the French research system are presented. We discuss some choices of prioritizing scientific productivity and expertise against hierarchical responsibilities and of keeping a satisfactory balance between family demand and research involvement. This is somewhat facilitated by the French system, which provides substantial support to women's work (nurseries, recreation centers during school holidays, etc.). As a conclusion, we think that the most promising way of increasing the number of women at top levels in research is through education and mentality evolution.

  1. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  2. Providing traceability for neuroimaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Habib, Irfan; Munir, Kamran; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    With the increasingly digital nature of biomedical data and as the complexity of analyses in medical research increases, the need for accurate information capture, traceability and accessibility has become crucial to medical researchers in the pursuance of their research goals. Grid- or Cloud-based technologies, often based on so-called Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), are increasingly being seen as viable solutions for managing distributed data and algorithms in the bio-medical domain. For neuroscientific analyses, especially those centred on complex image analysis, traceability of processes and datasets is essential but up to now this has not been captured in a manner that facilitates collaborative study. Few examples exist, of deployed medical systems based on Grids that provide the traceability of research data needed to facilitate complex analyses and none have been evaluated in practice. Over the past decade, we have been working with mammographers, paediatricians and neuroscientists in three generations of projects to provide the data management and provenance services now required for 21st century medical research. This paper outlines the finding of a requirements study and a resulting system architecture for the production of services to support neuroscientific studies of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. The paper proposes a software infrastructure and services that provide the foundation for such support. It introduces the use of the CRISTAL software to provide provenance management as one of a number of services delivered on a SOA, deployed to manage neuroimaging projects that have been studying biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In the neuGRID and N4U projects a Provenance Service has been delivered that captures and reconstructs the workflow information needed to facilitate researchers in conducting neuroimaging analyses. The software enables neuroscientists to track the evolution of workflows and datasets. It also tracks the outcomes of

  3. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  4. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  6. Overview of progesterone profiles in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blavy, P.; Derks, M.; Martin, O.

    2016-01-01

    kernel of three data points was used to smooth the progesterone time series. The time between start of progesterone rise and end of progesterone decline was identified by fitting a simple model consisting of base length and a quadratic curve to progesterone data, and this luteal like phase (LLP) was used...... to classify progesterone profiles without recourse to an a priori set of rules, which arbitrarily segment the natural variability in these profiles. Using data-derived profile shapes may allow a more accurate assessment of the effects of for example nutritional management or breeding system on progesterone...

  7. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lenka Záveská Drábková; Dobrev, Petre I.; Václav Motyka

    2015-01-01

    Background Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom...

  8. Introduction to Wireless Localization With iPhone SDK Examples

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Eddie C L

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the entire landscape of both outdoor and indoor wireless positioning, and guides the reader step by step in the implementation of wireless positioning applications on the iPhone. Explanations of fundamental positioning techniques are given throughout the text, along with many programming examples, providing the reader with an independent, practical, and enjoyable learning of the material while gaining a real feel for the subject.  Provides an accessible introduction to positioning technologies such as Global Positioning System and Wi-Fi posi

  9. Synthesizing a color algorithm from examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, A C; Poggio, T A

    1988-01-29

    A lightness algorithm that separates surface reflectance from illumination in a Mondrian world is synthesized automatically from a set of examples, which consist of pairs of input (intensity signal) and desired output (surface reflectance) images. The algorithm, which resembles a new lightness algorithm recently proposed by Land, is approximately equivalent to filtering the image through a center-surround receptive field in individual chromatic channels. The synthesizing technique, optimal linear estimation, requires only one assumption, that the operator that transforms input into output is linear. This assumption is true for a certain class of early vision algorithms that may therefore be synthesized in a similar way from examples. Other methods of synthesizing algorithms from examples, or "learning," such as back-propagation, do not yield a significantly better lightness algorithm.

  10. Prevention among immigrants: the example of Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spallek Jacob

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large and increasing part of the European population has a history of migration. Germany, for example, is home to about 15 million people with migrant background, which amounts to 19% of its population. Migrants may have differences in their lifestyle, health beliefs and risk factors compared to the autochthonous populations. Discussion As for example studies on children's participation in routine prevention activities have shown, these differences can have a relevant impact on the access of migrants to the health care system and are likely to lower their participation in prevention programs compared to the autochthonous population. To increase the uptake of prevention programs, barriers to access must be identified and approaches to reduce them must be developed. Summary Taking the example of Germany, a need exists for prevention programs that include (migrant sensitive and specifically address (migrant specific migrants. These should be of sufficient scale, evidence-based, sustainable and evaluated at regular intervals.

  11. Migration Profile NIGERIA 1. Structural Migration Profile 2. Flash Migration Profile (January - March 2017)

    OpenAIRE

    BRYTON DIAS MARQUES FERNANDO; URSO GIULIANA

    2017-01-01

    The new generation of Migration Profiles aims at collecting knowledge on migration and development at regular, short intervals (3/6 months) and with a sub-national coverage, providing tailored monitoring and ensuring comparability across countries. It links migration, developmental and humanitarian aspects as well as analyses on the EU strategic role vis-à-vis the third country, including its political, financial and humanitarian support. This publication reproduces the Migration Profile of N...

  12. Accurate automatic profile monitoring. Genaue automatische Profilkontrolle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, F. (Amberg Messtechnik AG (Germany))

    1994-06-09

    It is almost inconceivable that the present tunnelling methods will not employ modern surveying and monitoring technologies. Accurate, automatic profile monitoring is an aid to optimization of construction work in technical, financial and scheduling respects. These aspects are explained in more detail on the basis of a description of use, various practical examples and a cost analysis. (orig.)

  13. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  14. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  15. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  16. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bord, Sarah [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  17. Eclipse plugin development by example beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2013-01-01

    A Beginner's Guide following the ""by Example"" approach. There will be 5-8 major examples that will be used in the book to develop advanced plugins with the Eclipse IDE.This book is for Java developers who are familiar with Eclipse as a Java IDE and are interested in learning how to develop plug-ins for Eclipse. No prior knowledge of Eclipse plug-in development or OSGi is necessary, although you are expected to know how to create, run, and debug Java programs in Eclipse.

  18. Active learning techniques for librarians practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A practical work outlining the theory and practice of using active learning techniques in library settings. It explains the theory of active learning and argues for its importance in our teaching and is illustrated using a large number of examples of techniques that can be easily transferred and used in teaching library and information skills to a range of learners within all library sectors. These practical examples recognise that for most of us involved in teaching library and information skills the one off session is the norm, so we need techniques that allow us to quickly grab and hold our

  19. Example choice experiment using animations. Using animations

    OpenAIRE

    Tørrissen, Tom Kristian

    2012-01-01

    What are best practices in learning methods? That question has been and is still today still a much discussed topic. Some say learning by doing, some say read and memorize and some are not sure and try to think in new methods. One of these methods is a theory called the Example Choice theory. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the Examples Choice theory in learning with the use of animations. By setting up an experiment we might be able to de...

  20. Videoconference for psychotherapy training and supervision: two case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Tony; Abbass, Allan; Frederickson, Jon; Henning, Inés; Taubner, Svenja

    2014-01-01

    Psychotherapy supervision and training are now widely available online. However, many supervisors still may be unclear on how online supervision actually works, or what it actually looks like in practice. In this article, three case examples of online videoconference-based supervision programs will be described. Partial transcripts from two online supervision sessions are provided. The benefits and limitations of online supervision are discussed, including discussion of supervision process, ethics, privacy, and security.

  1. Cohort Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Diderichsen, Finn

    2014-01-01

    The Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study was established to determine pathways through which socioeconomic position affects morbidity and mortality, in particular common subtypes of cancer. Data from seven well-established cohort studies from Denmark were pooled. Combining these cohorts...... provided a unique opportunity to generate a large study population with long follow-up and sufficient statistical power to develop and apply new methods for quantification of the two basic mechanisms underlying social inequalities in cancer-mediation and interaction. The SIC cohort included 83 006...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt. C,...

  3. Proterozoic intracontinental basin: The Vindhyan example

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Vindhyan basin is a classic example of Proterozoic intracontinental basin that developed in the central part of the Indian shield along with several other basins such as Cuddapah,Chattisgarh,etc.The strata are exposed in three major sectors:Son valley,Bundelkhand and Rajasthan. Substantially thick Vindhyan rocks ...

  4. Chemical Oscillations-Basic Principles and Examples

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 2. Chemical Oscillations - Basic Principles and Examples ... Protein Science and Engineering Unit Institute of Microbial Technology Sector 39A Chandigarh 160 036; Department of Chemistry and Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry ...

  5. An example in linear quadratic optimal control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, George; Zwart, Heiko J.

    1998-01-01

    We construct a simple example of a quadratic optimal control problem for an infinite-dimensional linear system based on a shift semigroup. This system has an unbounded control operator. The cost is quadratic in the input and the state, and the weighting operators are bounded. Despite its extreme

  6. Regression Analysis by Example. 5th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Samprit; Hadi, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. "Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition" has been expanded and thoroughly…

  7. Examples of Neutrosophic Probability in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper re-discusses the problems of the so-called “law of nonconservation of parity” and “accelerating expansion of the universe”, and presents the examples of determining Neutrosophic Probability of the experiment of Chien-Shiung Wu et al in 1957, and determining Neutrosophic Probability of accelerating expansion of the partial universe.

  8. Returnable containers: an example of reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Kroon (Leo); G.M.C. Vrijens

    1996-01-01

    textabstractConsiders the application of returnable containers as an example of reverse logistics. A returnable container is a type of secondary packaging that can be used several times in the same form, in contrast with traditional cardboard boxes. For this equipment to be used, a system for the

  9. Categorising Example Sentences in Dictionaries for Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The definition (counterbalance or make up for something) contains difficult vocabulary and could be misinterpreted, but the example clearly shows what offset means and how it is used. This support is especially valid in South African schools, where learners may not have the language skills and fluency for a monolingual ...

  10. Choosing between Glaser and Strauss: an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Adeline

    2010-01-01

    Choosing between Glaserian and Straussian grounded theory when selecting a methodological approach can be challenging, but few papers consider this decision-making process. This paper explores the Glaser-Strauss debate using an example of a study which explored whether older people experience a sense of home in residential settings.

  11. Communication, Suspicion And Stability In Marriage: Examples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communication, Suspicion And Stability In Marriage: Examples From The Experiences Of Married Women In Two Private Universities In Ogun State, Nigeria. ... in homes and discourage suspicion, recruit professional counsellors, psychologists and social workers to attend to various needs of couples and intending couples.

  12. Fluid dynamics via examples and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    "This is an excellent book for fluid dynamics students. It gives a good overview of the theory through a large set of worthy example problems. After many classical textbooks on the subject, there is finally one with solved exercises. I fully appreciate the selection of topics."-Professor Miguel Onorato, Physics Department, University of Torino.

  13. Proterozoic intracontinental basin: The Vindhyan example

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Vindhyan basin is a classic example of Proterozoic intracontinental basin that developed in ... The Vindhyan strata define a broad, regional syncline trending ..... influenced inner shelf setting. (C hak rab orty and. B ose. 1990). Se m ri. G roup. R o h tas. F o rm ation. Th is formation b egin s w ith m assiv e, p lan e-lamin.

  14. Students' Views of Example Generation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Sinead; O'Shea, Ann; Pfeiffer, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here on students' views of example generation tasks assigned to them in two first year undergraduate Calculus courses. The design and use of such tasks was undertaken as part of a project which aimed to afford students opportunities to develop their thinking skills and their conceptual understanding. In interviews with 10 students, we…

  15. Selected critical examples of scientometric publication analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of authors, institutions or countries per publication indexed by Web of Science. Methodology: The paper uses examples from earlier research evaluation studies and cases based on online data to describe issues, problematic details, pitfalls and how to overcome them in publication analysis with respect...

  16. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  17. Some examples of geomorphodiversity in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Mario

    2014-05-01

    The concept of geomorphodiversity (Panizza, 2009) is presented: "the critical and specific assessment of the geomorphological features of a territory, by comparing them in a way both extrinsic (comparison of the geomorphological characteristics with those from other territories) and intrinsic (comparison of the geomorphological characteristics with other areas within the territory itself) and taking into account the level of their scientific quality, the scale of investigation and the purpose of the research". A first example concerns the Dolomites: they have been included in the UNESCO World Heritage List because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with their scientific importance from the geological and geomorphological point of view. They are of international significance for geomorphodiversity, as the classic site for the development of mountains in dolomite limestone and present a wide range of landforms related to erosion, tectonics and glaciation. They represent a kind of high altitude, open air laboratory of geomorphological heritage of exceptional global value, among the most extraordinary and accessible in the world and ideal for researching, teaching, understanding and developing Earth Science theories. The second example concerns the Emilia-Romagna Apennines, candidate for enrolment in the List of European Geoparks: they show a multifaceted and complex image from the international and regional geomorphological (extrinsic and intrinsic geomorphodiversity) point of view and are an educational example for illustrating morphotectonic evolution, stratigraphic and sedimentological sequences and morpholithological peculiarities connected with gypsum karst and clay mass wasting phenomena. The third example concerns the Vesuvius, one of the National Italian Parks: it shows an extrinsic geomorphodiversity mainly referred to the type of eruptions, with some exemplary processes inserted in international volcanic nomenclature; it makes up an

  18. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Forthun, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts......-the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort. MOBAND-CP includes maternal interview/questionnaire data collected during pregnancy and follow-up, plus linked information from national health registries. FINDINGS TO DATE: Initial harmonisation of data from the 2 cohorts...... has created 140 variables for children and their mothers. In the MOBAND-CP cohort, 438 children with CP have been identified through record linkage with validated national registries, providing by far the largest such sample with prospectively collected detailed pregnancy data. Several studies...

  19. Unlocking the mysteries of cataloging a workbook of examples

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Elizabeth; Zwierski, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Provides more than 100 examples that together encompass virtually all types of materials libraries collect and catalog, with MARC ""answer"" records Offers exercises that allow practice in AACR2r and RDA, description, subject classification, subject heading application, classification, subject analysis, and MARC 21 Covers both RDA and AACR2r answer records for selected exercises Includes non-English materials Links to a website that provides for multiple approaches and answer records and enables you to view all the graphics in color and enlarge them as needed Links instruction to a

  20. Comparing the effects of worked examples and modeling examples on learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerheide, Vincent|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412654504; Loyens, Sofie M M; Van Gog, Tamara|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/294304975

    2014-01-01

    Example-based learning is an effective instructional strategy for students with low prior knowledge, and is increasingly being used in online learning environments. However, examples can take many different forms and little is known about whether and how form affects learning outcomes. Therefore,

  1. Web User Profile Using XUL and Information Retrieval Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MUNTEANU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the importance of user profile in information retrieval, information filtering and recommender systems using explicit and implicit feedback. A Firefox extension (based on XUL used for gathering data needed to infer a web user profile and an example file with collected data are presented. Also an algorithm for creating and updating the user profile and keeping track of a fixed number k of subjects of interest is presented.

  2. A note on critical dimensions in profile semiparametric estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This paper complements the results of Andresen et. al "Critical dimension in profile semiparametric estimation" (2014) on profile estimators in semiparametric models. We present two examples. One that illustrates that the smoothness constraint on the expected value of the contrast functional used to define the profile M-estimator is necessary for the bound derived for the critical ratio of dimension to sample size. A second one to show that in the case that the target dimension is proportiona...

  3. Biodiversity, phylogeography, biogeography and conservation: lemurs as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, Urs

    2007-01-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar represent a spectacular example of adaptive radiation among primates. Given the special setting under which they evolved (i.e. long isolation, geographical location, geological relief), they provide excellent models for study in many realms, and at different levels and scales, including diversity. At the same time, they occur in a 'hottest hot spot' region for biodiversity conservation. Although there is no single definition of biodiversity, the most commonly used units to measure biodiversity are species-species richness, species abundance and, for conservation purposes in particular, species endemism. However, what a species actually is or how, precisely, it should be defined are unresolved issues. Many species concepts have been proposed and several have been used in primatology in recent years. Nowadays, one of the more common approaches to measuring diversity, and eventually inferring species status, is to look at genetic diversity as reflected by mitochondrial DNA differences. Not enough attention has been paid, however, to the different levels at which genetic differences may occur. Lemurs provide instructive examples to highlight the questions involved in species recognition and definition. Using lemurs as examples, I will highlight the strengths and limitations of some analytical tools, including phylogeography and cladistic biogeography and, I will, in particular, emphasize the questions arising at the interface of scientific and conservation perceptions, both of which influence decisions in the field of biodiversity preservation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Using Framework Analysis in nursing research: a worked example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Deborah J; Furber, Christine; Tierney, Stephanie; Swallow, Veronica

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate Framework Analysis using a worked example and to illustrate how criticisms of qualitative data analysis including issues of clarity and transparency can be addressed. Critics of the analysis of qualitative data sometimes cite lack of clarity and transparency about analytical procedures; this can deter nurse researchers from undertaking qualitative studies. Framework Analysis is flexible, systematic, and rigorous, offering clarity, transparency, an audit trail, an option for theme-based and case-based analysis and for readily retrievable data. This paper offers further explanation of the process undertaken which is illustrated with a worked example. Data were collected from 31 nursing students in 2009 using semi-structured interviews. The data collected are not reported directly here but used as a worked example for the five steps of Framework Analysis. Suggestions are provided to guide researchers through essential steps in undertaking Framework Analysis. The benefits and limitations of Framework Analysis are discussed. Nurses increasingly use qualitative research methods and need to use an analysis approach that offers transparency and rigour which Framework Analysis can provide. Nurse researchers may find the detailed critique of Framework Analysis presented in this paper a useful resource when designing and conducting qualitative studies. Qualitative data analysis presents challenges in relation to the volume and complexity of data obtained and the need to present an 'audit trail' for those using the research findings. Framework Analysis is an appropriate, rigorous and systematic method for undertaking qualitative analysis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Risk factors and their identification. Third Part: Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-10-01

    This is the final of a series of three articles in Diabete & Metabolisme which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. The three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and case-cohort studies are described in the second of the series [2]. Examples were provided of each of these study types and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. This final paper provides some examples of the study types and the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first examples involve diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and a disease, we then discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so and whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  6. Adaptive User Profiles in Pervasive Advertising Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Florian; Balz, Moritz; Kristes, Stefanie; Shirazi, Alireza Sahami; Mennenöh, Julian; Schmidt, Albrecht; Schröder, Hendrik; Goedicke, Michael

    Nowadays modern advertising environments try to provide more efficient ads by targeting costumers based on their interests. Various approaches exist today as to how information about the users' interests can be gathered. Users can deliberately and explicitly provide this information or user's shopping behaviors can be analyzed implicitly. We implemented an advertising platform to simulate an advertising environment and present adaptive profiles, which let users setup profiles based on a self-assessment, and enhance those profiles with information about their real shopping behavior as well as about their activity intensity. Additionally, we explain how pervasive technologies such as Bluetooth can be used to create a profile anonymously and unobtrusively.

  7. NASTRAN: User experience with four example problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivello, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Four different structural problems are solved to gain familiarity with the NASTRAN computer program. The problems are: (1) a simply-supported beam subjected to lateral loads, (2) a rotating filamentary composite bar under the action of centrifugal forces, (3) a missile body with aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial forces, and (4) a square simply-supported plate with in-plane temperature changes capable of buckling the plate. Input and output data are given for each problem. The results are compared with those obtained by other methods. However, except for the examples employing beam elements in which the agreement is excellent, the element breakup chosen for convenience in obtaining program familiarity is too coarse to draw conclusions regarding the program accuracy. The example problems disclosed errors in the plotting and thermal-buckling routines of the program.

  8. Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowski, Roy E.; Ooi, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer...

  9. Sparse representations for radar with Matlab examples

    CERN Document Server

    Knee, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although the field of sparse representations is relatively new, research activities in academic and industrial research labs are already producing encouraging results. The sparse signal or parameter model motivated several researchers and practitioners to explore high complexity/wide bandwidth applications such as Digital TV, MRI processing, and certain defense applications. The potential signal processing advancements in this area may influence radar technologies. This book presents the basic mathematical concepts along with a number of useful MATLAB® examples to emphasize the practical imple

  10. Regionalism on the example of Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Terez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the processes of association with the EU in which Hungary took place, and about the demands that should have been fulfilled. It is shown, on the example of Hungary, what progress has taken place in the last 15 years in the area of establishing of regional science and what sort of conclusion can be made for Yugoslavia. The author also deals with the possible functions of sociology in regional research.

  11. From Airborne EM to Geology, some examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnink, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Introduction Airborne Electro Magnetics (AEM) provide a model of the 3-dimensional distribution of resistivity of the subsurface. These resistivity models were used for delineating geological structures (e.g. Buried Valleys and salt domes) and for geohydrological modeling of aquifers (sandy sediments) and aquitards (clayey sediments). Most of the interpretation of the AEM has been carried out manually, by interpretation of 2 and 3-dimensional resistivity models into geological units by a skilled geologists / geophysicist. The manual interpretation is tiresome, takes a long time and is prone to subjective choices of the interpreter. Therefore, semi-automatic interpretation of AEM resistivity models into geological units is a recent research topic. Two examples are presented that show how resistivity, as obtained from AEM, can be "converted" to useful geological / geohydrolocal models. Statistical relation between borehole data and resistivity In the northeastern part of the Netherlands, the 3D distribution of clay deposits - formed in a glacio-lacustrine environment with buried glacial valleys - was modelled. Boreholes with description of lithology, were linked to AEM resistivity. First, 1D AEM resistivity models from each individual sounding were interpolated to cover the entire study area, resulting in a 3-dimensional model of resistivity. For each interval of clay and sand in the boreholes, the corresponding resistivity was extracted from the 3D resistivity model. Linear regression was used to link the clay and non-clay proportion in each borehole interval to the Ln(resistivity). This regression is then used to "convert" the 3D resistivity model into proportion of clay for the entire study area. This so-called "soft information" is combined with the "hard data" (boreholes) to model the proportion of clay for the entire study area using geostatistical simulation techniques (Sequential Indicator Simulation with collocated co-kriging). 100 realizations of the 3

  12. INGRID by example: A pictorial tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainsberger, R.

    1988-11-01

    The following examples of INGRID input files and results are from various sources including Doug Stillman. In many cases, they are the same as in the examples section of the INGRID manual by Doug Stillman. I have made some modest improvements so that they are all complete input files to be run with the latest version of INGRID. These files have been attached to the front end of the INGRID source as comments. I wish to invite all INGRID user's to submit any favorite input files to be included in this tutorial. Such an input file should not be too large, and the object being generated should have a natural appeal to INGRID users. Feel free to make suggestions. This tutorial will soon replace the examples section of the manual. The entire manual will be replaced a section at a time. I chose to do this section first, since it could give the most benefit in the shortest amount of time. As soon as I make INGRID interactive, I will then rewrite the section on standard parts.

  13. The Need for Killer Examples for Object-Oriented Frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we argue in favor of introducing object-oriented frameworks as an important topic in our software engineering teaching. Frameworks provide a basis for students to build interesting and impressive programs even with small programming effort at the introductory level. Frameworks...... of publications and literature about teaching frameworks, it seems that few has realized the potential---it is an under-utilized technology. We therefore suggest that killer examples are highly needed and present some experiences with two frameworks that we have found useful in our teaching....... are excellent examples of the use of design patterns and software engineering principles to serve as case study at the advanced level. And frameworks convey the important pedagogical point that developing software means reusing software just as much as producing code. However, counting the number...

