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Sample records for profiles beneath natural

  1. The nature of subslab slow velocity anomalies beneath South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Daniel Evan; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Scire, Alissa

    2017-05-01

    Slow seismic velocity anomalies are commonly imaged beneath subducting slabs in tomographic studies, yet a unifying explanation for their distribution has not been agreed upon. In South America two such anomalies have been imaged associated with subduction of the Nazca Ridge in Peru and the Juan Fernández Ridge in Chile. Here we present new seismic images of the subslab slow velocity anomaly beneath Chile, which give a unique view of the nature of such anomalies. Slow seismic velocities within a large hole in the subducted Nazca slab connect with a subslab slow anomaly that appears correlated with the extent of the subducted Juan Fernández Ridge. The hole in the slab may allow the subslab material to rise into the mantle wedge, revealing the positive buoyancy of the slow material. We propose a new model for subslab slow velocity anomalies beneath the Nazca slab related to the entrainment of hot spot material.

  2. Understanding the nature of mantle upwelling beneath East-Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James; Goes, Saskia; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, Mike; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rumpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham

    2014-05-01

    The concept of hot upwelling material - otherwise known as mantle plumes - has long been accepted as a possible mechanism to explain hotspots occurring at Earth's surface and it is recognized as a way of removing heat from the deep Earth. Nevertheless, this theory remains controversial since no one has definitively imaged a plume and over the last decades several other potential mechanisms that do not require a deep mantle source have been invoked to explain this phenomenon, for example small-scale convection at rifted margins, meteorite impacts or lithospheric delamination. One of the best locations to study the potential connection between hotspot volcanism at the surface and deep mantle plumes on land is the East African Rift (EAR). We image seismic velocity structure of the mantle below EAR with higher resolution than has been available to date by including seismic data recorded by stations from many regional networks ranging from Saudi Arabia to Tanzania. We use relative travel-time tomography to produce P- velocity models from the surface down into the lower mantle incorporating 9250 ray-paths in our model from 495 events and 402 stations. We add smaller earthquakes (4.5 image structures of ~ 100-km length scales to ~ 1000 km depth beneath the northern East-Africa rift (Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Yemen) with good resolution also in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle. Our observations provide evidence that the shallow mantle slow seismic velocities continue trough the transition zone and into the lower mantle. In particular, the relatively slow velocity anomaly beneath the Afar Depression extends up to depths of at least 1000 km depth while another low-velocity anomaly beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift seems to be present in the upper mantle only. These features in the lower mantle are isolated with a diameter of about 400 km indicating deep multiple sources of upwelling that converge in broader low-velocity bodies along the rift axis at shallow

  3. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  4. Stream bed temperature profiles as indicators of percolation characteristics beneath arroyos in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, J.; Thomas, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Stream bed temperature profiles were monitored continuously during water year 1990 and 1991 (WY90 and 91) in two New Mexico arroyos, similar in their meteorological features and dissimilar in their hydrological features. Stream bed temperature profiles between depths of 30 and 300 cm were examined to determine whether temporal changes in temperature profiles represent accurate indicators of the timing, depth and duration of percolation in each stream bed. These results were compared with stream flow, air temperature, and precipitation records for WY90 and 91, to evaluate the effect of changing surface conditions on temperature profiles. Temperature profiles indicate a persistently high thermal gradient with depth beneath Grantline Arroyo, except during a semi-annual thermal reversal in spring and autumn. This typifies the thermal response of dry sediments with low thermal conductivities. High thermal gradients were disrupted only during infrequent stream flows, followed by rapid re-establishment of high gradients. The stream bed temperature at 300 cm was unresponsive to individual precipitation or stream flow during WY90 and 91. This thermal pattern provides strong evidence that most seepage into Grantline Arroyo failed to percolate at a sufficient rate to reach 300 cm before being returned to the atmosphere. A distinctly different thermal pattern was recorded beneath Tijeras Arroyo. Low thermal gradients between 30 and 300 cm and large diurnal variations in temperature, suggest that stream flow created continuous, advection-dominated heat transport for over 300 days, annually. Beneath Tijeras Arroyo, low thermal gradients were interrupted only briefly during periodic, dry summer conditions. Comparisons of stream flow records for WY90 and 91 with stream bed temperature profiles indicate that independent analysis of thermal patterns provides accurate estimates of the timing, depth and duration of percolation beneath both arroyos. Stream flow loss estimates indicate

  5. Sodium storage in deep paleoweathering profiles beneath the Paleozoic-Triassic unconformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, M.; Parcerisa, D.; Ricordel-Prognon, C.; Schmitt, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    pink stage, with an increase in the amount and size of sericite and hematite inclusions. The latter causes the red coloration of the altered rocks. Regional layout Regional distribution of the alterations which affect the Carboniferous igneous and volcanic formations beneath the Jurassic sedimentary cover lead to associate these alterations to the Triassic unconformity. Besides, albitized facies show generally both topographic and regional arrangements, with more altered facies occurring in the mountain highs and in the external parts of the massifs and unaltered facies occurring in the river valleys and in the central parts of the massifs. Moreover, the haematite associated with these albitized basement rocks has been dated from Early Trias by means of paleomagnetism (Ricordel et al, 2007). From this layout and dating, it is deduced that albitization is related to the development of a deep weathering profile (up to 150 m deep) during a long-lasting exposure of the Triassic erosional unconformity (regolith). Geochemistry and paleoenvironmental setting It has to be highlighted that, this alteration may not behave like an "ordinary" weathering profile and occurred under unusual, or at least very specific, geological settings. The scale of the profiles (over 100 m depth) relates this alteration rather to a groundwater environment. The weak mobility of most chemical elements may point to a groundwater with very low outflows and deep water table. This may occur in very subdued landscape and in arid climatic conditions. It has also to be pointed that this alteration may have lasted for several 10's of Ma. Albite formation at low temperature may be envisioned consequently in alkaline, confined waters with sufficient concentrations of sodium and silica. Early attempts of modeling (Schmitt, 1994) have also indicated that a high Na+/K+ ratio is as well probably required. Petrographic data also indicate an import of sodium by the weathering solutions, without any clear enrichment

  6. Natural current profiles in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.B.

    1990-08-01

    In this paper I show how one may arrive at a universal, or natural, family of Tokamak profiles using only accepted physical principles. These particular profiles are similar to ones proposed previously on the basis of ad hoc variational principles and the point of the present paper is to provide a justification for them. However in addition, the present work provides an interesting view of Tokamak fluctuations and leads to a new result -- a relationship between the inward particle pinch velocity, the diffusion coefficient and the current profile. The basic Tokamak model is described in this paper. Then an analogy is developed between Tokamak profiles and the equilibrium of a realisable dynamical system. Then the equations governing the natural Tokamak profiles are derived by applying standard statistical mechanics to this analog. The profiles themselves are calculated and some other results of the theory are described.

  7. Natural gas annual 1992: Supplement: Company profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The data for the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement : Company Profiles are taken from Form EIA-176, (open quotes) Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition (close quotes). Other sources include industry literature and corporate annual reports to shareholders. The companies appearing in this report are major interstate natural gas pipeline companies, large distribution companies, or combination companies with both pipeline and distribution operations. The report contains profiles of 45 corporate families. The profiles describe briefly each company, where it operates, and any important issues that the company faces. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the 45 large companies profiled.

  8. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  9. What lies beneath: natural products from marine organisms as nuclear receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J

    2012-08-15

    The marine environment has long been known to be species-rich and to be a source of molecules with interesting and beneficial biochemical and clinical properties. However, despite some notable successes the potential of the 'marine pipeline' has yet to be fully realized. Recent studies involving members of the nuclear receptor superfamily illustrate the chemical richness of molecules from marine species and helps to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal Wang et al. describe the identification and characterization of such a compound, an agonist for the retinoic acid receptor isolated from the sponges Luffariella sp. and Fascaplysinopsis.

  10. Sequential motif profile of natural visibility graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    The concept of sequential visibility graph motifs—subgraphs appearing with characteristic frequencies in the visibility graphs associated to time series—has been advanced recently along with a theoretical framework to compute analytically the motif profiles associated to horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs). Here we develop a theory to compute the profile of sequential visibility graph motifs in the context of natural visibility graphs (VGs). This theory gives exact results for deterministic aperiodic processes with a smooth invariant density or stochastic processes that fulfill the Markov property and have a continuous marginal distribution. The framework also allows for a linear time numerical estimation in the case of empirical time series. A comparison between the HVG and the VG case (including evaluation of their robustness for short series polluted with measurement noise) is also presented.

  11. Mapping crustal thinning beneath the Eastern Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jordi; Chevrot, Sebastien; Verges, Jaume; Sylvander, Matthieu; Ruiz, Mario; Antonio-Vigil, Amanda

    2017-04-01

    The eastern termination of the Pyrenees is a complex region marked by two large tectonic events, the building of the Pyrenees during the Alpine orogeny and the Neogene extensional processes associated to the rotation of the Sardinia-Corsica block and the opening of the Valencia Trough. This complex tectonic history has left major imprints in crustal structures. Previous studies based on gravity data and active seismic profiles have documented a crustal thinning from 40-45 km about 80 km to the west of the Mediterranean coastline to less than 25 km beneath the eastern termination of the Pyrenees. To progress in the knowledge of the geometry of this transition, two passive seismic profiles have been acquired from mid 2015 to late 2016 within the OROGEN project, an academic-industrial collaboration between CNRS-Total-BRGM and CSIC. Up to 38 broad-band stations were deployed along two orthogonal lines, with an interstation spacing close to 10 km. First results of receiver function migration on the E-W profile suggest a smooth Moho thinning smoothly from 40 km beneath the western termination of the line to 23 km close to the coastline. The NNE-SSW profile shows a clearly defined Moho beneath Iberia, slightly deepening from 32 to 35 km northwards, a 28-30 km thick crust underneath the North Pyrenean Front Thrust and a complex geometry in the Axial Zone. Data from natural events located in the Gulf of Roses and near the intersecting point of the profiles have been recorded along the lines, hence allowing to produce wide angle reflection/refraction profiles providing additional constraints on the geometry of the crust/mantle boundary in the Eastern Pyrenees. These new results will be integrated with the available geophysical and geologic information for a more accurate geodynamical interpretation of the results. (Additional founding by the MISTERIOS project, CGL2013-48601-C2-1-R)

  12. Natural gas profile: the baking industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-11-01

    The U.S. baking industry contains three segments: bakeries which produce perishable products (SIC 2051); bakeries for dry bakery products, such as cookies and crackers (SIC 2052), and retail bakeries which bake and sell (SIC 5462). Data are presented on the number of establishments and employment in each segment, natural gas consumption for each segment in each U.S. state, natural gas prices in various U.S. regions, fuel conservation possibilities in the baking industry, FEA policy on curtailment of gas supplies, and the economic impact of such possible curtailments. (LCL)

  13. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  14. Beneath our Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Ron

    2001-01-01

    How much do you know about the rocks beneath your feet--the basic materials of our planet? Their variety and beauty is astounding, especially when viewed through the microscope, where crystals of different minerals and in various arrangements are revealed in exquisite detail. While surface rocks seem so solid, they flow deep inside the earth, and, in this spectacular book, you'll see what rocks that have flowed actually look like. Eminent geologist Ron Vernon reveals the incredible beauty and variety of earth rocks, both under and on the surface. Through breathtaking photographs he captures rocks formed by heating and melting inside the earth, rocks ejected from volcanoes, rocks formed by erosion on the earth's surface, and extraterrestrial rocks that have crashed into our planet. These stunning images are accompanied by clear, nontechnical explanations of the processes underlying the creation of rocks and minerals. No other current book so cogently explains the nature and origin of rocks for nonscientists. Beneath Our Feet: The Rocks of Planet Earth is destined to be a must-have purchase for a wide-ranging audience from professional scientists to amateur rock collectors--indeed anyone interested in natural history.

  15. Relationships between seismic wave-Speed, density, and electrical conductivity beneath Australia from seismology, mineralogy, and laboratory-based conductivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, A.; Koch, S.; Shankland, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present maps of the three-dimensional density (ρ), electrical conductivity (σ), and shear-wave speed (VS) structure of the mantle beneath Australia and surrounding ocean in the depth range of 100–800 km. These maps derived from stochastic inversion of seismic surface-wave dispersion data, ther...

  16. Gene expression profile study on osteoinductive effect of natural hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xiaoying; Wang, Jiandan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhao, Lifeng

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the osteoinductive effect of natural hydroxyapatite (NHA). NHA was extracted from pig bones and prepared into disk-like samples. Then, proliferation of mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on NHA was assessed by the methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) assay. Furthermore, microarray technology was applied to obtain the gene expression profiles of MSCs cultured on NHA at 24, 48, and 72 h. The gene expression profile was then comprehensively analyzed by clustering, Gene Ontology (GO), Gene Microarray Pathway Profiler (GenMAPP) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). According to the results of microarray experiment, 8992 differentially expressed genes were obtained. 90 differential expressed genes related to HA osteogenic differentiation were determined by GO analysis. These genes included not only 6 genes related to HA osteogenic differentiation as mentioned in the literatures but also newly discovered 84 genes. Some important signaling pathways (TGF-β, MAPK, Wnt, etc.) were influenced by these genes. Gene interaction networks were obtained by IPA software, in which the scoring values of two networks were highest, and their main functions were related to cell development. The comprehensive analysis of these results indicate that NHA regulate some crucial genes (e.g., Bmp2, Spp1) and then activate some pathways such as TGF-β signaling pathway, and ultimately osteogenic differentiation was induced. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Imaging voids beneath bridge bent using electrical resistivity tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Five electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles and borehole control were acquired beneath two bridges on the bank of the : Gasconade River in order to determine extension of the underground water-filled openings in rock encountered during a dr...

  18. Evaluation of Geothermal and Natural Gas Resources Beneath Camp Dawson and Opportunities for Deep Direct Use of Geothermal Energy or Natural Gas for Heat and Electricity Production; NETL-TRS-8-2017; NETL Technical Report Series; U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory: Morgantown, WV, 2017; p 148.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Means, Ken [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Muring, Timothy M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Sams, Neal W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Boswell, Ray [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Keairns, Dale [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Miller, III, Roy H. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Justman, Devn H. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Gemman, Randall S. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); McKoy, Mark L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Thewlis, Tracy A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Boyle, Edward J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Richards, George A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-08-01

    NETL has reviewed available information and evaluated the deep geothermal and natural gas resources located beneath the Camp Dawson National Guard Training Center in West Virginia. This facility is located in the northeastern portion of the state in Preston County, near the town of Kingwood. This study reviews options for the onsite drilling of wells for the production of geothermal heat or natural gas, as well as the utilization of these resources for on-site power and heating needs. Resources of potential interest are at subsurface depths between 7,000 feet and 15,000 feet.

  19. Community Profiling: From Technique to Reflective Practice in Community Engagement for Natural Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sonya; Boxelaar, Lucia; O'Donnell, Josette; Francis, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Community profiling is a tool that aims to help practitioners collect and make use of varied data to understand the diversity of stakeholders and issues in communities where they are delivering natural resource management programs. This paper will discuss some of the problems experienced with community profiling and propose a shift in the way in…

  20. Low-profile natural and metamaterial antennas analysis methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Hisamatsu

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the full range of low-profile antennas that use novel elements and take advantage of new concepts in antenna implementation, including metamaterials. Typically formed by constructing lattices of simple elements, metamaterials possess electromagnetic properties not found in naturally occurring materials, and show great promise in a number of low-profile antenna implementations. Introductory chapters define various natural and metamaterial-based antennas and provide the fundamentals of writing computer programs based on the method of moments (MoM) and the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTDM). Chapters then discuss low-profile natural antennas classified into base station antennas, mobile card antennas, beam-forming antennas, and satellite-satellite and earth-satellite communications antennas. Final chapters look at various properties of low-profile metamaterial-based ant nnas, revealing the strengths and limitations of the metamaterial-based straight line antenna (metaline antenna), m...

  1. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states.

  2. Natural radionuclides in soil profiles surrounding the largest coal-fired power plant in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Tanić Milan N.; Janković-Mandić Ljiljana J.; Gajić Boško A.; Daković Marko Z.; Dragović Snežana D.; Bačić Goran G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of the largest Serbian coal-fired power plant on radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles up to 50 cm in depth. Thirty soil profiles were sampled from the plant surroundings (up to 10 km distance) and analyzed using standard methods for soil physicochemical properties and gamma ray spectrometry for specific activities of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 232Th). Spatial and vertical distribution of radionuclides wa...

  3. Document Type Profiles in Nature, Science, and PNAS: Journal and Country Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jielan Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this contribution, we want to detect the document type profiles of the three prestigious journals Nature, Science, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (PNAS with regard to two levels: journal and country. Design/methodology/approach: Using relative values based on fractional counting, we investigate the distribution of publications across document types at both the journal and country level, and we use (cosine document type profile similarity values to compare pairs of publication years within countries. Findings: Nature and Science mainly publish Editorial Material, Article, News Item and Letter, whereas the publications of PNAS are heavily concentrated on Article. The shares of Article for Nature and Science are decreasing slightly from 1999 to 2014, while the corresponding shares of Editorial Material are increasing. Most studied countries focus on Article and Letter in Nature, but on Letter in Science and PNAS. The document type profiles of some of the studied countries change to a relatively large extent over publication years. Research limitations: The main limitation of this research concerns the Web of Science classification of publications into document types. Since the analysis of the paper is based on document types of Web of Science, the classification in question is not free from errors, and the accuracy of the analysis might be affected. Practical implications: Results show that Nature and Science are quite diversified with regard to document types. In bibliometric assessments, where publications in Nature and Science play a role, other document types than Article and Review might therefore be taken into account. Originality/value: Results highlight the importance of other document types than Article and Review in Nature and Science. Large differences are also found when comparing the country document type profiles of the three journals with the corresponding profiles in all Web of

  4. geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards in an alpine catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; de Graaff, L.W.S.

    2006-01-01

    Liechtenstein has faced an increasing number of natural hazards over recent decades: debris flows, slides, snow avalanches and floods repeatedly endanger the local infrastructure. Geomorphological field mapping and geo-electrical profiling was used to assess hazards near Malbun, a village

  5. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at

  6. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadham, J.L.; Arndt, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835706; Tulaczyk, S.; Stibal, M.; Tranter, M.; Telling, J.; Lis, G.P.; Lawson, E.; Ridgwell, A.; Dubnick, A.; Sharp, M.J.; Anesio, A.M.; Butler, C.E.H.

    2012-01-01

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been

  7. Natural radionuclides in soil profiles surrounding the largest coal-fired power plant in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanić Milan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of the largest Serbian coal-fired power plant on radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles up to 50 cm in depth. Thirty soil profiles were sampled from the plant surroundings (up to 10 km distance and analyzed using standard methods for soil physicochemical properties and gamma ray spectrometry for specific activities of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 232Th. Spatial and vertical distribution of radionuclides was determined and analyzed to show the relations between the specific activities in the soil and soil properties and the most influential factors of natural radionuclide variability were identified. The radiological indices for surface soil were calculated and radiological risk assessment was performed. The measured specific activities were similar to values of background levels for Serbia. The sampling depth did not show any significant influence on specific activities of natural radionuclides. The strongest predictor of specific activities of the investigated radionuclides was soil granulometry. All parameters of radiological risk assessment were below the recommended values and adopted limits. It appears that the coal-fired power plant does not have a significant impact on the spatial and vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in the area of interest, but technologically enhanced natural radioactivity as a consequence of the plant operations was identified within the first 1.5 km from the power plant. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije br. III43009 i br. III41005

  8. Profiling patterns of glutathione reductase inhibition by the natural product illudin S and its acylfulvene analogues

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, XIAODAN; Sturla, Shana J.

    2009-01-01

    Acylfulvenes (AFs) are a class of antitumor agents with favorable cytotoxic selectivity profiles compared to their natural product precursor, illudin S. Like many alkylating agents, illudin S and AFs readily react with thiol-containing small molecules such as cysteine, glutathione and cysteine-containing peptides; reduced cellular glutathione levels can affect illudin S toxicity. Glutathione reductase (GR) is a critical cellular anti-oxidant enzyme that regulates the intracellular ratio of re...

  9. The large low velocity province and the vertical flow beneath the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K.; Geller, R. J.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2010-12-01

    Since tomographic studies found the large low velocity province (LLVP) (degree-2 pattern) in the lowermost mantle in 1980's, it has been controversial whether it is due to thermal effects, chemical heterogeneity, or both. Geodynamical studies have suggested that both effects can explain the LLVP but that the large thermo-chemical pile model is preferred (e.g., Bull et al. 2009). Our seismological group has developed waveform inversion techniques and applied them to data from recently deployed broad-band seismic arrays such as US-Array. We found that there are notable S-velocity decreases beneath the D" discontinuity as the CMB is approached within the high average velocity regions such as the lowermost mantle beneath Central America, the Arctic, and Siberia (Kawai et al. 2007a,b, 2009). We also found "S-shaped" velocity models in the lowermost mantle in regions with low average S-velocity such as beneath the western Pacific and the Pacific (Konishi et al. 2009; Kawai & Geller 2010a). We performed analyses based on ab-initio mineral physics (Kawai & Tsuchiya 2009), which showed that these velocity profiles can be explained by a simple thermal boundary layer (TBL) model with a CMB temperature of about 3800 K. The TBL model can also explain most of the important seismological properties in the lowermost mantle such as the LLVP, so that the large thermo-chemical pile model appears to be inappropriate. On the other hand, the S-velocity model beneath Hawaii requires the existence of localized chemical heterogeneity (Kawai & Geller 2010b), which could be due to an accumulated Fe-rich dense pile (Kawai & Tsuchiya in prep.). To better constrain the nature of the LLVP, we inverted the horizontal components of observed radial and transverse waveforms of S and ScS phases to determine the radial profile of TI shear wave velocity at the northeastern edge of the LLVP in the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific (Kawai & Geller 2010c). We find that the radial (SV) component is 3

  10. CTAG-containing cleavage site profiling to delineate Salmonella into natural clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Tang

    Full Text Available The bacterial genus Salmonella contains thousands of serotypes that infect humans or other hosts, causing mild gastroenteritis to potentially fatal systemic infections in humans. Pathogenically distinct Salmonella serotypes have been classified as individual species or as serological variants of merely one or two species, causing considerable confusion in both research and clinical settings. This situation reflects a long unanswered question regarding whether the Salmonella serotypes exist as discrete genetic clusters (natural species of organisms or as phenotypic (e.g. pathogenic variants of a single (or two natural species with a continuous spectrum of genetic divergence among them. Our recent work, based on genomic sequence divergence analysis, has demonstrated that genetic boundaries exist among Salmonella serotypes, circumscribing them into clear-cut genetic clusters of bacteria.To further test the genetic boundary concept for delineating Salmonella into clearly defined natural lineages (e.g., species, we sampled a small subset of conserved genomic DNA sequences, i.e., the endonuclease cleavage sites that contain the highly conserved CTAG sequence such as TCTAGA for XbaI. We found that the CTAG-containing cleavage sequence profiles could be used to resolve the genetic boundaries as reliably and efficiently as whole genome sequence comparisons but with enormously reduced requirements for time and resources.Profiling of CTAG sequence subsets reflects genetic boundaries among Salmonella lineages and can delineate these bacteria into discrete natural clusters.

  11. The idol beneath the altar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2014-03-01

    Drawing on the imagery of a Mayan idol hidden beneath the altar of a Catholic mission church imposed on a Mayan city by Spanish conquerors, the author discusses the role of deeply rooted core beliefs that are not always evident on the surface-and the observation that, in clinical practice, things are not always as they seem. Psychotherapists may unconsciously be seen as invading cultural enemies.

  12. Temporal profiles of vegetation indices for characterizing grazing intensity on natural grasslands in Pampa biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Heemann Junges

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Pampa biome is an important ecosystem in Brazil that is highly relevant to livestock production. The objective of this study was to analyze the potential use of vegetation indices to discriminate grazing intensities on natural grasslands in the Pampa biome. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI images from Jan to Dec, 2000 to 2013 series, were analyzed for natural grassland experimental units managed under high (forage allowance of 5 ± 2 % live weight – LW, moderate (13 ± 5 % LW and low grazing intensity (19 ± 7 % LW. Regardless of intensity, the temporal profiles showed lower NDVI and EVI during winter, increased values in spring because of summer species regrowth, slightly decreased values in summer, especially in years when there is a water deficit, and increased values in the fall associated with the beginning of winter forage development. The average temporal profiles of moderate grazing intensity exhibited greater vegetation index values compared with low and high grazing intensities. The temporal profiles of less vegetation index were associated with lower green biomass accumulation caused by the negative impact of stocking rates on the leaf area index under high grazing intensity and a floristic composition with a predominance of tussocks under low grazing intensity. Vegetation indices can be used for distinguishing moderate grazing intensity from low and high intensities. The average EVI values can discriminate moderate grazing intensity during any season, and the NDVI values can discriminate moderate grazing intensity during spring and winter.

  13. Profiling unauthorized natural resource users for better targeting of conservation interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mariel; Baker, Julia; Twinamatsiko, Medard; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-12-01

    Unauthorized use of natural resources is a key threat to many protected areas. Approaches to reducing this threat include law enforcement and integrated conservation and development (ICD) projects, but for such ICDs to be targeted effectively, it is important to understand who is illegally using which natural resources and why. The nature of unauthorized behavior makes it difficult to ascertain this information through direct questioning. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, has many ICD projects, including authorizing some local people to use certain nontimber forest resources from the park. However, despite over 25 years of ICD, unauthorized resource use continues. We used household surveys, indirect questioning (unmatched count technique), and focus group discussions to generate profiles of authorized and unauthorized resource users and to explore motivations for unauthorized activity. Overall, unauthorized resource use was most common among people from poor households who lived closest to the park boundary and farthest from roads and trading centers. Other motivations for unauthorized resource use included crop raiding by wild animals, inequity of revenue sharing, and lack of employment, factors that created resentment among the poorest communities. In some communities, benefits obtained from ICD were reported to be the greatest deterrents against unauthorized activity, although law enforcement ranked highest overall. Despite the sensitive nature of exploring unauthorized resource use, management-relevant insights into the profiles and motivations of unauthorized resource users can be gained from a combination of survey techniques, as adopted here. To reduce unauthorized activity at Bwindi, we suggest ICD benefit the poorest people living in remote areas and near the park boundary by providing affordable alternative sources of forest products and addressing crop raiding. To prevent resentment from driving further unauthorized activity, ICDs should be

  14. Serum biochemical parameters and cytokine profiles associated with natural African trypanosome infections in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakari, Soale Majeed; Ofori, Jennifer Afua; Kusi, Kwadwo Asamoah; Aning, George Kwame; Awandare, Gordon Akanzuwine; Carrington, Mark; Gwira, Theresa Manful

    2017-06-27

    Animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) greatly affects livestock production in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ghana prevalence of AAT is estimated to range between 5 and 50%. Studies have reported serum biochemical aberrations and variability in cytokine profiles in animals during infection. However, information regarding the biochemical parameters and cytokine profiles associated with natural infections are limited. This study was therefore aimed at investigating changes in the levels of serum biochemical parameters and inflammatory cytokines during a natural infection. Nested internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based PCR and sequencing were used to characterise trypanosome infection in cattle at two areas in Ghana (Adidome and Accra) of different endemicities. The cattle were sampled at four to five-week intervals over a period of six months. Levels of serum biochemical parameters, including creatinine, cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin and total protein and cytokines (interleukin 10, interleukin 4, interleukin 12, interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha) were measured in serum samples and then compared between infected cattle and uninfected controls. The predominant trypanosome species detected in Accra (non-endemic) and Adidome (endemic) were Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma vivax, respectively. Serum biochemical parameters were similar between infected and uninfected cattle in Accra. Infected cattle at Adidome however, had significantly higher levels of ALP, creatinine, total protein and total bilirubin (P biochemical alterations whereas cattle in a non-endemic area with predominantly chronic T. theileri infections demonstrate high anti-inflammatory response and no biochemical alterations.

  15. Nonuniform subduction of the Indian crust beneath the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Li, Wenhui; Gao, Rui; Xu, Xiao; Li, Hongqiang; Huang, Xingfu; Ye, Zhuo; Lu, Zhanwu; Klemperer, Simon L

    2017-10-02

    Himalayan tectonic activity is triggered by downward penetration of the Indian plate beneath the Asian plate. The subsurface geometry of this interaction has not been fully investigated. This study presents novel constraints on this geometry provided by two newly obtained, deep seismic reflection profiles. The profiles cover 100- and 60-km transects across the Yarlung-Zangbo suture of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen at c. 88°E. Both profiles show a crustal-scale outline of the subducting Indian crust. This outline clearly shows Indian understhrusting southern Tibet, but only to a limited degree. When combined with a third seismic reflection profile of the western Himalayas, the new profiles reveal progressive, eastward steepening and shortening in the horizontal advance of the subducting Indian crust.

  16. Stage-dependent gene expression profiles during natural killer cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Sanggyu; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Lee, Young-Cheol; Kim, Sangsoo; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Wang, San Ming; Choi, Inpyo

    2005-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow. To understand the molecular regulation of NK cell development, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to HSCs, NK precursor (pNK) cells, and mature NK cells (mNK) cultured without or with OP9 stromal cells. From 170,464 total individual tags from four SAGE libraries, 35,385 unique genes were identified. A set of genes was expressed in a stage-specific manner: 15 genes in HSCs, 30 genes in pNK cells, and 27 genes in mNK cells. Among them, lipoprotein lipase induced NK cell maturation and cytotoxic activity. Identification of genome-wide profiles of gene expression in different stages of NK cell development affords us a fundamental basis for defining the molecular network during NK cell development.

  17. Hydrologic profiling for greenhouse gas effluxes from natural grasslands in the prairie pothole region of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Irena F.; Miller, Johnston; Aldred, David; Adams, Jennifer K.; Spitale, Salvatore; Bourbonniere, Rick A.

    2013-06-01

    prairie pothole physiographic region of North America is likely to be affected by climate change, and it is important to establish its baseline global warming potential as a basis for assessing global change effects. This study estimated the hydrologic effects on soil greenhouse gas efflux during the growing season along hydrologic profiles within natural prairie potholes ranging from the southern to northern limits of the prairie pothole region within central Canada. Soil moisture was found to be an important driver of differences in soil efflux along the hydrologic profiles and along the south-to-north gradient. The position of peak cumulative soil efflux varied along the hydrologic profile, with the N2O peak occurring at the backslope, the CO2 peaks at footslope and toeslope, and the CH4 peaks at toeslope and surface waters. When cumulative soil efflux was converted to global warming potential (Mg CO2 eq), the largest values were restricted to the narrow land-water interface in the south but expanded to a broader area of the hillslope in the north. CO2 was the major (> 95%) contributor to global warming potential. Omitting hydrologic controls on greenhouse gas fluxes from estimates of global warming potential led to substantial underestimates of the contributions of N2O and CH4. Arid regions in the south had smaller global warming potential than wetter regions in the north. If future climate projections for a warmer, drier climate in this region are realized, global warming potential from soil greenhouse gas fluxes will be smaller in this landscape, because the changing hydrologic conditions should result in a reduction of global warming potential from land surfaces, even as global warming potential from surface waters increases.

  18. Immunological profile of resistance and susceptibility in naturally infected dogs by Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Leal, Gleisiane Gomes; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; de Oliveira Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Cardoso, Jamille Mirelle; Mathias, Fernando Augusto Siqueira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Carneiro, Mariângela; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2014-10-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis has a great impact on public health, and dogs are considered the main domestic reservoir of Leishmania infantum, the causal parasite. In this study, 159 animals naturally infected by L. infantum from an endemic area of Brazil were evaluated through an analysis of cellular responses, using flow cytometry, and of the hematological parameters. The results confirmed that disease progression is associated with anemia and reductions in eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. The investigation of the immune response, based on the immunophenotypic profile of peripheral blood, showed declines in the absolute numbers of T lymphocytes CD5(+) and their subsets (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) and a drop of B lymphocytes in asymptomatic seropositive (AD-II) and symptomatic seropositive (SD) dogs. Neutrophils, when stimulated with soluble antigen of L. infantum, showed higher synthesis of interferon (IFN)-γ(+) in AD-II and SD groups, with decreased production of interleukin (IL)-4(+) in asymptomatic seronegative dogs positive for L. infantum infection based on polymerase chain reaction testing (AD-I group). In the AD-II and SD groups, subpopulations of stimulated lymphocytes (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) also exhibited greater synthesis of IFN-γ(+) and IL-4(+) in culture. These results suggest that the animals of the AD-II and SD groups exhibited a mixed immune response (Type 1 and 2) and the AD-I group presenting an immune profile very similar to normal control animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The oral spelling profile of posterior cortical atrophy and the nature of the graphemic representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primativo, Silvia; Yong, Keir X X; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2017-01-08

    Spelling is a complex cognitive task where central and peripheral components are involved in engaging resources from many different cognitive processes. The present paper aims to both characterize the oral spelling deficit in a population of patients affected by a neurodegenerative condition and to clarify the nature of the graphemic representation within the currently available spelling models. Indeed, the nature of graphemic representation as a linear or multi-componential structure is still debated. Different hypotheses have been raised about its nature in the orthographic lexicon, with one positing that graphemes are complex objects whereby quantity and identity are separately represented in orthographic representations and can thus be selectively impaired. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative condition that mainly affects visuoperceptual and visuospatial functions. Spelling impairments are considered part of the disease. Nonetheless the spelling deficit has received little attention so far and often it has been interpreted in relation to peripheral impairments such as writing difficulties associated with visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits. In the present study we provide a detailed characterization of the oral spelling profile in PCA. The data suggest that multiple deficits underpin oral spelling problems in PCA, with elements of surface and phonological dysgraphia but also suggesting the involvement of the graphemic buffer. A large phenotypic individual variability is reported. Moreover, the larger proportion and the specific nature of errors involving geminate (i.e., double) as compared to non-geminate (i.e., non-double) letters suggest that a further central impairment might be associated with the abstract graphemic representation of letter numerosity. The present study contributes to the clinical characterization of PCA and to the current debate in the cognitive literature on spelling models; findings, despite not definitive

  20. Geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards in an alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Seijmonsbergen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Liechtenstein has faced an increasing number of natural hazards over recent decades: debris flows, slides, snow avalanches and floods repeatedly endanger the local infrastructure. Geomorphological field mapping and geo-electrical profiling was used to assess hazards near Malbun, a village potentially endangered by landslides, and especially debris flows. The area is located on the tectonic contacts of four different nappe slices. The bedrock consists of anhydrite and gypsum, dolomite, shale, marl, and limestone. The spatial distribution and occurrence of debris flows and slides is evaluated through a combination of geomorphological expert knowledge, and detailed visualization in a geographical information system. In a geo-database a symbol-based 1:3000 scale geomorphological map has been digitized and rectified into polygons. The polygons include information on the main geomorphological environment, the Quaternary material distribution and of geomorphological processes, which are stored in attribute tables. The spatial distribution of these attributes is then combined with geophysical information and displacement rates interpolated from benchmark measurements. On one of the landslides two geo-electrical profiles show that the distance to a potential failure plane varies between 10-20 m and that the topography of the failure plane is influenced by subterranean gypsum karst features. The displacement measurements show that this landslide actively disintegrates into minor slides and is not, therefore, a risk to the village of Malbun. The hazard zonation indicates that debris flows can pose a risk if no countermeasures are taken. Gypsum karst may locally accelerate the landslide activity. In contrast, the impact of debris flows is diminished because collapse dolines may act as sediment traps for the debris flow materials. This research illustrates how geomorphological expert knowledge can be integrated in a GIS for the evaluation of natural hazards

  1. Structures of Active Blind Thrusts Beneath Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Kato, N.; Nakayama, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Abe, S.

    2011-12-01

    We show structural models of active blind thrust faults beneath Tokyo metropolitan area, based on actively deforming landforms, Quaternary stratigraphy, and deep to shallow high-resolution seismic reflection data tied with these stratigraphic constraints, resolving seismic hazards from otherwise elusive active structures beneath highly urbanized areas. At the leading edge of the subducting Philippine Sea plate beneath the Kanto region, most significant active structures are recognized as folding and/or faulting of late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial and marine deposits. Newly obtained seismic reflection profile and reprocessed sections indicate that these active structures are surface manifestations of emergent splay thrust faults extending from a subduction megathrust that generated the A.D.1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). Much slower rates of slip along these structures (~ 4.2 mm/yr) than slip deficits (~ 30 mm/yr) indicate that slip partitioning might have occurred between the subduction megathrust and splay faults. In contrast to these megathrust-related structures, steeply dipping blind thrusts are distributed beneath the Kanto plain underlain by several thousand meters thick Neogene forearc basin and shallow marine to terrestrial sediments (Kazusa and Shimousa Group). Deep seismic reflection profiles corroborate that these blind thrusts are reactivated normal faults originally formed due to early to middle Miocene extensional tectonics. While rates of slip along these structures are commonly slow (~0.1 mm/yr) based on offsets of late Pleistocene terrace deposits, their proximity to the metropolitan area urges more intense efforts to identify their potential seismic hazards including locations, sizes, rates of slip, and geometries of blind thrusts.

  2. Analyses of sublittoral macrobenthic community change in a marine nature reserve using similarity profiles (SIMPROF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerfield, P J; Burton, M; Sanderson, W G

    2014-12-01

    Sublittoral macrobenthic communities in the Skomer Marine Nature Reserve (SMNR), Pembrokeshire, Wales, were sampled at 10 stations in 1993, 1996, 1998, 2003, 2007 and 2009 using a Day grab and a 0.5 mm mesh. The time series is analysed using Similarities Profiles (SIMPROF) tests and associated methods. Q-mode analysis using clustering with Type 1 SIMPROF addresses multivariate structure among samples, showing that there is clear structure associated with differences among years. Inverse (r-mode) analysis using Type 2 SIMPROF decisively rejects a hypothesis that species are not associated with each other. Clustering of the variables (species) with Type 3 SIMPROF identifies groups of species which covary coherently through the time-series. The time-series is characterised by a dramatic decline in abundances and diversity between the 1993 and 1996 surveys. By 1998 there had been a shift in community composition from the 1993 situation, with different species dominating. Communities had recovered in terms of abundance and species richness, but different species dominated the community. No single factor could be identified which unequivocally explained the dramatic changes observed in the SMNR. Possible causes were the effects of dispersed oil and dispersants from the Sea Empress oil spill in February 1996 and the cessation of dredge-spoil disposal off St Annes Head in 1995, but the most likely cause was severe weather. With many species, and a demonstrable recovery from an impact, communities within the SMNR appear to be diverse and resilient. If attributable to natural storms, the changes observed here indicate that natural variability may be much more important than is generally taken into account in the design of monitoring programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Profiling patterns of glutathione reductase inhibition by the natural product illudin S and its acylfulvene analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodan; Sturla, Shana J

    2009-09-01

    Acylfulvenes (AFs) are a class of antitumor agents with favorable cytotoxic selectivity profiles compared to their natural product precursor, illudin S. Like many alkylating agents, illudin S and AFs readily react with thiol-containing small molecules such as cysteine, glutathione and cysteine-containing peptides; reduced cellular glutathione levels can affect illudin S toxicity. Glutathione reductase (GR) is a critical cellular antioxidant enzyme that regulates the intracellular ratio of reduced-oxidized glutathione. In this study, we found that acylfulvene analogues are GR inhibitors, and evaluated aspects of the drug-enzyme interactions as compared with the structurally related natural product illudin S and the known irreversible GR inhibitor, carmustine. Acylfulvene analogues exhibited concentration-dependent GR inhibitory activity with micromolar IC(50)s; however, up to 2 mM illudin S did not inhibit GR activity. The absence of NADPH attenuates GR inhibition by AFs and the presence of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), the natural GR substrate, which binds to the enzyme active site, has a minimal effect in protecting GR from AFs. Furthermore, each compound can induce GR conformation changes independent of the presence of NADPH or GSSG. These results, together with gel-filtration analysis results and mass spectrometry data, indicate AF is a reversible inhibitor and HMAF an irreversible inhibitor that can form a bis-adduct with GR by reacting with active site cysteines. Finally in a cell-based assay, illudin S and HMAF were found to inhibit GR activity, but this inhibition was not associated with the reduction of GR levels in the cell. A model accounting for differences in mechanisms of GR inhibition by the series of compounds is discussed.

  4. Temporal behaviour profiles of Mus musculus in nature are affected by population activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbers, Yuri; Koster, Eva A S; Krijbolder, Doortje I; Ruijs, Amanda; van Berloo, Sander; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-02-01

    Animals have circadian clocks that govern their activity pattern, resulting in 24h rhythms in physiology and behaviour. Under laboratory conditions, light is the major external signal that affects temporal patterns in behaviour, and Mus musculus is strictly nocturnal in its behaviour. In the present study we questioned whether under natural conditions, environmental factors other than light affect the temporal profile of mice. In order to test this, we investigated the activity patterns of free-ranging M. musculus in a natural habitat, using sensors and a camera integrated into a recording unit that the mice could freely enter and leave. Our data show that mice have seasonal fluctuations in activity duration (6.7±0.82 h in summer, 11.3±1.80 h in winter). Furthermore, although primarily nocturnal, wild mice also exhibit daytime activity from spring until late autumn. A multivariate analysis revealed that the major factor correlating with increased daytime activity was population activity, defined as the number of visits to the recording site. Day length had a small but significant effect. Further analysis revealed that the relative population activity (compared to the past couple of days) is a better predictor of daytime activity than absolute population activity. Light intensity and temperature did not have a significant effect on daytime activity. The amount of variance explained by external factors is 51.9%, leaving surprisingly little unexplained variance that might be attributed to the internal clock. Our data further indicate that mice determine population activity by comparing a given night with the preceding 2-7 nights, a time frame suggesting a role for olfactory cues. We conclude that relative population activity is a major factor controlling the temporal activity patterns of M. musculus in an unrestricted natural population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes correlate with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of Silene vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Matthew S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although rapid changes in copy number and gene order are common within plant mitochondrial genomes, associated patterns of gene transcription are underinvestigated. Previous studies have shown that the gynodioecious plant species Silene vulgaris exhibits high mitochondrial diversity and occasional paternal inheritance of mitochondrial markers. Here we address whether variation in DNA molecular markers is correlated with variation in transcription of mitochondrial genes in S. vulgaris collected from natural populations. Results We analyzed RFLP variation in two mitochondrial genes, cox1 and atp1, in offspring of ten plants from a natural population of S. vulgaris in Central Europe. We also investigated transcription profiles of the atp1 and cox1 genes. Most DNA haplotypes and transcription profiles were maternally inherited; for these, transcription profiles were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. One individual exhibited a pattern consistent with paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA; this individual exhibited a transcription profile suggestive of paternal but inconsistent with maternal inheritance. We found no associations between gender and transcript profiles. Conclusions Specific transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of a gynodioecious species S. vulgaris. Our findings suggest the potential for a causal association between rearrangements in the plant mt genome and transcription product variation.

  6. Synergistic combinatorial antihyperlipidemic study of selected natural antioxidants; modulatory effects on lipid profile and endogenous antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Peer Abdul; Khan, Jamshaid Ali; Ullah, Irfan; Ullah, Safi

    2016-09-09

    Hyperlipidemia, a major pathological condition associated with disrupted lipid levels and physiological redox homeostasis. The excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to enhanced lipid peroxidation, aggravated atherosclerosis and oxidative stress. Integration of natural antioxidant blends in alone or with conventional treatments can alleviate these issues synergistically contributing least side effects. Published literature reported the efficacy of natural antioxidants as individual and in combinations in various conditions but less data is available on their evaluation in low dose ratio blends particularly in hypercholesterolemic diet. Antihyperlipidemic effects of selected natural antioxidants; the phenolic oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) and pterostilbene (PT) with niacin (NA) were investigated in current study. Their effects on lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and their aptitude to establish redox state between oxidants and antioxidants in body were evaluated in high cholesterol diet fed animal model. Male albino rabbits (n = 6) weighing 1.2-1.6 kg, supplemented with high cholesterol diet (400 mg/kg) for 12 weeks were used in the experiment. Antioxidants were administered individual high (100 mg/kg) and in low dose combinations (total dose = 100 mg/kg). Student's t test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnet's test were used as statistical tools for evaluation. The results showed synergistic effects of low dose antioxidant blends. Therapies retarded elevation in blood lipid levels, lipid peroxidation and blood antioxidant depletion and consequently contributed in reestablishing redox homeostasis. The LDL/HDL ratio and atherogenic index were suppressed significantly in blend therapies with maximum effects of 59.3 and 25 % (p >0.001) observed in 50:30:20 ratios of OPC, NA and PT, compared to individual therapies 37 and 18 % max respectively. Moreover the results were also in close proximity with the statin

  7. Transient slab flattening beneath Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L. S.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Ramírez-Hoyos, L. F.; Monsalve, G.; Cardona, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-07-01

    Subduction of the Nazca and Caribbean Plates beneath northwestern Colombia is seen in two distinct Wadati Benioff Zones, one associated with a flat slab to the north and one associated with normal subduction south of 5.5°N. The normal subduction region is characterized by an active arc, whereas the flat slab region has no known Holocene volcanism. We analyze volcanic patterns over the past 14 Ma to show that in the mid-Miocene a continuous arc extended up to 7°N, indicating normal subduction of the Nazca Plate all along Colombia's Pacific margin. However, by 6 Ma, we find a complete cessation of this arc north of 3°N, indicating the presence of a far more laterally extensive flat slab than at present. Volcanism did not resume between 3°N and 6°N until after 4 Ma, consistent with lateral tearing and resteepening of the southern portion of the Colombian flat slab at that time.

  8. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  9. High-resolution phenotypic profiling of natural products-induced effects on the single-cell level

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan Georg

    2017-03-15

    Natural products (NPs) are highly evolved molecules making them a valuable resource for new therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of broad-spectrum phenotypic profiling of NP-induced perturbations on single cells with imaging-based High-Content Screening to inform on physiology, mechanisms-of-actions, and multi-level toxicity. Our technology platform aims at broad applicability using a comprehensive marker panel with standardized settings streamlined towards an easy implementation in laboratories dedicated to natural products research.

  10. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  11. Electromagnetic Mapping of Electrical Conductivity Beneath the Columbia Basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H. Frank; Shoham, Yoram; Hoversten, G. Michael; Torres-Verdin, Carlos

    1992-01-02

    Sedimentary rocks beneath the Columbia River Basalt Group are recognized as having potential for oil and gas production, but the overlying layered basalts effectively mask seismic reflections from the underlying sediments. Four electromagnetic (EM) methods have been applied on profiles crossing Boylston Ridge, a typical east-west trending anticline of the Yakima Fold Belt, in an attempt to map the resistivity interface between the basalts and the sediments and to map variations in structure and resistivity within the sediments. The EM surveys detected strong variations in resistivity within the basalts, and in particular the continuous magnetotelluric array profiling (EMAP) revealed resistivity lows beneath the surface anticlines. These low resistivity zones probably coincide with fracturing in the core of the anticlines and they appear to correlate well with similar zones of low seismic velocity observed on a nearby seismic profile. The controlled-source EM surveys (in-loop transient, long-offset transient, and variable-offset frequency-domain) were designed in anticipation of relatively uniform high resistivity basalts, and were found to have been seriously distorted by the intrabasalt conductors discovered in the field. In particular, the resistivity sections derived from 1D inversions were found to be inconsistent and misleading. The EMAP survey provided the most information about the subsurface resistivity distribution, and was certainly the most cost-effective. However, both controlled-source and EMAP surveys call for accurate 2D or 3D inversion to accommodate the geological objectives of this project. [References: 18

  12. Electromagnetic mapping of electrical conductivity beneath the Columbia basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H.F.; Hoversten, G.M [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Shoham, Y. [Shell Development Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Torres-Verdin, C. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Sedimentary rocks beneath the Columbia River Basalt Group are recognized as having potential for oil and gas production, but the overlying layered basalts effectively mask seismic reflections from the underlying sediments. Four electromagnetic (EM) methods have been applied on profiles crossing Boylston Ridge, a typical east-west trending anticline of the Yakima Fold Belt, in an attempt to map the resistivity interface between the basalts and the sediments and to map variations in structure and resistivity within the sediments. The EM surveys detected strong variations in resistivity within the basalts, and in particular the continuous magnetotelluric array profiling (EMAP) revealed resistivity lows beneath the surface anticlines. These low resistivity zones probably coincide with fracturing in the core of the anticlines and they appear to correlate well with similar zones of low seismic velocity observed on a nearby seismic profile. The controlled-source EM surveys (in-loop transient, long-offset transient, and variable-offset frequency-domain) were designed in anticipation of relatively uniform high resistivity basalts, and were found to have been seriously distorted by the intrabasalt conductors discovered in the field. In particular, the resistivity sections derived from 1D inversions were found to be inconsistent and misleading. The EMAP survey provided the most information about the subsurface resistivity distribution, and was certainly the most cost-effective. However, both controlled-source and EMAP surveys call for accurate 2D or 3D inversion to accommodate the geological objectives of this project.

  13. Slow upper mantle beneath Southern Norway from surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, C.; Maupin, V.

    2009-04-01

    A recent regional surface wave tomography for Northern Europe revealed unprecedented images of the upper mantle beneath the (Tertiary) North Atlantic and the bordering Fennoscandian craton of Archean-Proterozoic age. With respect to the circum-Atlantic regions of uplift, no common mantle pattern supporting the uplift of these regions is observed. The western boundary of the thick cratonic lithosphere follows the trend of the continental margin offshore northern Norway (i.e. the northern Scandes are underlain by thick lithosphere) whereas further south the boundary of the craton is located further east beneath southwestern Sweden. SV shear wave velocities beneath southern Norway are 10% slower than ak135 (at 70-115 km depth) and these low-velocities are clearly connected to the North Atlantic low-velocity regime through a ~ 400 km wide "channel". The low-velocity anomaly beneath Southern Norway coincides in geometry roughly with the dome-like high topography of the southern Scandes and may thus have a non-negligible contribution to the isostatic balance of the region. The amplitude and depth-distribution of this anomaly are due to be further constrained by new data that were acquired during the MAGNUS experiment in 2006-2008. The temporary seismic network, consisting of 40 broadband seismometers covers to a large extent the location of the anomaly as imaged by the regional tomography. This enables us to get unique control on the tomographic model at improved lateral and vertical resolution. Preliminary analysis of surface wave phase velocities yields an average 1-D shear wave velocity profile for southern Norway as a first step to constrain the presence and depth extent of this low-velocity anomaly.

  14. The ionospheric heating beneath the magnetospheric cleft revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Prölss

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A prominent peak in the electron temperature of the topside ionosphere is observed beneath the magnetospheric cleft. The present study uses DE-2 data obtained in the Northern Winter Hemisphere to investigate this phenomenon. First, the dependence of the location and magnitude of the temperature peak on the magnetic activity is determined. Next, using a superposed epoch analysis, the mean latitudinal profile of the temperature enhancement is derived. The results of the present study are compared primarily with those obtained by Titheridge (1976, but also with more recent observations and theoretical predictions.

  15. An Analysis of natural mentoring relationship profiles and associations with mentees’ mental health: considering links via support from important others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Noelle M.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    We explored associations between natural mentoring relationship profiles and young adults’ life satisfaction and symptoms of depression via participants’ perceived support from important others accounting for participants’ perceived support and mental health prior to the onset of their natural mentoring relationships. Participants included 396 young adults (57% female; mean age = 30.97, SD = .6), the majority of whom identified as Black or African American (79% Black, 18% White, 3% Biracial). Most participants had completed high school but few participants (13%) had completed degrees from 4-year institutions. We used a latent profile approach to identify natural mentoring relationship profiles and employed structural equation modeling to test our study hypotheses. Slightly over half of study participants (53%) reported the presence of a natural mentor in their lives since the age of 14. Results suggest that natural mentoring relationships characterized by high levels of relational closeness and either extended relationship duration or frequent contact may promote improvements in psychological well-being among mentees over time via greater experiences of social support from important others. PMID:24132713

  16. Imaging and Analyzing the Upper Lithosphere Beneath the Southern Appalachians using Global Seismic Phases Recorded by the SESAME Broadband Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, E.; Verellen, D.; Parker, H., Jr.; Hawman, R. B.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Global-phase seismic interferometry (GloPSI) is a seismic method that allows for the extraction of zero-offset reflections. We use the global seismic phase PKIKP as a virtual source to generate reflection profiles along three survey lines of the Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment (SESAME). The broadband recordings provide constraints on long-wavelength structure that complement the higher-frequency images obtained along Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) lines. Targets include structures associated with Paleozoic collision and Mesozoic extension. We focus in particular on the nature of the Southern Appalachian detachment, the Alleghanian suture and its possible relation to a zone of prominent south-dipping reflections observed on COCORP profiles, and estimating the volume of mafic intrusions added to the basement beneath the Coastal Plain. The broadband profiles also provide additional constraints on the thickness and lateral extent of Triassic sediments. Relative reflection amplitudes are used to estimate impedance contrasts to constrain the nature of major discontinuities. Over the Coastal Plain, we experiment with a number of approaches for suppressing multiple reflections generated by very low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments and poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. The resulting improvement in image quality should allow us to better evaluate the continuity of the detachment and other orogen-wide structures.

  17. The extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J.-M.; Collier, J. S.; Rümpker, G.

    2013-11-01

    The granitic islands of the Seychelles Plateau have long been recognised to overlie continental crust, isolated from Madagascar and India during the formation of the Indian Ocean. However, to date the extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles region remains unknown. This is particularly true beneath the Mascarene Basin between the Seychelles Plateau and Madagascar and beneath the Amirante Arc. Constraining the size and shape of the Seychelles continental fragment is needed for accurate plate reconstructions of the breakup of Gondwana and has implications for the processes of continental breakup in general. Here we present new estimates of crustal thickness and VP/VS from H-κ stacking of receiver functions from a year long deployment of seismic stations across the Seychelles covering the topographic plateau, the Amirante Ridge and the northern Mascarene Basin. These results, combined with gravity modelling of historical ship track data, confirm that continental crust is present beneath the Seychelles Plateau. This is ˜30-33 km thick, but with a relatively high velocity lower crustal layer. This layer thins southwards from ˜10 km to ˜1 km over a distance of ˜50 km, which is consistent with the Seychelles being at the edge of the Deccan plume prior to its separation from India. In contrast, the majority of the Seychelles Islands away from the topographic plateau show no direct evidence for continental crust. The exception to this is the island of Desroche on the northern Amirante Ridge, where thicker low density crust, consistent with a block of continental material is present. We suggest that the northern Amirantes are likely continental in nature and that small fragments of continental material are a common feature of plume affected continental breakup.

  18. Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

    2003-01-01

    The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the

  19. Allergen profiles of natural rubber latex (NRL) proteins on gloves and glove powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazic-Jezic, Vesna J; Sanchez, B A

    2005-01-01

    The contributing role of glove powder in sensitization to natural rubber latex (NRL) proteins has been well documented in laboratory studies and through clinical evaluations. However, the quantitative relationship of the respiratory and topical exposures in the sensitization process remains unknown because the relative levels of protein on the glove powders in relation to the total levels of protein on NRL gloves have not been determined. In NRL allergens--Hev b 1, Hev b 3, Hev b 5, and Hev b 6.02--on randomly selected surgical and examination NRL gloves. We also examined the binding pattern of the four allergens to several glove powders that showed a different affinity to NRL proteins. The level of powder-bound protein was determined by the ELISA Inhibition Assay (ASTM D6499 standard method). Two cross-linked corn starch powders, one sample of cooking corn starch and one oat starch sample, were exposed to ammoniated (AL) or nonammoniated (NAL) raw NRL protein extracts. The levels of individual allergens were determined using the NRL allergen kit. In the NRL glove extracts we observed a wide range in the total allergen levels and a great diversity in the proportion of the four allergens. On the other hand, the evaluated starches had similar ratios of four individual allergens, regardless of the differences in their total allergen levels. The exposure of starches to NRL proteins with different allergen profiles did not affect the allergen ratio. All samples demonstrated a selective affinity for binding Hev b 1 and Hev b 5 allergens and a lesser affinity for the Hev b 6.02 allergen. Allergen Hev b 6.02 made up about 60% of the total allergen in the NAL extract, but only 12-30% of Hev b 6.02 was bound to starches. In contrast, there was only 3-7% of Hev b 1 allergen in the NAL extract, but powders had 35-45% of Hev b 1. These findings indicate that allergenic properties of NRL gloves and respective glove powders may be different.

  20. Pressure generation beneath a new thermoplastic cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, L R; Pedowitz, R A; Byrne, T P; Gershuni, D H

    1996-01-01

    A new cast immobilizer that is heat-shrunk to conform to an injured extremity was examined. The purpose of these studies was to compare pressures beneath the thermoplastic cast with those beneath fiberglass casts on a laboratory model and on the forearms of human volunteers. Pressures measured beneath fiberglass casts on metal cylinders averaged 36 mm Hg. Thermoplastic casts on the smaller cylinder that allowed 42% shrinkage produced a mean pressure of 25 mm Hg; those placed on the larger cylinder that allowed 17% shrinkage produced a mean pressure of 39 mm Hg. Pressures measured on the forearms of healthy volunteers averaged 22 mm Hg beneath fiberglass casts and 31 mm Hg beneath the thermoplastic casts. These pressures were considerably less than pressures that have been shown to occlude the microcirculation of the skin. Acute compartment syndromes result from swelling within a limited space and remain a serious concern clinically when swelling is anticipated under any type of constraining cast. The results of these studies indicate that the new cast should not produce a greater risk of circulatory compromise to the limb than previously used fiberglass materials.

  1. Variability of Basal Melt Beneath the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Robert; Vaughan, David G.; Vornberger, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Observations from satellite and airborne platforms are combined with model calculations to infer the nature and efficiency of basal melting of the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf, West Antarctica, by ocean waters. Satellite imagery shows surface features that suggest ice-shelf-wide changes to the ocean s influence on the ice shelf as the grounding line retreated. Longitudinal profiles of ice surface and bottom elevations are analyzed to reveal a spatially dependent pattern of basal melt with an annual melt flux of 40.5 Gt/a. One profile captures a persistent set of surface waves that correlates with quasi-annual variations of atmospheric forcing of Amundsen Sea circulation patterns, establishing a direct connection between atmospheric variability and sub-ice-shelf melting. Ice surface troughs are hydrostatically compensated by ice-bottom voids up to 150m deep. Voids form dynamically at the grounding line, triggered by enhanced melting when warmer-than-average water arrives. Subsequent enlargement of the voids is thermally inefficient (4% or less) compared with an overall melting efficiency beneath the ice shelf of 22%. Residual warm water is believed to cause three persistent polynyas at the ice-shelf front seen in Landsat imagery. Landsat thermal imagery confirms the occurrence of warm water at the same locations.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the

  3. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Zhou, Xiaosu; Piao, Xianyu; Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the transcriptional level and provide a valuable resource for screening anti

  4. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date.Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98 genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research.This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the transcriptional level and provide a valuable resource

  5. Post-Mazama (7 KA) faulting beneath Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Reynolds, R.L.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz) show that a distinctive, widespread reflection occurs in the sediments beneath Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Coring reveals that this reflection is formed by Mazama tephra (MT), about 7 ka in age. The MT horizon is faulted in many places and locally displaced by as much as 3.1 m. Differential displacement of multiple horizons indicates recurrent fault movement, perhaps three episodes since deposition of the Mazama. The pattern of faulting indicates northeast-southwest extension beneath the lake basin.

  6. Magmatic underplating beneath the Rajmahal Traps: Gravity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The early Cretaceous thermal perturbation beneath the eastern continental margin of the Indian shield resulted in the eruption of the Rajmahal Traps. To understand the impact of the magmatic process that originated in the deep mantle on the lower crustal level of the eastern Indian shield and adjoining Bengal basin the ...

  7. Clinical haematology and biochemistry profiles of cattle naturally infected with Theileria orientalis Ikeda type in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K E; Forsyth, S F; Vaatstra, B L; McFadden, Amj; Pulford, D J; Govindaraju, K; Pomroy, W E

    2018-01-01

    To present the haematology and biochemistry profiles for cattle in New Zealand naturally infected with Theileria orientalis Ikeda type and investigate if the results differed between adult dairy cattle and calves aged biochemistry results were obtained from blood samples from cattle which tested positive for T. orientalis Ikeda type by PCR, that were submitted to veterinary laboratories in New Zealand between October 2012 and November 2014. Data sets for haematology and biochemistry results were prepared for adult dairy cattle (n=62 and 28, respectively) and calves aged biochemistry (pbiochemistry changes observed in cattle infected with T. orientalis Ikeda type were consistent with extravascular haemolytic anaemia. Adult dairy cattle were more likely to be severely anaemic than calves. There were differences in haematology and biochemistry profiles between adult dairy cattle and calves, but most of these differences likely had a physiological rather than pathological basis. Overall, the haematological changes in calves aged <6 months appeared less severe than in adult dairy cattle.

  8. Microbiological profile and calprotectin expression in naturally occurring and experimentally induced gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Roberto; Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the microbiological profile and the calprotectin expression in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in spontaneous and experimentally induced gingival inflammation. Thirty-seven periodontally healthy subjects were evaluated in real life conditions (N-O gingivitis) as well as after 21 days of experimental gingivitis trial (E-I gingivitis). During the experimental gingivitis trial, in one maxillary quadrant (test quadrant), gingival inflammation was induced by oral hygiene abstention, while in the contralateral (control) quadrant, oral hygiene was routinely continued. The results of the study showed that (1) the microbiological profile of quadrants where gingival inflammation was experimentally induced (i.e., E-I test quadrants) differed significantly from that of either quadrants where gingival inflammation was controlled by proper plaque control (i.e., E-I control quadrants) or quadrants with N-O gingivitis, and (2) GCF calprotectin was significantly higher at E-I test quadrants compared to either E-I control quadrants or quadrants with N-O gingivitis. A positive intrasubject correlation was found between GCF concentration of calprotectin at sites presenting N-O and E-I gingivitis. N-O and E-I gingivitis showed a different microbiological profile of the subgingival environment. GCF calprotectin is a reliable marker of gingival inflammation, and its concentration in N-O gingivitis is correlated with its expression in E-I gingivitis. The modality of plaque accumulation seems to affect the subgingival microbiological profile associated with a gingivitis condition. Calprotectin levels in GCF may be regarded as a promising marker of the individual susceptibility to develop gingival inflammation in response to experimentally induced plaque accumulation.