  14. Acceleration from Modified Gravity: Lessons from Worked Examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wayne [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    I examine how two specific examples of modified gravity explanations of cosmic acceleration help us understand some general problems confronting cosmological tests of gravity: how do we distinguish modified gravity from dark energy if they can be made formally equivalent? how do we parameterize deviations according to physical principles with sufficient generality, yet focus cosmological tests into areas that complement our existing knowledge of gravity? how do we treat the dynamics of modifications which necessarily involve non-linearities that preclude superposition of forces? The modified action f(R) and DGP braneworld models provide insight on these question as fully-worked examples whose expansion history, linear perturbation theory, and most recently, non-linear N-body and force-modification field dynamics of cosmological simulations are available for study.

  15. Quality Profiles in Early Childhood: An Example from Virginia's Quality Rating Improvement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality in early childhood settings has emerged as an important factor in determining whether the potential benefits of educational experiences before kindergarten will be realized. Research demonstrates that in order for such interventions to be beneficial to young children's development, the quality of their educational environments and…

  16. Wolves--Fact and Fiction: Example Performance Package, Minnesota Profile of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Children, Families, and Learning, St. Paul.

    Developed by classroom teachers during the development phase of Minnesota's Graduation Standards, these performance packages are made up of locally designed assignments that, taken together, show whether a student has learned and can apply the knowledge and skills related to comprehending literal meaning in reading, viewing and listening…

  17. Gene expression profiling for food safety assessment: Examples in potato and maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.P.; Leifert, C.; Barros, E.; Kok, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid 1990s, microarray analysis has become one of the few tools that can analyze the entire contents of a cell regarding a specific information type. Especially since the development of whole genome microarrays the technique can be considered truly holistic. Most DNA based microarrays are

  18. Gene expression profiling for food safety assessment: examples in potato and maize

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Dijk, JP

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available .A., Penninks, A.H., Poulsen, M., Schauzu, M., Wal, J.M., 2004. Assessment of the safety of foods derived from genetically modified (GM) crops. Food Chem. Toxicol. 42 (7), 1047?1088. grain than conventional breeding. Plant Biotechnol. J. 4 (4), 369... stream_source_info Barros4_2010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 30496 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Barros4_2010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 assessment , Esthe...

  19. Qualitative case study data analysis: an example from practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine; Murphy, Kathy; Shaw, David; Casey, Dympna

    2015-05-01

    To illustrate an approach to data analysis in qualitative case study methodology. There is often little detail in case study research about how data were analysed. However, it is important that comprehensive analysis procedures are used because there are often large sets of data from multiple sources of evidence. Furthermore, the ability to describe in detail how the analysis was conducted ensures rigour in reporting qualitative research. The research example used is a multiple case study that explored the role of the clinical skills laboratory in preparing students for the real world of practice. Data analysis was conducted using a framework guided by the four stages of analysis outlined by Morse ( 1994 ): comprehending, synthesising, theorising and recontextualising. The specific strategies for analysis in these stages centred on the work of Miles and Huberman ( 1994 ), which has been successfully used in case study research. The data were managed using NVivo software. Literature examining qualitative data analysis was reviewed and strategies illustrated by the case study example provided. Discussion Each stage of the analysis framework is described with illustration from the research example for the purpose of highlighting the benefits of a systematic approach to handling large data sets from multiple sources. By providing an example of how each stage of the analysis was conducted, it is hoped that researchers will be able to consider the benefits of such an approach to their own case study analysis. This paper illustrates specific strategies that can be employed when conducting data analysis in case study research and other qualitative research designs.

  20. Bayesian Methods for the Physical Sciences. Learning from Examples in Astronomy and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreon, Stefano; Weaver, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Chapter 1: This chapter presents some basic steps for performing a good statistical analysis, all summarized in about one page. Chapter 2: This short chapter introduces the basics of probability theory inan intuitive fashion using simple examples. It also illustrates, again with examples, how to propagate errors and the difference between marginal and profile likelihoods. Chapter 3: This chapter introduces the computational tools and methods that we use for sampling from the posterior distribution. Since all numerical computations, and Bayesian ones are no exception, may end in errors, we also provide a few tips to check that the numerical computation is sampling from the posterior distribution. Chapter 4: Many of the concepts of building, running, and summarizing the resultsof a Bayesian analysis are described with this step-by-step guide using a basic (Gaussian) model. The chapter also introduces examples using Poisson and Binomial likelihoods, and how to combine repeated independent measurements. Chapter 5: All statistical analyses make assumptions, and Bayesian analyses are no exception. This chapter emphasizes that results depend on data and priors (assumptions). We illustrate this concept with examples where the prior plays greatly different roles, from major to negligible. We also provide some advice on how to look for information useful for sculpting the prior. Chapter 6: In this chapter we consider examples for which we want to estimate more than a single parameter. These common problems include estimating location and spread. We also consider examples that require the modeling of two populations (one we are interested in and a nuisance population) or averaging incompatible measurements. We also introduce quite complex examples dealing with upper limits and with a larger-than-expected scatter. Chapter 7: Rarely is a sample randomly selected from the population we wish to study. Often, samples are affected by selection effects, e.g., easier

  1. Worked examples are more efficient for learning than high-assistance instructional software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaren, Bruce M.; van Gog, Tamara; Ganoe, Craig; Yaron, David; Karabinos, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ‘assistance dilemma’, an important issue in the Learning Sciences, is concerned with how much guidance or assistance should be provided to help students learn. A recent study comparing three high-assistance approaches (worked examples, tutored problems, and erroneous examples) and one

  2. Natural current profiles in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.B.

    1990-08-01

    In this paper I show how one may arrive at a universal, or natural, family of Tokamak profiles using only accepted physical principles. These particular profiles are similar to ones proposed previously on the basis of ad hoc variational principles and the point of the present paper is to provide a justification for them. However in addition, the present work provides an interesting view of Tokamak fluctuations and leads to a new result -- a relationship between the inward particle pinch velocity, the diffusion coefficient and the current profile. The basic Tokamak model is described in this paper. Then an analogy is developed between Tokamak profiles and the equilibrium of a realisable dynamical system. Then the equations governing the natural Tokamak profiles are derived by applying standard statistical mechanics to this analog. The profiles themselves are calculated and some other results of the theory are described.

  3. Task-oriented display design - Concept and example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1989-01-01

    The general topic was in the area of display design alternatives for improved man-machine performance. The intent was to define and assess a display design concept oriented toward providing this task-oriented information. The major focus of this concept deals with the processing of data into parameters that are more relevant to the task of the human operator. Closely coupled to this concept of relevant information is the form or manner in which this information is actually presented. Conventional forms of presentation are normally a direct representation of the underlying data. By providing information in a form that is more easily assimilated and understood, a reduction in human error and cognitive workload may be obtained. A description of this proposed concept with a design example is provided. The application for the example was an engine display for a generic, twin-engine civil transport aircraft. The product of this concept was evaluated against a functionally similar, traditional display. The results of this evaluation showed that a task-oriented approach to design is a viable concept with regard to reducing user error and cognitive workload. The goal of this design process, providing task-oriented information to the user, both in content and form, appears to be a feasible mechanism for increasing the overall performance of a man-machine system.

  4. Task-oriented display design: Concept and example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1989-01-01

    The general topic was in the area of display design alternatives for improved man-machine performance. The intent was to define and assess a display design concept oriented toward providing this task-oriented information. The major focus of this concept deals with the processing of data into parameters that are more relevant to the task of the human operator. Closely coupled to this concept of relevant information is the form or manner in which this information is actually presented. Conventional forms of presentation are normally a direct representation of the underlying data. By providing information in a form that is more easily assimilated and understood, a reduction in human error and cognitive workload may be obtained. A description of this proposed concept with a design example is provided. The application for the example was an engine display for a generic, twin-engine civil transport aircraft. The product of this concept was evaluated against a functionally similar, traditional display. The results of this evaluation showed that a task-oriented approach to design is a viable concept with regard to reducing user error and cognitive workload. The goal of this design process, providing task-oriented information to the user, both in content and form, appears to be a feasible mechanism for increasing the overall performance of a man-machine system.

  5. Doing Business Economy Profile 2017

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Guatemala. To allow useful comparison, it also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2017 is the 14th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing...

  6. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  7. OpenCL programming by example

    CERN Document Server

    Banger, Ravishekhar

    2013-01-01

    This book follows an example-driven, simplified, and practical approach to using OpenCL for general purpose GPU programming.If you are a beginner in parallel programming and would like to quickly accelerate your algorithms using OpenCL, this book is perfect for you! You will find the diverse topics and case studies in this book interesting and informative. You will only require a good knowledge of C programming for this book, and an understanding of parallel implementations will be useful, but not necessary.

  8. [Janusz Korczak: an example of unlimited devotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta Carruyo, Eliéxer; Dairy Salcedo, Roxani

    2014-12-01

    Janusz Korczak was a prominent educator and humanist of the twentieth century. His ideas for reforming the education of children inspired generations of teachers and still remain valid. His main contribution was to introduce the pedagogical principle of autonomy, in order that the child be starring in their actions and accountable for their decisions, and in turn, he was respected as a person by their teachers. His heroic and touching life was a song of hope and love to abandoned children and his memory will live on as an example of devotion without limit.

  9. Some recent examples of fractal music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Torres, Cesar; Hinojosa-Rivera, Moises; Garza-Garza, Juan Angel; Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2002-11-01

    Since the first published studies of fractal music by Mandelbrot and Voss, the relationship between music, mathematics, and fractal geometry has been a very active field of research. It has been found that the music of classical composers can be characterized by fractal or self-affine parameters, which in turn serve as the basis for synthetic fractal music. In this work is presented a brief discussion of the state of the art as well as some recent examples of fractal music, including a live demonstration.

  10. Planetary Protection: Two Relevant Terrestrial Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, C.

    2002-09-01

    Concerns about potential pathogens in returned samples from Mars ("Mars Sample Return: Issues and Recommendations", National Research Council, 1997) or planetary satellites ("Evaluating the Biological Potential in Samples Returned from Planetary Satellites and Small Solar System Bodies", National Research Council, 1998) focus on two potential types of pathogenesis, toxic and infectious. The National Research Council reports cited above state that the chances of extraterrestrial organisms proving either toxic or infectious to humans are extremely low, but cannot be entirely ruled out. Here I discuss recently discovered terrestrial examples relevant to each possibility, in order to make these concerns concrete. The first example concerns the production of hepatotoxins (toxins affecting the liver) and neurotoxins by cyanobacteria in glacial lakes on alpine pastures in Switzerland. In this example, mat-forming benthic cyanobacteria are implicated in a hundred cattle poisonings that have been reported from alpine pasteurs in southeastern Switzerland over the past twenty-five years (e.g. K. Mez et al, Hydrobiologia 368, 1-15 (1998)). It is unlikely that these cyanobacteria evolved the toxins in response to dairy cows; rather the susceptibility of cattle to these toxins seems simply to be an unfortunate coincidence of a toxin working across a large evolutionary distance. The second example concerns the recent demonstration that the decimation of shallow-water Caribbean elkhorn coral is due to infection by a common fecal enterobacterium associated with the human gut (K. L. Patterson et al., PNAS 99, 8725-8730 (2002)). The bacterium, Serratia marcenscens, is also a free-living microbe in water and soil, as well as an opportunistic pathogen in a variety of animal species. The distance between humans and corals emphasizes the possibility that certain organisms may prove pathogenic across a wide evolutionary divide. Of course, in neither of these cases are the evolutionary

  11. Examples of Residual Heat Projects; Voorbeeldprojecten Restwarmte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-03-15

    An overview is given of applied technology, results, method, lessons learned and project data of 9 examples of projects in the Netherlands in which residual heat is produced and used [Dutch] Een overzicht is gegeven van de toegepaste techniek, resultaten, aanpak, lessons learned, en kerngegevens van 9 restwarmte voorbeeldprojecten: Restwarmtekoppeling Moerdijk; Melkpoederfabriek verwarmt zwembad en school in Beilen; Verzorgingstehuis in Leeuwarden krijgt restwarmte van rioolwaterzuivering; Warmtenet Maastricht draait op restwarmte papierfabriek; Stoomgrid Delfzijl voorziet industrieterrein van stoom en warmte; Fosforfabriek wint warmte uit fosforverbranding; Diervoederproducent levert warmte aan bedrijventerrein Kesteren; Kunstmestfabriek levert restwarmte en CO2 aan glastuinbouw; Aluminiumproducent levert restwarmte voor gassenterminal.

  12. Fuzzy Clustering - Principles, Methods and Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroszynski, Uri; Zhou, Jianjun

    1998-01-01

    One of the most remarkable advances in the field of identification and control of systems -in particular mechanical systems- whose behaviour can not be described by means of the usual mathematical models, has been achieved by the application of methods of fuzzy theory.In the framework of a study ...... of the methods. The examples were solved by hand and served as a test bench for exploration of the MATLAB capabilities included in the Fuzzy Control Toolbox. The fuzzy clustering methods described include Fuzzy c-means (FCM), Fuzzy c-lines (FCL) and Fuzzy c-elliptotypes (FCE)....

  13. Continuum modeling an approach through practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    This book develops continuum modeling skills and approaches the topic from three sides: (1) derivation of global integral laws together with the associated local differential equations, (2) design of constitutive laws and (3) modeling boundary processes. The focus of this presentation lies on many practical examples covering aspects such as coupled flow, diffusion and reaction in porous media or microwave heating of a pizza, as well as traffic issues in bacterial colonies and energy harvesting from geothermal wells. The target audience comprises primarily graduate students in pure and applied mathematics as well as working practitioners in engineering who are faced by nonstandard rheological topics like those typically arising in the food industry.

  14. ETHNIC TOURISM: AN EXAMPLE FROM ISTANBUL, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISTVÁN EGRESI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic Tourism: An Example from Istanbul, Turkey. Globalization has not only produced a trend towards economic integration and cultural homogenization but has also encouraged the preservation of local diversity and of multiculturalism. Whereas in the past ethnic or religious minorities were seen as a threat to the territorial unity of the country, today, increasingly countries are promoting ethnicities to attract tourists. Ethnic tourism is an alternative form of tourism that relies on attracting tourists to see sites connected to the cultural and historical heritage of ethnic minorities. This study explores the potential for ethnic tourism development in Istanbul, a city with a multicultural past and great heritage attractions.

  15. Ancon sheep: a now disproven example of macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    The Ancon breed of sheep provided, for decades, a critical support for the existence of major evolutionary changes or jumps called "sports." Putative examples of sports have been used as evidence of rapid macroevolution since Darwin first discussed the Ancon sheep mutation in 1859. Ancon sheep had very short legs that were considered an advantage for shepherds because the sheep were less likely to escape over fences. Many textbooks and articles implied that the breed was an example of how a major new trait could evolve in a single generation. The Ancon sheep example has been used both to prove gradual Darwinism and also to argue for rapid evolution as opposed to gradualism. It now is recognized that Ancon sheep resulted from genetic diseases, and that they usually suffered from achondroplasia. The so-called new breed had so many major health problems that the condition caused the breed's extinction decades ago, yet was mentioned in textbooks as evidence for evolutionary jumps as recently as 2005.

  16. ["Bientraitance": conceptual exploration and an example of its application in public health. An experience from Fribourg, Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand; Plancherel, Fabienne; Gervasoni, Jean-Pierre; Hofner, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Since the year 2000, the concept of "bientraitance" (for which no equivalent term has yet emerged in either the English or German language) has gained widespread credence among educators, sociologists and health professionals in France and Belgium. This concept emphasizes a constructive approach to care and education rather than merely one of prevention of disasters. Applied in public health, and in particular to mental health promotion, the use of the concept of "bientraitance" can help promote both effectiveness and meaning in the design and planning of community interventions. The article presents an example of an intervention for children and adolescents in Fribourg, Switzerland. The underpinning hypothesis is that the children and youth groups (such as sports clubs, artistic and cultural associations, scouts and guides) represent largely untapped, or under-tapped, informal health resources with a favourable cost-effectiveness profile. "Bientraitance" criteria are used in selecting certain associations offering structured extracurricular group educational activities and collective out-of-school (or after school) programmes. Support is provided to the organisations selected for recruiting new members, in particular those with potentially lower levels of access, for example disabled children or new migrants. The results will be evaluated for the impact of participation in various out-of-school activities on health and health determinants from a prospective and comparative perspective. This paper shows how the concept of "bientraitance" can be useful in the development of a public health intervention.

  17. Uncertainty and Decision Making: Examples of Some Possible New Frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, S. E.; Rodak, C. M.; Bolster, D.; Saavedra, K.; Evans, W.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of decision making under uncertainty for groundwater systems represents an exciting area of research and application. In this presentation, three examples are briefly introduced which represent possible new applications of risk and decision making under uncertainty. In the most classic of the three examples, a probabilistic strategy is considered within the context of management / assessment of proposed changes in land-use in the vicinity of a public water-supply well. Focused on health-risk related to contamination at the well, the analysis includes uncertainties in source location / strength, groundwater flow / transport, human exposure, and human health risk. The second example involves application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to the evaluation of development projects in rural regions of developing countries. PRA combined with Fault Tree Analysis provides a structure for analysis of the impact of data uncertainties on the estimation of health risk resulting from failure of multiple components of new water-resource systems. The third is an extension of the concept of "risk compensation" to the analysis of potential long-term risk associated with new water resource projects. Of direct interest here is the appearance of new risk to the public, such as introduction of new disease pathways or new sources of contamination of the source waters. As a result of limitations on conceptual model and/or limitations on data, this type of risk is often difficult to identify / assess, and is therefore not commonly included in formal decision-making efforts: it may however seriously impact the long-term net benefit of a water resource project. The goal of presenting these three examples is to illustrate the breadth of possible application of uncertainty / risk analyses beyond the more classic applications to groundwater remediation and protection.

  18. Unilever Nutrition Strategy and Examples in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Karen; Kamonpatana, Kom; Bao, Jason; Ramos-Buenviaje, Joy; Wagianto, Andriyani; Yeap, Pau-wei

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people in Asia are facing challenges from undernutrition, obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases. Unilever, as a global food business, has a simple approach to nutrition strategy: 'better products' help people to enjoy 'better diets' and live 'better lives.' For 'Better Products,' Unilever strives to improve the taste and nutritional qualities of all our products. By 2020, we commit to double the proportion of our entire global portfolio meeting the highest nutrition standards, based on globally recognised dietary guidelines. Unilever sets a clear plan to achieve reduction of sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, sugar, and calories in our products. Unilever developed fortified seasoning and spread products in 2013 for Vietnam, Indonesia, and the Philippines in collaboration with government bodies to address nutrient deficiencies. For 'Better Diets and Better Lives,' Unilever uses targeted communication to raise awareness and promote behavior change for healthy lifestyles. We committed to full nutrition labeling on our food products by 2015. We contribute experience to science-based regional initiatives on product labeling as well as nutrient profiling. Unilever collaborated with international, regional and country bodies to promote consumer understanding and food accessibility on public health priorities such as proper salt consumption, healthier meals, and employee well-being programs. Looking ahead, we are continuing to improve the nutritional profile of our products as well as our communication to improve diets and lives. Collaboration between industry, government and public health organizations is needed to address complex diet and life style issues.

  19. Collaborative process improvement with examples from the software world

    CERN Document Server

    Yeakley, C

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Process Improvement specifically addresses software companies that are interested in addressing quality in human terms. Using Collaborative Process Improvement techniques builds effective processes to deliver quality products; it helps readers relate to what quality means to the end-user and provides the essential tools and methods to integrate the face of the customer into the organization's day-to-day processes. It comes complete with real-world examples that are practical and unders andable to professionals in every role of a company.

  20. Creating robust vocabulary frequently asked questions and extended examples

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Isabel L

    2008-01-01

    Bringing Words to Life has enlivened the classrooms of hundreds of thousands of teachers. Responding to readers' success stories, practical questions, and requests for extended examples, this ideal volume builds on the groundbreaking work of Bringing Words to Life. The authors present additional tools, tips, and detailed explanations of such questions as which words to teach, when and how to teach them, and how to adapt instruction for English language learners. They provide specific instructional sequences, including assessments, for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12, as well as interactive less

  1. Human Rights and Vulnerability. Examples of Sexism and Ageism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª DEL CARMEN BARRANCO AVILÉS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A human rights based approach applied to the idea of ‘vulnerable group’ connects vulnerability and structural discrimination. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability provides some elements that allow to state that we are facing a new paradigm in the International Human Rights Law. One of the keys for the understanding of this new framework is the assumption of the disadvantage related to vulnerability as, at least in a part, socially built and ideologically justified. Sexism and ageism are examples of how ideologies reinforce vulnerability of women, children and aged persons transforming them in groups which members are in risk of discrimination.

  2. The ambiguous role of healthcare providers: a new perspective in Human Resources Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panari, Chiara; Levati, W; Bonini, A; Tonelli, M; Alfieri, E; Artioli, Giovanna

    2016-05-26

    A strategic Human Resources Management approach, that overcomes anadministrative Personnel Management, is becoming crucial for hospital organizations. In this sense, the aimof this work was to examine the figure of healthcare provider using the concept of role, as expected behaviourin term of integration in the organizational culture. The instrument used to analyse the healthcareprovider figure was "role mapping". Particularly, semistructured interviews were conducted and involved to36 health professionals of four units in order to examine the behaviour expectations system towards thehealthcare providers. The analysis revealed that the expectations of different professionals relatedto the healthcare provider were dissimilar. Physicians' expectations referred to technical preparation and efficiency,while nurses and nurse coordinators required collaboration in equip work and emotional support forpatients. In all Operating Units, directors were perceived as missing persons with vague expectations of efficiency.Differences concerned also the four Units. For example, in intensive care Unit, the role of healthcareprovider was clearer and this figure was perceived as essential for patients' care and for the equip teamwork.On the contrary, in Recovery Unit the healthcare provider was underestimated, the role was ambiguous andnot integrated in the equip even if there was a clear division of tasks between nurses and healthcare providers. The "role mapping" instrument allows to identify healthcare provider profile and find possible roleambiguity and conflicts in order to plan adequate human resources management interventions.

  3. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Mateo County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Mateo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  4. Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2014-01-01

    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Guatemala. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it....

  5. Collis-Romberg Mathematical Problem Solving Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, K. F.; Romberg, T. A.

    Problem solving has become a focus of mathematics programs in Australia in recent years, necessitating the assessment of students' problem-solving abilities. This manual provides a problem-solving assessment and teaching resource package containing four elements: (1) profiles assessment items; (2) profiles diagnostic forms for recording individual…

  6. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  7. Some practical examples of defence in depth analysis for category IV gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo, E-mail: aryarj@ig.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    The Defence in Depth concept provides a major contribution to the safety philosophy of irradiation facilities. But problems occur when somebody tries to understand or analyse a safety system or develop a new one because there is a lack of practical examples in Safety Series 107 or other IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) publications for irradiation facilities. This paper tries to fill this lack of information by providing a series of practical examples and explanations about Defence in Depth concepts. (author)

  8. GLL RPT IONOSPHERE PROFILES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Radio Propagation Team Ionosphere Profile data set is small number of electron density profiles derived from radio occultation data collected while...

  9. GHGRP Industrial Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  10. HOPWA Performance Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOPWA Performance Profiles are generated quarterly for all agencies receiving HOPWA formula or competitive grants. Performance Profiles are available at the national...

  11. A protection type of flow-guided extrusion die for semi-hollow Al-Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Rurong; Yun, Peng; Huang, Cuiting; Huang, Xuemei

    2017-09-01

    A new die structure for the semi-hollow Al-profiles was presented. Through a practical example, the die structure named protection type of flow-guided die was introduced. The composition of the structure and the selection of structure parameters were analyzed in detail. And the method of checking the die strength was introduced. The characteristics of the new structure were simple and easy to process. The practical application shows that the die structure can enhance the strength and prolong the life of the die. It is worth promoting. The purpose is to extend the experience and the new die structure, Provide reliable and valid reference data to the designers.

  12. PROFILER: 1D galaxy light profile decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.

    2017-05-01

    Written in Python, PROFILER analyzes the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. It accurately models a wide range of galaxies and galaxy components, such as elliptical galaxies, the bulges of spiral and lenticular galaxies, nuclear sources, discs, bars, rings, and spiral arms with a variety of parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat and Ferrers). In addition, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model (relevant for disc truncations or antitruncations) and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: namely along the major axis (in the disc plane) and along the minor axis (perpendicular to the disc plane).

  13. Physical properties of reservoirs using an artificial neural network approach: Example from the Jeanne d'Arc basin, eastern offshore Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehui Huang; Williamson, M.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Dartmouth (Canada))

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative statements of the evolution of petroleum systems in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin provides a solid basis for future exploration, reservoir modelling, reservoir development and resource management. As a contribution to such statements, we have integrated physical property measurements (porosity and permeability) and well log data from the major reservoir intervals throughout the basin using an efficient backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) modified with the Marquardt algorithm. The bulk of the data are from the Avalon Formation (13 wells), the Hibernia Formation (7 wells) and the Jeanne d'Arc Formation (12 wells). After data preprocessing and training/supervising example preparation, a model for the relationship of physical property and well log response was established with the BP-ANN technique. Test of the BP-ANN model in other Mesozoic reservoir intervals in the same basin whose data were not used as the training and supervising examples shows good agreement between the measured and predicted values. The BP-ANN model established was used to construct permeability porosity profiles in 40 wells for the Avalon Formation, 36 wells for the Hibernia Formation and 37 wells for the Jeanne d'Arc Formation from well logs. These profiles offer a more complete basis for understanding physical properties of reservoir intervals of this basin. They allow a detailed review of vertical and horizontal variations of physical properties in key areas of this basin.

  14. Physical properties of reservoirs using an artificial neural network approach: Example from the Jeanne d`Arc basin, eastern offshore Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehui Huang; Williamson, M.A. [Geological Survey of Canada, Dartmouth (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Quantitative statements of the evolution of petroleum systems in the Jeanne d`Arc Basin provides a solid basis for future exploration, reservoir modelling, reservoir development and resource management. As a contribution to such statements, we have integrated physical property measurements (porosity and permeability) and well log data from the major reservoir intervals throughout the basin using an efficient backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) modified with the Marquardt algorithm. The bulk of the data are from the Avalon Formation (13 wells), the Hibernia Formation (7 wells) and the Jeanne d`Arc Formation (12 wells). After data preprocessing and training/supervising example preparation, a model for the relationship of physical property and well log response was established with the BP-ANN technique. Test of the BP-ANN model in other Mesozoic reservoir intervals in the same basin whose data were not used as the training and supervising examples shows good agreement between the measured and predicted values. The BP-ANN model established was used to construct permeability porosity profiles in 40 wells for the Avalon Formation, 36 wells for the Hibernia Formation and 37 wells for the Jeanne d`Arc Formation from well logs. These profiles offer a more complete basis for understanding physical properties of reservoir intervals of this basin. They allow a detailed review of vertical and horizontal variations of physical properties in key areas of this basin.

  15. Sustainability through service perspectives, concepts and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfson, Adi; Martin, Patrick M; Tavor, Dorith

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses the mutual relationship between service and sustainability. It covers methodologies and approaches and describes measurements and tools that can promote sustainability on the service market. Lastly, it presents the different applications of sustainability, together with examples of sustainable services. Environmental concerns have become integral to any decision-making process in the design and implementation of goods and services. With the increasing dominance of the service sector, and as service systems become more complex and interdisciplinary, the focus must move from the exchange of products to that of services. Newly created services should thus aim to incorporate sustainability into their designs while viewing sustainability as a service in its own right. Integrating sustainability in the service design and development process is essential to improving the sustainability of our society and preserving the environment. Moreover, doing so shifts the service boundaries from values that...

  16. Examples of industrial achievements. [Energy economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Several examples are presented of industrial units concerned by energy economies. The problem, the solution, the energy savings and the financial balance are given for each following case: recuperation of smoke from two glass furnaces with continuous heat and power production; a new type of heating furnace for non-ferrous ingots; heating furnace with smoke recuperation; high-power boiler for very wet barks; smokes to supply heat to buildings and for a dryer; heat pump drying of plaster squares; air-conditioning of a workshop by recuperation on a furnace; dehydration of fodder and beetroot pulp with a straw generator; microprocessor-controlled hot water recuperation in cheese-making; electronic speed regulation for electronic motors.

  17. Differential geometry basic notions and physical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Differential Geometry offers a concise introduction to some basic notions of modern differential geometry and their applications to solid mechanics and physics. Concepts such as manifolds, groups, fibre bundles and groupoids are first introduced within a purely topological framework. They are shown to be relevant to the description of space-time, configuration spaces of mechanical systems, symmetries in general, microstructure and local and distant symmetries of the constitutive response of continuous media. Once these ideas have been grasped at the topological level, the differential structure needed for the description of physical fields is introduced in terms of differentiable manifolds and principal frame bundles. These mathematical concepts are then illustrated with examples from continuum kinematics, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, Cauchy fluxes and dislocation theory. This book will be useful for researchers and graduate students in science and engineering.

  18. Introducing Programming Languages Through Data Acquisition Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kocijancic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivating students at low and upper secondary schools to learn programming languages is not an easy task for a teacher. Namely, programming is not and easy job to do and the results of first “programs” seem to be very poor compared even to free software available on the web. So why learn programming languages? To overcome the trouble of motivation in teaching programming languages, we have developed a course to introduce Delphi, Visual basic, C++, LabView, … based on practical examples supported by self developed, low-cost data acquisition modules. In-service teachers at secondary schools who attended the workshops accepted this concept positively, most of them reported about positive change of students’ attitude regarding programming classes.

  19. Query-by-example surgical activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yixin; Vedula, S Swaroop; Lee, Gyusung I; Lee, Mija R; Khudanpur, Sanjeev; Hager, Gregory D

    2016-06-01

    Easy acquisition of surgical data opens many opportunities to automate skill evaluation and teaching. Current technology to search tool motion data for surgical activity segments of interest is limited by the need for manual pre-processing, which can be prohibitive at scale. We developed a content-based information retrieval method, query-by-example (QBE), to automatically detect activity segments within surgical data recordings of long duration that match a query. The example segment of interest (query) and the surgical data recording (target trial) are time series of kinematics. Our approach includes an unsupervised feature learning module using a stacked denoising autoencoder (SDAE), two scoring modules based on asymmetric subsequence dynamic time warping (AS-DTW) and template matching, respectively, and a detection module. A distance matrix of the query against the trial is computed using the SDAE features, followed by AS-DTW combined with template scoring, to generate a ranked list of candidate subsequences (substrings). To evaluate the quality of the ranked list against the ground-truth, thresholding conventional DTW distances and bipartite matching are applied. We computed the recall, precision, F1-score, and a Jaccard index-based score on three experimental setups. We evaluated our QBE method using a suture throw maneuver as the query, on two tool motion datasets (JIGSAWS and MISTIC-SL) captured in a training laboratory. We observed a recall of 93, 90 and 87 % and a precision of 93, 91, and 88 % with same surgeon same trial (SSST), same surgeon different trial (SSDT) and different surgeon (DS) experiment setups on JIGSAWS, and a recall of 87, 81 and 75 % and a precision of 72, 61, and 53 % with SSST, SSDT and DS experiment setups on MISTIC-SL, respectively. We developed a novel, content-based information retrieval method to automatically detect multiple instances of an activity within long surgical recordings. Our method demonstrated adequate recall

  20. Profiles of Loneliness in the Caregiving Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2016-04-01

    The study evaluated profiles (a typology) of loneliness within the caregiving unit, which was composed of an older care recipient with functional impairment, a family member, and a home care worker. Overall, 223 complete caregiving units completed the 3-item Revised-University of California San Francisco Loneliness scale. Latent profile analysis was used to identify profiles of loneliness within the caregiving unit. Subsequently, latent profile membership was used as a between-subject variable to examine correlates of the latent profiles. A 2-profile solution was deemed most plausible. This classification consisted of a large (174 caregiving units; 78%) more favorable profile in terms of loneliness and a smaller (49 caregiving units; 22%) lonelier profile. Profile classification was associated with a variety of quality of life, well-being, social relations, and sociodemographic indicators of the 3 members of the caregiving unit. The study provides a needed recognition of the potential interdependence among members of the caregiving unit and calls for research and practice that go beyond the individual level. The assessment of loneliness at the caregiving unit can provide valuable information about at-risk units as well as about the potential effectiveness of interventions that target the entire caregiving unit. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Gravity with extra dimensions and dark matter interpretation: phenomenological example via Miyamoto Nagai Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letelier, Patricio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica. Dept. de Matematica Aplicada; Coimbra-Araujo, Carlos Henrique, E-mail: carlos.coimbra@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Any connection between dark matter and extra dimensions is revealed by the effective energy momentum tensor associated with the theory. In order to investigate and test such a relationship, we examine a higher-dimensional space- time endowed with a factorizable general metric with a configuration such that its density profile coincides with the Newtonian potential for disk galaxies. An appropriate solution representing stratifications of mass in the central-bulge and disk part of galaxies, e.g., the Miyamoto - Nagai Ansatz, is used to solve the Einstein equations.We compute the stable rotation curves of such systems and, with no adjustable parameters, accurately recover the observational data for flat or not asymptotically flat galaxy rotation curves. We present examples of density profiles and compare them to the profile obtained from purely Newtonian potentials. (author)

  2. Nutritional profile of edible red marine seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Guedes Costa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine biodiversity represents an exceptional source of natural resources. Their use in a sustainable way may ensure alternative food sources for human consumption, which scarcity is anticipated. Macroalgae, also known as seaweed, are an outstanding example of this biodiversity and are considered an excellent source of a wide number of chemical compounds with beneficial health effects [1]. According to their pigmentation, they can be distinguished in green (Chlorophytaea, brown (Phaeophytaea and red (Rhodophytaea, showing differences in nutritional and chemical compositions [1]. Some macroalgae are widely used as food ingredients in oriental countries as a good source of fiber and protein. Alternatively, they are also considered a source of nutraceuticals, providing health benefits such as anti-inflamatory, anti-allergic, antimutagenic, antitumor, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antihyperthensive and neuroprotective properties [2]. Indeed, macroalgae are a very attractive material for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. According to some studies red seaweeds seem to be the most suitable source of proteins for human nutrition [3]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional profile of the most consumed species of red seaweed that are commercially available in the market. Red species as Palmaria palmata (Dulse, Porphyra tenera (Nori and Eisenia bicyclis (Arame, were analyzed. Moisture determination was performed using a Scaltec SMO01 moisture analyzer. The ashes were obtained by incineration at 500ºC. The protein content was determined using the Kjeldahl procedure and total fat was measured through Soxhlet method. The carbohydrates were calculated indirectly by difference. In addition, chlorides were volumetrically determined and vitamin E profile was analysed by HPLC/DAD/FLD. The algae samples are commercialized dry, so the moisture content was very low, around 10%. The ash content was around 10-17%. Protein levels ranged from

  3. Usability Guidelines for Product Recommenders Based on Example Critiquing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Pearl; Faltings, Boi; Chen, Li; Zhang, Jiyong; Viappiani, Paolo

    Over the past decade, our group has developed a suite of decision tools based on example critiquing to help users find their preferred products in e-commerce environments. In this chapter, we survey important usability research work relative to example critiquing and summarize the major results by deriving a set of usability guidelines. Our survey is focused on three key interaction activities between the user and the system: the initial preference elicitation process, the preference revision process, and the presentation of the systems recommendation results. To provide a basis for the derivation of the guidelines, we developed a multi-objective framework of three interacting criteria: accuracy, confidence, and effort (ACE). We use this framework to analyze our past work and provide a specific context for each guideline: when the system should maximize its ability to increase users' decision accuracy, when to increase user confidence, and when to minimize the interaction effort for the users. Due to the general nature of this multi-criteria model, the set of guidelines that we propose can be used to ease the usability engineering process of other recommender systems, especially those used in e-commerce environments. The ACE framework presented here is also the first in the field to evaluate the performance of preference-based recommenders from a user-centric point of view.

  4. Classification accuracy of claims-based methods for identifying providers failing to meet performance targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Benjamin-Johnson, Rhondee; Onega, Tracy; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Zhu, Weiwei; Fenton, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quality assessment is critical for healthcare reform but data sources are lacking for measurement of many important healthcare outcomes. With over 49 million people covered by Medicare as of 2010, Medicare claims data offer a potentially valuable source that could be used in targeted health care quality improvement efforts. However, little is known about the operating characteristics of provider profiling methods using claims-based outcome measures that may estimate provider performance with error. Motivated by the example of screening mammography performance, we compared approaches to identifying providers failing to meet guideline targets using Medicare claims data. We used data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and linked Medicare claims to compare claims-based and clinical estimates of cancer detection rate. We then demonstrated the performance of claim-based estimates across a broad range of operating characteristics using simulation studies. We found that identification of poor performing providers was extremely sensitive to algorithm specificity, with no approach identifying more than 65% of poorly performing providers when claims-based measures had specificity of 0.995 or less. We conclude that claims have the potential to contribute important information on healthcare outcomes to quality improvement efforts. However, to achieve this potential, development of highly accurate claims-based outcome measures should remain a priority. PMID:25302935

  5. Use of Pearson's Chi-Square for Testing Equality of Percentile Profiles across Multiple Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William D; Beyl, Robbie A; Burton, Jeffrey H; Johnson, Callie M; Romer, Jacob E; Zhang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    In large sample studies where distributions may be skewed and not readily transformed to symmetry, it may be of greater interest to compare different distributions in terms of percentiles rather than means. For example, it may be more informative to compare two or more populations with respect to their within population distributions by testing the hypothesis that their corresponding respective 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles are equal. As a generalization of the median test, the proposed test statistic is asymptotically distributed as Chi-square with degrees of freedom dependent upon the number of percentiles tested and constraints of the null hypothesis. Results from simulation studies are used to validate the nominal 0.05 significance level under the null hypothesis, and asymptotic power properties that are suitable for testing equality of percentile profiles against selected profile discrepancies for a variety of underlying distributions. A pragmatic example is provided to illustrate the comparison of the percentile profiles for four body mass index distributions.

  6. Profile of Vietnam War Veterans (2015).

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Profile of Vietnam War Veterans uses the 2015 ACS to provide a view into the demographic characteristics and socioeconomic conditions of the Vietnam War Veteran...

  7. OMPS-NPP L2 NP Ozone (O3) Vertical Profile swath orbital NRT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMPS-NPP L2 NP Ozone (O3) Total Column swath orbital product provides ozone profile retrievals from the Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) Nadir-Profiler...

  8. Protocol for quality control in metabolic profiling of biological fluids by U(H)PLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gika, Helen G; Zisi, Chrysostomi; Theodoridis, Georgios; Wilson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The process of untargeted metabolic profiling/phenotyping of complex biological matrices, i.e., biological fluids such as blood plasma/serum, saliva, bile, and tissue extracts, provides the analyst with a wide range of challenges. Not the least of these challenges is demonstrating that the acquired data are of "good" quality and provide the basis for more detailed multivariate, and other, statistical analysis necessary to detect, and identify, potential biomarkers that might provide insight into the process under study. Here straightforward and pragmatic "quality control (QC)" procedures are described that allow investigators to monitor the analytical processes employed for global, untargeted, metabolic profiling. The use of this methodology is illustrated with an example from the analysis of human urine where an excel spreadsheet of the preprocessed LC-MS output is provided with embedded macros, calculations and visualization plots that can be used to explore the data. Whilst the use of these procedures is exemplified on human urine samples, this protocol is generally applicable to metabonomic/metabolomic profiling of biofluids, tissue and cell extracts from many sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Example Problems to Improve Student Learning in Algebra: Differentiating between Correct and Incorrect Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Julie L.; Lange, Karin E.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Newton, Kristie J.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of two "in vivo" experiments, we examine whether correct and incorrect examples with prompts for self-explanation can be effective for improving students' conceptual understanding and procedural skill in Algebra when combined with guided practice. In Experiment 1, students working with the Algebra I Cognitive Tutor were randomly…

  10. Linguistic evaluation of terrorist scenarios: example application.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, John L.

    2007-03-01

    In 2005, a group of international decision makers developed a manual process for evaluating terrorist scenarios. That process has been implemented in the approximate reasoning Java software tool, LinguisticBelief, released in FY2007. One purpose of this report is to show the flexibility of the LinguisticBelief tool to automate a custom model developed by others. LinguisticBelief evaluates combinations of linguistic variables using an approximate reasoning rule base. Each variable is comprised of fuzzy sets, and a rule base describes the reasoning on combinations of variables fuzzy sets. Uncertainty is considered and propagated through the rule base using the belief/plausibility measure. This report documents the evaluation and rank-ordering of several example terrorist scenarios for the existing process implemented in our software. LinguisticBelief captures and propagates uncertainty and allows easy development of an expanded, more detailed evaluation, neither of which is feasible using a manual evaluation process. In conclusion, the Linguistic-Belief tool is able to (1) automate an expert-generated reasoning process for the evaluation of the risk of terrorist scenarios, including uncertainty, and (2) quickly evaluate and rank-order scenarios of concern using that process.

  11. Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Roy E; Ooi, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer to determine how to incorporate traditional knowledge into the gathering of baseline information, preparing impact prediction, and planning mitigation and monitoring. Traditional knowledge is defined as the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and/or local communities developed from experience gained over the centuries and adapted to local culture and environment. The mining company was asked to consider in its EIA: health, demographics, social and cultural patterns; services and infrastructure; local, regional and territorial economy; land and resource use; employment, education and training; government; and other matters. Cooperative efforts between government, industry and the community led to a project that coordinated the concerns of all interested stakeholders and the needs of present and future generations, thereby meeting the goals of sustainable development. The mitigation measures that were implemented take into account: income and social status, social support networks, education, employment and working conditions, physical environments, personal health practices and coping skills, and health services.

  12. Radiation transport Part B: Applications with examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutler, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    In the previous sections Len Lorence has described the need, theory, and types of radiation codes that can be applied to model the results of radiation effects tests or working environments for electronics. For the rest of this segment, the author will concentrate on the specific ways the codes can be used to predict device response or analyze radiation test results. Regardless of whether one is predicting responses in a working or test environment, the procedures are virtually the same. The same can be said for the use of 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional codes and Monte Carlo or discrete ordinates codes. No attempt is made to instruct the student on the specifics of the code. For example, the author will not discuss the details, such as the number of meshes, energy groups, etc. that are appropriate for a discrete ordinates code. For the sake of simplicity, he will restrict himself to the 1-dimensional code CEPXS/ONELD. This code along with a wide variety of other radiation codes can be obtained form the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) for a nominal handling fee.

  13. Residentialization of Public Spaces: Bratislava Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacová, Andrea; Puškár, Branislav; Vráblová, Edita

    2017-10-01

    The housing estates in Bratislava saturated the housing needs of a large number of inhabitants who come after World War II to the city. Design of public spaces often did not have priority in the process of designing. The solutions for mentioned exterior spaces had been planned after blocks of flat realization, but many of them are not realized to this day. The article analyzes the example of the unrealized public spaces in existing housing estates Devinska Nova Ves and Petržalka (city districts of Bratislava) and offer practical solutions in relation to residencialization method. Residencialization of missing public places is an effective method of adding identities to settlements. It improves the quality of residential environment and public spaces. The main aim is to create better conditions for social activities in public areas, which are missing on the present. The research will be focused on the examination of the urban, cultural and construction potential of the existing residential enviroment in Bratislava. The main aim of residentialization is not only to enhance the quality of spatial and building structures in the selected residential area and maintain long-term sustainability in the pertinent programme area, but mainly to improve the quality of living for the residents. The outputs of the project are proposals and practical procedures developed with regard to planning documents for local municipal authorities and regional organizations. The solutions will have a positive impact on the enhancement of the quality of public spaces, attractive social activities and of a conceptual link – residentialization.

  14. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE: PREVIOUS WORK AND EXAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill; William Charlton; Robert Bean

    2008-07-01

    The future expansion of nuclear power will require not just electricity production but fuel cycle facilities such as fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. As large reprocessing facilities are built in various states, they must be built and operated in a manner to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation. Process monitoring has returned to the spotlight as an added measure that can increase confidence in the safeguards of special nuclear material (SNM). Process monitoring can be demonstrated to lengthen the allowable inventory period by reducing accountancy requirements, and to reduce the false positive indications. The next logical step is the creation of a Safeguards Envelope, a set of operational parameters and models to maximize anomaly detection and inventory period by process monitoring while minimizing operator impact and false positive rates. A brief example of a rudimentary Safeguards Envelope is presented, and shown to detect synthetic diversions overlaying a measured processing plant data set. This demonstration Safeguards Envelope is shown to increase the confidence that no SNM has been diverted with minimal operator impact, even though it is based on an information sparse environment. While the foundation on which a full Safeguards Envelope can be built has been presented in historical demonstrations of process monitoring, several requirements remain yet unfulfilled. Future work will require reprocessing plant transient models, inclusion of “non-traditional” operating data, and exploration of new methods of identifying subtle events in transient processes.

  15. Querying Data Providing Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Sabesan, Manivasakan

    2010-01-01

    Web services are often used for search computing where data is retrieved from servers providing information of different kinds. Such data providing web services return a set of objects for a given set of parameters without any side effects. There is need to enable general and scalable search capabilities of data from data providing web services, which is the topic of this Thesis. The Web Service MEDiator (WSMED) system automatically provides relational views of any data providing web service ...

  16. UML modelling of network warfare examples

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Service Provider Lock doors and gates Install locks Install fencing Protect against fires ICT Infrastructure Security Guard Check ID cards Monitor premises Figure 2. Use Case Collaboration Diagram for Physical Security It was identified... and that the premises are protected against fire and power disruptions. At a structural level, the building service provider will address issues relating to the installation of fencing and locks. At an operational level, the security guard will be on duty to lock...