  9. Remarkable isotopic and trace element trends in potassic through sodic Cretaceous plutons of the Yukon-Koyukuk Basin, Alaska, and the nature of the lithosphere beneath the Koyukuk terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arth, Joseph G.; Criss, Robert E.; Zmuda, Clara C.; Foley, Nora K.; Patton, W.W.; Miller, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    During the period from 110 to 80 m.y. ago, a 450-km-long magmatic belt was active along the northern margin of Yukon-Koyukuk basin and on eastern Seward Peninsula. The plutons intruded Upper Jurassic(?) and Lower Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in Yukon-Koyukuk basin and Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic continental rocks in Seward Peninsula. Within Yukon-Koyukuk basin, the plutons vary in composition from calc-alkalic plutons on the east to potassic and ultrapotassic alkalic plutons on the west. Plutons within Yukon-Koyukuk basin were analyzed for trace element and isotopic compositions in order to discern their origin and the nature of the underling lithosphere. Farthest to the east, the calc-alkalic rocks of Indian Mountain pluton are largely tonalite and sodic granodiorite, and have low Rb (average 82 ppm), high Sr (>600 ppm), high chondrite-normalized (cn) Ce/Yb (16–37), low δ18O (+6.5 to +7.1), low initial 87Sr/86Sr (SIR) (0.704), and high initial 143Nd/144Nd (NIR) (0.5126). These rocks resemble those modelled elsewhere as partial melts and subsequent fractionates of basaltic or gabbroic metaigneous rocks, and may be products of melting in the deeper parts of the Late Jurassic(?) and Early Cretaceous volcanic arc. Farthest to the west, the two ultrapotassic bodies of Selawik and Inland Lake are high in Cs (up to 93 ppm), Rb (up to 997 ppm), Sr, Ba, Th, and light rare earth elements, have high (Ce/Yb)cn (30, 27), moderate to low δ18O (+8.4, +6.9), high SIR (0.712, 0.710), and moderate NIR (0.5121–0.5122). These rocks resemble rocks of Australia and elsewhere that were modelled as melts of continental mantle that had been previously enriched in large cations. This mantle may be Paleozoic or older. The farthest west alkalic pluton of Selawik Hills is largely monzonite, quartz monzonite, and granite; has moderate Rb (average 284 ppm), high Sr (>600 ppm), high (Ce/Yb)cn (15–25), moderate δ18O (+8.3 to +8.6), high SIR (0.708

  10. Impact of natural light on growth and biopigment profile of cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kumar, Manoj; Ali, Mohammad Irfan; Saran, Suman; Jasuja, Nakuleshwar Dut

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are economically important microorganisms and good source of natural pigments such as chlorophyll, carotenoids and phycobilliproteins. The present research work showed the optimum combination of photophase and scotophase of Spirulina platensis on biomass and chlorophyll-a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, and phycoerythrin contents. The study revealed that among all six light conditions tested, the cultures placed at west facing window, receiving natural day light at temperature 30°C showed extremely significant higher biomass (O.D. 3.46 ± 0.17%) and biopigment accumulation Chlorophyll a 8.94 ± 0.43%, Carotenoid 1.62 ± 0.18%, phycocyanin 2.26 ± 0.14%, allophycocyanin 2.66 ± 0.18% and phycoerythrin 1.32 ± 0.31% as compared to the standard (Full day natural light), which might be beneficial for large scale production of biopigment.

  11. Natural variation in steroid hormone profiles of male Timber Rattlesnakes, Crotalus horridus, in northwest Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Craig M; Beaupre, Steven J

    2014-09-15

    We describe the seasonal profile of circulating steroid hormones (testosterone and corticosterone) in relation to the breeding season in free ranging male Timber Rattlesnakes, Crotalus horridus, over the course of three active seasons. In addition, we examine variation in steroid concentrations across years and in relation to body condition. We found that seasonal profiles of plasma testosterone were different compared to other crotalines with similar mating patterns. Concentrations of testosterone were elevated above baseline in the three months leading up to the single late summer breeding season. Testosterone peaked in July at the onset of the breeding season and dropped to baseline during the peak months of breeding (August and September). Testosterone concentrations also varied annually. Although the exact cause of annual variation could not be established, our results indicate that weather patterns may have driven observed differences. Testosterone concentrations were positively related to body condition, indicating that testosterone production is modulated according to energetic status (particularly in the two months prior to the breeding season). Corticosterone did not vary seasonally or with any measured variable, a result similar to other studied crotalines. Our results highlight the importance of long-term descriptive studies of the regulatory mechanisms that underlie behavior and physiology in diverse taxa, as these mechanisms can vary greatly within and among populations and are valuable in elucidating the intrinsic and extrinsic sources of such variation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Capturing the flow beneath water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbin, A; Ribeiro-Junior, R

    2018-01-28

    Recently, the authors presented two numerical studies for capturing the flow structure beneath water waves (Nachbin and Ribeiro-Junior 2014 Disc. Cont. Dyn. Syst. A 34 , 3135-3153 (doi:10.3934/dcds.2014.34.3135); Ribeiro-Junior et al. 2017 J. Fluid Mech. 812 , 792-814 (doi:10.1017/jfm.2016.820)). Closed orbits for irrotational waves with an opposing current and stagnation points for rotational waves were some of the issues addressed. This paper summarizes the numerical strategies adopted for capturing the flow beneath irrotational and rotational water waves. It also presents new preliminary results for particle trajectories, due to irrotational waves, in the presence of a bottom topography.This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Lower Crustal and Moho Reflections Beneath Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Zelt, C. A.; Creager, K.; Ulberg, C. W.; Schmandt, B.; Hansen, S. M.; Abers, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The multi-disciplinary project iMUSH (imaging Magma Under St. Helens) was designed to illuminate the magmatic system beneath Mount St Helens (MSH) from the subducting Juan de Fuca slab to the surface using seismic, magnetotelluric, and petrologic data. The iMUSH active source experiment consisted of 23 large shots and 6000 seismograph locations. Included in the active-source seismic experiment were 2 dense linear profiles striking NW-SE and NE-SW, each with over 1000 receivers ( 150 m spacing) and 8 shots. Using the 1D average velocity model around MSH determined from travel-time analysis (Kiser et al., 2016, Geology), we have common-midpoint stacked STA/LTA envelope functions from all of the data along the NW-SE profile. A number of bright reflection events in the CMP section show remarkably good correspondence with abrupt velocity changes that were imaged in the 2D travel-time analysis in the mid to lower crust and at the Moho: Reflections appear at 20-25 km depth at the tops of two lower crustal high velocity (Vp > 7.5 km/s) bodies. One of these high velocity bodies is directly beneath MSH. The other is 40 km SE of MSH, under the Indian Heaven volcanic field, a basaltic field last active 9 ka. We have interpreted the high velocity bodies as cumulates from Quaternary or Tertiary volcanism. Separating the two high Vp bodies is a lower velocity column (Vp ≤ 6.5 km/s) dipping to the SE from the midcrust to the Moho. In the CMP section, the Moho reflection is bright under the region of low velocity and dims beneath both of the high velocity lower crustal bodies. Seismicity associated with the 1980 eruption extended from the summit to 20 km depth, stopping just above the bright reflection at the top of the MSH high Vp body. Deep long period events under MSH, often associated with motion of magmatic fluids, cluster at 20-30 km depth along the southeastern edge of the same reflection. This leads us to suggest that lower crustal magmas migrate along the southeastern

  14. Analysis of temperature profile and electric field in natural rubber glove due to microwave heating: effects of waveguide position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keangin, P.; Narumitbowonkul, U.; Rattanadecho, P.

    2018-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) is the key raw material used in the manufacture of other products such as rubber band, tire and shoes. Recently, the NR is used in natural rubber glove ( NRG) manufacturing in the industrial and medical fields. This research aims to investigate the electromagnetic wave propagation and heat transfer in NRG due to heating with microwave energy within the microwave oven at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Three-dimensional model of NRG and microwave oven are considered in this work. The comparative effects of waveguide position on the electric field and temperature profile in NRG when subjected to microwave energy are discussed. The finite element method (FEM) is used to solve the transient Maxwell’s equation coupled with the transient heat transfer equation. The simulation results with computer programs are validated with experimental results. The placement of waveguides in three cases are left hand side of microwave oven, right hand side of microwave oven and left and right hand sides of microwave oven are investigated. The findings revealed that the placing the waveguide on the right side of the microwave oven gives the highest electric field and temperature profile. The values obtained provide an indication toward understanding the study of heat transfer in NRG during microwave heating in the industry.

  15. The Ocean Boundary Layer beneath Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasaro, E. A.; Sanford, T. B.; Terrill, E.; Price, J.

    2006-12-01

    The upper ocean beneath the peak winds of Hurricane Frances (57 m/s) was measured using several varieties of air-deployed floats as part of CBLAST. A multilayer structure was observed as the boundary layer deepened from 20m to 120m in about 12 hours. Bubbles generated by breaking waves create a 10m thick surface layer with a density anomaly, due to the bubbles, of about 1 kg/m3. This acts to lubricate the near surface layer. A turbulent boundary layer extends beneath this to about 40 m depth. This is characterized by large turbulent eddies spanning the boundary layer. A stratified boundary layer grows beneath this reaching 120m depth. This is characterized by a gradient Richardson number of 1/4, which is maintained by strong inertial currents generated by the hurricane, and smaller turbulent eddies driven by the shear instead of the wind and waves. There is little evidence of mixing beneath this layer. Heat budgets reveal the boundary layer to be nearly one dimensional through much of the deepening, with horizontal and vertical heat advection becoming important only after the storm had passed. Turbulent kinetic energy measurements support the idea of reduced surface drag at high wind speeds. The PWP model correctly predicts the degree of mixed layer deepening if the surface drag is reduced at high wind speed. Overall, the greatest uncertainty in understanding the ocean boundary layer at these extreme wind speeds is a characterization of the near- surface processes which govern the air-sea fluxes and surface wave properties.

  16. Landholder Profiling and Typologies for Natural Resource-Management Policy and Program Support: Potential and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtage, Nick; Herbohn, John; Harrison, Steve

    2007-09-01

    The use of landholder typologies to aid the development, implementation, and monitoring natural-resource management (NRM) policies and programs has increased considerably during the past decade. This article explores the potential for using such typologies for a variety of NRM and rural and regional development applications. Review of typology use further suggests that there is potential to refine the way that typologies are developed and applied to better aid NRM, farming systems analyses, and rural and regional development. Before typologies will be adopted more widely, a number of theoretical and methodologic issues must be addressed. These include the following questions: (1) Which criteria and methods should or can be used to classify landholders? (2) How should studies across spatial and temporal scales be integrated? (3) How should multiple and single industry studies be integrated to gain the most value from research? We argue that quantitative research techniques are well suited to provide an underlying structure for landholder typologies, and qualitative research techniques are useful for developing understanding of the nature of variation within and between landholder types. We argued further that because of the potential utility and breadth for the application of landholder typologies, a nested set of landholder typologies could be developed that are coordinated at the national, regional, and local geographic levels, with repeated measures used to track the evolution with time of landholder practices, management values, and socioeconomic characteristics.

  17. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  18. Propaedeutics of Mathematical Language of Schemes and Structures in School Teaching of the Natural Sciences Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kotchnev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the teaching process at schools of the natural sciences profile. The subject of the research is devoted to the correlations between the students’ progress and the degree of their involvement in creative activities of problem solving in the natural sciences context. The research is aimed to demonstrate the reinforce- ment of students’ creative learning by teaching mathematical schemes and structures. The comparative characteristics of the task, problem and model approaches to mathematical problem solving are given; the experimental data on the efficiency of mathematical training based on the above approaches being discussed, as well as the specifics of modeling the tasks for problem solving. The author examines the ways for stimulating the students’ creative activity and motivating the knowledge acquisition, and search for the new mathematical conformities related to the natural science content. The significance of the Olympiad and other non-standard tasks, broadening the students’ horizons and stimulating creative thinking and abilities, is emphasized.The proposed method confirms the appropriateness of introducing the Olympiad and non-standard problem solving into the preparatory training curricula for the Unified State Examinations. 

  19. High-Resolution Replication Profiles Define the Stochastic Nature of Genome Replication Initiation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hawkins

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genome replication is stochastic, and each cell uses a different cohort of replication origins. We demonstrate that interpreting high-resolution Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome replication data with a mathematical model allows quantification of the stochastic nature of genome replication, including the efficiency of each origin and the distribution of termination events. Single-cell measurements support the inferred values for stochastic origin activation time. A strain, in which three origins were inactivated, confirmed that the distribution of termination events is primarily dictated by the stochastic activation time of origins. Cell-to-cell variability in origin activity ensures that termination events are widely distributed across virtually the whole genome. We propose that the heterogeneity in origin usage contributes to genome stability by limiting potentially deleterious events from accumulating at particular loci.

  20. Development and validation of risk profiles of West African rural communities facing multiple natural hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare-Kyei, Daniel; Renaud, Fabrice G; Kloos, Julia; Walz, Yvonne; Rhyner, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    West Africa has been described as a hotspot of climate change. The reliance on rain-fed agriculture by over 65% of the population means that vulnerability to climatic hazards such as droughts, rainstorms and floods will continue. Yet, the vulnerability and risk levels faced by different rural social-ecological systems (SES) affected by multiple hazards are poorly understood. To fill this gap, this study quantifies risk and vulnerability of rural communities to drought and floods. Risk is assessed using an indicator-based approach. A stepwise methodology is followed that combines participatory approaches with statistical, remote sensing and Geographic Information System techniques to develop community level vulnerability indices in three watersheds (Dano, Burkina Faso; Dassari, Benin; Vea, Ghana). The results show varying levels of risk profiles across the three watersheds. Statistically significant high levels of mean risk in the Dano area of Burkina Faso are found whilst communities in the Dassari area of Benin show low mean risk. The high risk in the Dano area results from, among other factors, underlying high exposure to droughts and rainstorms, longer dry season duration, low caloric intake per capita, and poor local institutions. The study introduces the concept of community impact score (CIS) to validate the indicator-based risk and vulnerability modelling. The CIS measures the cumulative impact of the occurrence of multiple hazards over five years. 65.3% of the variance in observed impact of hazards/CIS was explained by the risk models and communities with high simulated disaster risk generally follow areas with high observed disaster impacts. Results from this study will help disaster managers to better understand disaster risk and develop appropriate, inclusive and well integrated mitigation and adaptation plans at the local level. It fulfills the increasing need to balance global/regional assessments with community level assessments where major decisions

  1. Trace element profiles of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis living nearby a natural CO2 vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rael Horwitz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is not an isolated threat, but acts in concert with other impacts on ecosystems and species. Coastal marine invertebrates will have to face the synergistic interactions of OA with other global and local stressors. One local factor, common in coastal environments, is trace element contamination. CO2 vent sites are extensively studied in the context of OA and are often considered analogous to the oceans in the next few decades. The CO2 vent found at Levante Bay (Vulcano, NE Sicily, Italy also releases high concentrations of trace elements to its surrounding seawater, and is therefore a unique site to examine the effects of long-term exposure of nearby organisms to high pCO2 and trace element enrichment in situ. The sea anemone Anemonia viridis is prevalent next to the Vulcano vent and does not show signs of trace element poisoning/stress. The aim of our study was to compare A. viridis trace element profiles and compartmentalization between high pCO2 and control environments. Rather than examining whole anemone tissue, we analyzed two different body compartments—the pedal disc and the tentacles, and also examined the distribution of trace elements in the tentacles between the animal and the symbiotic algae. We found dramatic changes in trace element tissue concentrations between the high pCO2/high trace element and control sites, with strong accumulation of iron, lead, copper and cobalt, but decreased concentrations of cadmium, zinc and arsenic proximate to the vent. The pedal disc contained substantially more trace elements than the anemone’s tentacles, suggesting the pedal disc may serve as a detoxification/storage site for excess trace elements. Within the tentacles, the various trace elements displayed different partitioning patterns between animal tissue and algal symbionts. At both sites iron was found primarily in the algae, whereas cadmium, zinc and arsenic were primarily found in the animal tissue. Our data

  2. Endogenous steroid profiling by gas-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics for detection of natural hormone abuse in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Blokland, Marco; Tricht, Frederike; Rossum, Hennie; Sterk, Saskia; Nielen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For years it is suspected that natural hormones are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle in the European Union. Unfortunately there is a lack of methods and criteria that can be used to detect the abuse of natural hormones and distinguish treated from non-treated animals. Pattern recognition of steroid profiles is a promising approach for tracing/detecting the abuse of natural hormones administered to cattle. Traditionally steroids are analyzed in urine as free ste...

  3. Microbiological and chemical profiles of naturally fermented table olives and brines from different Italian cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Schirone, Maria; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Angelozzi, Giovanni; Suzzi, Giovanna; Corsetti, Aldo

    2012-06-01

    Six naturally fermented (Greek-style) table olives of cultivars Itrana, Peranzana, Cellina di Nardò, Nocellara del Belice and Bella di Cerignola, as well as their corresponding brines, were studied by a combined strategy consisting of chemical, microbiological and molecular analyses. In particular, organic acids, sugars, polyphenols, fatty acids, biogenic amines and cultivable microbiota were detected by standard methods. Moreover, tyramine and histamine producing bacteria were evaluated by an original approach consisting of Reverse-Transcription (RT)-qPCR. At the end of the fermentation process, mesophilic lactobacilli and yeasts in brine represented the dominating biota, ranging from 6.25 to 7.84 log CFU/ml and from 6.5 to 7.56 log CFU/ml, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae and pathogens were undetectable in all the samples. In general, table olive preparations differed in chemical composition. In particular, C16:0 and C18:2c9,12 concentrations ranged from 9.9 to 18.8 % and from 5.4 to 15.4 % of total fatty acids, respectively. The main fatty acid detected was C18:1c9 while CLAc9, t11 was present only in traces. Polyphenol concentrations greatly differentiated the final product, depending on the cultivar. A low quantity of biogenic amines was found in some samples and biogenic amines producing bacteria were rapidly detectable by RT-qPCR.

  4. Immunoblot profiles of sera from laboratory rats naturally infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis and technicians exposed to infected animal facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado Márcio Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pulmonis have been isolated in about 10(5 CFU/mL from tracheal aspirates of rats from conventional animal facilities in São Paulo. The mycoplasma transmission by aerosol may happen from an infected rat to a healthy one at distances up to 120 cm. This condition also favors the technicians contamination. As this infection is unknown in humans, in this study the immunoblot profiles to M. pulmonis of sera from rats were compared to those presented by animal facility technicians. About 32 proteins from 11 to 230 kDa (kilodaltons were recognized by the sera from rats naturally infected with M. pulmonis. Sera from technicians responsible for the cleaning and sanitation of cages of infected animals for more than seven years recognized about 10 proteins of this bacteria. Sera from individuals with shorter working time or that had never been exposed to such environment recognized few proteins. Proteins about 117 and 95 kDa were recognized by human and rat sera and by the negative controls. Although a positive human serum against M. pulmonis is unknown, this study established a temporary profile of protein recognition of human serum against such mycoplasma.

  5. Analysis of groundwater flow beneath ice sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, G. S.; Zatsepin, S.; Maillot, B. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2001-03-01

    The large-scale pattern of subglacial groundwater flow beneath European ice sheets was analysed in a previous report. It was based on a two-dimensional flowline model. In this report, the analysis is extended to three dimensions by exploring the interactions between groundwater and tunnel flow. A theory is developed which suggests that the large-scale geometry of the hydraulic system beneath an ice sheet is a coupled, self-organising system. In this system the pressure distribution along tunnels is a function of discharge derived from basal meltwater delivered to tunnels by groundwater flow, and the pressure along tunnels itself sets the base pressure which determines the geometry of catchments and flow towards the tunnel. The large-scale geometry of tunnel distribution is a product of the pattern of basal meltwater production and the transmissive properties of the bed. The tunnel discharge from the ice margin of the glacier, its seasonal fluctuation and the sedimentary characteristics of eskers are largely determined by the discharge of surface meltwater which penetrates to the bed in the terminal zone. The theory explains many of the characteristics of esker systems and can account for tunnel valleys. It is concluded that the large-scale hydraulic regime beneath ice sheets is largely a consequence of groundwater/tunnel flow interactions and that it is essential similar to non-glacial hydraulic regimes. Experimental data from an Icelandic glacier, which demonstrates measured relationships between subglacial tunnel flow and groundwater flow during the transition from summer to winter seasons for a modern glacier, and which support the general conclusions of the theory is summarised in an appendix.

  6. Subducting characteristic of the Pacific slab beneath northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, G.; Zhang, G.; Xu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The volcanoes locating in northeast China are very active. Some researchers consider that the origin of volcanoes is closely related to the subducting western Pacific plate and the upwelling asthenosphere. The thickness and the existing range of the subducted plate are not clear as far although the seismic tomography results obviously show that the Pacific plate exists below the volcano region. Therefore, in this study, we adopted the method combining the teleseismic tomography with travel time forward modeling to further study the velocity structure beneath northeast China, especially the precise model of subducted Pacific plate. Our results show that (1) the average thickness and velocity perturbation of slab is 85 km and 1%, respectively, and the slab has not been thickened compared with the previous result of the Japan Sea; (2) the Pacific plate subducted into the mantle transition zone with a shallow dip angle, and changed horizontally when it touched the bottom of mantle transition zone, and extended westward to Longitude 127°E and then stops over there; (3) the horizontal slab locates right below the volcano region. These above features help people understand the origin of intraplate volcanoes and the geodynamical process better. (a) Tomographic result along 43°N. Red and blue colors represent the high and low velocity anomalies, respectively, and the scale is shown at the right-bottom; The profile line is shown in (b); The black triangles represent the volcanoes locating near the profile; The black solid and dashed lines show the depths of upper and lower boundaries of Pacific plate, respectively. The red dots represent the deep earthquakes around the profile. (b) Location of profile AA' along 43°N. Black triangles denote volcanoes; White squares represent the stations; Blue contours denote the depth of upper boundary of Pacific plate; Black and red dots represent the deep epicenters.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from natural sources of water from rural areas of East Sikkim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubra Poonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water, food, and environment with antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a serious public health issue. Objective: The objective was to study the bacterial pollution of the natural sources of water in east Sikkim and to determine the antimicrobial profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 225 samples, 75 each during winter, summer, and monsoon season were collected from the same source in every season for bacteriological analysis by membrane filtration method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using standard disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 19 bacterial species of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, Shigella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, and Serratia were isolated and their antimicrobial sensitivity tested. Generally, most bacterial isolates except Salmonella and Shigella species were found resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (57.5%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxaole (39.1%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (37.4%, cefixime (34.5%, tetracycline (29.1%, ceftazidime (26.3%, ofloxacin (25.9%, amikacin (8.7%, and gentamicin (2.7% but sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion: Natural sources of water in east Sikkim are grossly contaminated with bacteria including enteropathogens. The consumption of untreated water from these sources might pose health risk to consumers.

  8. Slab melting and magma formation beneath the southern Cascade arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, Kristina J.; Wallace, Paul J.; Clynne, Michael A.; Rasmussen, D.J.; Weis, D.

    2016-01-01

    The processes that drive magma formation beneath the Cascade arc and other warm-slab subduction zones have been debated because young oceanic crust is predicted to largely dehydrate beneath the forearc during subduction. In addition, geochemical variability along strike in the Cascades has led to contrasting interpretations about the role of volatiles in magma generation. Here, we focus on the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc, where previous work has demonstrated across-arc geochemical variations related to subduction enrichment, and H-isotope data suggest that H2O in basaltic magmas is derived from the final breakdown of chlorite in the mantle portion of the slab. We use naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from the tephra deposits of eight primitive (MgO>7 wt%) basaltic cinder cones to quantify the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mantle-derived melts in this region. The melt inclusions have B concentrations and isotope ratios that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), suggesting extensive dehydration of the downgoing plate prior to reaching sub-arc depths and little input of slab-derived B into the mantle wedge. However, correlations of volatile and trace element ratios (H2O/Ce, Cl/Nb, Sr/Nd) in the melt inclusions demonstrate that geochemical variability is the result of variable addition of a hydrous subduction component to the mantle wedge. Furthermore, correlations between subduction component tracers and radiogenic isotope ratios show that the subduction component has less radiogenic Sr and Pb than the Lassen sub-arc mantle, which can be explained by melting of subducted Gorda MORB beneath the arc. Agreement between pMELTS melting models and melt inclusion volatile, major, and trace element data suggests that hydrous slab melt addition to the mantle wedge can produce the range in primitive compositions erupted in the Lassen region. Our results provide further evidence that chlorite-derived fluids from the mantle portion of the

  9. Accumulation profiles of PrPSc in hemal nodes of naturally and experimentally scrapie-infected sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In classical scrapie, the disease-associated abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of normal prion protein accumulates principally in the nervous system and lymphoid tissues of small ruminants. Lymph nodes traffic leukocytes via lymphatic and blood vasculatures but hemal nodes lack lymphatic vessels and thus traffic leukocytes only via the blood. Although PrPSc accumulation profiles are well-characterized in ovine lymphoid tissues, there is limited information on such profiles in hemal nodes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the follicular accumulation of PrPSc within hemal nodes and lymph nodes by prion epitope mapping and western blot studies. Results Our studies found that PrPSc accumulation in 82% of animals’ abdominal hemal nodes when PrPSc is detected in both mesenteric and retropharyngeal lymph nodes collected from preclinical and clinical, naturally and experimentally (blood transfusion) scrapie-infected sheep representing all three major scrapie-susceptible Prnp genotypes. Abdominal hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes were then used to analyze immune cell phenotypes and PrPSc epitope mapping by immunohistochemistry and PrPSc banding patterns by western blot. Similar patterns of PrPSc accumulation were detected within the secondary follicles of hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes, where cellular labeling was mostly associated with macrophages and follicular dendritic cells. The pattern of PrPSc accumulation within hemal nodes and retropharyngeal lymph nodes also did not differ with respect to epitope mapping with seven mAbs (N-terminus, n = 4; globular domain, n = 2; C-terminus, n = 1) in all three Prnp genotypes. Western blot analysis of hemal node and retropharyngeal lymph node homogenates revealed identical three banding patterns of proteinase K resistant PrPSc. Conclusion Despite the anatomical difference in leukocyte trafficking between lymph nodes and hemal nodes, the follicles of hemal nodes appear to

  10. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  11. Bubble streams rising beneath an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Brasz, Frederik; Kim, Dayoung; Menesses, Mark; Belden, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Bubbles released beneath a submerged inclined surface can tumble along the wall as they rise, dragging the surrounding fluid with them. This effect has recently regained attention as a method to mitigate biofouling in marine environment, such as a ship hull. It appears that the efficacy of this approach may be related to the velocity of the rising bubbles and the extent that they spread laterally as they rise. Yet, it is unclear how bubble stream rise velocity and lateral migration depend on bubble size, flow rate, and inclination angle. Here we perform systematic experiments to quantify these relationships for both individual bubble trajectories and ensemble average statistics. Research supported by the Office of Naval Research under Grant Number award N00014-16-1-3000.

  12. Detecting slab structure beneath the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The presence of subducted slabs in the Mediterranean has been well documented with seismic tomography, however, these images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, underestimate the sharpness of the structures. The position and extent of the slabs and the presence possible tears or gaps in the subducted lithosphere are still debated, yet the shape and location these structures are important for kinematic reconstructions and evolution of the entire subduction zone system. Extensive distribution of broadband seismic instrumentation in the Mediterranean (Italian National Seismic Network in Italy and the NSF-PICASSO project in Spain and Morocco) has allowed us to use alternative methodologies to detect the position of the slabs and slab tears beneath the Central and Western Mediterranean. Using S receiver functions we are able to identify S-to-p conversions from the bottom of the subducted slab and a lack of these signals where there are gaps or tears in the slab. We also analyze broadband waveforms for changes in P wave coda from deep (> 300 km depth) local earthquakes. The waveform records for stations in southern Italy and around the Betic-Rif show large amplitude, high frequency (f > 5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after relatively low-frequency onset. High frequency arrivals are the strongest from events whose raypaths travel within the slab to the stations where they are recorded allowing for mapping of where the subducted material is located within the upper mantle. These two methods, along with inferring the slab position from fast P-wave velocity perturbations in tomography and intermediate depth seismicity, provide additional geophysical evidence to aid in interpretation of the complex, segmented slab structure beneath the Mediterranean.

  13. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Owens, Thomas J.; Silver, Paul G.; Wu, Frances T.

    1994-07-01

    Eleven broadband digital seismic stations were deployed across the central Tibetan Plateau in the first extensive passive-source experiment attempted within the Tibetan Plateau. One year of recording resulted in 186 event-station pairs which we analyze to determine the characteristics of shear wave splitting in the upper mantle beneath the array. Measurements of the fast polarization direction (phi) and delay time (delta-t) for SKS and direct S arrivals reveal systematic variations along the north-south oriented array. In the north central region of the plateau, very large delay times are observed at three stations, the largest of which is BUDO with delta-t = 2.4 s. However, at TUNL, which is off the northern edge of the plateau and 110 km from BUDO, and at sites in the south central plateau, delta-t decreases by nearly a factor of 3. We also observe a systematic rotation of phi from about 45 deg (NE) to 90 deg (E-W) from south to north along the array. A previously identified zone of inefficient Sn propagation correlates well with our region of large delta-t observations. The large delay times suggest that a relatively high number of anisotropic crystals are preferentially alligned within the mantle-lid, beneath the north central portion of the Tibetan Plateau. In most cases, fast polarization directions appear to be parallel to surface geologic features suggesting as much as 200 km of the upper mantle has been involved in the collisional deformation that has produced the Tibetan Plateau.

  14. Recharge Rates and Chemistry Beneath Playas of the High Plains Aquifer - A Literature Review and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdak, Jason J.; Roe, Cassia D.

    2009-01-01

    Playas are ephemeral, closed-basin wetlands that are important zones of recharge to the High Plains (or Ogallala) aquifer and critical habitat for birds and other wildlife in the otherwise semiarid, shortgrass prairie and agricultural landscape. The ephemeral nature of playas, low regional recharge rates, and a strong reliance on ground water from the High Plains aquifer has prompted many questions regarding the contribution of recharge from playas to the regional aquifer. To address these questions and concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Playa Lakes Joint Venture, present a review and synthesis of the more than 175 publications about recharge rates and chemistry beneath playas and interplaya settings. Although a number of questions remain regarding the controls on recharge rates and chemistry beneath playas, the results from most published studies indicate that recharge rates beneath playas are substantially (1 to 2 orders of magnitude) higher than recharge rates beneath interplaya settings. The synthesis presented here supports the conceptual model that playas are important zones of recharge to the High Plains aquifer and are not strictly evaporative pans. The major findings of this synthesis yield science-based implications for the protection and management of playas and ground-water resources of the High Plains aquifer and directions for future research.

  15. A detailed look beneath the surface: Evidence of a surface reconstruction beneath a capping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krull, D., E-mail: dominique.krull@tu-dortmund.de [Lehrstuhl für Experimentelle Physik I and DELTA, Dortmund University of Technology, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Tesch, M.F. [University of Applied Sciences Münster, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany); Schönbohm, F.; Lühr, T.; Keutner, C.; Berges, U. [Lehrstuhl für Experimentelle Physik I and DELTA, Dortmund University of Technology, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Mertins, H.-Ch. [University of Applied Sciences Münster, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany); Westphal, C. [Lehrstuhl für Experimentelle Physik I and DELTA, Dortmund University of Technology, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2016-03-30

    Highlights: • Demonstration of a detailed look into internal interface structures. • Close-up view to an internal surface beneath a capping layer. • Resolving of inter-diffusion layers. • Imaging of phase-transition (local layers). • Demonstration of achieving magnetic information of an interlayer. - Abstract: Many physical effects are strongly depending on the composition of the interfaces between separating layers. Hence, the knowledge of the interfacial characteristics such as structure, chemical bonds, or magnetic properties of the corresponding materials is essential for an understanding and optimization of these effects. This study reports on a combined magnetic and structural analysis using X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (T-MOKE). The information depth of these methods is demonstrated by investigating the uppermost GaAs(001) layer beneath a Fe-film and the interfacial regimes of Fe/GaAs(001) beneath an MgO capping layer. Iron was prepared on a clean GaAs(001) surface and a GaAs(001)-(4 × 2)-reconstructed surface. Beneath the Fe-film, the (4 × 2)-reconstruction is not lifted, which is clearly shown by the diffraction pattern of the GaAs(4 × 2)-Fe surface. It is shown that Fe inter-diffusion, resulting in an amorphous interface, is almost prevented by the Ga-rich reconstruction. The magneto-optical measurements with T-MOKE clearly demonstrated the Fe-interlayer in a ferromagnetic state. We find no evidence for magnetic properties neither within the signal of the GaAs-substrate nor the MgO-film.

  16. A detailed look beneath the surface: Evidence of a surface reconstruction beneath a capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, D.; Tesch, M. F.; Schönbohm, F.; Lühr, T.; Keutner, C.; Berges, U.; Mertins, H.-Ch.; Westphal, C.

    2016-03-01

    Many physical effects are strongly depending on the composition of the interfaces between separating layers. Hence, the knowledge of the interfacial characteristics such as structure, chemical bonds, or magnetic properties of the corresponding materials is essential for an understanding and optimization of these effects. This study reports on a combined magnetic and structural analysis using X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (T-MOKE). The information depth of these methods is demonstrated by investigating the uppermost GaAs(001) layer beneath a Fe-film and the interfacial regimes of Fe/GaAs(001) beneath an MgO capping layer. Iron was prepared on a clean GaAs(001) surface and a GaAs(001)-(4 × 2)-reconstructed surface. Beneath the Fe-film, the (4 × 2)-reconstruction is not lifted, which is clearly shown by the diffraction pattern of the GaAs(4 × 2)-Fe surface. It is shown that Fe inter-diffusion, resulting in an amorphous interface, is almost prevented by the Ga-rich reconstruction. The magneto-optical measurements with T-MOKE clearly demonstrated the Fe-interlayer in a ferromagnetic state. We find no evidence for magnetic properties neither within the signal of the GaAs-substrate nor the MgO-film.

  17. Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Beneath Regions of Recent Volcanism in the Basin and Range Province and Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. W.; Rau, C. J.; Plank, T.; Gazel, E.; Bendersky, C.

    2010-12-01

    Melt in the asthenosphere may contribute strongly to the development of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in some settings. We have compiled a set of vertical shear-velocity profiles beneath centers of recent (Hill and Amboy in the southern Mojave, the lithospheric lid extends to a depth of ~ 90 km. Minimum velocities in the LVZs beneath the higher velocity lids typically are 4.00-4.05 km/s, similar to that beneath the East Pacific Rise and too low to be caused by temperature alone without unreasonably high attenuation. Beneath other centers, like Big Pine, Lathrop Wells and Tahoe, there is no resolvable lid. The lid is either missing or too thin to resolve, but the absence of the lid/LVZ pattern seems to be due to a combination of lower velocities immediately beneath the Moho and higher velocities in the LVZ. Petrological indicators of temperature and depth of melting from basalt composition are in general agreement with the seismological observations, with the depth of last equilibration typically occurring near the top of the LVZ. Beneath Big Pine, for example, the equilibration temperatures are unusually low and the equilibration depth is 40 to 50 km, just below the Moho, in agreement with the lack of a distinct lid. Beneath Cima, equilibration depths are 60-70 km. Beneath Coso, equilibration depths are only slightly deeper than Big Pine, but the temperatures are higher, in agreement with the more pronounced LVZ and the presence of a thin lid. Beneath the Tabernacle Hill/Black Rock volcanic field in west-central Utah, there is a well-developed lid/LVZ structure, but the "high" velocity lid is only ~ 4.10 km/s while the underlying LVZ reaches as low as 3.90 km/s. This observation points to the importance of melt concentration or distribution controlling the velocities. Lid velocities are often relatively low (4.2-4.4 km/s) in the Basin and Range, indicating high temperatures, but here there is probably melt within the lid as well, with higher

  18. Investigating Late Cenozoic Mantle Dynamics beneath Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Liu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent tomography models (Sigloch, 2011; Schmandt & Lin, 2014) reveal unprecedented details of the mantle structure beneath the United States (U.S.). Prominent slow seismic anomalies below Yellowstone, traditionally interpreted as due to a mantle plume, are restricted to depths either shallower than 200 km or between 500 and 1000 km, but a continuation to greater depth is missing. Compared to fast seismic anomalies, which are usually interpreted as slabs or delaminated lithosphere, origin of deep slow seismic anomalies, especially those in the vicinity of subduction zones, is more enigmatic. As a consequence, both the dynamics and evolution of these slow anomalies remain poorly understood. To investigate the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone slow anomaly during the past 20 Myr, we construct a 4D inverse mantle convection model with a hybrid data assimilation scheme. On the one hand, we use the adjoint method to recover the past evolution of mantle seismic structures beyond the subduction zones. On the other hand, we use a high-resolution forward model to simulate the subduction of the oceanic (i.e., Farallon) plate. During the adjoint iterations, features from these two approaches are blended together at a depth of ~200 km below the subduction zone. In practice, we convert fast and slow seismic anomalies to effective positive and negative density heterogeneities. Our preliminary results indicate that at 20 Ma, the present-day shallow slow anomalies beneath the western U.S. were located inside the oceanic asthenosphere, which subsequently entered the mantle wedge, through the segmented Farallon slab. The eastward encroachment of the slow anomaly largely followed the Yellowstone hotspot track migration. The present deep mantle Yellowstone slow anomaly originated at shallower depths (i.e. transition zone), and was then translated down to the lower mantle accompanying the sinking fast anomalies. The temporal evolution of the slow anomalies suggests that the deep

  19. Natural blood feeding and temperature shift modulate the global transcriptional profile of Rickettsia rickettsii infecting its tick vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda B M Galletti

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii is an obligate intracellular tick-borne bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, the most lethal spotted fever rickettsiosis. When an infected starving tick begins blood feeding from a vertebrate host, R. rickettsii is exposed to a temperature elevation and to components in the blood meal. These two environmental stimuli have been previously associated with the reactivation of rickettsial virulence in ticks, but the factors responsible for this phenotype conversion have not been completely elucidated. Using customized oligonucleotide microarrays and high-throughput microfluidic qRT-PCR, we analyzed the effects of a 10°C temperature elevation and of a blood meal on the transcriptional profile of R. rickettsii infecting the tick Amblyomma aureolatum. This is the first study of the transcriptome of a bacterium in the genus Rickettsia infecting a natural tick vector. Although both stimuli significantly increased bacterial load, blood feeding had a greater effect, modulating five-fold more genes than the temperature upshift. Certain components of the Type IV Secretion System (T4SS were up-regulated by blood feeding. This suggests that this important bacterial transport system may be utilized to secrete effectors during the tick vector's blood meal. Blood feeding also up-regulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes, which might correspond to an attempt by R. rickettsii to protect itself against the deleterious effects of free radicals produced by fed ticks. The modulated genes identified in this study, including those encoding hypothetical proteins, require further functional analysis and may have potential as future targets for vaccine development.

  20. Turbulence beneath finite amplitude water waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beya, J.F. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Escuela de Ingenieria Civil Oceanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Valparaiso (Chile); The University of New South Wales, Water Research Laboratory, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Peirson, W.L. [The University of New South Wales, Water Research Laboratory, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Banner, M.L. [The University of New South Wales, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Babanin and Haus (J Phys Oceanogr 39:2675-2679, 2009) recently presented evidence of near-surface turbulence generated below steep non-breaking deep-water waves. They proposed a threshold wave parameter a {sup 2}{omega}/{nu} = 3,000 for the spontaneous occurrence of turbulence beneath surface waves. This is in contrast to conventional understanding that irrotational wave theories provide a good approximation of non-wind-forced wave behaviour as validated by classical experiments. Many laboratory wave experiments were carried out in the early 1960s (e.g. Wiegel 1964). In those experiments, no evidence of turbulence was reported, and steep waves behaved as predicted by the high-order irrotational wave theories within the accuracy of the theories and experimental techniques at the time. This contribution describes flow visualisation experiments for steep non-breaking waves using conventional dye techniques in the wave boundary layer extending above the wave trough level. The measurements showed no evidence of turbulent mixing up to a value of a {sup 2}{omega}/{nu} = 7,000 at which breaking commenced in these experiments. These present findings are in accord with the conventional understandings of wave behaviour. (orig.)

  1. Channelization of plumes beneath ice shelves

    KAUST Repository

    Dallaston, M. C.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We study a simplified model of ice-ocean interaction beneath a floating ice shelf, and investigate the possibility for channels to form in the ice shelf base due to spatial variations in conditions at the grounding line. The model combines an extensional thin-film description of viscous ice flow in the shelf, with melting at its base driven by a turbulent ocean plume. Small transverse perturbations to the one-dimensional steady state are considered, driven either by ice thickness or subglacial discharge variations across the grounding line. Either forcing leads to the growth of channels downstream, with melting driven by locally enhanced ocean velocities, and thus heat transfer. Narrow channels are smoothed out due to turbulent mixing in the ocean plume, leading to a preferred wavelength for channel growth. In the absence of perturbations at the grounding line, linear stability analysis suggests that the one-dimensional state is stable to initial perturbations, chiefly due to the background ice advection.

  2. PICASSSO Ps Receiver Function Analysis of the Lithospheric Structure Beneath the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, S.; Palomeras, I.; Levander, A.

    2011-12-01

    Rif and Betic Mountains we observe complex crustal structures, possibly resulting from the associated thrust systems in each region. Along a profile across Morocco, we observe thick crust in the north beneath the Rif Mountains and to the south beneath the northern edge of the West African craton. Near the center of this transect, directly beneath the Atlas, we observe a much thinner crust at ~30-35 km. These receiver functions also reveal a clear LAB at variable depths throughout the study area, with up to a ~100% change in LAB depth from the southern region to the northern region. From south to north, we see an abrupt change in LAB depth from the High Atlas (~85-95 km) to the Middle Atlas (~65-70 km). The LAB remains relatively shallow beneath the Rif (~75 km) and thickens to the north beneath the Betic Mountains (~85-95 km) and the Iberian Massif (~100-125 km). These LAB depth estimates agree well with those from the surface wave analysis presented by Palomeras et al. (this session), and both data sets can be used to better constrain the LAB depth.

  3. Seismic structure and composition of the crust beneath the southern Scandes, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratford, Wanda Rose; Thybo, Hans

    2011-01-01

    investigations of Norwegian uplift structure, refraction experiment) acquired data along three 300 to 400 km long active source seismic profiles across the Southwest Scandinavian Domain in southern Norway, the youngest section of the Fennoscandian shield. Moho depths in the Domain are 36–40 km, thinning towards...... the continental shelf and Oslo Graben. The high Vp lower crust beneath the Southwest Scandinavian Domain (Vp > 7 km/s) is around 4 km thick. Crustal structure in the adjacent Svecofennian Domain differs significantly; Moho depths reach ~ 50 km and an up to 24 km thick high Vp lower crust is present. Strong P...

  4. Electrical conductivity beneath the volcanoes of the NW Argentinian Puna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lezaeta, Pamela; Brasse, Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    ...., in the eastern Puna and backarc zone. The 2‐D conductivity models show a conductive zone beneath the eastern Puna shoshonitic volcanoes and nearby Tuzgle volcano, which reaches from the upper crust to the upper mantle...

  5. Comparative Study on the Electrical Properties of the Oceanic Mantle Beneath the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, H.

    2013-12-01

    We have been conducting long-term seafloor electromagnetic (EM) observations at two sites in the northwest Pacific since 2001. The older site was established at the deep seafloor (~5600m) on the northwest Pacific basin (Site NWP), while the new one was installed on the west Philippine basin (Site WPB) in 2006 at the slightly deeper (~5700m) seafloor. The ages of the oceanic basins at those sites are approximately 129 Ma for Site NWP (Shipboard Scientific Party of ODP Leg 191, 2000) and 49 Ma for Site WPB (Salisbury et al., 2006), respectively. The EM instruments deployed at those sites are seafloor EM stations (SFEMS; Toh et al., 2004 and 2006) and capable of measuring vector EM fields at the seafloor for as long as one year or more with other physical quantities such as the instruments' attitude, orientation and temperature. One of the objectives of the seafloor long-term EM observations by SFEMSs is to make a comparative study of the oceanic mantle with and without influence of the so-called 'stagnant slabs' in terms of their electrical conductivity. It is anticipated that the mantle transition zone under the influence of the stagnant slab has a higher electrical conductivity because the transition zone there could be wetter than that in the absence of the stagnant slab. In this context, the mantle transition zone beneath Site WPB can be said to have influence by the stagnant slab, while that beneath Site NWP does not. It, therefore, is basically possible to estimate how much water is present in each transition zone by comparison of the electrical conductivity profiles of the two. The one-dimensional electrical profile beneath Site NWP has been derived so far using the magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic depth sounding (GDS) methods with significant jumps in the electrical property at 410 and 660km discontinuities. The jumps are approximately factors of 10 and 2, respectively (Ichiki et al., 2009). Here we show a profile beneath Site WPB using both MT and GDS

  6. Endogenous steroid profiling by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics for the detection of natural hormone abuse in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokland, M H; Van Tricht, E F; Van Rossum, H J; Sterk, S S; Nielen, M W F

    2012-01-01

    For years it has been suspected that natural hormones are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle in the European Union. Unfortunately there is a lack of methods and criteria that can be used to detect the abuse of natural hormones and distinguish treated from non-treated animals. Pattern recognition of steroid profiles is a promising approach for tracing/detecting the abuse of natural hormones administered to cattle. Traditionally steroids are analysed in urine as free steroid after deconjugation of the glucuronide (and sulphate) conjugates. The disadvantage of this deconjugation is that valuable information about the steroid profile in the sample is lost. In this study we develop a method to analyse steroids at very low concentration levels (ng l(-1)) for the free steroid, glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in urine samples. This method was used to determine concentrations of natural (pro)hormones in a large population (n = 620) of samples from male and female bovine animals and from bovine animals treated with testosterone-cypionate, estradiol-benzoate, dihydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone. The data acquired were used to build a statistical model applying the multivariate technique 'Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy' (SIMCA). It is demonstrated that by using this model the results of the urine analysis can indicate which animal may have had illegal treatment with natural (pro)hormones.

  7. Tomography of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnin, Mickael; Nolet, Guust; Thomas, Christine; Villaseñor, Antonio; Gallart, Josep; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    In this study we take advantage of the dense broadband-station networks available in western Mediterranean region (IberArray, PICASSO and MOROCCO-MUENSTER networks) to develop a high-resolution 3D tomographic P velocity model of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone. This model is based on teleseismic arrival times recorded between 2008 and 2012 for which cross-correlation delays are measured with a new technique in different frequency bands centered between 0.03 and 1.0 Hz, and interpreted using multiple frequency tomography. Such a tomography is required to scrutinize the nature and extent of the thermal anomalies inferred beneath Northern Africa, especially in the Atlas ranges region and associated to sparse volcanic activities. Tomography is notably needed to help in determining the hypothetical connection between those hot anomalies and the Canary Island hotspot as proposed by geochemistry studies. It also provides new insights on the geometry of the subducting slab previously inferred from tomography, GPS measurements or shear-wave splitting patterns beneath the Alboran Sea and the Betic ranges and is indispensable for deciphering the complex geodynamic history of the Western Mediterranean region. We shall present the overall statistics of the delays, their geographical distribution, as well as the first inversion results.

  8. Major disruption of D'' beneath Alaska: D'' Beneath Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Daoyuan [Laboratory of Seismology and Physics of Earth' s Interior, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui China; National Geophysics Observatory at Mengcheng, Anhui China; Helmberger, Don [Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Caltech, Pasadena California USA; Miller, Meghan S. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles California USA; Jackson, Jennifer M. [Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Caltech, Pasadena California USA

    2016-05-01

    D'' represents one of the most dramatic thermal and compositional layers within our planet. In particular, global tomographic models display relatively fast patches at the base of the mantle along the circum-Pacific which are generally attributed to slab debris. Such distinct patches interact with the bridgmanite (Br) to post-bridgmanite (PBr) phase boundary to generate particularly strong heterogeneity at their edges. Most seismic observations for the D'' come from the lower mantle S wave triplication (Scd). Here we exploit the USArray waveform data to examine one of these sharp transitions in structure beneath Alaska. From west to east beneath Alaska, we observed three different characteristics in D'': (1) the western region with a strong Scd, requiring a sharp δVs = 2.5% increase; (2) the middle region with no clear Scd phases, indicating a lack of D'' (or thin Br-PBr layer); and (3) the eastern region with strong Scd phase, requiring a gradient increase in δVs. To explain such strong lateral variation in the velocity structure, chemical variations must be involved. We suggest that the western region represents relatively normal mantle. In contrast, the eastern region is influenced by a relic slab that has subducted down to the lowermost mantle. In the middle region, we infer an upwelling structure that disrupts the Br-PBr phase boundary. Such an interpretation is based upon a distinct pattern of travel time delays, waveform distortions, and amplitude patterns that reveal a circular-shaped anomaly about 5° across which can be modeled synthetically as a plume-like structure rising about 400 km high with a shear velocity reduction of ~5%, similar to geodynamic modeling predictions of upwellings.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of Gram-positive Arthrobacter in the phyllosphere: induction of pollutant degradation genes by natural plant phenolic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheublin, T.R.; Deusch, S.; Moreno-Forero, S.K.; Müller, J.A.; van der Meer, J.R.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 is a Gram-positive, 4-chlorophenol degrading soil bacterium that was recently shown to be an effective colonizer of plant leaf surfaces. The genetic basis for this phyllosphere competency is unknown. In this paper, we describe the genome-wide expression profile of A.

  10. Seismic Anisotropy due to Crust and Uppermost Mantle Deformation Beneath Southern Peru and Bolivia: Constraints from Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, N.; Long, M. D.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Tavera, H.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction systems play a key role in plate tectonics, but the deformation of the crust and uppermost mantle during subduction and orogenesis in continental subduction systems remains poorly understood. Observations of seismic anisotropy can provide important constraints on dynamic processes in the crust and uppermost mantle in subduction systems. The subduction zone beneath Peru and Bolivia, where the Nazca plate subducts beneath South America, represents a particularly interesting location to study subduction-related deformation, given the complex slab morphology and the along-strike transition from flat to normally dipping subduction. In particular, understanding the structure and deformation of the crust and mantle will yield insight into the relationship between the flat slab and the overriding continental lithosphere. In this study we constrain seismic anisotropy within and above the subducting slab (including the mantle wedge and the overriding plate) beneath southern Peru and Bolivia using transverse component receiver functions. Because anisotropic receiver function analysis can constrain the depth distribution of anisotropy, this analysis is complementary to previous studies of shear wave splitting in this region. We examine data from two dense lines of seismometers from the PULSE and CAUGHT deployments in Peru and Bolivia, each anchored by a long-running permanent station. The northern line overlies the Peru flat slab, while the southern line overlies the normally dipping slab beneath Bolivia. Beneath Peru, our investigation of anisotropic structure along the flat slab will help test the recently suggested hypothesis of a slab tear; beneath Bolivia, we aim to characterize the pattern of flow in the mantle wedge as well as the nature of deformation in the lower crust of the overriding plate.

  11. Bedrock topography beneath uppermost part of Aletsch glacier, Central Swiss Alps, revealed from cosmic-ray muon radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Käser, Samuel; Lechmann, Alessandro; Mair, David; Scampoli, Paola; Vladymyrov, Mykhailo; Ereditato, Antonio; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In mountainous landscapes such as the Central Alps of Europe, the bedrock topography is one of the most interesting subjects of study since it separates the geological substratum (bedrock) from the overlying unconsolidated units (ice). The geometry of the bedrock topography puts a tight constraint on the erosional mechanism of glaciers. In previous studies, it has been inferred mainly from landscapes where glaciers have disappeared after the termination of the last glacial epoch. However, the number of studies with a focus on the structure beneath active glaciers is limited, because existing exploration methods have limitation in resolution and mobility. The Eiger-μ project proposes a new technology, called muon radiography, to investigate the bedrock geometry beneath active glaciers. The muon radiography is a recent technique that relies on the high penetration power of muon components in natural cosmic rays. Specifically, one can resolve the internal density profile of a gigantic object by measuring the attenuation rate of the intensity of muons after passing through it, as in medical X-ray diagnostic. This technique has been applied to many fields such as volcano monitoring (eg. Ambrosino et al., 2015; Jourde et al., 2016; Nishiyama et al., 2016), detection of seismic faults (eg. Tanaka et al., 2011), inspection inside nuclear reactors, etc. The first feasibility test of the Eiger-μ project has been performed at Jungfrau region, Central Swiss Alps, Switzerland. We installed cosmic-ray detectors consisting of emulsion films at three sites along the Jungfrau railway tunnel facing Aletsch glacier (Jungfraufirn). The detectors stayed 47 days in the tunnel and recorded the tracks of muons which passed through the glacier and bedrock (thickness is about 100 m). Successively the films were chemically developed and scanned at University of Bern with microscopes originally developed for the analysis of physics experiments on neutrino oscillation. The analysis of muon

  12. Treatment of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater Beneath an Occupied Building at the Young-Rainey STAR Center, Pinellas, FL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering; Surovchak, Scott [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Legacy Management; Tabor, Charles [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater contamination, consisting of two dissolved-phase plumes originating from chlorinated solvent source areas, in the southeastern portion of the Young- Rainey Star Center (also known as the Pinellas County, Florida, Site) in Largo, Florida, has migrated beyond the property boundary, beneath the roadways, and beneath adjacent properties to the south and east. Groundwater contamination will persist as long as the onsite contaminant source remains. The origin of the contamination appears to be multiple long-term point sources beneath Building 100, a 4.5 ha (11 acre) building that housed manufacturing facilities during US DOE operations at the site. The site is now owned by Pinellas County, and most of the space inside the building is leased to private companies, so DOE chose not to conduct characterization or remediation through the floor of the building, instead choosing to conduct all work from outside the building. Injection of emulsified soybean oil and a microbial culture has been used at other areas of the site to accelerate naturally occurring bacterial processes that degrade groundwater contaminants to harmless compounds, and that same approach was chosen for this task. The technical approach consisted of installing horizontal wells from outside the building footprint, extending through and around the identified subsurface treatment areas, and terminating beneath the building. Two 107 m (350 ft) long wells, two 122 m (400 ft) long wells, and four 137 m (450 ft) long wells have been installed to intersect the inferred source areas and confirmed contaminant plumes beneath the building. DOE then injected emulsified vegetable oil and a microbial culture into the horizontal wells at each of several target areas beneath the building where the highest groundwater contaminant concentrations have been detected. The target areas are the northwest corner of the building between the old drum storage pad locations and monitoring well PIN12-S35B, the vicinity of

  13. The Use of Temperature Profiles Through Unsaturated Soils to Estimate Short-term Rates of Natural Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dripps, W. R.; Anderson, M. P.; Hunt, R. J.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been recognized that infiltration influences the vertical subsurface temperature profile. Many researchers have used changes in the temperature profile to quantify the rate of groundwater flow in saturated systems, e.g. in wetlands and streambeds. Others have considered coupled heat and flow transport through the unsaturated zone, but we are aware of only two groups (Taniguchi and Sharma, 1993; Tabbagh et al., 1999) who have previously used temperature profiles through the unsaturated zone to estimate rates of areally extensive groundwater recharge. Both groups looked at seasonal changes in soil temperature to estimate annual recharge rates, but no attempt was made to analyze individual recharge events. We collected hourly soil temperature measurements through the unsaturated zone at depths of 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, 1, and 3 meters at a site in the Trout Lake basin of northern Wisconsin for the past two years. VS2DH (Healy and Ronan, 1996), a two-dimensional, numerical, coupled heat and water flow model for variably saturated media, was used to simulate the thermocouple data and estimate rates of recharge for individual recharge events. Field studies including Guelph permeameter tests, slug tests, grain size analyses, bulk density estimates, and lab measurements of soil moisture characteristic curves were used to estimate the necessary hydraulic and thermal parameters for the model. The field data were supplemented by values reported in the literature, and further refined during model calibration. Recharge rates computed using temperature data were compared with estimates based on water level fluctuations and estimates obtained using simple water balance modeling.

  14. Linking hormonal profiles with variations in sugar and anthocyanin contents during the natural development and ripening of sweet cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teribia, Natalia; Tijero, Verónica; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-12-25

    Sweet cherries are highly appreciated by consumers worldwide and are usually cold-stored during postharvest to prevent over-ripening before distribution to the market. Sweet cherry is a non-climacteric fruit, for which ripening is known to be regulated by abscisic acid. Here we aimed to examine the hormone profiles, including measurements of abscisic acid, auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS), in relation to variations in sugar and anthocyanin contents, during growth and ripening of this fruit. Hormonal profiling revealed that indole-3-acetic acid, GA1 and trans-zeatin levels decreased at early stages of fruit development, while GA3 levels decreased at early stages but also later, once anthocyanin accumulation started. Conversely, abscisic acid levels rose significantly once the fruit started to synthetize anthocyanins, and isopentenyladenosine levels also increased during the ripening of sweet cherries. A strong negative correlation was found between GA4 levels and both fruit biomass and anthocyanin levels, and between the levels of trans-zeatin and both fruit biomass and total sugar contents. In contrast, abscisic acid and isopentenyladenosine levels correlated positively with fruit biomass, anthocyanin and total soluble sugar content. Results suggest that auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins may act coordinately with abscisic acid in the regulation of sweet cherry development and ripening. Furthermore, it is shown that hormonal profile measurements by UHPLC-MS/MS may be a helpful tool to elucidate the timing of action of each specific hormonal compound during ripening, which has important applications in the agri-food biotechnological sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lithospheric structure beneath the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and the western Sino-Korea Craton revealed by Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Pan, Jiatie; Wu, Qingju; Ding, Zhifeng

    2017-08-01

    A new 3-D shear wave velocity model of the northeastern (NE) Tibetan Plateau and western Sino-Korea Craton is presented. The model is based on Rayleigh waves recorded at 650 portable stations deployed in the region. Interstation phase and group velocity dispersions for more than 18 000 paths were estimated using the two-station method and then inverted to produce phase velocity maps for 10-80 s period and group velocity maps for 10-60 s period. Local 1-D shear wave velocity profiles for each 0.5° × 0.5°grid node were obtained by inverting Rayleigh wave dispersions obtained in this study together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocities between 60 and 145 s and then assembled into a 3-D shear wave velocity model. The images obtained reveal an obvious mid-crustal low-velocity zone (LVZ) and low-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle beneath the Songpan-Ganzi terrane. The mid-crustal LVZ can be explained by the presence of partial melting, most likely from asthenospheric upwelling. The existence of a relatively weak mid-crustal LVZ beneath the Qilian orogeny is also confirmed. This LVZ is likely caused by the presence of deep crustal fluids. The Yinchuan-Hetao graben is characterized by relatively low velocities that extend to at least 200 km below the Earth's surface, strongly contrasting with the seismically fast lithosphere of the Ordos and Alax blocks. The model presented here shows the presence of a relatively thick and high-velocity lithosphere beneath the Ordos and NE Alxa blocks, as well as evidence of thinning of the lithosphere beneath the southwestern Alxa and Qilian blocks, indicating that the Alxa block is not subducting beneath NE Tibet.

  16. SSH gene expression profile of Eisenia andrei exposed in situ to a naturally contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Joana; Pereira, Ruth; Gonçalves, Fernando; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-02-01

    The effects of the exposure of earthworms (Eisenia andrei) to contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine, were assessed through gene expression profile evaluation by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Organisms were exposed in situ for 56 days, in containers placed both in a contaminated and in a non-contaminated site (reference). Organisms were sampled after 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results showed that the main physiological functions affected by the exposure to metals and radionuclides were: metabolism, oxireductase activity, redox homeostasis and response to chemical stimulus and stress. The relative expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and elongation factor 1 alpha was also affected, since the genes encoding these enzymes were significantly up and down-regulated, after 14 and 56 days of exposure, respectively. Also, an EST with homology for SET oncogene was found to be up-regulated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this gene was identified in earthworms and thus, further studies are required, to clarify its involvement in the toxicity of metals and radionuclides. Considering the results herein presented, gene expression profiling proved to be a very useful tool to detect earthworms underlying responses to metals and radionuclides exposure, pointing out for the detection and development of potential new biomarkers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Crustal Structure Beneath India and Tibet: New Constraints From Inversion of Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Ravi Kumar, M.; Mohanty, Debasis D.; Singh, Chandrani; Biswas, Rahul; Srinagesh, D.

    2017-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent comprises geological terranes of varied age and structural character. In this study, we provide new constraints to existing crustal models by inverting the P-to-s receiver functions (RFs) at 317 broadband seismic stations. Inversion results fill crucial gaps in existing velocity models (CRUST1.0 and SEAPS) by capturing regions which are less represented. The final model produced is much more heterogeneous and is able to capture the structural variations between closely spaced seismic stations. In comparison to the global models, major differences are seen for seismic stations located over various rift zones (e.g., Godavari, Narmada, and Cambay) and those close to the coastal regions where transition from oceanic to continental crust is expected to create drastic changes in the crustal configuration. Seismic images are produced along various profiles using 49,682 individual RFs recorded at 442 seismic stations. Lateral variations captured using migrated images across the Himalayan collisional front revealed the hitherto elusive southern extent of the Moho and intracrustal features south of the Main Central Thrust (MCT). Poisson's ratio and crustal thickness estimates obtained using H-k stacking technique and inversion of RFs are grossly similar lending credence to the robustness of inversions. An updated crustal thickness map produced using 1,525 individual data points from controlled source seismics and RFs reveals a (a) thickened crust (>55 km) at the boundary of Dharwar Craton and Southern Granulite Terrain, (b) clear difference in crustal thickness estimates between Eastern Dharwar Craton and Western Dharwar Craton, (c) thinner crust beneath Cambay Basin between southwest Deccan Volcanic Province and Delhi-Aravalli Fold Belt, (d) thinner crust (40 km) beneath paleorift zones like Narmada Son Lineament and Godavari Graben, and (f) very thick crust beneath central Tibet (>65 km) with maximum lateral variations along the Himalayan collision

  18. Comparison of fruit quality and GC-MS-based metabolite profiling of kiwifruit 'Jecy green': Natural and exogenous ethylene-induced ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sooyeon; Lee, Jeong Gu; Lee, Eun Jin

    2017-11-01

    We applied exogenous ethylene to 'Jecy green' kiwifruit to elucidate the differences in fruit quality and metabolite profiling between naturally ripe (NR) and ethylene-induced ripe (ER) kiwifruit. Kiwifruit were exposed to ethylene (200μL/L) for 12h at 20°C and maintained for 9days at 20°C. Two metabolites of ascorbic acid and arabinose significantly decreased during kiwifruit ripening regardless of the ripening method. The concentrations of sucrose, myo-inositol, citric acid, and malic acid in NR fruit were substantially higher than those in ER fruit, while the concentrations of fructose, glucose, and quinic acid in ER fruit were higher than those in NR fruit. NR and ER kiwifruit were statistically similar in regard to overall sensory profile, even though the metabolite profiling showed a little difference. The application of ethylene to 'Jecy green' kiwifruit to regulate ripening for commercial purposes can result in good quality fruit without side effects. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are validated targets for treatment of certain cancer types and play numerous regulatory roles in biology, ranging from epigenetics to metabolism. Small molecules are highly important as tool compounds for probing these mechanisms as well as for the development of new...... medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  20. Project Skippy explores the lithosphere and mantle beneath Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Kennett, Brian; Christie, Doug; Grant, John

    1994-01-01

    A new project is probing the seismic structure of the lithosphere and mantle beneath Australia. The Skippy Project, named after the bush kangaroo, exploits Australia's regional seismicity and makes use of recent advances in digital recording technology to collect three-component broadband

  1. Deep structure beneath Lake Ontario: Crustal-scale Grenville subdivisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. A.; Milkereit, B.; Zelt, Colin A.; White, D. J.; Easton, R. M.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1994-01-01

    Lake Ontario marine seismic data reveal major Grenville crustal subdivisions beneath central and southern Lake Ontario separated by interpreted shear zones that extend to the lower crust. A shear zone bounded transition between the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes exposed north of Lake Ontario is linked to a seismically defined shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario by prominent aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies, easterly dipping wide-angle reflections, and fractures in Paleozoic strata. We suggest the central Lake Ontario zone represents crustal-scale deformation along an Elzevir–Frontenac boundary zone that extends from outcrop to the south shore of Lake Ontario.Seismic images from Lake Ontario and the exposed western Central Metasedimentary Belt are dominated by crustal-scale shear zones and reflection geometries featuring arcuate reflections truncated at their bases by apparent east-dipping linear reflections. The images show that zones analogous to the interpreted Grenville Front Tectonic Zone are also present within the Central Metasedimentary Belt and support models of northwest-directed crustal shortening for Grenvillian deep crustal deformation beneath most of southeastern Ontario.A Precambrian basement high, the Iroquoian high, is defined by a thinning of generally horizontal Paleozoic strata over a crestal area above the basement shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario. The Iroquoian high helps explain the peninsular extension into Lake Ontario forming Prince Edward County, the occurrence of Precambrian inlier outcrops in Prince Edward County, and Paleozoic fractures forming the Clarendon–Linden structure in New York.