  17. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, Debra L; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W; Waitzman, Norman J; Magill, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is key to the successful implementation of major improvement strategies. Transformation to a patient-centered medical home (PCHM) is such an improvement strategy, requiring a shift from provider-centric care to team-based care. Because this shift may impact provider satisfaction, it is important to understand the relationship between provider satisfaction and organizational culture, specifically in the context of practices that have transformed to a PCMH model. This was a cross-sectional study of surveys conducted in 2011 among providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (mean, 4.14; scale of 1-5) and interactions with patients (mean, 4.12) and were least satisfied with time spent working (mean, 3.47), paperwork (mean, 3.45), and compensation (mean, 3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics, with family/clan and hierarchical cultures the most common. Significant correlations (P ≤ .05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included family/clan culture negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial culture positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational culture positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical culture negatively correlated with the Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended.

  18. Data for the elaboration of the CIPROS checklist with items for a patient registry software system: Examples and explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Lindoerfer

    2017-10-01

    The data presented per checklist item provide the relevant textual information (examples and a first qualitative summary (explanation. The examples and explanations provide the background information on CIPROS. They elucidate how to implement the checklist items in other projects. The literature list and the selected texts serve as a reference for scientists and system developers.

  19. Preclinical Models Provide Scientific Justification and Translational Relevance for Moving Novel Therapeutics into Clinical Trials for Pediatric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, David M; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Dyer, Michael A

    2015-12-15

    Despite improvements in survival rates for children with cancer since the 1960s, progress for many pediatric malignancies has slowed over the past two decades. With the recent advances in our understanding of the genomic landscape of pediatric cancer, there is now enthusiasm for individualized cancer therapy based on genomic profiling of patients' tumors. However, several obstacles to effective personalized cancer therapy remain. For example, relatively little data from prospective clinical trials demonstrate the selective efficacy of molecular-targeted therapeutics based on somatic mutations in the patient's tumor. In this commentary, we discuss recent advances in preclinical testing for pediatric cancer and provide recommendations for providing scientific justification and translational relevance for novel therapeutic combinations for childhood cancer. Establishing rigorous criteria for defining and validating druggable mutations will be essential for the success of ongoing and future clinical genomic trials for pediatric malignancies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Wind profiler installed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.; Carey, J.; Woodman, R. F.; Sarango, M.; Urbina, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ragaini, E.

    A VHF (50 MHz) wind profiler was installed in Antarctica at the Peruvian Base “Machu Picchu” on King George Island from January 21 to 26. The wind profiler will provide a first look at atmospheric dynamics over the region.The profiler—the first of its kind in Antarctica—is a National Science Foundationsponsored cooperative project of the University of Colorado, the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the University of Piura (Peru), and the Peruvian Navy. This venture was also greatly facilitated by Peru's Comision Nacional de Asuntos Antartidos and Consejo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologia, with additional logis tics support provided by the Argentinean Navy and the Uruguayan Air Force.

  1. Composite Measures of Health Care Provider Performance: A Description of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Michael; Restuccia, Joseph D; Rosen, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Context Since the Institute of Medicine’s 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm, there has been a rapid proliferation of quality measures used in quality-monitoring, provider-profiling, and pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Although individual performance measures are useful for identifying specific processes and outcomes for improvement and tracking progress, they do not easily provide an accessible overview of performance. Composite measures aggregate individual performance measures into a summary score. By reducing the amount of data that must be processed, they facilitate (1) benchmarking of an organization’s performance, encouraging quality improvement initiatives to match performance against high-performing organizations, and (2) profiling and P4P programs based on an organization’s overall performance. Methods We describe different approaches to creating composite measures, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and provide examples of their use. Findings The major issues in creating composite measures are (1) whether to aggregate measures at the patient level through all-or-none approaches or the facility level, using one of the several possible weighting schemes; (2) when combining measures on different scales, how to rescale measures (using z scores, range percentages, ranks, or 5-star categorizations); and (3) whether to use shrinkage estimators, which increase precision by smoothing rates from smaller facilities but also decrease transparency. Conclusions Because provider rankings and rewards under P4P programs may be sensitive to both context and the data, careful analysis is warranted before deciding to implement a particular method. A better understanding of both when and where to use composite measures and the incentives created by composite measures are likely to be important areas of research as the use of composite measures grows. PMID:26626986

  2. Medical rationing: the implicit result of Leadership by Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has released the latest publication in its campaign to curtail medical error: Leadership by Example: Coordinating Government Roles in Improving Health Care Quality. In this publication, the IOM recommends that the government utilize its position as the country's largest purchaser of healthcare to institute unified performance standards, create appropriate incentives to improve quality of care, and develop a system to disseminate provider-specific quality information to the public. The author examines these recommendations and the contents of IOM's prior publications and concludes that necessary predicates of IOM's vision are rationing of care and a two-tiered system of healthcare. Thus, if the IOM's recommendations are carried out, the author envisions a healthcare system in which truly state-of-the-art care can only be purchased out of pocket. He concludes that, although Leadership by Example is a rational plan to address escalating healthcare costs, it is unclear both whether the American public would support it if the IOM were explicit about its ultimate impact, and whether the recommendations, in the long run, will prove to be a good thing.

  3. Hinduism and death with dignity: historic and contemporary case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Rajan; Cahners, Nancy; Mitchell, Christine; Forrow, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 1.2 to 2.3 million Hindus live in the United States. End-of-life care choices for a subset of these patients may be driven by religious beliefs. In this article, we present Hindu beliefs that could strongly influence a devout person's decisions about medical care, including end-of-life care. We provide four case examples (one sacred epic, one historical example, and two cases from current practice) that illustrate Hindu notions surrounding pain and suffering at the end of life. Chief among those is the principle of karma, through which one reaps the benefits and penalties for past deeds. Deference to one's spouse or family is another important Hindu value, especially among Hindu women, which can impact the decision-making process and challenge the Western emphasis on autonomy. In addition, the Hindu embrace of astrology can lead to a desire to control the exact time of death. Confounding any generalizations, a Hindu patient may reject or accept treatments based on the individual patient's or family's interpretation of any given tradition. Through an awareness of some of the fundamental practices in Hinduism and the role of individual interpretation within the tradition, clinicians will be better able to support their Hindu patients and families at the end of life. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  4. Choosing a primary care provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Choosing a primary care provider URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001939.htm Choosing a primary care provider To ...

  5. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  6. Geographic profiling and animal foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Comber, Steven C; Nicholls, Barry; Rossmo, D Kim; Racey, Paul A

    2006-05-21

    Geographic profiling was originally developed as a statistical tool for use in criminal cases, particularly those involving serial killers and rapists. It is designed to help police forces prioritize lists of suspects by using the location of crime scenes to identify the areas in which the criminal is most likely to live. Two important concepts are the buffer zone (criminals are less likely to commit crimes in the immediate vicinity of their home) and distance decay (criminals commit fewer crimes as the distance from their home increases). In this study, we show how the techniques of geographic profiling may be applied to animal data, using as an example foraging patterns in two sympatric colonies of pipistrelle bats, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus, in the northeast of Scotland. We show that if model variables are fitted to known roost locations, these variables may be used as numerical descriptors of foraging patterns. We go on to show that these variables can be used to differentiate patterns of foraging in these two species.

  7. Women and economic development: Igbo women example ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some countries like America, China, Germany and so on, the development of their economy is the major area of importance over other sectors of life. They ensured that their citizens are provided with food and other economic materials that will help to improve and sustain life. Here in Nigeria, is it so? What should be done ...

  8. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Hannes; Meyer, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    We present an immersive virtual reality (VR) application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths…

  9. YOUNG ATHLETES' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Moreno Murcia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between motivational characteristics and dispositional flow. In order to accomplish this goal, motivational profiles emerging from key constructs within Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory were related to the dispositional flow measures. A sample of 413 young athletes (Age range 12 to 16 years completed the PMCSQ-2, POSQ, SMS and DFS measures. Cluster analysis results revealed three profiles: a "self-determined profile" characterised by higher scores on the task-involving climate perception and on the task orientation; a "non-self-determined profile", characterised by higher scores on ego-involving climate perception and ego orientation; and a "low self-determined and low non-self-determined profile" which had the lowest dispositional flow. No meaningful differences were found between the "self-determined profile" and the "non-self-determined profile" in dispositional flow. The "self-determined profile" was more commonly associated with females, athletes practising individual sports and those training more than three days a week. The "non-self-determined profile" was more customary of males and athletes practising team sports as well as those training just two or three days a week

  10. From Concrete Examples to Abstract Relations: The Rostrolateral Prefrontal Cortex Integrates Novel Examples into Relational Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tyler; Goldwater, Micah; Giron, Josue

    2017-04-01

    The ability to form relational categories for objects that share few features in common is a hallmark of human cognition. For example, anything that can play a preventative role, from a boulder to poverty, can be a "barrier." However, neurobiological research has focused solely on how people acquire categories defined by features. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study examines how relational and feature-based category learning compare in well-matched learning tasks. Using a computational model-based approach, we observed a cluster in left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (rlPFC) that tracked quantitative predictions for the representational distance between test and training examples during relational categorization. Contrastingly, medial and dorsal PFC exhibited graded activation that tracked decision evidence during both feature-based and relational categorization. The results suggest that rlPFC computes an alignment signal that is critical for integrating novel examples during relational categorization whereas other PFC regions support more general decision functions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Effectively working with challenging clients who receive hunger service assistance: Case examples and eight recommended guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E. Moore

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Those who provide services for people who experience food insecurity come into contact with people who do not always present themselves courteously and favorably. Using case examples from the food bank industry, the authors of this paper will: (1 discuss why people sometimes behave discourteously when seeking assistance from human services professionals; (2 give case examples of how social workers could properly respond to these situations and, (3 give recommendations for effectively working with this client population.

  12. EXAMINATION OF ETHICAL PROCUREMENT THROUGH ENTERPRISE EXAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beáta Sz. G. Pató

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s business world is affected by the 21st century’s processes, like globalization, fluent online attendance, digitalization and their direct consequence depersonalisation. The authors are motivated by these facts and want to vivify the „old fashioned” correct business models and find the indispensable parameter of the well-functioning economy, in one word today’s equivalent of „honorable gentlemen”. The assumed key to success could be useful for the for-profit sector because not only profit can be the impelling in the professional life of a corporation. The human value added is one of the most important keystones of thrift. The aim to establish a balance between economic and ethical behaviour of corporations has been enounced serving the interest of all participants, consumers, corporations and society. The before natural thought values seem nowadays to turn into something different or to be neglected. As a consequence the question has been raised, if society has the force to establish and improve Ethics, will it be able to destroy it as well?! The main focus of the research is therefore the mapping of criteria and marks which belong to on the competitive market successful enterprises whose procurement decisions are ethical as well. These marks can be formal or informal. The results of the research show well that there are parameters of a company, for example, a code of conduct within guidelines concerning the procurement or procedure manuals in which also ethical issues appear in a formal way. From another point of view there are informal signs like customs arising from the corporate culture, daily routine or just human behaviour and convincement of the management and procurement employees that also support the ethical performance of the company. The results of the research can serve as best practice for the other enterprises too in their daily appearance on the market. Particularly in that area the company’s most important

  13. Contingency management: perspectives of Australian service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jacqui; Ritter, Alison

    2007-03-01

    Given the very positive and extensive research evidence demonstrating efficacy and effectiveness of contingency management, it is important that Australia explore whether contingency management has a role to play in our own treatment context. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 experienced alcohol and drug practitioners, service managers and policy-makers in Victoria. Interviewees were selected to represent the range of drug treatment services types and included rural representation. A semi-structured interview schedule, covering their perceptions and practices of contingency management was used. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using N2 qualitative data analysis program. The majority of key informants were positively inclined toward contingency management, notwithstanding some concerns about the philosophical underpinnings. Concerns were raised in relation to the use of monetary rewards. Examples of the use of contingency management provided by key informants demonstrated an over-inclusive definition: all the examples did not adhere to the key principles of contingency management. This may create problems if a structured contingency management were to be introduced in Australia. Contingency management is an important adjunctive treatment intervention and its use in Australia has the potential to enhance treatment outcomes. No unmanageable barriers were identified in this study.

  14. Antibody profiling with protein antigen microarrays in early stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brian C-S; Dijohnson, Daniel A; O'Rourke, Dennis J

    2012-05-01

    Proteins not present in normal cells, that is, cancer cells, may elicit a host immune response that leads to the generation of antibodies that might react with these tumor-associated proteins. In recent years, a growing number of reports have showed that autoantibody profiling may provide an alternative approach for the detection of cancer. However, most studies of antigen-autoantibody reactivity have relied on recombinant proteins. Recombinant proteins lack the proper post-translational modifications present in native proteins. Because of this limitation, native or natural protein antigen microarrays are gaining popularity for profiling antibody responses. i) To illustrate some examples of autoantibodies as signatures for early stage cancer; ii) to briefly outline the various protein antigen microarray platforms; iii) to illustrate the use of native or natural protein microarrays in the discovery of potential biomarkers and iv) to discuss the advantages of native protein antigen microarrays over other approaches. The nature of protein microarray platforms is conducive to multiplexing, which amplifies the potential for uncovering effective biomarkers for many significant diseases. However, the major challenge will be in integrating microarray platforms into multiplexed clinical diagnostic tools, as the main drawback is the reproducibility and coefficient of variation of the results from array to array, and the transportability of the array platform to a more automatable platform.

  15. An Object-Oriented Approach for Analyzing CALIPSO's Profile Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The CALIPSO satellite mission is a pioneering international partnership between NASA and the French Space Agency, CNES. Since launch on 28 April 2006, CALIPSO has been acquiring near-continuous lidar profile observations of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. Many studies have profitably used these observations to advance our understanding of climate, weather and air quality. For the most part, however, these studies have considered CALIPSO profile measurements independent from one another and have not related each to neighboring or family observations within a cloud element or aerosol feature. In this presentation we describe an alternative approach that groups measurements into objects visually identified from CALIPSO browse images. The approach makes use of the Visualization of CALIPSO (VOCAL) software tool that enables a user to outline a region of interest and save coordinates into a database. The selected features or objects can then be analyzed to explore spatial correlations over the feature's domain and construct bulk statistical properties for each structure. This presentation will show examples that examine cirrus and dust layers and will describe how this object-oriented approach can provide added insight into physical processes beyond conventional statistical treatments. It will further show results with combined measurements from other A-Train sensors to highlight advantages of viewing features in this manner.

  16. Renewable Energy Country Profiles. Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    IRENA Renewable Energy Country Profiles take stock of the latest developments in the field of renewables at country level around the world. Each profile combines analysis by IRENA's specialists with the latest available country data and additional information from a wide array of sources. The resulting reports provide a brief yet comprehensive picture of the situation with regard to renewable energy, including energy supply, electrical generation and grid capacity, and access. Energy policies, targets and projects are also considered, along with each country's investment climate and endowment with renewable energy resources. The energy statistics presented here span the period from 2009 until 2012, reflecting varying timelines in the source material. Since data availability differs from country to country, wider regional comparisons are possible only for the latest year with figures available for every country included. Despite the time lag in some cases, the evident differences and disparities between countries and regions around the world remain striking. The current package of country profiles is just a starting point. The geographic scope will continue to expand, and existing profiles will be enhanced with new indicators, with the whole series maintained as a live product on the IRENA website (www.irena.org)

  17. Data synthesis in community health assessment: practical examples from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Paul Campbell; Knight, Margaret; Graham, Jennifer; Kalos, Alan V; Kent, Louise A; Glenn, Michael; Rayman, Rebecca J; Read, Erin; Welch, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    State and local health departments (LHDs) are increasingly conducting community health assessments, using models such as Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships. Within the peer-reviewed literature, relevant Web sites, and textbooks on health planning, there is limited practical guidance for bridging data collection and prioritization. The purpose of this article was to provide examples of how LHDs have bridged these steps through "data synthesis." We provide examples from 3 LHDs that have extensive experience with the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships model. The LHDs provide a detailed synopsis of data synthesis activities, including the setting, participants, processes, and outcomes. Commonalities between the LHDs' processes emerged, including daylong (or more) retreats, multiple nominal group-like techniques, and iterative approaches to reduce the number of strategic issues. These processes provide examples of data synthesis and are relevant to current practice, given the national voluntary accreditation process and the new nonprofit hospital requirements to conduct community health assessments.

  18. "Thinking is a Thing: Hegel's use of Examples"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Benjamin

    What is the act of giving an example? What kind of thinking is done when a concept is exemplified? What if examples not only deliver less, but also sometimes more, than what their concepts promised? What if there in this way is a certain materiality of the example, a certain “excess of stuff” con...... climax of classical philosophy, namely in Hegel’s use of examples, especially in his masterpiece The Phenomenology of Spirit....

  19. Providing for the Future: Providers' Views on Apprenticeship Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrone, Tami; Sims, David; Gladding, Cath

    2016-01-01

    Apprenticeships are currently undergoing reform in England. Funding mechanisms and the content of Apprenticeship programmes are being restructured. NFER and the Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP) have carried out a joint research project to inform future policy and practice with evidence on how providers of Apprenticeships are…

  20. Human impact on Karst: the example of Lusaka (Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Waele Jo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lusaka, the capital of Zambia with over 2,000,000 inhabitants, is built on an extensive plateau composed mainly of schists and dolomitic marbles, constituting a very important aquifer that provides the city with almost half of its drinking water needs. Recent demographic growth, leading to uncontrolled urban expansion, and mismanagement of the water resource and of urban waste has lead, in the past 20 years, to an overexploitation of the aquifer and to a generalised water quality depletion, putting in serious danger the future social and economical development of the capital. This third world city has, for these reasons, become a terrifying example of human impact on a vulnerable karst environment, and if no measures will be taken in the very near future, quality of life in the city will be at serious risk.

  1. Solubility-driven lead optimisation: Recent examples and personal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nadia M

    2016-07-01

    Solubility is recognised as one of the most important physicochemical parameters necessary for a successful clinical candidate. Despite that, there are few articles in the medicinal chemistry literature with a specific focus on solubility-driven optimisation of lead compounds. This could be because the importance of measuring solubilities as part of the optimisation process is relatively underappreciated, or the fact that obtaining sufficient high quality solubility data is difficult. This review gives examples of solubility-driven optimisation programs from the last fifteen years, and explores recent developments in solubility measurement techniques. Quantitative NMR methods are highlighted; these offer the potential to provide high quality solubility measurements in a cost-effective and high-throughput manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hospital Based Health Technology Assessment: an example from Siena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Manzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Health Technology Assessment (HTA has emerged in recent years as a useful tool in healthcare decision-making. It is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology and provides evidence-based information on how to allocate resources. The experience of Siena University Hospital is an example of multidisciplinary hospital-based HTA. In the present paper we summarize the organization of HTA commission and the assessment methodology of the purchase, rental or sale of medical equipment and medical devices. Furthermore we illustrate the data concerning the commission activities in 2013.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v16i1.943

  3. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    OpenAIRE

    Hannes Kaufmann; Bernd Meyer

    2009-01-01

    We present an immersive virtual reality (VR) application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths and other properties of objects before, during and after experiments. Innovative teaching content is presented thatexploits the strengths of the 3D...

  4. New insights about the evaluation of human sperm quality: the aromatase example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male contribution to the couple's infertility is at first evaluated by the routine examination of semen parameters upon optical microscopy providing valuable information for a rational initial diagnosis and for a clinical management of infertility. But the different forms of infertility defined according to the WHO criteria especially teratozoospermia are not always related to the chromatin structure or to the fertilization capacity. New investigations at the molecular level (transcript and protein could be developed in order to understand the nature of sperm malformation responsible of human infertility and thus to evaluate the sperm quality. The profile analysis of spermatozoal transcripts could be considered as a fingerprint of the past spermatogenic events. The selection of representative transcripts of normal spermatozoa remains complex because a differential expression (increased, decreased or not modified levels of specific transcripts has been revealed between immotile and motile sperm fractions issued from normozoospermic donors. Microarrays tests or real-time quantitative PCR could be helpful for the identification of factors involved in the male infertility. Differences in the expression of specific transcripts have been reported between normal and abnormal semen samples. With the aromatase example, we have noted a negative strong correlation between the amount of transcript and the percentage of abnormal forms especially in presence of head defects. Immunocytochemical procedures using fluorescent probes associated with either confocal microscopy or flow cytometry can be also helpful to proceed with further investigations about the localization of proteins in the compartmentalized spermatozoa or the acrosome reaction. The dual location of aromatase both in the equatorial segment, the mid-piece and the tail could explain the double role of this enzyme in acrosome reaction and motility.

  5. Example book; Miro V3.0: fiche de cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnat, Ph.; Treimany, C.; Gouedard, C.; Morice, O

    1998-06-01

    This document presents some examples which were used for debugging the code. It seemed useful to write these examples onto a book to be sure the code would not regret; to give warranties for the code`s functionality; to propose some examples to illustrate the possibilities and the limits of Miro. (author) 26 refs.

  6. A Qualitative Research on Example Generation Capabilities of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Yasemin; Dost, Senol

    2016-01-01

    Examples which are used in exploring a procedure or comprehending/concretizing a mathematical concept are powerful teaching tools. Generating examples other than conventional ones is both a means for research and a pedagogical method. The aim of this study is to determine the transition process between example generation strategies, and the…

  7. The Atmospheric River Observatory: an example of a meteorological application of real-time GNSS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, S. I.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (AR's) are long narrow bands of moisture that transport energy in the form of latent heat poleward from the Equatorial Warm Pool. AR's are usually confined to the warm sector of extratropical cyclones which form along the leading edge of cold fronts, and are sometimes referred to as the "Warm Conveyor Belt," a term coined by Browning (1990) and Carlson (1991). A well-known example of a strong AR event that occasionally hits the west coast of the U.S. is the "Pineapple Express." These storms are so-named because of their apparent origin in the tropics near Hawaii. Observational studies of atmospheric rivers prior to landfall made using in situ aircraft and remote sensing satellite observations indicate that AR's are usually characterized by warm air temperatures, large water vapor content, and strong winds at low altitudes (Ralph et al., 2004, 2005). The importance of AR's and AR-like features is underscored by the fact that they are responsible for about 90% of the total meridional water vapor transport at mid latitudes on the planet. The impact of AR's are felt on landfall. Not all ARs cause damage - most are weak, and simply provide beneficial rain or snow that is crucial to local and regional water supplies. Those that contain the largest amounts of water vapor, the strongest winds, and stall over watersheds vulnerable to flooding can create extreme rainfall and floods. These events commonly disrupt travel, induce mud slides, and cause catastrophic damage to life and property. The challenges to operational meteorologists are to accurately identify those events that are most likely to cause catastrophic damage with as much lead-time as possible, and provide decision makers and the public with accurate and timely information as these storms evolve. There are several aspects to this, including observations, data assimilation, analysis, prediction and verification. GNSS observations provide critical and heretofore unavailable information about the

  8. Interpreting Repeated Temperature-Depth Profiles for Groundwater Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, Victor F.; Kurylyk, Barret L.; van Daal, Jonathan; van der Ploeg, Martine J.; Carey, Sean K.