  2. Living and Working Beneath the Sea – Next Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowiński Lech

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The idea of living beneath the sea is very new if compared with millennia of shipping activity. In fact, ocean surface was considered mainly as medium suitable for transport of persons and goods as well as aggression and robbery. More practical attempts to live “on” the water surface are limited to well protected internal waters.

  3. Simulation of Wave-Plus-Current Scour beneath Submarine Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke; Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    A fully coupled hydrodynamic and morphologic numerical model was utilized for the simulation of wave-plus-current scour beneath submarine pipelines. The model was based on incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations, coupled with k-ω turbulence closure, with additional bed and suspen...

  4. Mantle transition zone discontinuities beneath the Tien Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Youqiang; Zhao, Dapeng; Lei, Jianshe

    2017-10-01

    To better understand geodynamic processes of intracontinental mountain building, we conduct a systematic investigation of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) beneath the Tien Shan and its surrounding areas using a receiver function method under non-plane wave front assumption. The resulting apparent depths of the 410 km (d410) and 660 km (d660) discontinuities and the MTZ thickness display significant lateral variations. Both the central Tien Shan and the Pamir Plateau are characterized by a thick MTZ, which can be well explained by the existence of lithospheric segments resulted from possible break-off of the subducted slab or lithosphere delamination. A thin MTZ and an obviously depressed d410, which may be induced by asthenosphere upwelling associated with the dropping lithospheric segment, are revealed beneath the Kazakh Shield. Seismic evidence is obtained for the potential existence of lower mantle upwelling beneath the Tarim Basin based on the observed thin MTZ and relatively significant uplift of d660. The subduction of the Kazakh Shield and Tarim lithosphere driven by the India-Eurasia collision possibly plays an essential role in the formation and evolution of the Tien Shan orogenic belt, and the lower mantle upwelling revealed beneath the Tarim Basin may promote the uplift of the Tien Shan by softening the upper mantle.

  5. Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M.L.; Malone, S.D.; Moran, S.C.; Thelen, W.A.; Vidale, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Stuck Schools Revisited: Beneath the Averages. K-12 Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushomirsky, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    "Stuck Schools Revisited: Beneath the Averages" shows why a national focus on turning around the lowest performing schools, while needed, is not enough to raise achievement and close gaps. The report analyzes student achievement data from Maryland and Indiana, which reflect the outcomes seen in other states. The results confirm a…

  7. Extracts of Canadian first nations medicinal plants, used as natural products, inhibit neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with different antibiotic resistance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Paulina; Thakur, Sidharath D; Foster, Brian C; Scott, Ian M; Leduc, Renée I; Arnason, John T; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2011-07-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) has developed resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the antibiotics recommended for therapy are restricted, for the most part, to third generation cephalosporins. In order to investigate new potential sources of antimicrobial agents, the antibacterial properties of 14 Canadian plants used in traditional First Nations' medicine were tested against Ng isolates having differing antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Ethanolic extracts of 14 Canadian botanicals, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, were tested for their antimicrobial activity (disc diffusion and/or agar dilution assays) against susceptible Ng reference strains and a panel of 28 Ng isolates with various antimicrobial resistance profiles. Extracts of Arctostaphylos uva ursi (kinnikinnick or bearberry), Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), Prunus serotina (black cherry), and Rhodiola rosea (roseroot) inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 32 μg/mL, 4 to 32 μg/mL, 16 to >32 μg/mL, and 32 to 64 μg/mL, respectively. Extracts of Acorus americanus (sweet flag), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh), Equisetum arvense (field horsetail), Gaultheria procumbens (wintergreen), Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea), Ledum palustre (marsh Labrador tea), Oenothera biennis (common evening primrose), Sambucus nigra (elderberry), and Zanthoxylum americanum (prickly ash) had weak or no antimicrobial activity against the Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥256 μg/mL. The phytochemical berberine from H. canadensis inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates. The phytochemicals, salidroside and rosavin, present in R. rosea, also showed inhibitory activity against Ng strains. Canadian botanicals represent a potential source of novel compounds which inhibit Ng, including isolates resistant to antibiotics.

  8. Thin lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Eastern Indian craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalivahan; Bhattacharya, Bimalendu B.; Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Maurya, V. P.

    2014-02-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) separates the hard and rigid outer layer of the earth (lithosphere) and the weaker, hotter, and deeper part of the upper mantle (asthenosphere) and plays a pivotal role in plate tectonics. However, its definitive detection, especially beneath the cratons, is proving elusive. One of the geophysical tools used to map the LAB beneath the cratons is through magnetotelluric (MT) observations. The resistivity at boundary falls in the range of 5-25 Ω-m and can be explained by the presence of a small amount of water in the asthenosphere, possibly inducing partial melt. Here, we report thickness of the LAB in one of the oldest dated ancient cratons of India-Eastern Indian Craton (EIC) of ~ 3.3 Gyr, from MT studies. The two prominent phase-sensitive strike directions, one each for crust and mantle, and the presence of resistive continental lower crust act as a window to mantle in resolving deeper electrical conductivity structures beneath EIC. Our results show that the LAB beneath the EIC is at 95 km. The region is interesting as the electrical properties of the crust and mantle and the Moho depth are similar to those of the Slave Craton, Canada (~ 4.0 Gyr) but the depth of the LAB beneath the EIC is half that of the Slave craton. As cratonic signatures, depicted by ultrapotassic rocks from Gondwana coal fields close to EIC, are preserved at least till early Cretaceous (117 Ma) it is likely that Himalayan orogeny could have played a major role in delamination of the lithospheric roots of the EIC in addition to attendant seismicity.

  9. Three-dimensional shallow velocity structure beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shuei-Huei; Konstantinou, Konstantinos I.; Gung, Yuancheng; Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2017-11-01

    Based on its numerous historical explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of millions, Taal Volcano is one of the most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. To provide better investigation on local seismicity and seismic structure beneath Taal Volcano, we deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of eight stations from March 2008 to March 2010. In the preliminary data processing stage, three periods showing linear time-drifting of internal clock were clearly identified from noise-derived empirical Green's functions. The time-drifting errors were corrected prior to further data analyses. By using VELEST, 2274 local earthquakes were manually picked and located. Two major earthquake groups are noticed, with one lying beneath the western shore of Taal Lake showing a linear feature, and the other spreading around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island at shallower depths. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using the LOTOS algorithm. Some interesting features are revealed from the tomographic results, including a solidified magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, indicated by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a large potential hydrothermal reservoir beneath the center of Taal Volcano Island, suggested by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Furthermore, combining earthquake distributions and tomographic images, we suggest potential existence of a hydrothermal reservoir beneath the southwestern corner of Taal Lake, and a fluid conduit extending to the northwest. These seismic features have never been proposed in previous studies, implying that new hydrothermal activity might be formed in places away from the historical craters on Taal Volcano Island.

  10. Modelling the Crust beneath the Kashmir valley in Northwestern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, R. R.; Parvez, I. A.; Gaur, V. K.; A.; Chandra, R.; Romshoo, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure beneath five broadband seismic stations in the NW-SE trendingoval shaped Kashmir valley sandwiched between the Zanskar and the Pir Panjal ranges of thenorthwestern Himalaya. Three of these sites were located along the southwestern edge of the valley andthe other two adjoined the southeastern. Receiver Functions (RFs) at these sites were calculated usingthe iterative time domain deconvolution method and jointly inverted with surface wave dispersiondata to estimate the shear wave velocity structure beneath each station. To further test the results ofinversion, we applied forward modelling by dividing the crust beneath each station into 4-6homogeneous, isotropic layers. Moho depths were separately calculated at different piercing pointsfrom the inversion of only a few stacked receiver functions of high quality around each piercing point.These uncertainties were further reduced to ±2 km by trial forward modelling as Moho depths werevaried over a range of ±6 km in steps of 2 km and the synthetic receiver functions matched with theinverted ones. The final values were also found to be close to those independently estimated using theH-K stacks. The Moho depths on the eastern edge of the valley and at piercing points in itssouthwestern half are close to 55 km, but increase to about 58 km on the eastern edge, suggesting thathere, as in the central and Nepal Himalaya, the Indian plate dips northeastwards beneath the Himalaya.We also calculated the Vp/Vs ratio beneath these 5 stations which were found to lie between 1.7 and1.76, yielding a Poisson's ratio of ~0.25 which is characteristic of a felsic composition.

  11. Window into the Caledonian orogen: Structure of the crust beneath the East Shetland platform, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J.H.; England, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Reprocessing and interpretation of commercial and deep seismic reflection data across the East Shetland platform and its North Sea margin provide a new view of crustal subbasement structure beneath a poorly known region of the British Caledonian orogen. The East Shetland platform, east of the Great Glen strike-slip fault system, is one of the few areas of the offshore British Caledonides that remained relatively insulated from the Mesozoic and later rifting that involved much of the area around the British Isles, thus providing an "acoustic window" into the deep structure of the orogen. Interpretation of the reflection data suggests that the crust beneath the platform retains a significant amount of its original Caledonian and older architecture. The upper to middle crust is typically poorly reflective except for individual prominent dipping reflectors with complex orientations that decrease in dip with depth and merge with a lower crustal layer of high reflectivity. The three-dimensional structural orientation of the reflectors beneath the East Shetland platform is at variance with Caledonian reflector trends observed elsewhere in the Caledonian orogen (e.g., north of the Scottish mainland), emphasizing the unique tectonic character of this part of the orogen. Upper to middle crustal reflectors are interpreted as Caledonian or older thrust surfaces that were possibly reactivated by Devonian extension associated with post-Caledonian orogenic collapse. The appearance of two levels of uneven and diffractive (i.e., corrugated) reflectivity in the lower crust, best developed on east-west-oriented profiles, is characteristic of the East Shetland platform. However, a north-south-oriented profile reveals an interpreted south-vergent folded and imbricated thrust structure in the lower crust that appears to be tied to the two levels of corrugated reflectivity on the east-west profiles. A thrust-belt origin for lower crustal reflectivity would explain its corrugated

  12. Baicalein, a Natural Anti-Cancer Compound, Alters MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Bel-7402 Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Bie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Baicalein has been shown to possess significant anti-hepatoma activity by inhibiting cell proliferation. Whether the anti-proliferative effect of baicalein is related to its modulation of miRNA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is still unknown. Methods: The anti-proliferative effects of baicalein on HCC cell line Bel-7402 was assessed by detecting the proliferation activity, cell cycle distribution, expression changes of p21/CDKN1A, P27/CDKN1B, total Akt and phosphoryted AKT. Microarray analysis was conducted to determine the miRNA expression profiles in baicalein-treated or untreated Bel-7402 cells and then validated by qRT-PCR in two HCC cell lines (Bel-7402 and Hep3B. The gain-of-function of miR-3127-5p was performed by detecting anti-proliferative effects after transfecting miRNA mimics in cells. Finally, the expression level of miR-3127-5p in different HCC cell lines was determined by qRT-PCR. Results: Baicalein was able to inhibit the proliferation of Bel-7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phase via up-regulating the expression of p21/CDKN1A and P27/CDKN1B and suppressing the PI3K/Akt pathway. Baicalein could alter the miRNA expression profiles in Bel-7402 cells. Putative target genes for differentially expressed miRNAs could be enriched in terms of cell proliferation regulation, cell cycle arrest and were mainly involved in MAPK, PI3K-Akt, Wnt, Hippo and mTOR signaling pathways. MiR- 3127-5p, one of up-regulated miRNAs, exhibits low expression level in several HCC cell lines and its overexpression could inhibit cell growth of Bel-7402 and Hep3B cell lines by inducing S phase arrest by up-regulating the expression of p21and P27 and repressing the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conclusions: Modulation of miRNA expression may be an important mechanism underlying the anti-hepatoma effects of baicalein.

  13. Monomelic amyotrophy: clinical profile and natural history of 279 cases seen over 35 years (1976-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Gourie-Devi, Mandavilli; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Ramalingaiah, Aravinda Hanumanthapura

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to study the clinical characteristics and natural history of monomelic amyotrophy (MMA). We used a retrospective study of 279 patients diagnosed to have either upper (Hirayama disease) or lower limb MMA. Results showed that brachial MMA (BMMA) occurred in 224 patients (male:female, 9:1). Mean age of onset was 19.5 ± 4.18 years. Progression occurred over less than five years in the majority (95.9%) of patients. Duration at the last follow-up was: up to five years in 61.4%, 5-10 in 21.3%, 10-15 in 7.2%, > 15 years in 10.1%. MRI showed asymmetrical lower cervical cord atrophy in 44.6% of patients. Crural MMA (CMMA) occurred in 55 patients (male:female, 13:1). Mean age of onset was 21.38 ± 5.3 years. Similar to BMMA, most cases (65.5%) had onset between 15 and 25 years of age. Total duration of illness at the last follow-up was up to five years in 52.7%, 10 and beyond in 47.3%. In conclusion, a large cohort of patients with monomelic amyotrophy seen over 35 years (1976-2010) is described. Study data support the clinical findings and its natural history with long term follow-up, and the findings emphasize that monomelic amyotrophy is a 'benign' condition with a self-limiting course.

  14. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-03-12

    Electricity markets in the United States have witnessed unprecedented instability over the last few years, with substantial volatility in wholesale market prices, significant financial distress among major industry organizations, and unprecedented legal, regulatory and legislative activity. These events demonstrate the considerable risks that exist in the electricity industry. Recent industry instability also illustrates the need for thoughtful resource planning to balance the cost, reliability, and risk of the electricity supplied to end-use customers. In balancing different supply options, utilities, regulators, and other resource planners must consider the unique risk profiles of each generating source. This paper evaluates the relative risk profiles of renewable and natural gas generating plants. The risks that exist in the electricity industry depend in part on the technologies that are used to generate electricity. Natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plant additions in the United States. To some, this emphasis on a single fuel source signals the potential for increased risk. Renewable generation sources, on the other hand, are frequently cited as a potent source of socially beneficial risk reduction relative to natural gas-fired generation. Renewable generation is not risk free, however, and also imposes certain costs on the electricity sector. This paper specifically compares the allocation and mitigation of risks in long-term natural gas-fired electricity contracts with the allocation and mitigation of these same risks in long-term renewable energy contracts. This comparison highlights some of the key differences between renewable and natural gas generation that decision makers should consider when making electricity investment and contracting decisions. Our assessment is relevant in both regulated and restructured markets. In still-regulated markets, the audience for this report clearly includes regulators and the utilities they

  15. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON THE PLASMA LIPID PROFILE IN HISPANIOLAN AMAZON PARROTS (AMAZONA VENTRALIS) WITH NATURALLY OCCURRING HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, Kate A; Stanhope, Kimber L; Lin, Amy S; Graham, James L; Havel, Peter J; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is common in psittacines, and Amazon parrots ( Amazona spp.) are particularly susceptible. Associations have been demonstrated between naturally occurring and experimentally induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in psittacines. Daily exercise improves lipid metabolism in humans and other mammals, as well as pigeons and chickens, under varying experimental conditions. Hispaniolan Amazon parrots ( Amazona ventralis ) with naturally occurring hypercholesterolemia (343-576 mg/dl) were divided into two groups. An exercised group (n = 8) was housed as a flock and exercised daily with 30 min of aviary flight and 30 min walking on a rotating perch. A sedentary control group (n = 4) was housed in individual cages with no exercise regime. A plasma lipid panel, including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, was validated for this species. Body weight, chest girth, and the lipid panel were measured at 0, 61, and 105 days. Hematology and plasma biochemistry were measured at 0 and 105 days. Weight and girth were significantly lower in exercised than sedentary parrots at 61 and 105 days. HDL-C concentrations were significantly higher in exercised parrots at 61 days but returned to near baseline by 105 days. There were no significant changes in hematology, biochemistry, or other lipid panel parameters. Results were similar to studies in humans and animal models, in which increased HDL-C was the most consistent effect of exercise on circulating lipid and lipoprotein parameters. The return toward baseline HDL-C may have resulted from decreased participation in aviary flight. Additional investigation will be required to determine the amount of exercise and change in circulating lipid-related parameters necessary to improve long-term wellness in psittacine species predisposed to hypercholesterolemia.

  16. HAEMOGLOBIN PHENOVARIANTS VS RESILIENCE STATUS, HAEMATOLOGICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND MINERAL PROFILE IN GAROLE SHEEP NATURALLY INFECTED WITH HAEMONCHUS CONTORTUS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoranjan Roy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 232 nos. of Garole sheep were evaluated for studying the variability of resilience to natural infection of Haemonchus contortus in relation to haemoglobin phenovariants as well as to know the association of haemoglobin phenovariants with several haematological parameters, biochemical parameters and serum macro and micro elements. This study revealed a significant variation (p<0.01 of haematological parameters, biochemical parameters and mineral status against resistance status and haemoglobin phenovariants. Significantly (P<0.01 less EPG count was recorded in Haemoglobin–AB type animals than the Haemoglobin-BB type animals. Haemoglobin-AB type animals also possessed significantly higher level of haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total leukocyte count, lymphocyte count, serum total protein, albumin, globulin, calcium, phosphorus, iron, copper and zinc than Haemoglobin-BB type animals. On the other hand Haemoglobin-BB type animals possessed significantly higher level of neutrophil and serum alkaline phosphatase enzyme than Haemoglobin-AB type animals. During selection of H. contortus resistant Garole sheep inclusion of haemoglobin type as an indicator trait may be helpful to achieve the goal. Measurement of haematological parameters, biochemical parameters and serum macro and micro elements in these cases may also be essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes

  17. Aroma profiling of an aerated fermentation of natural grape must with selected yeast strains at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronchoni, Jordi; Curiel, José Antonio; Sáenz-Navajas, María Pilar; Morales, Pilar; de-la-Fuente-Blanco, Arancha; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación; Ferreira, Vicente; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2018-04-01

    The use of non-Saccharomyces strains in aerated conditions has proven effective for alcohol content reduction in wine during lab-scale fermentation. The process has been scaled up to 20 L batches, in order to produce lower alcohol wines amenable to sensory analysis. Sequential instead of simultaneous inoculation was chosen to prevent oxygen exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, since previous results indicated that this would result in increased acetic acid production. In addition, an adaptation step was included to facilitate non-Saccharomyces implantation in natural must. Wines elaborated with Torulaspora delbrueckii or Metschnikowia pulcherrima in aerated conditions contained less alcohol than control wine (S. cerevisiae, non-aerated). Sensory and aroma analysis revealed that the quality of mixed fermentations was affected by the high levels of some yeast amino acid related byproducts, which suggests that further progress requires a careful selection of non-Saccharomyces strains and the use of specific N-nutrients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Velocity structure of the mantle transition zone beneath the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Bai, Ling; Zhou, Yuanze; Wang, Xiaoran; Cui, Qinghui

    2017-11-01

    P-wave triplications related to the 410 km discontinuity (the 410) were clearly observed from the vertical component seismograms of three intermediate-depth earthquakes that occurred in the Indo-Burma Subduction Zone (IBSZ) and were recorded by the Chinese Digital Seismic Network (CDSN). By matching the observed P-wave triplications with synthetics through a grid search, we obtained the best-fit models for four azimuthal profiles (I-IV from north to south) to constrain the P-wave velocity structure near the 410 beneath the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (TP). A ubiquitous low-velocity layer (LVL) resides atop the mantle transition zone (MTZ). The LVL is 25 to 40 km thick, with a P-wave velocity decrement ranging from approximately - 5.3% to - 3.6% related to the standard Earth model IASP91. An abrupt transition in the velocity decrement of the LVL was observed between profiles II and III. We postulate that the mantle structure beneath the southeastern margin of the TP is primarily controlled by the southeastern extrusion of the TP to the north combined with the eastward subduction of the Indian plate to the south, but not affected by the Emeishan mantle plume. We attribute the LVL to the partial melting induced by water and/or other volatiles released from the subducted Indian plate and the stagnant Pacific plate, but not from the upwelling or the remnants of the Emeishan mantle plume. A high-velocity anomaly ranging from approximately 1.0% to 1.5% was also detected at a depth of 542 to 600 km, providing additional evidence for the remnants of the subducted Pacific plate within the MTZ.

  19. Sheep cheese naturally enriched in α-linolenic, conjugated linoleic and vaccenic acids improves the lipid profile and reduces anandamide in the plasma of hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintus, Stefano; Murru, Elisabetta; Carta, Gianfranca; Cordeddu, Lina; Batetta, Barbara; Accossu, Simonetta; Pistis, Danila; Uda, Sabrina; Elena Ghiani, Maria; Mele, Marcello; Secchiari, Pierlorenzo; Almerighi, Guido; Pintus, Paolo; Banni, Sebastiano

    2013-04-28

    Intake of dairy fat has long been considered as a risk factor for CVD. Pasture and dietary lipid supplementation have been reported to be reliable strategies in ruminant nutrition, in order to increase the content of α-linolenic acid (ALA), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and vaccenic acid (VA), and decrease SFA in milk fat. In the present study, we aimed at verifying whether consumption of a sheep cheese, naturally enriched in ALA, CLA and VA, would modify the plasma lipid and endocannabinoid profiles in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. A total of forty-two adult volunteers (nineteen males and twenty-three females) with diagnosed mildly hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol 5·68-7·49 mmol/l) were randomly assigned to eat 90 g/d of a control or enriched cheese for 3 weeks, with a cross-over after 3 weeks of washout. Plasma lipids, endocannabinoids, adipokines and inflammatory markers were measured. The intake of enriched cheese significantly increased the plasma concentrations of CLA, VA, the n-3 fatty acids ALA and EPA, and more remarkably decreased that of the endocannabinoid anandamide. LDL-cholesterol decreased significantly (7%). No changes were detected in the levels of inflammatory markers; however, a significant correlation was found between the plasma levels of anandamide and leptin. The control cheese modified none of the parameters measured. The results obtained do not support the view that intake of dairy fat is detrimental to hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Indeed, they show that a naturally enriched cheese possesses beneficial properties, since it ameliorates the plasma lipid profile, and more remarkably reduces endocannabinoid biosynthesis.

  20. Cytotoxicity, anti-angiogenic, apoptotic effects and transcript profiling of a naturally occurring naphthyl butenone, guieranone A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuete Victor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant diseases are responsible of approximately 13% of all deaths each year in the world. Natural products represent a valuable source for the development of novel anticancer drugs. The present study was aimed at evaluating the cytotoxicity of a naphtyl butanone isolated from the leaves of Guiera senegalensis, guieranone A (GA. Results The results indicated that GA was active on 91.67% of the 12 tested cancer cell lines, the IC50 values below 4 μg/ml being recorded on 83.33% of them. In addition, the IC50 values obtained on human lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM (0.73 μg/ml and its resistant subline CEM/ADR5000 (1.01 μg/ml and on lung adenocarcinoma A549 (0.72 μg/ml cell lines were closer or lower than that of doxorubicin. Interestingly, low cytotoxicity to normal hepatocyte, AML12 cell line was observed. GA showed anti-angiogenic activity with up to 51.9% inhibition of the growth of blood capillaries on the chorioallantoic membrane of quail embryo. Its also induced apotosis and cell cycle arrest. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified several pathways in CCRF-CEM cells and functional group of genes regulated upon GA treatment (P , the Cell Cycle: G2/M DNA Damage Checkpoint Regulation and ATM Signaling pathways being amongst the four most involved functional groups. Conclusion The overall results of this work provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of GA and supportive data for its possible use in cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungyon; Bush, John W. M.; Hosoi, A. E.; Lauga, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being g...

  2. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  3. Tomographic Inversion for Shear Velocity Beneath the North American Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Stephen P.

    1987-12-01

    A tomographic back projection scheme has been applied to S and SS travel times to invert for shear velocity below the North American plate. The data range in distance from 8° to 80°, and a total of 3923 arrival times were used. First arrivals were measured directly off the seismograms, while the arrival times of later arrivals were found by a waveform correlation technique using synthetic seismograms. The starting model was laterally heterogeneous in the upper 400 km to account for the first-order differences in ray paths already known. The model was divided into blocks with horizontal dimensions of 500 km by 500 km and varying vertical thicknesses. Good resolution was obtained for structure from just below the crust to about 1700 km depth in the mantle. In the upper mantle a high-velocity root was found directly beneath the Canadian shield to about 400 km depth with the Superior province having the highest velocity and deepest root. The east coast of the United States was found to have intermediate velocities from 100 to 350 km depth and the western United States the slowest velocities at these depths. Below 400 km depth the most significant structure found is a slab-shaped high-velocity anomaly from the eastern Carribean to the northern United States. Beneath the Carribean this anomaly is almost vertical and extends from about 700 km to 1700 km depth. Further to the north, the anomaly dips to the east with high velocities at 700 km depth in the central United States and high velocities below 1100 km depth beneath the east coast. The anomaly is about 1% in magnitude. This lower-mantle anomaly may be associated with past subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America.

  4. Lithospheric radial anisotropy beneath the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Risheng; Ko, Justin Yen-Ting; Wei, Shengji; Zhan, Zhongwen; Helmberger, Don

    2017-05-01

    The Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), where a layer of low viscosity asthenosphere decouples with the upper plate motion, plays an essential role in plate tectonics. Most dynamic modeling assumes that the shear velocity can be used as a surrogate for viscosity which provides key information about mantle flow. Here, we derive a shear velocity model for the LAB structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico allowing a detailed comparison with that beneath the Pacific (PAC) and Atlantic (ATL). Our study takes advantage of the USArray data from the March 25th, 2013 Guatemala earthquake at a depth of 200 km. Such data is unique in that we can observe a direct upward traveling lid arrival which remains the first arrival ahead of the triplications beyond 18°. This extra feature in conjunction with upper-mantle triplication sampling allows good depth control of the LAB and a new upper-mantle seismic model ATM, a modification of ATL, to be developed. ATM has a prominent low velocity zone similar to the structure beneath the western Atlantic. The model contains strong radial anisotropy in the lid where VSH is about 6% faster than VSV. This anisotropic feature ends at the bottom of the lithosphere at about the depth of 175 km in contrast to the Pacific where it extends to over 300 km. Another important feature of ATM is the weaker velocity gradient from the depth of 175 to 350 km compared to Pacific models, which may be related to differences in mantle flow.

  5. Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea-Alcázar, Daniel M.; Simonetti, Javier A.

    2007-07-01

    We compared the relative importance of chemical alellopathy, pruning behaviour of resident ants and other non-related agents to ant-plant mutualism for seedling establishment beneath Triplaris americana L. (Polygonaceae), a myrmecophyte plant. We also included a preliminary analysis of effects of fragmentation on these ecological processes. Seeds and seedlings of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) were used as the target species in all experiments. Leaf-tissue extracts of the myrmecophyte plant did not inhibit germination of cacao seeds. Resident Pseudomyrmex triplarinus Weddell (Pseudomyrmecinae) ants did not remove seeds under the canopy of their host plants. The main seed consumer was the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens L. (Myrmicinae). Leaves of cacao seedlings were partially or totally pruned by Pseudomyrmex ants mainly in forest fragments studied. We offer evidence pointing to the possibility that the absence of seedlings beneath Triplaris may result from effects of both ant species. We discuss the benefits of pruning behaviour for the resident ant colony and the effects of ant-ant interactions on seedling establishment beneath this ant-plant system.

  6. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater-surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M.; Kennedy, Celia S.; Capes, Donovan C.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-06-01

    Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater-surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater-surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze-thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool-riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle) and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface). While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river ice during the winter season

  7. Channelling of Melt Above Plumes and Beneath MORs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, K.; Schmeling, H.

    2003-12-01

    We investigate melt transportation in partially molten rocks under different stress fields above the head of a mantle plume or beneath a spreading mid-oceanic ridge under hydrous and anhydrous conditions. We model such aggregates with the 2D-FD code FDCON [1] by means of a porous deformable matrix with melt under the influence of a given stress field to clarify the following key questions: Could channeling occur in a matrix containing a random melt distribution under a given stress field? Which orientation does it take? Is it possible to achieve a focusing of melt towards a MOR (dykes)? Does applying simple or pure shear to the matrix result in a difference in the formation and orientation of channels? How does the channel instability evolve during finite simple shear? In a deforming partially molten aggregate, weakening of the solid matrix due to the presence of melt creates an instability in which melt is localized by the following mechanism: regions of initially high melt fraction are areas of low viscosity and pressure, so that melt is drawn into these regions from higher pressure surroundings. This further enhances the melt weakening, producing a self-excited localization mechanism [2]. The channeling developing in models with a random melt distribution of 3.5 +/- 0.5% shows that melt is accumulated preferably in inclined channels. For both, simple as well as pure shear, the growth rate is highest for an orientation parallel to the direction of the maximum compressive stress and proportional to applied stress and the reverse of the Melt Retention Number. This also confirms the theoretical growth rate found by Stevenson [2]. In our isothermal models we found that the influence of water reduces the growth rate, in contrast to non-isothermal models of Hall [3]. Under simple shear melt channels evolve from an irregular melt distribution at angles of 45 degrees to the direction of shear. Upon further straining they rotate out of the orientation of maximum growth

  8. Seismic Investigation of Sediments Beneath Antarctic Ice Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Tarun

    Fault zones are areas of localized deformation that accommodate strain in the Earth's crust accumulated over time due to tectonic motion or stress transfer from adjacent areas. Faults are traditionally considered to accommodate this strain by either constant slow movement (creep), or by rapid catastrophic failure events (earthquakes). The behavior of faults which produce earthquakes has been extensively studied, including characterization of the time and slip predictability of earthquakes, frequency-magnitude distributions, aftershock decay patterns, dynamic triggering, and frictional processes. Chance observations in global positioning system (GPS) data from the Vancouver Island area in 2001 revealed a new kind of fault slip that had not been considered before, slowslip events. Since those early observations, slow-slip events have been observed at most major subduction interfaces and even in glacial systems. In this dissertation, I strive to answer some of the fundamental questions about slow-slip systems. Little is known about the dynamics of these systems and how they operate. Scattered laboratory observations have provided clues, but this study is the first systematic examination of slow-slip earthquakes and their frictional behavior in the laboratory. I examine questions such as what controls how a fault zone will fail and what the velocity and normal stress sensitives are, then connect those mechanisms to observations from a natural slow-slip system beneath Whillans Ice Stream in western Antarctica. In chapter 1, I demonstrate how to modify the stiffness of the testing machine to create slow-slip events in the laboratory inartificial granular material. I also present a method to automatically calculate the stiffness of each slip event in a given experiment. Chapter 2 extends this work into a synthetic fault gouge material and carefully examines the sensitivity of the system to the stiffness of the testing apparatus. Chapter 3 introduces the new parameter of

  9. Antioxidant Activities, Metabolic Profiling, Proximate Analysis, Mineral Nutrient Composition of Salvadora persica Fruit Unravel a Potential Functional Food and a Natural Source of Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Asha; Parida, Asish K; Rangani, Jaykumar; Panda, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Salvadora persica is a medicinally important plant mainly used in oral hygiene. However, little attention has been given towards the nutritional prominence of this plant. This study encloses the proximate and mineral nutrient contents, amino acid composition, metabolite profiling and antioxidant potential of S. persica fruit. The ripen fruit contained substantial amount of sugars, mineral nutrients, carotenoids, polyphenols and flavonoids. The metabolic profiling of the fruit extract by GC-MS revealed a total of 22 metabolites comprising of sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, organic base, and aromatic silica compound. The identified metabolites have been previously reported to have potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-hyperglycemic, and antitumor properties. The GC-MS analysis indicated high glucose and glucopyranose (247.62 and 42.90 mg g(-1) FW respectively) contents in fruit of S. persica. The fruit extract demonstrated a significantly higher antioxidant and ROS scavenging properties along with high contents of mineral nutrients and essential amino acids. HPLC analysis revealed presence of essential and non-essential amino acid required for healthy body metabolism. The cysteine was found to be in highest amount (733.69 mg 100 g(-1) DW) among all amino acids quantified. Specifically, compared to similar medicinal plants, previously reported as a source of non-conventional food and with some of the commercially important fruits, S. persica fruit appears to be a potential source of essential mineral nutrients, amino acids, vitamins (ascorbic acid and carotenoid) and pharmaceutically important metabolites contributing towards fulfilling the recommended daily requirement of these for a healthy human being. This is the first report establishing importance of S. persica fruit as nutraceuticals. The data presented here proposed that fruit of S. persica may be used as functional food or reinvigorating ingredient for processed food to reduce deficiency of

  10. GC-MS-Based Metabonomic Profiling Displayed Differing Effects of Borna Disease Virus Natural Strain Hu-H1 and Laboratory Strain V Infection in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwen; Bode, Liv; Zhang, Lujun; He, Peng; Huang, Rongzhong; Sun, Lin; Chen, Shigang; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yujie; Zhou, Jingjing; Fu, Yuying; Zhu, Dan; Xie, Peng

    2015-08-17

    Borna disease virus (BDV) persists in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of vertebrates and causes behavioral disorders. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with BDV infection. However, the pathophysiological effects of different viral strains remain largely unknown. Rat cortical neurons infected with human strain BDV Hu-H1, laboratory BDV Strain V, and non-infected control (CON) cells were cultured in vitro. At day 12 post-infection, a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 35 independent intracellular samples from Hu-H1-infected cells (n = 12), Strain V-infected cells (n = 12), and CON cells (n = 11). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed to demonstrate discrimination between the three groups. Further statistical testing determined which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between groups. PLS-DA demonstrated that the whole metabolic pattern enabled statistical discrimination between groups. We identified 31 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and CON groups (21 decreased and 10 increased in Hu-H1 relative to CON), 35 differential metabolites in the Strain V and CON groups (30 decreased and 5 increased in Strain V relative to CON), and 21 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and Strain V groups (8 decreased and 13 increased in Hu-H1 relative to Strain V). Comparative metabonomic profiling revealed divergent perturbations in key energy and amino acid metabolites between natural strain Hu-H1 and laboratory Strain V of BDV. The two BDV strains differentially alter metabolic pathways of rat cortical neurons in vitro. Their systematic classification provides a valuable template for improved BDV strain definition in future studies.

  11. GC–MS-Based Metabonomic Profiling Displayed Differing Effects of Borna Disease Virus Natural Strain Hu-H1 and Laboratory Strain V Infection in Rat Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwen; Bode, Liv; Zhang, Lujun; He, Peng; Huang, Rongzhong; Sun, Lin; Chen, Shigang; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yujie; Zhou, Jingjing; Fu, Yuying; Zhu, Dan; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) persists in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of vertebrates and causes behavioral disorders. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with BDV infection. However, the pathophysiological effects of different viral strains remain largely unknown. Rat cortical neurons infected with human strain BDV Hu-H1, laboratory BDV Strain V, and non-infected control (CON) cells were cultured in vitro. At day 12 post-infection, a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 35 independent intracellular samples from Hu-H1-infected cells (n = 12), Strain V-infected cells (n = 12), and CON cells (n = 11). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed to demonstrate discrimination between the three groups. Further statistical testing determined which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between groups. PLS-DA demonstrated that the whole metabolic pattern enabled statistical discrimination between groups. We identified 31 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and CON groups (21 decreased and 10 increased in Hu-H1 relative to CON), 35 differential metabolites in the Strain V and CON groups (30 decreased and 5 increased in Strain V relative to CON), and 21 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and Strain V groups (8 decreased and 13 increased in Hu-H1 relative to Strain V). Comparative metabonomic profiling revealed divergent perturbations in key energy and amino acid metabolites between natural strain Hu-H1 and laboratory Strain V of BDV. The two BDV strains differentially alter metabolic pathways of rat cortical neurons in vitro. Their systematic classification provides a valuable template for improved BDV strain definition in future studies. PMID:26287181

  12. GC–MS-Based Metabonomic Profiling Displayed Differing Effects of Borna Disease Virus Natural Strain Hu-H1 and Laboratory Strain V Infection in Rat Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwen Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Borna disease virus (BDV persists in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of vertebrates and causes behavioral disorders. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with BDV infection. However, the pathophysiological effects of different viral strains remain largely unknown. Rat cortical neurons infected with human strain BDV Hu-H1, laboratory BDV Strain V, and non-infected control (CON cells were cultured in vitro. At day 12 post-infection, a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 35 independent intracellular samples from Hu-H1-infected cells (n = 12, Strain V-infected cells (n = 12, and CON cells (n = 11. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA was performed to demonstrate discrimination between the three groups. Further statistical testing determined which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between groups. PLS-DA demonstrated that the whole metabolic pattern enabled statistical discrimination between groups. We identified 31 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and CON groups (21 decreased and 10 increased in Hu-H1 relative to CON, 35 differential metabolites in the Strain V and CON groups (30 decreased and 5 increased in Strain V relative to CON, and 21 differential metabolites in the Hu-H1 and Strain V groups (8 decreased and 13 increased in Hu-H1 relative to Strain V. Comparative metabonomic profiling revealed divergent perturbations in key energy and amino acid metabolites between natural strain Hu-H1 and laboratory Strain V of BDV. The two BDV strains differentially alter metabolic pathways of rat cortical neurons in vitro. Their systematic classification provides a valuable template for improved BDV strain definition in future studies.

  13. Seismic structure beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and adjacent areas based on the tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khrepy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Petrunin, Alexey G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first 3-D model of seismic P and S velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and surrounding areas based on the results of passive travel time tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed based on travel time data from ˜ 9000 regional earthquakes provided by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), and this was complemented with data from the International Seismological Centre (ISC). The resulting P and S velocity patterns were generally consistent with each other at all depths. Beneath the northern part of the Red Sea, we observed a strong high-velocity anomaly with abrupt limits that coincide with the coastal lines. This finding may indicate the oceanic nature of the crust in the Red Sea, and it does not support the concept of gradual stretching of the continental crust. According to our results, in the middle and lower crust, the seismic anomalies beneath the Gulf of Aqaba seem to delineate a sinistral shift (˜ 100 km) in the opposite flanks of the fault zone, which is consistent with other estimates of the left-lateral displacement in the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform fault. However, no displacement structures were visible in the uppermost lithospheric mantle.

  14. A Low-velocity Finger from Iceland beneath Southern Scandinavia - the Key to Understanding Neogene Uplift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, C.; Maupin, V.

    2007-12-01

    A model of upper mantle S-wave velocity beneath northwestern Europe is presented, based on a tomography of regional surface wave observations. Data from international and, more importantly, regional data archives (including temporary deployments) were used to measure group velocities for both Love and Rayleigh surface waves. The procedure for data selection, group velocity measurements and inversion for group velocity 2-D maps follows closely the one described by Levshin et al. (GJI, 170, 441-459, 2007). Our new set of group velocity maps differs significantly from global reference maps, enhancing many details and amplitudes of group velocity variations in the study region. We then apply a linear inversion scheme to invert for 1-D shear wave velocity profiles which are assembled to a 3-D model. By choosing conservative regularization parameters in the 2-D inversion we ensure the smoothness of the group velocity maps and the resulting 3-D shear wave speed model. To account for the different tectonic regimes in the study region, we compare inversions with 3 different reference models (pure 1-D, 3-D crust / 1-D mantle and pure 3-D) to investigate the sensitivity of the 1-D inversions to inaccuracies in crustal models. We find that all three models are consistent at depths below 90 km and the resulting models deviate only slightly from each other, mostly in amplitudes. We image an intriguing low-velocity anomaly extending from the Iceland plume domain across the north Atlantic beneath southern Scandinavia between 70-150 km depth. Beneath southern Norway, the negative perturbations reach a maximum of up to 13 % w.r.t. ak135 and a shallowing of the anomaly is indicated. This observation could explain the sustained uplift of southern Scandinavia in Neogene times, but the mechanisms are yet undetermined. Furthermore, our upper mantle model reveals good alignment to ancient plate boundaries and first-order crustal fronts around the triple junction of the Baltica

  15. A Broad Depressed 410-km Discontinuity beneath Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Guo, G.; WANG, X.

    2016-12-01

    The topography of the upper mantle discontinuities is important for good understanding of the thermal structure, composition of the mantle, and scales of mantle circulation as well. We applied both receiver function analysis and multiple-ScS reverberations to seismic waveforms recorded by stations beneath land and ocean, respectively. We obtained a complete image of the upper mantle discontinuities beneath northeast Asia, covering from the Okhotsk Sea, far east Russia, Japan Sea and northeast China. Results with different resolutions from different methods are compared in detail, and the comparison shows that long-period ScS reverberation signals is effective in extracting the robust features of the upper mantle discontinuities. Through the integrated depth undulation map covering both sea and land, we detected an obvious depression of the 410-km discontinuity with value 8-25 km, anticorrelated with a wide range of depressed 660-km discontinuity. The depression of the 660 can be explained by the temperature anomaly associated to the subducting Pacific slab. The landward extension of the depressed 410, however, is of large scale with a lateral range of at least 800-1000 km. Mechanism invoking chemical heterogeneity in the mantle transition zone was explored to explain the observation. We speculate that the broadly depressed 410 beneath west Japan Sea, part of Okhotsk Sea, and northeast China might be caused by high water content at the top of the mantle transition zone. The significant trench rollback motion of the subducting Pacific slab from the Miocene might explain the widespread distribution of the depression of the 410. The west edge of observed depressed 410-km discontinuity might pin the initial location where the Pacific subducting slab had been furthest before the occurrence of trench retreating.

  16. Mantle structure beneath the Alboran Sea from shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, L. A.; Becker, T. W.; Miller, M. S.; Allam, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    New seismological investigations in the Alboran domain of the western Mediterranean, as part of the PICASSO experiment, support geodynamic models which constrain the mantle structure beneath the Alboran Sea. We evaluate global circulation models in the context of seismic anistropy as inferred from SKS/SKKS splitting observations. Using instantaneous velocity fields from 3-D flow models with variable mantle density based on several tomography and seismicity based models, we calculate the predicted anisotropy, fast polarization direction (FPD), and delay times in order to explain the complex tectonic and geologic history of the Alboran Sea region. Slab rollback, delamination, and convective removal processes have been invoked to explain the synorogenic extension in the Alboran and recently published splitting measurements show north-east trending FPD across the Iberian margin with a rotation to the southeast that follows the curve of the Gibraltar arc, suggested by the authors as supporting west-directed slab rollback. Our new measurements from 39 stations substantiate the measurements in southern Spain, but we find a striking, nearly 90 degree rotation in azimuth and reduced delay times across the High Atlas Mountains in northern Morocco. These splitting patterns define three distinct regions we attempt to predict with our geodynamic models. Here, we test several differently-oriented subduction, slab break-off, and delamination scenarios. Our preliminary results show that density models which include a curved, northeast trending slab predict the east-northeast oriented measurements along the Iberian margin. Imposing a drip structure beneath the Alboran Sea also predicts these orientations. In order to predict the rotation of the FPD we find in Morocco, however, most models require a stiff keel beneath the African craton.

  17. Compositions and processes of lithospheric mantle beneath the west Cathaysia block, southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Jianping; Pan, Shaokui; Lu, Jianggu; Li, Yihe; Xiang, Lu; Lin, Abing

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge about the nature and history of the lithospheric mantle beneath the west Cathaysia block (South China) is still sparse. The major- and trace-element compositions and H2O contents of minerals from peridotite xenoliths entrained in the Cenozoic lamprophyres of the Anyuan area (SE China), were conducted to investigate the nature and evolution of the lithospheric mantle, as well as the factors controlling the distribution of water. The xenoliths including spinel harzburgites and lherzolites are moderately refractory (Mg# Olivine = 90.2-91.2) with minor fertile lherzolites (Mg# Olivine = 89.1-89.9). Clinopyroxenes in lherzolites show variable REE patterns from LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched patterns, and commonly exhibit negative anomalies of U, Pb and Ti. The mantle represented by the xenoliths mostly experienced 1-10% partial melting and obvious subsequent silicate metasomatism. H2O contents of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and olivine in the peridotites are 320-404 ppm, 138-200 ppm, and 11-33 ppm, respectively. The whole-rock H2O contents range from 63 to 120 ppm, similar to that estimated for the MORB source. The negative correlations of H2O contents with Mg# in olivine and lack of correlation correlations with (La/Yb)N in clinopyroxene suggest that the H2O contents are mainly controlled by the partial melting process rather than mantle metasomatism. The fertile and moderately refractory peridotite xenoliths have similar equilibrium temperatures, implying that the lithospheric mantle is not compositionally stratified. Integrated with published data, we suggest that the widespread fertile and moderately refractory lithospheric mantle beneath the studied area (west Cathaysia), even the whole South China, might be eroded or melt-rock reacted by upwelling asthenospheric materials. Finally, the cooling of the upwelled asthenospheric materials resulted in the formation of the accreted lithospheric mantle mixed with pre-existing moderately refractory volumes.

  18. The structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Madagascar

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    Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wysession, Michael E.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Tilmann, Frederik; Julià, Jordi; Pratt, Martin J.; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Shore, Patrick J.; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana

    2017-09-01

    The lithosphere of Madagascar was initially amalgamated during the Pan-African events in the Neoproterozoic. It has subsequently been reshaped by extensional processes associated with the separation from Africa and India in the Jurassic and Cretaceous, respectively, and been subjected to several magmatic events in the late Cretaceous and the Cenozoic. In this study, the crust and uppermost mantle have been investigated to gain insights into the present-day structure and tectonic evolution of Madagascar. We analysed receiver functions, computed from data recorded on 37 broad-band seismic stations, using the H-κ stacking method and a joint inversion with Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity measurements. The thickness of the Malagasy crust ranges between 18 and 46 km. It is generally thick beneath the spine of mountains in the centre part (up to 46 km thick) and decreases in thickness towards the edges of the island. The shallowest Moho is found beneath the western sedimentary basins (18 km thick), which formed during both the Permo-Triassic Karro rifting in Gondwana and the Jurassic rifting of Madagascar from eastern Africa. The crust below the sedimentary basin thickens towards the north and east, reflecting the progressive development of the basins. In contrast, in the east there was no major rifting episode. Instead, the slight thinning of the crust along the east coast (31-36 km thick) may have been caused by crustal uplift and erosion when Madagascar moved over the Marion hotspot and India broke away from it. The parameters describing the crustal structure of Archean and Proterozoic terranes, including average thickness (40 km versus 35 km), Poisson's ratio (0.25 versus 0.26), average shear-wave velocity (both 3.7 km s-1), and thickness of mafic lower crust (7 km versus 4 km), show weak evidence of secular variation. The uppermost mantle beneath Madagascar is generally characterized by shear-wave velocities typical of stable lithosphere (∼4.5 km s-1). However

  19. New insights on the crustal thickness and its lateral variations beneath the Rif Cordillera

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    Gil de la Iglesia, A.; Diaz Cusi, J.; Gallart, J.; Carbonell, R.; Harnafi, M.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Rif cordillera forms, together with the Betic ranges, one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth. This continental boundary zone is dominated now by the slow convergence between Nubia and Eurasia, but with clear evidences of extensional tectonics. One of the missing elements to constrain the complex geodynamics of the Gibraltar Arc System is the knowledge on crustal structure beneath northern Morocco. In the last decade a major effort has been done in this sense, from active and passive seismics. We compile here the recent results available from the Rif domains. Two 330 km long wide angle DSS profiles were recorded end of 2011 across the Rif in NS and EW transects within the Rifsis project, complemented by onshore recordings of the Gassis-WestMed marine profiles. At the same period, BB seismic arrays were deployed in the area within Topo-Iberia and Picasso projects, allowing receiver function analyses of crustal depths. The ray-tracing modeling of the Rifsis profiles reveal a large Moho step and an area of crustal thickening both in EW and NS directions, grossly coincident with the Bouguer gravity anomalies. The deployment logistics allowed that all the stations recorded all the shots, thus providing useful offline data. We will use here all available in-line and offline data to provide a map of the crustal thickness in northern Morocco. We combined two approaches: i) a hyperbolic time reduction applied to the seismic data, resulting in low-fold stacks in which the reflections from the Moho should appear as subhorizontal lines; ii) the arrival times of the observed PmP phases allow, assuming a mean crustal velocity, to assign a midpoint crustal thickness to each lecture. Although some uncertainties may be inherent to those approaches, a large crustal root, reaching more than 50 km, is well documented in the central part of the Rif Cordillera, close to the zone where the Alboran slab may still be attached to the lithosphere. We also compared these results with

  20. The Maternal Cytokine and Chemokine Profile of Naturally Conceived Gestations Is Mainly Preserved during In Vitro Fertilization and Egg Donation Pregnancies

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    Alicia Martínez-Varea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective longitudinal study aimed at comparing maternal immune response among naturally conceived (NC; n=25, in vitro fertilization (IVF; n=25, and egg donation (ED; n=25 pregnancies. The main outcome measures were, firstly, to follow up plasma levels of interleukin (IL 1beta, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL17, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α, and decidual granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF during the three trimesters of pregnancy during the three trimesters of pregnancy; secondly, to evaluate if the cytokine and chemokine pattern of ED pregnant women differs from that of those with autologous oocytes and, thirdly, to assess if women with preeclampsia show different cytokine and chemokine profile throughout pregnancy versus women with uneventful pregnancies. Pregnant women in the three study groups displayed similar cytokine and chemokine pattern throughout pregnancy. The levels of all quantified cytokines and chemokines, except RANTES, TNFα, IL8, TGFβ, and SDF1α, rose in the second trimester compared with the first, and these higher values remained in the third trimester. ED pregnancies showed lower SDF1α levels in the third trimester compared with NC and IVF pregnancies. Patients who developed preeclampsia displayed higher SDF1α plasma levels in the third trimester.

  1. Nutrition of students from dietetics profile education in the Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities compared with students from other academic centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalcze, Katarzyna; Turyk, Zofia; Drywień, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition in humans is one of the most important factors affecting normal development, nutritional status and keeping healthy. University students can be overburdened with responsibilities arising from their studies which may result in abnormal diet/nutrition and decrease their levels of physical activity. To determine and assess nutrition and eating habits for selected female students studying nutrition at the Siedlce University of Natural Sciences & Humanities (UPH), compared with young people from other academic centres also studying nutrition and having a similar education profile. A diagnostic survey was undertaken anonymously on 100 female student subjects using a proprietary questionnaire. Students were undergraduates at the UPH during their 2nd and 3rd year. Dietetics students considered that the practical application of proper nutrition principles is very important. Nevertheless, 44% assessed themselves to follow abnormal diets; 58% declared they ate whole grains frequently whereas 58% and 65% respectively consumed fruit and vegetables daily. Dietary irregularities were identified, particularly in how often fish was eaten, where 46% either never ate fish or did so only occasionally. Subjects preferred lean cuts of poultry meat (65%), and the most common cooking practice was frying (52%). Subjects did not follow dietary recommendations, although responses varied in the different academic centres. Despite learning from their studies about normal nutritional requirements it seems that, to large degree, students follow eating habits acquired during their childhoods in the home.

  2. Stress-Induced In Vivo Recruitment of Human Cytotoxic Natural Killer Cells Favors Subsets with Distinct Receptor Profiles and Associates with Increased Epinephrine Levels.

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    Marc B Bigler

    Full Text Available Acute stress drives a 'high-alert' response in the immune system. Psychoactive drugs induce distinct stress hormone profiles, offering a sought-after opportunity to dissect the in vivo immunological effects of acute stress in humans.3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, methylphenidate (MPH, or both, were administered to healthy volunteers in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover-study. Lymphocyte subset frequencies, natural killer (NK cell immune-phenotypes, and changes in effector function were assessed, and linked to stress hormone levels and expression of CD62L, CX3CR1, CD18, and stress hormone receptors on NK cells.MDMA/MPH > MDMA > MPH robustly induced an epinephrine-dominant stress response. Immunologically, rapid redistribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte-subsets towards phenotypically mature NK cells occurred. NK cytotoxicity was unaltered, but they expressed slightly reduced levels of the activating receptor NKG2D. Preferential circulation of mature NK cells was associated with high epinephrine receptor expression among this subset, as well as expression of integrin ligands previously linked to epinephrine-induced endothelial detachment.The acute epinephrine-induced stress response was characterized by rapid accumulation of mature and functional NK cells in the peripheral circulation. This is in line with studies using other acute stressors and supports the role of the acute stress response in rapidly mobilizing the innate immune system to counteract incoming threats.

  3. Complex seismic anisotropy and mantle dynamics beneath Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemnifi, Awad A.; Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Karaoğlu, Özgür; Salah, Mohamed K.; Aouad, Nassib; Reed, Cory A.; Yu, Youqiang

    2017-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is an unambiguous property of the deep Earth that is often detected through shear wave splitting (SWS) and anisotropic receiver function (RF) techniques, which are then used to infer the lithospheric and asthenospheric deformational structure. The Anatolian plate and its associated Mediterranean, Eurasian, and Arabian plate boundaries represent the consequences of a variety of convergent and transform tectonic regimes; these boundaries are thus well-suited for studying seismic anisotropy related to subduction, orogenic, and strike-slip processes. We apply a joint SWS and RF analysis to identify the magnitude and orientation of deformation associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling beneath the Anatolian plate system as well as intra-plate fossil fabrics resulting from ancient and ongoing collision. SWS analysis reveals the existence of complex anisotropic fabrics beneath the Anatolian region, where the upper-layer fast orientations are either parallel to strike-slip faults or orthogonal to reverse faults. Strongly oriented NE-SW lower-layer fast orientations suggest that they originate from slab-modulated flow in the mantle wedge overlying the northward-subducting African plate. The results of the RF analysis show that the fast orientations are spatially variable but are generally consistent with crustal fabrics developed mostly through intensive faulting and are possibly associated with sub-vertical lower crustal shear zones.

  4. Pervasive upper mantle melting beneath the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Tauzin, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    We report from converted seismic waves, a pervasive seismically anomalous layer above the transition zone beneath the western US. The layer, characterized by an average shear wave speed reduction of 1.6%, spans over an area of ∼ 1.8 ×106 km2 with thicknesses varying between 25 and 70 km. The location of the layer correlates with the present location of a segment of the Farallon plate. This spatial correlation and the sharp seismic signal atop of the layer indicate that the layer is caused by compositional heterogeneity. Analysis of the seismic signature reveals that the compositional heterogeneity can be ascribed to a small volume of partial melt (0.5 ± 0.2 vol% on average). This article presents the first high resolution map of the melt present within the layer. Despite spatial variations in temperature, the calculated melt volume fraction correlates strongly with the amplitude of P-S conversion throughout the region. Comparing the values of temperature calculated from the seismic signal with available petrological constraints, we infer that melting in the layer is caused by release of volatiles from the subducted Farallon slab. This partially molten zone beneath the western US can sequester at least 1.2 ×1017 kg of volatiles, and can act as a large regional reservoir of volatile species such as H or C.

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy in the D″ layer beneath the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, ValéRie; Garnero, Edward J.; Lay, Thorne; Fouch, Matthew J.

    2005-08-01

    The lowermost mantle beneath Central America has anisotropic seismic velocity structure manifested in shear wave splitting of signals from South American earthquakes recorded at North American broadband recording stations. Prior studies of deep mantle anisotropy in this region have characterized the structure as having vertical transverse isotropy (VTI), which is sufficient to explain a general trend of early tangential (SH) component arrivals. However, VTI models cannot quantitatively match systematic waveform complexities in the onset of many of the shear waves that graze this region. After accounting for splitting effects of upper mantle anisotropy beneath the recording stations, we model the corrected waveform data using full wave theory for mantle velocity models with an anisotropic D″ layer. This is the first attempt to quantitatively model a large data set including azimuthal anisotropy in D″. The models include transverse isotropy with either a vertical or tilted symmetry axis, the latter resulting in azimuthal anisotropy. For some initial shear wave polarizations, tilted transverse isotropy (TTI) produces small, reversed polarity arrivals on the SV components at the arrival time of SH, consistent with the data. Geographical variations in the azimuth of the TTI symmetry axis are indicated by the data. The lack of azimuthal coverage prevents unique resolution of the TTI orientation and also precludes distinguishing between TTI and other azimuthal anisotropy structures such as that predicted for lattice preferred orientation of minerals. Nonetheless, our modeling demonstrates the need for laterally varying anisotropic structure of more complex form than VTI for this region.

  6. Perfil das reservas particulares do patrimônio natural do Estado do Paraná = Private reserves of natural patrimony profile in the State of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cristiano Vieira Cegana

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available As Reservas Particulares do Patrimônio Natural (RPPNs, uma das categorias de manejo do Sistema Nacional de Unidades de Conservação, são fundamentais para a preservação da biodiversidade. Com o objetivo de caracterizar as RPPNs do Estado do Paraná, destacando os pontos primordiais para um efetivo e adequado manejo das áreas em prol da conservação, foram aplicados 66 questionários junto aos proprietários de RPPNs, entre julho e novembro de 2004. Após as análises univariadas e bivariadas, desenvolvidas pelo pacote estatístico Le Sphinx Plus, foi verificado que o poder público municipal foi oprincipal incentivador à criação dessas unidades de conservação, visando aos benefícios financeiros gerados pelo ICMS Ecológico. A maior parte das reservas não apresenta tipo algum de planejamento devido à falta de apoio técnico e ao custo oneroso do documento; aproteção das áreas não vem sendo atingida em conseqüência da baixa disponibilidade financeira e as pesquisas científicas são pouco desenvolvidas nas RPPNs, em decorrência da falta de apoio oferecido e da ineficiente divulgação junto às instituições de ensino, depesquisa, dentre outras.Private Reserves of Natural Patrimony have a fundamental role in environmental preservation, as a component of the Brazilian National Protected Area System. This study aimed to evaluate the private reserves’ profile by selecting questions asked to 66 private reserve owners, personally, from July to November, 2004. Data was processed by univariate and bivariate analyses, developed by Le Sphinx Plus statistical package. Results showed that the municipal government provided the main stimulus for the creation of private reserves in the state of Parana, as the municipality receives financial support generated by an Ecological Tax (Ecological ICMS; most private protected areas have no management plan. The protection of these private lands did not endured due to the lack of financial

  7. Seismic tomography reveals magma chamber location beneath Uturuncu volcano (Bolivia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukarina, Ekaterina; West, Michael; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Uturuncu volcano belongs to the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex in the central Andes, the product of an ignimbrite ''flare-up''. The region has been the site of large-scale silicic magmatism since 10 Ma, producing 10 major eruptive calderas and edifices, some of which are multiple-eruption resurgent complexes as large as the Yellowstone or Long Valley caldera. Satellite measurements show that the hill has been rising more than half an inch a year for almost 20 years, suggesting that the Uturuncu volcano, which has erupted last time more than 300,000 years ago, is steadily inflating, which makes it fertile ground for study. In 2009 an international multidisciplinary team formed a project called PLUTONS to study Uturuncu. Under this project a 100 km wide seismic network was set around the volcano by seismologists from University of Alaska Fairbanks. Local seismicity is well distributed and provides constraints on the shallow crust. Ray paths from earthquakes in the subducting slab complement this with steep ray paths that sample the deeper crust. Together the shallow and deep earthquakes provide strong 3D coverage of Uturuncu and the surrounding region. To study the deformation source beneath the volcano we performed simultaneous tomographic inversion for the Vp and Vs anomalies and source locations, using the non-linear passive source tomographic code, LOTOS. We estimated both P and S wave velocity structures beneath the entire Uturuncu volcano by using arrival times of P and S waves from more than 600 events registered by 33 stations. To show the reliability of the results, we performed a number of different tests, including checkerboard synthetic tests and tests with odd/even data. Obtained Vp/Vs ratio distribution shows increased values beneath the south Uturuncu, at a depth of about 15 km. We suggest the high ratio anomaly is caused by partial melt, presented in expanding magma chamber, responsible for the volcano inflation. The resulting Vp, Vs and the ratio

  8. Soil organic carbon stocks quantification in Mediterranean natural areas, a trade-off between entire soil profiles and soil control sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Brevik, Eric. C.; Cerdá, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is extremely important in the global carbon (C) cycle; also, SOC is a soil property subject to changes, inasmuch as SOC is highly variable in space and time. The scientific community is researching the fate of the organic carbon in the ecosystems and this is why there is a blooming interest on this topic (Oliveira et al., 2014; Kukal et al., 2015). Soil organic matter play a key role in the Soil System (Fernández-Romero et al., 2014; Parras-Alcántara and Lozano García, 2014; Lozano-García and Parras-Alcántara; Parras-Alcántara et al., 2015).Globally it is known that soil C sequestration is a strategy to mitigate climate change. Over time, some researchers have analyzed entire soil profiles (ESP) by pedogenetic horizons and other researchers have analyzed soil control sections (SCS) (edaphic controls to different thickness), and in each case the benefits of the methodology established was justified. However, very few studies compare both methods (ESP versus SCS). This research sought to analyze the SOC stock (SOCS) variability using both methods (ESP and SCS) in The Despeñaperros Natural Park, a nature reserve that consists of a 76.8 km2 forested area in southern Spain. The park is in a Mediterranean environment and is a natural area (free of human disturbance). Thirty-four sampling points were selected in the study zone. Each sampling point was analyzed in two different ways, as ESP (by horizons) and as SCS with different depth increments (0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm). The major goal of this research was to study the SOCS variability at regional scale. The studied soils were classified as Phaeozems, Cambisols, Regosols and Leptosols. The total SOCS in the Despeñaperros Natural Park was over 28.2% greater when SCS were used compared to ESP, ranging from 0.8144 Tg C to 0.6353 Tg C respectively (1 Tg = 10E12 g). However, when the top soil (surface horizon and superficial section control) was analyzed, this difference increased to

  9. Gravimetric imaging of partially molten bodies beneath the Bolivian Altiplano

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    del Potro, R.; Diez, M.; Gottsmann, J.; Camacho, A. J.; Sunagua, M.

    2011-12-01

    The presence of partial melt in the Earth's crust causes a decrease in density, and hence a density contrast, that generates a potential field anomaly. Gravimetric techniques can quantify such an anomaly and invert its signature to produce a subsurface density distribution model, from which images of anomalous density bodies can be isolated. Here, we present a 3D gravimetric image of four deep-rooted negative density bodies in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes in southern Bolivia, which we interpret to contain partial melt. The underlying gravimetric data were obtained by the combination of 143 new with 60 existing observation from previous regional surveys. The survey covers an area of ~5000 km2 that comprises the Central Andean Bouguer anomaly minima of about -450 μGal. After standard data reduction, the local residual gravity signal was inverted using a priori determined plausible density contrasts (±50 to ±300 kg m-3). The inversion routine builds a subsurface model (defined by the 3D aggregation of parallel-piped cells) based on a controlled 'growth' process of anomalous density bodies by means of an exploratory approach. Non-uniqueness is addressed by favouring solutions that balance minimum residuals and minimum number of anomalous bodies with minimum anomalous mass. Within the range of assumed density contrasts, all inversion models show the presence of the deep-rooted low-density bodies, providing a significant confidence level to the inversion results. Our favoured 3D model of the anomalous bodies is obtained from a negative density contrast of 150 kg m-3 that corresponds to bodies appear to connect the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (AMPB) at ~20 km depth, to shallower (~5 km) pre-eruption levels beneath the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC). One of the bodies is located beneath a large on-going ground uplift centred at Uturuncu volcano and the modelled ground deformation source lies within the gravimetrically imaged body of partial melt.