    2017-10-01

    Temperature can be used to trace groundwater flows due to thermal disturbances of subsurface advection. Prior hydrogeological studies that have used temperature-depth profiles to estimate vertical groundwater fluxes have either ignored the influence of climate change by employing steady-state analytical solutions or applied transient techniques to study temperature-depth profiles recorded at only a single point in time. Transient analyses of a single profile are predicated on the accurate determination of an unknown profile at some time in the past to form the initial condition. In this study, we use both analytical solutions and a numerical model to demonstrate that boreholes with temperature-depth profiles recorded at multiple times can be analyzed to either overcome the uncertainty associated with estimating unknown initial conditions or to form an additional check for the profile fitting. We further illustrate that the common approach of assuming a linear initial temperature-depth profile can result in significant errors for groundwater flux estimates. Profiles obtained from a borehole in the Veluwe area, Netherlands in both 1978 and 2016 are analyzed for an illustrative example. Since many temperature-depth profiles were collected in the late 1970s and 1980s, these previously profiled boreholes represent a significant and underexploited opportunity to obtain repeat measurements that can be used for similar analyses at other sites around the world.

  9. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  10. Criminal Psychological Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-18

    landmark report became known to the general population. Dr. Langer’s profile broke new ground. While the practice of psychoanalysis was not new, this marked...school or college dropout. Suspect is probably suffering from one or more forms of paranoid psychosis .6 Perpetrator: Based on this profile, the police

  11. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scale-Compton profile is directly related to the momentum distribution of the electrons. The spectral analysis ... proximation, the Compton profile J(q) is the projection of the target's electron momentum distribution, n(p) ... densed matter and serves as a reliable test of the accuracy of the calculated wave functions. Such basic ...

  12. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...

  13. Chemical profiling of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, G.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop analytical methods for the chemical profiling of explosives. Current methodologies for the forensic analysis of explosives focus on identification of the explosive material. However, chemical profiling of explosives becomes increasingly important, as

  14. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  15. Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem: example of planning choice in transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Tao; Young, Rhonda

    2010-05-01

    Transportation programming, a process of selecting projects for funding given budget and other constraints, is becoming more complex as a result of new federal laws, local planning regulations, and increased public involvement. This article describes the use of an integer programming tool, Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem (MCKP), to provide optimal solutions to transportation programming problems in cases where alternative versions of projects are under consideration. In this paper, optimization methods for use in the transportation programming process are compared and then the process of building and solving the optimization problems is discussed. The concepts about the use of MCKP are presented and a real-world transportation programming example at various budget levels is provided. This article illustrates how the use of MCKP addresses the modern complexities and provides timely solutions in transportation programming practice. While the article uses transportation programming as a case study, MCKP can be useful in other fields where a similar decision among a subset of the alternatives is required. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of inter-provider conflicts among healthcare providers

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Mona; Epstein, Nancy; Mark M Stecker; Ausman, James I.; Harrigan, Noyes

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is a top priority of healthcare organizations. The Joint Commission (TJC) is now requiring that healthcare organizations promulgate polices to investigate and resolve disruptive behavior among employees. Methods: Our aims in this investigation utilizing the Provider Conflict Questionnaire (PCQ: Appendix A) included; determining what conflicts exist among a large sample of healthcare providers, how to assess the extent and frequency of disruptive behaviors, and what ...

  17. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  18. Adaptive Sensing Based on Profiles for Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a profile-based sensing framework for adaptive sensor systems based on models that relate possibly heterogeneous sensor data and profiles generated by the models to detect events. With these concepts, three phases for building the sensor systems are extracted from two examples: a combustion control sensor system for an automobile engine, and a sensor system for home security. The three phases are: modeling, profiling, and managing trade-offs. Designing and building a sensor system involves mapping the signals to a model to achieve a given mission.

  19. A Profile for Safety Critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new, minimal specification for real-time Java for safety critical applications. The intention is to provide a profile that supports programming of applications that can be validated against safety critical standards such as DO-178B [15]. The proposed profile is in line with the Java...... specification request JSR-302: Safety Critical Java Technology, which is still under discussion. In contrast to the current direction of the expert group for the JSR-302 we do not subset the rather complex Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). Nevertheless, our profile can be implemented on top of an RTSJ...

  20. Physics and mathematical tools methods and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Alastuey, Angel; Magro, Marc; Pujol, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods and tools which are useful for physicists and engineers: response functions, Kramers-Kronig relations, Green's functions, saddle point approximation. The derivations emphasize the underlying physical arguments and interpretations without any loss of rigor. General introductions describe the main features of the methods, while connections and analogies between a priori different problems are discussed. They are completed by detailed applications in many topics including electromagnetism, hydrodynamics, statistical physics, quantum mechanics, etc. Exercises are also proposed, and their solutions are sketched. A self-contained reading of the book is favored by avoiding too technical derivations, and by providing a short presentation of important tools in the appendices. It is addressed to undergraduate and graduate students in physics, but it can also be used by teachers, researchers and engineers.

  1. Smoke-free nurses: leading by example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Kathleen A

    2005-05-01

    Occupational health nurses' scope of practice includes health promotion and restoration of health from environmental hazards (American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, n.d.). Because the nursing profession is the largest constituent of health care providers, it is essential that occupational health nurses tackle the smoking epidemic among the nursing profession. By encouraging smoking cessation among nurses, occupational health nurses reduce the environmental hazard of second-hand smoke and improve the health of nurses who smoke. When occupational health nurses take an active role in encouraging smoking cessation among nurses, they become leaders in reducing smoking within their communities. Members of the nursing profession are also role models. Occupational health nurses must help nurses become healthy role models and credible educators in the battle against smoking.

  2. A step toward universal competency profiler

    OpenAIRE

    Avsec, Stanislav; Kaučič, Branko; Ramšak, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Last decade, the competences, competency and competency profiling have been recognized as the core information and process to provide basics for implementation of efficient interchangeable widely recognized education and worldwide employment. Competences are components of a job which are reflected in behaviour that are observable in a workplace. A list of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform a job well is determined as competency profile. Types of skills li...

  3. Geotechnical Parameters from Seismic Measurements: Two Field Examples from Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Mohamed H.

    2016-03-18

    © 2016 EEGS. Geotechnical parameters were used to determine subsurface rock quality for construction purposes. We summarize the mathematical relationships used to calculate the geotechnical parameters from P- and S-wave velocities and density values. These relationships are applied to two field examples; the first is a regional seismic study in Egypt and the second is a 2-D seismic profile recorded in Saudi Arabia. Results from both field examples are used to determine the subsurface rock quality and locate zones that should be avoided during construction. We suggest combining all geotechnical parameters into one map using a normalized-weighted relation, which helps to locate the zones with high versus low rock quality for engineering purposes.

  4. Coordination of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, D L; McAlister, W H

    1988-02-01

    Surveys were sent to family physicians in Illinois to determine knowledge and attitude concerning optometry. The respondents were knowledgeable in certain aspects of optometry. However, many need to become more aware of the optometrist as a health care provider.

  5. Medicare Referring Provider DMEPOS PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset, which is part of CMSs Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, details information on Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and...

  6. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  7. EAMJ Provider April 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-04

    Apr 4, 2010 ... with breast cancer is known to result in more adverse outcomes (1). ... Objective: To determine the extent and nature of provider delay in breast cancer management at .... and calls for a review of booking procedures. Also.

  8. TERRAIN, PROVIDENCE COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Providence AOI consists of the costal portion of the county, and meshes up seamlessly with the Kent county AOI directly south. Ground Control is collected...

  9. Lodging Update: Providence, Rhode Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragel Roginsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Each quarter, Pinnacle Advisory Group prepares an analysis of the New England lodging industry, which provides a regional summary and then focuses in depth on a particular market. These reviews look at recent and proposed supply changes, factors affecting demand and growth rates, and the effects of interactions between such supply and demand trends. In this issue, the authors spotlight the lodging market in Providence, Rhode Island.

  10. Overview of urban growth simulation: With examples of results from three SA cities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Waldeck, L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available and floor space for business. They maximise profit through same return on investment calculation as real- world developers Businesses Jobs serve as proxy for businesses Examples of typical output © IPDM 2010 13 14 15 UrbanSim tracks profile... – Busy comparing simulated growth between 2001 and 2011 with ‘actual’ growth in households from census at sub place geography – Problem: Sub place (SP) boundaries changed substantially – Problem: SPs in outlying areas too big for useful comparisons...

  11. AN EXAMPLE - BASED, DIAGNOSTIC INVESTIGATION OF VALUE CREATION AND VALUE DESTRUCTION BY CORPORATE ACTIVISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABURICI Matei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates, through an example-based scenario, the extent to which corporate activists create or destroy shareholder value; there are five high-profile campaigns analyzed related to four major players. The foundation of the analysis is a variant of DCF model which examines the cash flows to equity. In 4 out of 5 cases the financial metrics are computed in order to assess the performance of the subject company ex-ante and ex-post activists’ involvement.

  12. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer.

  13. Ecohydrological modeling in agroecosystems: Examples and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, A.; Feng, X.; Manzoni, S.; Mau, Y.; Parolari, A. J.; Vico, G.

    2015-07-01

    Human societies are increasingly altering the water and biogeochemical cycles to both improve ecosystem productivity and reduce risks associated with the unpredictable variability of climatic drivers. These alterations, however, often cause large negative environmental consequences, raising the question as to how societies can ensure a sustainable use of natural resources for the future. Here we discuss how ecohydrological modeling may address these broad questions with special attention to agroecosystems. The challenges related to modeling the two-way interaction between society and environment are illustrated by means of a dynamical model in which soil and water quality supports the growth of human society but is also degraded by excessive pressure, leading to critical transitions and sustained societal growth-collapse cycles. We then focus on the coupled dynamics of soil water and solutes (nutrients or contaminants), emphasizing the modeling challenges, presented by the strong nonlinearities in the soil and plant system and the unpredictable hydroclimatic forcing, that need to be overcome to quantitatively analyze problems of soil water sustainability in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. We discuss applications of this framework to problems of irrigation, soil salinization, and fertilization and emphasize how optimal solutions for large-scale, long-term planning of soil and water resources in agroecosystems under uncertainty could be provided by methods from stochastic control, informed by physically and mathematically sound descriptions of ecohydrological and biogeochemical interactions.

  14. Blogs in education. A practical example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fernández Chamorro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the currently changing educational scenario, there are three kinds of education, traditional or merely face-to-face teaching, virtual education and b-learning education, and are attempts to provide an answer to the need of using information and communication technologies (ICT in all areas of education and across different levels. In order to do so, assorted methodologies, tools and resources are introduced so as to obtain higher levels of motivation and better academic results. The application of on-line or virtual methodologies in the traditional classroom-based teaching will allow students to become more autonomous and flexible in their study. In this way, the diversity of students is addressed. Teacher and students' roles are also changed. On the one hand, teachers are no longer mere transmitters of knowledge and now become learning facilitators. On the other hand, students become active participants of their own learning process. Blogs are a learning tool and resource within this educational proposal.

  15. Example comparison of minimum miscibility pressure correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzwi, A. [Department of Mineral Resources and Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Leoben (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using gas injection, in particular CO{sub 2}, is one of the most discussed miscible processes in Libya. Many of the giant and super-giant oil fields are becoming mature, and although the recovery factors from primary and secondary recoveries can be as high as sixty percent, the remaining quantities are billions of stock tank barrels of oil. One of the major challenges hindering such projects is the availability of injection CO{sub 2}. Recently after lifting the American sanctions, the country opened to foreign companies for exploration and production investments. Besides oil and gas discoveries, some discoveries of high CO{sub 2} concentrations favoured EOR using CO{sub 2} flooding. This article provides preliminary work and a review of experimental and empirical methods and correlations for predicting CO{sub 2} minimum miscibility pressure, MMP. Using the available slim-tube experiments and conventional fluid analysis, MMP was predicted using eight correlations, and the results were compared to the slim-tube measured MMP, and the deviation was reported as an absolute average error, AAE (%). A Peng-Robinson Equation of State, Pre-EOS, model was set up and calibrated using a subsurface fluid sample. This article will be followed up with a compositional simulation study to investigate flow problems during CO{sub 2} injection in one of the Libyan clastic reservoirs. (orig.)

  16. Monitoring/Verification using DMS: TATP Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle, Manuel Manard

    2008-05-30

    Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operations-management systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a “smart dust” sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the illegal use of explosives or chemical and biological materials. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for field separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. Fast GC is the leading field analytical method for gas phase separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Low-thermal-mass GC columns have led to compact, low-power field systems capable of complete analyses in 15–300 seconds. A collaborative effort optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for peroxide-based explosive measurements.

  17. Monitoring/Verification Using DMS: TATP Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kyle; Stephan Weeks

    2008-03-01

    Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operationsmanagement systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a “smart dust” sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the illegal use of explosives or chemical and biological materials. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for field separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. GC is the leading analytical method for the separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Low-thermal-mass GC columns have led to compact, low-power field systems capable of complete analyses in 15–300 seconds. A collaborative effort optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for peroxide-based explosive measurements.

  18. Profiling the Mobile Customer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille Wegener; King, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mobile customers are increasingly being tracked and profiled by behavioural advertisers to enhance delivery of personalized advertising. This type of profiling relies on automated processes that mine databases containing personally-identifying or anonymous consumer data, and it raises a host...... of significant concerns about privacy and data protection. This second article in a two part series on "Profiling the Mobile Customer" explores how to best protect consumers' privacy and personal data through available mechanisms that include industry self-regulation, privacy-enhancing technologies...

  19. Negative example selection for protein function prediction: the NoGO database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Youngs

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Negative examples - genes that are known not to carry out a given protein function - are rarely recorded in genome and proteome annotation databases, such as the Gene Ontology database. Negative examples are required, however, for several of the most powerful machine learning methods for integrative protein function prediction. Most protein function prediction efforts have relied on a variety of heuristics for the choice of negative examples. Determining the accuracy of methods for negative example prediction is itself a non-trivial task, given that the Open World Assumption as applied to gene annotations rules out many traditional validation metrics. We present a rigorous comparison of these heuristics, utilizing a temporal holdout, and a novel evaluation strategy for negative examples. We add to this comparison several algorithms adapted from Positive-Unlabeled learning scenarios in text-classification, which are the current state of the art methods for generating negative examples in low-density annotation contexts. Lastly, we present two novel algorithms of our own construction, one based on empirical conditional probability, and the other using topic modeling applied to genes and annotations. We demonstrate that our algorithms achieve significantly fewer incorrect negative example predictions than the current state of the art, using multiple benchmarks covering multiple organisms. Our methods may be applied to generate negative examples for any type of method that deals with protein function, and to this end we provide a database of negative examples in several well-studied organisms, for general use (The NoGO database, available at: bonneaulab.bio.nyu.edu/nogo.html.

  20. Negative example selection for protein function prediction: the NoGO database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Noah; Penfold-Brown, Duncan; Bonneau, Richard; Shasha, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    Negative examples - genes that are known not to carry out a given protein function - are rarely recorded in genome and proteome annotation databases, such as the Gene Ontology database. Negative examples are required, however, for several of the most powerful machine learning methods for integrative protein function prediction. Most protein function prediction efforts have relied on a variety of heuristics for the choice of negative examples. Determining the accuracy of methods for negative example prediction is itself a non-trivial task, given that the Open World Assumption as applied to gene annotations rules out many traditional validation metrics. We present a rigorous comparison of these heuristics, utilizing a temporal holdout, and a novel evaluation strategy for negative examples. We add to this comparison several algorithms adapted from Positive-Unlabeled learning scenarios in text-classification, which are the current state of the art methods for generating negative examples in low-density annotation contexts. Lastly, we present two novel algorithms of our own construction, one based on empirical conditional probability, and the other using topic modeling applied to genes and annotations. We demonstrate that our algorithms achieve significantly fewer incorrect negative example predictions than the current state of the art, using multiple benchmarks covering multiple organisms. Our methods may be applied to generate negative examples for any type of method that deals with protein function, and to this end we provide a database of negative examples in several well-studied organisms, for general use (The NoGO database, available at: bonneaulab.bio.nyu.edu/nogo.html).

  1. Electronics Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers the occupation of electronics technician. Section 1 provides the occupation definition. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes--abbreviations for grade level, (by the end of grade 12, by the end of associate degree), academic codes (communications, math, or…

  2. Signatures of dynamical processes in Raman lidar profiles of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Hallen, Hans D.

    2017-05-01

    Raman lidar measurements provide profiles of several different tracers of spatial and temporal variations, which are excellent signatures for studies of dynamical processes in the atmosphere. An examination of Raman lidar data collected during the last four decades clearly show signatures of atmospheric planetary waves, gravity waves, low-level jets, weather fronts, turbulence from wind shear at surfaces and at the interface of the boundary layer with the free troposphere. Water vapor profiles are found to be important as a tracer of the sources of turbulence eddies associated with thermal convection, pressure waves, and wind shears, which result from surface heating, winds, weather systems, orographic forcing, and regions of reduced atmospheric stability. Examples of these processes are selected to show the influence of turbulence on profiles of atmospheric properties. Turbulence eddies generated in the wind shear region near the top of the boundary layer are found to mix into the atmospheric boundary layer. Results from several prior research projects are examined to gain a better understanding of processes impacting optical propagation through the many sources of turbulence observed in the lower atmosphere. Advances in lasers, detectors, and particularly in high-speed electronics now available are expected to provide important opportunities to improve our understanding of the formation processes, as well as for tracking of the sources and dissipation of turbulence eddies.

  3. Monitoring/Verification using DMS: TATP Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Weeks; Kevin Kyle

    2008-03-01

    Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operations management systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a 'smart dust' sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the use of explosives or chemical and biological weapons in terrorist activities. Two peroxide-based liquid explosives, triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), are synthesized from common chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide, acetone, sulfuric acid, ammonia, and citric acid (Figure 1). Recipes can be readily found on the Internet by anyone seeking to generate sufficient quantities of these highly explosive chemicals to cause considerable collateral damage. Detection of TATP and HMTD by advanced sensing systems can provide the early warning necessary to prevent terror plots from coming to fruition. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for the separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. DMS separates and identifies ions at ambient pressures by utilizing the non-linear dependence of an ion's mobility on the radio frequency (rf) electric field strength. GC is widely considered to be one of the leading analytical methods for the separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Advances in the technique have led to the development of low-thermal-mass fast GC columns. These columns are

  4. Hearing colors: An example of Brain Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARANTXA eALFARO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory substitution devices are providing new ways for improving or replacing sensory abilities that have been lost due to disease or injury, and at the same time offer unprecedented opportunities to address how the nervous system could lead to an augmentation of its capacities. In this work we have evaluated a color-blind subject using a new visual-to-auditory sensory substitution device (SSD device called Eyeborg, that allows colors to be perceived as sounds. We used a combination of neuroimaging techniques including Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI and proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS to study potential brain plasticity in this subject. Our results suggest that after 8 years of continuous use of this device there could be significant adaptive and compensatory changes within the brain. In particular, we found changes in functional neural patterns, structural connectivity and cortical topography at the visual and auditive cortex of the Eyeborg user in comparison with a control population. Although at the moment we cannot claim that the continuous use of the Eyeborg is the only reason for these findings, our results may shed further light on potential brain changes associated with the use of other SSDs. This could help to better understand how the brain adapts to several pathologies and uncover adaptive resources such as cross-modal representations. We expect that the precise understanding of these changes will have clear implications for rehabilitative training, device development and for more efficient programs for people with disabilities.

  5. An example of woman scientist in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, A.

    2002-12-01

    Although the presence of women in sciences has been increasing in the past few decades in Europe, it remains incredibly low at the top levels. Recent statistics from the European Commission indicate that now women represent 50 per cent of first degree students in many countries. However, the proportion of women at each stage of the scientific career decreases almost linearly, reaching less than 10 per cent at the highest level jobs. From my own experience, I don't think that this results from sexism nor discrimination. Rather, I think that this is a result of complex cultural factors making women subconsciously persuaded that top level jobs are destined to male scientists only. Many women scientists drop the idea of playing a role at high-level research, considering it is a way of exerting power (a matter reserved to men). Others give up the possibility of combining childcare and high level commitments in research. And too many (married women) still find only natural to sacrifice their own scientific ambitions to the benefit of their spouse's career. In this poster, I briefly present my personal experience. I chose to prioritize scientific productivity and expertise versus hierarchical responsibilities. Besides I tried to keep a satisfactory balance between family demand and research involvement. This was indeed facilitated by the French system, which provides substantial support to women's work (nurseries, recreation centers during school holidays, etc.). To my point of view, the most promising way of increasing the number of women at top levels in research is through education and mentality evolution

  6. Paleomagnetic dating: Methods, MATLAB software, example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatyshin, Danny; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.

    2014-09-01

    A MATLAB software tool has been developed to provide an easy to use graphical interface for the plotting and interpretation of paleomagnetic data. The tool takes either paleomagnetic directions or paleopoles and compares them to a user defined apparent polar wander path or secular variation curve to determine the age of a paleomagnetic sample. Ages can be determined in two ways, either by translating the data onto the reference curve, or by rotating it about a set location (e.g. sampling location). The results are then compiled in data tables which can be exported as an excel file. This data can also be plotted using variety of built-in stereographic projections, which can then be exported as an image file. This software was used to date the giant Sukhoi Log gold deposit in Russia. Sukhoi Log has undergone a complicated history of faulting, folding, metamorphism, and is the vicinity of many granitic bodies. Paleomagnetic analysis of Sukhoi Log allowed for the timing of large scale thermal or chemical events to be determined. Paleomagnetic analysis from gold mineralized black shales was used to define the natural remanent magnetization recorded at Sukhoi Log. The obtained paleomagnetic direction from thermal demagnetization produced a paleopole at 61.3°N, 155.9°E, with the semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of the 95% confidence ellipse being 16.6° and 15.9° respectively. This paleopole is compared to the Siberian apparent polar wander path (APWP) by translating the paleopole to the nearest location on the APWP. This produced an age of 255.2- 31.0+ 32.0Ma and is the youngest well defined age known for Sukhoi Log. We propose that this is the last major stage of activity at Sukhoi Log, and likely had a role in determining the present day state of mineralization seen at the deposit.

  7. Zen of cloud learning cloud computing by examples on Microsoft Azure

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Haishi

    2014-01-01

    Zen of Cloud: Learning Cloud Computing by Examples on Microsoft Azure provides comprehensive coverage of the essential theories behind cloud computing and the Windows Azure cloud platform. Sharing the author's insights gained while working at Microsoft's headquarters, it presents nearly 70 end-to-end examples with step-by-step guidance on implementing typical cloud-based scenarios.The book is organized into four sections: cloud service fundamentals, cloud solutions, devices and cloud, and system integration and project management. Each chapter contains detailed exercises that provide readers w

  8. Examples of sports-based youth development programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Richard A; Dworkin, Aaron; Eames, Ned; Menconi, Arn; Perkins, Daniel F

    2007-01-01

    The authors provide examples of sports-based youth development programs and offer information about program mission and vision, program design and content, evaluation results, and program sustainability. The four sports-based youth development programs presented are Harlem RBI, Tenacity, Snowsports Outreach Society, and Hoops & Leaders Basketball Camp. These programs serve diverse audiences with diverse missions, but all are focused on using sports to develop life skills and facilitate learning. Harlem RBI serves boys and girls ages seven to eighteen living in East Harlem. The program combines baseball, academic, and enrichment programs with the overall goal that participants who enter the program as vulnerable children graduate as resilient young adults. Tenacity, a nonprofit organization with headquarters in Boston, uses tennis to attract and retain students who particiate in a high-quality academic support and physical fitness program. The mission of Snowsports Outreach Society, based in Vail, Colorado, is building character in at-risk and underprivileged youth to develop their decision-making ability for healthy and successful life experiences. Hoops & Leaders Basketball Camp is a youth mentoring and leadership development program that offers summer camp experiences to improve the lives of at-risk urban youth in New York City. It uses the game of basketball to provide youth with caring mentors, develop leadership skills, and offer exposure to different educational and career paths.