  10. Quaternary extensional growth folding beneath Reno, Nevada, imaged by urban seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Frary, Roxy N.; Louie, John; Odum, Jackson K.

    2013-01-01

    We characterize shallow subsurface faulting and basin structure along a transect through heavily urbanized Reno, Nevada, with high‐resolution seismic reflection imaging. The 6.8 km of P‐wave data image the subsurface to approximately 800 m depth and delineate two subbasins and basin uplift that are consistent with structure previously inferred from gravity modeling in this region of the northern Walker Lane. We interpret two primary faults that bound the uplift and deform Quaternary deposits. The dip of Quaternary and Tertiary strata in the western subbasin increases with greater depth to the east, suggesting recurrent fault motion across the westernmost of these faults. Deformation in the Quaternary section of the western subbasin is likely evidence of extensional growth folding at the edge of the Truckee River through Reno. This deformation is north of, and on trend with, previously mapped Quaternary fault strands of the Mt. Rose fault zone. In addition to corroborating the existence of previously inferred intrabasin structure, these data provide evidence for an active extensional Quaternary fault at a previously unknown location within the Truckee Meadows basin that furthers our understanding of both the seismotectonic framework and earthquake hazards in this urbanized region.

  11. Receiver Function Imaging of Crust and Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath the Japan Islands -Inclusion of Hi-net Data-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Hirahara, K.; Shibutani, T.

    2001-12-01

    We are examining a large number of teleseismic waveforms observed at stations closely distributed over the Japan Islands to construct body-wave waveform tomography data for determining 3-D crust and upper mantle structure including velocity discontinuities. As one of preparatory studies toward this final goal, we are executing array analyses of Receiver Functions (RF). RF analyses of J-array data ( 32 broad band stations and 269 short period stations ) and Freesia data ( 15 broad band stations ), whose stations are closely distributed, have provided us with new information on the structure including velocity discontinuities beneath the Japan Islands (Tada et al, 2001). In their study, for crustal imaging, RFs transformed from time to depth domain after SVD filtering ( Chevrot and Giardin, 2000 ) are projected onto 2-D profiles, which show average values for cells within +/- 50km from each cross section. However, this cell size does not satisfy our demand to draw the detailed image beneath the Japan Islands. In addition, J-array short period RFs available for the analyses are limited because of high frequency noises. In this research, Hi-net data (short period), whose stations are far more closely distributed, are newly included into our data. We make RF image with α =3 of short period J-array data and Hi-net data for events observed during a period from September, 2000 to July, 2001 with the magnitudes larger than 5.5. The total number of the stations with their average spacing of 10km is about 800 (J-array; 270, Hi-net; 500), which enables to reduce the cell size to +/- 20km at most. We show a new 3-D RF image of the crust and the uppermost mantle, whose best spatial resolution is reaching less than 5km. Therefore we can obtain much more detailed 3-D RF image beneath the whole Japan Islands.

  12. Os and HSE of the hot upper mantle beneath southern Tibet: Indian mantle affinity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z.; Dale, C. W.; Pearson, D. G.; Niu, Y.; Zhu, D.; Mo, X.

    2011-12-01

    The subduction of the Indian plate (including cratonic continental crust and/or upper mantle) beneath southern Tibet is widely accepted from both geological and geophysical studies. Mantle-derived xenoliths from this region provide a means of directly investigating the mantle underlying the southern part of the plateau. Studies of xenoliths hosted in the Sailipu ultrapotassic volcanic rocks, erupted at ~17 Ma, have indicated that the subcontinental mantle of southern Tibetan Plateau is hot and strongly influenced by metasomatism (Zhao et al., 2008a, b; Liu et al., 2011). Here we report comprehensive EPMA and LA-ICP-MS major and trace element data for the Sailipu xenoliths and also whole rock Os isotope and HSE data in order to constrain the depletion history of the mantle and to identify the presence of any potential Indian cratonic mantle. The xenoliths, ranging in size from 0.5cm to 1.5cm in diameter, are mostly peridotites. The calculated temperatures are 1010-1230°C at the given pressures of ~1.6-2.0 GPa (n=47). These P-T conditions are similar to rift-related upper mantle regimes (e.g. Kenya), indicating the influence of regional extension beneath southern Tibet in the Miocene. A series of compositional discriminations for minerals (Cpx, Opx, Ol, and Phl), e.g. Fo ~91), with a clear metasomatic signature We obtained Os isotope data and abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE, including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd and Re) on a set of six olivine-dominated peridotite samples from Sailipu volcanics, less than 1 cm in dimension. They allow us to further constrain the nature and state of the upper mantle beneath the southern Tibet. Sailipu samples display low total HSE abundances (Os+Ir+Ru+Pt+Pd+Re) ranging from 8.7 to 25 ppb, with nearly constant Os, Ir , and Ru, but rather varied Pt (2-13), Pd (0.4-5.2), and Re (0.01-0.5). Chondrite-normalised Pd/Ir ratios range from 0.2 to 2.4 reflecting significant metasomatism of some samples. The xenoliths exhibit 187Os/188Os

  13. Upper mantle thermal variations beneath the Transantarctic Mountains inferred from teleseismic S-wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jesse F.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Anandakrishan, Sridhar; Shore, Patrick J.; Voigt, Donald

    2006-02-01

    This study examines teleseismic S-wave attenuation variations between the Ross Sea in West Antarctica and Vostok Subglacial Highlands in East Antarctica. These analyses indicate that δt* is ~1 second greater beneath the Ross Sea than East Antarctica, with the transition occurring beneath the Transantarctic Mountains. While the structure is non-unique, low attenuation beneath East Antarctica is consistent with thick subcontinental lithosphere (>=250 km) and negligible asthenosphere. In contrast, the Ross Sea possesses a thin lithosphere underlain by thick, highly anelastic asthenosphere. Independent temperature estimates from velocity and quality factor indicate that the mantle is 200-400°C colder beneath East Antarctica than the Ross Sea between 80 and 220 km depth. The temperature variation beneath the Transantarctic Mountains may have assisted in the asymmetric uplift of the mountains. Attenuation and velocity anomalies within East Antarctica may delineate regions of elevated temperature, representing recently modified sections between older lithospheric blocks.

  14. Incipient mantle plume evolution: Constraints from ancient landscapes buried beneath the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky de Quay, G.; Roberts, G. G.; Watson, J. S.; Jackson, C. A.-L.

    2017-03-01

    Geological observations that constrain the history of mantle convection are sparse despite its importance in determining vertical and horizontal plate motions, plate rheology, and magmatism. We use a suite of geological and geophysical observations from the northern North Sea to constrain evolution of the incipient Paleocene-Eocene Icelandic plume. Well data and a three-dimensional seismic survey are used to reconstruct a 58-55 Ma landscape now buried ˜1.5 km beneath the seabed in the Bressay region. Geochemical analyses of cuttings from wells that intersect the landscape indicate the presence of angiosperm debris. These observations, combined with presence of coarse clastic material, interpreted beach ridges, and a large dendritic drainage network, indicate that this landscape formed subaerially. Longitudinal profiles of paleo-rivers were extracted and inverted for an uplift rate history, indicating three distinct phases of uplift and total cumulative uplift of ˜350 m. Dinoflagellate cysts in the surrounding marine stratigraphy indicate that this terrestrial landscape formed in ˜150 km/Ma.

  15. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I; Keire, David A

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR (1)H-X (X=(15)N or (13)C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited(1)H-(13)C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH(2) and CH/CH(3) at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the (13)C T(2) relaxation during an additional 1/(1)JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than (13)C (i.e.(15)N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T(2) losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated(1)H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H(2)O/5% D(2)O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/(1)JXH editing-period is incorporated in to the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved (1)J(XH)-active and the (1)J(XH)-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH(2) and XH/XH(3). Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Comparison of Chemical Profiles, Anti-Inflammatory Activity, and UPLC-Q-TOF/MS-Based Metabolomics in Endotoxic Fever Rats between Synthetic Borneol and Natural Borneol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural borneol (NB, called “Bingpian” is an important traditional Chinese medicine to restore consciousness, remove heat and relieve pain, all of which are inflammation-related diseases. Recently, due to the limited source of NB, synthetic borneol (SB is widely used as a substitute for NB in clinics. However, little is known about the effects of SB instead of NB. Herein, the aim of the present study was to compare NB and SB on chemical profiles by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS analysis, anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS metabolomic approaches in endotoxic fever induced in rats. Results showed that, in total, 13 volatile components could be identified in NB and SB by GC-MS analysis, in which a significant difference between them still existed. The main constituents in SB were iso-borneol and borneol, while borneol contributes to 98.96% of the amount in NB. Additionally, both NB and SB exhibited remarkable anti-inflammatory effects to reduce the level of inflammatory factors including NO, TNF-α and IL-6 in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, and lower the high body temperature in rats with endotoxic fever induced by LPS. Moreover, it seems that NB exhibited higher efficacy than SB. The unequal bioactive efficiency between NB and SB was also indicated by means of non-targeting metabolomics. Based on UPLC-Q-TOF/MS technology, 12 biomarkers in the serum of fever rats were identified. Pathway analysis revealed that the anti-fever effect of NB and SB was related to regulating the abnormal glycerophospholipid, linoleic acid and alpha-linoleic acid metabolism pathways in the fever model. Results indicated that there was still a great difference between NB and SB involving chemical constituents, anti-inflammation activity and the ability to regulate the abnormal metabolism pathways of

  17. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  18. Heterogeneous Structure and Seismicity beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kato, A.; Sakai, S.; Nanjo, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Kurashimo, E.; Obara, K.; Kasahara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2010-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes damaged mega-thrust earthquakes. Sato et al. (2005) revealed the geometry of upper surface of PSP, and Hagiwara et al. (2006) estimated the velocity structure beneath Boso peninsula. However, these results are not sufficient for the assessment of the entire picture of the seismic hazards beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area including those due to an intra-slab M7+ earthquake. So, we launched the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan area (Hirata et al., 2009). Proving the more detailed geometry and physical properties (e.g. velocities, densities, attenuation) and stress field within PSP is very important to attain this issue. The core item of this project is a dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) for making observations in the metropolitan area (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We deployed the 249 seismic stations with a spacing of 5 km. Some parts of stations construct 5 linear arrays at interval of 2 km such as Tsukuba-Fujisawa (TF) array, etc. The TF array runs from northeast to southwest through the center of Tokyo. In this study, we applied the tomography method to image the heterogeneous structure under the Tokyo metropolitan area. We selected events from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) unified earthquake list. All data of MeSO-net were edited into event data by the selected JMA unified earthquake list. We picked the P and S wave arrival times. The total number of stations and events are 421 and 1,256, respectively. Then, we applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to this dataset and estimated the fine-scale velocity structure. The grid nodes locate 10 km interval in parallel with the array, 20 km interval in perpendicular to the array; and on depth direction, 5 km interval to a depth of less than 50 km and 10 km interval at a depth of more

  19. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater–surface water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Steelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater–surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater–surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze–thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool–riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface. While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river

  20. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  1. Mantle transition zone structure beneath the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Helffrich, G. R.; Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J.; Eaton, D. W.; Snyder, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The Canadian Shield is underlain by one of the deepest and most laterally extensive continental roots on the planet. Seismological constraints on the mantle structure beneath the region are presently lacking due to the paucity of stations in this remote area. Presented here is a receiver function study on transition zone structure using data from recently deployed seismic networks from the Hudson Bay region. High resolution images based on high signal-to-noise ratio data show clear arrivals from the 410 km and 660 km discontinuities, revealing remarkably little variation in transition zone structure. Transition zone thickness is close to the global average (averaging 245 km across the study area), and any deviations in Pds arrival time from reference Earth models can be readily explained by upper-mantle velocity structure. The 520 km discontinuity is not a ubiquitous feature, and is only weakly observed in localised areas. These results imply that the Laurentian root is likely confined to the upper-mantle and if any mantle downwelling exists, possibly explaining the existence of Hudson Bay, it is also confined to the upper 400 km. Any thermal perturbations at transition zone depths associated with the existence of the root, whether they be cold downwellings or elevated temperatures due to the insulating effect of the root, are thus either non-existent or below the resolution of the study.

  2. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon; Bush, John W. M.; Hosoi, A. E.; Lauga, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small-amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be nonzero for moderate values of the capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low capillary number. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

  3. Peeking Beneath the Caldera: Communicating Subsurface Knowledge of Newberry Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Moser, M.; Rose, K.; Schultz, J.; Cameron, E.

    2016-12-01

    "Imaging the Subsurface: Enhanced Geothermal Systems and Exploring Beneath Newberry Volcano" is an interactive website that presents a three-dimensional subsurface model of Newberry Volcano developed at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Created using the Story Maps application by ArcGIS Online, this format's dynamic capabilities provide the user the opportunity for multimedia engagement with the datasets and information used to build the subsurface model. This website allows for an interactive experience that the user dictates, including interactive maps, instructive videos and video capture of the subsurface model, and linked information throughout the text. This Story Map offers a general background on the technology of enhanced geothermal systems and the geologic and development history of Newberry Volcano before presenting NETL's modeling efforts that support the installation of enhanced geothermal systems. The model is driven by multiple geologic and geophysical datasets to compare and contrast results which allow for the targeting of potential EGS sites and the reduction of subsurface uncertainty. This Story Map aims to communicate to a broad audience, and provides a platform to effectively introduce the model to researchers and stakeholders.

  4. Neotectonic fault detection and lithosphere structure beneath SW of High Atlas (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoulali, Youssef; Radi, Said; Azguet, Roumaissae; Bachaoui, Mostapha

    2016-08-01

    subduction zone marking the limit between SW of High Atlas and the western Meseta. A second high velocity body, dipping north beneath the Hercynian Tichka Massif is detected. This positive velocity anomaly can be interpreted as an old subduction zone marking the limit between Meseta Domain and West African Craton. The occurrence of tholeiitic and alkaline magmatism respectively in the Essaouira basin zone and in the Hercynian Ticka Massif zone leads us to conclude that remains of subduction exist in these zones. The negative lithospheric anomalies are interpreted as heat or hot asthenospheric material upwelling from depth crossing the main crustal structures in SW High Atlas. The negative lithospheric anomalies are interpreted as hot asthenospheric material or heat coming from depth to replace the detached crust. Based on our analysis of local P wave velocities and profiles, the crustal thickness beneath SW of High Atlas region varies from 30 km to 45 km in central and western part.

  5. Soil property control of biogeochemical processes beneath two subtropical stormwater infiltration basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Harris, Willie G.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Substantially different biogeochemical processes affecting nitrogen fate and transport were observed beneath two stormwater infiltration basins in north-central Florida. Differences are related to soil textural properties that deeply link hydroclimatic conditions with soil moisture variations in a humid, subtropical climate. During 2008, shallow groundwater beneath the basin with predominantly clayey soils (median, 41% silt+clay) exhibited decreases in dissolved oxygen from 3.8 to 0.1 mg L-1 and decreases in nitrate nitrogen (NO3-–N) from 2.7 mg L-1 to -1, followed by manganese and iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, beneath the basin with predominantly sandy soils (median, 2% silt+clay), aerobic conditions persisted from 2007 through 2009 (dissolved oxygen, 5.0–7.8 mg L-1), resulting in NO3-–N of 1.3 to 3.3 mg L-1 in shallow groundwater. Enrichment of d15N and d18O of NO3- combined with water chemistry data indicates denitrification beneath the clayey basin and relatively conservative NO3- transport beneath the sandy basin. Soil-extractable NO3-–N was significantly lower and the copper-containing nitrite reductase gene density was significantly higher beneath the clayey basin. Differences in moisture retention capacity between fine- and coarse-textured soils resulted in median volumetric gas-phase contents of 0.04 beneath the clayey basin and 0.19 beneath the sandy basin, inhibiting surface/subsurface oxygen exchange beneath the clayey basin. Results can inform development of soil amendments to maintain elevated moisture content in shallow soils of stormwater infiltration basins, which can be incorporated in improved best management practices to mitigate NO3- impacts.

  6. Deep-crustal magma reservoirs beneath the Nicaraguan volcanic arc, revealed by 2-D and semi 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasse, Heinrich; Schäfer, Anja; Díaz, Daniel; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Muñoz, Angélica; Mütschard, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    A long-period magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted in early 2009 in western Nicaragua to study the electrical resistivity and thus fluid/melt distribution at the Central American continental margin where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate. Strike analysis yields a preference direction perpendicular to the profile, with moderate deviation from two-dimensionality, however. Two-dimensional modeling maps the sediments of the Nicaraguan Depression and a high-conductivity zone in the mid-crust, slightly offset from the arc. Further conductors are modeled in the backarc. However, these features are probably artifacts when a 2-D program is applied to data which show moderate 3-D characteristics. 3-D inversion clarifies the situation, and the major remaining conductive structure is now quasi directly beneath the volcanic chain and interpreted as a deep-seated magma deposit. Conductivity in the backarc is also relatively high and may either be caused by still existing partial melts beneath the Paleocene to Miocene volcanic arcs or by related metallic deposits in the aureoles of hydrothermal alteration.

  7. Endogenous steroid profiling by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics for the detection of natural hormone abuse in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, M.H.; Tricht, van E.F.; Rossum, van H.J.; Sterk, S.S.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    For years it has been suspected that natural hormones are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle in the European Union. Unfortunately there is a lack of methods and criteria that can be used to detect the abuse of natural hormones and distinguish treated from non-treated animals. Pattern

  8. Current ecological understanding of fungal-like pathogens of fish: what lies beneath?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Elie Gozlan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasingly sophisticated microbiological techniques, and long after the first discovery of microbes, basic knowledge is still lacking to fully appreciate the ecological importance of microbial parasites in fish. This is likely due to the nature of their habitats as many species of fish suffer from living beneath turbid water away from easy recording. However, fishes represent key ecosystem services for millions of people around the world and the absence of a functional ecological understanding of viruses, prokaryotes, and small eukaryotes in the maintenance of fish populations and of their diversity represents an inherent barrier to aquatic conservation and food security. Among recent emerging infectious diseases responsible for severe population declines in plant and animal taxa, fungal and fungal-like microbes have emerged as significant contributors. Here, we review the current knowledge gaps of fungal and fungal-like parasites and pathogens in fish and put them into an ecological perspective with direct implications for the monitoring of fungal fish pathogens in the wild, their phylogeography as well as their associated ecological impact on fish populations. With increasing fish movement around the world for farming, releases into the wild for sport fishing and human-driven habitat changes, it is expected, along with improved environmental monitoring of fungal and fungal-like infections, that the full extent of the impact of these pathogens on wild fish populations will soon emerge as a major threat to freshwater biodiversity.

  9. Probing Earth's conductivity structure beneath oceans by scalar geomagnetic data: autonomous surface vehicle solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Matzka, Jürgen; Poedjono, Benny; Samrock, Friedemann; Olsen, Nils; Pai, Sudhir

    2016-11-01

    The electric conductivity distribution of the Earth's crust and upper mantle provides a key to unraveling its structure. Information can be obtained from vector data time series of the natural variations of the magnetic and electric field in a directional stable reference frame. Applying this method, known as magnetotellurics, to oceanic regions is challenging since only vector instruments placed at the sea bottom can provide such data. Here, we discuss a concept of marine induction surveying which is based on sea-surface scalar magnetic field measurements from a modern position-keeping platform. The concept exploits scalar magnetic responses that relate variations of the scalar magnetic field at the survey sites with variations of the horizontal magnetic field at a reference site. A 3-D model study offshore Oahu Island (Hawaii) demonstrates that these responses are sensitive to the conductivity structure beneath the ocean. We conclude that the sensitivity, depending on the bathymetry gradient, is typically largest near the coast offshore. We show that such sea-surface marine induction surveys can be performed with the Wave Glider, an easy-to-deploy, autonomous, energy-harvesting floating platform with position-keeping capability.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. The Janus-faced nature of time spent on homework : Using latent profile analyses to predict academic achievement over a school year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flunger, Barbara; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagengast, Benjamin; Lüdtke, Oliver; Niggli, Alois; Schnyder, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Homework time and achievement are only modestly associated, whereas homework effort has consistently been shown to positively predict later achievement. We argue that time spent on homework can be an important predictor of achievement when combined with measures of homework effort. Latent profile

  11. The crustal structure beneath the Netherlands from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, Hanneke; Yudistira, Tedi; Trampert, Jeannot

    2017-04-01

    A 3-D shear velocity model of the crust beneath the Netherlands is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love wave group measurements derived from ambient seismic noise recordings. The data are obtained from a temporary array of broad-band seismometers in and around the Netherlands (the NARS-Netherlands project, 2008-2012) complemented with data from existing networks in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity maps were constructed for the period range of 10 to 30 s. Lateral variations in the group velocity maps primarily reflect variations in sedimentary thickness across the Netherlands. The 2-psi Rayleigh wave and 4-psi Love wave fast directions of the group velocity maps are in agreement with the NW-SE direction of maximum compressive stress as well as with the NW-SE dominant direction of faulting in the Netherlands. The frequency dependence suggests that the azimuthal anisotropy is caused by lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of lower crustal minerals. A 3-D shear-velocity model is obtained by inversion of the group velocity maps using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. The results show a top layer that varies in thickness from 2 to 4 km with with a pattern that is similar to the base of the Rotliegend. A midcrustal discontinuity is found at a depth of about 13 km. The Moho appears to be relatively flat with an average depth of 33 km. Radial anisotropy is mainly positive (Vsh - Vsv > 0) for the lower crust. This can be an expression of LPO but also of horizontal layering or lamination. The top layer shows the largest variations in radial anisotropy with distinct areas of negative radial anisotropy that can be attributed to high-density near-vertical faulting in those regions.

  12. The stress field beneath Mt. Vesuvius (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Luca; Massa, Bruno; De Matteo, Ada

    2014-05-01

    The Somma-Vesuvius is the smallest and one of the youngest volcanoes of the Neapolitan district. Its origin is linked to a Late Pleistocene-Holocene extension occurred along the entire Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain. Nowadays, Mt. Vesuvius is a quiescent strato-volcano. Using different approaches and a comparison between observations and numerical models we have determined the spatial variations in the stress field beneath the volcano edifice. In order to achieve this target we have analyzed a focal mechanism dataset derived from 197 events recorded from Jan. 1999 to Jan. 2012. The main results highlight the presence of two seismogenic volumes characterized by markedly different stress patterns. The two volumes are separated by a layer where the seismic strain release shows a significant decrease. Previous studies postulated the existence, at about the same depth, of a ductile layer allowing the spreading of the Mt. Vesuvius edifice. We interpreted the difference in the stress pattern within the two volumes as the effect of a mechanical decoupling caused by the aforementioned ductile layer. The stress pattern in the top volume is dominated by a reverse faulting style, which agrees with the hypothesis of a seismicity driven by the spreading process. On the other hand, the stress field determined for the deep volume is consistent with a background regional field locally perturbed by the effects of the topography and of heterogeneities in the volcanic structure. Since the seismicity of the deep volume shows an intermittent behaviour and has shown to be linked to geochemical variations in the fumaroles of the volcano, we hypothesize that it results from the effect of fluid injection episodes, possibly of magmatic origin, perturbing the pore pressure within the hydrothermal system. The retrieved changes in the stress pattern could indicate variations in volcano dynamics potentially linked to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth.

  13. Determination of the Basin Structure Beneath European Side of Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Savas; Cengiz Cinku, Mulla; Thomas, Michael; Lamontagne, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul (near North Anatolian Fault Zone:NAFZ, Turkey) is located in northern part of Sea of Marmara, an area that has been influenced by possible Marmara Earthquakes. The general geology of Istanbul divided into two stratigraphic unit such as sedimentary (from Oligocene to Quaternary Deposits) and bedrock (Paleozoic and Eocene). The bedrock units consists of sand stone, clay stone to Paleozoic age and limestone to Eocene age and sedimentary unit consist of sand, clay, mil and gravel from Oligocene to Quaternary age. Earthquake disaster mitigation studies divided into two important phases, too. Firstly, earthquake, soil and engineering structure problems identify for investigation area, later on strategic emergency plan can prepare for these problems. Soil amplification play important role the disaster mitigation and the site effect analysis and basin structure is also a key parameter for determining of site effect. Some geophysical, geological and geotechnical measurements are requeired to defined this relationship. Istanbul Megacity has been waiting possible Marmara Earthquake and their related results. In order to defined to possible damage potential related to site effect, gravity measurements carried out for determining to geological structure, basin geometry and faults in Istanbul. Gravity data were collected at 640 sites by using a Scientrex CG-5 Autogravity meter Standard corrections applied to the gravity data include those for instrumental drift, Earth tides and latitude, and the free-air and Bouguer corrections. The corrected gravity data were imported into a Geosoft database to create a grid and map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly (grid cell size of 200 m). As a previously results, we determined some lineminants, faults and basins beneath Istanbul City. Especially, orientation of faults were NW-SE direction and some basin structures determined on between Buyukcekmece and Kucukcekmece Lake.

  14. Distribution of Attenuation Factor Beneath the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, S.; Hashimoto, M.

    2001-12-01

    In this research, we tried to estimate the distribution of attenuation factor of seismic wave, which is closely related to the above-mentioned inelastic parameters. Here the velocity records of events from the Freesia network and the J-array network were used. The events were selected based on the following criteria: (a) events with JMA magnitudes from 3.8 to 5.0 and hypocentral distance from 20km to 200km, (b) events with JMA magnitudes from 5.1 to 6.8 and hypocentral distance from 200km to 10_?, (c) Depth of all events is greater than 30km with S/N ratio greater than 2. After correcting the instrument response, P-wave spectra were estimated. Following Boatwright (1991), the observed spectra were modeled by the theoretical spectra by assuming the following relation; Aij(f) = Si(f) Pij(f) Cj(f). Brune's model (1970) was assumed for the source model. Aij(f), Si(f), Pij(f), and Cj(f) are defined as observed spectrum, source spectrum, propagation effect, and site effect, respectively. Frequency dependence of attenuation factor was not assumed here. The global standard velocity model (AK135) is used for ray tracing. Ellipticity corrections and station elevation corrections are also done. The block sizes are 50km by 50km laterally and increase vertically. As the results of analysis, the attenuation structure beneath Japanese Islands up to the depth of 180km was reconstructed with relatively good resolution. The low Q distribution is clearly seen in central Hokkaido, western Hokkaido, Tohoku region, Hida region, Izu region, and southern Kyushu. The relatively sharp decrease in Q associated with asthenosphere can be seen below the depth of 70km.

  15. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P. M.; Behn, M. D.; Lin, J.; Grove, T. L.

    2009-11-01

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a temperature-dependent rheology that incorporates a viscoplastic approximation for brittle deformation in the lithosphere. Thermal solutions are combined with the near-fractional, polybaric melting model of Kinzler and Grove (1992a, 1992b, 1993) to determine extents of melting, the shape of the melting regime, and major element melt composition. We investigate the mantle source region of intratransform spreading centers (ITSCs) using the melt migration approach of Sparks and Parmentier (1991) for two end-member pooling models: (1) a wide pooling region that incorporates all of the melt focused to the ITSC and (2) a narrow pooling region that assumes melt will not migrate across a transform fault or fracture zone. Assuming wide melt pooling, our model predictions can explain both the systematic crustal thickness excesses observed at intermediate and fast slipping transform faults as well as the deeper and lower extents of melting observed in the vicinity of several transform systems. Applying these techniques to the Siqueiros transform on the East Pacific Rise we find that both the viscoplastic rheology and wide melt pooling are required to explain the observed variations in gravity inferred crustal thickness. Finally, we show that mantle potential temperature Tp = 1350°C and fractional crystallization at depths of 9-15.5 km fit the majority of the major element geochemical data from the Siqueiros transform fault system.

  16. Crustal structure beneath Portugal from teleseismic Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanayake, Januka; Ferreira, Ana M. G.; Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Up until now, Portugal lacked a countrywide shear velocity model sampling short length-scale crustal structure, which limits interpretations of seismicity and tectonics, and predictions of strong ground motion. In turn, such interpretations and predictions are important to help mitigate risk of destruction from future large on- and offshore earthquakes similar to those that Portugal has experienced in the past (e.g. the Mw 8.5-8.7 tsunamigenic event in 1755). In this study, we measured teleseismic Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity (RWE) from 33 permanent and temporary seismic stations in Portugal with wave periods between 15 s and 60 s, and inverted it for 1-D models of shear wave velocity (Vs) structure beneath each station using a fully non-linear Monte Carlo method. Because RWE is strongly sensitive to the uppermost few kilometres of the crust, both RWE measurements and Vs models are spatially correlated with surface geology in Portugal. For instance, we find that sedimentary basins produced by rifting that had begun in the Mesozoic such as the Lusitanian Basin (LB) and the Lower Tagus-Sado Basin (LTSB) are characterised by higher RWE (lower Vs). Interestingly, we observe similar RWE (and Vs) values in the interior of the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ), which is a metamorphic belt of Paleozoic age. Together with reduced crustal thickness previously estimated for the same parts of the CIZ, this suggests that the CIZ might have experienced an episode of extension possibly simultaneous to Mesozoic rifting. The Galicia-Tras-os-Montes-Zone (GTMZ) that has undergone polyphased deformation since the Paleozoic is characterised by the lowest RWE (highest Vs) in Portugal. Ossa Morena Zone and the South Portuguese Zone exhibit intermediate Vs values when compared to that of basins and the GTMZ. Our crustal Vs model can be used to provide new insights into the tectonics, seismicity and strong ground motion in Portugal.

  17. Thermal-Mechanical Regime beneath Tarim Basin, Northwestern China and its Implications for Cenozoic Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Wang, L.

    2005-12-01

    As one of the super-large scale sedimentary basins in China, the Tarim basin is also the strategic basement for Chinese `Natural gas transportation from west to east' project. To know its thermal regime is vital for understanding the deformation and oil gas resource in Tarim basin. Integrated the abundant data of geotemperature and rock thermophysical parameters collected and measured in the basin with corresponding geothermal modeling, here we present the characteristics of geotemperature field, thermal evolution and lithospheric thermo-rheological structure of the Tarim basin, along with the implications for formation and deformation of basin and hydrocarbon reservoir. Our results show that the average present-day heat flow of the basin is about 45 mW/m2 and 18-20°/km for geotemperature gradient, respectively. The basin is characterized by lower temperature in a whole. Lateral heterogeneities exist for the distribution of geotemperature field in the basin. The structural units of basin differ much in the geothermal features; generally, the depression areas are of relatively low geotemperature while high for those uplifts and highs in the basin. Thermal evolution modeling of the basin indicated that it has experienced four different phases since basin formation as follows: high heat flow phase from Sinian to Ordovician, thermal attenuation phase during Silurian to late Paleozoic, then stable thermal evolution phase in Mesozoic, and flexural deformation of lithosphere in Cenozoic. The thickness of the thermal lithosphere of basin is 168-192 km, and 25-28km for the crustal brittle-ductile transition depth; the total lithospheric strength is 1.6-7.8*10**13 N/m. The lithosphere beneath basin is characterized by the rigid block with low temperature but large strength, and deform in a whole. Responded to the far field effect of the Cenozoic India-Eurasia collision, the lithosphere beneath Tarim basin is characterized by flexure deformation, resulting in the intensive

  18. Geophysical study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the central Rio Grande rift and adjacent Great Plains and Colorado Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ander, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    As part of the national hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a regional deep magnetotelluric (MT) survey of Arizona and New Mexico was performed. The main objective of the MT project was to produce a regional geoelectric contour map of the pervasive deep electrical conductor within the crust and/or upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau, Basin and Range Province, and Rio Grande rift. Three MT profiles cross the Jemez lineament. Preliminary one-dimensional analysis of the data suggest the lineament is associated with anomalously high electrical conductivity very shallow in the crust. An MT/audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) study of a 161 km/sup 2/ HDR prospect was performed on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Two-dimensional gravity modeling of a 700-km gravity profile at 34/sup 0/30'N latitude was used to study the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. Several models of each of three consecutive layers were produced using all available geologic and geophysical constraints. Two short-wavelength anomalies along the gravity profile were analyzed using linear optimization techniques.

  19. Structure of the mantle lithosphere beneath the Siberian kimberlite pipes reconstructed by monomineral thermobarometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, I. V.

    2009-04-01

    The original methods of the monomineral thermobarometry for clinopyroxene, garnet, ilmenite, chromite (Ashchepkov,2008) and orthopyroxene (Brey, Kohler, 1990- McGregor, 1974) thermobarometer allow to reconstruct the mantle columns. TP diagram for Udachnaya pipe suggests creation at least in tree stages of the melt percolation through the mantle column differing in Fe# and other parameters. The most high temperature (HT) (45 mvm-2) and Fe# rich refer to the last HT reactions with the protokimberlite melts formed the megacrystalline associations. Relict low temperature (LT) geotherm (35 45 mvm-2 and lower) is close to the conductive geotherm (Boyd et al., 1997). Most of ТР parameters for the minerals refer to the middle part of the geotherm (40- 45 mvm-2). Monomineral thermobarometry reconstructing the PTX values (Fe#; CrCpx, Cr-Ilm CaGar, TiChr) showing the high overlapping formed by the the melt percolation. The clinopyroxene growth in the mantle lithosphere in Daldyn, Akakite, Nakyn and Upper Muna are produced by the refertilization events under the influence of the protokimberlite melts. Their spreading in the lower part of mantle section of Garnet trend to subcalsic and pyroxenitic types is likely the result of submelting and heating of the mantle peridotites. Similar process for eclogites is responsible for the appearance of LT eclogites tracing subduction gradients and HT branches with the Ti- bearing associations corresponding to advective gradients. . For the larger pipes the scale of the perturbation is much higher then for smaller. The levels of the melt intrusions are reconstructed by the clotting of TP values inflections of TP paths and TiChr, CrIlm and Fe#. Ilmenite trends reveal the polybaric character of the fractionation and high degree interaction with the wall rock peridotites visible by CrIlm increase. The metasomatic associations differ in PTX diagrams by higher Cr and LT conditions the HT megacrystalls. The evident layered nature of the mantle

  20. Rapid Mantle Ascent Rates Beneath Brazil: Diamond Bullets from a Smoking Plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M. J.; Frost, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    inclusions in diamonds from Juina also provide evidence for mantle ascent of this magnitude [2, 3]. The questions are (1) over what timeframe do the diamonds ascend? (2) what causes mantle ascent beneath the craton? Bulanova et al [2] were able to obtain a U/Pb age for the J1 perovskite inclusion, giving an astonishingly young model age of 101 ±7 Ma, close to the eruption age of the host kimberlite (93 ±1.5 Ma). From the time and depth differences we calculate ascent rates of about 1 to 50 cm/yr. We suggest that such rapid rates of mantle ascent beneath a craton may be ascribed to buoyant upwelling of mantle material. Diamond speedometry may provide direct evidence for a Cretaceous plume beneath Brazil, which was ultimately responsible for alkaline and kimberlite magmatism, and probably the Trindade magmatic track [6]. 1. Harte et al., Geochem. Soc. Spec. Pub, 1999, 125-153. 2. Bulanova et al., CMP, 2010, DOI:10.1007/s00410-010-0490-6. 3. Harte and Cayzer, Phys. Chem. Min., 2007. 4. Shirey et al., Science, 2002. 297, 1683- 1686. 5. Walter et al., Nature, 2008. 454, 622-625. [6] Gibson et al., J Petrol, 1995, 36, 89-229.

  1. Mantle Shear-Wave Velocity Structure beneath the Hawaiian Hot Spot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cecily J. Wolfe; Sean C. Solomon; Gabi Laske; John A. Collins; Robert S. Detrick; John A. Orcutt; David Bercovici; Erik H. Hauri

    2009-01-01

    .... Three-dimensional images of shear-wave velocity beneath the Hawaiian Islands, obtained from a network of sea-floor and land seismometers, show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated...

  2. Imaging Canary Island hotspot material beneath the lithosphere of Morocco and southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Meghan S.; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Butcher, Amber J.; Thomas, Christine

    2015-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean has developed into its present day tectonic configuration as a result of complex interactions between late stage subduction of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, continental collision of Africa and Eurasia, and the Canary Island mantle plume. This study utilizes S receiver functions (SRFs) from over 360 broadband seismic stations to seismically image the lithosphere and uppermost mantle from southern Spain through Morocco and the Canary Islands. The lithospheric thickness ranges from ∼65 km beneath the Atlas Mountains and the active volcanic islands to over ∼210 km beneath the cratonic lithosphere in southern Morocco. The common conversion point (CCP) volume of the SRFs indicates that thinned lithosphere extends from beneath the Canary Islands offshore southwestern Morocco, to beneath the continental lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains, and then thickens abruptly at the West African craton. Beneath thin lithosphere between the Canary hot spot and southern Spain, including below the Atlas Mountains and the Alboran Sea, there are distinct pockets of low velocity material, as inferred from high amplitude positive, sub-lithospheric conversions in the SRFs. These regions of low seismic velocity at the base of the lithosphere extend beneath the areas of Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism, which has been linked to a Canary hotspot source via geochemical signatures. However, we find that this volume of low velocity material is discontinuous along strike and occurs only in areas of recent volcanism and where asthenospheric mantle flow is identified with shear wave splitting analyses. We propose that the low velocity structure beneath the lithosphere is material flowing sub-horizontally northeastwards beneath Morocco from the tilted Canary Island plume, and the small, localized volcanoes are the result of small-scale upwellings from this material.

  3. Lithospheric mantle heterogeneities beneath the Zagros Mountains and the Iranian Plateau: A petrological-geophysical study

    OpenAIRE

    Tunini, Lavinia; Jiménez-Munt, Ivone; Fernandez, Manel; Vergés, Jaume; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. We apply a combined geophysical-petrological methodology in order to study the thermal, compositional, density and seismological structure of the crust and upper mantle along two transects across the Arabia-Eurasia collision region. Results on the crustal thickness show minimum values beneath the Arabia Platform and Central Iran (42-43 km), and maximum values beneath the Sanandaj Sirjan zone ...

  4. Crustal and Mantle Structure Beneath the Iles Eparses (Mozambique Channel, Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barruol, G.; Fontaine, F. R.; Davy, C.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Sigloch, K.

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the lithospheric structure of the Mozambique channel (Indian Ocean), we deployed 5 broadband three-components seismic stations between April 2011 and January 2014 on the Islands of Europa (EURO), Juan de Nova (JNOV), Mayotte (MAYO), and Glorieuses (GLOR) in the Mozambique channel and on Tromelin Island (TROM) located ca. 450 km east of Madagascar. We performed measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting using SKS and SKKS phases and receiver function analyses to characterize the nature and thickness of the crust and the underlying upper mantle structure. Seismic anisotropy is observed at all seismic stations and display a rather homogeneous pattern: average values of the splitting parameters show fast polarization trending between N112°E (EURO) and N120°E (JNOV) to N81°E (MAYO). Observed delay times vary between 0.8 (JNOV) and 1.0 s (MAYO). In Mayotte, analysis of individual backazimuthal variation of splitting parameters suggests an upper mantle more complex than a single anisotropic layer. Station TROM located on Tromelin Island shows similar fast polarization azimuth of N123°E but slightly higher delay time (1.4 s). Fast polarization directions are compared with values predicted by drag-induced anisotropy and absolute plate motion direction and with lithospheric fossil spreading directions. Results are also compared to orientation predicted by large-scale mantle convection models. Receiver functions observations and modelling of P-to-S conversions at the Mohorovičić (Moho) discontinuity have been employed to investigate the variations in the Moho depth, the nature of the crust and of the crust-mantle transition. Preliminary results suggest a Moho depth of 16 km beneath Europa Island.

  5. A new tomographic image on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo - Implication to seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Kasahara, K.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    In central Japan, the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducts beneath the Tokyo metropolitan region. Devastating M8-class earthquakes occurred on the upper surface of the Philippine Sea plate (SPS), examples of which are the Genroku earthquake of 1703 (magnitude M=8.0) and the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M=7.9), which had 105,000 fatalities. A M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this region at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions although it is smaller than the megathrust type M8-class earthquakes. This great earthquake is evaluated to occur with a probability of 70 % in 30 years by the Earthquake Research Committee of Japan. The M7+ earthquakes may occur either on the upper surface or intra slab of PSP. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US$) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo

  6. Observations of turbulence beneath sea ice in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Stevens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The first turbulence profiler observations beneath land fast sea ice which is directly adjacent to an Antarctic ice shelf are described. The stratification in the 325 m deep water column consisted of a layer of supercooled water in the upper 40 m lying above a quasi-linearly stratified water column with a sharp step in density at mid-depth. Turbulent energy dissipation rates were on average 3×10−8 m2 s−3 with peak bin-averaged values reaching 4×10−7 m2 s−3. The local dissipation rate per unit area was estimated to be 10 m Wm−2 on average with a peak of 50 m Wm−2. These values are consistent with a moderate baroclinic response to the tides. The small-scale turbulent energetics lie on the boundary between isotropy and buoyancy-affected. This will likely influence the formation and aggregation of frazil ice crystals within the supercooled layer. The data suggest that the large crystals observed in McMurdo Sound will transition from initial growth at scales smaller than the Kolmogorov lengthscale to sizes substantially (1–2 orders of magnitude greater than the Kolmogorov scale. An estimate of the experiment-averaged vertical diffusivity of mass Kρ yields a coefficient of around 2×10−4 m2s−1 although this increased by a factor of 2 near the surface. Combining this estimate of Kρ with available observations of average and maximum currents suggests the layer of supercooled water can persist for a distance of ~250 km from the front of the McMurdo Ice Shelf.

  7. A reference model for crust and uppermost mantle beneath Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W.; Wiens, D.; Gerstoft, P.; Bromirski, P. D.; Stephen, R. A.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.; Winberry, J. P.; Huerta, A. D.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Hansen, S. E.; Wilson, T. J.; Heeszel, D.

    2016-12-01

    Since the last decade of the 20th Century, over 300 broad-band seismic stations have been deployed across the continent of Antarctica (e.g., temporary networks such as TAMSEIS, AGAP/GAMSEIS, POLENET/ANET, TAMNNET and RIS/DRIS by US geoscientists, as well as stations deployed by other countries). In this presentation, we discuss our recent effort that builds a reference crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity (Vs) model for continental Antarctica based on those seismic arrays. The data analysis for this effort consists of four steps. First, we compute ambient noise cross-correlations between all possible station pairs and use them to construct Rayleigh wave phase and group velocity maps at a continental scale. Coherence of the new maps with maps generated from teleseismic earthquake data from an earlier study (Heeszel et al., 2016) confirms the high quality of both maps and the minor difference helps quantify the map uncertainties. Second, we compute P receiver function waveforms for each station in Antarctica. Third, we collect Rayleigh waves generated by teleseismic earthquakes and measure their horizontal to vertical (H/V) ratio at each station. Fourth and finally, by combing all seismic measurements from the first three steps together with the phase velocity maps by Heeszel et al.(2016) using a non-linear Monte Carlo (MC) inversion algorithm, we built a 3-D model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath continental Antarctica and its periphery to a depth of 150 km. This high resolution model, together with associated uncertainty estimates from the MC inversion, serve as a starting point for further improvement and geological interpretation. A variety of tectonic features, including a slower but highly heterogeneous West Antarctica and a much faster East Antarctica, are present in the 3D model. A better image of these features from the 3D model helps further investigation of the thermal and dynamic state of Antarctica's lithosphere and underlying

  8. Crust and Upper Mantle Structure beneath Isparta Angle in SW Turkey from P and S Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, M.; Turkelli, N.; Özacar, A.; Sandvol, E. A.; Teoman, U.

    2015-12-01

    what appears to be imaged northern tip of slab at ~45 km depth. Finally, ~30km crustal thickness released in southeast beneath the Cyprus. On the other hand; preliminary results of S RFs cross-sections present the LAB boundary between ~60 to ~90 km depth range, observed almost beneath all profiles and clear positive phase arrivals right below the LAB depths.

  9. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  10. Prominent reflector beneath around the segmentation boundary between Tonankai-Nankai earthquake area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, A.; Shimomura, N.; Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneda, Y.; Mochizuki, K.; Kato, A.; Iidaka, T.; Kurashimo, E.; Shinohara, M.; Takeda, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. In most cases, first break of such large events of Nankai Trough usually begins from southwest off the Kii Peninsula so far. The idea of split Philippine Sea plate between the Kii Peninsula and the Shikoku Island, which explains seismicity, tectonic background, receiver function image and historical plate motion, was previously suggested. Moreover, between the Kii Peninsula and the Shikoku Island, there is a gap of deep low-frequency events observed in the belt-like zone along the strike of the subducting Philippine Sea plate. In 2010 and 2011, we conducted the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle and reflection (MCS) seismic study, and long-term observation from off Shikoku and Kii Peninsula. Marine active source seismic data have been acquired along grid two-dimensional profiles having the total length of ~800km/year. A three-dimensional seismic tomography using active and passive seismic data observed both land and ocean bottom stations have been also performed. From those data, we found a possible prominent reflector imaged in the offshore side in the Kii channel at the depth of ~18km. The velocity just beneath the reflector cannot be determined due to the lack of ray paths. Based of the amplitude information, we interpret the reflector as the forearc Moho based on the velocity gap (from ~6.4km/s to ~7.4km/s). However, the reflector is shallower than the forearc Moho of other area along the Nankai Trough. Similar reflectors are recognized along other seismic profiles around the Kii channel. In this presentation, we will show the result of structure analysis to understand the peculiar structure including the prominent reflector around the Kii channel. Relation between the structure and the existence of the segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake or seismic gap of the deep low-frequency events will be also

  11. Gene expression profiling in Caco-2 human colon cells exposed to TCDD, benzo[a]pyrene, and natural Ah receptor agonists from cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de W.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Baykus, H.; Talsma, E.F.; Punt, A.; Kok, de T.M.C.M.; Schooten, van F.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits are reported to possess health-beneficial properties, but also have been shown to contain natural aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (NAhRAs). Binding to the AhR is widely assumed to activate the main pathway by which dioxins, like

  12. Antimycobacterial natural products from Moroccan medicinal plants: Chemical composition, bacteriostatic and bactericidal profile of Thymus satureioides and Mentha pulegium essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Chraibi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: It is clearly evident from the results obtained that the Moroccan medicinal plants have great potential to be used as anti-tuberculosis agents. These findings may help scientists to undertake several research projects to discover useful natural product as new anti-tuberculosis drug.

  13. Mapping the indentation between the Iberian and Eurasian plates beneath the Western Pyrenees/Eastern Cantabrian Mountains from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J.; Pedreira, D.; Ruiz, M.; Pulgar, J. A.; Gallart, J.

    2012-10-01

    In the last decades, active seismic profiling in the northern part of the Iberian Peninsula has evidenced that the Alpine collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates resulted in a complex crustal structure, with the Iberian crust underthrusting the Eurasian crust and reaching depths of at least 45-50 km beneath the Pyrenean chain and the Cantabrian Mountains. In the transition between these two zones the situation is particularly complex, as evidenced in previous wide-angle and passive seismic studies. This contribution focuses in getting new clues on the crustal structure of this transitional zone through receiver function (RF) analysis of teleseismic data recorded at permanent and temporary stations located in both the Spanish and French sides of the Western Pyrenees. Different techniques (H-κ stacking, pseudo-migration, synthetic 2D modeling) have been considered in the analysis. Passive seismic data from previous temporary deployments in the zone have been reworked and added to the discussion. A first order result is that passive seismic data are broadly consistent with the indentation of the Iberian and Eurasian crusts inferred from active seismic profiling, thus providing a completely independent confirmation of this feature. For the first time, an Iberian Moho underlying the Eurasian crust is documented from RF beneath the stations located at the Northern side of the Pyrenean range. Moreover, clear indications of dipping interfaces are observed at some stations. The new RF results suggest that in the crustal indentation beneath the Basque Massifs area, the Eurasian crust extends farther south with respect to the image inferred from active seismic data. This new geometry implies that the Pamplona transfer zone has played a major role in the regional geodynamic history.

  14. Distribution and characteristics of overdeepenings beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets: Implications for overdeepening origin and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, H.; Swift, D. A.; Clark, C. D.; Livingstone, S. J.; Cook, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Glacier bed overdeepenings are ubiquitous in glacier systems and likely exert significant influence on ice dynamics, subglacial hydrology, and ice stability. Understanding of overdeepening formation and evolution has been hampered by an absence of quantitative empirical studies of their distribution and morphology, with process insights having been drawn largely from theoretical or numerical studies. To address this shortcoming, we first map the distribution of potential overdeepenings beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets using a GIS-based algorithm that identifies closed-contours in the bed topography and then describe and analyse the characteristics and metrics of a subset of overdeepenings that pass further quality control criteria. Overdeepenings are found to be widespread, but are particularly associated with areas of topographically laterally constrained ice flow, notably near the ice sheet margins where outlet systems follow deeply incised troughs. Overdeepenings also occur in regions of topographically unconstrained ice flow (for example, beneath the Siple Coast ice streams and on the Greenland continental shelf). Metrics indicate that overdeepening growth is generally allometric and that topographic confinement of ice flow in general enhances overdeepening depth. However, overdeepening depth is skewed towards shallow values - typically 200-300 m - indicating that the rate of deepening slows with overdeepening age. This is reflected in a decline in adverse slope steepness with increasing overdeepening planform size. Finally, overdeepening long-profiles are found to support headward quarrying as the primary factor in overdeepening development. These observations support proposed negative feedbacks related to hydrology and sediment transport that stabilise overdeepening growth through sedimentation on the adverse slope but permit continued overdeepening planform enlargement by processes of headward erosion.

  15. Imaging of the Deep Structure and Extension of the North Anatolian Fault Zone by Magnetotelluric Method Beneath the Marmara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Kasaya, T.; Tank, B.; Honkura, Y.; Tuncer, M. K.; Oshiman, N.; Matsushima, M.

    2011-12-01

    Relative motions of the Arabian and African plates with respect to stable Eurasian plate resulted in westward movement of the Anatolian block and produced two main fault zones in Turkey. The most active one, the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), hosted destructive earthquakes during the history causing not only damage in the buildings but also thousands of causalities. The migration of large earthquakes along the NAFZ from east to west in 20th century, occurrence of the last earthquakes (1999 Izmit and Duzce) by the side of Marmara Sea, and owning the fault segment which has not ruptured since 1766 made the Marmara Sea a potential location for the next large rupture on the NAFZ. Seismic, geodetic and other studies showed complexity of the structure suggesting various estimates about the extension of the NAFZ through the Marmara Sea. In this study, we benefit from the high depth resolution of the Magnetotelluric (MT) method to resolve the electrical resistivity structure beneath the Marmara Sea and disclose its relation with the geologic structure. In order to investigate extension of the NAFZ beneath the Marmara Sea we deployed long period ocean bottom electromagnetic data at 16 sites which form 4 profiles perpendicular to the possible traces of the NAFZ. Variation of the geoelectric strike from east to west demonstrates different oriented faults in the Marmara Sea. The highly conductive anomaly in electrical resistivity models extends from crustal depths to the lithosphere and merges with the melted mantle material. This conductive anomaly is surrounded by relatively resistive anomalies which imply continuation of the fault structure from land to the Marmara Sea. Our results clear the location of the highly conductive and resistive anomalies that has crucial implications in two aspects; conductive anomaly may trigger the micro-seismic activity and resistive anomalies may refer to the asperity zones where stress accumulation result in large earth quakes.

  16. Crustal root beneath the Rif Cordillera as imaged from both active seismic data and teleseismic receiver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jordi; Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The Rif cordillera forms, together with the Betic ranges, one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth. This continental boundary zone is dominated now by the slow convergence between Nubia and Eurasia, but with clear evidences of extensional tectonics. One of the missing elements to constrain the complex geodynamics of the Gibraltar Arc System is the knowledge of the crustal architecture beneath northern Morocco. In the last decade a major effort has been done in this sense, from active and passive seismics. We compile here the recent results available from the Rif domains. Two 330 km long wide angle DSS profiles were recorded end of 2011 across the Rif in NS and EW transects within the Rifsis project, complemented by onshore recordings of the Gassis-WestMed marine profiles. At the same period, BB seismic arrays were deployed in the area within Topo-Iberia and Picasso projects, allowing receiver function analyses of crustal depths. The ray-tracing modeling of the Rifsis profiles reveal a large Moho step and an area of crustal thickening both in EW and NS directions, grossly coincident with the Bouguer gravity anomalies. The deployment logistics allowed that all the stations recorded all the shots, thus providing useful offline data. We will use here all available in-line and offline data to provide a map of the crustal thickness in northern Morocco. We combined two approaches: i) a hyperbolic time reduction applied to the seismic data, resulting in low-fold stacks in which the reflections from the Moho should appear as subhorizontal lines; ii) the arrival times of the observed PmP phases allow, assuming a mean crustal velocity, to assign a midpoint crustal thickness to each lecture. Although some uncertainties may be inherent to those approaches, a large crustal root, reaching more than 50 km, is well documented in the central part of the Rif Cordillera, close to the zone where the Alboran slab may still be attached to the lithosphere. We also compared these results

  17. Mohorovicic discontinuity depth analysis beneath North Patagonian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Dacal, M. L.; Tocho, C.; Aragón, E.

    2013-05-01

    The North Patagonian Massif is a 100000 km2, sub-rectangular plateau that stands out 500 to 700 m higher in altitude than the surrounding topography. The creation of this plateau took place during the Oligocene through a sudden uplift without noticeable internal deformation. This quite different mechanical response between the massif and the surrounding back arc, the short time in which this process took place and a regional negative Bouguer anomaly in the massif area, raise the question about the isostatic compensation state of the previously mentioned massif. In the present work, a comparison between different results about the depth of the Mohorovicic discontinuity beneath the North Patagonian Massif and a later analysis is made. It has the objective to analyze the crustal thickness in the area to contribute in the determination of the isostatic balance and the better understanding of the Cenozoic evolution of the mentioned area. The comparison is made between four models; two of these were created with seismic information (Feng et al., 2006 and Bassin et al., 2000), another model with gravity information (Barzaghi et al., 2011) and the last one with a combination of both techniques (Tassara y Etchaurren, 2011). The latter was the result of the adaptation to the work area of a three-dimensional density model made with some additional information, mainly seismic, that constrain the surfaces. The work of restriction and adaptation of this model, the later analysis and comparison with the other three models and the combination of both seismic models to cover the lack of resolution in some areas, is presented here. According the different models, the crustal thickness of the study zone would be between 36 and 45 Km. and thicker than the surrounding areas. These results talk us about a crust thicker than normal and that could behave as a rigid and independent block. Moreover, it can be observed that there are noticeable differences between gravimetric and seismic

  18. Small length scale heterogeneity beneath the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, S.; Salters, V. J.; Perfit, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    We found two areas (~1.80°N and Siqueiros Transform Fault, STF) on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) where ridge basalts show large variation in chemical and isotope compositions compared to the other EPR basalts. Samples from ~1.80°N have relatively large ranges in trace element abundances(Ba/Zr = 0.11-0.80, Ce/Yb = 2.64-7.77) and isotope ratios 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70226-0.70282, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.513070-0.513275, 176Hf/177Hf = 0.283105-0.283281, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.54-18.62) encompassing ~70% of the variability shown by EPR ridge basalts though they are collected from 2 higher than most EPR basalts but with 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd similar to EPR basalts. The second group has incompatible trace elements similar to average EPR basalts but are among the most depleted in isotope ratios and similar to the Garrett FZ lavas from SEPR. The degree of isotopic variation observed along this 25km ridge segments is similar in amplitude as the variations observed in EPR seamounts. The large variation in a small area indicates there are significant small-scale heterogeneities in the sub-ridge mantle and that ridge basalts average melts from a smaller area of a mantle than the proposed length scale of melting (100km) and points at efficient melt extraction and inefficient mixing of melts. Samples from STF also show a wide range in chemical compositions (Ba/Zr = 0.03-0.79, Ce/Yb = 1.83-11.65) and isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr= 0.70233-0.70285, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.513011-0.513189, 176Hf/177Hf = 0.283043-0.283225, 206Pb/204Pb=18.12-18.66) within the compositional range found in NEPR basalts, but lacking samples with depleted isotopic composition as observed at ~1.80°N and at the Garrett FZ. Previous studies have shown that the STF basalts are derived from the shallow mantle (<1GPa).This suggests that this shallow mantle must have been able to either retain or regain its more fertile composition during melting beneath the ridge. Basalts from west part of the STF have isotopic compositions similar to

  19. Continuous resistivity profiling data from Great South Bay, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Kroeger, K.D.; Crusius, John; Worley, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of submarine aquifers adjacent to the Fire Island National Seashore and Long Island, New York was conducted to assess the importance of submarine groundwater discharge as a potential nonpoint source of nitrogen delivery to Great South Bay. Over 200 kilometers of continuous resistivity profiling data were collected to image the fresh-saline groundwater interface in sediments beneath the bay. In addition, groundwater sampling was performed at sites (1) along the north shore of Great South Bay, particularly in Patchogue Bay, that were representative of the developed Long Island shoreline, and (2) at sites on and adjacent to Fire Island, a 50-kilometer-long barrier island on the south side of Great South Bay. Other field activities included sediment coring, stationary electrical resistivity profiling, and surveys of in situ pore water conductivity. Results of continuous resistivity profiling surveys are described in this report. The onshore and offshore shallow hydrostratigraphy of the Great South Bay shorelines, particularly the presence and nature of submarine confining units, appears to exert primary control on the dimensions and chemistry of the submarine groundwater flow and discharge zones. Sediment coring has shown that the confining units commonly consist of drowned and buried peat layers likely deposited in salt marshes. Low-salinity groundwater extends from 10 to 100 meters offshore along much of the north and south shores of Great South Bay based on continuous resistivity profiling data, especially off the mouths of tidal creeks and beneath shallow flats to the north of Fire Island adjacent to modern salt marshes. Human modifications of much of the shoreline and nearshore areas along the north shore of the bay, including filling of salt marshes, construction of bulkheads and piers, and dredging of navigation channels, has substantially altered the natural hydrogeology of the bay's shorelines by truncating confining units and increasing

  20. Crustal thickness and composition beneath the High Lava Plains of Eastern Oregon from teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, K. C.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.; Carlson, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the crust beneath the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon is fundamental for understanding the origins of widespread Cenozoic volcanism in the region. Eruptions of flood basalts in the southern Cascadian back arc peaked ~17-15 Ma, and were followed by distributed bimodal volcanism along two perpendicular migrating tracks; the Snake River Plain and the High Lava Plains. The orientations of eruptive centers have led to several competing hypotheses about their cause, including a deep mantle plume, slab retreat and asthenospheric inflow, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric extension. The goal of this project is to constrain the nature, geometry, and depth of the Moho across the High Lava Plains, which will shed light on questions regarding crustal influence on melt generation and differentiation and the degree of magmatic underplating. In this study, we analyze teleseismic receiver functions from 118 stations of the High Lava Plains temporary broadband array, 34 nearby EarthScope/USArray stations, and 5 other regional broadband stations to determine bulk crustal features of thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (κ). Applying the H-κ stacking method, we search for the best-fitting solution of timing predictions for direct and multiple P-to-S conversions from the Moho interface. Converting Vp/Vs to Poisson ratio, which is dependent primarily upon rock composition, allows for comparison with other direct geological observations. Preliminary results show that the crust of the High Lava Plains is relatively thin (~31 km) with a very sharp gradient to thicker crust (~42 km) at the western edge of the Owyhee Plateau in southwestern Idaho. This gradient is co-located with the western margin of Precambrian North America and is in the vicinity of the Jordan Craters volcanic center. The sharp topography of the Moho might have been a factor in melt migration beneath this area. West of the High Lava Plains, the crust thickens to ~40 km into the Cascade volcanic arc

  1. Influence of the natural ripening stage, cold storage, and ethylene treatment on the protein and IgE-binding profiles of green and gold kiwi fruit extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardiello, M Antonietta; Giangrieco, Ivana; Tuppo, Lisa; Tamburrini, Maurizio; Buccheri, Marina; Palazzo, Paola; Bernardi, Maria Livia; Ferrara, Rosetta; Mari, Adriano

    2009-02-25

    Kiwi fruit is an important source of food allergens, the number and relevance of which are still the object of investigation. Following a comparative analysis of the protein profiles in SDS-PAGE and IgE immunoblotting, a significant influence of conditions such as the ripening stage and the extraction method on the composition of green and gold kiwi fruit extracts was observed. Furthermore, the experimental data indicate that, mostly in the green species, a ripe fruit may have a different concentration of total proteins and a different amount of single components when ripeness is reached by different means of postharvest handling, such as ethylene exposure with or without previous cold storage. In summary, this study emphasizes the level of complexity associated with the preparation of extracts when a known and defined concentration of proteins/allergens is requested.

  2. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-05-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42 - reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3--N less than 0.016 mg L- 1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L- 1 progressively enriched in δ15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy δ15N and δ18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  3. Three-dimensional passive mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges: an analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligi, Marco; Cuffaro, Marco; Chierici, Francesco; Calafato, Antonino

    2008-11-01

    We discuss theoretical and computational method on plate-driven mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges. We consider a steady-state flow induced by motion of overlying rigid plates in an incompressible viscous mantle beneath a generic ridge-transform-ridge plate boundary. No assumption of orthogonal and symmetric spreading at ridge axis is made. Analytical solutions for viscosity flow in a half-space and in a layered viscosity mantle beneath an infinitesimal thickness lithosphere and beneath plates that thicken with increasing age, are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using a standard fast Fourier transform algorithm. The difficulty of using standard Fourier methods to predict accurately the mantle flow field in the proximity of the plate boundaries is overcome by applying the Gegenbauer reconstruction post-processing technique to the Fourier pseudo-spectral solutions. Finally, we present some examples of flow computations. We consider, for both models, two different ridge-transform-ridge geometries consisting of 100 and 1000 km offsets of two ridge segments spreading at 15 mm/yr half rate. We found a significant difference in the flow structure between the two flow models close to ridge axis and ridge-transform intersections. The proposed model and methods are useful for fast mantle flow calculations to investigate melting processes beneath spreading centres, and to predict the relationship between mantle temperature, crustal thickness and geochemistry of the oceanic crust.

  4. Fungal communities in soil beneath Scots pine and their stumps. Effect of fungi on Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria ostoyae growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil beneath 30-year-old Scots pines, was inhabited by fungi communities which were at least iwicc as big as communities from ihe 49-year-old stand. The fungi communities in soil beneath the stumps were much smaller compared to those beneath the live trees and more abundant in the 30- than in the 49--year-old stand. The fungal communities in soil beneath the 30-year-old pines have bigger antagonistic effect on Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria ostoyae than those beneath the 49-year-old stand. The decrease in density of fungi and in the frequency of species antagonistic to H. annosum and A. ostoyae resulted in the decrease of the antagonistic effect on both pathogens in soil beneath pine stumps.

  5. Effects of linseed oil and natural or synthetic vitamin E supplementation in lactating ewes' diets on meat fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation from their milk fed lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, B; Manca, M G; Mantecón, A R; Nudda, A; Manso, T

    2015-04-01

    Forty-eight Churra ewes with their new-born lambs were separated into four dietary treatments: Control (without added fat), LO (with 3% linseed oil), LO-Syn E (LO plus 400 mg/kg TMR of synthetic vitamin E) and LO-Nat E (LO plus 400 g/kg TMR of natural vitamin E). Linseed oil caused an increase in trans-11 C18:1 (VA), trans-10 C18:1, cis-9, trans-11 C18:2 (RA), trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and C18:3 n-3 (ALA) in milk fat compared to the Control. The addition of vitamin E to the LO diets did not influence significantly the majority of milk fatty acids compared with the LO diet alone. Trans-10 C18:1, VA, RA, trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and LA levels were higher in intramuscular lamb fat from treatments with linseed oil. No statistically significant differences were observed in these FA due to vitamin E supplementation or the type of vitamin E (synthetic vs. natural). Vitamin supplementation resulted in lipid oxidation levels below the threshold values for detection of rancidity in lamb meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  7. Optimization by simulation of the nature of the buffer, the gap profile of the absorber and the thickness of the various layers in CZTSSe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadel, Meriem; Chadel, Asma; Moustafa Bouzaki, Mohammed; Aillerie, Michel; Benyoucef, Boumediene; Charles, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Performances of ZnO/ZnS/CZTSSe polycrystalline thin film solar cells (Copper Zinc Tin Sulphur Selenium-solar cell) were simulated for different thicknesses of the absorber and ZnS buffer layers. Simulations were performed with SCAPS (Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator) software, starting with actual parameters available from industrial data for commercial cells processing. The influences of the thickness of the various layers in the structure of the solar cell and the gap profile of the CZTSSe absorber layer on the performance of the solar cell were studied in detail. Through considerations of recent works, we discuss possible routes to enhance the performance of CZTSSe solar cells towards a higher efficiency level. Thus, we found that for one specific thickness of the absorber layer, the efficiency of the CZTSSe solar cell can be increased when a ZnS layer replaces the usual CdS buffer layer. On the other hand, the efficiency of the solar cell can be also improved when the absorber layer presents a grad-gap. In this case, the maximum efficiency for the CZTSSe cell was found equal to 13.73%.

  8. Gluten-free pasta incorporating chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as thickening agent: An approach to naturally improve the nutritional profile and the in vitro carbohydrate digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Valeria; Amato, Mariana; Phillips, Tim D; Angelino, Donato; Morreale, Federico; Fares, Clara

    2017-04-15

    A gluten-free pasta was prepared adding chia at rice flour for testing the thickening and nutritional properties of this specie. Chemical analysis showed chia is a source of protein (19.52% and 15.81%, seeds and mucilage respectively), insoluble/soluble dietary fiber ratio (4.3 and 1.79 seeds and mucilage respectively), fat and ash content. The total phenolic acids content ranged from 734.5μg/g to 923.9μg/g for seeds and mucilage respectively. Chia was a good thickening agent and, improved the nutritional profile of enriched samples compared to CGF. After cooking TPAs increased in all samples, ranging from 5.3% in DW to 52.8% in CM5. The addition of chia seeds also increased the slowly digestible starch fraction of rice flour, commonly known to have a high glycemic index. Results suggest that chia should be added as thickening agent in the formulation of GF pasta for conferring healthier characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Melting beneath Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David; Perrette, Mahé; Beckmann, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Basal melting of fast-flowing Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams due to frictional heating at the ice-bed interface contributes significantly to total glacier mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, yet modelling this basal melt process in Greenland has received minimal research attention. A one-dimensional dynamic ice-flow model is calibrated to the present day longitudinal profiles of 10 major Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams (including the Jakobshavn Isbrae, Petermann Glacier and Helheim Glacier) and is validated against published ice flow and surface elevation measurements. Along each longitudinal profile, basal melt is calculated as a function of ice flow velocity and basal shear stress. The basal shear stress is dependent on the effective pressure (difference between ice overburden pressure and water pressure), basal roughness and a sliding parametrization. Model output indicates that where outlet glaciers and ice streams terminate into the ocean with either a small floating ice tongue or no floating tongue whatsoever, the proportion of basal melt to total melt (surface, basal and submarine melt) is 5-10% (e.g. Jakobshavn Isbrae; Daugaard-Jensen Glacier). This proportion is, however, negligible where larger ice tongues lose mass mostly by submarine melt (~1%; e.g. Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier). Modelled basal melt is highest immediately upvalley of the grounding line, with contributions typically up to 20-40% of the total melt for slippery beds and up to 30-70% for resistant beds. Additionally, modelled grounding line and calving front migration inland for all outlet glaciers and ice streams of hundreds of metres to several kilometres occurs. Including basal melt due to frictional heating in outlet glacier and ice stream models is important for more accurately modelling mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, and therefore, more accurately modelling outlet glacier and ice stream dynamics and responses to future climate change.

  10. Microfungi in the soil beneath common oak and their effect on Armillaria occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfungal assemblages in a soil beneath 30- and 50·year-old oaks and their 2-year-old stumps were studied using the soil dilution plate method. A total of 98 culturable microfungi were isolated. Compared to the living oaks before felling and the control living oaks, the density of Mortierella macrocystis, Penicillium jonczewskii, Pseudogymnoascus roseus Sporothrix schenckii, Tolypoccladiumum inflatum and Umbelopsis vinacea sigificantly inacased in the soil beneath slumps in the 32- and 52-year-old stands. Density of Aspergillus kanagawaensis, Monodictys lepraria, P. daleae and sterile dematiaceous hyphomycetes increased significantly in the 32-year-old stand and Chrysosporium merdarium in the 52·year-old stand. These fungi are known 'stimulants' of Armillaria rhizomorph formation. It is suggested that the increase in density of Armillaria rhizomorph 'stimulants' in a soil beneath oak stumps may increase the possibility of colonization of stumps by Armillaria.

  11. Imaging the midcontinent rift beneath Lake Superior using large aperture seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, Anne M.; Morel-a-l'Huissier, Patrick; Meyer, R.; Hajnal, Z.; Karl, J.; Mereu, R. F.; Sexton, J.; Shay, J.; Chan, W. K.; Epili, D.; Jefferson, T.; Shih, X. R.; Wendling, S.; Milkereit, B.; Green, A.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1991-01-01

    We present a detailed velocity model across the 1.1 billion year old Midcontinent Rift System (MRS) in central Lake Superior. The model was derived primarily from onshore-offshore large-aperture seismic and gravity data. High velocities obtained within a highly reflective half-graben that was imaged on coincident seismic reflection data demonstrate the dominantly mafic composition of the graben fill and constrain its total thickness to be at least 30km. Strong wide-angle reflections are observed from the lower crust and Moho, indicating that the crust is thickest (55–60km) beneath the axis of the graben. The total crustal thickness decreases rapidly to about 40 km beneath the south shore of the lake and decreases more gradually to the north. Above the Moho is a high-velocity lower crust interpreted to result from syn-rift basaltic intrusion into and/or underplating beneath the Archean lower crust. The lower crust is thickest beneath the axis of the main rift half-graben. A second region of thick lower crust is found approximately 100km north of the axis of the rift beneath a smaller half graben that is interpreted to reflect an earlier stage of rifting. The crustal model presented here resembles recent models of some passive continental margins and is in marked contrast to many models of both active and extinct Phanerozoic continental rift zones. It demonstrates that the Moho is a dynamic feature, since the pre-rift Moho is probably within or above the high-velocity lower crust, whereas the post-rift Moho is defined as the base of this layer. In the absence of major tectonic activity, however, the Moho is very stable, since the large, abrupt variations in crustal thickness beneath the MRS have been preserved for at least a billion years.

  12. Effects of oil and natural or synthetic vitamin E on ruminal and milk fatty acid profiles in cows receiving a high-starch diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zened, A; Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Najar, T; Enjalbert, F

    2012-10-01

    Among trans fatty acids, trans-10,cis-12 CLA has negative effects on cow milk fat production and can affect human health. In high-yielding dairy cows, a shift from the trans-11 to the trans-10 pathway of biohydrogenation (BH) can occur in the rumen of cows receiving high-concentrate diets, especially when the diet is supplemented with unsaturated fat sources. In some but not all experiments, vitamin E has been shown to control this shift. To ascertain the effects of vitamin E on this shift of BH pathway, 2 studies were conducted. The first study explored in vitro the effects of addition of natural (RRR-α-tocopherol acetate) and synthetic (dl-α-tocopherol acetate) vitamin E. Compared with control and synthetic vitamin E, the natural form resulted in a greater trans-10/trans-11 ratio; however, the effect was very low, suggesting that vitamin E was neither a limiting factor for rumen BH nor a modulator of the BH pathway. An in vivo study investigated the effect of natural vitamin E (RRR-α-tocopherol) on this shift and subsequent milk fat depression. Six rumen-fistulated lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 2×2 crossover design. Cows received 20-kg DM of a control diet based on corn silage with 22% of wheat, and after 2 wk of adaptation, the diet was supplemented with 600 g of sunflower oil for 2 more weeks. During the last week of this 4-wk experimental period, cows were divided into 2 groups: an unsupplemented control group and a group receiving 11 g of RRR-α-tocopherol acetate per day. A trans-10 shift of ruminal BH associated with milk fat depression due to oil supplementation of a high-wheat diet was observed, but vitamin E supplementation of dairy cows did not result in a reversal toward a trans-11 BH pathway, and did not restore milk fat content. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deep sequencing uncovers commonality in small RNA profiles between transgene-induced and naturally occurring RNA silencing of chalcone synthase-A gene in petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction of a transgene that transcribes RNA homologous to an endogenous gene in the plant genome can induce silencing of both genes, a phenomenon termed cosuppression. Cosuppression was first discovered in transgenic petunia plants transformed with the CHS-A gene encoding chalcone synthase, in which nonpigmented sectors in flowers or completely white flowers are produced. Some of the flower-color patterns observed in transgenic petunias having CHS-A cosuppression resemble those in existing nontransgenic varieties. Although the mechanism by which white sectors are generated in nontransgenic petunia is known to be due to RNA silencing of the CHS-A gene as in cosuppression, whether the same trigger(s) and/or pattern of RNA degradation are involved in these phenomena has not been known. Here, we addressed this question using deep-sequencing and bioinformatic analyses of small RNAs. Results We analyzed short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) produced in nonpigmented sectors of petal tissues in transgenic petunia plants that have CHS-A cosuppression and a nontransgenic petunia variety Red Star, that has naturally occurring CHS-A RNA silencing. In both silencing systems, 21-nt and 22-nt siRNAs were the most and the second-most abundant size classes, respectively. CHS-A siRNA production was confined to exon 2, indicating that RNA degradation through the RNA silencing pathway occurred in this exon. Common siRNAs were detected in cosuppression and naturally occurring RNA silencing, and their ranks based on the number of siRNAs in these plants were correlated with each other. Noticeably, highly abundant siRNAs were common in these systems. Phased siRNAs were detected in multiple phases at multiple sites, and some of the ends of the regions that produced phased siRNAs were conserved. Conclusions The features of siRNA production found to be common to cosuppression and naturally occurring silencing of the CHS-A gene indicate mechanistic similarities between these

  14. Mantle seismic anisotropy beneath NE China and implications for the lithospheric delamination hypothesis beneath the southern Great Xing'an range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haichao; Niu, Fenglin; Obayashi, Masayuki; Grand, Stephen P.; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; John Chen, Y.; Ning, Jieyuan; Tanaka, Satoru

    2017-08-01

    We measured shear wave splitting from SKS data recorded by the transcontinental NECESSArray in NE China to constrain lithosphere deformation and sublithospheric flows beneath the area. We selected several hundreds of high quality SKS/SKKS waveforms from 32 teleseismic earthquakes occurring between 09/01/2009 and 08/31/2011 recorded by 125 broadband stations. These stations cover a variety of tectonic terranes, including the Songliao basin, the Changbaishan mountain range and Zhangguancai range in the east, the Great Xing'an range in the west and the Yanshan orogenic belt in the southwest. We assumed each station is underlaid by a single anisotropic layer and employed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) weighted multi-event stacking method to estimate the two splitting parameters (the fast polarization direction φ, and delay time, δt) that gives the best fit to all the SKS/SKKS waveforms recorded at each station. Overall, the measured fast polarization direction lies more or less along the NW-SE direction, which significantly differs from the absolute plate motion direction, but is roughly consistent with the regional extension direction. This suggests that lithosphere deformation is likely the general cause of the observed seismic anisotropy. The most complicated anisotropic structure is observed beneath the southern Great Xing'an range and southwest Songliao basin. The observed large variations in splitting parameters and the seismic tomographic images of the area are consistent with ongoing lithospheric delamination beneath this region.

  15. Daily and Seasonal Expression Profile of Serum Melatonin and Its Biosynthesizing Enzyme Genes (tph1, aanat1, aanat2, and hiomt) in Pineal Organ and Retina: A Study under Natural Environmental Conditions in a Tropical Carp, Catla catla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, Chongtham; Sanjita Devi, Haobijam; Mondal, Gopinath; Devi, Sijagurumayum Dharmajyoti; Khan, Zeeshan Ahmad; Yumnamcha, Thangal; Bharali, Rupjyoti; Chattoraj, Asamanja

    2016-12-01

    The tropical carp Catla catla is gaining importance for the studies of the impact of environmental changes on aquatic animals due to its surface dwelling habitat. To date, no information is available on the transcriptional profile of melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes in any tropical carp under either natural or artificial photothermal conditions in pineal and retina. The present study is an attempt to demonstrate the temporal pattern of expression of melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (tph1), arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aanat1 and aanat2), and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (hiomt) collectively and simultaneously in pineal organ and retina in tropical fish, C. catla, on a daily and seasonal basis under natural environmental conditions along with the serum melatonin levels. Depending upon the changes of the natural photothermal conditions, in four phases of an annual cycle, the variation and/or shifting of the rhythm parameters of different melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes in these two organs are different. Moreover, relative expression of these genes varies based on tissue and season. The serum melatonin levels correspond to the expression pattern of pineal aanat2 and hiomt. This finding indicates a possible organization of melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes with reproductive phases differently in these two photoreceptive organs for maintaining its physiological functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Peeking Under the Ice… Literally: Records of Arctic Climate Change from Radiocarbon Dating Moss Emerging from Beneath Retreating Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, J. P.; Schweinsberg, A.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Beel, C. R.; Bennike, O.

    2014-12-01

    Dramatic changes are taking place throughout the Arctic. Many glaciers have already melted away completely, and most others are well on their way as rising snowline elevations promise continued glacier retreat. Emerging from beneath retreating glacier margins is a landscape rich in information about past climate and glacier changes. Within newly exposed bedrock is an inventory of cosmogenic nuclides that archive past ice cover timing and duration. Lake basins re-appearing due to retreating ice preserve sediment archives that tell of cooling climate and advancing ice. And ancient surfaces vegetated with tundra communities that have long been entombed beneath frozen-bedded ice caps are now being revealed for the first time in millennia. This presentation will focus on the climate and glacier record derived from radiocarbon dating of in situ moss recently exhumed from retreating local ice cap margins on western Greenland. Dozens of radiocarbon ages from moss group into several distinct modes, which are interpreted as discrete times of persistent summer cooling and resultant glacier expansion. The data reveal a pattern of glacier expansion beginning ~5000 years ago, followed by periods of glacier growth around 3500 and 1500 years ago. Because these times of glacier expansion are recorded at many sites in western Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic, they are interpreted as times of step-wise summer cooling events during the Holocene. These non-linear climate changes may be a result of feedbacks that amplify linear insolation forcing of Holocene climate. In addition to these insights into the Arctic climate system, the antiquity of many radiocarbon ages of ice-killed moss indicate that many arctic surfaces are being re-exposed for the first time in millennia due to retreating ice, emphasizing the unprecedented nature of current summer warming.

  17. Magnetolluric Imaging of the Lithosphere beneath the Tibetan Plateau: A Synoptic View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Wei, W.; Jin, S.; Ye, G.; Jing, J.; Zhang, L.; Jones, A. G.; Xie, C.; Yin, Y.

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the collision and convergence process between India and Asia continent, magnetotelluric (MT) data have been used to image crustal electrical resistivity and to estimate the rheological structure in the south, east and north margin of Tibetan Plateau in the last decades. However, most of these MT data were collected as isolated profiles and insufficient to convey a synoptic view of the Plateau. Recently, the MT data coverage is greatly improved from the 1 by 1 degree SINOPROBE MT array data from 2011-2013. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) geo-electrical model of the crust and uppermost mantle is derived from the combined broadband and long period array dataset. The resulting model features broadly resistive structure in the upper crust, with the exception of small scale conductors lining along the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture (YZS) and Bangong-Nujiang Suture (BNS). The lower crust consists of widely spread high conductive structures beneath Lhasa and Qiangtang Block except for the southeast part of Tibetan Plateau. Instead of the previous proposed homogenous high conductive layer, these lower crustal conductors are generally N-S directed and perpendicular to the above Cenozoic and Mesozoic sutures. While the lower crustal structures probably indicate partial melts induced by radiogenic heat from the thickened crust, the conductor along the suture zones in the upper crust might imply pathways for deep fluids into the shear zones of YZS and BNS. One of the most prominent feature revealed is the upper mantle conductive sturcture in the central part of Tibet Plateau (85-92°E) accompanied by two resistive regions in the southeast and southwest part of the Plateau. While the southwest resistive zone is broadly consistent with the "flat subduction" region of Indian lithosphere revealed by seismic receiver function study, the conductive middle part of Tibetan Plateau might represent the upper mantle melts induced by the water carried by the steeper

  18. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E., E-mail: emalkoc@atauni.edu.tr

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. • In FTIR spectra, various functional groups detected on the surface of NUC before and after adsorption. There are some peaks were shifted, disappeared and new peaks were also detected in the BY2 dye adsorbed NUC. Six significant bands at 3621, 3349, 1651,1608,1435 and 872 cm⁻¹ which indicated the bonds, –OH groups, –NH stretching, C–H and C–C bend group were increased. These six significant bands in the spectrum indicate the possible involvement of the respective functional group on the surface of NUC in BY2 dye adsorption process. • Obtained XRD result suggests that the BY2 dye adsorbed NUC might induce bulk phase changes. • The most probable pore size was about 5 nm, according to pore size distribution, therefore it was regarded as a mesoporous material of NUC. • From BET analysis, the specific BET and Langmuir surface area of NUC was found to be 90.5454 and 123.1516 m²/g with corresponding total pore volume of 0.1155 cm³/g (P/P₀ = 0.98). Micropore volume and micropore surface area were calculated using the t-plot method. The micropore surface area, calculated by the t-plot method, was 23.544 m²/g for NUC. • Pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits the adsorption process accurately. The Langmuir isotherm model was well described by the equilibrium data with maximum adsorption capacity of 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C. From Boyd plot, the adsorption of BY2 on NUC took place by film diffusion mechanism. Thermodynamic calculation indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Abstract: In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2

  19. Global transcriptome profile reveals abundance of DNA damage response and repair genes in individuals from high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Jain

    Full Text Available The high level natural radiation areas (HLNRA of Kerala coast in south west India is unique for its wide variation in the background radiation dose (15.0 mGy/year] to find out differentially expressed genes and their biological significance in response to chronic low dose radiation exposure. Our results revealed a dose dependent increase in the number of differentially expressed genes with respect to different background dose levels. Gene ontology analysis revealed majority of these differentially expressed genes are involved in DNA damage response (DDR signaling, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, histone/chromatin modification and immune response. In the present study, 64 background dose responsive genes have been identified as possible chronic low dose radiation signatures. Validation of 30 differentially expressed genes was carried out using fluorescent based universal probe library. Abundance of DDR and DNA repair genes along with pathways such as MAPK, p53 and JNK in higher background dose groups (> 5.0mGy/year indicated a possible threshold dose for DDR signaling and are plausible reason of observing in vivo radio-adaptive response and non-carcinogenesis in HLNRA population. To our knowledge, this is the first study on molecular effect of chronic low dose radiation exposure on human population from high background radiation areas at transcriptome level using high throughput approach. These findings have tremendous implications in understanding low dose radiation biology especially, the effect of low dose radiation exposure in humans.

  20. Occurrence and Profiles of the Artificial Endocrine Disruptor Bisphenol A and Natural Endocrine Disruptor Phytoestrogens in Urine from Children in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to artificial or natural endocrine disruptors, such as bisphenol A (BPA and phytoestrogens has been demonstrated to have health effects, especially in children. Biomonitoring of BPA and phytoestrogens in human urine can be used to assess the intake levels of these compounds. Methods: In this study, BPA and phytoestrogens in urine specimens (n = 256 collected from children in China were measured by liquid chromatography (LC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Results: BPA was detected in most specimens, with a geometric mean concentration of 1.58 ng/mL. For the first time, levels of urinary phytoestrogens in Chinese children were reported. Daidzein and enterolactone are the typical isoflavones and lignans compounds in urine, respectively. Conclusions: Relatively high levels of urinary BPA indicate an increasing risk of BPA exposure to Chinese children. Urinary concentrations of daidzein in Chinese children are higher when compared with those reported in the U.S. children, while concentrations of urinary enterolactone and enterodiols are significantly lower. This suggests a significant difference in phytoestrogen intake between the children from China and from the U.S.

  1. The first synthesis of 4-phenylbutenone derivative bromophenols including natural products and their inhibition profiles for carbonic anhydrase, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Çetin; Taslimi, Parham; Gülçin, İlhami; Menzek, Abdullah

    2017-06-01

    The first synthesis of (E)-4-(3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one (1), (E)-4-(2-bromo-4,5-dihydroxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one (2), and (E)-4-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one (3) was realized as natural bromophenols. Derivatives with mono OMe of 2 and 3 were obtained from the reactions of their derivatives with di OMe with AlCl3. These novel 4-phenylbutenone derivatives were effective inhibitors of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase I and II isoenzymes (hCA I and II), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) with Ki values in the range of 158.07-404.16pM for hCA I, 107.63-237.40pM for hCA II, 14.81-33.99pM for AChE and 5.64-19.30pM for BChE. The inhibitory effects of the synthesized novel 4-phenylbutenone derivatives were compared to acetazolamide as a clinical hCA I and II isoenzymes inhibitor and tacrine as a clinical AChE and BChE enzymes inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Soil water storage and groundwater behaviour in a catenary sequence beneath forest in central Amazonia: I. Comparisons between plateau, slope and valley floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Hodnett

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil water storage was monitored in three landscape elements in the forest (plateau, slope and valley floor over a 3 year period to identify differences in sub-surface hydrological response. Under the plateau and slope, the changes of storage were very similar and there was no indication of surface runoff on the slope. The mean maximum seasonal storage change was 156 mm in the 2 m profile but it was clear that, in the dry season, the forest was able to take up water from below 3.6 m. Soil water availability was low. Soil water storage changes in the valley were dominated by the behaviour of a shallow water table which, in normal years, varied between 0.1 m below the surface at the end of the wet season and 0.8 m at the end of the dry season. Soil water storage changes were small because root uptake was largely replenished by groundwater flow towards the stream. The groundwater behaviour is controlled mainly by the deep drainage from beneath the plateau and slope areas. The groundwater gradient beneath the slope indicated that recharge beneath the plateau and slope commences only after the soil water deficits from the previous dry season have been replenished. Following a wet season with little recharge, the water table fell, ceasing to influence the valley soil water storage, and the stream dried up. The plateau and slope, a zone of very high porosity between 0.4 and 1.1 m, underlain by a less conductive layer, is a probable route for interflow during, and for a few hours after, heavy and prolonged rainfall.

  3. Cytokine and iNOS profiles in lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and their association with the parasitic DNA load and clinical and histopathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Tassia Cristina Bello; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Sávio Freire; de Campos, Monique Paiva; de Miranda, Luisa Helena Monteiro; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Belo, Vinícius Silva; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges

    2016-08-30

    In South America, visceral leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease with severe evolution characteristics in humans, and dogs are its main reservoir. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the clinical status of dogs from a Brazilian endemic area naturally, at Barra Mansa municipality, infected with Leishmania infantum, in conjunction with their histopathological profile and, in order to determine possible markers of susceptibility or resistance to the disease, parasitic DNA load, cytokine and iNOS mRNA expression profiles were investigated in lymph nodes. High levels of IFN-ɣ and IL-6 mRNA were detected. Both IFN-ɣ and IL-6 mRNA were associated with disorganization of the corticomedullary region. IFN-ɣ and TNF-α mRNA were associated with the absence of follicular hyperplasia. The regulatory pathway was remarkable with IL-10 mRNA detection and its significant association with the severity of the disease. Plasmacytosis and sinus histiocytosis were associated with high loads of parasitic DNA, but there was no significant association between the parasite DNA load and animal clinical alterations. Since high parasitic loads were found in animals with or without symptoms, clinical examination cannot be considered as a criterion for disease susceptibility assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 enzymes and their influence on cardiovascular risk and lipid profile in people who live near a natural gas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašalić, Daria; Marinković, Natalija

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to see whether genetic polymorphisms of the enzymes CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 are associated with higher risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and whether they affect lipid profile in 252 subjects living near a natural gas plant, who are likely to be exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fasting serum concentrations of biochemical parameters were determined with standard methods. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP 1A1 rs4646903, rs1048943, rs4986883, and rs1799814 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL), while GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions were detected with multiplex PCR. Cardiovascular risk was assessed with Framingham risk score, and the subjects divided in two groups: >10% risk and ≤10% risk. The two groups did not differ in the genotype frequencies. MANCOVA analysis, which included lipid parameters, glucose, and BMI with sex, age, hypertension and smoking status as covariates, showed a significant difference between the GSTT1*0 and GSTT1*1 allele carriers (p=0.001). UNIANCOVA with same covariates showed that total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in GSTT1*1 allele carriers than in GSTT1*0 carriers (p<0.001 and p=0.006, respectively). Our findings suggest that CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms are not associated with the higher risk of CAD, but that GSTT1 affects lipid profile.

  5. Thrust Faulting, Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Poisson's Ratios Beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California as Determined from the Santa Clara Seismic Investigation (SCSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M. R.; Kiger, L.; Saulter, D.; Wentworth, C.

    2001-12-01

    In December 2000, we conducted an ~20-km-long, southwest-northeast-trending seismic reflection and refraction seismic imaging survey extending from the central Santa Cruz Mountains to the central Santa Clara Valley. The Santa Clara Seismic investigation (SCSI) originated within 0.5 km of the surface trace of the San Andreas fault zone and terminated in downtown San Jose. Between its origin and terminus, the profile crossed the Cupertino Basin and numerous mapped faults, including the Monte Vista thrust fault. Seismic sources were generated by 11 explosions ranging in size from about 12 to 23 kg (25 to 50 lbs.) and were spaced approximately 1 km apart in the central part of the profile. The seismic data were recorded with approximately 400 PASSCAL Texan seismographs, spaced approximately 50 m apart. We inverted first-arrival refractions to determine the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the upper 3.5 km of the crust, and we stacked the seismic reflection data to develop reflection images the upper 10 km of the crust. Our data indicate that P-wave velocities range from about 1.3 km/s near the surface to about 6.0 km/s at varying depths along the profile. Measured S-wave velocities range from about 0.6 km/s near the surface to about 2.6 km/s at varying depths along the profile. Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios vary from about 1.57 to about 2.10 and from 0.16 to about 0.37, respectively. All velocities and ratios vary laterally and vertically along the profile, but there is an appreciable difference on either side of the Monte Vista fault. Beneath the central Cupertino Basin, the velocity data suggest that sediments (3 km/s) are about 1.2 km deep, thinning to about 600 m deep beneath downtown San Jose and to 0 km deep in the Santa Cruz Mountains. These data show that the Santa Clara Valley and Cupertino Basin sediments are shallower beneath our profile than previously believed. The velocity image also shows a clear low-velocity zone that is most prominent beneath the town

  6. Ultrasound of the abdominal wall: what lies beneath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N; Goyal, N; Mukherjee, K; Kamath, S

    2013-01-01

    Clinically equivocal abdominal wall lesions often pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. It can be equally challenging to appreciate the nature of abdominal wall lesions found incidentally on abdominal ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound is a non-ionizing, cheap, and easily accessible investigation for such lesions. It is widely used and has the added advantage of being a dynamic investigation. However, imaging with ultrasound is operator-dependent and relies on technical skills. It is important to understand the imaging of normal anatomy and to be familiar with the imaging appearance of lesions. We present a review of various lesions seen during ultrasound examinations of the abdominal wall or as incidental findings on abdominal ultrasound. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ambika; Ramachandran, Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF) and weak (WK) bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5) and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and P and Q both) are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  8. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF and weak (WK bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5 and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and  P and Q both are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  9. Constraining P-wave velocity variations in the upper mantle beneath Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Chang; Hilst, R.D. van der; Toksöz, M. Nafi

    2006-01-01

    We have produced a P-wave model of the upper mantle beneath Southeast (SE) Asia from reprocessed short period International Seismological Centre (ISC) P and pP data, short period P data of the Annual Bulletin of Chinese Earthquakes (ABCE), and long period PP-P data.We used 3D sensitivity kernels

  10. Constraining spatial variations in P-wave velocity in the upper mantle beneath SE Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Hilst, R.D. van der; Toksoz, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have produced a P-wave model of the upper mantle beneath Southeast (SE) Asia from reprocessed short period International Seismological Centre (ISC) P and pP data, short period P data of the Annual Bulletin of Chinese Earthquakes (ABCE), and long period PP-P data.We used 3D sensitivity kernels

  11. Assessing the impact of modern recharge on a sandstone aquifer beneath a suburb of Doncaster, UK

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Brian L.; Darling, W. George; Cronin, Aidan A; Rueedi, Joerg; Whitehead, Emily J.; Gooddy, Daren C.

    2006-01-01

    A major water quality issue in urban areas underlain by a productive aquifer is the impact of modern recharge. Using a variety of sample sources including multi-level boreholes, detectable concentrations of CFCs and SF6 have been found throughout the upper 50 m of the saturated aquifer beneath a suburb of Doncaster, UK, indicating that modern (

  12. Upper-mantle shear velocity beneath eastern Australia from inversion of waveforms from SKIPPY portable arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielhuis, A.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    1996-01-01

    In 1993, the Research School of Earth Sciences of the Australian National University commenced a nationwide seismometry project, SKIPPY, for a comprehensive study of the upper mantle beneath the Australian continent. We applied a waveform inversion technique to broad-band data recorded while the

  13. Slab remnants beneath the Baja California peninsula : Seismic constraints and tectonic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulssen, Hanneke; de Vos, Denise

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the Gulf of California has been related to the cessation of subduction of the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Various studies have identified features that point to the presence of a slab remnant beneath the Baja California peninsula, but its depth range and lateral extent

  14. Structure and evolution of subducted lithosphere beneath the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widiyantoro, Sri; Hilst, R.D. van der

    1996-01-01

    Tomographic imaging reveals seismic anomalies beneath the Sunda island arc, Indonesia, that suggest that the lithospheric slab penetrates to a depth of at least 1500 kilometers. The Sunda slab forms the eastern end of a deep anomaly associated with the past subduction of the plate underlying the

  15. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area.

  16. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2004-08-31

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

  17. Seismic imaging of a mid-lithospheric discontinuity beneath Ontong Java Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharimena, Saikiran; Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) is a huge, completely submerged volcanic edifice that is hypothesized to have formed during large plume melting events ∼90 and 120 My ago. It is currently resisting subduction into the North Solomon trench. The size and buoyancy of the plateau along with its history of plume melting and current interaction with a subduction zone are all similar to the characteristics and hypothesized mechanisms of continent formation. However, the plateau is remote, and enigmatic, and its proto-continent potential is debated. We use SS precursors to image seismic discontinuity structure beneath Ontong Java Plateau. We image a velocity increase with depth at 28 ± 4 km consistent with the Moho. In addition, we image velocity decreases at 80 ± 5 km and 282 ± 7 km depth. Discontinuities at 60-100 km depth are frequently observed both beneath the oceans and the continents. However, the discontinuity at 282 km is anomalous in comparison to surrounding oceanic regions; in the context of previous results it may suggest a thick viscous root beneath OJP. If such a root exists, then the discontinuity at 80 km bears some similarity to the mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs) observed beneath continents. One possibility is that plume melting events, similar to that which formed OJP, may cause discontinuities in the MLD depth range. Plume-plate interaction could be a mechanism for MLD formation in some continents in the Archean prior to the onset of subduction.

  18. Crustal thickness, discontinuity depth, and upper mantle structure beneath southern Africa: constraints from body wave conversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stankiewicz, Jacek; Che, Sébastien; Hilst, R.D. van der; Wit, Maarten J. de

    2002-01-01

    The technique of receiver function analysis is applied to the study of crustal and upper mantle structures beneath the Kaapvaal craton in southern Africa and its surroundings. Seismic data were recorded by the seismic array of 82 sites deployed from April 1997 to April 1999 across southern Africa,

  19. The crustal structure beneath The Netherlands derived from ambient seismic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudistira, Tedi|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410597; Paulssen, Hanneke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073584436; Trampert, Jeannot|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829250

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive 3-D model of the crust beneath The Netherlands. To obtain this model, we designed the NARS-Netherlands project, a dense deployment of broadband stations in the area. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion was measured from ambient noise

  20. Formation of heterogeneous magmatic series beneath North Santorini, South Aegean island arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, John C; Jensen, E.S.; Hansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    magma formation beneath North Santorini throughout its 500 ka history is attributed to variable transfer of sedimentary components - either terrigenous or pelagic, as bulk sediments or high-temperature partial melts rather than fluids or low-temperature partial melts - from a rupture zone...

  1. Topography of the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Black Sea Basin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starostenkp, V.; Buryanov, V.; Makarenko, I.; Rusakov, O.M.; Stephenson, R.A.; Nikishin, A.M.; Georgiev, G.; Gerasimov, M.; Dimitriu, R.; Legostaeva, O.V.; Pchelarov, V.; Sava, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    A map of Moho depth for the Black Sea and its immediate surroundings has been inferred from 3-D gravity modelling, and crustal structure has been clarified. Beneath the basin centre, the thickness of the crystalline layer is similar to that of the oceanic crust. In the Western and Eastern Black Sea

  2. NUMERIC SOLUTION FOR OBTENTION OF THE LINE FLOW PROFILE IN NATURAL CHANNELS SOLUÇÃO NUMÉRICA PARA A OBTENÇÃO DO PERFIL DA LINHA D’ÁGUA EM CANAIS NATURAIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Coutinho de Oliveira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this research was to obtain the line flow profile as affected by a weir installed on a natural channel. The channel flow was measured through a suppressed weir. In order to obtain the channel geometric parameters a profile cross section survey was performed at several points, adjusting equations of the power type to describe the top width and the flow area as a function of depth. To obtain the line flow, the numeric solution of Bernoulli equation was used through the finite differences technique. The line flow profile was similar to that observed in the field, suggesting the adequacy of the proposed methodology.

    KEY-WORDS: Open channel; gradually varied flow; backwater curve.

    O presente trabalho teve como objetivo a obtenção do perfil da linha d’água do remanso provocado pela instalação de um vertedor em um canal natural. A vazão do canal foi medida por um vertedor sem contração lateral instalado no canal utilizado neste estudo. Para a obtenção dos parâmetros geométricos do canal, procedeu-se ao levantamento do perfil da sua seção transversal em vários pontos. Com os dados obtidos, ajustaram-se as equações do tipo potencial para descrever a largura do espelho d’água e a área molhada em função da profundidade. Para a obtenção do perfil da linha d’água, empregou-se a solução numérica da equação de Bernoulli pela técnica das diferenças finitas. O perfil da linha d’água simulado aproximou-se do observado no campo, o que confere adequação à metodologia proposta neste trabalho.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Conduto livre; escoamento gradualmente variado; curva de remanso.

  3. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-07-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time.

  4. Radial Viscous Fingering and its Surface Expression due to Convective Upwelling Beneath North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, N. J.; Schoonman, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Icelandic mantle plume has had a significant influence on the geologic and oceanographic evolution of the North Atlantic Ocean during Cenozoic times. Full-waveform tomographic imaging of this region show that the planform of this plume has a complex irregular shape with significant shear wave velocity anomalies lying beneath the lithospheric plates between 100 and 200 km depth. The planform of these anomalies suggests that five or more horizontal fingers extend radially beneath the fringing continental margins. The best-imaged fingers lie beneath the British Isles and beneath western Norway where significant crustal isostatic departures have been measured. Here, we propose that these radial fingers are generated by a phenomenon known as the Saffman-Taylor instability. Experimental and theoretical analyses show that radial, miscible viscous fingering occurs when a less viscous fluid is injected into a more viscous fluid. The wavelength and number of fingers are controlled by the mobility (i.e. the ratio of viscosities), by the Peclet number (i.e. the ratio of advective and diffusive processes), and by the thickness of the horizontal layer into which fluid is injected. We have combined shear wave velocity estimates with residual depth measurements around the Atlantic margins to calculate the planform distribution of temperature and viscosity within an asthenospheric layer beneath the lithospheric plates. Our calculations suggest that the mobility is 20-50, that the Peclet number is O(104, and that the asthenospheric channel is 150 ± 50 km thick. The existence and form of viscous fingering is consistent with experimental observations and with linear stability analysis. A useful rule of thumb is that the wavelength of viscous fingering is 5 ± 1 times the thickness of the horizontal layer. Our proposal support the notion that dynamic topography of the Earth's surface can be influenced by rapid horizontal flow within spatially evolving asthenospheric fingers.

  5. Combined multi-scale characterization of a sedimentary structure beneath a river embankment to expand conventional flood protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienken, T.; Kreck, M.; Hausmann, J.; Werban, U.

    2011-12-01

    Embankments along rivers and streams are a common measure of constructional flood protection in Germany. At a test site along the River Mulde near the town of Löbnitz, Saxony, Germany, aerial photographs reveal the presence of a surface near underground sedimentary structure that crosses the embankment. This sedimentary structure is suspected to consist of sedimentary channel deposits that may serve as preferential flow path during seasonal flooding, leading to increased water propagation beneath the embankment. During normal water level, this structure is within the unsaturated zone. Geophysical techniques, GPR and geoelectrics, were used to characterize the extent of the sedimentary structure. At selected points high resolution vertical one-dimensional profiles of geotechnical and hydrogeological sediment properties were measured using minimum invasive direct push technology. The combination of multi-scale data allows the characterization of the identified sedimentary structure at the test site regarding its extent and hydraulic properties in respect to the fluviatile floodplain deposits present at the test site along a 500m transect. In this study, the combination of non-invasive geophysics and minimum invasive direct push technology provided high resolution geospatial information of a sedimentary regime, which could not have been achieved with conventional characterization methods, e.g. retrieval and analysis of soil samples, regarding resolution and work efficiency.

  6. Crustal structure beneath the middle-lower Yangtze metallogenic belt in East China: Constraints from passive source seismic experiment on the Mesozoic intra-continental mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Danian; Lü, Qingtian; Xu, Wenyi; Yan, Jiayong; Zhao, Jinhua; Dong, Shuwen; Chang, Yinfo

    2013-10-01

    To understand the formation and the tectonic process of the Mesozoic middle-lower Yangtze metallogenic belt (YMB), the SinoProbe program deployed a quasi-linear passive source seismic array across the belt. We performed receiver function profiling and measurement of shear-wave splitting parameters with the collected data. Our results show that the Moho depth varies significantly along the profile and that a “mantle uplift” exists right beneath the YMB. We also found that the lower crust of the YMB is different from that of its adjacent areas in structure on the receiver function profile. It possesses seismic anisotropy with direction roughly parallel to the belt. Our SKS/SKKS shear-wave splitting results also show similar belt-parallel azimuthal anisotropy right beneath the YMB. We interpret the seismic anisotropy in the lower crust of the YMB as the result of mineral crystal alignment caused by melting and belt-parallel flow in the Mesozoic ore-forming process. Besides, we observed a nearly south-dipping converter extending from shallow to lower crust beneath the Hefei Basin, which most possibly resulted from the Mesozoic crustal extension. We interpret the “mantle uplift” and the crustal extensional structures to be consequences of asthenospheric upwelling during the Mesozoic ore-forming process. Our results suggest that the lower crust of the YMB was most likely one part of the multi-level metallogenic magma system in the Mesozoic magmatism and mineralization processes, and the formation of the metallogenic belt to be a result much similar to the MASH (Melting, Assimilation, Storage and Homogenization; cf. Hildreth and Moorbath, 1988; Richards, 2003) process. First, the asthenospheric upwelling resulted in a crustal extensional environment; then the melts from the upwelling asthenosphere intruded into the lower crust of the YMB, and assimilation occurred when they mixed with in situ lower crustal materials, which led to the formation of adakitic

  7. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  8. Depths to major density contrats beneath the West African rift system in Nigeria and Cameroon based on the spectral analysis of gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhead, J. D.; Okereke, C. S.

    Estimates of depth to major density contrats within the lithosphere have been made, over the West African Rift System and adjacent basement areas in Nigeria and Cameroon, based on the spectral analysis of the Bouguer gravity field. The study reveals that three main density discontinuities occur in the depth ranges 7 to 12 km, 19 to 30 km and 80 to 93 km. The shallow crustal density discontinuities reflect a range of geological structures associated with the rift zones, shear zones and cratonic margins. The 19 to 30 km depth range is in good agreement with the Moho' depths determined by seismic refraction studies beneath and to the south of the Yola Rift in Cameroon and by East-West gravity modelling profiles across the Benue Trough in Nigeria. The deepest density discontinuities observed at 80 to 93 km depth are compatible with the presence of an anomalous low velocity upper mantle structure at these depths deduced from the inversion of teleseismic travel time residuals. The spectral analysis of gravity data can thus provide reliable first order estimates of depth to density discontinuities within the lithosphere beneath a rifted continental plate where such density variations would be expected.

  9. Mantle melting and melt refertilization beneath the Southwest Indian Ridge: Mineral composition of abyssal peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhu, Jihao; Chu, Fengyou; Dong, Yan-hui; Liu, Jiqiang; Li, Zhenggang; Zhu, Zhimin; Tang, Limei

    2017-04-01

    As one of the slowest spreading ridges of the global ocean ridge system, the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is characterized by discontinued magmatism. The 53°E segment between the Gallieni fracture zone (FZ) (52°20'E) and the Gazelle FZ (53°30'E) is a typical amagmatic segment (crustal thickness flat or U-type REE patterns, thus cannot be the pure residue of mantle melting. Mineral compositions of the Group 2 peridotites are more depleted than that of peridotites sampled near the Bouvet hot spot (Johnson et al., 1990), implying that the depleted mantle beneath the 53°E segment may be the residue of ancient melting event. This hypothesis is supported by the the low Ol/Opx ratios, coarse grain sizes (>1cm) Opx, and Mg-rich mineral compositions akin to harzburgite xenoliths that sample old continental lithospheric mantle (Kelemen et al., 1998). Melt refertilization model shows that Group 2 peridotites were affected by an enriched low-degree partial melt from the garnet stability field. These results indicate that depleted mantle which experiences ancient melting event are more sensitive to melt refertilization, thus may reduce the melt flux, leading to extremely thin crust at 53°E segment. This research was granted by the National Basic Research Programme of China (973 programme) (grant No. 2013CB429705) and the Fundamental Research Funds of Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration (JG1603, SZ1507). References: Johnson K T M, Dick H J B, Shimizu N. Melting in the oceanic upper mantle: An ion microprobe study of diopsides in abyssal peridotites[J]. Journal of Geophysical Research, 1990, 95(B3):2661-2678. Kelemen P B, Hart S R, Bernstein S. Silica enrichment in the continental upper mantle via melt/rock reaction[J]. Earth & Planetary Science Letters, 1998, 164(1-2):387-406. Zhou H, Dick H J. Thin crust as evidence for depleted mantle supporting the Marion Rise.[J]. Nature, 2013, 494(7436):195-200.

  10. Petrological and experimental evidence for differentiation of water-rich magmas beneath St. Kitts, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekhova, Elena; Blundy, Jon; Martin, Rita; Arculus, Richard; Pichavant, Michel

    2017-12-01

    St. Kitts lies in the northern Lesser Antilles, a subduction-related intraoceanic volcanic arc known for its magmatic diversity and unusually abundant cognate xenoliths. We combine the geochemistry of xenoliths, melt inclusions and lavas with high pressure-temperature experiments to explore magma differentiation processes beneath St. Kitts. Lavas range from basalt to rhyolite, with predominant andesites and basaltic andesites. Xenoliths, dominated by calcic plagioclase and amphibole, typically in reaction relationship with pyroxenes and olivine, can be divided into plutonic and cumulate varieties based on mineral textures and compositions. Cumulate varieties, formed primarily by the accumulation of liquidus phases, comprise ensembles that represent instantaneous solid compositions from one or more magma batches; plutonic varieties have mineralogy and textures consistent with protracted solidification of magmatic mush. Mineral chemistry in lavas and xenoliths is subtly different. For example, plagioclase with unusually high anorthite content (An≤100) occurs in some plutonic xenoliths, whereas the most calcic plagioclase in cumulate xenoliths and lavas are An97 and An95, respectively. Fluid-saturated, equilibrium crystallisation experiments were performed on a St. Kitts basaltic andesite, with three different fluid compositions ( XH2O = 1.0, 0.66 and 0.33) at 2.4 kbar, 950-1025 °C, and fO2 = NNO - 0.6 to NNO + 1.2 log units. Experiments reproduce lava liquid lines of descent and many xenolith assemblages, but fail to match xenolith and lava phenocryst mineral compositions, notably the very An-rich plagioclase. The strong positive correlation between experimentally determined plagioclase-melt KdCa-Na and dissolved H2O in the melt, together with the occurrence of Al-rich mafic lavas, suggests that parental magmas were water-rich (> 9 wt% H2O) basaltic andesites that crystallised over a wide pressure range (1.5-6 kbar). Comparison of experimental and natural (lava

  11. Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and

  12. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  13. Aeromagnetic evidence for a volcanic caldera(?) complex beneath the divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.; Blankenship, D.; Bell, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of <1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of < 1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.

  14. Country Profiles, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel; Thapa, Rita

    A profile of Nepal is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population--size, growth patterns, age/sex structure, geographical distribution, topographical obstacles, ethnic and religious…

  15. Country Profiles, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lewis S.

    A profile of Turkey is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  16. Temperature-profile methods for estimating percolation rates in arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, Jim; Tyler, Scott W.; Kwicklis, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Percolation rates are estimated using vertical temperature profiles from sequentially deeper vadose environments, progressing from sediments beneath stream channels, to expansive basin-fill materials, and finally to deep fractured bedrock underlying mountainous terrain. Beneath stream channels, vertical temperature profiles vary over time in response to downward heat transport, which is generally controlled by conductive heat transport during dry periods, or by advective transport during channel infiltration. During periods of stream-channel infiltration, two relatively simple approaches are possible: a heat-pulse technique, or a heat and liquid-water transport simulation code. Focused percolation rates beneath stream channels are examined for perennial, seasonal, and ephemeral channels in central New Mexico, with estimated percolation rates ranging from 100 to 2100 mm d−1 Deep within basin-fill and underlying mountainous terrain, vertical temperature gradients are dominated by the local geothermal gradient, which creates a profile with decreasing temperatures toward the surface. If simplifying assumptions are employed regarding stratigraphy and vapor fluxes, an analytical solution to the heat transport problem can be used to generate temperature profiles at specified percolation rates for comparison to the observed geothermal gradient. Comparisons to an observed temperature profile in the basin-fill sediments beneath Frenchman Flat, Nevada, yielded water fluxes near zero, with absolute values <10 mm yr−1 For the deep vadose environment beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the complexities of stratigraphy and vapor movement are incorporated into a more elaborate heat and water transport model to compare simulated and observed temperature profiles for a pair of deep boreholes. Best matches resulted in a percolation rate near zero for one borehole and 11 mm yr−1 for the second borehole.

  17. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system.

  18. A 9,000-year-old caribou hunting structure beneath Lake Huron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, John M; Lemke, Ashley K; Sonnenburg, Elizabeth P; Reynolds, Robert G; Abbott, Brian D

    2014-05-13

    Some of the most pivotal questions in human history necessitate the investigation of archaeological sites that are now under water. Nine thousand years ago, the Alpena-Amberley Ridge (AAR) beneath modern Lake Huron was a dry land corridor that connected northeast Michigan to southern Ontario. The newly discovered Drop 45 Drive Lane is the most complex hunting structure found to date beneath the Great Lakes. The site and its associated artifacts provide unprecedented insight into the social and seasonal organization of prehistoric caribou hunting. When combined with environmental and simulation studies, it is suggested that distinctly different seasonal strategies were used by early hunters on the AAR, with autumn hunting being carried out by small groups, and spring hunts being conducted by larger groups of cooperating hunters.

  19. Dry Lining as a Method for Maintaining Comfort Levels Beneath Pitched Roofs; An Experimental Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hippisley-Cox, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Loft spaces and roof voids present quite a challenge in the refurbishment and conversion of spaces beneath pitched roofs. There is a tendency for expensive heat loss in winter and excessively high temperatures during the summer months. Recent work on a small property in Northern France was used as an opportunity to undertake some tests whilst adopting some modern materials to obtain consistent comfort levels whilst addressing fuel costs and sustainability issues.

  20. Detailed characterization of the anisotropic parameters beneath Iberia and Northern Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jordi; Gallart, Josep; Morais, Iolanda; Silveira, Graça; Pedreira, David; Pulgar, Javier A.; Dias, Nuno A.; Ruiz, Mario; Gonzalez-Cortina, Juan-Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the anisotropic properties beneath the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Morocco has been dramatically improved since late 2007 with the analysis of the data provided by the dense IberArray broad-band seismic network deployed in the Topo-Iberia project, the increasing number of permanent stations operating in Morocco, Portugal and Spain, and the contribution of smaller scale/higher resolution experiments. The first Topo-Iberia deployment in the Betics-Alboran zone has evidenced a spectacular rotation of the fast polarization direction (FPD) along the Gibraltar arc following the curvature of the Rif-Betic chain. This result has been interpreted as an evidence of mantle flow deflected around the high velocity slab beneath the Alboran Sea Arc. Data from the second Topo-Iberia deployment and from additional deployments in the Moroccan Meseta and the western High Atlas have shown a rather uniform N100°E FPD beneath the Variscan Central Iberian Massif, consistent with global mantle flow models taking into account contributions of surface plate motion, density variations and net lithosphere rotation. The results from the last deployment of the IberArray network presented here cover the northern part of the Iberian Peninsula and also show a rather uniform FPD orientation close to N100°E, confirming the previous interpretation. However, the degree of anisotropy changes significantly, from delay times values around 0.5 s beneath NW Iberia to values reaching 2.0s in its NE corner. The anisotropic parameters retrieved from single events providing high quality data also show significant differences for stations located in the Variscan units of NW Iberia, suggesting that the region includes multiple anisotropic layers or complex anisotropy systems.

  1. Near-shore talik development beneath shallow water in expanding thermokarst lakes, Old Crow Flats, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Leveillee, Pascale; Burn, Christopher R.

    2017-05-01

    It is generally assumed that permafrost is preserved beneath shallow lakes and ponds in the Western North American Arctic where water depth is less than about two thirds of the late-winter lake ice thickness. Here we present field observations of talik development beneath water as shallow as 0.2 m despite a lake ice thickness of 1.5 m, in Old Crow Flats (OCF), YT. Conditions leading to the initiation and development of taliks beneath shallow water were investigated with field measurements of shore erosion rates, bathymetry, ice thickness, snow accumulation, and lake bottom temperature near the shores of two expanding lakes in OCF. The sensitivity of talik development to variations in lake bottom thermal regime was then investigated numerically. Where ice reached the lake bottom, talik development was controlled by the ratio of freezing degree days to thawing degree days at the lake bottom (FDDlb/TDDlb). In some cases, spatial variations in on-ice snow depth had a minimal effect on annual mean lake bottom temperature (Tlb) but caused sufficient variations in FDDlb/TDDlb to influence talik development. Where Tlb was close to but greater than 0°C simulations indicated that the thermal offset allowed permafrost aggradation to occur under certain conditions, resulting in irregular near-shore talik geometries. The results highlight the sensitivity of permafrost to small changes in lake bottom thermal conditions where the water column freezes through in early winter and indicate the occurrence of permafrost degradation beneath very shallow water in the near-shore zone of Arctic ponds and lakes.

  2. Three-dimensional structure and seismicity beneath the Central Vanuatu subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foix, Oceane; Crawford, Wayne; Pelletier, Bernard; Regnier, Marc; Garaebiti, Esline; Koulakov, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The 1400-km long Vanuatu subduction zone results from subduction of the oceanic Australian plate (OAP) beneath the North-Fijian microplate (NFM). Seismic and volcanic activity are both high, and several morphologic features enter into subduction, affecting seismicity and probably plate coupling. The Entrecasteaux Ridge, West-Torres plateau, and Bougainville seamount currently enter into subduction below the large forearc islands of Santo and Malekula. This collision coincides with a strongly decreased local convergence velocity rate - 35 mm/yr compared to 120-160 mm/yr to the north and south - and significant uplift on the overriding plate, indicating a high degree of deformation. The close proximity of large uplifted forearc islands to the trench provides excellent coverage of the megathrust seismogenic zone for a seismological study. We used 10 months of seismological data collected using the 30-instrument land and sea ARC-VANUATU seismology network to construct a 3D velocity model — using the LOTOS joint location/model inversion software — and locate 11655 earthquakes using the NonLinLoc software suite. The 3-D model reveals low P and S velocities in the first tens of kilometers beneath both islands, probably due to water infiltration in the heavily faulted upper plate. The model also suggests the presence of a subducted seamount beneath south Santo. The earthquake locations reveal a complex interaction of faults and stress zones related to high and highly variable deformation. Both brittle deformation and the seismogenic zone depth limits vary along-slab and earthquake clusters are identified beneath central and south Santo, at about 10-30 km of depth, and southwest of Malekula island between 10-20 km depth.

  3. Layered Crustal and Mantle Structure and Anisotropy beneath the Afar Depression and Malawi Rift Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cory Alexander

    Although a wealth of geophysical data sets have been acquired within the vicinity of continental rift zones, the mechanisms responsible for the breakup of stable continental lithosphere are ambiguous. Eastern Africa is host to the largest contemporary rift zone on Earth, and is thus the most prominent site with which to investigate the processes which govern the rupture of continental lithosphere. The studies herein represent teleseismic analyses of the velocity and thermomechanical structure of the crust and mantle beneath the Afar Depression and Malawi Rift Zone (MRZ) of the East African Rift System. Within the Afar Depression, the first densely-spaced receiver function investigation of crustal thickness and inferred velocity attenuation across the Tendaho Graben is conducted, and the largest to-date study of the topography of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) beneath NE Africa is provided, which reveals low upper-mantle velocities beneath the Afar concordant with a probable mantle plume traversing the MTZ beneath the western Ethiopian Plateau. In the vicinity of the MRZ, a data set comprised of 35 seismic stations is employed that was deployed over a two year period from mid-2012 to mid-2014, belonging to the SAFARI (Seismic Arrays For African Rift Initiation) experiment. Accordingly, the first MTZ topography and shear wave splitting analyses were conducted in the region. The latter reveals largely plate motion-parallel anisotropy that is locally modulated by lithospheric thickness abnormalities adjacent to the MRZ, while the former reveals normal MTZ thicknesses and shallow discontinuities that support the presence of a thick lithospheric keel within the MRZ region. These evidences strongly argue for the evolution of the MRZ via passive rifting mechanisms absent lower-mantle influences.

  4. The Baltic Klint beneath the central Baltic Sea and its comparison with the North Estonian Klint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuling, Igor; Flodén, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Along its contact with the Baltic Shield, the margin of the East European Platform reveals a well-developed, flooded terraced relief. The most striking and consistent set of escarpments at the contact of the Lower Palaeozoic calcareous and terrigenous rocks, known as the Baltic Klint (BK), extends from northwest of Russia to the Swedish island of Öland. Marine seismic reflection profiling in 1990-2004 revealed the central Baltic Sea Klint (BSK) section in detail and enabled comparison of its geology/geomorphology with a classical klint-section onshore, namely the North Estonian Klint (NEK). The conception of the BK onshore, which is based on the land-sea separating terraced relief in northern Estonia, is not fully applicable beneath the sea. Therefore, we consider that the BSK includes the entire terraced Cambrian outcrop. We suggest the term "Baltic Klint Complex" to include the well-terraced margin of the Ordovician limestone outcrop, which is weakly developed in Estonia. Because of a steady lithological framework of the bedrock layers across the southern slope of the Fennoscandian Shield, the central BSK in the western and the NEK in the eastern part of the Baltic Homocline have largely identical morphologies. The North Estonian Ordovician limestone plateau with the calcareous crest of the BK extends across the central Baltic Sea, whereas morphological changes/variations along the Klint base occur due to the east-westerly lithostratigraphic/thickness changes in the siliciclastic Cambrian sequence. The verge of the NEK, located some 30-50 m above sea level, starts to drop in altitude as its east-westerly course turns to northeast-southwest in western Estonia. Further westwards, the BK shifts gradually into southerly deepening (0.1-0.2°) layers as its crest drops to c. 150 m below sea level (b.s.l.) near Gotska Sandön. This course change is accompanied by a considerable decrease in thickness of the platform sedimentary cover, as below the central Baltic Sea the

  5. Predicting scour beneath subsea pipelines from existing small free span depths under steady currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Y. Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An equation was developed to predict current-induced scour beneath subsea pipelines in areas with small span depths, S. Current equations for scour prediction are only applicable to partially buried pipelines. The existence of small span depths (i.e. S/D < 0.3 are of concern because the capacity for scour is higher at smaller span depths. Furthermore, it is impractical to perform rectification works, such as installing grout bags, under a pipeline with a small S/D. Full-scale two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations were performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes approach and the Shear stress transport k–ω turbulence model. To predict the occurrence of scour, the computed maximum bed shear stress beneath the pipe was converted to the dimensionless Shields parameter, and compared with the critical Shields parameter based on the mean sediment grain size. The numerical setup was verified, and a good agreement was found between model-scale CFD data and experimental data. Field data were obtained to determine the mean grain size, far field current velocity and to measure the span depths along the surveyed pipe length. A trend line equation was fitted to the full-scale CFD data, whereby the maximum Shields parameter beneath the pipe can be calculated based on the undisturbed Shields parameter and S/D.

  6. Preliminary result of P-wave speed tomography beneath North Sumatera region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatnika, Jajat [Earth Science Study Program, Institute of Technology Bandung (Indonesia); Indonesian Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jakarta (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Insitute of Technology Bandung (Indonesia); Wandono [Indonesian Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The structure of P-wave speed beneath the North Sumatra region was determined using P-wave arrival times compiled by MCGA from time periods of January 2009 to December 2012 combining with PASSCAL data for February to May 1995. In total, there are 2,246 local earthquake events with 10,666 P-wave phases from 63 stations seismic around the study area. Ray tracing to estimate travel time from source to receiver in this study by applying pseudo-bending method while the damped LSQR method was used for the tomographic inversion. Based on assessment of ray coverage, earthquakes and stations distribution, horizontal grid nodes was set up of 30×30 km2 for inside the study area and 80×80 km2 for outside the study area. The tomographic inversion results show low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex region and around the Sumatra Fault Zones (SFZ). These features are consistent with previous study. The low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex are observed around Mt. Pusuk Bukit at depths of 5 km down to 100 km. The interpretation is these anomalies may be associated with ascending hot materials from subduction processes at depths of 80 km down to 100 km. The obtained Vp structure from local tomography will give valuable information to enhance understanding of tectonic and volcanic in this study area.

  7. Constraints on the anisotropic contributions to velocity discontinuities at ∼60 km depth beneath the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Strong, sharp, negative seismic discontinuities, velocity decreases with depth, are observed beneath the Pacific seafloor at ∼60 km depth. It has been suggested that these are caused by an increase in radial anisotropy with depth, which occurs in global surface wave models. Here we test this hypothesis in two ways. We evaluate whether an increase in surface wave radial anisotropy with depth is robust with synthetic resolution tests. We do this by fitting an example surface wave data set near the East Pacific Rise. We also estimate the apparent isotropic seismic velocity discontinuities that could be caused by changes in radial anisotropy in S‐to‐P and P‐to‐S receiver functions and SS precursors using synthetic seismograms. We test one model where radial anisotropy is caused by olivine alignment and one model where it is caused by compositional layering. The result of our surface wave inversion suggests strong shallow azimuthal anisotropy beneath 0–10 Ma seafloor, which would also have a radial anisotropy signature. An increase in radial anisotropy with depth at 60 km depth is not well‐resolved in surface wave models, and could be artificially observed. Shallow isotropy underlain by strong radial anisotropy could explain moderate apparent velocity drops (depth as suggested by surface waves. Overall, an increase in radial anisotropy with depth may not exist at 60 km beneath the oceans and does not explain the scattered wave observations.

  8. Planetary protection and the search for life beneath the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    The search for traces of extinct and extant life on Mars will be extended to beneath the surface of the planet. Current data from Mars missions suggesting the presence of liquid water early in Mars' history and mathematical modeling of the fate of water on Mars imply that liquid water may exist deep beneath the surface of Mars. This leads to the hypothesis that life may exist deep beneath the Martian surface. One possible scenario to look for life on Mars involves a series of unmanned missions culminating with a manned mission drilling deep into the Martian subsurface (/~3Km), collecting samples, and conducting preliminary analyses to select samples for return to earth. This mission must address both forward and back contamination issues, and falls under planetary protection category V. Planetary protection issues to be addressed include provisions stating that the inevitable deposition of earth microbes by humans should be minimized and localized, and that earth microbes and organic material must not contaminate the Martian subsurface. This requires that the drilling equipment be sterilized prior to use. Further, the collection, containment and retrieval of the sample must be conducted such that the crew is protected and that any materials returning to earth are contained (i.e., physically and biologically isolated) and the chain of connection with Mars is broken

  9. Age of the subducting Pacific slab beneath East Asia and its geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Sanzhong; Wei, Wei

    2017-04-01

    We study the age of the subducting Pacific slab beneath East Asia using a high-resolution model of P-wave tomography and paleo-age data of ancient seafloor. Our results show that the lithosphere age of the subducting slab becomes younger from the Japan Trench (∼130 Ma) to the slab's western edge (∼90 Ma) beneath East China, and the flat (stagnant) slab in the mantle transition zone (MTZ) is the subducted Pacific plate rather than the proposed Izanagi plate which should have already collapsed into the lower mantle. The flat Pacific slab has been in the MTZ for no more than ∼10-20 million years, considerably less than the age of the big mantle wedge beneath East Asia (>110 million years). Hence, the present flat Pacific slab in the MTZ has contributed to the Cenozoic destruction of the East Asian continental lithosphere with extensive intraplate volcanism and back-arc spreading, whereas the destruction of the North China Craton during the Early Cretaceous (∼140-110 Ma) was caused by the subduction of the Izanagi (or the Paleo-Pacific) plate.

  10. Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance Prothro

    2008-03-01

    The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

  11. Simulation of flow in the unsaturated zone beneath Pagany Wash, Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamir, F.; Kwicklis, E.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hampson, D. [Foothills Engineering Consultants Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Anderton, S. [ROCKTECH, West Jordan, UT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A one-dimensional numerical model was created simulate water movement beneath Pagany Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Model stratigraphy and properties were on data obtained from boreholes UE-25 UZ {number_sign}4 UE-25 UZ {number_sign}5, which were drilled in the alluvial channel and bedrock sideslope of Pagany Wash. Although unable to account for multidimensional or preferential flowpaths beneath the wash, the model proved a useful conceptual tool with which to develop hypotheses and, in some cases, provide bounding calculations. The model indicated that liquid flux decreases with depth in the upper 120 m beneath the wash, with fluxes of several tens mm/yr in the nonwelded base of the Tiva Canyon Member and fluxes on the order of a tenth mm/yr in the upper Topopah Spring Member. Capillary barrier effects were indicated by the model to significantly delay the entry of large fluxes into the potential repository horizon during periods of increasing net infiltration, and to inhibit rapid drainage of water from the nonwelded and bedded intervals into the potential repository horizon during periods of moisture redistribution. Lateral moisture redistribution can be expected to be promoted by these effects.