  9. Transient heat transfer in longitudinal fins of various profiles with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The literature in this area is immense (see, for example, [1] and references cited therein). Perhaps such interest has been instilled by frequent ... (2) and initially the fin is kept at the temperature of the fluid (the ambient temperature),. T(0, X) = Ta. The schematic representation of a fin with arbitrary profile is given in figure 1.

  10. Using the Degree Qualifications Profile to Foster Meaningful Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Giffin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Examples from the field indicates that effectively using the Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) can benefit both students and institutions (Jankowski & Giffin, 2016). But what does "effective use" entail and how does it unfold? That is, what is the nature of the process that makes it possible for institutions to use the DQP to…

  11. Haematological profile in salt loaded experimental rabbits treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological profile in salt loaded experimental rabbits treated with ethanol extract of Acalypha wilkesiana leaves. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how ...

  12. Ancillary Services Provided from DER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.B.

    2005-12-21

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation. They are effective at starting and then producing full-load power within a few seconds. The distribution system is aging and transmission system development has not kept up with the growth in load and generation. The nation's transmission system is stressed with heavy power flows over long distances, and many areas are experiencing problems in providing the power quality needed to satisfy customers. Thus, a new market for DER is beginning to emerge. DER can alleviate the burden on the distribution system by providing ancillary services while providing a cost adjustment for the DER owner. This report describes 10 types of ancillary services that distributed generation (DG) can provide to the distribution system. Of these 10 services the feasibility, control strategy, effectiveness, and cost benefits are all analyzed as in the context of a future utility-power market. In this market, services will be provided at a local level that will benefit the customer, the distribution utility, and the transmission company.

  13. HMMEditor: a visual editing tool for profile hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jianlin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM is a powerful statistical model to represent a family of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. Profile HMM has been widely used in bioinformatics research such as sequence alignment, gene structure prediction, motif identification, protein structure prediction, and biological database search. However, few comprehensive, visual editing tools for profile HMM are publicly available. Results We develop a visual editor for profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMEditor. HMMEditor can visualize the profile HMM architecture, transition probabilities, and emission probabilities. Moreover, it provides functions to edit and save HMM and parameters. Furthermore, HMMEditor allows users to align a sequence against the profile HMM and to visualize the corresponding Viterbi path. Conclusion HMMEditor provides a set of unique functions to visualize and edit a profile HMM. It is a useful tool for biological sequence analysis and modeling. Both HMMEditor software and web service are freely available.

  14. Fishing Community Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To enable fisheries managers to comply with National Standard 8 (NS8), NMFS social scientists around the nation are preparing fishing community profiles that present...

  15. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  16. Prescription Drug Profiles PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Prescription Drug Profiles Public Use Files (PUFs) drawn from Medicare prescription drug claims for the year of the date on which the...

  17. Fire Management Species Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the Fire Management Species Profile project is to identify habitat management objectives that are specific, measurable, achievable, clearly...

  18. Beach Profile Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Beaches are commonly characterized by cross-shore surveys. The resulting profiles represent the elevation of the beach surface and nearshore seabed from the back of...

  19. Enstore with Chimera namespace provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvintsev, Dmitry [Fermilab; Moibenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Oleynik, Gene [Fermilab; Zalokar, Michael [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Enstore is a mass storage system developed by Fermilab that provides distributed access and management of data stored on tapes. It uses a namespace service, PNFS, developed by DESY to provide a filesystem-like view of the stored data. PNFS is a legacy product and is being replaced by a new implementation, called Chimera, which is also developed by DESY. Chimera offers multiple advantages over PNFS in terms of performance and functionality. The Enstore client component, encp, has been modified to work with Chimera, as well as with any other namespace provider. We performed high load end-to-end acceptance test of Enstore with the Chimera namespace. This paper describes the modifications to Enstore, the test procedure and the results of the acceptance testing.

  20. Household electricity demand profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Larsen, Olena Kalyanova

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A 1-min resolution household electricity load model is presented. •Model adapts a bottom-up approach with single appliance as the main building block. •Load profiles are used to analyse the flexibility potential of household appliances. •Load profiles can be applied in other domains, e.......g. building energy simulations. •The demand level of houses with different number of occupants is well captured....

  1. Providing Real Research Opoportunities to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    The current approach to undergraduate education focuses on teaching classes which provide the foundational knowledge for more applied experiences such as scientific research. Like most programs, Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech or FIT) strongly encourages undergraduate research, but is dominated by content-focused courses (e.g., "Physical Mechanics"). Research-like experiences are generally offered through "lab" classes, but these are almost always reproductions of past experiments: contrived, formulaic, and lacking the "heart" of real (i.e., potentially publishable) scientific research. Real research opportunities 1) provide students with realistic insight into the actual scientific process; 2) excite students far more than end-of-chapter problems; 3) provide context for the importance of learning math, physics, and astrophysics concepts; and 4) allow unique research progress for well-chosen problems. I have provided real research opportunities as an "Exoplanet Lab" component of my Introduction to Space Science (SPS1020) class at Florida Tech, generally taken by first-year majors in our Physics, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrobiology degree programs. These labs are a hybrid between citizen science (e.g., PlanetHunters) and simultaneously mentoring ~60 undergraduates in similar small research projects. These projects focus on problems that can be understood in the context of the course, but which benefit from "crowdsourcing". Examples include: dividing up the known planetary systems and developing a classification scheme and organizing them into populations (Fall 2013); searching through folded light curves to discover new exoplanets missed by previous pipelines (Fall 2014); and fitting n-body models to all exoplanets with known Transit Timing Variations to estimate planet masses (Fall 2015). The students love the fact that they are doing real potentially publishable research: not many undergraduates can claim to have discovered

  2. Unsupervised learning in neurodynamics using example-interaction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    1989-01-01

    A new concept for unsupervised learning based upon examples introduced to the neural network is proposed. Each example is considered as an interpolation node of the velocity field in the phase space. The velocities at these nodes are selected such that all the streamlines diverge to an attracting set imbedded in the subspace occupied by the cluster of examples. The synaptic interconnections are found from the minimization of the strength energy, while the node velocities play the role of constraints.

  3. Providing Southern Perspectives on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Søren; Kothuis, Bas

    The article seeks to contribute to the SMEs and CSR literature in developing countries by providing; a) a ‘Southern’ SME perspective, which includes the voices of managers and workers, b) a perspective of CSR, which opens up to informal CSR practices that SMEs undertake, and c) an analysis...

  4. Wind Turbine Providing Grid Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A variable speed wind turbine is arranged to provide additional electrical power to counteract non-periodic disturbances in an electrical grid. A controller monitors events indicating a need to increase the electrical output power from the wind turbine to the electrical grid. The controller...

  5. Narratives of Ghanaian abortion providers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Michigan, Department of Women's Studies, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 7University of Michigan, Department of Obstetrics and. Gynaecology, Ann Arbor, MI USA ..... personal spending habits of physicians who were known to provide abortion – a new ..... characterized by safe space for speaking can improve physician's resilience to ...

  6. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Origins of the physical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2013-08-01

    This article examines how the U.S. Army came to adopt the physical profile. In 1945, the Army adopted the physical profile system that has, with some changes, survived to this day. Although the profile system does not always work smoothly, it replaced a system that was failing completely to deliver physically fit men to combat units. The World War II problems were the outgrowth of two World War I systems that had been adopted to speed mobilization by (1) accepting physically substandard men and (2) matching men to a noncombat job by their skills. By simply identifying a soldier as "General Service" or "Limited Service" it did not provide enough information about his limitations. In addition, the Army used an intelligence test to grade manpower, but because it lacked information on a man's physical abilities/limitations, that data were misused to allot manpower. These policies interacted with a societal disdain for the "handicapped" and "substandard" and made it hard to use Limited Service men. Adding detail to the information on physical abilities was the Army's solution. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Záveská Drábková

    Full Text Available Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom.Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid were found with respect to the phylogeny.The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution.

  9. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Dobrev, Petre I; Motyka, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom. Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales) were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid) were found with respect to the phylogeny. The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution.

  10. Free Sugar Profile in Cycads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Edward Marler

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sugars fructose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose were quantified in seven tissues of Zamia muricata Willd. to determine their distribution throughout various organs of a model cycad species, and in lateral structural roots of 18 cycad species to determine the variation in sugar concentration and composition among species representing every cycad genus. Taproot and lateral structural roots contained more sugars than leaf, stem, female strobilus, or coralloid roots. For example, taproot sugar concentration was 6.4-fold greater than stem sugar concentration. The dominant root sugars were glucose and fructose, and the only detected stem sugar was sucrose. Sucrose also dominated the sugar profile for leaflet and coralloid root tissue, and fructose was the dominant sugar in female strobilus tissue. Maltose was a minor constituent of taproot, leaflet, and female strobilus tissue, but absent in other tissues. The concentration of total free sugars and each of the four sugars did not differ among genera or families. Stoichiometric relationships among the sugars, such as the quotient hexoses/disaccharides, differed among organs and families. Although anecdotal reports on cycad starch have been abundant due to its historical use as human food and the voluminous medical research invested into cycad neurotoxins, this is the first report on the sugar component of the non-structural carbohydrate profile of cycads. Fructose, glucose, and sucrose are abundant in cycad tissues, with their relative abundance highly contrasting among organs. Their importance as forms of carbon storage, messengers of information, or regulators of cycad metabolism have not been determined to date.

  11. Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler for Fluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method, first developed in medical engineering, is now widely used in clinical settings. The fluid mechanical basis of UVP was established in investigations by the author and his colleagues with work demonstrating that UVP is a powerful new tool in experimental fluid mechanics. There are diverse examples, ranging from problems in fundamental fluid dynamics to applied problems in mechanical, chemical, nuclear, and environmental engineering. In all these problems, the methodological principle in fluid mechanics was converted from point measurements to spatio-temporal measurements along a line. This book is the first monograph on UVP that offers comprehensive information about the method, its principles, its practice, and applied examples, and which serves both current and new users. Current users can confirm that their application configurations are correct, which will help them to improve the configurations so as to make them more efficient and effective. New users will be...

  12. Flavor release measurement by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, construction of interface and mathematical modeling of release profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Madsen, Henrik; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    and the method can be used to measure breath from the nose. A mathematical model of the data was developed to give a quantitative method for description and characterization of the release of flavor compounds. The release profiles consisted of two sequences, one for a chewing period, and one for a phasing out...... process. The proposed method for modeling provided a reasonable description of the release process. In addition to flavor compounds, this new interface and mathematical application could provide information on chemicals in the human breath which could be interesting, for example, within medical diagnosis....

  13. Developing Terrestrial Trophic Models for Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration and Production Sites: The Oklahoma Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, M; Coty, J; Stewart, J; Carlsen, T; Callaham, M

    2001-01-26

    This document details procedures to be used when constructing a conceptual terrestrial trophic model for natural gas and oil exploration and production sites. A site conceptual trophic model is intended for use in evaluating ecological impacts of oil and brine releases at E&P sites from a landscape or ecosystem perspective. The terrestrial trophic model protocol was developed using an example site, the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (TPP) in Oklahoma. The procedure focuses on developing a terrestrial trophic model using information found in the primary literature, and augmented using site-specific research where available. Although the TPP has been the subject of considerable research and public interest since the high-profile reintroduction of bison (Bison bison) in 1993, little formal work has been done to develop a food web for the plant and animal communities found at the preserve. We describe how to divide species into guilds using explicit criteria on the basis of resource use and spatial distribution. For the TPP, sixteen guilds were developed for use in the trophic model, and the relationships among these guilds were analyzed. A brief discussion of the results of this model is provided, along with considerations for its use and areas for further study.

  14. OGC Web Services standards by example : the European Seismic Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobert, L.; Kamb, L.; Trani, L.; Spinuso, A.; Bossu, R.; Van Eck, T.

    2011-12-01

    NERIES (2006-2010) was an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3) project in the Sixth Framework Program (FP6) of the European Commission (EC), aiming at networking the European seismic networks, improving access to data, allowing access to specific seismic infrastructures and pursuing targeted research developing the next generation of tools for improved service and data analysis. During this project, a web portal was developed using web services to access data and a Visual Web Applications to display them. However these web services were not conform to any standard, making them difficult to consume by any new user interface. Therefore, for the NERA project, the follow-up of NERIES, we have proposed the use of web services standards to access our data. We have decided to use standards defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The OGC defines standards for the Web service interfaces to access geo-tagged data. The events and seismic stations are also geo-tagged making these web services suitable for our purpose. Using standard web services gives us the opportunity to distribute our data across all conformant consumers to these standards through various programming languages and applications We have implemented a preliminary version of web services conforming to the Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) standard to access our catalog of seismic events (nearly 200 000 events). To visualize them we have made four examples demo on our web site using different technologies (Adobe Flash, JavaScript, Java with Nasa World Wind and UDig a desktop GIS application). In the future we hope to implement other OGC Web services standard like : - Sensor Observation Service (SOS) to provide seismic waveform records; - Web Notification Service (WNS); - Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) to provide a search engine of all our web services; - Web Processing Service (WPS) to process data between different services. The power of the use of OGC standards is the easy

  15. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bayesian methods for the physical sciences learning from examples in astronomy and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Andreon, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Statistical literacy is critical for the modern researcher in Physics and Astronomy. This book empowers researchers in these disciplines by providing the tools they will need to analyze their own data. Chapters in this book provide a statistical base from which to approach new problems, including numerical advice and a profusion of examples. The examples are engaging analyses of real-world problems taken from modern astronomical research. The examples are intended to be starting points for readers as they learn to approach their own data and research questions. Acknowledging that scientific progress now hinges on the availability of data and the possibility to improve previous analyses, data and code are distributed throughout the book. The JAGS symbolic language used throughout the book makes it easy to perform Bayesian analysis and is particularly valuable as readers may use it in a myriad of scenarios through slight modifications.

  17. Enhancing Learning in Statistics Classes Through The Use of Concrete Historical Examples: The Space Shuttle Challenger, Pearl Harbor, and the RMS Titanic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Walter R.; Webb, Farrell J.; Castelo, Carlos S.; Akagi, Cynthia G.; Jensen, Erick J.; Ditto, Rose M.; Spencer Carver, Elaine; Brown, Beverlyn F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of historical events as examples for teaching college level statistics courses. Focuses on examples of the space shuttle Challenger, Pearl Harbor (Hawaii), and the RMS Titanic. Finds real life examples can bridge a link to short term experiential learning and provide a means for long term understanding of statistics. (KDR)

  18. Effects of a chemical plant on surface water, illustrated by the example of the chemical plant at Berlin-Adlershof/Gruenau. Vol.3 in the series: Site profiles of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons - cause-oriented monitoring in aquatic media; Auswirkungen eines Chemiestandortes auf umliegende Gewaesser dargestellt am Beispiel der chemischen Fabrik in Berlin-Adlershof/Gruenau. Bd. 3 der Reihe: Standortprofile persistenter chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2002-06-01

    Primary data which were obtained on the basis of official surveys by the Senatsverwaltung fuer Stadtentwicklung/Fischereiamt des Landes Berlin for sDDT ({sigma} DDT, DDE, DDD, DDMU), sHCH ({sigma}{alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, {delta}-, {epsilon}-HCH), sPCB ({sigma} Cong. 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) and HCB in surface water, surface sediment, suspended matter, breams (Abramis brama) and eels (Anguilla anguilla) a cause-oriented monitoring was elaborated concerning the load of waters of Berlin for the period 1983-2000. The structuring of the data consolidated statistically was made according to longitudinal profiles (Teltowkanal from the entrance to the Griebnitzsee, Spree-Oder-System from Seddinsee via Ober-, Stadt- and Unterspree to the mouth into the Havel in Spandau, the Havel from Niederneuendorfer See till Suedliche Unterhavel, the lakes in Grunewald till the city area in Charlottenburg, the lakes in the north of Berlin) as well as time series. The chemical enterprise in Adlershof/Gruenau which produced DDT containing preparations till 1985 and lindane containing preparations till 1989 was identified as the outstanding source of sDDT and sHCH loads. (orig.) [German] Auf der Basis amtlicher Erhebungen durch die Senatsverwaltung fuer Stadtentwicklung/Fischereiamt des Landes Berlin gewonnene Primaerdaten von sDDT ({sigma} DDT, DDE, DDD, DDMU), sHCH ({sigma}{alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, {delta}-, {epsilon}-HCH), sPCB ({sigma} Kong. 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) und HCB in Oberflaechenwasser, Oberflaechensediment, Schwebstoffen, Brassen/Bleien (Abramis brama) und Aalen (Anguilla anguilla) wurde ein ursachenorientiertes Monitoring ueber die Belastung Berliner Gewaesser erarbeitet, das den Zeitraum von 1983-2000 umfasst. Die Strukturierung der statistisch aufgearbeiteten Werte erfolgte einmal nach Laengsprofilen (Teltowkanal von der Einfahrt bis zum Griebnitzsee, Spree-Oder-System vom Seddinsee ueber die Ober-, Stadt- und Unterspree bis zur Muendung in die Havel in

  19. Preparing to provide MTM services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Zandra M; Mahdavian, Soheyla L; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Medication Therapy Management (MTM) has been a way for pharmacist to enhance their position as an integral member of the health care team as the need for improved clinical and economic outcomes in relation to the US health care system became apparent. MTM Certificate training programs are provided by numerous organizations. Collaboration Practice Agreements (CPA) are gaining significance as the role of the pharmacist is expanding in the care of patients as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. One major hurdle that many pharmacists are faced with is receiving reimbursement for the services provided. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 recognized that pharmacists play an important role in the management of patient care and that pharmacists bring an expertise and knowledge that will help to identify and resolve patient medication therapy problems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Support Net for Frontline Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With a multidisciplinary team that included an external evaluator (Dr. Robert Durham), and an extended research team (Drs. Alan Peterson and Bret...21.7%) indicated being single. The sample of providers included 13 clinical psychologists (21.7%), 17 counselors or psychotherapists (28.3%), three...a sample of service members from Iraq and Afghanistan. Military Medicine, 172, 359–363. Figley, C. R. (2002). Compassion fatigue: Psychotherapists

  1. Thermodynamic Profiles of the Destructive June 2012 Derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Novakovskaia, E.; Bosse, J.; Ware, R.; Stillman, D.; Sloop, C.; Blanchette, L.; Demoz, B.; Nelson, M.; Cooper, L.; Czarnetzki, A.; Reehorst, A.

    2012-12-01

    The June 2012 mid-Atlantic and Midwest Derecho was one of the most destructive and deadly fast-moving severe thunderstorm events in North American history. The derecho produced wind gusts approaching 100 miles per hour as it traveled more than 600 miles across large sections of the Midwestern United States, the central Appalachians and the Mid-Atlantic States on the afternoon and evening of June 29, 2012 and into the early morning of June 30, 2012. It produced hurricane-like impacts with little warning, resulting in more than 20 deaths, widespread damage and millions of power outages across the entire affected region. We present continuous temperature and moisture profiles observed by microwave radiometers, and derived forecast indices, along the storm path at locations in Iowa, Ohio and Maryland, providing unique perspective on the evolution of this historic storm. For example, an extreme CAPE value of 5,000 J/kg was derived from radiometer observations at Germantown, Maryland ten hours before storm passage, and 80 knot Wind Index (WINDEX) was derived seven hours before passage. The Germantown radiometer is operated as part of the Earth Networks Boundary Layer Network (BLN) for continuous thermodynamic monitoring of the planetary boundary layer up to 30,000 feet. The BLN uses Radiometrics microwave profilers providing continuous temperature and humidity soundings with radiosonde-equivalent observation accuracy, and unique liquid soundings. This case study illustrates the promise for severe storm forecast improvement based on continuous monitoring of temperature and moisture in the boundary layer and above.

  2. A UML profile for framework modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Wang, Le-yu; Zhou, Hong

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendability adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  3. PUMAS: The On-line journal of Math and Science Examples for Pre-College Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2015-11-01

    PUMAS - “Practical Uses of Math And Science” - is an on-line collection of brief examples showing how math and science topics taught in K-12 classes can be used in interesting settings, including every day life. The examples are written primarily by scientists, engineers, and other content experts having practical experience with the material. They are aimed mainly at classroom teachers to enrich their presentation of math and science topics. The goal of PUMAS is to capture, for the benefit of pre-college education, the flavor of the vast experience that working scientists have with interesting and practical uses of math and science. There are currently over 80 examples in the PUMAS collection, and they are organized by curriculum topics and tagged with relevant grade levels and curriculum topic benchmarks. The published examples cover a wide range of subject matter: from demonstrating why summer is hot, to describing the fluid dynamics of a lava lamp, to calculating the best age to collect Social Security Benefits. The examples are available to all interested parties via the PUMAS web site: http://pumas.nasa.gov/.We invite the community to participate in the PUMAS collection. We seek scientists and scientific thinkers to provide innovative examples of practical uses for teachers to use to enrich the classroom experience, and content experts to participate in peer-review. We also seek teachers to review examples for originality, accuracy of content, clarity of presentation, and grade-level appropriateness. Finally, we encourage teachers to mine this rich repository for real-world examples to demonstrate the value of math in science in everyday life.

  4. Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Book cover Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia. Directeur(s) : Ronnie Vernooy. Maison(s) d'édition : Cambridge University Press India, IDRC. 1 décembre 2010. ISBN :.

  5. Can Using Human Examples Facilitate Learning Mendelian Genetics Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports an experimental study of 80 ninth grade biology students randomly assigned to treatment and control groups to determine whether the use of human examples in instructional strategies on Mendelian genetics increases acquisition and retention of genetics concepts. Results indicate that use of human examples in contrast to traditional examples…

  6. Translation: an example from ancient Chinese to modern Chinese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X; Hoede, C.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we gave an idea of translation by means of knowledge graph theory from ancient Chinese to modern Chinese, by using an example story. Actually, we give the details of the method of translation from ancient Chinese to modern Chinese step by step as carried out by hand. From the example,

  7. Leading by Example: The Case of Leader OCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Tal; Kark, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    The importance of leading by personal example or role modeling for effective leadership has been recognized in many leadership theories. However, leaders' ability to influence group behavior through exemplary behavior has received little attention in empirical work. This study explores leading by example through theoretical development and…

  8. Building a data warehouse with examples in SQL server

    CERN Document Server

    Rainardi, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    ""Building a Data Warehouse: With Examples in SQL Server"" describes how to build a data warehouse completely from scratch and shows practical examples on how to do it. Author Rainardi also describes some practical issues that developers are likely to encounter in their first data warehousing project, along with solutions and advice.

  9. Child-Specific Exposure Scenarios Examples (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Child-Specific Exposure Scenarios Examples. This report is intended to be a companion document to the Exposure Factors Handbook (U.S. EPA 2011). The example scenarios were compiled from questions and inquiries r...

  10. Illustrative Examples in a Bilingual Decoding Dictionary: An (Un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    whose purpose is to supplement dictionary equivalent(s) in the grammatical, lexical, semantic and contextual senses. Apart from ... well as grammatical changes in the translation of examples demand not only a high level of knowl- edge of both ... example by Arab lexicographers since the 8th century or by Greek and Latin.