  12. Crustal thickness and Moho sharpness beneath the Midcontinent rift from receiver functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moikwathai Moidaki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mesoproterozoic Midcontinent rift (MCR in the central US is an approximately 2000 km long, 100 km wide structure from Kansas to Michigan. During the 20-40 million years of rifting, a thick (up to 20 km layer of basaltic lava was deposited in the rift valleys. Quantifying the effects of the rifting and associated volcanic eruptions on the structure and composition of the crust and mantle beneath the MCR is important for the understanding of the evolution of continental lithosphere. In this study we measure the crustal thickness (H, and the sharpness of the Moho (R at about 24 portable and permanent stations in Iowa, Kansas, and South Dakota by stacking Pto- S converted waves (PmS and their multiples (PPmS and PSmS. Under the assumption that the crustal mean velocity in the study area is the same as the IASP91 earth model, we find a significantly thickened crust beneath the MCR of about 53 km. The crustal Vp/Vs ratios increases from about 1.80 off rift to as large as 1.95 within the rift, which corresponds to an increase of Poisson’s ratio from 0.28 to 0.32, suggesting a more mafic crust beneath the MCR. The R measurements are spatially variable and are relatively small in the vicinity of the MCR, indicating the disturbance of the original sharp Moho by the rifting and magmatic intrusion and volcanic eruption.

  13. Curie point depth beneath the Barramiya-Red Sea coast area estimated from spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Nabi, Sami Hamed

    2012-01-01

    The geothermal regime beneath the Barramiya-Red Sea coast area of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt has been determined by using the Curie point depth, which is temperature dependent. This study is based on the analysis of aeromagnetic data. The depth to the tops and centroid of the magnetic anomalies are calculated by power spectrum method for the whole area. The result of this investigation indicates, two new maps of the Curie point depth (CPD) and the surface heat flow ( q) maps of the study area. The coastal regions are characterized by high heat flow (83.6 mW/m 2), due to the geothermic nature of the region, and shallow Curie depth (22.5 km), where (CPD) depends on the tectonic regime and morphology in the eastern part of the area. The western portion of the studied area has a lower heat flow (<50 mW/m 2) and deeper Curie depth (˜40 km), due to the existence of a large areal extent of negative Bouguer anomaly in the NE-SW direction. In addition to its bordering to the Red Sea margin, such high heat flow anomaly is associated with the increased earthquake swarms activity in the Abu Dabbab area.

  14. Luminescence profiling of loess-dominated archaeological layers of a Chalcolithic site, Northern Negev Desert fringe, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Gloria I.; Roskin, Joel; Bee'ri, Ron

    2017-04-01

    This study applies a pulsed-photon Portable OSL Reader (PPSL) in investigating the palaeoenviroment and stages of development of a Chalcolithic site revealed during a salvage excavation. The (Shoqet Junction) site, within late Pleistocene loess-dominated sediment, is adjacent to the meandering and ephemeral Hebron Wadi in the Beer-Sheva Valley, at the fringe of the Northern Negev Desert (Israel). The site intermittently covers approximately 8 hectares and was exposed at 0.3 - 0.5 m depths beneath a plowed field. Five areas were excavated down to 4 meters. The site was dominated by an array of underground facilities: tunnels, (capped) shafts, walls, floors and infilled cavities were found within four main layers. The site includes a mixture of sediments: large amounts of organic material, weathered bricks, a powdery loess-like unit and thin Bk horizons. The artifact assemblage is associated with the Ghassulian culture. The objectives of this multi-parameter study, which combines PPSL luminescence profiling with sedimentological and geomorphic analyses, are to (1) analyze the Chalcolithic palaeoenvironments, aeolian and fluvial processes and location and morphology of streambeds, (2) identify possible deterministic physical influences upon the occupations (3) decipher the natural stratigraphic archive and discriminate between human and natural (aeolian/fluvial) induced sedimentation (4) create relative age profiles based on portable OSL measurements and OSL ages, in order to minimize OSL dating. Three main sections were profiled: a natural section - in order to identify the natural sedimentological regime and two walls of two excavation squares down to the sites' alluvial base. A small section above a prominent Bk horizon was also profiled. Altogether 58 samples were obtained for sediment and PPSL analyses. Luminescence profiles in general fit the stratigraphic breaks and enable discrimination between layers. Plowed and surface loess give low reads. Inverse reads

  15. Bent-shaped plumes and horizontal channel flow beneath the 660 km discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Nicola; Yuen, David A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent high-resolution seismic imaging of the transition zone topography beneath the Hawaiian archipelago shows strong evidence for a 1000 to 2000 km wide hot thermal anomaly ponding beneath the 660 km boundary west of Hawaii islands [Q. Cao et al. Seismic imaging of transition zone discontinuities suggests hot mantle west of Hawaii. Science (2011), 332, 1068-1071]. This scenario suggests that Hawaiian volcanism may not be caused by a stationary narrow plume rising from the core-mantle boundary but by hot plume material first held back beneath the 660 km discontinuity and then entrained under the transition zone before coming up to the surface. Using a cylindrical model of iso-chemical mantle convection with multiple phase transitions, we investigate the dynamical conditions for obtaining this peculiar plume morphology. Focusing on the role exerted by pressure-dependent thermodynamic and transport parameters, we show that a strong reduction of the coefficient of thermal expansion in the lower mantle and a viscosity hill at a depth of around 1800 km allow plumes to have enough focused buoyancy to reach and pass the 660 km depth interface. The lateral spreading of plumes near the top of the lower mantle manifests itself as a channel flow whose length is controlled by the viscosity contrast due to temperature variations ∆η T. For small values of ∆η T, broad and highly viscous plumes are generated that tend to pass through the transition zone relatively unperturbed. For higher values (10 2 ≤ ∆η T ≤ 10 3), we obtain horizontal channel flows beneath the 660 km boundary as long as 1500 km within a timescale that resembles that of Hawaiian hotspot activity. This finding could help to explain the origin of the broad hot anomaly observed west of Hawaii. For a normal thermal anomaly of 450 K associated with a lower mantle plume, we obtain activation energies of about 400 kJ/mol and 670 kJ/mol for ∆ ηT = 10 2 and 10 3, respectively, in good agreement with

  16. Saltwater movement in the upper Floridan aquifer beneath Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barry S.

    1994-01-01

    Freshwater for Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, is supplied by withdrawals from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Freshwater for the nearby city of Savannah, Georgia, and for the industry that has grown adjacent to the city, has also been supplied, in part, by withdrawal from the Upper Floridan aquifer since 1885. The withdrawal of ground water has caused water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer to decline over a broad area, forming a cone of depression in the potentiometric surface of the aquifer centered near Savannah. In 1984, the cone of depression extended beneath Hilton Head Island as far as Port Royal Sound. Flow in the aquifer, which had previously been toward Port Royal Sound, has been reversed, and, as a result, saltwater in the aquifer beneath Port Royal Sound has begun to move toward Hilton Head Island. The Saturated-Unsaturated Transport (SUTRA) model of the U.S. Geological Survey was used for the simulation of density-dependent ground-water flow and solute transport for a vertical section of the Upper Floridan aquifer and upper confining unit beneath Hilton Head Island and Port Royal Sound. The model simulated a dynamic equilibrium between the flow of seawater and freshwater in the aquifer near the Gyben-Herzberg position estimated for the period before withdrawals began in 1885; it simulated reasonable movements of brackish water and saltwater from that position to the position determined by chemical analyses of samples withdrawn from the aquifer in 1984, and it approximated hydraulic heads measured in the aquifer in 1976 and 1984. The solute-transport simulations indicate that the transition zone would continue to move toward Hilton Head Island even if pumping ceased on the island. Increases in existing withdrawals or additional withdrawals on or near Hilton Head Island would accelerate movement of the transition zone toward the island, but reduction in withdrawals or the injection of freshwater would slow movement toward the island, according to the

  17. Radial viscous fingering of hot asthenosphere within the Icelandic plume beneath the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonman, C. M.; White, N. J.; Pritchard, D.

    2017-06-01

    The Icelandic mantle plume has had a significant influence on the geologic and oceanographic evolution of the North Atlantic Ocean during Cenozoic times. Full-waveform tomographic imaging of this region shows that the planform of this plume has a complex irregular shape with significant shear wave velocity anomalies lying beneath the lithospheric plates at a depth of 100-200 km. The distribution of these anomalies suggests that about five horizontal fingers extend radially beneath the fringing continental margins. The best-imaged fingers lie beneath the British Isles and beneath western Norway where significant departures from crustal isostatic equilibrium have been measured. Here, we propose that these radial fingers are generated by a phenomenon known as the Saffman-Taylor instability. Experimental and theoretical analyses show that fingering occurs when a less viscous fluid is injected into a more viscous fluid. In radial, miscible fingering, the wavelength and number of fingers are controlled by the mobility ratio (i.e. the ratio of viscosities), by the Péclet number (i.e. the ratio of advective and diffusive transport rates), and by the thickness of the horizontal layer into which fluid is injected. We combine shear wave velocity estimates with residual depth measurements around the Atlantic margins to estimate the planform distribution of temperature and viscosity within a horizontal asthenospheric layer beneath the lithospheric plate. Our estimates suggest that the mobility ratio is at least 20-50, that the Péclet number is O (104), and that the asthenospheric channel is 100 ± 20 km thick. The existence and planform of fingering is consistent with experimental observations and with theoretical arguments. A useful rule of thumb is that the wavelength of fingering is 5 ± 1 times the thickness of the horizontal layer. Our proposal has been further tested by examining plumes of different vigor and planform (e.g. Hawaii, Cape Verde, Yellowstone). Our results

  18. Seismic Velocity Structure of the Mantle beneath the Hawaiian Hotspot and Geodynamic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, C. J.; Laske, G.; Ballmer, M. D.; Ito, G.; Collins, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Rychert, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Data from the PLUME deployments of land and ocean bottom seismometers have provided unprecedented new constraints on regional seismic structure of the mantle beneath the Hawaiian Islands and motivated a new generation of geodynamic models for understanding hotspot origins. Three-dimensional finite-frequency body-wave tomographic images of S- and P-wave velocity structure reveal an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly beneath Hawaii that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a high-velocity anomaly in the shallow upper mantle that is parabolic in map view. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 km depth and extend into the topmost lower mantle southeast of Hawaii. Upper mantle structure from both S and P waves is asymmetric about the island chain, with lower velocities just southwest of the island of Hawaii and higher velocities to the east. Independent Rayleigh-wave tomography displays a similarly asymmetric structure in the lower lithosphere and asthenosphere, and also reveals a low-velocity anomaly (with horizontal dimensions of 100 by 300 km across and along the chain, respectively) beneath the hotspot swell that reaches to depths of at least 140 km. Shear-wave splitting observations dominantly reflect fossil lithospheric anisotropy, although a signature of asthenospheric flow also may be resolvable. S-to-P receiver function imaging of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary suggests shoaling from 100 km west of Hawaii to 80 km beneath the island, a pattern consistent with results from Rayleigh wave imaging. In terms of mantle plume geodynamic models, the broad upper-mantle low-velocity region beneath the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the "diverging pancake" at the top of the upwelling zone; the surrounding region of high velocities could represent a downwelling curtain of relatively cool sublithospheric material; and the low-velocity anomalies southeast of Hawaii in the transition zone and

  19. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven G.; Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Netea, Mihai G.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C); heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF); eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1β production

  20. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB. There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C; heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF; eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1

  1. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven G; Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Netea, Mihai G; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C); heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF); eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1β production

  2. Preliminary assessment of a previously unknown fault zone beneath the Daytona Beach sand blow cluster near Marianna, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jackson K.; Williams, Robert; Stephenson, William J.; Tuttle, Martitia P.; Al-Shukri, Hadar

    2016-01-01

    We collected new high‐resolution P‐wave seismic‐reflection data to explore for possible faults beneath a roughly linear cluster of early to mid‐Holocene earthquake‐induced sand blows to the south of Marianna, Arkansas. The Daytona Beach sand blow deposits are located in east‐central Arkansas about 75 km southwest of Memphis, Tennessee, and about 80 km south of the southwestern end of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). Previous studies of these sand blows indicate that they were produced between 10,500 and 5350 yr B.P. (before A.D. 1950). The sand blows are large and similar in size to those in the heart of the NMSZ produced by the 1811–1812 earthquakes. The seismic‐reflection profiles reveal a previously unknown zone of near‐vertical faults imaged in the 100–1100‐m depth range that are approximately coincident with a cluster of earthquake‐induced sand blows and a near‐linear surface lineament composed of air photo tonal anomalies. These interpreted faults are expressed as vertical discontinuities with the largest displacement fault showing about 40 m of west‐side‐up displacement at the top of the Paleozoic section at about 1100 m depth. There are about 20 m of folding on reflections within the Eocene strata at 400 m depth. Increasing fault displacement with depth suggests long‐term recurrent faulting. The imaged faults within the vicinity of the numerous sand blow features could be a causative earthquake source, although it does not rule out the possibility of other seismic sources nearby. These newly located faults add to a growing list of potentially active Pleistocene–Holocene faults discovered over the last two decades that are within the Mississippi embayment region but outside of the historical NMSZ.

  3. Imaging of upper crustal structure beneath East Java-Bali, Indonesia with ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Cummins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Sri Widiyantoro; Masturyono

    2017-12-01

    The complex geological structures in East Java and Bali provide important opportunities for natural resource exploitation, but also harbor perils associated with natural disasters. Such a condition makes the East Java region an important area for exploration of the subsurface seismic wave velocity structure, especially in its upper crust. We employed the ambient noise tomography method to image the upper crustal structure under this study area. We used seismic data recorded at 24 seismographs of BMKG spread over East Java and Bali. In addition, we installed 28 portable seismographs in East Java from April 2013 to January 2014 for 2-8 weeks, and we installed an additional 28 seismographs simultaneously throughout East Java from August 2015 to April 2016. We constructed inter-station Rayleigh wave Green's functions through cross-correlations of the vertical component of seismic noise recordings at 1500 pairs of stations. We used the Neighborhood Algorithm to construct depth profiles of shear wave velocity (Vs). The main result obtained from this study is the thickness of sediment cover. East Java's southern mountain zone is dominated by higher Vs, the Kendeng basin in the center is dominated by very low Vs, and the Rembang zone (to the North of Kendeng zone) is associated with medium Vs. The existence of structures with oil and gas potential in the Kendeng and Rembang zones can be identified by low Vs.

  4. Natural Childbirth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold, ice Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Natural Childbirth KidsHealth > For Parents > Natural Childbirth Print A A ... the pain, extremely empowering and rewarding. About Natural Childbirth Natural childbirth is a "low-tech" way of ...

  5. The Local Beneath the National and Global - Institutional Education, Credentialed Natural Resource Management (NRM) and Rural Community (Un) Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of strategies for national and global outcomes has in some instances left rural community resources and practices devalued and disturbed and rural people demoralised with the result that local community sustainability has been compromised. Formal education in Australia is about many things, but is rarely sympathetic towards…

  6. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  7. Effect of osmotic dehydration of olives as pre-fermentation treatment and partial substitution of sodium chloride by monosodium glutamate in the fermentation profile of Kalamata natural black olives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatsou, Stamatoula; Iliopoulos, Vasilis; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Gogou, Eleni; Oikonomopoulou, Vasiliki; Krokida, Magdalini; Taoukis, Petros; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the effect of osmotic dehydration of Kalamata natural black olives as pre-fermentation treatment in combination with partial substitution of NaCl by monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the fermentation profile of olives. Osmotic dehydration was undertaken by immersing the olives in 70% (w/w) glucose syrup overnight at room temperature. Further on, three different mixtures of NaCl and MSG with/without prior osmotic dehydration of olives were investigated, namely (i) 6.65% NaCl - 0.35% MSG (5% substitution), (ii) 6.30% NaCl - 0.70% MSG (10% substitution), (iii) 5.95% NaCl - 1.05% MSG (15% substitution), and (iv) 7% NaCl without osmotic dehydration (control treatment). Changes in the microbial association (lactic acid bacteria [LAB], yeasts, Enterobacteriaceae), pH, titratable acidity, organic acids, sugars, and volatile compounds in the brine were analyzed for a period of 4 months. The final product was subjected to sensory analysis and the content of MSG in olives was determined. Results demonstrated that osmotic dehydration of olives prior to brining led to vigorous lactic acid processes as indicated by the obtained values of pH (3.7-4.1) and acidity (0.7-0.8%) regardless of the amount of MSG used. However, in non-osmotically dehydrated olives, the highest substitution level of MSG resulted in a final pH (4.5) that was beyond specification for this type of olives. MSG was degraded in the brines being almost completely converted to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the end of fermentation. Finally, the sensory assessment of fermented olives with/without osmotic dehydration and at all levels of MSG did not show any deviation compared to the control treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  9. Upper mantle compositional variations and discontinuity topography imaged beneath Australia from Bayesian inversion of surface-wave phase velocities and thermochemical modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, A.; Zunino, Andrea; Deschamps, F.

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss the nature of velocity heterogeneities seen in seismic tomography images of Earth's mantle whose origins and relation to thermochemical variations are yet to be understood. We illustrate this by inverting fundamental-mode and higher-order surface-wave phase velocities for radial...... inference approach whereby robust uncertainty estimates are obtained. We find that both compositional and thermal anomalies are required if observations are to be satisfied. Mantle thermochemical variations extend to 250 km depth beneath western and central Australia and are characterized by increased Mg....../Fe and Mg/Si values relative to surrounding mantle. Correlated herewith are thermal variations that closely follow surface tectonics. We also observe a strong contribution to lateral variations in structure and topography across the “410 km” seismic discontinuity from thermochemically induced phase...

  10. Perfil eletroforético das proteínas séricas de frangos de corte alimentados com dietas contendo aflatoxinas e/ou argila clinoptilolita natural Electrophoresis profile of serum proteins in broilers fed with diets containing aflatoxins and/or natural clinoptilolite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Marinho Maciel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar o perfil eletroforético das proteínas séricas de frangos de corte alimentados com dietas contendo aflatoxinas e/ou argila clinoptilolita natural. Foram utilizados 528 frangos de corte, machos, da linhagem Ross, distribuídos em seis tratamentos com 4 repetições cada: T1 - testemunha (ração sem aflatoxinas ou clinoptilolita, T2 - ração com 5ppm de aflatoxinas, T3 - ração com 0,25% de clinoptilolita, T4 - ração com 5ppm de aflatoxinas e 0,25% de clinoptilolita, T5 - ração com 0,5% de clinoptilolita e T6 - ração com 5ppm de aflatoxinas e 0,5% de clinoptilolita. Os animais ficaram alojados em 24 boxes, e submetidos aos tratamentos do 1° ao 42° dia, quando foram sacrificados. Foram analisadas as proteínas totais, as frações albumina, alfa 1, alfa 2, beta e gama. Com exceção das médias da fração gama, o teste de Tukey revelou diferenças significativas (PThis study was aimed at evaluating the electrophoresis profile of serum protein in broilers fed with diets containing aflatoxins and natural clinoptilolite clay. Five hundred and twenty eight male broilers Ross were distributed in six treatments and each one with 4 replications: T1 - control (without aflatoxins or clinoptilolite, T2 -5ppm of aflatoxins, T3 -0.25% of clinoptilolite, T4 -5ppm of aflatoxins and 0.25% of clinoptilolite, T5 -0.5% of clinoptilolite and T6 - 5ppm of aflatoxins and 0.5% of clinoptilolite. The broilers were allocated in 24 boxes and submitted to a treatments for 42 days, when they were slaughtered. Total proteins, albumin fractions, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta and gamma were analyzed. Except gamma fraction the Tukey test showed differences (P<0.05 on serum total proteins and proteins fractions in all treatments which aflatoxin was present. The clinoptilolite did not modify (P<0.05 the serum proteins. The control broilers fed with diets containing aflatoxins and clinoptilolite presented low levels (P<0.05 of

  11. Layered anisotropy within the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, C. P.; Zhao, L.; Deschamps, F.; Chen, Q.-F.

    2016-10-01

    Continental rifting during the Oligocene to mid-Miocene caused the opening of the Sea of Japan and the separation between the Japanese Islands and the Eurasian Plate. The tectonic evolution in the Sea of Japan is important for understanding the evolution of back-arc regions in active convergent margins. Here, we use data from the seismic stations surrounding the Sea of Japan to map the Rayleigh-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath the Sea of Japan. We explore the variations of Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity beneath the Sea of Japan in a broad period range (30-80 s). Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves are measured by the two-station technique for a total of 231 interstation paths using vertical-component broad-band waveforms at 22 seismic stations around the Sea of Japan from 1411 global earthquakes. The resulting maps of Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy allow the examination of azimuthal anisotropy at specific periods. They exhibit several regions with different isotropic and anisotropic patterns: the Japan Basin displays fast velocities at shorter periods (30 and 40 s) with NNE-SSW anisotropy, whereas at 60 s and longer, the velocities become slow even if the anisotropy remains NE-SW; the East China Sea shows fast velocities at all periods (30-80 s) with constant NW-SE anisotropy. Trench-normal anisotropy beneath the Japanese Islands is found at short periods (30-40 s) and become trench-parallel at periods of 60 s and longer. Overall, our model resolves two layers of anisotropy, the shallowest and deepest layers being potentially related to frozen deformation due to recent geodynamic events, and asthenospheric flow, respectively.

  12. Crustal structure beneath Beijing and its surrounding regions derived from gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingfa; Lu, Xiaocui; Lu, Jing

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we use gravity data to study fine crustal structure and seismogenic environment beneath Beijing and its surrounding regions. Multi-scale wavelet analysis method is applied to separating gravity fields. Logarithmic power spectrum method is also used to calculate depth of gravity field source. The results show that the crustal structure is very complicated beneath Beijing and its surrounding areas. The crustal density exhibits laterally inhomogeneous. There are three large scale tectonic zones in North China, i.e., WNW-striking Zhangjiakou-Bohai tectonic zone (ZBTZ), NE-striking Taihang piedmont tectonic zone (TPTZ) and Cangxian tectonic zone (CTZ). ZBTZ and TPTZ intersect with each other beneath Beijing area and both of them cut through the lithosphere. The upper and middle crusts consist of many small-scale faults, uplifts and depressions. In the lower crust, these small-scale tectonic units disappear gradually, and they are replaced by large-scale tectonic units. In surrounding regions of Beijing, ZBTZ intersects with several other NE-striking tectonic units, such as Cangxian uplift, Jizhong depression and Shanxi Graben System (SGS). In west of Taihangshan uplift, gravity anomalies in upper and middle crusts are correlated with geological and topographic features on the surface. Compared with the crust, the structure is comparatively simple in uppermost mantle. Earthquakes mainly occurred in upper and middle crusts, especially in transitional regions between high gravity anomaly and low gravity anomaly. Occurrence of large earthquakes may be related to the upwelling of upper mantle and asthenosphere heat flow materials, such as Sanhe earthquake ( M S8.0) and Tangshan earthquake ( M S7.8).

  13. Constraints on the anisotropic contributions to velocity discontinuities at ∼60 km depth beneath the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychert, Catherine A; Harmon, Nicholas

    2017-08-01

    Strong, sharp, negative seismic discontinuities, velocity decreases with depth, are observed beneath the Pacific seafloor at ∼60 km depth. It has been suggested that these are caused by an increase in radial anisotropy with depth, which occurs in global surface wave models. Here we test this hypothesis in two ways. We evaluate whether an increase in surface wave radial anisotropy with depth is robust with synthetic resolution tests. We do this by fitting an example surface wave data set near the East Pacific Rise. We also estimate the apparent isotropic seismic velocity discontinuities that could be caused by changes in radial anisotropy in S-to-P and P-to-S receiver functions and SS precursors using synthetic seismograms. We test one model where radial anisotropy is caused by olivine alignment and one model where it is caused by compositional layering. The result of our surface wave inversion suggests strong shallow azimuthal anisotropy beneath 0-10 Ma seafloor, which would also have a radial anisotropy signature. An increase in radial anisotropy with depth at 60 km depth is not well-resolved in surface wave models, and could be artificially observed. Shallow isotropy underlain by strong radial anisotropy could explain moderate apparent velocity drops (<6%) in SS precursor imaging, but not receiver functions. The effect is diminished if strong anisotropy also exists at 0-60 km depth as suggested by surface waves. Overall, an increase in radial anisotropy with depth may not exist at 60 km beneath the oceans and does not explain the scattered wave observations.

  14. A journey to the seismic low velocity zone beneath the ocean (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    The seismic low velocity zone (LVZ), first proposed by Beno Gutenberg, is an enigmatic layer of the Earth that has been drawing attention of earth scientists, most-likely because of its close association with the asthenosphere that enables plate motions in the plate tectonics context. "A journey to the LVZ", therefore, is equivalent to a journey to elucidate the lithosphere-asthenosphere system (LAS) beneath the ocean (at least that is what I mean by this title). Plate tectonics started as a theory of ocean basins nearly 50 years ago, but the mechanical details of how it works are still highly debated. It has been hampered partly by our inability to characterize the physical properties of the LAS beneath the ocean. I will discuss existing observational constraints, including our own results, on the physical properties of the LAS for normal oceanic regions, where plate tectonics is expected to present its simplest form. While a growing number of seismic data on land have provided remarkable advances in large scale pictures, seafloor observations have been shedding new light on the essential details. Particularly, recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire LAS, from the surface to a depth of 200km, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal), with deployments of 15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers for 1 2 years. We have thus succeeded to model the entire oceanic LAS without a priori assumption for the shallow-most structure, the assumption often made for the global surface wave tomography. I hope to convince the audience that we are now at an exciting stage that a large-scale array experiment in the ocean (e.g., Pacific Array: http://eri-ndc.eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp/PacificArray/) is becoming approachable to elucidate the enigma of the LVZ, thus the lithosphere-asthenosphere system, beneath the ocean.

  15. Lithospheric and sublithospheric anisotropy beneath the Baltic shield from surface-wave array analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Helle A.; Bruneton, Marianne; Maupin, Valérie; Svekalapko Seismic Tomography Working Group

    2006-04-01

    We report measurements of radial and azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath southern and central Finland, which we obtained by array analysis of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love waves. Azimuthally averaged phase velocities were analysed in the period range 15 to 190 s for Rayleigh waves and 15 to 100 s for Love waves. The azimuthal variation of the Rayleigh wave phase velocities was obtained in the period range 20 to 100 s. The limited depth resolution of fundamental-mode surface waves necessitated strong damping constraints in the inversion for anisotropic parameters. We investigated the effects of non-unicity on the final model by experimenting with varying model geometries. The radial anisotropy beneath Finland can be explained by a lithosphere at least 200 km thick, predominantly (> 50% by volume) composed of olivine crystals having their a-axes randomly distributed in the horizontal plane. On the contrary, the measured lithospheric azimuthal anisotropy is small. This can be reconciled with body-wave observations made in the area that indicate a complex pattern of rapidly varying anisotropy. Below 200-250 km depth, that is below the petrologic lithosphere as revealed by xenolith analyses conducted in the area, the magnitude of the azimuthal anisotropy increases and would be compatible with a mantle containing 15-20% by volume of olivine crystals whose a-axes are coherently aligned in the N-NE direction. The alignment of the a-axes is off the direction of present-day absolute plate motion in either the no-net-rotation or hot-spot reference frame, currently N55-N60. We interpret this mismatch as evidence for a complex convective flow pattern of the mantle beneath the shield, which, by inference, is decoupled from the overlying lithosphere.

  16. Potential subglacial lake locations and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C. D.; Woodward, J.; Kingslake, J.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Shreve hydraulic potential equation as a simplified approach to investigate potential subglacial lake locations and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. We validate the method by demonstrating its ability to recall the locations of >60% of the known subglacial lakes beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. This is despite uncertainty in the ice-sheet bed elevation and our simplified modelling approach. However, we predict many more lakes than are observed. Hence we suggest that thousands of subglacial lakes remain to be found. Applying our technique to the Greenland Ice Sheet, where very few subglacial lakes have so far been observed, recalls 1607 potential lake locations, covering 1.2% of the bed. Our results will therefore provide suitable targets for geophysical surveys aimed at identifying lakes beneath Greenland. We also apply the technique to modelled past ice-sheet configurations and find that during deglaciation both ice sheets likely had more subglacial lakes at their beds. These lakes, inherited from past ice-sheet configurations, would not form under current surface conditions, but are able to persist, suggesting a retreating ice-sheet will have many more subglacial lakes than advancing ones. We also investigate subglacial drainage pathways of the present-day and former Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Key sectors of the ice sheets, such as the Siple Coast (Antarctica) and NE Greenland Ice Stream system, are suggested to have been susceptible to subglacial drainage switching. We discuss how our results impact our understanding of meltwater drainage, basal lubrication and ice-stream formation.

  17. A Simple Diagnostic Model of the Circulation Beneath an Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Adrian; Nøst, Ole Anders

    2017-04-01

    The ocean circulation beneath ice shelves supplies the heat required to melt ice and exports the resulting freshwater. It therefore plays a key role in determining the mass balance and geometry of the ice shelves and hence the restraint they impose on the outflow of grounded ice from the interior of the ice sheet. Despite this critical role in regulating the ice sheet's contribution to eustatic sea level, an understanding of some of the most basic features of the circulation is lacking. The conventional paradigm is one of a buoyancy-forced overturning circulation, with inflow of warm, salty water along the seabed and outflow of cooled and freshened waters along the ice base. However, most sub-ice-shelf cavities are broad relative to the internal Rossby radius, so a horizontal circulation accompanies the overturning. Primitive equation ocean models applied to idealised geometries produce cyclonic gyres of comparable magnitude, but in the absence of a theoretical understanding of what controls the gyre strength, those solutions can only be validated against each other. Furthermore, we have no understanding of how the gyre circulation should change given more complex geometries. To begin to address this gap in our theoretical understanding we present a simple, linear, steady-state model for the circulation beneath an ice shelf. Our approach in analogous to that of Stommel's classic analysis of the wind-driven gyres, but is complicated by the fact that his most basic assumption of homogeneity is inappropriate. The only forcing on the flow beneath an ice shelf arises because of the horizontal density gradients set up by melting. We thus arrive at a diagnostic model which gives us the depth-dependent horizontal circulation that results from an imposed geometry and density distribution. We describe the development of the model and present some preliminary solutions for the simplest cavity geometries.

  18. Receiver function imaging of upper mantle complexity beneath the Pacific Northwest, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Kevin C.; Fouch, Matthew J.; James, David E.

    2010-08-01

    Small-scale topographic variations on the upper mantle seismic discontinuities provide important constraints on the thermal influences of upwellings and downwellings in geodynamically complex regions. Subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate and other tectonic processes dominating the Pacific Northwest, United States in the Cenozoic involve massive thermal flux that likely result in an upper mantle that has strong 3-D temperature variations. We address the interaction of such processes in the region using receiver functions to image the upper mantle seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km. We utilized over 15 000 high quality receiver functions gathered from 294 teleseismic earthquakes recorded at 277 regional broadband seismic stations, primarily those of the Earthscope/USArray Transportable Array. We find the average depths of the discontinuities to be 412 km and 658 km, respectively, with no obvious 520 km discontinuity detected. The peak-to-peak range is greater on the '410' than the '660', suggesting the possibility of more significant regional dynamic processes at upper mantle depths. Our results are not consistent with a mantle plume below central Oregon in the High Lava Plains region. Our observation of a thinner transition zone beneath the western Snake River Plain region, however, is consistent with a regional increase in mantle temperatures, perhaps due to either asthenospheric flow from beneath and around the southern edge of the Juan de Fuca plate, or to vertical flow in the form of regional mantle upwelling related to the Snake River Plain / Yellowstone hotspot track. Further, our results are not consistent with a simple subducting Juan de Fuca slab morphology, but rather suggest similar levels of significant complexity in slab structure found by recent regional tomographic studies. We find evidence for a thickened and therefore cooler mantle transition zone beneath the Wallowa / Idaho Batholith region, consistent with tomographic models which suggest

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-07-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS worked with a builder of single- and multifamily homes in southwestern Pennsylvania (climate zone 5) to understand its methods of successfully using polyethylene sheeting over aggregate as a capillary break beneath the slab in new construction. This builder’s homes vary in terms of whether they have crawlspaces or basements. However, in both cases, the strategy protects the home from water intrusion via capillary action (e.g., water wicking into cracks and spaces in the slab), thereby helping to preserve the durability of the home.

  20. Lithospheric structure beneath the Northwest Iran using Ps and Sp converted waves

    OpenAIRE

    F. T. Farahmand; Forough Sodoudi

    2009-01-01

    We compute P and S receiver functions to investigate the crustal and lithospheric thickness as well as the Vp/Vs ratio beneath the Northwest of Iran and map out the lateral variations of these discontinuities under this region.We selected data from teleseismic events (Mb ≥ 5.5, epicentral distance between 30°-95° for P receiver functions and Mb > 5.7, epicentral distance between 60°-85° for S receiver functions) recorded since 1995 to present at 8 three component short period stations from Ta...

  1. Large-scale trench-normal mantle flow beneath central South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rümpker, G.; Wölbern, I.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropic properties of the fore-arc region of the central Andean margin between 17-25°S by analyzing shear-wave splitting from teleseismic and local earthquakes from the Nazca slab. With partly over ten years of recording time, the data set is uniquely suited to address the long-standing debate about the mantle flow field at the South American margin and in particular whether the flow field beneath the slab is parallel or perpendicular to the trench. Our measurements suggest two anisotropic layers located within the crust and mantle beneath the stations, respectively. The teleseismic measurements show a moderate change of fast polarizations from North to South along the trench ranging from parallel to subparallel to the absolute plate motion and, are oriented mostly perpendicular to the trench. Shear-wave splitting measurements from local earthquakes show fast polarizations roughly aligned trench-parallel but exhibit short-scale variations which are indicative of a relatively shallow origin. Comparisons between fast polarization directions from local earthquakes and the strike of the local fault systems yield a good agreement. To infer the parameters of the lower anisotropic layer we employ an inversion of the teleseismic waveforms based on two-layer models, where the anisotropy of the upper (crustal) layer is constrained by the results from the local splitting. The waveform inversion yields a mantle layer that is best characterized by a fast axis parallel to the absolute plate motion which is more-or-less perpendicular to the trench. This orientation is likely caused by a combination of the fossil crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine within the slab and entrained mantle flow beneath the slab. The anisotropy within the crust of the overriding continental plate is explained by the shape-preferred orientation of micro-cracks in relation to local fault zones which are oriented parallel to the overall strike of the Andean range. Our

  2. Deep groundwater and potential subsurface habitats beneath an Antarctic dry valley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikucki, J. A.; Auken, E.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of groundwater in Antarctica, particularly in the ice-free regions and along the coastal margins is poorly understood. Here we use an airborne transient electromagnetic (AEM) sensor to produce extensive imagery of resistivity beneath Taylor Valley. Regional-scale zones of low...... subsurface resistivity were detected that are inconsistent with the high resistivity of glacier ice or dry permafrost in this region. We interpret these results as an indication that liquid, with sufficiently high solute content, exists at temperatures well below freezing and considered within the range...

  3. Small subsidence of the 660-km discontinuity beneath Japan probed by ScS reverberations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mamoru; Misawa, Mika; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    We investigate layering structure in the mantle beneath Japan using ScS reverberation waveforms of two recent large deep events in the northwest Pacific. We estimate regional variation of the elastic and anelastic structure of the mantle as well as properties of the major velocity discontinuities by modeling broadband seismograms recorded at two dense networks, J-Array and FREESIA. The 660-km discontinuity is the deepest in the region where the stagnant subducting slab in the transition zone is tomographically imaged, but the subsidence is of ∼10 km, much smaller than previous estimates with SS precursors. No significant elevation is detected for the 410-km discontinuity.

  4. Geometry of the Main Himalayan Thrust and Moho beneath Satluj valley, northwest Himalaya: Constraints from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Devajit; Wadhawan, Monika; Paul, Arpita; Kumar, Naresh; Borah, Kajaljyoti

    2017-04-01

    Crustal configuration beneath the Satluj valley region of the northwest Himalaya has been studied with the help of receiver function analysis of teleseismic earthquakes recorded by 18 broadband seismological stations. These stations were located on diverse geotectonic units from the Himalayan foreland basin in the south to the Tethyan Himalaya (TH) in the north. A gentle north dipping structure of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) is imaged between the Sub and Higher Himalaya in contrast to the reported ramp structure of the MHT beneath the Garhwal and Nepal Himalaya. The ramp structure is, however, identified further north, beyond the South Tibetan Detachment in Satluj valley. The depth of the MHT varies from 16 to 27 km across the Sub, Lesser, and Higher Himalaya, and it increases to 38 km beneath the TH forming a ramp. This is significantly a different structure of the MHT beneath the Satluj valley, which is attributed to the effect of underthrusting Delhi-Hardwar Ridge, a transverse structure to the Himalayan arc. Conspicuously, no strong or large earthquake is observed during 1964-2015 in this segment of the Himalayan Seismic Belt. The RF modeling, on the other hand, shows 44 km crustal thickness beneath the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT), and it gradually increases to 62 km beneath the TH. Low shear wave velocity ( 0.8-1.8 km s-1) is observed in the uppermost 3-4 km of the crust beneath the stations near the HFT, which may be the effect of the sedimentary column of the Indo-Gangetic Plain.

  5. Mantle Flow and Melting Beneath Young Oceanic Lithosphere: Seismic Studies of the Galapagos Archipelago and the Juan de Fuca Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Joseph Stephen

    In this dissertation, I use seismic imaging techniques to constrain the physical state of the upper mantle beneath regions of young oceanic lithosphere. Mantle convection is investigated beneath the Galapagos Archipelago and then beneath the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate, with a focus on the JdF and Gorda Ridges before turning to the off-axis asthenosphere. In the Galapagos Archipelago, S-to-p receiver functions reveal a discontinuity in seismic velocity that is attributed to the dehydration of the upper mantle. The depth at which dehydration occurs is shown to be consistent with prior constraints on mantle temperature. A comparison between results from receiver functions, seismic tomography and petrology shows that mantle upwelling and melt generation occur shallower than the depth of the discontinuity, despite the expectation of high viscosities in the dehydrated layer. Beneath the JdF and Gorda Ridge, low Vs anomalies are too large to be explained by the cooling of the lithosphere and are attributed to partial melt. The asymmetry, large Vs gradients, and sinuosity of the anomalies beneath the JdF Ridge are consistent with models of buoyancy-driven upwelling. However, deformation zone processes appear to dominate mantle flow over seafloor spreading beneath the Explorer and Gorda diffuse plate boundaries. Finally, S-to-p receiver functions reveal a seismic discontinuity beneath the JdF plate that can only be attributed to seismic anisotropy. Synthesis of the receiver function results with prior SKS splitting results requires heterogeneous anisotropy between the crust and the discontinuity. Models of anisotropy feature increasing anisotropy before the decrease at the discontinuity, but well below the base of the lithosphere, and a clockwise rotation of the fast direction with increasing depth. In these results and even in the SKS splitting results, additional driving mechanisms for mantle flow such as density or pressure anomalies are required.

  6. Observations and modeling of ocean-induced melt beneath Petermann Glacier Ice Shelf in northwestern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Cilan; Rignot, Eric; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Nakayama, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    We update observationally based estimates of subaqueous melt, Qm, beneath Petermann Glacier Ice Shelf (PGIS), Greenland, and model its sensitivity to oceanic thermal forcing, TF, and subglacial runoff, Qsg, using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), in a two-dimensional domain, with 20 m vertical and 40 m horizontal resolution at the grounding line. We adjust the drag coefficient to match the observationally based Qm. With the inclusion of Qsg, the maximum melt rate (Qmmax) is 2 times larger in summer and 1/3 larger annually than in winter. Qmmax increases above linear with TF and below linear with Qsg. We estimate that Qmmax increased by 24% (+8.1 m/yr) beneath PGIS from the 1990s to the 2000s from a 0.21°C warming in ocean temperature and a doubling in Qsg, hence contributing to its thinning. If the PGIS is removed, we estimate that the modeled melt rate near the grounding line will increase 13-16 times.

  7. Probing seismic anisotropy in the lowermost mantle beneath the Central Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisconti, Angelo; Thomas, Christine; Wookey, James

    2017-04-01

    The D" region, the lowermost part of the Earth's mantle, exhibits complex structures which have been related to slabs graveyard and birth place of uprising plumes all through the mantle. These structures are likely due to flow in the mantle and investigating the anisotropy can help to determine flow and mineralogy of the D". Azimuthal anisotropy, rather than simple vertical transverse isotropy, have been recently detected using either shear wave splitting or polarities from reflected waves from the D" discontinuity. In this work, we use both methods in order to better constrain anisotropy and deformation in the lowermost mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean. We find a reflector in the lowermost mantle that shows a complex pattern in reflected wave polarities that in some cases travel out-of-plane. Applying ScS-S differential splitting method, we also detect a tilted fast polarization. Back projecting waves to their original bounce points, modelling out of plane waves, finding cross paths and modelling of anisotropy, will help us to better understand structure and flow of the lowermost mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Shear wave splitting measurements and interpretation beneath Acapulco-Tampico transect in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubailo, I.; Davis, P.

    2007-12-01

    We have examined shear wave splitting in teleseismic shear waves from 100 broadband stations installed from Acapulco to Tampico in Mexico over a period of 1.5 years (2005-2007). The instruments were part of the MASE (Middle America Subduction Experiment) which has the objective to build a geodynamical model of the subduction process beneath the Middle America Trench. The stations had a 5-6 km spacing and provided a unique data set which allows examination of the variation in splitting in high detail. Tomographic and receiver function studies in this area (done by MASE colleagues) show the presence of a flat slab under the western part of the array, and a steeply dipping slab beneath its center. According to geochronological data, the onset of flat slab subduction took place ~15-20 Ma, after the Cocos plate broke off the Farallon plate. We observe large splitting delay times with, on average, a fast direction in the northeast-southwest direction, but with considerable variation along the network. We compare the splitting results with the three dimensional structure inferred from the geochemistry and seismic analyses.

  9. Effect of partially demineralized dentin beneath the hybrid layer on dentin-adhesive interface micromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Luersen, Marco Antonio; Janal, Malvin; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-02-26

    To investigate the presence of non-infiltrated, partially demineralized dentin (PDD) beneath the hybrid layer for self-etch adhesive systems, and its effect on micromechanical behavior of dentin-adhesive interfaces (DAIs). This in-vitro laboratory and computer simulation study hypothesized that the presence of non-infiltrated PDD beneath the hybrid layer does not influence the mechanical behavior of the DAI of self-etch adhesive systems. Fifteen sound third molars were restored with composite resin using three adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Adper Promp L-Pop (APLP). The thickness and length of all DAIs were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, and used to generate three-dimensional finite element models. Elastic moduli of the hybrid layer, adhesive layer, intertubular dentin, peritubular dentin and resin tags were acquired using a nano-indenter. Finite element software was used to determine the maximum principal stress. Mixed models analysis of variance was used to verify statistical differences (Padhesive systems, as well as the presence and extension of PDD. Both self-etch adhesive systems (APLP and CSEB) had PDD. The DAI stress levels were higher for the one-step self-etch adhesive system (APLP) compared with the etch-and-rinse adhesive system (SBMP) and the self-etch primer system (CSEB). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of latent bloodstains beneath painted surfaces using reflected infrared photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Andrew; Porter, Glenn; Renshaw, Adrian

    2012-09-01

    Bloodstain evidence is a highly valued form of physical evidence commonly found at scenes involving violent crimes. However, painting over bloodstains will often conceal this type of evidence. There is limited research in the scientific literature that describes methods of detecting painted-over bloodstains. This project employed a modified digital single-lens reflex camera to investigate the effectiveness of infrared (IR) photography in detecting latent bloodstain evidence beneath a layer or multiple layers of paint. A qualitative evaluation was completed by comparing images taken of a series of samples using both IR and standard (visible light) photography. Further quantitative image analysis was used to verify the findings. Results from this project indicate that bloodstain evidence can be detected beneath up to six layers of paint using reflected IR; however, the results vary depending on the characteristics of the paint. This technique provides crime scene specialists with a new field method to assist in locating, visualizing, and documenting painted-over bloodstain evidence. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Slab melting beneath the Cascades Arc driven by dehydration of altered oceanic peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, Kristina J; Wallace, Paul J.; Hauri, E.H.; Wada, I.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Water is returned to Earth’s interior at subduction zones. However, the processes and pathways by which water leaves the subducting plate and causes melting beneath volcanic arcs are complex; the source of the water—subducting sediment, altered oceanic crust, or hydrated mantle in the downgoing plate—is debated; and the role of slab temperature is unclear. Here we analyse the hydrogen-isotope and trace-element signature of melt inclusions in ash samples from the Cascade Arc, where young, hot lithosphere subducts. Comparing these data with published analyses, we find that fluids in the Cascade magmas are sourced from deeper parts of the subducting slab—hydrated mantle peridotite in the slab interior—compared with fluids in magmas from the Marianas Arc, where older, colder lithosphere subducts. We use geodynamic modelling to show that, in the hotter subduction zone, the upper crust of the subducting slab rapidly dehydrates at shallow depths. With continued subduction, fluids released from the deeper plate interior migrate into the dehydrated parts, causing those to melt. These melts in turn migrate into the overlying mantle wedge, where they trigger further melting. Our results provide a physical model to explain melting of the subducted plate and mass transfer from the slab to the mantle beneath arcs where relatively young oceanic lithosphere is subducted.

  12. Strong lateral variations of lithospheric mantle beneath cratons - Example from the Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, H. A.; Debayle, E.; Maupin, V.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms for creation and evolution of Precambrian continental lithosphere requires to go beyond the large-scale seismic imaging in which shields often appear as laterally homogeneous, with a thick and fast lithosphere. We here present new results from a seismic experiment (POLENET-LAPNET) in the northern part of the Baltic Shield where we identify very high seismic velocities (Vs˜4.7 km/s) in the upper part of the mantle lithosphere and a velocity decrease of ˜0.2 km/s at approximately 150 km depth. We interpret this velocity decrease as refertilisation of the lower part of the lithosphere. This result is in contrast to the lithospheric structure immediately south of the study area, where the seismic velocities within the lithosphere are fast down to 250 km depth, as well as to that of southern Norway, where there is no indication of very high velocities in the lithospheric mantle (Vs of ˜4.4 km/s). While the relatively low velocities beneath southern Norway can tentatively be attributed to the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, the velocity decrease beneath northern Finland is not easily explained with present knowledge of surface tectonics. Our results show that shield areas may be laterally heterogeneous even over relatively short distances. Such variability may in many cases be related to lithosphere erosion and/or refertilisation at the edge of cratons, which may therefore be particularly interesting targets for seismic imaging.

  13. Ambient noise adjoint tomography of the crust beneath the eastern Tibetan plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Xiong, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new shear wave speed model of the crust beneath the eastern Tibetan plateau based on ambient noise adjoint tomography method [Chen et al., 2014].Instead of taking an intermediate step of measuring the surface dispersion curves in the traditional ambient noise tomography, we directly minimize the frequency-dependent travel-time misfits between the synthetic Green's functionsand the observed (empirical) Green's functions of Rayleigh waves in the period range of 10-50 s, which are extracted from two-year ambient noise data from the vertical recordings of 109 stations in the eastern Tibetan margin. The 3-D Vsv model inverted from traditional ambient noise tomography [Yang et al., 2012] is used as the initial shear wave speed model in the ambient noise adjoint tomography. The wave speed model is iteratively updated and the final model is obtained after five iterations. Frequency dependent 3-D kernels that account for off-ray path sensitivities are calculated based on adjoint methods aided by a spectral-element numerical code. Compared to the initial shear wave speed model, our new model showsmuch stronger low shear wave speed anomalies with 10% to 15% reductions at depths 15 35 km beneath the Songpan-Ganzi and the Qiangtang blocks, and much sharper wave speed contrast (up to 20%) across the boundary between the Songpan-Ganzi block and the Qaidam basin. The implications of the correlations between crustal-depth shear wave speed anomalies and the surface geological features will be discussed.

  14. New images of the crustal structure beneath eastern Tibet from a high-density seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Tian, Xiaobo; Gao, Rui; Wang, Gaochun; Wu, Zhenbo; Zhou, Beibei; Tan, Ping; Nie, Shitan; Yu, Guiping; Zhu, Gaohua; Xu, Xiao

    2017-12-01

    An east-west trending, high-density seismic array was deployed along the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau to investigate its eastward expansion. The 160 km long array spans the Ruoergai basin, Minjiang fault, Minshan Mountains, Tazang fault, and West Qinling. The array included 330 short-period seismographs spaced at 500 m intervals, which recorded teleseismic 3-component waveforms over a one month period. P-wave receiver functions calculated from 35 teleseismic events provided an image of crustal structure. The results show a massive thrust nappe structure around the Minshan Mountains and beneath the Minjiang fault. We suggest that this nappe formed after the closure of the Paleo-Tethyan ocean. The resultant Triassic thrusting contributed to partial uplift of the eastern Ruoergai basin and the Minshan Mountains in middle-to-late Miocene time. Receiver function images show that the Tazang fault is a crustal-scale rupture cutting across the Moho. The western Tazang fault appears as a nearly vertical strike-slip fault accommodating left lateral shear at the terminus of the eastern Kunlun fault. After clockwise rotation from an approximate east-west orientation to a nearly north-south orientation, the eastern Tazang fault became a west-dipping thrust fault, which caused crustal thickening beneath the Minshan Mountains and the West Qinling. Our results suggest that late Cenozoic uplift of the eastern margin of the plateau is produced by eastward overthrusting and crustal shortening, processes that absorbed slip along the Tazang and Kunlun faults.

  15. Unusually thickened crust beneath the Emeishan large igneous province detected by virtual deep seismic sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Tian, Xiaobo; Chen, Yun; Xu, Tao; Bai, Zhiming; Liang, Xiaofeng; Iqbal, Javed; Xu, Yigang

    2017-11-01

    The Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in southwest China represents the erosional remnant of a vast basalt field emplaced during the Permian Period. Spanning 0.25 million km2, the ELIP occupies a relatively small area relative to other Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) such as the Siberian Traps and Ontong Java Plateau. The original volume of an ancient LIP can be constrained from estimates of its intrusive component. We used virtual deep seismic sounding (VDSS) to detect the boundary between the crust and the upper mantle (Moho) beneath the ELIP. A strong set of reflections from depths of 60-70 km indicate an unusually thick crust having a P-wave velocity of 7.0-7.4 km/s located beneath the inner zone of the ELIP. A high-velocity lower crustal body (HVLCB) of this thickness may have been formed by ponding magmas derived from the Emeishan mantle plume and associated fractionated materials. Combined images of crustal structure allow re-estimation of Emeishan magmatic volume. With a total estimated volume of 1.76-3.2 × 106 km3, the ELIP appears to have been a typical sized plume-generated LIP relative to other global examples.

  16. Structure beneath the Alboran from geodynamic flow models and seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Lisa A.; Miller, Meghan S.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Allam, Amir A.

    2013-08-01

    Upper mantle heterogeneity beneath the Alboran Sea (western Mediterranean) as inferred from seismology has been associated with a range of subduction and lithospheric delamination scenarios. However, better constraints on the deep dynamics of the region are needed to determine the cause and consequence of complex surface tectonics. Here, we use an improved set of shear wave splitting observations and a suite of mantle flow models to test a range of suggested structures. We find that the observed seismic anisotropy is best reproduced by mantle flow models that include a continuous, deeply extending slab beneath the Alboran which elongates along the Iberian margin from Granada to Gibraltar and curves southward toward the High Atlas. Other models with detached slabs, slabs with spatial gaps, or drip-like features produce results inconsistent with the splitting observations. SW-directed shear flow, when combined with sublithospheric deflection in response to a dense sinker, generates NNW-splitting orientations most similar to the patterns observed along Gibraltar. Slab viscosities of ˜250 times that of the upper mantle are preferred because they provide a balance between the poloidal flow induced by any sinker and toroidal flow induced by stiff slabs. The best match to anisotropy across the Atlas is a model with a stiff continental keel in northwestern Africa which deflects flow northward. Our results show that quantitative predictions of seismic anisotropy are useful in distinguishing the spatial and depth extent of regional density structures which may otherwise be ambiguous.

  17. Microbial oxidation as a methane sink beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Achberger, Amanda M.; Christner, Brent C.; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Priscu, John C.

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic habitats beneath ice masses contain active microbial ecosystems capable of cycling important greenhouse gases, such as methane (CH4). A large methane reservoir is thought to exist beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but its quantity, source and ultimate fate are poorly understood. For instance, O2 supplied by basal melting should result in conditions favourable for aerobic methane oxidation. Here we use measurements of methane concentrations and stable isotope compositions along with genomic analyses to assess the sources and cycling of methane in Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) in West Antarctica. We show that sub-ice-sheet methane is produced through the biological reduction of CO2 using H2. This methane pool is subsequently consumed by aerobic, bacterial methane oxidation at the SLW sediment-water interface. Bacterial oxidation consumes >99% of the methane and represents a significant methane sink, and source of biomass carbon and metabolic energy to the surficial SLW sediments. We conclude that aerobic methanotrophy may mitigate the release of methane to the atmosphere upon subglacial water drainage to ice sheet margins and during periods of deglaciation.

  18. Mantle upwelling beneath Madagascar: evidence from receiver function analysis and shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan D.; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2017-07-01

    Crustal receiver functions have been calculated from 128 events for two three-component broadband seismomenters located on the south coast (FOMA) and in the central High Plateaux (ABPO) of Madagascar. For each station, crustal thickness and V p / V s ratio were estimated from H- κ plots. Self-consistent receiver functions from a smaller back-azimuthal range were then selected, stacked and inverted to determine shear wave velocity structure as a function of depth. These results were corroborated by guided forward modeling and by Monte Carlo error analysis. The crust is found to be thinner (39 ± 0.7 km) beneath the highland center of Madagascar compared to the coast (44 ± 1.6 km), which is the opposite of what would be expected for crustal isostasy, suggesting that present-day long wavelength topography is maintained, at least in part, dynamically. This inference of dynamic support is corroborated by shear wave splitting analyses at the same stations, which produce an overwhelming majority of null results (>96 %), as expected for vertical mantle flow or asthenospheric upwelling beneath the island. These findings suggest a sub-plate origin for dynamic support.

  19. Anatomy of a meltwater drainage system beneath the ancestral East Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Lauren M.; Anderson, John B.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Prothro, Lindsay O.; Halberstadt, Anna Ruth W.; Stearns, Leigh A.; Pollard, David; Deconto, Robert M.

    2017-09-01

    Subglacial hydrology is critical to understand the behaviour of ice sheets, yet active meltwater drainage beneath contemporary ice sheets is rarely accessible to direct observation. Using geophysical and sedimentological data from the deglaciated western Ross Sea, we identify a palaeo-subglacial hydrological system active beneath an area formerly covered by the East Antarctic ice sheet. A long channel network repeatedly delivered meltwater to an ice stream grounding line and was a persistent pathway for episodic meltwater drainage events. Embayments within grounding-line landforms coincide with the location of subglacial channels, marking reduced sedimentation and restricted landform growth. Consequently, channelized drainage at the grounding line influenced the degree to which these landforms could provide stability feedbacks to the ice stream. The channel network was connected to upstream subglacial lakes in an area of geologically recent rifting and volcanism, where elevated heat flux would have produced sufficient basal melting to fill the lakes over decades to several centuries; this timescale is consistent with our estimates of the frequency of drainage events at the retreating grounding line. Based on these data, we hypothesize that ice stream dynamics in this region were sensitive to the underlying hydrological system.

  20. Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-KV Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jack Monroe, Jr.

    There is ongoing controversy about the possibility of adverse biological effects from environmental exposures to electric and magnetic fields. These fields are produced by all electrical equipment and appliances including electrical transmission lines. The objective of this environmental science study was to investigate the possible effects of a high voltage transmission line on domestic sheep (Ovis aries L.), a species that can often be found near such lines. The study was primarily designed to determine whether a specific effect of electric and magnetic fields found in laboratory animals also occurs in livestock under natural environmental conditions. The effect is the ability of fields, at levels found in the environment, to significantly depress the normally high nocturnal concentrations of the pineal hormone-melatonin. Ten female Suffolk lambs were penned for 10 months directly beneath a 500-kV transmission line near Estacada, Oregon. Ten other lambs of the same type were penned in a control area away from the transmission line where electric and magnetic fields were at ambient levels. Serum melatonin was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) from 6618 blood samples collected at 0.5 to 3-hour intervals over eight 48-hour periods. Serum progesterone was analyzed by RIA from blood samples collected twice weekly. Serum cortisol was also assayed by RIA from the blood samples collected during the 48-hour samples. Results showed that lambs in both the control and line groups had the typical pattern of melatonin secretion consisting of low daytime and high nighttime serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in melatonin levels, or in the phase or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation. Age at puberty and number of reproductive cycles also did not differ between groups. Serum cortisol showed a circadian rhythm with highest concentrations during the day. There were, however, no differences in cortisol concentrations

  1. Sub-crustal earthquakes beneath the Gulf of Cadiz - First results from seismological observations with the NEAREST OBS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, W. H.; Matias, L. M.; Monna, S.; Stich, D.; Iben Brahim, A.; Mancilla, F.; Zitellini, N.; Nearest Working Group

    2009-04-01

    The geophysical and geological investigations conducted so far in the Gulf of Cadiz allow us today to have an idea of the largest active faults that can generate destructive earthquakes and tsunamis comparable to the Nov 1st, 1755 Lisbon event. However, their kinematics and seismic activity are poorly known because the seismic networks based on land do not allow a precise hypocenter location and estimation of focal mechanisms for the smaller events. Therefore the EC project NEAREST (Integrated observation from NEAR shore sourcES of Tsunamis: towards an early warning system) was initiated (GOCE, contract n. 037110). One of the main objectives of the project is the characterisation of the tsunamigenic sources in the Gulf of Cadiz through seismological monitoring of natural seismicity by means of 24 BB seismometers deployed for 11 months in addition to the GEOSTAR multi-parameter deep-sea observatory. Together with the dense onshore seismic networks the temporary OBS network will allow the location and characterization of small seismic events more precisely than it can be done with onshore stations only. Spectrograms are used to identify previously unknown earthquakes. One of the major questions is the maximum depth of seismic activity beneath the Gulf of Cadiz. In the recording period from September 2007 to August 2008 about 300 events were located within the OBS network using the Portuguese onshore seismic stations. Magnitudes range from 1 to 4.7 (ML from Institute of Meteorology Lisbon, Portugal). Using the OBS network many events could be detected which are not located by the onshore stations. First results show that the events occur to approximately 50 km depth, often deeper than the locations by land stations, and confirming the results available from regional and teleseismic waveform modelling. Focal mechanisms show strike-slip and thrust-slip events.

  2. Proterozoic mantle lithosphere beneath the Tariat Depression and Dariganga Plateau, Mongolia: in situ Re-Os evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; O'Reilly, S.; Griffin, W.; Pearson, N.; Zhang, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Os isotope compositions of sulfides in mantle peridotites from the Tariat Depression (TD) in central Mongolia and the Dariganga Plateau (DP) in southeast Mongolia reveal the presence of Proterozoic lithospheric mantle beneath these regions. The least-disturbed sulfides, with 187Re/188Os1 Ga [2] and 1.6 Ga [3] for DP). In the Tariat region, these mantle events are consistent with those known in the overlying crust as recorded by Mesoproterozoic Nd model ages (TDM = 1.4-1.1 Ga) of Paleozoic and Mesozoic granitoids from the Khangai microcontinental block, where the Tariat Depression is located, and similar Nd model ages of 1.5-1.0 Ga for crustal granulite xenoliths from the Shavaryn-Tsaram volcano in the Tariat Depression [4]. Younger sulfide Os ages (1.1, 0.7 and ~0.5 Ga) may date mantle thermal events that also affected the overlying crust, marking the beginning of the Central Asia Orogeny in Neoproterozoic time. Although the South Mongolia domain, where the Dariganga Plateau is located, is believed to consist of late Paleozoic accretionary complexes and arc terrains [5], the presence of Precambrian zircon xenocrysts in magmatic rocks and ancient detrital zircons in arc-derived sediments [6], and Proterozoic Nd model ages of basement rocks in the Xilinhot region (B. Chen, pers. comm.) suggest substantial reworking of old crust. The presence of a Precambrian crustal terrain in the Dariganga region, corresponding to the underlying Mesoproterozoic lithospheric mantle indicated by the DP sulfide Os data, appears probable. References [1] Stosch, H.-G. et al. (1986) GCA 50, 2601-2614; [2] Wiechert, U. et al. (1997) CMP 126, 345-364; [3] Deng, F.-L. et al. (1992) Nature 360, 333-336; [4] Kovalenko V.I. et al. (2004) JAES 23, 605-627; [5] Windley, B.F. et al. (2007) JGS 164, 31-47; [6] Kroner, A. et al. (2007) GASM, in press.

  3. Modeling Magnetic Fields from a DC Power Cable Buried Beneath San Francisco Bay Based on Empirical Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T; Klimley, A Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable's path; these included the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR), the Benicia-Martinez Bridge (Ben) and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP) in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field) to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable's contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing) were virtually identical to the measured values. The modeling

  4. Modeling Magnetic Fields from a DC Power Cable Buried Beneath San Francisco Bay Based on Empirical Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kavet

    Full Text Available The Trans Bay Cable (TBC is a ±200-kilovolt (kV, 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable's path; these included the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB, the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR, the Benicia-Martinez Bridge (Ben and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable's contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing were virtually identical to the measured values. The

  5. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  6. Mantle Flow Beneath the Juan de Fuca and East Pacific Rise Spreading Centers and Adjacent Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy are a principal means of inferring the direction of mantle flow beneath tectonic plates. Azimuthal anisotropy of mantle head waves (Pn) observed in mid-plate settings, for example, has been used to infer that beneath oceanic crust the mantle flow that is frozen in is parallel to the paleospreading direction. While the agreement between historical measurements of azimuthal anisotropy and paleospreading direction is good, the combined uncertainties in experimental results (many of which date back 30 to 50 years) and in inferring the paleospreading direction are often 10-15°. In contrast to historical results from mid-plate settings, recent studies of Pn anisotropy beneath the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge reveal that the fast-direction of seismic anisotropy - and by inference the direction of mantle flow - is skewed with respect to the current spreading direction. This result indicates that sub-ridge mantle flow is not an entirely passive response to plate spreading. Here we use data from recent active-source seismic experiments to investigate azimuthal anisotropy of Pn arrivals in two near-ridge settings. These modern experiments, which use dense arrays of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) and well-navigated seismic shooting lines, can constrain azimuthal anisotropy to within ±1°. One data set is from the multi-scale Endeavour seismic tomography experiment (ETOMO) that took place in September 2009. Seismic data were collected using 68 four-component OBSs at 64 sites and the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The study includes 5567 shots covering 90 km along-axis and 50 km across. The second data set is from the UNDERSHOOT experiment, which was conducted at the EPR between the Siqueiros and Clipperton transforms, a section of ridge that is sub-divided by the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC). Seismic data were collected using a combination of four-component OBSs and single

  7. Electrical conductivity of old oceanic mantle in the northwestern Pacific I: 1-D profiles suggesting differences in thermal structure not predictable from a plate cooling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Kiyoshi; Tada, Noriko; Matsuno, Tetsuo; Liang, Pengfei; Li, Ruibai; Zhang, Luolei; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Abe, Natsue; Hirano, Naoto; Ichiki, Masahiro; Utada, Hisashi

    2017-08-01

    Seafloor magnetotelluric (MT) experiments were recently conducted in two areas of the northwestern Pacific to investigate the nature of the old oceanic upper mantle. The areas are far from any tectonic activity, and "normal" mantle structure is therefore expected. The data were carefully analyzed to reduce the effects of coastlines and seafloor topographic changes, which are significant boundaries in electrical conductivity and thus distort seafloor MT data. An isotropic, one-dimensional electrical conductivity profile was estimated for each area. The profiles were compared with those obtained from two previous study areas in the northwestern Pacific. Between the four profiles, significant differences were observed in the thickness of the resistive layer beyond expectations based on cooling of homogeneous oceanic lithosphere over time. This surprising feature is now further clarified from what was suggested in a previous study. To explain the observed spatial variation, dynamic processes must be introduced, such as influence of the plume associated with the formation of the Shatsky Rise, or spatially non-uniform, small-scale convection in the asthenosphere. There is significant room of further investigation to determine a reasonable and comprehensive interpretation of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath the northwestern Pacific. The present results demonstrate that electrical conductivity provides key information for such investigation.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  9. Factors contributing to the temperature beneath plaster or fiberglass cast material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson Mark R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cast materials mature and harden via an exothermic reaction. Although rare, thermal injuries secondary to casting can occur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors that contribute to the elevated temperature beneath a cast and, more specifically, evaluate the differences of modern casting materials including fiberglass and prefabricated splints. Methods The temperature beneath various types (plaster, fiberglass, and fiberglass splints, brands, and thickness of cast material were measured after they were applied over thermometer which was on the surface of a single diameter and thickness PVC tube. A single layer of cotton stockinette with variable layers and types of cast padding were placed prior to application of the cast. Serial temperature measurements were made as the cast matured and reached peak temperature. Time to peak, duration of peak, and peak temperature were noted. Additional tests included varying the dip water temperature and assessing external insulating factors. Ambient temperature, ambient humidity and dip water freshness were controlled. Results Outcomes revealed that material type, cast thickness, and dip water temperature played key roles regarding the temperature beneath the cast. Faster setting plasters achieved peak temperature quicker and at a higher level than slower setting plasters. Thicker fiberglass and plaster casts led to greater peak temperature levels. Likewise increasing dip-water temperature led to elevated temperatures. The thickness and type of cast padding had less of an effect for all materials. With a definition of thermal injury risk of skin injury being greater than 49 degrees Celsius, we found that thick casts of extra fast setting plaster consistently approached dangerous levels (greater than 49 degrees for an extended period. Indeed a cast of extra-fast setting plaster, 20 layers thick, placed on a pillow during maturation maintained temperatures over 50 degrees of

  10. Lithospheric discontinuities beneath the U.S. Midcontinent - signatures of Proterozoic terrane accretion and failed rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Gilbert, Hersh; Fischer, Karen M.; Andronicos, Christopher L.; Pavlis, Gary L.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Marshak, Stephen; Larson, Timothy; Yang, Xiaotao

    2018-01-01

    Seismic discontinuities between the Moho and the inferred lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are known as mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs) and have been ascribed to a variety of phenomena that are critical to understanding lithospheric growth and evolution. In this study, we used S-to-P converted waves recorded by the USArray Transportable Array and the OIINK (Ozarks-Illinois-Indiana-Kentucky) Flexible Array to investigate lithospheric structure beneath the central U.S. This region, a portion of North America's cratonic platform, provides an opportunity to explore how terrane accretion, cratonization, and subsequent rifting may have influenced lithospheric structure. The 3D common conversion point (CCP) volume produced by stacking back-projected Sp receiver functions reveals a general absence of negative converted phases at the depths of the LAB across much of the central U.S. This observation suggests a gradual velocity decrease between the lithosphere and asthenosphere. Within the lithosphere, the CCP stacks display negative arrivals at depths between 65 km and 125 km. We interpret these as MLDs resulting from the top of a layer of crystallized melts (sill-like igneous intrusions) or otherwise chemically modified lithosphere that is enriched in water and/or hydrous minerals. Chemical modification in this manner would cause a weak layer in the lithosphere that marks the MLDs. The depth and amplitude of negative MLD phases vary significantly both within and between the physiographic provinces of the midcontinent. Double, or overlapping, MLDs can be seen along Precambrian terrane boundaries and appear to result from stacked or imbricated lithospheric blocks. A prominent negative Sp phase can be clearly identified at 80 km depth within the Reelfoot Rift. This arrival aligns with the top of a zone of low shear-wave velocities, which suggests that it marks an unusually shallow seismic LAB for the midcontinent. This boundary would correspond to the top of a

  11. Factors contributing to the temperature beneath plaster or fiberglass cast material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Michael J; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2008-02-25

    Most cast materials mature and harden via an exothermic reaction. Although rare, thermal injuries secondary to casting can occur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors that contribute to the elevated temperature beneath a cast and, more specifically, evaluate the differences of modern casting materials including fiberglass and prefabricated splints. The temperature beneath various types (plaster, fiberglass, and fiberglass splints), brands, and thickness of cast material were measured after they were applied over thermometer which was on the surface of a single diameter and thickness PVC tube. A single layer of cotton stockinette with variable layers and types of cast padding were placed prior to application of the cast. Serial temperature measurements were made as the cast matured and reached peak temperature. Time to peak, duration of peak, and peak temperature were noted. Additional tests included varying the dip water temperature and assessing external insulating factors. Ambient temperature, ambient humidity and dip water freshness were controlled. Outcomes revealed that material type, cast thickness, and dip water temperature played key roles regarding the temperature beneath the cast. Faster setting plasters achieved peak temperature quicker and at a higher level than slower setting plasters. Thicker fiberglass and plaster casts led to greater peak temperature levels. Likewise increasing dip-water temperature led to elevated temperatures. The thickness and type of cast padding had less of an effect for all materials. With a definition of thermal injury risk of skin injury being greater than 49 degrees Celsius, we found that thick casts of extra fast setting plaster consistently approached dangerous levels (greater than 49 degrees for an extended period). Indeed a cast of extra-fast setting plaster, 20 layers thick, placed on a pillow during maturation maintained temperatures over 50 degrees of Celsius for over 20 minutes. Clinicians should be

  12. A Dynamical Context for Small-scale Heterogeneity Throughout the Mantle Beneath Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, D. A.; Rost, S.; Garnero, E.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction zones are a source for mantle heterogeneity within the convection system and there is mounting evidence that seismic signatures can be used to track slabs down from the surface throughout the mantle. Seismic studies of the mantle beneath Central America demonstrate that subducted slab material reaches the Core-Mantle Boundary (CMB). The lowermost mantle beneath this convergent margin shows strong seismic evidence for heterogeneity. Tomographic models characterise subduction zones to be underlain by increased seismic velocities over 100s-1000s km laterally, in association with D'´ discontinuities 100-300 km above the CMB, consistent with phase transitions in the Bridgmanite system. Recent analyses have found evidence for isolated Ultra Low Velocity Zones in addition to prevalent fine-scale heterogeneity, on the order of 1-10 km, scattering high frequency waves. These techniques indicate thermal and/or chemical anomalies within the mantle on a range of scales. Numerical geodynamical simulations suggest small-scale mechanical mixing of initially coherent compositionally anomalous subducted material separating into entities of various sizes consistent with the range of heterogeneity sizes observed in the lower mantle.Investigating seismic scattering, the re-radiation of a wavefront due to interaction with a sharply contrasting volumetric anomaly, is an effective method for studying small-scale elastic heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle. Studies commonly record structure with scale lengths of about 10 km. Here we analyse scattered energy related to PKPPKP — PKP•PKP (the • indicates the scattering location along the raypath) — sampling a large volume of the mantle beneath Central America. We reveal the character of heterogeneity in various frequency bands within the whole mantle using both broadband and short-period data. These observations will be placed in context with other studies in this region illustrating the large-scale background structure

  13. Seismic evidence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Izu-Bonin area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H.; Gao, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), separating the rigid lithosphere and the ductile asthenosphere layers, is the seismic discontinuity with the negative velocity contrast of the Earth's interior [Fischer et al., 2010]. The LAB has been also termed the Gutenberg (G) discontinuity that defines the top of the low velocity zone in the upper mantle [Gutenberg, 1959; Revenaugh and Jordan, 1991]. The seismic velocity, viscosity, resistivity and other physical parameters change rapidly with the depths across the boundary [Eaton et al., 2009]. Seismic detections on the LAB in subduction zone regions are of great help to understand the interactions between the lithosphere and asthenosphere layers and the geodynamic processes related with the slab subductions. In this study, the vertical broadband waveforms are collected from three deep earthquake events occurring from 2000 to 2014 with the focal depths of 400 600 km beneath the Izu-Bonin area. The waveform data is processed with the linear slant stack method [Zang and Zhou, 2002] to obtain the vespagrams in the relative travel-time to slowness domain and the stacked waveforms. The sP precursors reflected on the LAB (sLABP), which have the negative polarities with the amplitude ratios of 0.17 0.21 relative to the sP phases, are successfully extracted. Based on the one-dimensional modified velocity model (IASP91-IB), we obtain the distributions for six reflected points of the sLABP phases near the source region. Our results reveal that the LAB depths range between 58 and 65 km beneath the Izu-Bonin Arc, with the average depth of 62 km and the small topography of 7 km. Compared with the results of the tectonic stable areas in Philippine Sea [Kawakatsu et al., 2009; Kumar and Kawakatsu, 2011], the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Izu-Bonin Arc shows the obvious thinning phenomena. We infer that the lithospheric thinning is closely related with the partial melting, which is caused by the volatiles continuously released

  14. One and two-dimensional Triplicated waveform modeling beneath northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y.; Chen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Northeast Asia has long been investigated by geoscientists for its critical importance where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian continent accompanying by complicated mantle processes. In our study, taking advantages of frequent occurrence of deep earthquakes(>300km) in the subduction zone and dense seismic arrays in mainland China and Japan, we conducted both 1-Dimensional (1-D) and 2-Dimensional (2-D) triplicated forward waveform modeling on several selected deep events in the Japan-kuril and Izu areas. Triplicated waveform or Triplication which consists of refracted and reflected wave caused by the 410km/660km discontinuity, is very sensitive to the mantle transition zone velocity structure compared with the most commonly adopted methods such as receiver functions and seismic tomography. From 1-D modeling, we obtained the 1-D P and SH wave velocity structure model in the research area, which has an average P wave velocity 1% with maximum 2.1% and an average SH wave velocity 2% with maximum 3.9% higher than the global Iasp91 model in the mantle transition zone, consistent with the tomographic image of a fast stagnant slab in the region. In addition, we found slightly low velocities at approximately 560 km depth. However, the distribution and properties of such a low velocity feature cannot be well constrained based purely on the simple 1-D waveform modeling. In our 2-D simulations, we constructed a series of models and adopted the SEM method to investigate the sensitivity of triplicated waveforms on the slab structure in the mantle transition zone. In particular, we tested a model with a low velocity metastable olivine wedge (mow) added in the slab in the case that seismic waves travel roughly along the trending direction of the steep slab beneath the Izu Arc. Our preliminary result shows that the synthetic seismograms with the mow model display waveform variations distinctly different from the observations, suggesting that a metastable olivine

  15. Crustal Structure Beneath the Tibetan Plateau Using Receiver Functions and Surface Wave Dispersion Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, T.; Ammon, C. J.; Mejia, J.

    2002-12-01

    Despite substantial effort, some uncertainty in the bulk crustal geology beneath the Tibetan Plateau remains. Recent experiments have provided a wealth of seismic data for investigating structures within the Tibetan lithosphere. We investigate the subsurface Tibetan geology using receiver functions from the 1991-1992 Passive Source and the 1997-1999 INDEPTH III experiments. We have completed joint inversions of surface-wave dispersion and select receiver functions for the older data and plan to explore and invert receiver functions from select stations from the INDEPTH III experiment. The combination of receiver functions with surface-wave dispersion does much to improve P- and S-velocity structure resolution, but modeling is most appropriate for relatively simple structures. We begin our analyses with the depth-velocity stacking estimation of Zhu and Kanamori [2000] where we attempt to extract thickness, P-velocity, and Vp/Vs ratios compatible with the move-out of the Ps conversion and multiples from velocity contrasts within the lithosphere. Again, the main limitation of the technique is the assumption of a simple structure to insure consistency with a set of straightforward travel-time equations used to compute arrival-time move-out (as a function of incident-wave ray parameter). Poisson's ratio values from the 1991-1992 deployment were difficult to extract because of complex structure. The station with simplest response, WNDO, suggests a ratio of 0.28 beneath the north-central Plateau, which is slightly above average for continental crust. These results are lower than some earlier values which suggested that the lower crust beneath central and northern Tibet may contain substantial partial melt. The joint inversion of the simplest available receiver functions, and global long-period and local short-period surface-wave dispersion observations suggests that the crustal thickness for the northern Plateau ranges from 60-70 km (stations ERDO, BUDO, TUNL). Thickness

  16. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of subaerial lava flows of Barren Island volcano and the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc, Burma Microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh

    2015-06-01

    Little was known about the nature and origin of the deep crust beneath the Andaman Island Arc in spite of the fact that it formed part of the highly active Indonesian volcanic arc system, one of the important continental crust forming regions in Southeast Asia. This arc, formed as a result of subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Microplate (a sliver of the Eurasian Plate), contains only one active subaerial magmatic center, Barren Island volcano, whose evolutional timeline had remained uncertain. In this work, we present results of the first successful attempt to date crustal xenoliths and their host lava flows from the island, by incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar method, in an attempt to understand the evolutionary histories of the volcano and its basement. Based on concordant plateau and isochron ages, we establish that the oldest subaerial lava flows of the volcano are 1.58 ± 0.04 (2σ) Ma, and some of the plagioclase xenocrysts have been derived from crustal rocks of 106 ± 3 (2σ) Ma. Mineralogy (anorthite + Cr-rich diopside + minor olivine) and isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr 7.0) of xenoliths not only indicate their derivation from a lower (oceanic) crustal olivine gabbro but also suggest a genetic relationship between the arc crust and the ophiolitic basement of the Andaman accretionary prism. We speculate that the basements of the forearc and volcanic arc of the Andaman subduction zone belong to a single continuous unit that was once attached to the western margin of the Eurasian Plate.

  17. New constraints on the textural and geochemical evolution of the upper mantle beneath the Styrian basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Laszlo; Hidas, Károly; Zanetti, Alberto; János Kovács, István; Patkó, Levente; Szabó, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    Plio-Pleistocene alkali basaltic volcanism sampled sporadically the upper mantle beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian Region (CPR, e.g. [1]). Lavas and pyroclasts often contain mantle derived xenoliths, and the majority of them have been extensively studied [1], except the westernmost Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF, Eastern Austria and Slovenia). In the SBVF only a few volcanic centers have been studied in details (e.g. Kapfenstein & Tobaj). Based on these studies, the upper mantle beneath the SBVF is consists of dominantly high temperature, texturally and geochemically homogeneous protogranular spinel lherzolite. New major and trace element data from rock-forming minerals of ultramafic xenoliths, coupled with texture and deformation analysis from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF, suggest that the lithospheric roots of the region are more heterogeneous than described previously. The studied xenoliths are predominantly lherzolite, amphibole is a common phase that replaces pyroxenes and spinels and proves modal metasomatism. Phlogopite coupled with apatite is also present in amphibole-rich samples. The texture of the xenoliths is usually coarse-grained and annealed with low abundance of subgrain boundaries in both olivine and pyroxenes. Olivine crystal preferred orientation (CPO) varies between the three most abundant one: [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry [2]. The CPO of pyroxenes is usually coherent with coeval deformation with olivine, however the CPO of amphibole is suggesting postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. According to equilibrium temperatures, the studied xenolith suite samples a broader temperature range (850-1100 °C) than the literature data, corresponding to mantle depths between 30 and 60 km, which indicates that the xenolith suite only represents the shallower part of the recent 100 km thick lithospheric mantle beneath the SBVF. The equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries

  18. Detailed crustal thickness variations beneath the Illinois Basin area: Implications for crustal evolution of the midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaotao; Pavlis, Gary L.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Marshak, Stephen; Gilbert, Hersh; Rupp, John; Larson, Timothy H.; Chen, Chen; Carpenter, N. Seth

    2017-08-01

    We present high-resolution imaging results of crustal and upper mantle velocity discontinuities across the Illinois Basin area using both common conversion point stacking and plane wave migration methods applied to P wave receiver functions from the EarthScope Ozark, Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky experiment. The images reveal unusually thick crust (up to 62 km) throughout the central and southeastern Illinois Basin area. A significant Moho gradient underlies the NW trending Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone, which delineates the boundary between the Illinois Basin and Ozark Dome. Relatively thinner crust (Proterozoic convergent margin tectonics around 1.55-1.35 Ga; (3) by Late Precambrian magmatic underplating at the base of older crust, associated with the creation of the Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Province around 1.3 Ga; and (4) through crustal "relamination" during an episode of Proterozoic flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois Basin, possibly associated with the Grenville Orogeny.

  19. Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, P. A.; Wilbur, J. S.

    1981-04-01

    Operations at the Hanford Site since 1944 have resulted in the discharge to the ground of large volumes of process cooling water and low-level liquid radioactive waste. Radioactivity and chemical substances have been carried with these discharges and have reached the Hanford ground water. For many years wells have been used as ground-water sampling structures to gather data on the distribution and movement of these discharges as they interact with the unconfined ground water beneath the Hanford Site. During 1980, 317 such structures were sampled at various times for radionuclide and chemical contaminants. Data collected during 1980 describe the movement of tritium and ruthenium-106 and the nonradioactive nitrate plume as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay.

  20. Indicators of sewage contamination in sediments beneath a deep-ocean dump site off New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothner, Michael H.; Takada, H.; Knight, I.T.; Hill, R.T.; Butman, B.; Farrington, J.W.; Colwell, R.R.; Grassle, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    The world's largest discharge of municipal sewage sludge to surface waters of the deep sea has caused measurable changes in the concentration of sludge indicators in sea-floor sediments, in a spatial pattern which agrees with the predictions of a recent sludge deposition model. Silver, linear alkylbenzenes, coprostanol, and spores of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens, in bottom sediments and in near-bottom suspended sediment, provide evidence for rapid settling of a portion of discharged solids, accumulation on the sea floor, and biological mixing beneath the water sediment interface. Biological effects include an increase in 1989 of two species of benthic polychaete worm not abundant at the dump site before sludge dumping began in 1986. These changes in benthic ecology are attributed to the increased deposition of utilizable food in the form of sludge-derived organic matter.

  1. Deep groundwater and potential subsurface habitats beneath an Antarctic dry valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J A; Auken, E; Tulaczyk, S; Virginia, R A; Schamper, C; Sørensen, K I; Doran, P T; Dugan, H; Foley, N

    2015-04-28

    The occurrence of groundwater in Antarctica, particularly in the ice-free regions and along the coastal margins is poorly understood. Here we use an airborne transient electromagnetic (AEM) sensor to produce extensive imagery of resistivity beneath Taylor Valley. Regional-scale zones of low subsurface resistivity were detected that are inconsistent with the high resistivity of glacier ice or dry permafrost in this region. We interpret these results as an indication that liquid, with sufficiently high solute content, exists at temperatures well below freezing and considered within the range suitable for microbial life. These inferred brines are widespread within permafrost and extend below glaciers and lakes. One system emanates from below Taylor Glacier into Lake Bonney and a second system connects the ocean with the eastern 18 km of the valley. A connection between these two basins was not detected to the depth limitation of the AEM survey (∼350 m).

  2. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiyono, Samsul H., E-mail: samsul.wiyono@bmkg.go.id [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia’s Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Jakarta 10610 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Indonesia’s Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Jakarta 10610 (Indonesia); Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132, Indonesia, Phone: +62-22 2534137 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  3. Formation of magmatic brine lenses via focussed fluid-flow beneath volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Blundy, Jon; Melnik, Oleg; Sparks, Steve

    2018-03-01

    Many active or dormant volcanoes show regions of high electrical conductivity at depths of a few kilometres beneath the edifice. We explore the possibility that these regions represent lenses of high-salinity brine separated from a single-phase magmatic fluid containing H2O and NaCl. Since chloride-bearing fluids are highly conductive and have an exceptional capacity to transport metals, these regions can be an indication of an active hydrothermal ore-formation beneath volcanoes. To investigate this possibility we have performed hydrodynamic simulations of magma degassing into permeable rock. In our models the magma source is located at 7 km depth and the fluid salinity approximates that expected for fluids released from typical arc magmas. Our model differs from previous models of a similar process because it is (a) axisymmetric and (b) includes a static high-permeability pathway that links the magma source to the surface. This pathway simulates the presence of a volcanic conduit and/or plexus of feeder dykes that are typical of most volcanic systems. The presence of the conduit leads to a number of important hydrodynamic consequences, not observed in previous models. Importantly, we show that an annular brine lens capped by crystallised halite is likely to form above an actively degassing sub-volcanic magma body and can persist for more than 250 kyr after degassing ceases. Parametric analysis shows that brine lenses are more prevalent when the fluid is released at temperatures above the wet granite solidus, when magmatic fluid salinity is high, and when the high-permeability pathway is narrow. The calculated depth, form and electrical conductivity of our modelled system shares many features with published magnetotelluric images of volcano subsurfaces. The formation and persistence of sub-volcanic brine lenses has implications for geothermal systems and hydrothermal ore formation, although these features are not explored in the presented model.

  4. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the South Island of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Junlin; Fischer, Karen M.; Savage, Martha K.

    2018-02-01

    Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) properties beneath the South Island of New Zealand have been imaged by Sp receiver function common-conversion point stacking. In this transpressional boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, dextral offset on the Alpine fault and convergence have occurred for the past 20 My, with the Alpine fault now bounded by Australian plate subduction to the south and Pacific plate subduction to the north. Using data from onland seismometers, especially the 29 broadband stations of the New Zealand permanent seismic network (GeoNet), we obtained 24,971 individual receiver functions by extended-time multi-taper deconvolution, and mapped them to three-dimensional space using a Fresnel zone approximation. Pervasive strong positive Sp phases are observed in the LAB depth range indicated by surface wave tomography. These phases are interpreted as conversions from a velocity decrease across the LAB. In the central South Island, the LAB is observed to be deeper and broader to the northwest of the Alpine fault. The deeper LAB to the northwest of the Alpine fault is consistent with models in which oceanic lithosphere attached to the Australian plate was partially subducted, or models in which the Pacific lithosphere has been underthrust northwest past the Alpine fault. Further north, a zone of thin lithosphere with a strong and vertically localized LAB velocity gradient occurs to the northwest of the fault, juxtaposed against a region of anomalously weak LAB conversions to the southeast of the fault. This structure could be explained by lithospheric blocks with contrasting LAB properties that meet beneath the Alpine fault, or by the effects of Pacific plate subduction. The observed variations in LAB properties indicate strong modification of the LAB by the interplay of convergence and strike-slip deformation along and across this transpressional plate boundary.

  5. A Receiver Function Study of Mantle Transition Zone Discontinuities beneath Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K. H.; Mohamed, A. A.; Gao, S. S.; Elsheikh, A. A.; Yu, Y.; Fat-Helbary, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The dramatic asymmetry in terms of surface elevation, Cenozoic volcanisms, and earthquake activity across the Red Sea is an enigmatic issue in global tectonics, partially due to the unavailability of broadband seismic data on the African plate adjacent to the Red Sea. Here we report the first results from a receiver function study of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities using data from the Egyptian National Seismic Network, and compare the resulting depths of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities (d410 and d660) with those observed on the Arabian side. Results using more than 6000 P-to-S receiver functions recorded at 49 broadband seismic stations in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and adjacent areas show that when the IASP91 Earth model is used for time-to-depth conversion, the resulting depth of the discontinuities increases systematically toward the axis of the Afro-Arabian Dome (AAD) from both the west and east. Relative to the westernmost area, the maximum depression of the 410-km discontinuity is about 30 km, and that of the 660-km discontinuity is about 45 km. Highly correlated d410 and d660 depths suggest that the observed apparent depth variations are mostly caused by lateral velocity anomalies in the upper mantle, while the 15 km additional depression of the d660 relative to the d410 requires either a colder-than-normal MTZ or the presence of water in the MTZ. We tested several models involving upper mantle and MTZ velocity anomalies and undulations of the MTZ discontinuities due to temperature anomalies and water content, and found that the observed systematic variations can best be explained by a model involving a hydrated MTZ and an upper-mantle low-velocity zone beneath the AAD (Mohamed et al., 2014, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu284). Models invoking one or more mantle plumes originated from the MTZ or the lower-mantle beneath the study area are not consistent with the observations.

  6. Helium as a tracer for fluids released from Juan de Fuca lithosphere beneath the Cascadia forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Constantz, James E.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Blair, James Luke

    2016-01-01

    The ratio between helium isotopes (3He/4He) provides an excellent geochemical tracer for investigating the sources of fluids sampled at the Earth's surface. 3He/4He values observed in 25 mineral springs and wells above the Cascadia forearc document a significant component of mantle-derived helium above Juan de Fuca lithosphere, as well as variability in 3He enrichment across the forearc. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner (FMC) generally yield significantly higher ratios (1.2-4.0 RA) than those seaward of the corner (0.03-0.7 RA). The highest ratios in the Cascadia forearc coincide with slab depths (40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab depths (25-30 km) beneath sites seaward of the corner.Tremor (considered a marker for high fluid pressure) and high RA values in the forearc are spatially correlated. The Cascadia tremor band is centered on its FMC, and we tentatively postulate that hydrated forearc mantle beneath Cascadia deflects a significant portion of slab-derived fluids updip along the subduction interface, to vent in the vicinity of its corner. Furthermore, high RA values within the tremor band just arcward of the FMC, suggest that the innermost mantle wedge is relatively permeable.Conceptual models require: (1) a deep fluid source as a medium to transport primordial 3He; (2) conduits through the lithosphere which serve to speed fluid ascent to the surface before significant dilution from radiogenic 4He can occur; and (3) near lithostatic fluid pressure to keep conduits open. Our spatial correlation between high RA values and tectonic tremor provides independent evidence that tremor is associated with deep fluids, and it further suggests that high pore pressures associated with tremor may serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through ductile upper mantle and lower crust.

  7. Slab remnants beneath the Baja California peninsula: Seismic constraints and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, Hanneke; de Vos, Denise

    2017-11-01

    The formation of the Gulf of California has been related to the cessation of subduction of the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Various studies have identified features that point to the presence of a slab remnant beneath the Baja California peninsula, but its depth range and lateral extent remained unclear. In this study we used surface wave phase velocity and receiver function data of NARS-Baja stations around the Gulf of California to better constrain the location of the slab. For stations in central and southern Baja California the shear velocity models show an upper mantle high-velocity layer with its top in the depth range from 115 to 135km and a thickness varying between roughly 40 and 60km. These high-velocity anomalies are interpreted as subducted slab remnants. In contrast, the models for the northern peninsula show no slab signature. This change directly correlates with the variation in relative motion between the Baja California peninsula and the Pacific plate as measured by GPS data. It is inferred that the stalled slab fragments beneath the peninsula produce strong coupling between Baja California and the Pacific plate. The shear velocity models for stations on the Mexican mainland show a layer of higher velocities above a low-velocity upper mantle. In the North, the low-velocity mantle, starting at a depth of 40km, is associated with upwelling as suggested by previous studies. Further south, the transition from higher to lower mantle velocities occurs around 80km depth, which is a typical value for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Furthermore, the models show strong crustal thinning towards the gulf, both from the peninsula as well as from the Mexican mainland.

  8. Upper Mantle Shear Wave Structure Beneath North America From Multi-mode Surface Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Ekström, G.

    2008-12-01

    The upper mantle structure beneath the North American continent has been investigated from measurements of multi-mode phase speeds of Love and Rayleigh waves. To estimate fundamental-mode and higher-mode phase speeds of surface waves from a single seismogram at regional distances, we have employed a method of nonlinear waveform fitting based on a direct model-parameter search using the neighbourhood algorithm (Yoshizawa & Kennett, 2002). The method of the waveform analysis has been fully automated by employing empirical quantitative measures for evaluating the accuracy/reliability of estimated multi-mode phase dispersion curves, and thus it is helpful in processing the dramatically increasing numbers of seismic data from the latest regional networks such as USArray. As a first step toward modeling the regional anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the North American upper mantle with extended vertical resolution, we have applied the method to long-period three-component records of seismic stations in North America, which mostly comprise the GSN and US regional networks as well as the permanent and transportable USArray stations distributed by the IRIS DMC. Preliminary multi-mode phase-speed models show large-scale patterns of isotropic heterogeneity, such as a strong velocity contrast between the western and central/eastern United States, which are consistent with the recent global and regional models (e.g., Marone, et al. 2007; Nettles & Dziewonski, 2008). We will also discuss radial anisotropy of shear wave speed beneath North America from multi-mode dispersion measurements of Love and Rayleigh waves.

  9. Fate and Transport of 17β-Estradiol beneath Animal Waste Holding Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lori A; Tyner, John S; Buchanan, John R; Hawkins, Shawn A; Lee, Jaehoon

    2015-05-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations typically store livestock waste in clay-lined ponds. Although these ponds are regulated to include a liner with a small hydraulic conductivity to limit leaching, previous studies have traced surface and groundwater contamination from such regulated animal waste ponds. This research examined the transport of 17β-estradiol (E2) and its primary metabolite, estrone (E1), through soil liners using field- and laboratory-based studies. Additionally, a potential engineering solution to limit hormone transport-applying biochar to new pond liners to act as a retardant-was studied. Soil cores 80 cm in length were collected beneath a mature dairy waste pond and analyzed for moisture content and hormone concentrations. Unsaturated conditions and E2 concentrations of 4 to 250 ng g were detected beneath the waste pond. In the laboratory portion of the study, hand-packed columns of sand or clay were subjected to infiltration by a 2.3-m head of dairy waste. A subset of the hand-packed sand columns was amended with powdered biochar to test its ability to retard E2 and E1. For 3 mo, column leachate was analyzed for hormone concentrations, and at the conclusion of the study E2 and E1 concentrations in the soil were measured. In the 44 d after sealing, the clay, sand, sand with a thin layer of biochar, and sand mixed with a biochar amendment leached a total of 0.54, 1.3, 0.09, and 0.45 μg of E2, respectively. The biochar amendments to the hand-packed columns considerably minimized E2 in the leachate. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Modeling Rayleigh Wave Azimuthal Anisotropy in the Upper Mantle Beneath Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, P. R.; Laske, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from the forward modeling of frequency-dependent Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy observed at the Hawaiian Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Mantle Experiment (PLUME) that was deployed from January 2005 through May 2007. We create models of the mantle consisting of one or two layers of constant anisotropy derived from pyrolite, which has one symmetry axis, in order to understand how mantle flow affects observations of Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy. We perform forward modeling experiments in which we vary the depth and thickness of the layer(s), as well as the inclination and azimuth of the symmetry axis in each of the layers. We use mode summation code MINOS to calculate predictions for these models. Then we compare the predictions with frequency-dependent average phase velocities within a series of station triangles. We use a chi-squared test for frequencies between 10 and 50 mHz to model the two principal parameters of azimuthal anisotropy: the frequency-dependent strength of azimuthal anisotropy and the frequency-dependent direction of fast phase velocity. For the former, we fix the azimuth in the synthetic model and compare the strength of anisotropy. For one-layer models, we find that most station triangles are best fit by fixing the inclination between 20 and 35° from the vertical, suggesting that a significant amount of vertical mineral alignment is present. Almost all station triangles require an anisotropic layer beginning no deeper than 50 km below the surface, and a thinner layer is present beneath the Island of Hawaii and to the east of the islands. A thicker layer is present beneath and to the west of the older islands. First results from two-layer modeling suggest that a layer in the asthenosphere must consist of near horizontal flow while a layer in the lithosphere must contain a significant amount of vertical anisotropy.

  11. Evidence for gas and magmatic sources beneath the Yellowstone volcanic field from seismic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Stephan; Smith, Robert B.; Waite, Gregory P.

    2004-03-01

    The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity ( Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio ( Vp/ Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15×15 km) are reliably imaged in the northwestern part of the model outside the Yellowstone caldera; inside the caldera only Vp anomalies of large size extending over several grid nodes are reliably imaged. The Vp/ Vs solution is generally poorer due to the low number of S-P arrival times. Only the northwestern part of the model is resolved with confidence; the Vp/ Vs solution also suffers from strong vertical and horizontal velocity smearing. The tomographic images confirm the existence of a low Vp-body beneath the Yellowstone caldera at depths greater than 8 km, possibly representing hot, crystallizing magma. The most striking result of our study is a volume of anomalously low Vp and Vp/ Vs in the northwestern part of the Yellowstone volcanic field at shallow depths of <2.0 km. Theoretical calculations of changes in P- to S-wave velocity ratios indicate that these anomalies can be interpreted as porous, gas-filled rock. The close spatial correlation of the observed anomalies and the occurrence of the largest earthquake swarm in historic time in Yellowstone, 1985, suggest that the gas may have originated as part of magmatic fluids released by crystallization of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera.

  12. Drought-induced recharge promotes long-term storage of porewater salinity beneath a prairie wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Zeno F.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Moucha, Robert; Mushet, David M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; LaBaugh, James W.; Fiorentino, Anthony J.; Siegel, Donald I.

    2018-02-01

    Subsurface storage of sulfate salts allows closed-basin wetlands in the semiarid Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America to maintain moderate surface water salinity (total dissolved solids [TDS] from 1 to 10 g L-1), which provides critical habitat for communities of aquatic biota. However, it is unclear how the salinity of wetland ponds will respond to a recent shift in mid-continental climate to wetter conditions. To understand better the mechanisms that control surface-subsurface salinity exchanges during regional dry-wet climate cycles, we made a detailed geoelectrical study of a closed-basin prairie wetland (P1 in the Cottonwood Lake Study Area, North Dakota) that is currently experiencing record wet conditions. We found saline lenses of sulfate-rich porewater (TDS > 10 g L-1) contained in fine-grained wetland sediments 2-4 m beneath the bathymetric low of the wetland and within the currently ponded area along the shoreline of a prior pond stand (c. 1983). During the most recent drought (1988-1993), the wetland switched from a groundwater discharge to recharge function, allowing salts dissolved in surface runoff to move into wetland sediments beneath the bathymetric low of the basin. However, groundwater levels during this time did not decline to the elevation of the saline lenses, suggesting these features formed during more extended paleo-droughts and are stable in the subsurface on at least centennial timescales. We hypothesize a "drought-induced recharge" mechanism that allows wetland ponds to maintain moderate salinity under semiarid climate. Discharge of drought-derived saline groundwater has the potential to increase the salinity of wetland ponds during wet climate.

  13. The preliminary results: Internal seismic velocity structure imaging beneath Mount Lokon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firmansyah, Rizky, E-mail: rizkyfirmansyah@hotmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Kristianto, E-mail: kris@vsi.esdm.go.id [Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency, Bandung, 40122 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Historical records that before the 17{sup th} century, Mount Lokon had been dormant for approximately 400 years. In the years between 1350 and 1400, eruption ever recorded in Empung, came from Mount Lokon’s central crater. Subsequently, in 1750 to 1800, Mount Lokon continued to erupt again and caused soil damage and fall victim. After 1949, Mount Lokon dramatically increased in its frequency: the eruption interval varies between 1 – 5 years, with an average interval of 3 years and a rest interval ranged from 8 – 64 years. Then, on June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation. Peak activity happened on July 4{sup th}, 2011 that Mount Lokon erupted continuously until August 28{sup th}, 2011. In this study, we carefully analyzed micro-earthquakes waveform and determined hypocenter location of those events. We then conducted travel time seismic tomographic inversion using SIMULPS12 method to detemine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structures beneath Lokon volcano in order to enhance our subsurface geological structure. During the tomographic inversion, we started from 1-D seismic velocities model obtained from VELEST33 method. Our preliminary results show low Vp, low Vs, and high Vp/Vs are observed beneath Mount Lokon-Empung which are may be associated with weak zone or hot material zones. However, in this study we used few station for recording of micro-earthquake events. So, we suggest in the future tomography study, the adding of some seismometers in order to improve ray coverage in the region is profoundly justified.

  14. Microleakage beneath ceramic and metal brackets photopolymerized with LED or conventional light curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Serdar; Arhun, Neslihan; Arman, Ayça; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2006-11-01

    To test the null hypotheses that (1) the type of light curing unit used (quartz-tungsten-halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED]) would not affect the amount of microleakage observed beneath brackets, and (2) the bracket type used (ceramic or metal) would not influence the amount of microleakage observed beneath brackets. 40 freshly-extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into 4 bonding groups (n = 10/group): group 1, metal bracket + LED-cured Transbond XT; group 2, ceramic bracket + LED-cured Transbond XT; group 3, metal bracket + QTH-cured Transbond XT; and group 4, ceramic bracket + QTH-cured Transbond XT. The teeth were kept in distilled water for 1 month, and thereafter subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then, specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, sectioned, and photographed under a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was scored with regard to the adhesive-tooth interface and the bracket-adhesive interface at both incisal and gingival margins. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni correction. Microleakage was observed in all groups. When an LED curing unit was used for adhesive polymerization, ceramic brackets displayed significantly less microleakage than metal brackets in both tooth-adhesive and bracket-adhesive interfaces. When a QTH curing unit was used, ceramic brackets displayed significantly less microleakage than metal brackets in the bracket-adhesive interface in both gingival and incisal margins. Ceramic brackets cured with LED units were the best combination, demonstrating the lowest microleakage scores.

  15. Crust beneath the northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province, India: Evidence for uplift and magmatic underplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Madhusudhan; Kumar, M. Ravi; Rastogi, B. K.

    2015-05-01

    The northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province of India and its pericratonic rift basins were reactivated during different stages after the breakup of India from the Gondwanaland and collision with the Asian plate. In this study, we present results of crustal thickness and average crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath this plume-affected region using common conversion point imaging and H-k stacking analysis of 6893 receiver functions using data from a network comprising 58 broadband seismic stations sited on diverse tectonic terrains. We find large variations in crustal thickness, with the Moho depths varying from 28 to 43 km in the Kachchh rift, 28 to 38 km in the Cambay rift, 39.5-41.5 km in the north and eastern parts of the Cambay rift, and 29 to 39 km in the Saurashtra region and South Gujarat. A Moho upwarp of 6 to 7 km in the Saurashtra region can be attributed to positive buoyancy and uplift due to thermal influx affected by the Reunion plume. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath the Kachchh rift (1.8 to 2.05), coastal areas of Saurashtra (1.75 to 2.06), and North Gujarat (1.81 to 1.85) indicate dominance of a mafic/ultramafic crust. High regional heat flow, high electrical conductivity, large intracrustal S wave velocity reduction, and high average crustal Poisson's ratios are consistent with partial melt related to the process of magmatic underplating in the lower crust. At other stations, the crust appears to be felsic with Vp/Vs ratios in the range of 1.57 to 1.76.

  16. Two Plumes Beneath the East African Rift System: a Geochemical Investigation into Possible Interactions in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; van Keken, P. E.; Lin, S.

    2007-12-01

    East African Rift System magmatism began over 40 my ago and has continued through the present. Numerical models have determined two plumes are necessary to create the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanism. Geochemical data support the presence of two chemically distinct plumes initially located beneath the Afar Depression (NE Ethiopia) and the Turkana Depression (SW Ethiopia/N Kenya). The timing and eruptive of the Afar and Kenya plumes are also distinct. While there is growing evidence to support the existence of two dynamically and chemically distinct plumes beneath the East African Rift System, the interactions between them remain unclear. Our study focuses on the geochemistry of mafic shield lavas from three locations on the eastern flank of the Ethiopian plateau. These lavas are spatially located between the surface manifestation of the Afar and Kenya plumes. The majority of the lava is alkaline and has experienced varying degrees of olivine and pyroxene fractionation. The northernmost lavas (9°10'N) are transitional and display the most fractionation. Primitive mantle melts were generated at depths near the fertile mantle garnet-spinel transition zone and deeper (80-100km) and are free of metasomatic influence. Minor HREE depletions also support derivation of melts from a garnet-bearing source. Lavas with lithospheric influence are generated from shallower depths and show minor amphibole influence. Overall, geochemical data show the lavas in this study closely resemble those from various episodes of Kenya plume magmatism with modifications attributed to lithospheric contamination. This interpretation is consistent with current numerical models suggesting episodic northward movement of Kenya plume magmas along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The data imply that the Kenya plume has a much larger spatial influence and therefore a larger geodynamic influence in the EARS than previously recognized.

  17. A First Crustal Model beneath Portugal from Teleseismic Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanayake, Januka; Ferreira, Ana M. G.; Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Accurate seismic crustal models are important for interpreting seismicity and tectonics and predicting strong ground motion. These interpretations and predictions are particularly important in regions prone to significant seismic hazard such as Portugal, where considerable destruction has taken place from large on- and offshore earthquakes (e.g. 1755 M 8 Lisbon and 1909 Benavente M 6.0 earthquakes). The lack of high quality countrywide broadband data in the past has hindered quantitative characterization of regional Earth structure in Portugal. Due to a significant expansion of the Portuguese seismic network, however, a large volume of data is accumulating since 2006. We used this new high quality dataset to measure multi-period Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity (RWE), which we inverted to build the first seismic crustal model beneath Portugal. RWE is defined by the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) amplitude ratio at a given seismic station, and theoretical studies demonstrate it to be strongly sensitive to the structure immediately beneath that particular station. We measured teleseismic RWE between 15 s and 60 s from 33 permanent and temporary stations in Portugal and inverted it for shear wave velocity (Vs) structure of the crust using a fully non-linear Monte Carlo method. Our results show that both RWE and Vs are spatially correlated with surface geology. Notably, sedimentary basins produced by Mesozoic rifting (e.g. Lusitanian Basin (LB) and the Lower Tagus-Sado Basin (LTSB)) are correlated with higher RWE (lower Vs). Similar high RWE values are observed in the interior of Central Iberian Zone (CIZ), which is an older metamorphic belt. We interpret this to be the signature of an extensional episode that the CIZ has undergone possibly simultaneous to the Mesozoic rift event. The Galicia-Tras-os-Montes-Zone (GTMZ)- a Paleozoic metamorphic belt - in Northern Portugal exhibits the lowest RWE (highest Vs), whereas other metamorphic terrains have RWE intermediate to Basins and

  18. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-07-21

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

  19. What Lies beneath Seemingly Positive Campus Climate Results: Institutional Sexism, Racism, and Male Hostility toward Equity Initiatives and Liberal Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    This article presents qualitative results from a campus climate study at one predominately white university. Data analysis uncovered "what lies beneath" a seemingly positive campus climate. Gender differences in survey responses suggest that men and women experienced the climate in vastly different ways. Additionally, lack of deep diversity…

  20. Low-velocity zones in the crust beneath Aso caldera, Kyushu, Japan, derived from receiver function analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuki; Ohkura, Takahiro; Shibutani, Takuo; Hirahara, Kazuro; Yoshikawa, Shin; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Aso volcano, in central Kyushu Island in southwest Japan, has a large caldera (18 × 25 km) that formed by the ejection of more than 600 km3 of deposits 89 thousand years ago. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic waveform data obtained from densely distributed stations in and around the caldera. We estimated the crustal S wave velocity structure from the receiver functions by using genetic algorithm inversion. We detected a low-velocity zone (Vs > 2.2 km/s) at a depth of 8-15 km beneath the eastern flank of the central cones. A sill-like deformation source has been detected at a depth of 15.5 km by analyses of GPS data, and a swarm of low-frequency earthquakes exists at depths of 15-25 km just beneath this low-velocity zone. Magma may be newly generated and accumulated in this low-velocity zone as a result of hot intrusions coming from beneath it. Except for the region beneath the eastern flank of the central cones, a second low-velocity zone (Vs > 1.9 km/s) extends in and around the caldera at a depth of 15-23 km, although phenomena representing intrusions have not been detected below it. From the estimated velocity structure, these low-velocity zones are interpreted to contain a maximum of 15% melt or 30% water.

  1. Complex structure of the lithospheric slab beneath the Banda arc, eastern Indonesia depicted by a seismic tomographic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Widiyantoro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seismic tomography with a non-linear approach has been successfully applied to image the P-wave velocity structure beneath the Banda arc in detail. Nearly one million compressional phases including the surfacereflected depth phases pP and pwP from events within the Indonesian region have been used. The depth phases have been incorporated in order to improve the sampling of the uppermantle structure, particularly below the Banda Sea in the back-arc regions. For the model parameterization, we have combined a highresolution regional inversion with a low-resolution global inversion to allow detailed images of slab structures within the study region and to minimize the mapping of distant aspherical mantle structure into the volume under study. In this paper, we focus our discussion on the upper mantle and transition zone structure beneath the curved Banda arc. The tomographic images confirm previous observations of the twisting of the slab in the upper mantle, forming a spoon-shaped structure beneath the Banda arc. A slab lying flat on the 660 km discontinuity beneath the Banda Sea is also well imaged. Further interpretations of the resulting tomograms and seismicity data support the scenario of the Banda arc subduction rollback.

  2. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  3. PLURALIZING NATURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    not necessary mean planning for a one common nature. As exemplified by the River Aire Re-naturalization Project (2002-2015), landscape architecture might provide an alternative approach to nature restoration that is more site specific and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. In the presentation...

  4. Radial, Viscous, Saffman-Taylor Fingering of Hot Asthenosphere associated with the Icelandic plume beneath the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicky; Schoonman, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    The Icelandic plume has had a significant influence upon the geologic and oceanographic evolution of the North Atlantic Ocean throughout Cenozoic times. Published full-waveform earthquake tomographic imaging of this region shows that the planform of this plume has a complex irregular shape with significant shear wave velocity anomalies lying beneath the lithospheric plate at depths of between 100 and 200 km. The planform of these anomalies suggests that five or more horizontal fingers extend radially beneath the fringing continental margins. The best-resolved of these fingers lie beneath the British Isles and beneath western Norway where significant crustal isostatic departures have been measured. Here, we propose that these radial fingers are generated by a well-known fluid dynamical phenomenon known as the Saffman-Taylor instability. Experimental and theoretical analyses show that radial, miscible viscous fingering occurs when a less viscous fluid is injected into a more viscous fluid. The wavelength and number of fingers are controlled by the mobility (i.e. the ratio of viscosities), by the Peclet number (i.e. the ratio of advective and diffusive processes), and by the thickness of the horizontal layer into which fluid is injected. We have combined shear wave velocity estimates with residual depth measurements around the Atlantic margins to calculate the planform distribution of temperature and viscosity within an asthenospheric layer beneath the lithospheric plates. Our calculations suggest that the mobility is 20-50, that the Peclet number is O(10000), and that the asthenospheric channel is 150 +/- 50 km thick. The existence and form of viscous fingering is consistent with experimental observations and with linear stability analysis. A useful rule of thumb is that the wavelength of viscous fingering is 5 +/- 1 times the thickness of the horizontal layer. Our proposal support the notion that dynamic topography of the Earth's surface can be generated and

  5. Seismological evidence for monsoon induced micro to moderate earthquake sequence beneath the 2011 Talala, Saurashtra earthquake, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. P.; Mishra, O. P.

    2015-10-01

    In order to understand the processes involved in the genesis of monsoon induced micro to moderate earthquakes after heavy rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon period beneath the 2011 Talala, Saurashtra earthquake (Mw 5.1) source zone, we assimilated 3-D microstructures of the sub-surface rock materials using a data set recorded by the Seismic Network of Gujarat (SeisNetG), India. Crack attributes in terms of crack density (ε), the saturation rate (ξ) and porosity parameter (ψ) were determined from the estimated 3-D sub-surface velocities (Vp, Vs) and Poisson's ratio (σ) structures of the area at varying depths. We distinctly imaged high-ε, high-ξ and low-ψ anomalies at shallow depths, extending up to 9-15 km. We infer that the existence of sub-surface fractured rock matrix connected to the surface from the source zone may have contributed to the changes in differential strain deep down to the crust due to the infiltration of rainwater, which in turn induced micro to moderate earthquake sequence beneath Talala source zone. Infiltration of rainwater during the Indian summer monsoon might have hastened the failure of the rock by perturbing the crustal volume strain of the causative source rock matrix associated with the changes in the seismic moment release beneath the surface. Analyses of crack attributes suggest that the fractured volume of the rock matrix with high porosity and lowered seismic strength beneath the source zone might have considerable influence on the style of fault displacements due to seismo-hydraulic fluid flows. Localized zone of micro-cracks diagnosed within the causative rock matrix connected to the water table and their association with shallow crustal faults might have acted as a conduit for infiltrating the precipitation down to the shallow crustal layers following the fault suction mechanism of pore pressure diffusion, triggering the monsoon induced earthquake sequence beneath the source zone.

  6. Crustal structure beneath the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon and surrounding regions from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Kevin C.; Fouch, Matthew J.; James, David E.; Carlson, Richard W.

    2011-02-01

    We analyze teleseismic P-to-S receiver functions to image crustal structure beneath the High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon and surrounding regions. Coverage from 206 broadband seismic stations provides the first opportunity to resolve variations in crustal composition, thickness, and heterogeneity on scales of a few km in depth and tens of km laterally across the HLP region. We utilize both H - κ stacking and a new Gaussian-weighted common conversion point stacking technique. We find crust that is ≥40 km thick beneath the Cascades, Idaho Batholith, and Owyhee Plateau and thinner (˜31 km) crust beneath the HLP and northern Great Basin. Low Poisson's ratios of ˜0.240 characterize the granitic crust beneath the Idaho Batholith, while the Owyhee Plateau exhibits values of ˜0.270, typical of average continental crust. The Owyhee Plateau is a thick simple crustal block with distinct edges at depth. The western HLP exhibits high average values of 0.304, typical for regions of widespread basaltic volcanism. Combined with other geological and geophysical observations, the areas of abnormally high Poisson's ratios (˜0.320) and low-velocity zones in the crust beneath north-central and southern Oregon are consistent with the presence of partial melt on either side of the HLP trend, suggesting a central zone where crustal melts have drained to the surface, perhaps enabled by the Brothers Fault Zone. Thicker crust and an anomalous N-S band of low Poisson's ratios (˜0.252) skirting the Steens Mountain escarpment is consistent with residuum from a midcrustal magma source of the massive flood basalts, supporting the view of extensive mafic underplating and intraplating of the crust from Cenozoic volcanism.

  7. Crustal structure beneath the Blue Mountains terranes and cratonic North America, eastern Oregon, and Idaho, from teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian Stanciu, A.; Russo, Raymond M.; Mocanu, Victor I.; Bremner, Paul M.; Hongsresawat, Sutatcha; Torpey, Megan E.; VanDecar, John C.; Foster, David A.; Hole, John A.

    2016-07-01

    We present new images of lithospheric structure obtained from P-to-S conversions defined by receiver functions at the 85 broadband seismic stations of the EarthScope IDaho-ORegon experiment. We resolve the crustal thickness beneath the Blue Mountains province and the former western margin of cratonic North America, the geometry of the western Idaho shear zone (WISZ), and the boundary between the Grouse Creek and Farmington provinces. We calculated P-to-S receiver functions using the iterative time domain deconvolution method, and we used the H-k grid search method and common conversion point stacking to image the lithospheric structure. Moho depths beneath the Blue Mountains terranes range from 24 to 34 km, whereas the crust is 32-40 km thick beneath the Idaho batholith and the regions of extended crust of east-central Idaho. The Blue Mountains group Olds Ferry terrane is characterized by the thinnest crust in the study area, 24 km thick. There is a clear break in the continuity of the Moho across the WISZ, with depths increasing from 28 km west of the shear zone to 36 km just east of its surface expression. The presence of a strong midcrustal converting interface at 18 km depth beneath the Idaho batholith extending 20 km east of the WISZ indicates tectonic wedging in this region. A north striking 7 km offset in Moho depth, thinning to the east, is present beneath the Lost River Range and Pahsimeroi Valley; we identify this sharp offset as the boundary that juxtaposes the Archean Grouse Creek block with the Paleoproterozoic Farmington zone.

  8. DOBRE-2 WARR profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Stephenson, R.

    2016-01-01

    zone in the southern part of the Azov Sea. A broader and somewhat deeper basement unit (about 11 km) with an antiformal shape lies beneath the northern East Black Sea Basin and forms the southern margin of the Crimea–Caucasus compressional zone. The depth of the underlying Moho discontinuity increases...

  9. Sources and mobility of carbonate melts beneath cratons, with implications for deep carbon cycling, metasomatism and rift initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Romer, Rolf L.; Stracke, Andreas; Steenfelt, Agnete; Smart, Katie A.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2017-05-01

    Kimberlite and carbonatite magmas that intrude cratonic lithosphere are among the deepest probes of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Their co-existence on thick continental shields is commonly attributed to continuous partial melting sequences of carbonated peridotite at >150 km depths, possibly as deep as the mantle transition zone. At Tikiusaaq on the North Atlantic craton in West Greenland, approximately 160 Ma old ultrafresh kimberlite dykes and carbonatite sheets provide a rare opportunity to study the origin and evolution of carbonate-rich melts beneath cratons. Although their Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-Li isotopic compositions suggest a common convecting upper mantle source that includes depleted and recycled oceanic crust components (e.g., negative ΔεHf coupled with > + 5 ‰ δ7Li), incompatible trace element modelling identifies only the kimberlites as near-primary low-degree partial melts (0.05-3%) of carbonated peridotite. In contrast, the trace element systematics of the carbonatites are difficult to reproduce by partial melting of carbonated peridotite, and the heavy carbon isotopic signatures (-3.6 to - 2.4 ‰ δ13C for carbonatites versus -5.7 to - 3.6 ‰ δ13C for kimberlites) require open-system fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Given that the oxidation state of Earth's mantle at >150 km depth is too reduced to enable larger volumes of 'pure' carbonate melt to migrate, it is reasonable to speculate that percolating near-solidus melts of carbonated peridotite must be silicate-dominated with only dilute carbonate contents, similar to the Tikiusaaq kimberlite compositions (e.g., 16-33 wt.% SiO2). This concept is supported by our findings from the North Atlantic craton where kimberlite and other deeply derived carbonated silicate melts, such as aillikites, exsolve their carbonate components within the shallow lithosphere en route to the Earth's surface, thereby producing carbonatite magmas. The relative abundances of trace elements of such highly

  10. Seismological studies of the plumbing system beneath the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group in Kamchataka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, I.; Shapiro, N.; Abkadyirov, I.; Gordeev, E.; Jakovlev, A.; Kugaenko, Y.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Novgorodova, A.; Kulakov, R.; Deev, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (KVG) is one of largest and most active clusters of subduction-related volcanoes in the World. Within an area of 70 km size, there are 13 closely located stratovolcanoes, of which Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik produced numerous strong eruptions during recent decades. The Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik recent eruptions produced lavas of basaltic to basaltic-andesitic composition while Bezimyanny is an explosive andesitic volcano. We present a seismological study of the KVG plumbing system. The first part of our study is the tomographic imaging based on data of permanent and temporary seismic stations operated in vicinity of the KVG. Beneath the Klyuchevskoy volcano at depths between 28 and 35 km, we observe an anomaly with very high Vp/Vs ratio collocated with a large cluster of long-period volcanic earthquakes. We propose that this feature represents the top of the mantle magmatic reservoir feeding the KVG. A narrow seismicity cluster beneath the Klyuchevskoy volcano marks a straight vertical conduit bringing basic magma from the deep reservoir at 30 km to the surface. For the Bezymianny volcano, we observe a middle-crust reservoir at 15 km depth, where the light andesitic magma is fractioned and separated. For the Tolbachik volcano, linearly clustered seismicity and seismic anomalies indicate two distinct pathways of magma ascending. In summary, the new seismic model has revealed three different types of plumbing systems explaining the variability of eruption styles in Klyuchevskoy, Bezymyanny and Tolbachik volcanoes. In the second part we study the occurrence of long-period (LP) seismic events occurring within KVG during two years preceding the large eruption of Tolbachik started at the end of 2012. We find two distinct groups of LP sources: events that occurred just below the edifices of the active volcanoes, and events at depths of 30 km in the vicinity of a deep magmatic reservoir. The time histories of these deep and

  11. Crustal Seismic Structure beneath Portugal (Western Iberia) and the role of Variscan Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veludo, Idalina; Afonso Dias, Nuno; Fonseca, Paulo; Matias, Luís; Carrilho, Fernando; Haberland, Christian; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mainland Portugal comprises most of the Western portion of the Iberian Peninsula, in a geodynamic setting associated with the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary. The crustal structure in Portugal is the result of a complex assemblage history of continental collision and extension with most of the surface is covered by rocks dating to the Variscan orogeny, the coastal ranges dominated by Mesozoic structures and Mesocenozoic basins covering partially the mainland. The impact and extension of this complex tectonic in the structure of the Iberian Lithosphere is still a matter of discussion, especially in its western part beneath Portugal. The existing knowledge relating the observed surface geology and lithospheric structures is sparse and sometimes incoherent, the relation between shallow and deep structures and their lateral extension still widely undetermined. Some questions still pertinent are the role and influence of the several tectonic units and their contacts in the present tectonic regime and in the stress field observed today, and the relation between the anomalous seismicity and associated crustal deformation rates with the inherited structure from past orogenies. In this study we present the results of a local earthquake tomographic study, performed to image this complex crustal structure down to 20 km depth. The relocation of the onshore seismicity recorded in the period 2000-2014 with the new 3D model allows cleansing some of the alignments and their correlation with some of the main active structures in Portugal enabling for the first time to correlate a large number of tectonic features to the small magnitude seismicity pattern. The seismicity distribution also displays a complex pattern, mainly reflecting the interaction between inherited Variscan structures with more recent fault systems created during the rifting stages of the Atlantic and diapir magmatic intrusions. The complex history of the assemblage of the crust beneath Western Iberia is well

  12. Orogen-parallel Variation in Flexure of the Arabian Plate Beneath the Zagros Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouz, M.; Avouac, J. P.; Simpson, G.; Hassanzadeh, J.; Herman, F.; Sternai, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros Mountains are the part of the Alpine-Himalayan chain that forms the northern margin of the Arabian plate and comprises a Neogene-Recent sedimentary basin that is forming in response to ongoing Arabia-Eurasia collision. Flexure of the Arabian lithosphere beneath the Zagros forms one of largest and most active basins in the world at which a backstripped deflection of a competent layer just below the foreland deposits represents its total amount of tectonic subsidence. As such, the Asmari Fm. can be used to analyze flexural bending and subsequently the amount of loading and elastic thickness of the Arabian lithosphere since the continent-continent collision started. In this study, flexure of the Arabian lithosphere is investigated using more than 100 boreholes and 60 interpreted seismic lines which show that the flexure is shallower (~ 1 km) and wider in the east and deeper (~6 km) and narrower towards the west (Figure 1). The shallow and wide eastern foredeep has little accommodation space due to small tectonic loads and the thick lithosphere in this region. In addition, viscous strength in the eastern sector leads to a wide deformation belt with low topography and low surface slopes. These factors, combined with arid climatic conditions, produce low sediment supply to the foreland basin so that it remains under-filled even though the foreland basin is shallow. In contrast, the western part of the Zagros region shows much larger accommodation space due to the combination of large loads and a relatively thin elastic plate. In the western sector, frictional basal strength and steeper topography along with more humid climatic conditions leading to a large supply of sediment to the foreland which is completely filled even though the foreland basin is deep. Our results also show that the Zagros foreland basin migrated towards south through the Neogene; however, the way of propagation is not fully understood yet. The eastern depocenter of the Zagros foreland

  13. Investigation of mantle kinematics beneath the Hellenic-subduction zone with teleseismic direct shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confal, Judith M.; Eken, Tuna; Tilmann, Frederik; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Çubuk-Sabuncu, Yeşim; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2016-12-01

    The subduction and roll-back of the African plate beneath the Eurasian plate along the arcuate Hellenic trench is the dominant geodynamic process in the Aegean and western Anatolia. Mantle flow and lithospheric kinematics in this region can potentially be understood better by mapping seismic anisotropy. This study uses direct shear-wave splitting measurements based on the Reference Station Technique in the southern Aegean Sea to reveal seismic anisotropy in the mantle. The technique overcomes possible contamination from source-side anisotropy on direct S-wave signals recorded at a station pair by maximizing the correlation between the seismic traces at reference and target stations after correcting the reference stations for known receiver-side anisotropy and the target stations for arbitrary splitting parameters probed via a grid search. We obtained splitting parameters at 35 stations with good-quality S-wave signals extracted from 81 teleseismic events. Employing direct S-waves enabled more stable and reliable splitting measurements than previously possible, based on sparse SKS data at temporary stations, with one to five events for local SKS studies, compared with an average of 12 events for each station in this study. The fast polarization directions mostly show NNE-SSW orientation with splitting time delays between 1.15 s and 1.62 s. Two stations in the west close to the Hellenic Trench and one in the east show N-S oriented fast polarizations. In the back-arc region three stations exhibit NE-SW orientation. The overall fast polarization variations tend to be similar to those obtained from previous SKS splitting studies in the region but indicate a more consistent pattern, most likely due to the usage of a larger number of individual observations in direct S-wave derived splitting measurements. Splitting analysis on direct shear waves typically resulted in larger split time delays compared to previous studies, possibly because S-waves travel along a longer path

  14. Nonconventional natural gas resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    It is concluded that it is impossible at this time to forecast the volume of natural gas dissolved in water that can be economically recovered. The investigation to southern Louisiana, both onshore and offshore was confined. Estimates of the dissolved methane content are based upon information on temperatures, pressures, sandstone thicknesses, sandstone porosities, salinity, and the solubility of methane. The salinity of waters encountered in wells was estimated from wireline logs, and in turn used to reduce the estimated content of dissolved gas. The reductions range from 51 to 61 percent of the solubility of methane in fresh water. The assessment does not include gas dissolved in water contained in shale beds. A series of maps display the information used in the computation. Methane solubility values were multiplied by porosity--feet values for each 1000-foot interval. The total dissolved methane in the resource base is estimated to be 6,143 trillion cubic feet (Tcf); assumptions on the effect of salinity reduce this to 3,264 Tcf. This figure does not include methane beneath the Texas coast. Very preliminary estimates of the recoverable proportion of dissolved gas in the highly ''geopressured'' zones range from 1 to over 20 percent. Not all of the resource base estimates of 3,264 Tcf occurs in the highly geopressured zone, and the proportions individually allocatable within the resource base to the highly ''geopressured'' zone, to the intermediate-pressure zone, and to the normal or ''hydropressure'' zone cannotbe estimated readily. The environmental aspects of recovery of dissolved gas are also presented. The review is necessarily generalized, since it could not be based on actual experience. The problems include subsidence of land surface and possibly increased seismic activity. Fluid withdrawal might result in subsidence of the land surface, as well as activation of growth faults, with adjustments

  15. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  16. Dissonant Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2013-01-01

    Nature restoration is far from being a neural undertaking. Just like any other type of heritage production it can be the source of dissonance – ‘our’ nature is not necessary ‘their’ nature. Often this dissonance is managed in ways, which are not particular sensitive to site-specificity. As exempl...... and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. Evidence can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015), a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  17. Upper mantle structure beneath the Hawaiian swell: Constraints from the ocean seismic network pilot experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. A.; Vernon, F. L.; Orcutt, J. A.; Stephen, R. A.