  11. R statistical application development by example : beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tattar, Narayanachart Prabhanjan

    2013-01-01

    Full of screenshots and examples, this Beginner's Guide by Example will teach you practically everything you need to know about R statistical application development from scratch. You will begin learning the first concepts of statistics in R which is vital in this fast paced era and it is also a bargain as you do not need to do a preliminary course on the subject.

  12. Adaptive tracking control of nonholonomic systems: an example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefeber, A.A.J.; Nijmeijer, Henk

    1999-01-01

    We study an example of an adaptive (state) tracking control problem for a four-wheel mobile robot, as it is an illustrative example of the general adaptive state-feedback tracking control problem. It turns out that formulating the adaptive state-feedback tracking control problem is not

  13. Toward an Instructionally Oriented Theory of Example-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Learning from examples is a very effective means of initial cognitive skill acquisition. There is an enormous body of research on the specifics of this learning method. This article presents an instructionally oriented theory of example-based learning that integrates theoretical assumptions and findings from three research areas: learning from…

  14. Providing Southern Perspectives on CSR

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, Søren; Kothuis, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The article seeks to contribute to the SMEs and CSR literature in developing countries by providing; a) a ‘Southern’ SME perspective, which includes the voices of managers and workers, b) a perspective of CSR, which opens up to informal CSR practices that SMEs undertake, and c) an analysis of the key institutional issues affecting the CSR practices of SMEs. It presents perceptions of CSR practices among 21 SMEs in the garment industry in South Africa, based on 40 interviews with managers and ...

  15. Sponge exhalent seawater contains a unique chemical profile of dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L. Fiore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are efficient filter feeders, removing significant portions of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM, DOM from the water column. While the assimilation and respiration of POM and DOM by sponges and their abundant microbial symbiont communities have received much attention, there is virtually no information on the impact of sponge holobiont metabolism on the composition of DOM at a molecular-level. We applied untargeted and targeted metabolomics techniques to characterize DOM in seawater samples prior to entering the sponge (inhalant reef water, in samples exiting the sponge (exhalent seawater, and in samples collected just outside the reef area (off reef seawater. Samples were collected from two sponge species, Ircinia campana and Spheciospongia vesparium, on a near-shore hard bottom reef in the Florida Keys. Metabolic profiles generated from untargeted metabolomics analysis indicated that many more compounds were enhanced in the exhalent samples than in the inhalant samples. Targeted metabolomics analysis revealed differences in diversity and concentration of metabolites between exhalent and off reef seawater. For example, most of the nucleosides were enriched in the exhalent seawater, while the aromatic amino acids, caffeine and the nucleoside xanthosine were elevated in the off reef water samples. Although the metabolic profile of the exhalent seawater was unique, the impact of sponge metabolism on the overall reef DOM profile was spatially limited in our study. There were also no significant differences in the metabolic profiles of exhalent water between the two sponge species, potentially indicating that there is a characteristic DOM profile in the exhalent seawater of Caribbean sponges. Additional work is needed to determine whether the impact of sponge DOM is greater in habitats with higher sponge cover and diversity. This work provides the first insight into the molecular-level impact of sponge holobiont metabolism on

  16. Community-scale solar photovoltaics: housing and public development examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komoto, K.

    2008-03-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 10 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at community-scale photovoltaics. The mission of the Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme is to enhance the international collaboration efforts which accelerate the development and deployment of photovoltaic solar energy. The aim of Task 10 is stated as being to enhance the opportunities for wide-scale, solution-oriented application of photovoltaics in the urban environment. This report provides examples of housing developments and incorporated townships that have integrated multiple stakeholder values into business solutions. The authors are of the opinion that builders, developers, architects and engineers need to consider orientation, aesthetics, load diversity, energy efficiency, grid infrastructure and end use. Residential and commercial building owners or occupants need to consider the design of electric services relative to loads, green image, and economic opportunities such as feed-in tariffs. Local government should give preference to granting permission to high-performance building projects. It is suggested that the finance and insurance sector consider the operational savings in overall debt allowances. System manufacturers and integrators should develop standardised systems. In the emerging PV community market, utilities are quickly gaining awareness of business opportunities. The need for professionals and skilled labour is quoted as having grown as drastically as the PV market itself.

  17. Defining rural, remote and isolated practices: the example of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Petrovcic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no single definition of rural practice available. Definitions vary from one country to another, as countries differ in geography and have different health care systems with varying organizational specificities, even within the same country. In spite of increased urbanization and the specific health-related problems it brings with it, a large proportion of the world population still dwells in rural, remote, and isolated areas. In fact, there are many countries in the world with extensive rural areas. Rural areas are unique in organization, demographics, and infrastructure, and so are the specific health-related problems of people living in them. Healthcare in such areas is generally provided by general practitioners or by physicians specialized in family medicine. One of the basic challenges in rural health is defining which areas are rural and finding the characteristics that define “rural”. There are several criteria and combinations of criteria that can be used to define rural areas. Their use mostly depends on the purpose for which the definition is used, and can thus vary from application to application. This paper addresses issues in rural family practice and criteria that may be used to define such practices. It also presents the use of criteria for defining rural practices in a small European country, on the example of Slovenia.

  18. X-ray diffraction crystallography. Introduction, examples and solved problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseda, Yoshio; Shinoda, Kozo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials; Matsubara, Eiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2011-07-01

    X-ray diffraction crystallography for powder samples is a well-established and widely used method. It is applied to materials characterization to reveal the atomic scale structure of various substances in a variety of states. The book deals with fundamental properties of X-rays, geometry analysis of crystals, X-ray scattering and diffraction in polycrystalline samples and its application to the determination of the crystal structure. The reciprocal lattice and integrated diffraction intensity from crystals and symmetry analysis of crystals are explained. To learn the method of X-ray diffraction crystallography well and to be able to cope with the given subject, a certain number of exercises is presented in the book to calculate specific values for typical examples. This is particularly important for beginners in X-ray diffraction crystallography. One aim of this book is to offer guidance to solving the problems of 90 typical substances. For further convenience, 100 supplementary exercises are also provided with solutions. Some essential points with basic equations are summarized in each chapter, together with some relevant physical constants and the atomic scattering factors of the elements. (orig.)

  19. Example Work Domain Analysis for a Reference Sodium Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. Uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. This report describes how the classical Work Domain Analysis method was adapted to develop operational concept frameworks for new plants. This adaptation of the method is better able to deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method in the operational analysis of sodium-cooled reactors. Insights from this application and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of Work Domain Analysis as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  20. 26 CFR 1.482-8 - Examples of the best method rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... illustrate the comparative analysis required to apply this rule. As with all of the examples in these... the type of analysis required under the relevant rule, and do not provide rules of general application.... Preference for comparable uncontrolled transaction method. (i) USpharm, a U.S. pharmaceutical company...

  1. Learning the Brain in Introductory Psychology: Examining the Generation Effect for Mnemonics and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether there is a generation effect for learner-created keyword mnemonics and real-life examples, compared to instructor-provided materials, when learning neurophysiological terms and definitions in introductory psychology. Students participated in an individual (Study 1) or small-group (Study 2)…

  2. Designing Clinical Examples To Promote Pattern Recognition: Nursing Education-Based Research and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Dorette Sugg

    2002-01-01

    Sophomore nursing students (n=162) examined scenarios depicting typical and atypical signs of heart attack. Examples were structured to include essential and nonessential symptoms, enabling pattern recognition and improved performance. The method provides a way to prepare students to anticipate and recognize life-threatening situations. (Contains…

  3. Degradative Enzymes from the Pharmacy or Health Food Store: Interesting Examples for Introductory Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E.

    2007-01-01

    Degradative enzymes in over-the-counter products from pharmacies and health food stores provide good examples of biological catalysis. These include [beta]-galactosidase in Lactaid[TM], [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano[R], [alpha]-amylase and proteases in digestive aids, and proteases in contact lens cleaners. These enzymes can be studied…

  4. Models for mapping potential habitat at landscape scales: an example using northern spotted owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. McComb; Michael T. McGrath; Thomas A. Spies; David. Vesely

    2002-01-01

    We are assessing the potential for current and alternative policies in the Oregon Coast Range to affect habitat capability for a suite of forest resources. We provide an example of a spatially explicit habitat capability model for northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina)to illustrate the approach we are taking to assess potential changes...

  5. The Need to Consider Ethnocultural Context in Prevention Programming: A Case Example from Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Susana; Baker, Charlene K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This article highlights the importance of incorporating ethnocultural contexts in prevention research and programming. We provide a case example from our research in youth violence prevention in Hawai'i. Methods: Data were collected in multiethnic communities on O'ahu. Focus groups were conducted with high school-aged youths of Native…

  6. Finding the Optimum Scenario in Risk-benefit Assessment: An Example on Vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berjia, Firew Lemma; Hoekstra, J.; Verhagen, H.

    2014-01-01

    that provides maximum net health gains. As a common health metric, Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) has been used to project the net health effect by using the QALIBRA (Quality of Life for Benefit Risk Assessment) software. Results: The method used in the vitamin D example shows that it is feasible to find...

  7. A climate change primer for land managers: an example from the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni Lyn Morelli; Maureen C. McGlinchy; Ronald P. Neilson

    2011-01-01

    Interest in location-specific climate projections is growing. To facilitate the communication of these data, we provide here an example for how to present climate information relevant at the scale of a national forest. We summarize some of the latest data on climate change projections and impacts relevant to eastern California, from the global scale to the state level...

  8. Development of a microarray platform for FFPET profiling: application to the classification of human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenwald, Sven; Zhou, Mingjie; Wang, Yanqun; Lejnine, Serguei; Kulkarni, Amit; Graves, Jaime; Smith, Ryan; Castle, John; Tokiwa, George; Fine, Bernard; Dai, Hongyue; Fare, Thomas; Marton, Matthew

    2009-07-28

    accurately sort FFPET samples into class labels derived from FF classifiers. Furthermore, using this platform, a classifier derived from FFPET samples can reliably provide the same sorting power as a classifier derived from matched FF samples. We anticipate that these techniques could be used to generate hypotheses from archives of FFPET samples, and thus may lead to prognostic and predictive classifiers that could be used, for example, to segregate patients for clinical trial enrollment or to guide patient treatment.

  9. Development of a microarray platform for FFPET profiling: application to the classification of human tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiwa George

    2009-07-01

    shown that our profiling platform is able to accurately sort FFPET samples into class labels derived from FF classifiers. Furthermore, using this platform, a classifier derived from FFPET samples can reliably provide the same sorting power as a classifier derived from matched FF samples. We anticipate that these techniques could be used to generate hypotheses from archives of FFPET samples, and thus may lead to prognostic and predictive classifiers that could be used, for example, to segregate patients for clinical trial enrollment or to guide patient treatment.

  10. The alteration of the urinary steroid profile under the stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gronowska

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the second part of twentieth century anabolic-androgenic steroids were introduced into doping practice and received continuously increasing significance. In order to prove the usage of doping substances, the determination of steroid profile in the urine came into practice. Several factors may be responsible for alterations in the normal steroid profile for example age, sex and diet. The aim of this study was to find out, whether the psychological stress may cause modifications in the steroid profile and T/Et ratio. The effect of physical activity was also considered. The steroid profile was determined in the group of 34 students being in non-stress conditions and under stress immediately before an important university exam. The intensity of stress was rated by self-reported questionnaire. The GC/MS method was applied to determine the steroid profile in the urine samples. The results of the experiment have shown that psychological stress may cause significant changes in the steroid profile, especially in females. Physical activity, independently of stress significantly modified the steroid profile. In summary, observed changes in steroid profile suggest, that major fluctuations of T/Et and A/E ratios under the influence of stressogenic factors and physical activity are unlikely.

  11. Temperamental Profiles of Dysregulated Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Robert R.; Ayer, Lynsay A.; Crehan, Eileen T.; Rettew, David C.; Baer, Julie R.; Hudziak, James J.

    2012-01-01

    It is crucial to characterize self-regulation in children. We compared the temperamental profiles of children with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) Dysregulation Profile (CBCL-DP) to profiles associated with other CBCL-derived syndromes. 382 children (204 boys; aged 5-18) from a large family study were examined. Temperamental profiles were…

  12. Detonation Wave Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  13. A ranking index for quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles forensic DNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Johannes; Ansell, Ricky; Nordgaard, Anders

    2010-11-09

    Assessment of DNA profile quality is vital in forensic DNA analysis, both in order to determine the evidentiary value of DNA results and to compare the performance of different DNA analysis protocols. Generally the quality assessment is performed through manual examination of the DNA profiles based on empirical knowledge, or by comparing the intensities (allelic peak heights) of the capillary electrophoresis electropherograms. We recently developed a ranking index for unbiased and quantitative quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles, the forensic DNA profile index (FI) (Hedman et al. Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles, Biotechniques 47 (2009) 951-958). FI uses electropherogram data to combine the intensities of the allelic peaks with the balances within and between loci, using Principal Components Analysis. Here we present the construction of FI. We explain the mathematical and statistical methodologies used and present details about the applied data reduction method. Thereby we show how to adapt the ranking index for any Short Tandem Repeat-based forensic DNA typing system through validation against a manual grading scale and calibration against a specific set of DNA profiles. The developed tool provides unbiased quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles. It can be applied for any DNA profiling system based on Short Tandem Repeat markers. Apart from crime related DNA analysis, FI can therefore be used as a quality tool in paternal or familial testing as well as in disaster victim identification.

  14. A ranking index for quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles forensic DNA profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansell Ricky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of DNA profile quality is vital in forensic DNA analysis, both in order to determine the evidentiary value of DNA results and to compare the performance of different DNA analysis protocols. Generally the quality assessment is performed through manual examination of the DNA profiles based on empirical knowledge, or by comparing the intensities (allelic peak heights of the capillary electrophoresis electropherograms. Results We recently developed a ranking index for unbiased and quantitative quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles, the forensic DNA profile index (FI (Hedman et al. Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles, Biotechniques 47 (2009 951-958. FI uses electropherogram data to combine the intensities of the allelic peaks with the balances within and between loci, using Principal Components Analysis. Here we present the construction of FI. We explain the mathematical and statistical methodologies used and present details about the applied data reduction method. Thereby we show how to adapt the ranking index for any Short Tandem Repeat-based forensic DNA typing system through validation against a manual grading scale and calibration against a specific set of DNA profiles. Conclusions The developed tool provides unbiased quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles. It can be applied for any DNA profiling system based on Short Tandem Repeat markers. Apart from crime related DNA analysis, FI can therefore be used as a quality tool in paternal or familial testing as well as in disaster victim identification.

  15. Profiler - A Fast and Versatile New Program for Decomposing Galaxy Light Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.

    2016-12-01

    I introduce Profiler, a user-friendly program designed to analyse the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. With an intuitive graphical user interface, Profiler can accurately model galaxies of a broad range of morphological types, with various parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat, and Ferrers). In addition to these, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model for disc truncations or anti-truncations, and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: along the disc's major or minor axis. The convolution of (circular or elliptical) models with the point spread function is performed in 2D, and offers a choice between Gaussian, Moffat or a user-provided profile for the point spread function. Profiler is optimised to work with galaxy light profiles obtained from isophotal measurements, which allow for radial gradients in the geometric parameters of the isophotes, and are thus often better at capturing the total light than 2D image-fitting programs. Additionally, the 1D approach is generally less computationally expensive and more stable. I demonstrate Profiler's features by decomposing three case-study galaxies: the cored elliptical galaxy NGC 3348, the nucleated dwarf Seyfert I galaxy Pox 52, and NGC 2549, a double-barred galaxy with an edge-on, truncated disc.

  16. A ranking index for quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles forensic DNA profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Assessment of DNA profile quality is vital in forensic DNA analysis, both in order to determine the evidentiary value of DNA results and to compare the performance of different DNA analysis protocols. Generally the quality assessment is performed through manual examination of the DNA profiles based on empirical knowledge, or by comparing the intensities (allelic peak heights) of the capillary electrophoresis electropherograms. Results We recently developed a ranking index for unbiased and quantitative quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles, the forensic DNA profile index (FI) (Hedman et al. Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles, Biotechniques 47 (2009) 951-958). FI uses electropherogram data to combine the intensities of the allelic peaks with the balances within and between loci, using Principal Components Analysis. Here we present the construction of FI. We explain the mathematical and statistical methodologies used and present details about the applied data reduction method. Thereby we show how to adapt the ranking index for any Short Tandem Repeat-based forensic DNA typing system through validation against a manual grading scale and calibration against a specific set of DNA profiles. Conclusions The developed tool provides unbiased quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles. It can be applied for any DNA profiling system based on Short Tandem Repeat markers. Apart from crime related DNA analysis, FI can therefore be used as a quality tool in paternal or familial testing as well as in disaster victim identification. PMID:21062433

  17. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS ON THE EXAMPLE OF WEIGHT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Novatchkov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the present study was to illustrate the potential of artificial intelligence (AI techniques in sports on the example of weight training. The research focused in particular on the implementation of pattern recognition methods for the evaluation of performed exercises on training machines. The data acquisition was carried out using way and cable force sensors attached to various weight machines, thereby enabling the measurement of essential displacement and force determinants during training. On the basis of the gathered data, it was consequently possible to deduce other significant characteristics like time periods or movement velocities. These parameters were applied for the development of intelligent methods adapted from conventional machine learning concepts, allowing an automatic assessment of the exercise technique and providing individuals with appropriate feedback. In practice, the implementation of such techniques could be crucial for the investigation of the quality of the execution, the assistance of athletes but also coaches, the training optimization and for prevention purposes. For the current study, the data was based on measurements from 15 rather inexperienced participants, performing 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions on a leg press machine. The initially preprocessed data was used for the extraction of significant features, on which supervised modeling methods were applied. Professional trainers were involved in the assessment and classification processes by analyzing the video recorded executions. The so far obtained modeling results showed good performance and prediction outcomes, indicating the feasibility and potency of AI techniques in assessing performances on weight training equipment automatically and providing sportsmen with prompt advice.

  18. Artificial intelligence in sports on the example of weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novatchkov, Hristo; Baca, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to illustrate the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in sports on the example of weight training. The research focused in particular on the implementation of pattern recognition methods for the evaluation of performed exercises on training machines. The data acquisition was carried out using way and cable force sensors attached to various weight machines, thereby enabling the measurement of essential displacement and force determinants during training. On the basis of the gathered data, it was consequently possible to deduce other significant characteristics like time periods or movement velocities. These parameters were applied for the development of intelligent methods adapted from conventional machine learning concepts, allowing an automatic assessment of the exercise technique and providing individuals with appropriate feedback. In practice, the implementation of such techniques could be crucial for the investigation of the quality of the execution, the assistance of athletes but also coaches, the training optimization and for prevention purposes. For the current study, the data was based on measurements from 15 rather inexperienced participants, performing 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions on a leg press machine. The initially preprocessed data was used for the extraction of significant features, on which supervised modeling methods were applied. Professional trainers were involved in the assessment and classification processes by analyzing the video recorded executions. The so far obtained modeling results showed good performance and prediction outcomes, indicating the feasibility and potency of AI techniques in assessing performances on weight training equipment automatically and providing sportsmen with prompt advice. Key pointsArtificial intelligence is a promising field for sport-related analysis.Implementations integrating pattern recognition techniques enable the automatic evaluation of data

  19. Artificial Intelligence in Sports on the Example of Weight Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novatchkov, Hristo; Baca, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to illustrate the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in sports on the example of weight training. The research focused in particular on the implementation of pattern recognition methods for the evaluation of performed exercises on training machines. The data acquisition was carried out using way and cable force sensors attached to various weight machines, thereby enabling the measurement of essential displacement and force determinants during training. On the basis of the gathered data, it was consequently possible to deduce other significant characteristics like time periods or movement velocities. These parameters were applied for the development of intelligent methods adapted from conventional machine learning concepts, allowing an automatic assessment of the exercise technique and providing individuals with appropriate feedback. In practice, the implementation of such techniques could be crucial for the investigation of the quality of the execution, the assistance of athletes but also coaches, the training optimization and for prevention purposes. For the current study, the data was based on measurements from 15 rather inexperienced participants, performing 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions on a leg press machine. The initially preprocessed data was used for the extraction of significant features, on which supervised modeling methods were applied. Professional trainers were involved in the assessment and classification processes by analyzing the video recorded executions. The so far obtained modeling results showed good performance and prediction outcomes, indicating the feasibility and potency of AI techniques in assessing performances on weight training equipment automatically and providing sportsmen with prompt advice. Key points Artificial intelligence is a promising field for sport-related analysis. Implementations integrating pattern recognition techniques enable the automatic evaluation of data

  20. Reputational concerns with altruistic providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, Pau; Siciliani, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    We study a model of reputational concerns when doctors differ in their degree of altruism and they can signal their altruism by their (observable) quality. When reputational concerns are high, following the introduction or enhancement of public reporting, the less altruistic (bad) doctor mimics the more altruistic (good) doctor. Otherwise, either a separating or a semi-separating equilibrium arises: the bad doctor mimics the good doctor with probability less than one. Pay-for-performance incentive schemes are unlikely to induce crowding out, unless some dimensions of quality are unobservable. Under the pooling equilibrium a purchaser can implement the first-best quality by appropriately choosing a simple payment scheme with a fixed price per unit of quality provided. This is not the case under the separating equilibrium. Therefore, policies that enhance public reporting complement pay-for-performance schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancements to BISON U-Zr Metallic Fuel X447 Example Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    As development of a metallic fuel modeling capability in BISON has progressed, the need for an example problem used as a comparison basis was observed. Collaborative work between researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) then proceeded to determine a viable rod to use as the basis and create a BISON input deck utilizing as many metallic fuel models as feasible. The basis chosen was what would be considered a generic rod from subassembly X447, an assembly irradiated in EBR-II towards the end of its operating life, heavily based on reported data for fuel pin DP11. Thus, the approach was adopted to use flow characteristics from subassembly X447 as a basis for the convective heat transfer solution, power history and axial power profiles that are representative of rod DP11 from subassembly X447. The rod simulated is a U-10Zr wt% (U-22.5Zr at%) composition. A 2D-RZ mesh would be used to capture axial thermal hydraulic effects, axial swelling and stress-strain calculations over the full length of the rod. After initial work was invested, a refinement of the various models and input parameters was conducted to ensure consistency between operator-declared conditions, model input requirements and those represented in the example problem. This report serves as a synopsis of the enhancements and refinements to the example problem conducted throughout the 2016 fiscal year.

  2. Development and evaluation of a high sensitivity dial system for profiling atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 ( laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  3. A simple example for the teaching of demand theory: Aggregate demand estimation for onions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chatterjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Managerial economics textbooks rarely include empirical examples of demand estimation of any commodity from real data, perhaps because in reality one must consider coupled demand systems. We suggest that on a national level and over a short time, the price–volume data for onions provide a bona fide example of a single-commodity demand curve. Since the onion has no real substitutes and taste for onions does not fluctuate, the demand curve does not shift over time. Empirical analysis of aggregated national level data yields a demand curve with two regimes: constant consumption at low prices, and constant budget at high prices.