    2002-06-01

    Data from two broadband, ocean-bottom seismographic stations deployed ~225 km southwest of Oahu, Hawaii during the Ocean Seismic Network Pilot Experiment provide constraints on upper mantle structure beneath the Hawaiian swell. Receiver functions show that the mantle transition zone is thinned by >50 km relative to reference model PA5, which, in the absence of compositional changes, implies excess temperatures of >350 K in the transition zone. The combination of the measurements reported here and the thickness variations reported by Li et al. [2000] imply that the transition zone is thinned by 30 +/- 15 km over an along-swell dimension of at least 700 km. At ~80 km depth, P-to-S converted phases are identified from the Gutenberg discontinuity marking the lid of the oceanic low-velocity zone and the base of the lithosphere. Shear-wave splitting measurements imply that fast-polarization azimuths are intermediate between the absolute plate-motion vector and the fossil spreading direction; multi-event stacked values of ø and δt are -80° and 1.5 s, respectively.

  18. The lithosphere structure beneath the central Mediterranean from S receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Irene; Miller, Meghan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; O'Driscoll, Leland

    2017-04-01

    The last piece of Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere from the Neo-Tethys Ocean is being consumed beneath Eurasia in the Central Mediterranean area, squeezed by the continuing convergence of Africa with the Eurasian plate. Convergence between Africa and Eurasia has been ongoing since the Cenozoic, forming a series of arcuate shaped subduction zones, and producing the current complex plate boundary that strikes across the Mediterranean area. Moreover, geophysical imaging depicts a variable lithospheric structure related to remnants of both oceanic and continental lithosphere within this convergent margin, which contributes to its complexity. In fact, the subduction/collision of blocks with different rheologies and thicknesses (e.g. continental or oceanic) has resulted in complex setting that includes accretionary wedges, orogenesis, and formation of an intricate back-arc/fore-arc/trench system. In order to shed light on these tectonic structures, we provide observations and interpretations of the lithospheric structure of the central Mediterranean via S receiver functions analysis. Teleseismic observations recorded at permanent and temporary seismic stations have been employed to produce images of the lithospheric discontinuities with tens of kilometers lateral resolution. We illustrate the feasibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary detection on a regional scale, and detect the occurrence of deeper seismic discontinuities due both to positive and negative seismic velocity jumps.

  19. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics beneath on-site wastewater treatment systems in Pitt County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosario, Katie L; Humphrey, Charles P; Mitra, Siddhartha; O'Driscoll, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWS) are a potentially significant non-point source of nutrients to groundwater and surface waters, and are extensively used in coastal North Carolina. The goal of this study was to determine the treatment efficiency of four OWS in reducing total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations before discharge to groundwater and/or adjacent surface water. Piezometers were installed for groundwater sample collection and nutrient analysis at four separate residences that use OWS. Septic tank effluent, groundwater, and surface water samples (from an adjacent stream) were collected four times during 2012 for TDN and DOC analysis and pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and dissolved oxygen measurements. Treatment efficiencies from the tank to the groundwater beneath the drainfields ranged from 33 to 95% for TDN and 45 to 82% for DOC, although dilution accounted for most of the concentration reductions. There was a significant positive correlation between nitrate concentration and separation distance from trench bottom to water table and a significant negative correlation between DOC concentration and separation distance. The TDN and DOC transport (>15 m) from two OWS with groundwater saturated drainfield trenches was significant.

  20. First evidence for high anelastic attenuation beneath the Red Sea from Love wave analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadiouche, Ouiza (Seismologisches Zentralobservatorium, Erlangen (West Germany))

    1990-10-01

    Attenuation coefficients of Love waves are determined for two seismic paths along the Red Sea. The attenuation coefficients are obtained using the multiple filter method for periods from 25 to 130 s along one path and from 40 to 130 s along the second one. The two sets of observations are in good agreement with anomalously high attenuation coefficients similar to those reported across a young part of the Pacific Ocean. Indeed, the values lie on average between 3.3 {plus minus} 0.6 and 1.1 {plus minus} 0.3 (10{sup {minus}4}km{sup {minus}1}) higher values being observed at shorter periods. In a second part of the paper, these apparent attenuation observations are interpreted in terms of a distribution of intrinsic absorption in the upper mantle. A frequency independent Q{sub {beta}} model is obtained using a trial-and-error method. The best fit to the data required a large and very low Q{sub {beta}} (30-50) zone below a depth of 50 km, underlying a thin and high Q{sub {beta}} (200-300) lid. These results are consistent with high heat flows and low velocities which characterize this tectonically active area, and corroborate the inference of anomalously high temperatures and low viscosity in the upper mantle beneath the Red Sea from recent seismological results.

  1. The efficiency of different light sources to polymerize resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Usumez, S; Ozturk, B

    2004-02-01

    Plasma arc light units for curing resin composites have been introduced with the claim of relatively short curing times. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different light sources to polymerize dual curing resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers. Twenty extracted healthy human maxillary centrals were used. Teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin, labial surface facing up. Cavity preparation was carried out on labial surfaces. These teeth were divided into two groups of 10 each. The resin cement/veneer combination was exposed to two different photo polymerization units. A conventional halogen light (Hilux 350, Express Dental Products) and a plasma arc light (Power PAC, ADT) were used to polymerize resin cement. Ten specimens were polymerized conventionally (40 s) and the other specimens by plasma arc curing (PAC) (6 s). Two samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microshear testing and failure values were recorded. Statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of veneers exposed to conventional light and PAC unit (P < 0.001). Samples polymerized with halogen light showed better bond strength. The results of this study suggest that the curing efficiency of PAC through ceramic was lower compared with conventional polymerization for the exposure durations tested in this study.

  2. Determination of Moho depth and dip beneath MEDNET station AQU by analysis of broadband receiver functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Morelli

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We applied the receiver function technique to retrieve Moho depth and dip beneath the MEDNET very-broadband seismographic station at l'Aquila, in the Central Apennines. Broadband data available for teleseismic events recorded in two years of operation were sufficient to delineate a rather simple structure consisting of a 32-34 km thick crust, in agreement with previous studies based on refraction seismics. In addition, the data show relatively large variation in the amplitude of the converted P-to-S phase generated at the crust-mantle interface as a function of azimuth. These variations are consistent with synthetic receiver functions generated for an incident P wave interacting with an interface dipping ~ 8° to the north. Observations of amplitude ratios of converted phases, polarity of first-motion in the SH directíon, and relative travel time delay are all consistent with a model assuming a Moho discontinuity about 33 km deep gently dipping towards north. The receiver function technique has shown to be an efficient tool for investigating deep crustal structure, giving localized but reliable information.

  3. Pathway from subducting slab to surface for melt and fluids beneath Mount Rainier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, R Shane; Evans, Rob L; Wannamaker, Philip E; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2014-07-17

    Convergent margin volcanism originates with partial melting, primarily of the upper mantle, into which the subducting slab descends. Melting of this material can occur in one of two ways. The flow induced in the mantle by the slab can result in upwelling and melting through adiabatic decompression. Alternatively, fluids released from the descending slab through dehydration reactions can migrate into the hot mantle wedge, inducing melting by lowering the solidus temperature. The two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. In either case, the buoyant melts make their way towards the surface to reside in the crust or to be extruded as lava. Here we use magnetotelluric data collected across the central state of Washington, USA, to image the complete pathway for the fluid-melt phase. By incorporating constraints from a collocated seismic study into the magnetotelluric inversion process, we obtain superior constraints on the fluids and melt in a subduction setting. Specifically, we are able to identify and connect fluid release at or near the top of the slab, migration of fluids into the overlying mantle wedge, melting in the wedge, and transport of the melt/fluid phase to a reservoir in the crust beneath Mt Rainier.

  4. Vigorous lateral export of the meltwater outflow from beneath an Antarctic ice shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabato, Alberto C. Naveira; Forryan, Alexander; Dutrieux, Pierre; Brannigan, Liam; Biddle, Louise C.; Heywood, Karen J.; Jenkins, Adrian; Firing, Yvonne L.; Kimura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    The instability and accelerated melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet are among the foremost elements of contemporary global climate change. The increased freshwater output from Antarctica is important in determining sea level rise, the fate of Antarctic sea ice and its effect on the Earth’s albedo, ongoing changes in global deep-ocean ventilation, and the evolution of Southern Ocean ecosystems and carbon cycling. A key uncertainty in assessing and predicting the impacts of Antarctic Ice Sheet melting concerns the vertical distribution of the exported meltwater. This is usually represented by climate-scale models as a near-surface freshwater input to the ocean, yet measurements around Antarctica reveal the meltwater to be concentrated at deeper levels. Here we use observations of the turbulent properties of the meltwater outflows from beneath a rapidly melting Antarctic ice shelf to identify the mechanism responsible for the depth of the meltwater. We show that the initial ascent of the meltwater outflow from the ice shelf cavity triggers a centrifugal overturning instability that grows by extracting kinetic energy from the lateral shear of the background oceanic flow. The instability promotes vigorous lateral export, rapid dilution by turbulent mixing, and finally settling of meltwater at depth. We use an idealized ocean circulation model to show that this mechanism is relevant to a broad spectrum of Antarctic ice shelves. Our findings demonstrate that the mechanism producing meltwater at depth is a dynamically robust feature of Antarctic melting that should be incorporated into climate-scale models.

  5. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (Psoils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  6. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqiang Wei

    Full Text Available Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (P<0.05 positive correlation between the densities of SOC and total nitrogen (N in the open soils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt. The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  7. Slow slip rate and excitation efficiency of deep low-frequency tremors beneath southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiku, Kumiko; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Matsuzawa, Takanori; Mizukami, Tomoyuki

    2018-01-01

    We estimated the long-term average slip rate on the plate interface across the Nankai subduction zone during 2002-2013 using deep low-frequency tremors as a proxy for short-term slow slip events based on empirical relations between the seismic moment of short-term slow slip events and tremor activities. The slip rate in each region is likely to compensate for differences between the convergence rate and the slip deficit rate of the subducting Philippine Sea plate estimated geodetically, although the uncertainty is large. This implies that the strain because of the subduction of the plate is partially stored as the slip deficit and partially released by slow slip events during the interseismic period. The excitation efficiency of the tremors for the slow slip events differs among regions: it is high in the northern Kii region. Some events in the western Shikoku region show a somewhat large value. Antigorite serpentinite of two types exists in the mantle wedge beneath southwest Japan. Slips with more effective excitation of tremors presumably occur in high-temperature conditions in the antigorite + olivine stability field. Other slip events with low excitation efficiency are distributed in the antigorite + brucite stability field. Considering the formation reactions of these minerals and their characteristic structures, events with high excitation efficiency can be correlated with a high pore fluid pressure condition. This result suggests that variation in pore fluid pressure on the plate interface affects the magnitude of tremors excited by slow slip events.

  8. Crustal seismic structure beneath the Deccan Traps area (Gujarat, India), from local travel-time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Srichand; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Mishra, Santosh

    2016-03-01

    The Gujarat region in western India is known for its intra-plate seismic activity, including the Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake, a reverse-faulting event that reactivated normal faults of the Mesozoic Kachchh rift zone. The Late Cretaceous Deccan Traps, one of the largest igneous provinces on the Earth, cover the southern part of Gujarat. This study is aimed at bringing light to the crustal rift zone structure and likely origin of the Traps based on the velocity structure of the crust beneath Gujarat. Tomographic inversion of the Gujarat region was done using the non-linear, passive-source tomographic algorithm, LOTOS. We use high-quality arrival times of 22,280 P and 22,040 S waves from 3555 events recorded from August 2006 to May 2011 at 83 permanent and temporary stations installed in Gujarat state by the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR). We conclude that the resulting high-velocity anomalies, which reach down to the Moho, are most likely related to intrusives associated with the Deccan Traps. Low velocity anomalies are found in sediment-filled Mesozoic rift basins and are related to weakened zones of faults and fracturing. A low-velocity anomaly in the north of the region coincides with the seismogenic zone of the reactivated Kachchh rift system, which is apparently associated with the channel of the outpouring of Deccan basalt.

  9. Measurement of dynamic scattering beneath stationary layers using multiple-exposure laser speckle contrast analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Evan; Thompson, Oliver; Andrews, Mike

    2013-02-01

    The retina/choroid structure is an example of a complex biological target featuring highly perfused tissues and vessel flows both near the surface and at some depth. Laser speckle imaging can be used to image blood flows but static scattering paths present a problem for extracting quantifiable data. The speckle contrast is artificially increased by any residual specular reflection and light paths where no moving scatterers are encountered. Here we present results from phantom experiments demonstrating that the static and dynamic contributions to laser speckle contrast can be separated when camera exposures of varying duration are used. The stationary contrast parameter follows the thickness and strength of the overlying scatterer while the dynamic proportion of the scatter resulting from vessel flows and Brownian motion is unchanged. The importance of separating the two scatter components is illustrated by in vivo measurements from a scarred human retina, where the effect of the un-perfused scar tissue can be decoupled from the dynamic speckle from the intact tissue beneath it.

  10. Upper crustal structure beneath East Java from ambient noise tomography: A preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha, Agustya Adi [Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia); Graduate Research on Earthquakes and Active Tectonics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri [Global Geophysics Group, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia); Center for Disaster Mitigation, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia); Cummins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Masturyono [Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    East Java has a fairly complex geological structure. Physiographically East Java can be divided into three zones, i.e. the Southern Mountains zone in the southern part, the Kendeng zone in the middle part, and the Rembang zone in the northern part. Most of the seismic hazards in this region are due to processes in the upper crust. In this study, the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method is used to image the upper crustal structure beneath East Java. We have used seismic waveform data recorded by 8Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 16 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. The data were processed to obtain waveforms fromnoise cross-correlation between pairs of seismographic stations. Our preliminary results indicate that the Kendeng zone, an area of low gravity anomaly, is associated with a low velocity zone. On the other hand, the southern mountain range, which has a high gravity anomaly, is related to a high velocity anomaly as shown by our tomographic images.

  11. Upper crustal structure beneath East Java from ambient noise tomography: A preliminary result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Cummins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Masturyono

    2015-04-01

    East Java has a fairly complex geological structure. Physiographically East Java can be divided into three zones, i.e. the Southern Mountains zone in the southern part, the Kendeng zone in the middle part, and the Rembang zone in the northern part. Most of the seismic hazards in this region are due to processes in the upper crust. In this study, the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method is used to image the upper crustal structure beneath East Java. We have used seismic waveform data recorded by 8Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 16 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. The data were processed to obtain waveforms fromnoise cross-correlation between pairs of seismographic stations. Our preliminary results indicate that the Kendeng zone, an area of low gravity anomaly, is associated with a low velocity zone. On the other hand, the southern mountain range, which has a high gravity anomaly, is related to a high velocity anomaly as shown by our tomographic images.

  12. Postcolonial Myth in Salman Rushdie’s The Ground Beneath Her Feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doncu Roxana Elena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcolonial writers like Salman Rushdie often write back to the “empire” by appropriating myth and allegory. In The Ground beneath Her Feet, Rushdie rewrites the mythological story of Orpheus and Eurydice, using katabasis (the trope of the descent into Hell to comment both on the situation of the postcolonial writer from a personal perspective and to attempt a redefinition of postcolonial migrant identity-formation. Hell has a symbolic function, pointing both to the external context of globalization and migration (which results in the characters’ disorientation and to an interior space which can be interpreted either as a source of unrepressed energies and creativity (in a Romantic vein or as the space of the abject (in the manner of Julia Kristeva. The article sets out to investigate the complex ways in which the Orphic myth and katabasis are employed to shed light on the psychology of the creative artist and on the reconfiguration of identity that becomes the task of the postcolonial migrant subject. The journey into the underworld functions simultaneously as an allegory of artistic creation and identity reconstruction.

  13. The crustal structure beneath The Netherlands derived from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistira, Tedi; Paulssen, Hanneke; Trampert, Jeannot

    2017-11-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive 3-D model of the crust beneath The Netherlands. To obtain this model, we designed the NARS-Netherlands project, a dense deployment of broadband stations in the area. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion was measured from ambient noise cross-correlations. Azimuthally anisotropic group velocity maps were then constructed and the isotropic part was used to determine a shear wave speed model that includes the effects of radial anisotropy. Employing the Neighbourhood Algorithm for the depth inversion, we obtained probabilistic estimates of the radially anisotropic model parameters. We found that the variations in the thickness of the top layer largely match the transition from sediments of Permian age to those of Carboniferous age. Regions of high faulting density such as the West Netherlands Basin and Roer Valley Graben are recognized in our model by their negative radial anisotropy (VSH - VSV < 0). The model has a mid-crustal discontinuity at a depth of around 13 km and the average Moho depth is 33 km, with most of its depth variations within 2 km. Specifically, a localized Moho uplift to a depth of 29 km is found within Roer Valley Graben, in the Campine region in Belgium. Furthermore, our Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity data at periods of around 20 s show evidence for azimuthal anisotropy with a NW-SE fast direction. This anisotropy is likely related to NW-SE rock fabric in the lower crust thought to originate from the Caledonian deformation.

  14. 3D seismic traveltime tomography beneath the Pannonian basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timkó, Máté; Wéber, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    The Pannonian basin and the surrounding orogens are located in central Europe and are parts of the Alpine-Carpathian orogenic mountain belts. This is a back-arc basin characterized by a thinned lower crust and an updoming mantle. Benath the basin the Moho discontinuity is not deeper than 30 km and the lithosphere also has smaller thickness ( 80 km) than the continental average. Imaging the velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle may help us to better understand the structure and formation of the Pannonian region. In this study we have estimated the three-dimensional (3D) P-wave velocity structure and Moho geometry beneath the Pannonian Basin by analysing the seismic data from the ISC bulletin using the FMTOMO tomographic inversion software package. The inversion procedure applies the fast marching method for calculating the forward step, and the subspace inversion method to retrieve the model parameters. In the inversion we used local, regional and teleseismic earthquakes as well. Altogether, we had more than 120 thousand P-wave arrival time data of more than 9000 seismic events from the time period between 2004 and 2014. The resulting 3D velocity image highly resembles the known geologic and tectonic structure of the area and is comperable to earlier tomographic images published in the literature. Also, the retrieved velocity anomalies correlate well with the Moho topography, the orogenic belts and the deep basins of the region.

  15. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Nevada test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, J. M.; Minster, J. B.; Rodi, W. L.; Jordan, T. H.; Masso, J. F.

    1981-08-01

    We have constructed a model of the three dimensional velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle beneath NTS. This model was obtained by inversion of teleseismic travel times from NTS explosions reported for a set of globally distributed seismograph stations. Although the geometry is conceptually the reciprocal of the classical geometry involving a localized network and distributed teleseismic sources, several important differences emerge. In particular, the data are contaminated by different error processes, and different correction terms need be applied to the raw travel time data. We present algorithms which take advantage of the large number of raw data initially available to improve to some extent the signal-to-noise ratio, and lead to a reduction of the inverse problem to computationally manageable size. In addition, we show how projection operators can be used to formulate an equivalent inverse problem with smaller dimensions which is insensitive to unknown baseline corrections and similar nuisance parameters. Finally, we develop an algorithm which permits further reduction in problem size by grouping redundant data with minimal loss of information and with further noise reduction.

  16. Seismic evidence for a possible deep crustal hot zone beneath Southwest Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Ashton; Shen, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Crustal pathways connecting deep sources of melt and the active volcanoes they supply are poorly understood. Beneath Mounts St. Helens, Adams, and Rainier these pathways connect subduction-induced ascending melts to shallow magma reservoirs. Petrogenetic modeling predicts that when these melts are emplaced as a succession of sills into the lower crust they generate deep crustal hot zones. While these zones are increasingly recognized as a primary site for silicic differentiation at a range of volcanic settings globally, imaging them remains challenging. Near Mount Rainier, ascending melt has previously been imaged ~28 km northwest of the volcano, while to the south, the volcano lies on the margin of a broad conductive region in the deep crust. Using 3D full-waveform tomography, we reveal an expansive low-velocity zone, which we interpret as a possible hot zone, linking ascending melts and shallow reservoirs. This hot zone may supply evolved magmas to Mounts St. Helens and Adams, and possibly Rainier, and could contain approximately twice the melt volume as the total eruptive products of all three volcanoes combined. Hot zones like this may be the primary reservoirs for arc volcanism, influencing compositional variations and spatial-segmentation along the entire 1100 km-long Cascades Arc.

  17. Intermittent tremor migrations beneath Guerrero, Mexico, and implications for fault healing within the slow slip zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.

    2017-01-01

    Slow slip events exhibit significant complexity in slip evolution and variations in recurrence intervals. Behavior that varies systematically with recurrence interval is likely to reflect different extents of fault healing between these events. Here we use high-resolution tremor catalogs beneath Guerrero, Mexico, to investigate the mechanics of slow slip. We observe complex tremor propagation styles, including rapid tremor migrations propagating either along the main tremor front or backward, reminiscent of those in northern Cascadia. We also find many migrations that originate well behind the front and repeatedly occupy the same source region during a tremor episode, similar to those previously reported from Shikoku, Japan. These migrations could be driven by slow slip in the surrounding regions, with recurrence intervals possibly modulated by tides. The propagation speed of these migrations decreases systematically with time since the previous migration over the same source area. Tremor amplitudes seem consistent with changes in the propagation speeds being controlled primarily by changes in the slip speeds. One interpretation is that the high propagation speeds and inferred high slip speeds during the migrations with short recurrence intervals are caused by incomplete healing within the host rock adjacent to the shear zone, which could lead to high permeability and reduced dilatant strengthening of the fault gouge. Similar processes may operate in other slow slip source regions such as Cascadia.

  18. Basement Structure Beneath the New York-Alabama Lineament and Amish Anomaly in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, L. W.; Singleton, R. F.; Steltenpohl, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    The southeastern margin of the United States has been modified by at least two complete successions of Wilson cycles. This study uses gravity and magnetic data to reveal the geologic record of these cycles in the basement rocks of Alabama. The magnetic data suggest crustal segmentation into three distinct regions that are separated from one another by the New-York Alabama lineament and the Amish Anomaly. These two anomalies mark the western and eastern boundaries, respectively, of a west-dipping terrane with high density and magnetic susceptibility. Both anomalies reflect major sutures that record accretion of crustal blocks onto the proto-Laurentia margin during the Grenville orogeny. Subsequent breakup of Rodinia and opening of the Iapetus Ocean occurred outboard of these accreted crustal blocks, which now underlie the decollement and overlying Paleozoic sediments that form the Black Warrior, Cahaba, and Coosa basins in central Alabama. The orientation of basement faults beneath these basins are consistent with focal mechanisms of recent seismic activity in central Alabama. The tectonic models derived in this study are also consistent with recently proposed seismotectonic models developed for the Eastern Tennessee seismic zone to the northeast of our study area.

  19. Matematica Natural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  20. Framing nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis is about communication concerning nature in the Netherlands. The purpose of this exploratory study is to take both a theoretical and an empirical look at whether (implicit) religious elements play a role in this communication about nature in the Netherlands.   In this PhD thesis

  1. Natur formet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011.......Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011....

  2. Specialized synaptic pathway for chromatic signals beneath S-cone photoreceptors is common to human, Old and New World primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puller, Christian; Manookin, Michael B; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of the soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor protein syntaxin-4 and the Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) were investigated in the outer plexiform layer of human retina using immunohistochemistry. Both proteins, which are proposed to be components of a gamma-aminobutyric acid mediated feed-forward circuit from horizontal cells directly to bipolar cells, were enriched beneath S-cones. The expression pattern of syntaxin-4 was further analyzed in baboon and marmoset to determine if the synaptic specialization is common to primates. Syntaxin-4 was enriched beneath S-cones in both species, which together with the human results indicates that this specialization may have evolved for the purpose of mediating unique color vision capacities that are exclusive to primates.

  3. Crustal structure beneath two seismic stations in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone derived from receiver function analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syuhada, E-mail: hadda9@gmail.com [Graduate Research on Earthquake and Active Tectonics (GREAT), Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks Puspiptek Serpong, Tangsel 15314, Banten Indonesia (Indonesia); Hananto, Nugroho D.; Handayani, Lina [Research Centre for Geotechnology - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Jl. Sangkuriang (Kompleks LIPI) Bandung 40135 (Indonesia); Puspito, Nanang T; Yudistira, Tedi [Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering ITB, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Anggono, Titi [Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks Puspiptek Serpong, Tangsel 15314, Banten Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    We analyzed receiver functions to estimate the crustal thickness and velocity structure beneath two stations of Geofon (GE) network in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. The stations are located in two different tectonic regimes: Sumbawa Island (station PLAI) and Timor Island (station SOEI) representing the oceanic and continental characters, respectively. We analyzed teleseismic events of 80 earthquakes to calculate the receiver functions using the time-domain iterative deconvolution technique. We employed 2D grid search (H-κ) algorithm based on the Moho interaction phases to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. We also derived the S-wave velocity variation with depth beneath both stations by inverting the receiver functions. We obtained that beneath station PLAI the crustal thickness is about 27.8 km with Vp/Vs ratio 2.01. As station SOEI is covered by very thick low-velocity sediment causing unstable solution for the inversion, we modified the initial velocity model by adding the sediment thickness estimated using high frequency content of receiver functions in H-κ stacking process. We obtained the crustal thickness is about 37 km with VP/Vs ratio 2.2 beneath station SOEI. We suggest that the high Vp/Vs in station PLAI may indicate the presence of fluid ascending from the subducted plate to the volcanic arc, whereas the high Vp/Vs in station SOEI could be due to the presence of sediment and rich mafic composition in the upper crust and possibly related to the serpentinization process in the lower crust. We also suggest that the difference in velocity models and crustal thicknesses between stations PLAI and SOEI are consistent with their contrasting tectonic environments.

  4. Modeling Magnetic Fields from a DC Power Cable Buried Beneath San Francisco Bay Based on Empirical Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T.; Klimley, A. Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind...

  5. Permeability of sheeted dykes beneath oceanic ridges: Strain experiments coupled with 3D numerical modeling of the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho,Gabriel; Branquet, Yannick; Sizaret, Stanislas; Arbaret, Laurent; Champallier, Rémi; Rozenbaum, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Permeability laboratory measurements under in-situ pressures, temperature and strain have been performed on three different diabase alteration facies (metadiabase, chloritized diabase, epidosite) from the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus. This aims to study the relations between hydrodynamics, deformation and hydrothermal reaction in the sheeted dyke complex beneath oceanic ridges. The use of water as pore fluid in these experiments favors hydrothermal fluid-rock interactions...

  6. Mapping the mantle transition zone beneath Hawaii from Ps receiver functions: Evidence for a hot plume and cold mantle downwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Matthew R.; Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas; Laske, Gabi

    2017-09-01

    Hawaii is the archetypal example of hotspot volcanism. Classic plume theory suggests a vertical plume ascent from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. However, recently it has been suggested that the plume path may be more complex. Determining the exact trajectory of the Hawaiian plume seismic anomaly in the mantle has proven challenging. We determine P-to-S (Ps) receiver functions to illuminate the 410- and 660-km depth mantle discontinuities beneath the Hawaiian Islands using waveforms recorded on land and ocean-bottom seismometers, applying new corrections for tilt and coherence to the ocean bottom data. Our 3-D depth-migrated maps provide enhanced lateral resolution of the mantle transition zone discontinuities. The 410 discontinuity is characterised by a deepened area beneath central Hawaii, surrounded by an elevated shoulder. At the 660 discontinuity, shallow topography is located to the north and far south of the islands, and a deep topographic anomaly is located far west and east. The transition zone thickness varies laterally by ±13 km depth: thin beneath north-central Hawaii and thick farther away in a horseshoe-like feature. We infer that at 660-km depth a broad or possibly a double region of upwelling converges into a single plume beneath central Hawaii at 410-km depth. As the plume rises farther, uppermost mantle melting and flow results in the downwelling of cold material, down to at least 410 km surrounding the plume stem. This result in the context of others supports complex plume dynamics including a possible non-vertical plume path and adjacent mantle downwellings.

  7. Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-16

    This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

  8. Flow and geochemistry of groundwater beneath a back-barrier lagoon: The subterranean estuary at Chincoteague Bay, Maryland, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, J.F.; Böhlke, J.K.; Krantz, D.E.; Tobias, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand large-scale interactions between fresh and saline groundwater beneath an Atlantic coastal estuary, an offshore drilling and sampling study was performed in a large barrier-bounded lagoon, Chincoteague Bay, Maryland, USA. Groundwater that was significantly fresher than overlying bay water was found in shallow plumes up to 8??m thick extending more than 1700??m offshore. Groundwater saltier than bay surface water was found locally beneath the lagoon and the barrier island, indicating recharge by saline water concentrated by evaporation prior to infiltration. Steep salinity and nutrient gradients occur within a few meters of the sediment surface in most locations studied, with buried peats and estuarine muds acting as confining units. Groundwater ages were generally more than 50??years in both fresh and brackish waters as deep as 23??m below the bay bottom. Water chemistry and isotopic data indicate that freshened plumes beneath the estuary are mixtures of water originally recharged on land and varying amounts of estuarine surface water that circulated through the bay floor, possibly at some distance from the sampling location. Ammonium is the dominant fixed nitrogen species in saline groundwater beneath the estuary at the locations sampled. Isotopic and dissolved-gas data from one location indicate that denitrification within the subsurface flow system removed terrestrial nitrate from fresh groundwater prior to discharge along the western side of the estuary. Similar situations, with one or more shallow semi-confined flow systems where groundwater geochemistry is strongly influenced by circulation of surface estuary water through organic-rich sediments, may be common on the Atlantic margin and elsewhere.

  9. Subduction of lower continental crust beneath the Pamir imaged by receiver functions from the seismological TIPAGE network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. M.; Yuan, X.; Schurr, B.; Mechie, J.; Sippl, C.; Kufner, S.; Haberland, C. A.; Minaev, V.; Oimahmadov, I.; Gadoev, M.; Abdybachaev, U.; Orunbaev, S.

    2013-12-01

    As the northwestern promontory of the Tibetan Plateau, the Pamir forms an outstanding part of the India-Asia convergence zone. The Pamir plateau has an average elevation of more than 4000 m surrounded by peaks exceeding 7000 m at its northern, eastern and southern borders. The Pamir is thought to consist of the same collage of continental terranes as Tibet. However, in this region the Indian-Asian continental collision presents an extreme situation since, compared to Tibet, in the Pamir a similar amount of north-south convergence has been accommodated within a much smaller distance. The Pamir hosts a zone of intermediate depth earthquakes being the seismic imprint of Earth's most spectacular active intra-continental subduction zone. We present receiver function (RF) images from the TIPAGE seismic profile giving evidence that the intermediate depth seismicity is situated within a subducted layer of lower continental crust: We observe a southerly dipping 10-15 km thick low-velocity zone (LVZ), that starts from the base of the crust and extends to a depth of more than 150 km enveloping the intermediate depth earthquakes that have been located with high precision from our local network records. In a second northwest to southeast cross section we observe that towards the western Pamir the dip direction of the LVZ bends to the southeast following the geometry of the intermediate depth seismic zone. Our observations imply that the complete arcuate intermediate depth seismic zone beneath the Pamir traces a slab of subducting Eurasian continental lower crust. These observations provide important implications for the geodynamics of continental collision: First, it shows that under extreme conditions lower crust can be brought to mantle depths despite its buoyancy, a fact that is also testified by the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Recent results from teleseismic tomography show a signal of Asian mantle lithosphere down to 600 km depth, implying a great

  10. Mantle plumes beneath the South Pacific superswell revealed by finite frequency P tomography using regional seafloor and island data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, M.; Yoshimitsu, J.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Isse, T.; Shiobara, H.; Reymond, D.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-11-01

    We present a new tomographic image beneath the South Pacific superswell, using finite frequency P wave travel time tomography with global and regional data. The regional stations include broadband ocean-bottom seismograph stations. The tomographic image shows slow anomalies of 200-300 km in diameter beneath most hot spots in the studied region, extending continuously from the shallow upper mantle to 400 km depth. Narrow and weak slow anomalies are detected at depths of 500-1000 km, connecting the upper mantle slow anomalies with large-scale slow anomalies with lateral dimension of 1000-2000 km prevailing below 1000 km depth down to the core-mantle boundary. There are two slow anomalies around the Society hot spot at depths shallower than 400 km, which both emerge from the same slow anomaly at 500 km depth. One of them is located beneath the Society hot spot and the other underlies 500 km east of the Society hot spot, where no volcanism is observed.

  11. Efficacy evaluation of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma beneath the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song WANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the feasibility, safety and efficacy of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beneath the diaphragm. Methods Twenty- three consecutive patients with solitary HCC beneath the diaphragm were treated by laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided RFA in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from January 2013 to March 2016. We observed the perioperative complications and followed- up long-term effect. Results All the 23 patients successfully underwent laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation. No serious complications such as massive hemorrhage, biliary fistula and severe pleural effusion, hemopneumothorax occurred in the patients during perioperative period. CT examination 2-3 days after the operation revealed that the tumor was completely covered by the ablation area. Besides, the survival condition was satisfactory during follow-up period of 9-38 months. Conclusion Laparoscopy-assisted ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation is effective and safe for HCC beneath the diaphragm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.16

  12. Crustal structure beneath the western Hubei Province of China from joint inversion of ambient noise and receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, S.; Zhu, L.; Luo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate crustal S-wave structure beneath the western Hubei Province, which is located at a topographic step in China with high-rising plateaus to the west and low-elevation plains to the east. We collected two-year continuous seismic waveform records of 22 permanent broadband stations and six-month records of 29 portable stations and did cross-correlations of the waveform data between stations. We then measured phase/group velocity dispersion curves from 8 to 35s using frequency-time analysis (FTAN) method and performed surface wave tomography using the fast marching method to obtain phase/group velocity maps. We finally constructed high resolution 3-D shear-wave velocity structure beneath the western Hubei Province from joint inversion of surface wave dispersion data and receiver functions. The 3D model shows shear velocity variations are well correlated with geological features, such as sedimentary basins and mountain ranges. In particular, a high velocity anomaly beneath the Three Gorges Reservoir Dam indicates that it is located in a tectonic stable region.

  13. Lateral variation in upper mantle temperature and composition beneath mid-ocean ridges inferred from shear-wave propagation, geoid, and bathymetry. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Anne Francis

    1991-01-01

    Resolution of both the extent and mechanism of lateral heterogeneity in the upper mantle constraints the nature and scales of mantle convection. Oceanic regions are of particular interest as they are likely to provide the closest glimpse at the patterns of temperature anomalies and convective flow in the upper mantle because of their young age and simple crustal structure relative to continental regions. Lateral variations were determined in the seismic velocity and attenuation structure of the lithosphere and astenosphere beneath the oceans, and these seismological observations were combined with the data and theory of geoid and bathymetry anomalies in order to test and improve current models for seafloor spreading and mantle convection. Variations were determined in mantle properties on a scale of about 1000 km, comparable to the thickness of the upper mantle. Seismic velocity, geoid, and bathymetry anomalies are all sensitive to variations in upper mantle density, and inversions were formulated to combine quantitatively these different data and to search for a common origin. Variations in mantle density can be either of thermal or compositional origin and are related to mantle convection or differentiation.

  14. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  15. In situ denitrification and DNRA rates in groundwater beneath an integrated constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M M R; Fenton, O; Müller, C; Harrington, R; Johnston, P; Richards, K G

    2017-03-15

    Evaluation of the environmental benefits of constructed wetlands (CWs) requires an understanding of their impacts on the groundwater quality under the wetlands. Empirical mass-balance (nitrogen in/nitrogen out) approaches for estimating nitrogen (N) removal in CWs do not characterise the final fate of N; where nitrate (NO3--N) could be reduced to either ammonium (NH4+-N) or N2 with the potential for significant production of N2O. Herein, in situ denitrification and DNRA (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) rates were measured in groundwater beneath cells of an earthen lined integrated constructed wetland (ICW, used to remove the nutrients from municipal wastewater) using the 15N-enriched NO3--N push-pull method. Experiments were conducted utilising replicated (n = 3) shallow (1 m depth) and deep (4 m depth) piezometers installed along two control planes. These control planes allowed for the assessment of groundwater underlying high (Cell 2, septic tank waste) and low (Cell 3) load cells of the ICW. Background piezometers were also installed off-site. Results showed that denitrification (N2O-N + N2-N) and DNRA were major NO3--N consumption processes accounting together for 54-79% of the total biochemical consumption of the applied NO3--N. Of which 14-16% and 40-63% were consumed by denitrification and DNRA, respectively. Both processes differed significantly across ICW cells indicating that N transformation depends on nutrient loading rates and were significantly higher in shallow compared to the deep groundwater. In such a reduced environment (low dissolved oxygen and low redox potential), higher DNRA over the denitrification rate can be attributed to the high C concentration and high TC/NO3--N ratio. Low pH (6.5-7.1) in this system might have limited denitrification to some extent to an incomplete state, evidenced by a high N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratio (0.35 ± 0.17, SE). A relatively higher N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratio and higher DNRA rate over

  16. A Microbial Community in Sediments Beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet, Ice Stream C (Kamb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, M.; Han, S.; Foo, W.; Bui, D.; Lanoil, B.

    2004-12-01

    In 2000, an ice-drilling project focusing on the "sticky spot" of Ice Stream C recovered cores of sub-glacial sediments from beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet. We have characterized several chemical and microbiological parameters of the sole intact sediment core. Pore waters extracted from these sediments were brackish and some were supersaturated with respect to calcite. Ion chromatography demonstrated the presence of several organic acids at low, but detectable, levels in the pore water. DAPI direct cell counts were approximately 107 cells g-1. Aerobic viable plate counts were much lower than direct cell counts; however, they were two orders of magnitude higher on plates incubated at low temperature (4 ° C; 3.63 x 105 CFU ml-1) than at higher temperatures (ca. 22° C; 1.5 x 103 CFU ml-1); no colonies were detected on plates incubated anaerobically at either temperature. 16S rDNA clone library analysis indicates extremely limited bacterial diversity in these samples: six phylogenetic clades were detected. The three dominant bacterial phylogenetic clades in the clone libraries (252 clones total) were most closely related to Thiobacillus thioparus (180 clones), Polaromonas vacuolata (34 clones), and Gallionella ferruginea (35 clones) and their relatives; one clone each represented the other three phylogenetic clades (most closely related to Ralstonia pickettii, Lysobacter antibioticus, and Xylella fastidiosa, respectively). These sequences match closely with sequences previously obtained from other subglacial environments in Alaska, Ellesmere Island, Canada and New Zealand. Implications of this microbial community to subglacial chemistry and microbial biogeography will be discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Sources of Nitrate Beneath Food Processing Wastewater-Application Sites near Umatilla, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna; Paulson, Anthony; Richerson, Phil; Striz, Elise; Black, Curt

    2009-01-01

    Water samples from wells were collected beneath and downgradient of two food-processing wastewater-application sites near Umatilla, Oregon. These samples were analyzed for nitrate stable isotopes, nutrients, major ions, and age-dating constituents to determine if nitrate-stable isotopes can be used to differentiate food-processing waste from other potential sources of nitrate. Major-ion data from each site were used to determine which samples were associated with the recharge of the food-processing wastewater. End-member mixing analysis was used to determine the relative amounts of each identified end member within the samples collected from the Terrace Farm site. The delta nitrogen-15 (delta 15N) of nitrate generally ranged between +2 and +9 parts per thousand and the delta oxygen-18 (delta 18O) of nitrate generally ranged between -2 and -7 parts per thousand. None of the samples that were determined to be associated with the wastewater were different from the samples that were not affected by the wastewater. The nitrate isotope values measured in this study are also characteristic of ammonium fertilizer, animal and human waste, and soil nitrate; therefore, it was not possible to differentiate between food-processing wastewater and the other nitrate sources. Values of delta 15N and delta 18O of nitrate provided no more information about the sources of nitrate in the Umatilla River basin than did a hydrologic and geochemical understanding of the ground-water system derived from interpreting water-level and major-ion chemistry data.

  18. Molecular and biogeochemical evidence for methane cycling beneath the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieser, Markus; Broemsen, Erik L J E; Cameron, Karen A; King, Gary M; Achberger, Amanda; Choquette, Kyla; Hagedorn, Birgit; Sletten, Ron; Junge, Karen; Christner, Brent C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial processes that mineralize organic carbon and enhance solute production at the bed of polar ice sheets could be of a magnitude sufficient to affect global elemental cycles. To investigate the biogeochemistry of a polar subglacial microbial ecosystem, we analyzed water discharged during the summer of 2012 and 2013 from Russell Glacier, a land-terminating outlet glacier at the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The molecular data implied that the most abundant and active component of the subglacial microbial community at these marginal locations were bacteria within the order Methylococcales (59-100% of reverse transcribed (RT)-rRNA sequences). mRNA transcripts of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) from these taxa were also detected, confirming that methanotrophic bacteria were functional members of this subglacial ecosystem. Dissolved methane ranged between 2.7 and 83 μM in the subglacial waters analyzed, and the concentration was inversely correlated with dissolved oxygen while positively correlated with electrical conductivity. Subglacial microbial methane production was supported by δ(13)C-CH4 values between -64‰ and -62‰ together with the recovery of RT-rRNA sequences that classified within the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales. Under aerobic conditions, >98% of the methane in the subglacial water was consumed over ∼30 days incubation at ∼4 °C and rates of methane oxidation were estimated at 0.32 μM per day. Our results support the occurrence of active methane cycling beneath this region of the Greenland Ice Sheet, where microbial communities poised in oxygenated subglacial drainage channels could serve as significant methane sinks.

  19. Deformation and hydration state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Styrian Basin (Pannonian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, L. E.; Hidas, K.; Kovács, I. J.; Klébesz, R.; Szabo, C.

    2016-12-01

    the shear wave delay time observed on the surface could be generated in the lithospheric mantle in addition to the contribution of the assumed NW-SE asthenospheric flow beneath the Styrian Basin.

  20. Bioremediation of RDX in the vadose zone beneath the Pantex Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, T.L.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.; McKinney, D.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1999-01-01

    The presence of dissolved high explosives (HE), in particular RDX and HMX, is well documented in the perched aquifer beneath the Pantex Plant, but the distribution of HE in the vadose zone has not yet been well defined. Although current remediation activities focus on the contamination in the perched aquifer, eventually regulatory concern is likely to turn to the residual contamination in the vadose zone. Sources of HE include the infiltration of past wastewater discharges from several HE-processing facilities through the ditch drainage system and leachate from former Landfill 3. With limited existing data on the HE distribution in the vadose zone and without preventive action, it must be assumed that residual HE could be leached into infiltrating water, providing a continuing supply of contamination to the perched aquifer. The purpose of this project was to more closely examine the fate and transport of HE in the vadose zone through mathematical modeling and laboratory experimentation. In particular, this report focuses on biodegradation as one possible fate of HE. Biodegradation of RDX in the vadose zone was studied because it is both present in highest concentration and is likely to be of the greatest regulatory concern. This study had several objectives: determine if indigenous soil organisms are capable of RDX biodegradation; determine the impact of electron acceptor availability and nutrient addition on RDX biodegradation; determine the extent of RDX mineralization (i.e., conversion to inorganic carbon) during biodegradation; and estimate the kinetics of RDX biodegradation to provide information for mathematical modeling of fate and transport.

  1. Signature of slab fragmentation beneath Anatolia from full-waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, Rob; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    When oceanic basins close after a long period of convergence and subduction, continental collision and mountain building is a common consequence. Slab segmentation is expected to have been relatively common just prior to closure of other oceans in the geological past, and may explain some of the complexity that geologists have documented in the Tibetan plateau also. We focus on the eastern Mediterranean basin, which is the last remainder of a once hemispherical neo-Tethys ocean that has nearly disappeared due to convergence of the India and Africa/Arabia plates with the Eurasia plate. We present new results of full-waveform tomography that allow us to image both the crust and upper mantle in great detail. We show that a major discontinuity exists between western Anatolia lithosphere and the region to the east of it. Also, the correlation of geological features and the crustal velocities is substantially stronger in the west than in the east. We interpret these observations as the imprint in the overriding plate of fragmentation of the neo-Tethys slab below it. This north-dipping slab may have fragmented following the Eocene (about 35 million years ago) arrival of a continental promontory (Central Anatolian Core Complex) at the subduction contact. From the Eocene through the Miocene, slab roll-back ensued in the Aegean and west Anatolia, while the Cyprus-Bitlis slab subducted horizontally beneath central and east Anatolia. Following collision of Arabia (about 16 million years ago), the Cyprus-Bitlis slab steepened, exposing the crust of central and east Anatolia to high temperature, and resulting in the velocity structure that we image today. Slab fragmentation thus was a major driver of the evolution of the overriding plate as collision unfolded.

  2. The lithospheric structure beneath southeast Tibet revealed by P and S receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Peng, Hengchu; Hu, Jiafu

    2017-05-01

    Yunnan is located at the margin of southeast Tibet, where dramatic tectonic activities occur. In this study, we calculated the P and S receiver functions by the deconvolution of three-component seismic data from 48 permanent broad-band stations deployed in Yunnan region. In order to improve signal-noise ratios of the receiver functions, we move-out corrected receiver functions to a reference epicentral distance of 67°, and then stacked them to one trace for each station. Finally, the stacked traces were converted to the depth domain to obtain the crustal and lithospheric thicknesses beneath each station. In southwestern Yunnan (at the west side of the Jinshajiang-Red River Fault), the crustal thicknesses from the P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) and from the S-wave receiver functions (SRFs) are in the ranges of 30-36 km, and of 33-39 km, respectively. But in northwestern Yunnan, the crustal thicknesses from PRFs and SRFs are from 66 to 69 km and from 63 to 66 km, respectively. Our results show that the crustal thicknesses in Yunnan from PRFs and SRFs are consistent, with a maximum deviation of 3 km; and increase gradually from ∼30 km in the south to ∼68 km in the northwest. Besides, the lithospheric thickness from PRFs is also similar to that from SRFs, with the largest difference of 15-20 km in southeastern Yunnan. At the west side of the Jinshajiang-Red River Fault in western Yunnan, it is only about 80-100 km, and increases to 140-150 km regionally in northern and southeastern Yunnan. The thinned lithosphere extends eastward from western Yunnan to eastern Yunnan. We attribute the thinned lithosphere to the upwelling of hot upper mantle materials associated with the eastward subduction of the Indian plate.

  3. The crust and lithospheric mantle beneath SE Tibet and Sichuan Province (SW China) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hilst, R. D.; Yao, H.; Huang, H.; Liu, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Studying the crust and upper mantle beneath SE Tibet and Sichuan Province, SW China, is important for (at least) two reasons. First, this region has been central in discussions about the mechanisms of the formation and (eastward) expansion of the Tibetan plateau and, in particular, about the role of lower crustal flow. Second, as the southern part of the Trans China Seismic Belt the region is often struck by powerful earthquakes - such as the devastating 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and its countless aftershocks along the Longmenshan fault system that separates the (mechanically rigid) Sichuan basin from the actively deforming and slowly eastward moving (eastern) Tibetan plateau (Burchfiel et al., GSA Today, 2008). In 2003-04, MIT and Lehigh University deployed (in separate experiments) a total of 75 broadband seismograph stations in western Sichuan and SE Tibet, and in 2006 the Institute of Geology of the Chinese Earthquake Administration (CEA), installed 300 temporary stations in west Sichuan. Data from these arrays have been used for a wide range of studies of the crust and upper mantle, including shear wave splitting (Lev et al., EPSL, 2006; Sol et al, Geology, 2007), receiver function analysis (Xu et al., PEPI, 2007), surface wave array tomography (Yao et al., 2006, 2008), and travel time tomography (Li et al., 2006, 2008). These analyses reveal substantial 3D heterogeneity as well as complex spatial variations of (azimuthal and radial) anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle. Both the surface wave inversions and the receiver function analyses suggest the existence of low shear velocity (and, presumably, mechanically weak) zones in the middle and lower crust, and the inferred 3D variations in anisotropy are inconsistent with vertically coherent deformation. We will review and summarize the findings of these studies and present the latest results of our ongoing investigation of the lithosphere in this region.

  4. Automated mapping of glacial overdeepenings beneath contemporary ice sheets: Approaches and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Henry; Swift, Darrel A.; Clark, Chris D.; Livingstone, Stephen J.; Cook, Simon J.; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-03-01

    Awareness is growing on the significance of overdeepenings in ice sheet systems. However, a complete understanding of overdeepening formation is lacking, meaning observations of overdeepening location and morphometry are urgently required to motivate process understanding. Subject to the development of appropriate mapping approaches, high resolution subglacial topography data sets covering the whole of Antarctica and Greenland offer significant potential to acquire such observations and to relate overdeepening characteristics to ice sheet parameters. We explore a possible method for mapping overdeepenings beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets and illustrate a potential application of this approach by testing a possible relationship between overdeepening elongation ratio and ice sheet flow velocity. We find that hydrological and terrain filtering approaches are unsuited to mapping overdeepenings and develop a novel rule-based GIS methodology that delineates overdeepening perimeters by analysis of closed-contour properties. We then develop GIS procedures that provide information on overdeepening morphology and topographic context. Limitations in the accuracy and resolution of bed-topography data sets mean that application to glaciological problems requires consideration of quality-control criteria to (a) remove potentially spurious depressions and (b) reduce uncertainties that arise from the inclusion of depressions of nonglacial origin, or those in regions where empirical data are sparse. To address the problem of overdeepening elongation, potential quality control criteria are introduced; and discussion of this example serves to highlight the limitations that mapping approaches - and applications of such approaches - must confront. We predict that improvements in bed-data quality will reduce the need for quality control procedures and facilitate increasingly robust insights from empirical data.

  5. Mapping b-values beneath Abu Dabbab from June to August 2004 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.F. Abu El-Nader

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abu Dabbab area is considered as one of the most active earthquake sources in Egypt. It is defined by its swarm type activity, and complicated stress pattern. This study was conducted to evaluate the two and three dimensional spatial distribution of b-value at Abu Dabbab area (Margin of the northern Red Sea Rift, Egypt. The gridding technique of Wiemer and Wyss (1997 was used to compute b-value using ZMAP software. The b-value is calculated from a catalog consisting of 850 well-located earthquakes, which were recorded from 1st June to August 2004, using the maximum likelihood method. These earthquakes were recorded by temporary digital seismic network, with magnitudes ranging from −1 to 3.4 ML. It is important to mention that the variations of b-value with time cannot be easily detected for a short period. Hence, this study has been carried out to examine the variations of b-value in space. The computed b-value in the Abu Dabbab area does not follow a uniform distribution. A small volume of anomalously high b-value (b > 1.8 exists in the central part of the area at a depth between 6 and 9 km. This seems to agree with the reported low velocity value derived from previous P-wave travel time tomography studies (Hosny et al., 2009 and the low Q value (Abdel-Fattah et al., 2008. The existence of an anomalously high b-value region may be attributed to the presence of a magma reservoir or dyke zone beneath the northern Red Sea Rift that causes an intensively heterogeneous fractured crust or unusually high pore pressure.

  6. Predicting subglacial lakes and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C. D.; Woodward, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we use the Shreve hydraulic potential equation to predict subglacial lakes and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. For the Antarctic Ice Sheet we are able to predict known subglacial lakes with a >70% success rate, which demonstrates the validity of this method. Despite the success in predicting known subglacial lakes the calculations produce two-orders of magnitude more lakes than are presently identified, covering 4% of the ice-sheet bed. The difference is thought to result from our poor knowledge of the bed (which has resulted in artefacts associated with the interpolation method), intrinsic errors associated with the simplified modelling approach and because thousands of subglacial lakes, particularly smaller ones, remain to be found. Applying the same modelling approach to the Greenland Ice Sheet predicts only 90 lakes under the present-day ice-sheet configuration, covering 0.2% of the bed. The paucity of subglacial lakes in Greenland is thought to be a function of steeper overall ice-surface gradients. As no lakes have currently been located under Greenland, model predictions will make suitable targets for radar surveys of Greenland to identify subglacial lakes. During deglaciation from the Last Glacial Maximum both ice sheets had more subglacial lakes at their beds, though many of these lakes have persisted to present conditions. These lakes, inherited from past ice-sheet configurations would not form under current surface conditions, suggesting a retreating ice-sheet will have many more subglacial lakes than an advancing ice sheet. This hysteresis effect has implications for ice-stream formation and flow, bed lubrication and meltwater drainage. The lake model also allows modelling of the drainage pathways of the present-day and former Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Significantly, key sectors of the ice sheets, such as the Siple Coast (Antarctica) and NE Greenland Ice Stream system, are shown to have

  7. Seismic Discontinuities within the Crust and Mantle Beneath Indonesia as Inferred from P Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelbern, I.; Rumpker, G.

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia is situated at the southern margin of SE Asia, which comprises an assemblage of Gondwana-derived continental terranes, suture zones and volcanic arcs. The formation of SE Asia is believed to have started in Early Devonian. Its complex history involves the opening and closure of three distinct Tethys oceans, each accompanied by the rifting of continental fragments. We apply the receiver function technique to data of the temporary MERAMEX network operated in Central Java from May to October 2004 by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. The network consisted of 112 mobile stations with a spacing of about 10 km covering the full width of the island between the southern and northern coast lines. The tectonic history is reflected in a complex crustal structure of Central Java exhibiting strong topography of the Moho discontinuity related to different tectonic units. A discontinuity of negative impedance contrast is observed throughout the mid-crust interpreted as the top of a low-velocity layer which shows no depth correlation with the Moho interface. Converted phases generated at greater depth beneath Indonesia indicate the existence of multiple seismic discontinuities within the upper mantle and even below. The strongest signal originates from the base of the mantle transition zone, i.e. the 660 km discontinuity. The phase related to the 410 km discontinuity is less pronounced, but clearly identifiable as well. The derived thickness of the mantle-transition zone is in good agreement with the IASP91 velocity model. Additional phases are observed at roughly 33 s and 90 s relative to the P onset, corresponding to about 300 km and 920 km, respectively. A signal of reversed polarity indicates the top of a low velocity layer at about 370 km depth overlying the mantle transition zone.

  8. Migrating tremors illuminate complex deformation beneath the seismogenic San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is one of the most extensively studied faults in the world, yet its physical character and deformation mode beneath the relatively shallow earthquake-generating portion remain largely unconstrained. Tectonic ‘non-volcanic’ tremor, a recently discovered seismic signal probably generated by shear slip on the deep extension of some major faults, can provide new insight into the deep fate of such faults, including that of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. Here I examine continuous seismic data from mid-2001 to 2008, identifying tremor and decomposing the signal into different families of activity based on the shape and timing of the waveforms at multiple stations. This approach allows differentiation between activities from nearby patches of the deep fault and begins to unveil rich and complex patterns of tremor occurrence. I find that tremor exhibits nearly continuous migration, with the most extensive episodes propagating more than 20 kilometres along fault strike at rates of 15–80 kilometres per hour. This suggests that the San Andreas fault remains a localized through-going structure, at least to the base of the crust, in this area. Tremor rates and recurrence behaviour changed markedly in the wake of the 2004 magnitude-6.0 Parkfield earthquake, but these changes were far from uniform within the tremor zone, probably reflecting heterogeneous fault properties and static and dynamic stresses decaying away from the rupture. The systematic recurrence of tremor demonstrated here suggests the potential to monitor detailed time-varying deformation on this portion of the deep San Andreas fault, deformation which unsteadily loads the shallower zone that last ruptured in the 1857 magnitude-7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake.

  9. Anelastic Mantle Structure beneath the Northern Philippine Sea from Phase Pair Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shito, A.; Shibutani, T.

    2001-12-01

    Anelasticity of the mantle provides important constraints on its dynamics, in complement to elasticity, however, studies of lateral variation in attenuation are few, especially at short periods. In this study, we determine the body wave attenuation structure of the mantle beneath the northern part of the Philippine Sea. Elastic tomography studies [e.g. van der Hilst et al., 1991; Fukao et al., 1992] show a stagnant Pacific lithosphere just above the 660 km discontinuity in this region. This stagnation was caused by the trench retreat due to the back arc spreading during the past 17 - 30 Ma [Seno et al., 1993; van der Hilst, 1995; Shito and Shibutani, 2001]. Anelastic properties of the mantle and lithosphere may play important roles in the interaction of the slab and mantle of this area. To study the attenuation structure, we examine the difference of the observed attenuation between P and S waves. The S-P phase pair method measures δ t* using the differential spectral decay between S and P waves arriving at the same station, assuming a constant Qα }/Q{β over the frequency band of 0.5 to 1.25 Hz. We use 20 earthquakes in the Izu-Bonin slab which were recorded at 43 broad-band stations of the J-array and FREESIA networks in Japan. About 700 phase pairs are used to invert for the 2-D attenuation structure. The resultant preliminary Q model shows the local variations of attenuation in the subduction zone. The slab is imaged as a low attenuation area (Qα > 1000), while Qα values in the range of 100 - 350 are found in the mantle wedge.

  10. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Travelling Beneath Crows: Representing socio-geographical concepts of time and travel in early medieval England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Symonds

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Landscape has always been an important aspect of archaeological research. Recently there has been emphasis placed not on the identification of specific sites and artefacts but on past attitudes towards social interaction within the landscape. This has stimulated debate on how people, both as individuals and collective societies, understand space and human action. Many of these studies integrate computer applications and quantitative methods with current theoretical agendas focusing on landscape and social practice. The combination of theory and practice is essential to archaeological enquiry, enabling hypotheses to stand upon firm data. This article explores theoretical understandings of space and landscape and the practical application of these agendas in a study which focuses on the production and consumption of artefacts, specifically pottery, in Anglo-Scandinavian Lincolnshire. Many archaeological approaches to landscape studies involve the ways in which monuments and monumental landscapes structure and are structured by the societies which built them and inhabited them. Alternatively, this article focuses on how the social practices associated with the production and consumption of pottery participated in the social cognition of the landscape. It specifically concentrates on how travel practices can be associated with artefact distributions by measuring the distances in hours rather than kilometers, travelling beneath the crows rather than following their straight line of flight. Much of the analysis and exploration of the data was done via a GIS (Geographical Information System. In order to simulate this interactive process, java applets were employed to allow the reader to investigate the patterns of data for themselves. This enables the author and reader to establish a discourse through the reader's participation in the cognitive processes involved in the analysis of data and the interpretation of maps and landscape.

  12. Potassic-ultrapotassic mafic rocks delineate two lithospheric mantle blocks beneath the southern Peruvian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, G.; Lorand, J. P.; Liégeois, J. P.; Fornari, M.; Soler, P.; Carlotto, V.; Cárdenas, J.

    2005-07-01

    The Altiplano of southern Peru displays a large spectrum of Cenozoic potassic (K) and ultrapotassic (UK) mafic rocks that delineate two deep lithospheric mantle blocks that have undergone different depletion and enrichment events. Phlogopite lamproites indicate that the eastern Altiplano block is underlain by a metasomatized harzburgitic mantle of Paleoproterozoic to Archean age (depleted mantle age, TDM = 1130 2485 Ma; ɛNd = -5.0 to -11.4; 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7100 0.7159). Beneath the western Altiplano block, the presence of a younger (TDM = 837 1259 Ma; ɛNd = +0.6 to -6.3; 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7048 0.7069) metasomatized lherzolitic mantle is deduced from multiple occurrences of diopside-rich K-UK lavas (leucitites, leucite-bearing tephrites, olivine, and diopside trachybasalts). A third suite of young (Cusco Vilcanota fault system separating the western and eastern Altiplano blocks; this third suite, composed of diopside-phlogopite lamproites and augite kersantites, minettes, and trachybasalts, sampled a composite mantle source that probably included an asthenospheric component (TDM = 612 864 Ma; ɛNd = -1.1 to -3.5; 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7051 0.7062), in addition to lithospheric components inherited from the eastern and western Altiplano blocks. The spatial distribution of the south Peruvian K-UK magmatism suggests that K-UK melts reached the surface through reuse of older translithospheric weakness zones extending at least to the depth of magma generation. These latter were reactivated by a dextral transpressional regime imposed on the two rigid lithospheric blocks by the Andean orogen.

  13. Nutrient Discharge Beneath Urban Lawns To A Sandy Coastal Aquifer, Perth, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. L.; Herne, D. E.; Byrne, J. D.; Kin, P. G.

    1996-01-01

    Excess nitrogen and phosphorus leaching beneath urban lawns on sandy soils in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, may pose a serious threat not only to the quality of the underlying groundwater but also to many surface-water bodies. In this study, suction-driven lysimeters were developed and used to quantify water and nutrient fluxes below the root zone at four urban lawn sites in Perth. The four sites received similar fertiliser treatment but differed in irrigation regimes. Over a period of 12 months, up to 51 percent of incident water passed below the root zone. Annual flow-weighted concentrations of NO3-N in the leachate ranged from 0.8-5.4 mg/L, whereas PO4-P concentrations ranged from 0.003-0.034 mg/L. At most sites, NO3-N concentrations periodically equalled or exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking-water limit of 10 mg/L; high concentration were maintained for longer periods at two sites with coarser sands and high irrigation regimes. Evidence exists that concentrations of N and P in urban groundwater are reduced through dilution and possibly through chemical transformation and adsorption. It is unlikely that NO3-N concentrations in groundwater will exceed the WHO drinking limit except for relatively short periods of time. However, nutrients (especially N) from fertilised lawns are a threat to wetlands and waterways into which nutrient-rich groundwater is discharged. Modified management practices for urban lawns, or alternative-style home gardens may need to be developed in order to minimise nutrient enrichment of groundwater and water bodies. Some suggestions for these are presented.

  14. Sensible and Latent Heat Exchange at the Soil Surface Beneath a Maize Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Thomas John

    Soil heat and vapor exchange at the soil surface beneath a plant canopy was measured using heat and vapor source plates. Data from field and laboratory experiments were used to derive equations predicting interfacial heat and vapor transfer coefficients for inclusion in an existing, comprehensive soil-plant-atmosphere model, Cupid. Heat and vapor source plates constructed of anodized aluminum (305 by 864 mm by 13 mm thick) were installed level with the soil surface within a maize (Zea mays, L.) field to provide an area of known and controllable temperature and/or vapor pressure and sensible and/or latent heat flux. Sensible heat flux density was determined from an energy budget analysis while evaporation from wetted felt fabric on one plate's surface was used to determine the latent heat flux density. Flux measurements were combined with measured temperature and vapor pressure differences to determine the interfacial transfer coefficients. Field measurements were made during all stages of canopy development and were supplemented by extensive measurements of the local microclimate. Controlled forced convection experiments were also conducted in a wind tunnel using three levels of turbulence intensity and two arrays of aluminum roughness elements to assess the effects of turbulence and surface roughness on heat and mass transfer. Measured interfacial transfer coefficients during the field experiments ranged from 2 to 30 mm s ^{-1} over wind speeds of 5 to 280 cm s^{-1} measured 3 cm above the plate surface. Equations based on dimensionless parameters were developed and fit to the wind tunnel data, compared with the field data, and incorporated into the computer model. The new transfer coefficient relationships had less scatter and were more closely correlated to within -canopy wind speed than the previous formulations. Predictions of canopy microclimate charac