  4. Providing global WLCG transfer monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; Campana, S; Flix, J; Flix, J; Keeble, O; Magini, N; Molnar, Z; Oleynik, D; Petrosyan, A; Ro, G; Saiz, P; Salichos, M; Tuckett, D; Uzhinsky, A; Wildish, T

    2012-01-01

    The WLCG[1] Transfers Dashboard is a monitoring system which aims to provide a global view of WLCG data transfers and to reduce redundancy in monitoring tasks performed by the LHC experiments. The system is designed to work transparently across LHC experiments and across the various technologies used for data transfer. Currently each LHC experiment monitors data transfers via experiment-specific systems but the overall cross-experiment picture is missing. Even for data transfers handled by FTS, which is used by 3 LHC experiments, monitoring tasks such as aggregation of FTS transfer statistics or estimation of transfer latencies are performed by every experiment separately. These tasks could be performed once, centrally, and then served to all experiments via a well-defined set of APIs. In the design and development of the new system, experience accumulated by the LHC experiments in the data management monitoring area is taken into account and a considerable part of the code of the ATLAS DDM Dashboard is being...

  5. The power of vertical geolocation of atmospheric profiles from GNSS radio occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwärz, Marc; Leroy, Stephen S

    2017-02-16

    High-resolution measurements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provide atmospheric profiles with independent information on altitude and pressure. This unique property is of crucial advantage when analyzing atmospheric characteristics that require joint knowledge of altitude and pressure or other thermodynamic atmospheric variables. Here we introduce and demonstrate the utility of this independent information from RO and discuss the computation, uncertainty, and use of RO atmospheric profiles on isohypsic coordinates-mean sea level altitude and geopotential height-as well as on thermodynamic coordinates (pressure and potential temperature). Using geopotential height as vertical grid, we give information on errors of RO-derived temperature, pressure, and potential temperature profiles and provide an empirical error model which accounts for seasonal and latitudinal variations. The observational uncertainty of individual temperature/pressure/potential temperature profiles is about 0.7 K/0.15%/1.4 K in the tropopause region. It gradually increases into the stratosphere and decreases toward the lower troposphere. This decrease is due to the increasing influence of background information. The total climatological error of mean atmospheric fields is, in general, dominated by the systematic error component. We use sampling error-corrected climatological fields to demonstrate the power of having different and accurate vertical coordinates available. As examples we analyze characteristics of the location of the tropopause for geopotential height, pressure, and potential temperature coordinates as well as seasonal variations of the midlatitude jet stream core. This highlights the broad applicability of RO and the utility of its versatile vertical geolocation for investigating the vertical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  6. Electronic cigarette solutions and resultant aerosol profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Jason S; Myers, Colton

    2015-10-30

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are growing in popularity exponentially. Despite their ever-growing acceptance, their aerosol has not been fully characterized. The current study focused on evaluating e-cigarette solutions and their resultant aerosol for potential differences. A simple sampling device was developed to draw e-cigarette aerosol into a multi-sorbent thermal desorption (TD) tube, which was then thermally extracted and analyzed via a gas chromatography (GC) mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. This novel application provided detectable levels of over one hundred fifteen volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a single 40mL puff. The aerosol profiles from four commercially available e-cigarettes were compared to their respective solution profiles with the same GC-MS method. Solution profiles produced upwards of sixty four unidentified and identified (some only tentatively) constituents and aerosol profiles produced upwards of eighty two compounds. Results demonstrated distinct analyte profiles between liquid and aerosol samples. Most notably, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and siloxanes were found in the aerosol profiles; however, these compounds were never present in the solutions. These results implicate the aerosolization process in the formation of compounds not found in solutions; have potential implications for human health; and stress the need for an emphasis on electronic cigarette aerosol testing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Research Into a Neon Spectral Line Profile of Dusty Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Pikalev, Aleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Ordered dusty structures influence plasma conditions. This influence can be revealed, when plasma spectral characteristics change, as dusty particles are injected. For example, a variation in the atomic temperature leads to a variation in the profiles of spectral lines. We studied the profile of a 585 nm neon spectral line in the dusty structures. The structures levitated in a positive column of a glow discharge at a pressure of 50-150 Pa and with a current of 1-9 mA. We scanned the profile with the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, by changing the air pressure between the interferometer mirrors. To process the data, a special algorithm was developed. The algorithm is resistant to a noise and a scanning speed instability. We have found an upper bound of the impact of dusty structures on the profile width. The appearance of macroparticles changes the atomic plasma temperature less than by 10 K.

  8. Strong profiling is not mathematically optimal for discovering rare malfeasors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Press, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In a large population of individuals labeled j = 1,2,...,N, governments attempt to find the rare malfeasor j = j, (terrorist, for example) by making use of priors p{sub j} that estimate the probability of individual j being a malfeasor. Societal resources for secondary random screening such as airport search or police investigation are concentrated against individuals with the largest priors. They may call this 'strong profiling' if the concentration is at least proportional to p{sub j} for the largest values. Strong profiling often results in higher probability, but otherwise innocent, individuals being repeatedly subjected to screening. They show here that, entirely apart from considerations of social policy, strong profiling is not mathematically optimal at finding malfeasors. Even if prior probabilities were accurate, their optimal use would be only as roughly the geometric mean between a strong profiling and a completely uniform sampling of the population.

  9. Culinary Arts Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This chart is intended for use in documenting the fact that a student participating in a culinary arts program has achieved the performance standards specified in the Missouri Competency Profile for culinary arts. The chart includes space for recording basic student and instructor information and the student's on-the-job training and work…

  10. Profiling Bad Apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFee, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Many school administrators want to develop profiling procedures to identify violence-prone students before bullets start flying. Warning signs (chronic depression, anger, abusive home conditions, violent history) are a staring point. Two FBI agents recommend visiting classrooms, identifying troubled kids, and ensuring that they get help. (MLH)

  11. A Danish Profiling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the statistical model used for profiling new unemployed workers in Denmark. When a worker – during his or her first six months in unemployment – enters the employment office for the first time, this model predicts whether or not he or she will be unemployed for more than six ...

  12. Economy Profile of Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Guatemala. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Guat...

  13. Economy Profile of Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Hungary. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Hungary ...

  14. Education Management Profile: Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This education management profile of Uzbekistan contains the following: basic information about the country, key educational indicators, brief comments about the country and its history, a description of the education system, the management of education, access to education and school enrollment, problems and challenges, educational reform in…

  15. Economy Profile of Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Bhutan. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Bhutan ...

  16. Eloise Greenfield (Profile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Rudine Sims

    1997-01-01

    Profiles Eloise Greenfield. Reveals that Greenfield's early love of music echoes in both the form and content of her poetry and prose. Notes that her poems are marked by strong rhythms, expressions of emotion, and a strong sense of children, their voices, and the waystations on their journey through life. (SR)

  17. PSI Member Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professional Secretaries International, Kansas City, MO.

    A survey of 2,700 of the 27,000 members of Professional Secretaries International received 755 responses yielding the following profile of secretarial workers: (1) the average member is female, about 45 years old, married with no dependents living at home, and owns a single-family home in the suburbs; (2) most respondents have worked in office or…

  18. Country Profiles, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel; Thapa, Rita

    A profile of Nepal is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population--size, growth patterns, age/sex structure, geographical distribution, topographical obstacles, ethnic and religious…

  19. Country Profiles, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lewis S.

    A profile of Turkey is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  20. Vaccine hesitancy and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Pauline; Meurice, François; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Glismann, Steffen; Rosenthal, Susan L; Larson, Heidi J

    2016-12-20

    While most people vaccinate according to the recommended schedule, this success is challenged by individuals and groups who delay or refuse vaccines. The aim of this article is to review studies on vaccine hesitancy among healthcare providers (HCPs), and the influences of their own vaccine confidence and vaccination behaviour on their vaccination recommendations to others. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted across several multidisciplinary mainstream databases including Embase Classic & Embase, and PschInfo. All foreign language articles were included if the abstract was available in English. A total of 185 articles were included in the literature review. 66% studied the vaccine hesitancy among HCPs, 17% analysed concerns, attitudes and/or behaviour of HCPs towards vaccinating others, and 9% were about evaluating intervention(s). Overall, knowledge about particular vaccines, their efficacy and safety, helped to build HCPs own confidence in vaccines and their willingness to recommend vaccines to others. The importance of societal endorsement and support from colleagues was also reported. In the face of emerging vaccine hesitancy, HCPs still remain the most trusted advisor and influencer of vaccination decisions. The capacity and confidence of HCPs, though, are stretched as they are faced with time constraints, increased workload and limited resources, and often have inadequate information or training support to address parents' questions. Overall, HCPs need more support to manage the quickly evolving vaccine environment as well as changing public, especially those who are reluctant or refuse vaccination. Some recommended strategies included strengthening trust between HCPs, health authorities and policymakers, through more shared involvement in the establishment of vaccine recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cytotoxicity Profile of Endodontic Sealers Provided by 3D Cell Culture Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi de; Ronconi, Carina Taboada; De-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mario Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of five endodontic sealers (AH Plus, Endomethasone N, EndoSequence BC, MTA Fillapex and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT) using a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model. A conventional bi-dimensional (2D) cell culture model was used as reference technique for comparison. Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured in conventional bi-dimensional cell culture and in rat-tail collagen type I three-dimensional cell culture models. Then, both cell cultures were incubated with elutes of freshly mixed endodontic sealers for 24 h. Cell viability was measured by the methyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium assay (MTT). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a significance level of pculture model- and sealer-dependent. Sealers showed higher cytotoxicity in 2D than in 3D cell culture model (pculture model (p>0.05). Endomethasone N and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT showed lower cytotoxic effects than AH Plus in 2D cell culture model (p3D cell culture model. It may be concluded that cytotoxicity was higher in 2D cell culture compared to 3D cell culture. EndoSequence BC sealer exhibited the highest cytocompatibility and MTA Fillapex the lowest cytocompatibility.

  2. A profile of Biokinetics service provided by the University of Kwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biokinetics can be viewed as an emerging member of the South African health professions in comparison to the longstanding professions of physiotherapy, ... There has been evidence of cross referrals for patients with cardiac and musculoskeletal dysfunction from cardiologists and orthopaedic surgeons, respectively.

  3. Metabolic Profiling Provides a System Understanding of Hypothyroidism in Rats and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Zhu, Zhenyu; Li, Wuhong; Lou, Ziyang; Chai, Yifeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is a chronic condition of endocrine disorder and its precise molecular mechanism remains obscure. In spite of certain efficacy of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in treating hypothyroidism, it often results in other side effects because of its over-replacement, so it is still urgent to discover new modes of treatment for hypothyroidism. Sini decoction (SND) is a well-known formula of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and is considered as efficient agents against hypothyroidism. However, its holistic effect assessment and mechanistic understanding are still lacking due to its complex components. Methodology/Principal Findings A urinary metabonomic method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was employed to explore global metabolic characters of hypothyroidism. Three typical hypothyroidism models (methimazole-, propylthiouracil- and thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism) were applied to elucidate the molecular mechanism of hypothyroidism. 17, 21, 19 potential biomarkers were identified with these three hypothyroidism models respectively, primarily involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism and purine metabolism. In order to avert the interference of drug interaction between the antithyroid drugs and SND, the thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism model was further used to systematically assess the therapeutic efficacy of SND on hypothyroidism. A time-dependent recovery tendency was observed in SND-treated group from the beginning of model to the end of treatment, suggesting that SND exerted a recovery effect on hypothyroidism in a time-dependent manner through partially regulating the perturbed metabolic pathways. Conclusions/Significance Our results showed that the metabonomic approach is instrumental to understand the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism and offers a valuable tool for systematically studying the therapeutic effects of SND on hypothyroidism. PMID:23409005

  4. Metabolic profiling provides a system understanding of hypothyroidism in rats and its application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism is a chronic condition of endocrine disorder and its precise molecular mechanism remains obscure. In spite of certain efficacy of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in treating hypothyroidism, it often results in other side effects because of its over-replacement, so it is still urgent to discover new modes of treatment for hypothyroidism. Sini decoction (SND is a well-known formula of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and is considered as efficient agents against hypothyroidism. However, its holistic effect assessment and mechanistic understanding are still lacking due to its complex components. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A urinary metabonomic method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was employed to explore global metabolic characters of hypothyroidism. Three typical hypothyroidism models (methimazole-, propylthiouracil- and thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism were applied to elucidate the molecular mechanism of hypothyroidism. 17, 21, 19 potential biomarkers were identified with these three hypothyroidism models respectively, primarily involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism and purine metabolism. In order to avert the interference of drug interaction between the antithyroid drugs and SND, the thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism model was further used to systematically assess the therapeutic efficacy of SND on hypothyroidism. A time-dependent recovery tendency was observed in SND-treated group from the beginning of model to the end of treatment, suggesting that SND exerted a recovery effect on hypothyroidism in a time-dependent manner through partially regulating the perturbed metabolic pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the metabonomic approach is instrumental to understand the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism and offers a valuable tool for systematically studying the therapeutic effects of SND on hypothyroidism.

  5. Metabolic profiling provides a system understanding of hypothyroidism in rats and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si; Tan, Guangguo; Dong, Xin; Zhu, Zhenyu; Li, Wuhong; Lou, Ziyang; Chai, Yifeng

    2013-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a chronic condition of endocrine disorder and its precise molecular mechanism remains obscure. In spite of certain efficacy of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in treating hypothyroidism, it often results in other side effects because of its over-replacement, so it is still urgent to discover new modes of treatment for hypothyroidism. Sini decoction (SND) is a well-known formula of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and is considered as efficient agents against hypothyroidism. However, its holistic effect assessment and mechanistic understanding are still lacking due to its complex components. A urinary metabonomic method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was employed to explore global metabolic characters of hypothyroidism. Three typical hypothyroidism models (methimazole-, propylthiouracil- and thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism) were applied to elucidate the molecular mechanism of hypothyroidism. 17, 21, 19 potential biomarkers were identified with these three hypothyroidism models respectively, primarily involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism and purine metabolism. In order to avert the interference of drug interaction between the antithyroid drugs and SND, the thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism model was further used to systematically assess the therapeutic efficacy of SND on hypothyroidism. A time-dependent recovery tendency was observed in SND-treated group from the beginning of model to the end of treatment, suggesting that SND exerted a recovery effect on hypothyroidism in a time-dependent manner through partially regulating the perturbed metabolic pathways. Our results showed that the metabonomic approach is instrumental to understand the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism and offers a valuable tool for systematically studying the therapeutic effects of SND on hypothyroidism.

  6. Lymphocytic profiling in thyroid cancer provides clues for failure of tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Paparodis, Rodis; Sharma, Deepak; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid cancers are usually surrounded by a significant number of immune-reactive cells. Tumor-associated lymphocytes as well as background lymphocytic thyroiditis are frequently mentioned in pathology reports of patients who have undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. The nature of this lymphocytic reaction is not well understood. The fact that cancer can survive in this adverse microenvironment is indicative of immune regulation. We characterized the lymphocytic infiltration that accompanies thyroid cancer and compared it with that present in thyroid autoimmunity. We found that double-negative (DN) T cells were significantly more abundant in thyroid cancer than in thyroid autoimmunity. Although FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells were also present, DN T cells were the dominant cell type, associated with thyroid cancer. Furthermore, upon stimulation, the DN T cells associated with cancer remained unchanged, while the few (thyroid autoimmunity increased in numbers (>20%). CD25 expression on DN T cells remained unchanged after stimulation, which indicates that the increase in the absolute number of DN T cells in thyroid autoimmunity was at the expense of inactivation of single-positive T cells. We concluded that in the setting of thyroid cancer, DN T cells appear to suppress tumor immunity. In contrast, in thyroid autoimmunity, DN T cells were barely present and only increased at the expense of inactivated, single-positive T cells upon induction. Together, these findings indicate that thyroid cancer-associated DN T cells might regulate proliferation and effector function of T cells and thereby contribute to tumor tolerance and active avoidance of tumor immunity. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. WoSIS: providing standardised soil profile data for the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.; Carvalho Ribeiro, E.D.; Oostrum, van A.J.M.; Leenaars, J.G.B.; Hengl, T.; Mendes de Jesus, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the World Soil Information Service (WoSIS) is to serve quality-assessed, georeferenced soil data (point, polygon, and grid) to the international community upon their standardisation and harmonisation. So far, the focus has been on developing procedures for legacy point data with special

  8. Genome wide DNA methylation profiles provide clues to the origin and pathogenesis of germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Rijlaarsdam (Martin); D.M.J. Tax (David); A.J.M. Gillis (Ad); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert); Koestler, D.C. (Devin C.); De Ridder, J. (Jeroen); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe cell of origin of the five subtypes (I-V) of germ cell tumors (GCTs) are assumed to be germ cells from different maturation stages. This is (potentially) reflected in their methylation status as fetal maturing primordial germ cells are globally demethylated during migration from the

  9. Genome wide DNA methylation profiles provide clues to the origin and pathogenesis of germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijlaarsdam, M.A.; Tax, D.M.J.; Gillis, A.J.M.; Dorssers, L.C.J.; Koestler, D.C.; De Ridder, J.; Looijenga, L.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The cell of origin of the five subtypes (I-V) of germ cell tumors (GCTs) are assumed to be germ cells from different maturation stages. This is (potentially) reflected in their methylation status as fetal maturing primordial germ cells are globally demethylated during migration from the yolk sac to

  10. Gene Expression Profiling in Blood Provides Reproducible Molecular Insights into Asthma Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Qiu, Weiliang; Martinez, Fernando D; Strunk, Robert C; Lemanske, Robert F; Liu, Andrew H; Gilliland, Frank D; Millstein, Joshua; Gauderman, W James; Ober, Carole; Krishnan, Jerry A; White, Steven R; Naureckas, Edward T; Nicolae, Dan L; Barnes, Kathleen C; London, Stephanie J; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Raby, Benjamin A

    2017-01-15

    Maintaining optimal symptom control remains the primary objective of asthma treatment. Better understanding of the biologic underpinnings of asthma control may lead to the development of improved clinical and pharmaceutical approaches. To identify molecular pathways and interrelated genes whose differential expression was associated with asthma control. We performed gene set enrichment analyses of asthma control in 1,170 adults with asthma, each with gene expression data derived from either whole blood (WB) or unstimulated CD4(+) T lymphocytes (CD4), and a self-reported asthma control score representing either the preceding 6 months (chronic) or 7 days (acute). Our study comprised a discovery WB cohort (n = 245, chronic) and three independent, nonoverlapping replication cohorts: a second WB set (n = 448, acute) and two CD4 sets (n = 300, chronic; n = 77, acute). In the WB discovery cohort, we found significant overrepresentation of genes associated with asthma control in 1,106 gene sets from the Molecular Signatures Database (false discovery rate, asthma control and implicate a novel biologic target (TREM-1).

  11. TERRAIN, Lake county, Illinois, USA-- BOGUS METADATA SEE NON-FEMA PROFILE METADATA PROVIDED BY VENDOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Efficient Double Fragmentation ChIP-seq Provides Nucleotide Resolution Protein-DNA Binding Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, Michal; Hatzis, Pantelis; de Bruijn, Ewart; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Schuijers, Jurian; van de Wetering, Marc; Guryev, Victor; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Immunoprecipitated crosslinked protein-DNA fragments typically range in size from several hundred to several thousand base pairs, with a significant part of chromatin being much longer than the optimal length for next-generation sequencing (NGS) procedures. Because these larger fragments may be

  13. Anxiety is not enough to drive me away: A latent profile analysis on math anxiety and math motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas; Schofield, Kerry; Malanchini, Margherita

    2018-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety (MA) and mathematics motivation (MM) are important multi-dimensional non-cognitive factors in mathematics learning. While the negative relation between global MA and MM is well replicated, the relations between specific dimensions of MA and MM are largely unexplored. The present study utilized latent profile analysis to explore profiles of various aspects of MA (including learning MA and exam MA) and MM (including importance, self-perceived ability, and interest), to provide a more holistic understanding of the math-specific emotion and motivation experiences. In a sample of 927 high school students (13–21 years old), we found 8 distinct profiles characterized by various combinations of dimensions of MA and MM, revealing the complexity in the math-specific emotion-motivation relation beyond a single negative correlation. Further, these profiles differed on mathematics learning behaviors and mathematics achievement. For example, the highest achieving students reported modest exam MA and high MM, whereas the most engaged students were characterized by a combination of high exam MA and high MM. These results call for the need to move beyond linear relations among global constructs to address the complexity in the emotion-motivation-cognition interplay in mathematics learning, and highlight the importance of customized intervention for these heterogeneous groups. PMID:29444137

  14. Exact analytical density profiles and surface tension

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to nonideality, which distinguish electrolyte from nonelectrolyte solutions. An example is provided by the excess surface tension for an air–water interface, which is determined by the excess particle density, and which was first calculated by Onsager and Samaras. Because of the discrepancy between the dielectric constants ...

  15. An introduction to Deep learning on biological sequence data - Examples and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Johansen, Alexander Rosenberg; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Deep neural network architectures such as convolutional and long short-term memory networks have become increasingly popular as machine learning tools during the recent years. The availability of greater computational resources, more data, new algorithms for training deep models and easy to use...... libraries for implementation and training of neural networks are the drivers of this development. The use of deep learning has been especially successful in image recognition; and the development of tools, applications and code examples are in most cases centered within this field rather than within biology....... Here, we aim to further the development of deep learning methods within biology by providing application examples and ready to apply and adapt code templates. Given such examples, we illustrate how architectures consisting of convolutional and long short-term memory neural networks can relatively...

  16. Entrepreneurial orientation and practice: three case examples of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Case examples of three successful entrepreneurial historically disad- vantaged primary schools are presented. Results indicate novel and innovative ventures undertaken at these schools and clearly indicate that some historically disadvantaged schools are indeed entrepreneurially oriented. Introduction and background.

  17. Content based image retrieval using unclean positive examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Ye, Lei

    2009-10-01

    Conventional content-based image retrieval (CBIR) schemes employing relevance feedback may suffer from some problems in the practical applications. First, most ordinary users would like to complete their search in a single interaction especially on the web. Second, it is time consuming and difficult to label a lot of negative examples with sufficient variety. Third, ordinary users may introduce some noisy examples into the query. This correspondence explores solutions to a new issue that image retrieval using unclean positive examples. In the proposed scheme, multiple feature distances are combined to obtain image similarity using classification technology. To handle the noisy positive examples, a new two-step strategy is proposed by incorporating the methods of data cleaning and noise tolerant classifier. The extensive experiments carried out on two different real image collections validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  18. Physics with illustrative examples from medicine and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Benedek, George B

    Physics: with illustrative examples from medicine and biology is a three-volume set of textbooks in introductory physics written at the calculus level and designed primarily for students with career objectives in the life sciences.

  19. Salt marsh vegetation: examples from the Tijuana estuary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zedler, J.B

    Using the Tijuana Estuary in southern California as an example, this booklet describes salt marsh vegetation and explains how marsh plants are able to tolerate the stresses of their variable environment...

  20. Coevolution in the Galapagos: An Example for the Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Alton L.

    1990-01-01

    Several examples of coevolution which can be used in biology classes are presented. Discussed are evolutionary processes in general, giant cacti, and reptile and cacti association. The effects of human interference are briefly described. (CW)